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of Juneau County

The Messenger HELEN MILNE RECEIVES JEFFERSON AWARD PAGE 9 VOL 14, NO. 49

LOOK INSIDE FOR YOUR LOCAL NEWS:

Elroy: Page 6 Mauston: Page 4 New Lisbon: Page 8

County: Page 9 Wonewoc: Page 16 Hillsboro: Page 14

Classifieds: Page 18 Legals: Pages 19–21

THE AWARD WINNING OFFICIAL LEGAL NEWSPAPER OF JUNEAU COUNTY THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013

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Shooting survivor shares her story Treul bound over for trial in shootings BY EVA MARIE WOYWOD On Monday afternoon Cody J. Treul was in Juneau County Court for a preliminary hearing on charges of first-degree intentional homicide, attempted homicide, and first-degree recklessly endangering public safety for the May 31, 2013 shooting behind PJ's Bar in Mauston. The shooting took the life of one Mauston woman, 29 year old Gail Howland, and left 23 year old Ebony Lasher, also of Mauston, critically injured and paralyzed from the chest down. According to testimony from Juneau County Sheriff's Department Detective Shaun Goyette an autopsy revealed that Howland suffered 10 gun shot wounds from varying angles. Goyette also testified to witness statements taken the night of the shooting where two witnesses stated that a man by the name of "Cody" was the shooter. Another witness, reportedly an ex girlfriend of Treul, provided Goyette with the suspect's last name. Sheriff's Deputy Michael Coughlin testified that after apprehending Treul and while transporting him the defendant questioned the deputy, "Who did I kill?" Juneau County Circuit Court Judge Paul Curran heard the testimony from law enforcement and ruled that there was probable cause that the defendant committed the crimes and bound Treul over for trial. Defense attorney David Geraghty alluded that there may be a possible plea of not guilty by mental disease or defect but first he would need to consult with a psychologist and review all police reports. During Monday's hearing Juneau County District Attorney Michael Solovey represented the State of Wisconsin. Treul is scheduled for an August 28, 2013 arraignment. He is currently in the custody of the Juneau County Sheriff's Department and has had bail set at $2 million.

At night Pamela Kissner opens a cot and places it next to her daughter's Madison hospital bed making sure she is as close as possible for when the night terrors come. Those terrors are the direct result from a shooting which took place in Mauston behind PJ's Bar on May 31st and her daughter is 23 year old Ebony Lasher, the lone survivor of the two women who were gunned down. The other victim was Gail Howland, 29 years old, and Ebony's best friend. Visiting Ebony in the hospital you may be surprised by the smile greeting you as you walk into her room. A beautiful girl with a soft voice, she will more than likely want to make sure you are comfortable first. If you walked in unaware you would not notice that she is unable to move from the chest down nor that she has difficulty moving her arm. She will not Ebony Lasher tells her story of what happened the her best friend was killed. Her mother Pam Kissner draw attention to just how, on May 31st, her spine, the other tore That first bullet is the one life changed forever. The bullets that entered through her intestines. that has left her paralyzed. "I had just gotten out the Ebony’s small frame have When she speaks of May left her paralyzed. One 31, 2013 tears well up in words, 'Gail he is here' and ripped through her clavicle her eyes as she explains she replied 'it's okay Sweet and came to rest in her she was the first to be shot. Pea', and then he shot me,"

night she was shot and is shown here with her. Ebony stated. The ‘he’ she speaks of is Cody Treul, 29 years old of Mauston. See SHOOTING, page 5

Police investigate sudden death of 30 year old Mauston male BY EVA MARIE WOYWOD On Wednesday, July 3rd, Mauston Police Chief Mark Messer issued a press release stating that the department was investigating the sudden death of a 30 year old male. According to the release, officers discovered the body of 30 year old Ryan Syverson in his apartment located on the 200 block of West State Street. Prompting the officers discovery was a call for a welfare visit to check on Syverson who had not been

heard from for a couple of days. As of the issuance of the press release the matter remains under investigation as there have been no updates from the Mauston Police Department. A memorial service was held for Syverson on Friday, July 5th, at Torkelson Funeral Home in Tomah. According to his obituary, Syverson was a very social person; he had a great sense of humor and loved to joke with his family and friends. In his younger years he enjoyed riding dirt bikes. He loved

listening to music and writing music and poems. He is survived by his parents, Christina and Todd Derkez of Tomah; his siblings, Scott (Nicole) Syverson and their children, Carson and Kendra all of New Lisbon, WI, Leanna Syverson and her children, Malachi, Deidra, and Logan all of Fargo, ND, Deanna Syverson and her children, Marcus Ryan and Lukus Scott all of Tomah; his grandmother, Nancy Duncan; other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, Dana Syverson on July 30, 1985.


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THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Obituaries GEORGE GREGAR

George Gregar, 97, beloved husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather, entered the Kingdom of Heavenly Glory on Thursday, June 27, 2013 to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. He was reunited with his wife Evelyn who passed away on January 7, 2010. George was born on February 9, 1916 in Oak Park, Illinois, the son of John and Mary (Benhardt) Gregar. His father died and his mother married Fred Ruskowsky on October 29, 1928. George deeply loved and respected his stepfather. George was united in marriage to Evelyn Randecker on November 1, 1945 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Nekoosa, WI. He was a charter member of St. James Lutheran Church in Necedah, WI. George enjoyed metal and woodworking and made a variety of decorative items for the church and his many friends and family members. George worked with his wife Evelyn and sons on Gregar’s Acres as a dairy farm until 1970 and then sold the dairy cattle and started a laying hen operation of approximately 17,000 chickens. They sold eggs to local restaurants, hospitals and stores in surrounding communities and had door to door routes in Wisconsin Rapids and Tomah. George drove school bus for the Necedah Area Schools for 26 years and logged in more than 400,000 miles without missing a day and without an accident. George also plowed snow for many years for the Township of Necedah. After his wife Evelyn died he stayed with his son Tom in Tomah during the week but always looked forward to staying with his son Fred at the end of the week so he could attend St. James Lutheran Church in Necedah every Sunday. This past winter his daughter Janet was blessed to have him stay with her for three months. He is survived by his children, Fred (Myong “Missie”) Gregar of Necedah, WI, Janet (Rev. Linden) Wendzel of Bagley, MN and Thomas (Sandra) Gregar of Tomah, WI; 7 grandchildren, Lisa Sharpe and her daughter, Katlyn of Newark, Delaware, Matthew Gregar of Minneapolis, MN, Paul (Jeri) Wendzel and their daughter Alexandria of Granger, IA, Heather (Brad) Dickson and their children Aliyah, Jayden and Payton of Ankeny, IA, Nathan (Alyssa) Wendzel of Ankeny, IA, Kevin Gregar (Jamie) and their children Kendalyn, Aliza and Jakobe of Tomah, WI, Stephanie (John) O’Bryant and their sons, Adam, Isaac and Eli of Lithia, FL; and a sister-in-law, Grace Gilman of Wisconsin Rapids, WI; nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife Evelyn, his father John, mother Mary, beloved step-father Fred Ruskowsky, sisters Mae Mlejnek, Anna Martinek, Helen Becker, Bessie Kulhavy, brother, Joseph Gregar and grandson Mark. Funeral services were held Tuesday, July 2, 2013, 11:00 a.m. at St. James Lutheran Church in Necedah, Wisconsin. Pastor John Krebs officiated. Burial followed in the Bayview Cemetery, Necedah, WI. Family and friends were invited for visitation Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. until the time of service at the church. Memorials can be given in his memory to St. James Lutheran Church, Necedah, WI. The Torkelson Funeral Home of Necedah is assisting the family with arrangements. Online condolences are available at www.torkelsonfuneralhome.

GENEVIEVE “JEAN” LABRIOLA

Genevieve “Jean” LaBriola, age 87, of New Lisbon died on June 28, 2013 at her residence. Jean was born in Chicago, Genevieve Skrubuton, daughter of George, a Russian immigrant from Lithuania, and mother Lillian of second generation German/Polish descent. Jean was one of 11 children raised in the Mount Greenwood neighborhood on the south side of Chicago. Jean suffered many hardships during her life but found strength and hope by her religious convictions and her steadfast devotion to daily prayer, fasting and a commitment to her love of God, Jesus and the Blessed Mother. Jean is survived by her son Michael LaBriola and grandchildren Maria and Maya. Jean was a pillar of prayer devotion; facilitating “Where two or more are Gathered” prayers, for dozens of individuals for over four decades. A graveside interment service was held on Monday, July 8, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. at the Queen of the Holy Rosary Mediatrix of Peace Cemetery in Necedah, WI. The Hare Funeral Home in New Lisbon is assisting the family with arrangements. Online condolences are available at www.harefuneralhome.com

LETA F. NELSON

Leta F. Nelson age 73 of New Lisbon died on Thursday June 27, 2013 at the Serenity House in Tomah, WI. Leta was the daughter of William and Eleanor (McDonough) Edwards and was born on January 1, 1940 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Leta graduated from Madonna High School in Mauston in 1958, and later received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from St. Anthony’s College in Rockford, Illinois in 1962. Leta was united in marriage to Jerry Nelson on December 31, 1967 in Rockton, IL. Leta worked as an RN for over 50 years, being employed at St. Anthony’s Hospital in Rockford, IL, and later at Mound View Memorial Hospital in Friendship, WI. Leta enjoyed crafting, reading, and was an active member in St. Paul’s Catholic Church, and in the Lioness Club. Leta was a member of St. Anthony’s College Alumni Board, in which she served as past president. Leta is survived by her children, Jeff (Pegi) Nelson of Virginia Beach, VA, Todd (Amy) Nelson of Manchesney Park, Il, Alene (Jason) Lowe of New Lisbon, WI, and Kendric (Marie) Nelson of La Crosse, WI, and by 9 grandchildren Jeffrey, Brooke, D’Anna, Clint, Desiree, DeLisa, Makayla, Alexia Nelson and Amelia Lowe, and by 3 great grandchildren, Jeffrey Lee Nelson, Vivian LuPercio, and Cydney Nelson, a brother George (Anita) Edwards of Los Alamitos, CA, a sister Joan Duffy of Columbus, WI, a niece Joylyn (Scott) Patrick of Milwaukee, a nephew James Edwards of Provo, UT, and a great nephew Jonathan Duffy of Milwaukee. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband Jerry, a son Mark, and a brother, James E. Edwards, a brother-in-law Jim Duffy and a nephew Joseph Duffy. A Mass of Christian Burial was held on Friday, July 5, 2013 at St. Paul’s Catholic Church (408 W. River St.) in New Lisbon, WI, with Fr. George Nelson Graham presiding. Relatives and friends were invited to call at the church on Friday from 10:00 a.m. till the time of service. Online condolences are available at www.harefuneralhome.com

ARLENE I. TOWER

Arlene I. Tower, 85, of Monticello, died at 8:30 am on Tuesday, July 2, 2013 at her residence. She was born September1, 1927 in Wellington, Monroe County, Wisconsin to the late Daniel and Ella (Kaus) Steinbrink. She married Norman E. Tower on July 6, 1949, Norman always said it was July 9th, at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in Mauston, WI in a double wedding ceremony with their good friends Ed and Kathleen Bones. Norman preceded Arlene in death on September 3, 2008. She was a graduate of Kendall High School, Kendall, WI. In 1943 Arlene worked as a type setter for the weekly local newspaper in Kendall, WI. She was hired because her cousin who originally held the job wanted to get married and the boss said “find a replacement first”. Arlene loved working the huge machines back in the day. During the war, the women put out the newspaper because all of the men were serving in the military. In May 1947, Arlene started working in Chicago for Mitchell Printing Company. She worked there for 34 years until the plant closed in 1980. Arlene and Norm moved to Mountain, WI and bought a restaurant with Norm’s brother and wife. They ran the Four T’s restaurant for one and a half years before moving back to Chicago. Arlene started working at Commerce Clearing House in 1990 and retired in February 1992. In November 1992, Arlene and her husband, Norman moved to Monticello. She is survived by a brother, Daniel M. Steinbrink of Sparta, WI and several nieces and nephews. She was also preceded in death by a brother, Norman Steinbrink. Visitation was from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m., Sunday, July 7, 2013 at Springer-Voorhis-Draper Funeral Home. Women of the Moose Memorial Service was at 7 p.m. Funeral Services were at 11 a.m., Monday at the funeral home with Rev. Mike Crawford officiating. Burial followed at Riverview I.O.O.F Cemetery in rural Monticello. Memorial contributions may be given to the White County Food Pantry or to Happy Tails. Envelopes will be available at the funeral home. You may sign the online guestbook at www.springerfuneralhome.com

July 11, 2013

The Messenger of Juneau County

ISSN Number 1526-7873 018-051 Published each Thursday at 229 Main St., Elroy, WI by Messenger of Juneau County LLC. The Messenger is an entirely independent publication serving all of Juneau County. It is not affiliated with any other newspaper or group of newspapers. Periodical postage paid at the Post Office at Elroy, WI 53929. Postmaster: Send address changes to: The Messenger of Juneau County, 229 Main St., Elroy, WI 53929 Bill Smith, Publisher Betty Waits, Co-Publisher Dianna Anderson, Co-Publisher Tasha Mueller, Reporter Eva Marie Woywod, Reporter Mandy Bloor, Graphic Design Phone 462-4902 Fax Number 462-4903 E-Mail: themessenger@centurytel.net Subscription rates: $30 per year in Juneau, Monroe, Sauk and Vernon Counties; $33 elsewhere in Wisconsin; $35 elsewhere in the U.S.A.

ROGER G. WATERS

Roger G. Waters, age 74, of New Lisbon died on Tuesday July 2, 2013 at the University Hospital in Madison. Roger was the son of Russell and Selma (Opheim) Waters and was born on February 5, 1939 in Madison, WI. Roger was raised in the Sun Prairie and Madison area, and graduated from Sun Prairie High School in 1957. He then entered into the US Navy for 6 years, two of which were active duty. Roger was united in marriage to Judy Weishoff on February 1, 1965 in Sioux Falls South Dakota. Roger worked in Madison for several years before going to work as a tinsmith for General Motors in Janesville, WI. He and his wife made their home in Janesville for 30 years. In the 1970’s they purchased some land in Clearfield Township in Juneau County, and retired there in 1990. Roger enjoyed the outdoors, hunting, fishing, and gardening. He also liked to do carpentry work and made some beautiful furniture, and he also tinkered with other mechanical things. Roger is survived by his wife Judy of New Lisbon, 2 daughters, Dawn (Burns) Searfoss of Colorado Springs, CO, and Kerri (Brad) Frisch of Pardeeville, WI, Grandchildren, Christopher Ball, Matthew Ball, Eric Martinson, Alicia Jurgenson, Kristi Emkow, Lauren Frisch, Lisa Frisch, and Kailey Frisch, and 5 great grandchildren, a brother Karl (Lori) Waters of Verona, WI, and a sister Linda (Bernie) Peterson of Foley, MN. He was preceded in death by his parents, and a brother Victor Waters. Funeral services were held on Saturday July 6, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. at the Hare Funeral Home in New Lisbon with Rev. Jeff Ruetten presiding. Relatives and friends called at the Hare Funeral Home on Saturday from 11:30 a.m. till the time of service. Burial with military honors provided by the Kendall American Legion Post 309 was in the Glendale Cemetery in Kendall, WI. Online condolences are available at www.harefuneralhome.com

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July 11, 2013

Obituaries RYAN JOSEPH SYVERSON

Ryan Joseph Syverson, age 30, of Mauston, WI and formerly of Tomah, WI, passed away. He was born June 3, 1983 to Christina Staab and Dana Syverson in Tomah, Wisconsin. Ryan was a very social person; he had a great sense of humor and loved to joke with his family and friends. In his younger years he enjoyed riding dirt bikes. He loved listening to music and writing music and poems. Ryan liked to go fishing in his spare time. He also liked to study world religion. More than anything he loved spending time with his nieces and nephews. He is survived by his parents, Christina and Todd Derkez of Tomah, WI, his siblings, Scott (Nicole) Syverson and their children, Carson and Kendra all of New Lisbon, WI, Leanna Syverson and her children, Malachi, Deidra and Logan all of Fargo, ND, Deanna Syverson and her children, Marcus Ryan and Lukus Scott all of Tomah, WI, his grandmother, Nancy Duncan, other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, Dana Syverson on July 30, 1985. A memorial service was held Friday, July 5, 2013, 11:00 a.m. at the Torkelson Funeral Home. Pastor Ronald Tobin officiated. Family and friends were invited for visitation Friday from 9:00 a.m. until the time of service at the funeral home. The Torkelson Funeral Home of Tomah is assisting the family with arrangements. Online condolences are available at www.torkelsonfuneralhome.com.

EARL R. SKINNER

Earl R. Skinner, age 80 of Necedah, WI, died on Monday July 1, 2013 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Marshfield, WI. Earl was the son of Fred and Susan (Howland) Skinner and was born on November 15, 1932 in the town of Clearfield, in Juneau County. Earl was married to Beverly Pray on September 6, 1956 in Necedah, WI. Earl worked as a wood cutter most of his life, he also worked for Walker Stainless Steel, and the Northwester Railroad. Earl lived in Necedah most of his life. He is survived by his wife Beverly of Necedah, 3 daughters, Louise BeneuxLong of Junction City, KS, Sharrie (Dale) Rohwer of Clifton, WI, and Susan K. (Dennis) Clark of Wonewoc, WI, a son Earl James Skinner of Texas, 12 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, and 8 sisters, and 2 brothers. A graveside memorial service was held on Wednesday July 10, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. at the New Lisbon City Cemetery. The Hare Funeral Home in New Lisbon is assisting the family with services. Online condolences are available at www.harefuneralhome.com

LYNNE CELESTE COLLER

Lynne Celeste Coller, age 75, of Necedah, Wisconsin, passed away Sunday, June 30, 2013, at the Villa Pines Living Center in Adams, Wisconsin. She was born September 5, 1937 to William and Frances (Smith) Nelson. She was united in marriage to Richard Coller October 17, 1969. Lynne is survived by her husband, Richard of Necedah, her children, William (Doreen) Coller and Robert Coller all of Necedah, WI, granddaughters, Calista and Celeste Coller, sisters, Marcia Blystad of Wisconsin Dells, WI and Gail (Richard) Gall of Trenton, IL, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents. A Celebration of Lynne’s life was held Saturday, July 6, 2013 from 12:00 p.m. until 2:00 p.m. at the Veteran’s Hall in Necedah. The Torkelson Necedah Family Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements. Online condolences are available at www.torkelsonfuneralhome.com.

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

MILDRED ERIS (HOWLAND) SCHRIVER

Mildred Eris (Howland) Schriver passed away Saturday, June 29, 2013 at her home. Mildred was born in New Lisbon, WI July 1st 1926 the daughter of Albert and Anna Howland. She grew up in Mauston and was united in marriage to Harley Schriver on Feb 5th, 1944. She was a caregiver by nature and was a homemaker. She raised five children, and was a Mother figure to many, as well as caring for her husband for many years after his stroke. Milly was known by many as a sweet, kind and caring person who made friends easily with her warm smile. She was a woman of faith who shared her spirituality freely. She loved her family and friends, animals, Shirley Temple, music and especially country dancing. Also, she found many treasures on road trip rides to rummage sales. She enjoyed being outdoors and gardening for many years on the family farm. Her green thumb benefited family and friends as she shared the fruits of her hard work. She was known as a fantastic baker and fudge maker. Her beautifully embroidered towels and pillowcases were highly sought after by family and friends during Lemonweir school reunions. She was appreciative of the generosity of her family, especially Harley Dale who called daily and ensured that she was well cared for and comfortable. Milly kept countless journals and writings of her activities with her family including vacations and cruises. Mildred is survived by her children William (Mary Jo) Schriver, Belvidere IL; Harley Schriver, Middleton, WI; Carol (Bob) Kauscher, Elroy, WI; Sandy (Les) Saunders, Mauston, WI; Sister Alice Georgeson, Racine, WI; many grandchildren great-grandchildren and many friends. She was preceded in death and is sharing her 87th birthday with God, her parents, Albert and Anna (Baumgart) Howland; her husband Harley Schriver 10/1984; Son, Harvey Schriver 11/2007; Brothers: Lawrence, Fred and William Howland; Sisters: Dorothy Olson, Clara Davis, Marie McClurg, Granddaughter Michelle Saunders, and life long friend Mary Greene. Funeral services were held at 1:00 p.m., Wednesday, July 3, 2013 at St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Mauston. Burial was at the Rose Cemetery. Friends called on Tuesday, July 2nd from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the Crandall Funeral Home, Mauston and on Wednesday from 12 noon until time of services at the church. In lieu of flowers memorials may be made in Mildred’s name for memorial to be established. For online condolences please go to www.crandallfuneral.com

RUBY J. JOHNSON

Ruby J. Johnson, age 96 years, of rural Elroy, Wisconsin passed away peacefully on Sunday, July 7, 2013 in the home on the farm where she was born. She was born on April 25, 1917 to John and Josephine (Gruetzmacher) Thompson. Ruby graduated from the Elroy High School. She was united in marriage to Floyd Johnson on July 1, 1936 in Rockford, Illinois. They lived for many years in Wilmington and Morton, Illinois, prior to moving back to the Elroy area. He preceded her in death on October 27, 2000. Ruby was active in the East Lemonweir Lutheran Church and also enjoyed collecting antiques. Survivors include her children, James (Donna) Johnson of Wilmington, Eileen O’Reilly of Wilmington, Bruce (Dianne) Johnson of Elroy and Gloria (Al) Abraham of Morton; 8 Grandchildren, 16 Great Grandchildren, 25 Great Great Grandchildren and a sister-in-law, Eleanor Thompson of Elroy. In addition to her husband, Floyd, she was preceded in death by her Parents; granddaughter, Judy Johnson; grandson, Pat O’Reilly; son-in-law, James O’Reilly; brothers, William and Herman Thompson and sisters, Blanche Lee and Frieda Patzer. Funeral Services will be held on Monday, July 15, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the East Lemonweir Lutheran Church, W8943 Cty. Hwy. S (between Elroy & New Lisbon), with Rev. Wendy Ruetten officiating. Burial will be in the East Lemonweir Lutheran Cemetery. Friends may call at the Church on Monday from 10 to 11 a.m. The Picha Funeral Home in Elroy assisted the family, for online information go to www.pichafuneralhomes.com

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ROBERT “BOB” YARROCH

Robert “Bob” Yarroch, 62, of New Lisbon, passed away on Saturday, July 6, 2013, after a hard fought battle with prostate cancer. Bob was born in Baraboo on November 3, 1950, and was the son of Levi and Inez (Schenkat) Yarroch. He graduated from New Lisbon High School in 1968. Bob worked for the City of New Lisbon from 1977 to 2011as Supervisor of Water Works. He enjoyed riding his ATV, hunting, and working on his 1967 Ford Fairlane and Jeep CJ5. Most of all though, he enjoyed boating and spending time with friends on Castle Rock Lake where he was affectionately nicknamed, “Captain Bob.” He is survived by his sons, Jayme (Raina) Yarroch of Millbrook, AL, and Rob (Dr. Raquel) Yarroch of Wonewoc, his brother, William (Joan) Yarroch of Hancock, MI, and his sister, Rebecca (Kasper) Knabb, of Athens, WI., 5 grandchildren, and by many other relatives and friends. Bob is preceded in death by his parents, Levi and Inez Yarroch, and a granddaughter, Aislyn Yarroch. Family and friends were invited to attend a visitation on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 from 4:00 p.m. till 8:00 p.m. at the Hare Funeral Home in New Lisbon. A private family burial will be held at the Brewster Cemetery. Online condolences are available at www.harefuneralhome.com

GENEVIEVE W. GRANT

Genevieve W. Grant, age 92 years, of Elroy, passed on Monday, July 8, 2013 at Heritage Manor in Elroy, Wisconsin with her family near her side. She was born on May 15, 1921 to James and Carrie (Severson) Janecek in the Town of Greenwood, Vernon County, Wisconsin. She attended school at Debello Ridge and Hillsboro High School, and then she worked at Badger Ordinance until she married. Genevieve was united in marriage to Warren E. Grant on May 3, 1947 in Elroy. She spent many hours farming, milking cows, feeding chickens, gardening, canning and was employed 28 years at the Valley Inn in Elroy as a cook. Grandma Jenny treated many big and little kids to her special chocolate chip cookies. Other treasured recipes included her homemade noodles and boiled chicken, deviled eggs, vegetable beef dumpling roast, corn fritters, red jello with bananas, oyster stew, turkey dressing, kolache and pumpkin pie. Nobody ever left her house hungry and the cookies never lasted very long when she had company. Survivors include her children, Karen Leis of Elroy and Alva “Kirby” (Carol) Grant of Elroy; four grandchildren, Jeannine (Chad) Ottum of Kendall, Jennifer (Doug) Brandau of Wilton, Stacy Leis of Elroy and Carrie (Todd) Krueger of Elroy; and seven great grandchildren, Cory Ottum, Cole Brandau, Alyssa Ottum, Cora Brandau, Liza Krueger, Grant Krueger and Jay Ottum. She was preceded in death by her husband, Warren “Govy” on June 4, 1977: her Parents; brother, Leo Janecek; son-in-law, Donald Leis; and special friends, Irene Snyder and Dorothy Novy. Funeral Services will be held on Friday, July 12, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the Picha Funeral Home in Elroy, with Rev. Wesley Dunbar officiating. Burial will be in the Elroy City Cemetery. Friends may call at the Picha Funeral Home in Elroy on Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. and on Friday from 10 to 11 a.m. For online information go to www.pichafuneralhomes.com The family would like to extend a special thank you to the staff at Heritage Manor, and also the health care providers from Gundersen including Michelle Masters and Jane Weiss for many years of care and compassion for Genevieve.

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The Messenger Page 4

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

of Mauston July 11, 2013

NEW FACILITY TAKING SHAPE

The Mauston Area Ambulance Association's new facility is quickly taking shape. Located on Union Street near downtown Mauston the site was prepared for construction on May 3rd. Since that time the walls have been erected and what was just a skeleton of a building a few weeks ago is now a building nearing completion which is expected to be finished by Thanksgiving. The facility is located at 302 S. Union Street. The photo above is the drawing of what the building will look like completed. EVA MARIE WOYWOD PHOTO

Daniel Coughlin trial begins for child sexual assaults BY EVA MARIE WOYWOD Nearly four years after the investigation began, a five day trial on the State of Wisconsin's case against 50 year old Daniel Coughlin of Lyndon Station started this week with a jury selection on Monday and prosecution witnesses being called to the stand on Tuesday. Coughlin is facing three counts each of 1st degree child sexual and 2nd degree child sexual assault. The crimes are alleged to have occurred over a period of time from 1989 through 1992 and the victims involved were young males. In his opening statement to jurors State of Wisconsin Attorney General prosecutor Winn Collins stated that evidence will prove Coughlin had sexual contact with two male victims which have left deep wounds. Collins went on to state that the victims involved came from a troubled past and that not only had they been abused by Dan Coughlin but the sexual abuse first started with his brother, Donald Coughlin. In 1988 the victims, according to Collins, spent summers working and living on Dan Coughlin's farm outside of Lyndon Station. At the time they would have been in their preteen years and already used to a life of abuse. Collins went on to say Coughlin started grooming them by playing a game known with the Coughlin brothers as "grubbing." Grubbing was explained to be where one male would surprise attack another male by grabbing their testicles and squeezing. The sexual contact progressed according to Collins to include oral copulation and Coughlin simulating intercourse by inserting his penis between the legs of one of the boys while the child would be laying on his stomach. Collins also pointed to one incident with the younger victim where Coughlin was alleged to have tied the child to a calve pen, pouring milk on his exposed genitals and then had the calves enter the pen causing sexual contact with the child. "The kids entered into survival mode," stated Collins. The story of abuse came to light, according to Collins, when the children were older. "When a wound is left untreated it becomes infected," he said. The secret is out, he went on to state, "Everyone can pretend that the family secret didn't happen, but it did." Collins stated to the jury that by the end of the trial he would prove that beyond a reasonable doubt the two elements he needed: sexual contact happened and the victims were children at the time. Representing Coughlin at the trial is defense attorney Michael Ganzer. In his opening statement he reminded jurors that his client sits in the court room presumed innocent. Ganzer went on to state he questioned the delay in the charges, pointing to two decades have passed since the abuse was alleged to have occurred. The reason for the delay, according to Ganzer, was because the allegations were untrue and did not happen. "The stories do not add up," stated Ganzer who then pointed to one of the victim's behavior as an adult including that he has stated he loved Dan Coughlin. Ganzer then stated that as an adult he had vacationed with Coughlin, including bringing his young children with and allowing them to be alone with Coughlin. As to the "grubbing" incidents Ganzer

Mauston PD reminds drivers to be careful BY EVA MARIE WOYWOD

Dan Coughlin stated that it was something the Coughlin males do as "jokes" and while sophomoric it should be considered "locker room behavior." "Dan is just a farmer," he stated when pointing to the media attention the case has garnered. "His brother is the public official, former village president and fire chief, that is why this case is getting attention," he said. Ganzer then pointed to Dan Coughlin's sister in law, Don's wife, as to why the false allegations came forward. He stated that at one time she blackmailed Dan Coughlin over a disagreement they had regarding the priest at the Catholic church they both attended. Ganzer then stated she was "a little crazy." Following the opening statement the prosecution called to the stand their first witness, one of the alleged male victims. Now an adult, he gave testimony to the years he spent working summers on Coughlin's farm and stated that fondling began the second summer he and the other male worked. The witness stated that at the time sexual abuse was something he had already been used to as he had already been abused by Don Coughlin and that it had occurred "all the time" beginning when he was seven years old. He stated that the abuse alleged to have been inflicted by Don Coughlin occurred at least two to three times a week during his childhood. The witness also testified to having made contact with Juneau County Deputy Shaun Goyette in 2009 and informing him of the abuse that had occurred during his childhood. He stated that the first contact was made by via a phone call, which was followed up by a written statement he mailed to the detective. At the time the witness was living out of state. After submitting the written statement the victim stated that Detective Goyette traveled to where he was living and conducted an in-person interview. The trial is expected to last throughout the week. Donald Coughlin has also been charged and is facing 23 felony counts relating to child sexual assault. His trial is scheduled to begin later this month on July 29th. He is being represented by defense attorney Daniel Berkos.

Within the City of Mauston there have been numerous traffic accidents over the last few weeks, so many that the Mauston Police Department has issued a reminder to drivers on how to navigate the newly reconstructed roadways and traffic light system. In a press release Chief Mark Messer stated that since the construction Hwy 58 and 82 now have twin or (2) left turn lanes which, according to the Chief, has helped to move traffic through town. Drivers should remain in their lanes as they navigate the turns. "Both lanes are clearly marked with a solid yellow line," stated Chief Messer. The release also addressed concerns that have been brought to the department's attention on the yellow amber flashing left turn arrow now utilized on many of the City's intersections. "When this segment of the traffic light is activated, motorist MUST YIELD the right of way before making a left hand turn," stated Chief Messer. If you are still somewhat intimidated by the new traffic signals, you're not alone. Over the course of the last year news agencies throughout the country have issued similar reminders to their area's drivers as, like in Mauston, fender benders were occurring more often after the lights were installed. Last year the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) issued a brochure explaining to motorist how to use the lights, and why they were being installed throughout the state. The brochure states the following: "They are safer -A decade-long national study by the Federal Highway Administration found that drivers had fewer crashes with the flashing yellow arrow. They are more efficient and the new signal provides more options for controlling traffic based on variable traffic volumes since the timing sequence can be made to vary throughout the day."


July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Page 5

Hatch Happenings BY DEBBY ENNIS We had snakes, hissing cockroaches, a hedgehog and a whole variety of animals for our Life Underground program Friday, June 28th! Over 100 people were on hand to hear Dino from Nature’s Niche tell all about burrowing animals and how they survive. Kids had the opportunity to hold most of the animals, however, that proved to be a little harder than planned when one of the hissing cockroaches got dropped on the floor and he scurried away. I have to say, there was a few seconds of panic until he was found! Join us on Monday, July 15th at 1PM to “Dig into the Underground World” with Professor Oops, the “explorer who stayed home.” Professor Oops will present a program about the underground ecosystem including microorganisms, insects, worms, plants, soil, minerals and gems. If you enjoy science, this is a program full of fun for the whole family to enjoy!

Kids—don’t forget to look for the “garden gnome” hiding around the library. If you find his picture be sure to bring it up to the front desk to receive your prize. You can also have your picture taken with the large stand up gnome found in the kid’s new book display area. Through July 27th, patrons 16 and older can participate in an ADULT summer reading program, too. For each book you read, you can enter win to win weekly prize drawings, including Chamber bucks, book bags, books or coupons. The more you read, the more chances to win!

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Club gave three care bags to Mauston Chief of Police, Mark Messer. The bags will go to the Hope House in Baraboo. They're for children that go with their mothers to the abused home center. Three other bags were also given to Juneau County Sheriff Brent Oleson. Those bags will go to children taken from abused homes. Above, Mark Messer accepts the bags from Verna Loendorf, Vice-President and Julaine Roach, President. Bottom photo, the ladies present the bags to Sheriff Oleson.

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SHOOTING, from Page 1 Treul is currently in custody of the Juneau County Sheriff's Department and facing charges of firstdegree intentional homicide, attempted homicide and first-degree recklessly endangering public safety. "All I can remember is as soon as the bullets hit I was unable to feel anything and fell to the ground - I pretended to be dead. I think that is why I am alive," she said. She went on to say the next to be shot was Gail, "I could hear her screaming. She kept screaming and then all of a sudden the screaming stopped." Ebony stated that while she did not know Treul well, Gail did. She claims that earlier in the evening Gail had broken off a sporadic intimate relationship with Treul as she had feelings for a new man in her life. Ebony's mother Pamela said she found out about the shooting just moments after it had happened when she received a phone call from someone who had been at PJ's Bar. "I thought they were playing games with me - it was just a little after midnight when the phone rang. I didn't believe them. I hung up the phone," she said. Within seconds her phone rang again and the caller explained it was not a joke and Ebony was on a medflight to Madison. Pamela, who lived in the Appleton area at the time, said she grabbed her keys, got into

her car and drove to a gas station to fill her car. It was at that gas station the shock hit and she passed out. The attendant had to call a relative who came and drove her to Madison. After getting to Madison it was another eleven hours before she saw her daughter, who had been in surgery for most of morning into the afternoon. "They didn't prepare me. No one prepared me. I am a CNA and I was unprepared to see my baby laying there, swollen and with tubes coming out of her body," said Pamela. Since that day Pamela has been by Ebony's side, only leaving the hospital on two occasions and quitting her job so she could be with her daughter. "They didn't know if she would live. The first week was touch and go," said Pamela. The daughter mother pair are now facing a future neither planned for and one which is starting out with hurdles other than Ebony's rehabilitation. Due to Pamela quitting her job and Ebony rooming with someone prior to the shooting, they consider themselves homeless. "I can't go back to where I was living and take Ebony with me, I was also rooming with someone," said Pamela. "We need to stay together so I can take care of her," she went on to say. Finding a place to go

home to has been difficult for the pair, and time has been running out - Ebony is expected to be released from the hospital on July 17th. "Medicare would pay for a nursing home, but Ebony wants to be with me. If we have no choice then I will still be homeless and without a job," said Pamela. They have been working closely with a social worker at the hospital, as well as a Social Security Benefit Specialist at Juneau County Aging and Disability. "It's just a matter of time before we have some income - her claims are being expedited but it will not happen soon enough to pay rent or qualify for some programs," said Pamela. A light is at the end of a tunnel. Just this week Juneau County Circle of Hope's former board member and treasurer John McGinley and his wife Pamela, offered to rent the pair a Mauston residence they own. McGinley resigned from Circle of Hope's board two months ago but has had years of experience working with the area's homeless and said he realizes the difficulties many experiencing financial difficulties due to medical issues, face. "We'll get this figured out," both he and his wife stated. Ebony is expecting her benefits to fall into place in about two months, which includes allowing her moth-

er to provide home healthcare. Until then they will have little to live on. Within the next month at least two fundraising opportunities are in the process of being planned, one in Necedah and another in Mauston and friends of the family are currently working on setting up a funding account for Ebony. When asked the one thing she wanted people in the community to know, Ebony stated she now realizes not to take life for granted and that in an instant everything can change, including how you view life. As for a question to the man she accuses of changing her life - she had two simple words, "Why me?"

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The Messenger Page 6

of Elroy

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

July 11, 2013

“4K for Cancer” visits Elroy while biking across the nation BY TASHA MUELLER A team of 28 bicyclists is making it’s way across the country to raise money and awareness for the Ulman Cancer Fund. The group, known as “4K for Cancer”, began as the Hopkins 4K for Cancer in 2001 and has been pedaling on ever since. Undergraduate students from John Hopkins University decided to combine their fight against cancer with their dream of bicycling across the country. The 4K became a program of the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults with successful years, combined at John Hopkins and a stand-alone non-profit group. Getting a dose of hospitality from several members of the H.O.P.E. organization while stopping at the Royall High School, the team of strangers was fed a large meal. All food was donated to the H.O.P.E. organization for the special overnight stay and morning breakfast. The group started at Baltimore, Maryland and will end in Seattle, Washington. If you add that all up, they will be bicycling over 4,000 miles within a 70-day period. The cyclists, most of them college students, are riding in honor of others with cancer. They pedaled into Elroy at about 5 p.m. on Thursday the 27th at the end of their 75-mile leg from Madison on day 26 of their journey. It was a shorter ride than usual – the cyclists typically ride about 80 to 100 miles a day. When leaving on Friday, their next stop was to La Crosse, another short ride. Each rider had to raise $4,500 to participate with the ultimate goal of $800,000 by all participants by August 10. The group’s motto is Cycle, Inspire, Unite. Churches and YMCAs have opened their doors to the cyclists, providing showers and laundry facilities as donations come along the way. The cyclists left Elroy the next morning around 7 a.m. and started out their day with a dedication circle, in which they hold hands and say who they’re dedicating the day’s ride to. A few of the area cancer survivors joined in the circle and were able to tell of their story. The group is accompanied by a 15-passenger van to carry the group’s backpacks and duffel bags and a water van stocked full of coolers. The group stops about every 20 miles for a water break. After eating their meal Thursday evening and getting everything settled on the Royall gymnasium floor, the group posed for a photo in front of the school before heading out to the Elroy Fair and enjoyed learning what exactly a horse pull was. One rider, Catherine Cardinal, who is a senior at Niagara University in New York wrote this on her blog about making the stop in Elroy, “When we arrived we had a warm welcome to Elroy by community members at the high school. We had showers and a huge feast prepared by the locals. This is their third year hosting the 4K Seattle team and they plan to con-

The 28 member group posed for a group picture in front of the Royall School on Thursday, June 27 before heading to the Elroy Fair. tinue to host. They were so happy to meet all of us and talk and share and they took us to the horse pulls at the fair. It was so cool and I learned all about them. We left after a horse team of two pulled 4,200 pounds twenty-five and a half feet! There were also monkeys there and you could take photos with them! They were so stinking cute!” Catherine’s connection with the cancer community, as stated on her page, is with her grandmother’s survival of breast cancer. Also, her best friend is a survivor of Leukemia and over the last few years, her mother has been struggling with cancer related issues. “I want to be a strength for those who are experiencing the effects of cancer.” While on their ride to Elroy, the trip consisted mainly of bike trails, which consisted of dirt, mosquitos and misdirections on the trail system, explained one rider, Spencer Matson, who was in the water van for the day leg as each member takes turns. In his blog, Spencer summed up his experience in Elroy as, “Elroy is the first of many small towns to host us. The 4K

Each morning before heading on their ride for the day, a dedication circle is formed as members tell a story about the previous days ride. Each member announces who they dedicate the day’s ride to.

simply would not exist without the generosity of small towns. Oftentimes, these towns are the only settlement for many miles and if we didn’t have them as rest stops, we would be up a creek without a paddle. Also, we find that small towns have the greatest hosts! We were greeted by an army of Elroy citizens wearing 4K shirts and brandishing a home cooked dinner. They also took us to a county fair, where we saw sheep in sweaters and a horse pull competition. Some of our riders even got into large plastic balls and bounced around a pool. I can tell you one thing: you certainty don’t see horse pulls in Connecticut!” In 2001, 4K for Cancer was named “Special Event of the Year” by The American Cancer Society and was presented with the first ever Pioneer Award. The group has raised a total of $111,000 so far this year. For more information on 4K for Cancer or to make a donation, visit www.4Kforcancer.org.

The bicyclists will ride over 4,000 miles over a 70-day stretch across the country. Along the way, the team will ask for donated items and have stops that open their doors for a good night’s stay. MIKE BURCH PHOTOS


July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Page 7

Kendall meal site news BY JOYCE THONESEN SITE MANAGER Hope everyone had a Happy July 4th. At least the weather was great. We had a picnic here with all the family. Lot of fun. Now for the meal site news. We have lots of birthdays of those who eat at our site, which are David Fauska, Virginia Olson, Alan Rieck, Darlene Rieck, Dianne Wilson, Alvin Cook,

Charles Schnurr, and Sylvia Woodard. The birthday club will meet for a party for Sylvia on July 24th. Our music day will be Friday, July 19. That is a fun day at our site. We do thank all those who come and play and sing for us. We would love to have more join us for lunch. On these hot July days we have a nice cool place to eat. Well guess thats it for now.

Music in Central Park

ELROY MOVING FORWARD

On July 3rd The Elroy Area Chamber of Commerce put on a Community Picnic and Ribbon Cutting at the Elroy Commons. Mayor Mark Stanek did the honor of cutting the ribbon celebrating the completion of the repaving of Main Street. The night was packed with lots of fun and some great foods thanks to BluZone, Children Cottage, Country Pick’ins, Fertile Grounds, Sportsman’s Bar & Grill, and Trepes Construction. We had a wonderful turn out. The Commons was buzzing with eager children waiting to compete in the timed The Miller Heating Obstacle Course. The winners in the 5-8 age group: 1st Hunter S. 2nd Sampson I. 3rd Ava S. The winners in the 9-12 age group: 1st Max B. 2nd Nia I. 3rd Maycie V. Congratulations to the winners and all that participated!

BY LYNETTE VLASAK Thursday, July 18, is the date for Music and Sundaes in Kendall’s Central Park. Music by One Acchord will begin at 7 p.m. and frozen custard sundaes by Culver’s will be available during the intermission. Bring your own lawn chair and come ready for good music, tasty treats and a chance to visit with your neighbors. The music and sundaes are free. In case of bad weather, the program will be moved to the Kendall Community Hall. The evening’s festivities are co-sponsored by the Kendall Area Arts and Culture Organization

(KAACO) and the Kendall

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Crash injures two

STATE FINALIST

Miss Maycie Vierck, daughter of Stacie and Mark Vierck, age 9, has been chosen as a State Finalist in the National American Miss Wisconsin Pageant to be held August 23rd and 24th at the beautiful Chula Vista in Wisconsin Dells. The National American Miss pageants are held for girls ages 4-18, and have five different age divisions. Maycie will be participating in the Junior Pre-teen age division. The winner of the Pageant will receive a $1,000 cash award, the official crown and banner, a bouquet of roses, and air transportation to compete in the National Pageant in California where she will receive an exciting complimentary Tour of Hollywood and two V.I.P. tickets to Disneyland®. The National American Miss Pageants are dedicated to celebrating America's future leaders and equipping them with life-long skills. Each year the pageant nationally awards 1.5 million dollars in cash, scholarships, and other prizes, which includes a new Ford Mustang Convertible! The National American Miss Pageants are unlike any other. All activities and competitions are kept age appropriate. Girls under the age of 12 are not allowed to wear make-up, and there is no swimsuit competition. The Pageant program is based on inner-beauty, as well as poise and presentation, and offers an "All-American spirit of fun for family and friends." Emphasis is put on the importance of developing self confidence, learning good sportsmanship, as well as setting and achieving personal goals. The Pageant recognizes the accomplishments of each girl while encouraging her to set goals for her future. Miss Maycie Vierck's activities include basketball, softball, gymnastics, piano, and soccer. She also enjoys time with her family and four cats and one dog. Miss Maycie Vierck's sponsors include Sportsman's Bar, Royal Bank, Mark's Jewelry, Schotten Motorsports, Dog House Bar, Tim Neubauer Trucking.

Monroe County Sheriff Peter Quirin reports a two vehicle crash that resulted in injuries to two parties. The crash occurred at about 11:03 AM on July 8, 2013 on ST HWY 71, .1 mile West of ST HWY 131 in the Township of Wilton. One of the vehicles involved is a 2005 Chevy Silverado C1500, driven by Jamie L. Pfaff (age 21) of Melrose, WI, was eastbound on ST HWY 71. The vehicle Jamie was driving crossed the centerline of the road and collided with a 2003 Chrysler Town and Country Van, driven by Yvonne L. Pratt (age 22) of Norwalk, WI who was westbound. Both drivers were transported to the Tomah Memorial Hospital, with non-life threatening injuries. The passengers in the Pratt vehicle were not injured and all parties were wearing seat belts at the time of the crash. Assisting the Sheriff’s Department at the scene were the Wilton Fire

Department, the Wilton Area Ambulance Service, the Monroe County 9-1-1 center, and the Wisconsin State Patrol. The crash remains under investigation by the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department.

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The Messenger Page 8

of New Lisbon

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

July 11, 2013

New Lisbon Pool installs new lift BY EVA MARIE WOYWOD "Dan is the Man," according to Denise Fleming - Manager at the New Lisbon Community Pool. She's speaking of Dan Murphy who just two weeks ago finished the installation of

a new remote controlled lift so that patrons, of all ages, with special needs can enjoy the benefits of swimming. The mandated addition cost the city just under $6,000. Spending that both Fleming and Murphy said was worth it.

MILESTONE Michael Wilson retires from Walker after 45 years of service.

Murphy has over 30 years experience managing and taking care of pools, including over two decades for New Lisbon. A humble man, Murphy stated he enjoys taking care of the pool - "It's for the community," he said.

FIRST DOLLAR OF PROFIT The New Lisbon Area Chamber of Commerce is pleased to welcome and present the “First Dollar of Profit” to Jessica Nelson with Sun Kissed Tanning! Jessica explains that: “We just moved to the New Lisbon area in January. Lived in the surrounding area for some time though. I will be starting Spray tanning soon and also coming in the next few weeks I will be doing It Works body wraps at the salon. I will be doing them here ...and also selling them for people to do in the privacy of their home too. I hope to be a business owner in the New Lisbon area for years to come. Down the road I would like to expand with a few other staples to add to the tanning. It's been a great experience to meet all my clients and have them enjoy their experience at Sun Kissed Tanning. I feel very proud to have fresh new faces every day. Stop in and check it out!!”

Mile Bluff encourages sun safety Now that it is July, some of you may have already spent time on the beach listening to the peaceful sound of waves crashing on the lakeshore. Maybe you have enjoyed the smell of a charcoal grill while sipping a glass of ice cold lemonade, as a cool breeze crosses your face and the hot sun warms your skin. Yes, summer is finally here! While our senses love all that summer has to offer, including the warmth of the sun on our skin, it is always good to remind ourselves that too much sun can be dangerous. We should never forget the negative effects the sun can have on the body if proper precautions are not taken. As the weather gets warmer, Mile Bluff Medical Center is encouraging sun safety, and reminding everyone about the importance of protecting their skin while enjoying summer activities. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, and the leading cause is too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. Most often found naturally in sunlight, UV rays are also present in manmade sources such as tanning beds. It is estimated that one in five Americans has a form of skin cancer, and of those, more than 20 die each day. No one is invincible to this disease, in fact, if you have had even one blistering sunburn while growing up, the chances of skin cancer becoming present later in life more than doubles. So, how can you protect yourself from becoming one of these statistics? The first step is to understand what factors will

increase your chances for developing skin cancer. These risk factors include fair skin, a family history of skin cancer and a weakened immune system. Although many of the things that put you at risk for skin cancer cannot be controlled by you alone, there are some lifestyle changes that you can make to help prevent or avoid the disease. By following a few simple tips, you greatly reduce your risk of being diagnosed with skin cancer. These methods provide the best protection when used together. Prevention methods: * Avoid direct sun exposure, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. * Use sunscreen every day - it should have a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher, and protect against both UVA and UVB rays. * Cover up with clothing when outside. * Wear a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses. * Avoid tanning and UV tanning booths. * Be sure to re-apply sunscreen every two hours. After learning what factors put you at risk for skin cancer, and how to prevent it, the next important step is to know the warning signs. If detected early, skin cancer can be treated. The best way to achieve early detection is by performing monthly headto-toe skin checks at home, in addition to the yearly exam performed by your primary healthcare provider. The most common

sign in identifying skin cancer is the presence of irregular moles. An ordinary mole will be an evenly-colored spot that is brown, tan or flesh-colored; it will be either flat or raised, and will have sharply defined borders. If you notice one that has some of the following characteristics, be sure to share your findings with your healthcare provider right away. Signs and symptoms: * The spread of pigment from the border of a mole to the surrounding skin * A change in sensation of a mole - itchiness, tenderness or pain * A change in the surface of a mole - oozing, bleeding or the appearance of a bump or nodule * Moles that stand out or look different from others The warm sun is one of the best things about summer, just remember to enjoy responsibly. If you have questions regarding prevention or specific risks for skin cancer, Mile Bluff is available to help. Make an appointment today with one of Mile Bluff’s healthcare providers to better understand what the outcomes of good sun safety practices will mean for your health. Additionally, there are oncology specialists and cancer care services available locally if it is determined that you need them. For more information on the services offered at Mile Bluff Medical Center, call 608-847-6161, or to make an appointment with a healthcare provider.


July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Page 9

Helen Milne receives Jefferson Award BY TASHA MUELLER It’s not every day a television crew wants to interview you. But it may be out of the ordinary that the same crew wants to give you a local award. La Crosse television station WXOW, a media partner behind the Jefferson Award for public service, awarded Helen Milne on Friday, June 28 after setting up a crew in front of what she began 10 years ago. The station presented Milne with the award for her continued years of service to Elroy and the surrounding communities. During the feature that aired on the station Monday evening, the crew interviewed Jerry Zirk who nominated Helen for many months. In the broadcast, Zirk commented on Milne saying, “She’s the go-to lady. If you need anything she’ll get it for you or know someone who can.” Her donation of time with helping others was a contributing factor with receiving the award. The Jefferson Awards were founded more than 40 years ago to provide both local and national recognition for community and public service. News media outlets – newspapers, television, and radio stations – partner with the Jefferson Awards to create public awareness of the work award winners do. Illinois-based Quincy Newspapers, which owns WXOW in La Crosse and WKOW in Madison, is the media partner behind Milne’s Jefferson Award. Located adjacent to Grace Lutheran Church in downtown Elroy, Milne started to operate a sale in the garage owned by the church for the past 10 years. Milne describe the event as something for the entire community, not just the church as everyone gains from it. Donations from the community and from as far as Madison has filled the garage with items up for grabs. Since 2003, the sale has generated over $50,000 which has been put back into the Grace Lutheran Church to fund annual maintenance of the church’s elevator. Also, new chairs, tables, lights, and stair maintenance at the meals program site have all been contributed from the sale Milne has also set up a Cans for Kids drop-off spot at the car wash in Elroy. With the money from recycling aluminum cans, she buys coats for children. Milne saw the need after not having enough coats in the sale. A story Milne shared with the WXOW crew was having to raise three kids on her own after her husband became terminally ill. “We lived in a house with no running water. I couldn’t afford a telephone. My son and I used to carry him in on a chair with a hole because we couldn’t afford a wheelchair. I made a deal with the Lord, and I know you’re not supposed

Helen Milne (center) surrounds herself by the ones who have not only helped her run the weekly garage sale adjacent to the Grace Lutheran Church, but have understood what she wanted to do to help out the community. Before receiving the Jefferson Award from La Crosse television station WXOW, Milne kept saying that she doesn’t deserve the award, but rather the community. Donations are always welcome, and remember, if you see Milne, to congratulate her on an outstanding award. to, but I told Him if he would help me through this time in my life I would do whatever I could for everybody I could.” Her husband passed away in 1973, six years after a kidney transplant. “And I have tried to keep that promise to the Lord,” Milne said. Even though she doesn’t believe she deserves the award, many in attendance for the event thought otherwise. Others described her as genuine, hard working, and helps others when needed. Before receiving the award, Milne still doesn’t believe she

should have received it. “I don’t deserve it. The people here deserve it.” The broadcast is listed on the WXOW news site at www.wxow.com under the community tab and click on Jefferson Awards. The garage sale is open throughout the warm months and is open Thursday through Saturday 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. and, if you stop by early enough you’ll get a fresh, homemade cookie.

More time needed on Kendall school purchase BY TASHA MUELLER During the regular Kendall Village Board meeting on Monday, July 1, the decision of needing “more time” on what exactly the village would like to do with the former Kendall Elementary school was stated by Kendall Village Board President Richard Martin. At the meeting, the municipality additionally needs “more answers”, thus delaying the decision on purchasing the school for $1 from the Royall School District. The municipality is working with an individual that is considering a development plan at the school site who needs more time. Martin released no additional information regarding the building. If no decisions are made regarding the purchase of the building, the Royall School District intends on putting the building up for public auction. The elementary school closed after the 2010-2011 school year after declining enrollment and financial constraints. All grades moved to the Elroy facility with ownership still under the district. Another delayed decision included a request for a Class B combination liquor license to Wood Pipes Smoke Shoppe. The license would give the business the approval to serve liquor at their already placed bar. Board members decided to wait on preliminary

results of a trial with the business owner Brian Wood. Pending charges could result in a felony as the board tabled the action and would see the upcoming outcome. Board members also grappled with variance requests on two separate ordinance issues. The first included a 30-foot camping trailer that was characterized as a traffic hazard. Marshal Rich Laxton received complaints from several different citizens regarding the location of the trailer on 505 Thayer Street hindering the visibility for traffic. Owners of the trailer, William and Jamie Solchenberger, received first a verbal warning, then written due to stipulations in the village ordinance. Marshal Laxton had explained to owner Bill Solchenberger, who was in attendance for the meeting, that not only was the trailer a possibility for an accident at the intersection, it was also in violation of the village ordinance saying that the trailer must not be parked on the side of the street for more than two days and must be moved. The owner had parked a trailer on the side of the street every summer for the past six years. The previous trailers included a 24-foot trailer, and the next three years, a 27-foot trailer. Solchenberger moved the now 30-foot trailer 78-80 feet from the intersection to meet the June 30 deadline for the written deadline.

Board members agreed to give Solchenberger a extension on when to remove the trailer from the street until Labor Day. An option Solchenberger explained to the board was to move the trailer on his own lawn during the camping season. Members agreed on the option, under one understanding that a plan would be advised to remove part of the curb in front of his house in order for the camper to be properly secure. The curb removal would be the owner’s cost. The second variance request came forth to the board towards Brian and Tammy Woods’ new deck at their 116 Short Street residence. The deck had fallen as the couple constructed a replacement without obtaining a proper building permit. Building inspector Tammy Roscovious noted the nonbuilding permit as a stop-work permit was issued, which the Woods’ did stop all construction. The plans for the new project were larger than the original deck. The new deck measured 8-by-10 feet, whereas the old one was at 4-by-6 feet. The new deck is about 16 feet from the lot line, a violation of village ordinance. Board members approved of the variance, but were critical on how the Woods’ have a pattern of applying for the proper permits after beginning projects. A letter written from the village attorney will also

be sent to the residents remarking on the village’s limitations to projects. In other business, Marshal Laxton issued five citations for speeding and one for lack of insurance, along with eight warnings. Scott Construction, based out of Lake Delton, will be contacted from the village on a quote to fill street cracks. Additionally, two lawn mowers were looked over to be used for the cemetery. Test runs will take place before making any purchase. A bartender’s license was approved from Larry Bender. A “Children at Play” sign will be put up on Medbury Street with an increased amount of children in the area near the village limits. The Helpful Homemakers Club donated $25 for upkeep to Central Park. The purchase of 50 new chairs for the Kendall Community Hall was delayed as board members would like to seek more bids. The Kendall Fire Department will be donating $500 towards the purchase. The donation comes from fundraisers, not through taxes. A special meeting regarding the Spring Street renovation project is set for Tuesday, July 16 at 6 p.m. which is open to the public. The next regular Kendall Village Board meeting is Monday, August 5 at 7 p.m.

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The Messenger Page 10

of Necedah

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

July 11, 2013

Library program hosts unique creatures BY STEVE NORLING The summer program at The Necedah Library continued on Friday, June 28th with the program “Digging the Dirt up on Creatures Underground”. The program, which he titled “Life Underground”, was led by “Dino” Tlachac. Dino is the owner of “Nature’s Niche” in Stevens Point. Nature’s Niche is a rescue facility for exotic and native animals and an educational facility. He does educational programs on humane animal and wildlife issues. The animals he receives at his facility are mostly exotic animals that were someone’s pets that escaped or that the people could no longer keep. He brought along a large number of animals, most of them smaller animals, but some very large ones including a 15 foot python. About 25 people attended and 15 of them were youngsters. They were entertained by being allowed to touch and carry many of the exotic animals around. All of the animals that Dino brought with him make their homes underground. Many were from Africa or South America but there were some from right here in the United States. One of the local ones was a Gila Monster from the southwest. He also had cockroaches that were six inches long and three inches wide. He also brought a tarantula and many other spiders as well as other lizards and salamanders. There were African lizards and an African tortoise whose family is the third largest turtle in the world. He showed where the tortoise had been injured and explained how they use fiberglass to repair the tortoise and all turtles that need repair. He also had quite a number of different snakes. He had a coatimundi, a hedgehog, and a giant rabbit as mammals in his collection. Many of the children were enthused to carry some of the creatures around to show the rest of the crowd. One young man got to wear a helmet with the live tarantula crawling around it as he walked through the rest of the attendees. Others got to carry

One youngster was brave enough to let a tarantula relax on his hat while he walked around the crowd.

This coatimundi seems comfortable to take a ride high above. snakes, lizards, and various other creatures around the crowd. Dino then went on to explain the pitfalls of having exotic pets. He explained how many of the pets get too big and the people cannot any longer keep them. This was true of the 15 foot python, which he had with him. It was turned over to the local animal shelter and as they had no facilities for it they turned it over to Nature’s Niche. The youngsters were fascinated with the python and as it lay on the floor most of them went up to touch it. Nature’s Niche also takes animals that have been found by police or the DNR that have escaped their owners or that the owners have turned loose. Many of these exotic animals would die in the Wisconsin winters because they are from tropical cli-

The 15 foot python was very popular and many were able to touch the large visitor. mates. Dino put on an excellent “hands on” program and almost everyone attending, parents and youngsters alike went up to thank him after the program ended. It was an interesting, educational, fun program and the Necedah Library is to be commended for bringing this type of program to Necedah. On Thursday, July 18th at 1:00 p.m. there will be a matinee showing of the movie “Holes”. This is an adventure filled movie that is rated PG and is free for everyone. There is also free popcorn to go with it. On Friday, August 16th at 10:00 a.m. the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge will put on an educational program titled “Animal Architects”. These are all part of the great summer program at the Necedah Library.

One animal from the southwest that visited was this gila monster.

A tortoise was one popular visitor at the Library.

Volunteers paint playground BY STEVE NORLING In his Public Works Report, Chris Woda reported that a group of youngsters and adults from the Assembly of God Church painted the playground equipment in the Vets Hall playground. They had volunteered to do so and on June 30th completed the job. He also reported that the painting of the dam has been completed and that the remainder of the riprap will be installed once the water goes down. The purchase of a snow blower, rotary broom, and front blade for the John Deere yard tractor was approved. This will be paid for at a cost of $5,986.54 using funds from the Wisconsin Surplus Auction sales. The work agreement with North Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission to update the comprehensive plan at a cost of $5,000 was approved.

The first reading of two ordinances took place. They were Ordinance 13-05 and 13-06. 13-05 pertains to the parking ordinance for prohibited parking during certain hours. Much of the new ordinance is rewording and adding to the present ordinance. Ordinance 13-06 has to do with the penalties associated with 13-05. Again the major part was changing the old ordinance to coincide with the new parking ordinance and bringing the penalties up to date. A discussion and review of the Camp Douglas Rescue Inc. service for the first sixmonths, January through June 2013 was held. The average response time for the 52 calls in the village was three and one half minutes. It was decided that the company has been doing an excellent job and Roger Herried was given authorization to attempt to obtain a longer contract the next time, perhaps three or even

five years. An ordinance on compression braking is being considered and Administrator Herried obtained ordinances from several villages to get an idea of what needs to be in the ordinance. After some discussion an ordinance was introduced that all of the board members were in agreement with. A motion was made and approved to accept the donation of property from the Great Lakes Region Church of God Prophecy. The motion was made on the assumption that an inspection of the property would turn up no major problems with the building. It was stated that as there were no taxes being paid on the property at this time that it would not cost the village anything. One of the things suggested for the parking lot is to install a basketball court. In Administrator Herried’s reports he covered an invitation to the board members to

attend the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge “Making Tracks” event. He also gave an update on the Community

Development Block Grant application for the public safety building. His final report was on the

Phosphorous removal optimization variance request The board then went into closed session.

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July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Page 11

Necedah holds 38th annual parade BY STEVE NORLING Back in 1976, Ken and Dena Winters decided that the little town of New Miner needed to celebrate Independence Day with a parade. They organized it, did all of the work involved and so began a tradition. This year they held the 38th annual New Miner Independence Day Parade. The parade is always held on the Saturday closest to Independence Day and this year it was held on Saturday, July 6th. When the parade kicked off at noon, both sides of County G were lined with people. The best estimate of number was well over 1,000; this in a town that sports two businesses, a Legion Hall and a fire station. The parade itself contained numerous entries, some of them from other communities. Necedah, Babcock, Wisconsin Rapids, Nekoosa and Armenia. There were military units, floats, antique

cars, antique tractors, motorcycles, fire equipment, old trucks, modern farm equipment and of course horses. There were also a number of local politicians including ED Brooks, Howard Marklein and District Attorney Solovey. There were ten trophies given, each for a different division. The winners were: military, Babcock American Legion, antique cars 1949 and older, 1930 Model A owned by Lee Martinovich of Babcock, 1950 and newer, 1964 Ford Falcon owned by John Pelleh of Armenia, old trucks, 1964 El Camino, owned by Bob Martinovich of Babcock, old tractors, 1948 John Deere A owned by Elmer Anderson of Necedah, the EMS/fire department trophy went to Necedah Fire and Rescue for their four trucks, the best float trophy went to St. James Lutheran Church of Necedah, modern tractor and farm went to Arndt Cranberry Company, the

horse trophy went to Sergio and Alfredo Rodriguce of Nekoosa and the judges trophy went to Abate of Wis. Region 7E motorcycle and ATV club of Necedah. There were also other things to occupy the crowd for the day. There were food booths, bake sale, raffles, kids games all day and a horseshoe-pitching contest after the parade. While the parade began as the brainchild of the Winters’ and for a time they did most of the work they now have more help. The Petenwell ATV club now runs the food stand and the department, the fire American Legion and St. Paul’s Lutheran Church also pitch in along with a number of the local citizens who also pitch in to help now that the parade has grown. This parade in a small town is a great tribute to our country’s independence. A great way to celebrate what this country stands for, freedom.

Model A winner of antique car trophy.

The crowd that showed up for the parade stretched for at least a 1/2 mile.

Abate of Wis. motorcycle and ATV club - Judges choice trophy.

The best float trophy went to St. James.

Babcock Legion was the winner of the Military trophy.

New hires at Necedah Schools BY STEVE NORLING The Necedah School Board met for their July meeting on July 8th. The first order of business was the introduction of two new employees of the school district. The new head of maintenance and grounds is Marty McNew and the new 6 – 12 grade science teacher is Molly Moseley. Both of them were welcomed by the board. One resignation was announced and that was Joni Mach resigning from being cheerleading coach and also resigning from being middle school track coach. High School principal Mark Becker reported on changes that were being made to the school handbook. Some of them had to do with positive behavior with more of a focus on teaching the punishment, and the differences between minor and major behavior problems. He also stated that the new Necedah ordinance rules on truancy would be added to the

book and students that were not keeping up and not doing their best to improve would be involved what he referred to as a working lunch. Mrs. Horbinski reported that the school again will receive funds for the after school program. She also reported that the leadership team made out the district goals for the next five years. One of those goals is that by 2017 all students will be ready to transition to college or a career. Superintendent Gierach reported that there were changes in the law covering the rehiring of employees that had retired. He went through and explained the changes, a couple of which are that the person has to wait longer before being rehired and they are limited in the number of hours that they can work. An in depth discussion of the preliminary budget for the 2013/2014 school year was held. Mr. Gierach reported that

Necedah will be receiving approximately 14 percent less in state aid. This is tied to number of students and valuation of property in the district. He stated that they tried to be as conservative as possible with the budget but it would still probably contain a hike in the property tax. One of the problems that the board found with the preliminary budget is that there are no concrete figures, only guesstimates. There are so many things that can change before the final budget is done that it is unknown how the final budget will turn out. After all of the discussion the preliminary budget was approved. This is actually necessary so that the school can continue to run until the numbers come in for the final budget. This is also the budget that will be taken to the district voters at the voters meeting on July 22nd.


Page 12

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

July 11, 2013

MAUSTON FFA HOLDS ANIMAL DISPLAY Mauston

High School FFA will be sponsoring a farm animal display on the old Juneau County Court House lawn in Friday, July 12th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. In addition to the traditional farm animal display, there will be several specialty animals on display. The Mauston FFA chapter will be selling their remarkable FFA shakes as well as brats and burgers. Also in extension to horses, there will be Dairy, Piglets, Beef, Sheep, Calves, Pet animals, Poultry, and Goats on display. In conclusion the Mauston FFA would like to give out a warm appreciation and would love to see all your smiling faces down at the Court House lawn to give these students a round of applause and to check out some fascinating animals. Come out and Support! Pictured is McKayla Osborne with her horse Bam that will be on display during the FFA farm animal display on Friday.

ICE CREAM SOCIAL

The month of June ended with a Pie and Ice Cream Social at the Juneau County Historical Society's Boorman House in Mauston. The annual event has been a staple in the community for as long as those involved and those who regularly attend it, can remember. The pies were once again baked by the tender loving care of volunteers. As in previous years the event also entertained the ears as much as filled stomachs, music was provided by Doc Logan and his band. In addition to the music there were live demonstrations of the art of the spinning wheel. EVA MARIE WOYWOD PHOTO

Elroy Public Library news BY MARY WAARVIK LIBRARIAN Let the games begin!The Summer Reading Program games, that is. This Thursday, we will start our Lunch

Bunch and Activity times at noon. Bring a lunch, we will provide a drink and a dessert. You can record your times at any time, play Bingo and maybe win prizes.

DONATION Sharon Bingenheimer, from the Double B Bar in Lyndon Station, has donated over $300 to the Carl W. Nelson Animal Shelter (CWNAS). The money was raised through fundraisers held at their establishment. CWNAS president, Deb Flint said “We are very appreciative to Sharon, and all the local businesses that have donated money, materials, or labor to help us with our new building. Without the support of the community we would not be as far as we are.” CWNAS is in the process of converting a 4,500 square foot building into an animal shelter. Pictured here are Sharon Bingenheimer and CWNAS president, Deb Flint.

FIREMEN’S CHICKEN Nothing beats the heat like someone else grilling your meal and then letting the spray of water cool you off. That was the scene this past Saturday at the Mauston Fire Department's Annual Chicken Dinner. Patrons had a choice of either driving thru to pick up their meals or dining in. Those who dined in then had a chance to walk behind St. Patrick's School for some Kids' Games which started at 1:00 p.m. Those games included sprays of water, which for those who participated and those who watched, welcomed the chance to cool off. EVA MARIE WOYWOD PHOTO

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July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Page 13

Fun for everyone at the 116th Elroy Fair BY TASHA MUELLER The 116th Elroy Fair proved to be another successful fair with something fun for everyone. People watched grand champions be crowned, the grandstand shows such as the rodeo, tractor pull and demo derby and enjoyed a few good deep fried vegetables throughout the 116th Elroy Fair. During the opening ceremony, Elroy’s Fairest of the Fair Lacey Morris had to pass along her crown and sash to a deserving lady that has not only been though more fairs than she can remember, but Hana Weber was crowned this year’s Elroy Fairest of the Fair with attendant Allison Kolodzinski. Weber attends Viterbo for nursing and her parents are Kip and Heidi Weber. Hana has been showing at the fair since she was four years old and was looking forward to making many more memories during the four-day fair events. Kolodzinski attends UM-Minnesota for teaching. Her parents are Bill and Beth Kolodzinski. Both girls are 19 years old. Neither had much time to stay in their sashes, as the next morning both had animal entries to be shown and to hand out ribbons. During the weekend, both had the chance to sing the

National Anthem before the grandstand events and even got to judge the mutton buston competition before bull riding. Weber will be in local parades throughout the year and is looking forward to every second of all the opportunities that will come her way. A new midway attraction that caught the eyes of many included walking on water. The owner of “Wowballs” from Dekalb, Illinois brought the company to America from the Philippines. It’s really the first “walk on water” ball company to be seen in the area. How it works is pretty easy. Inflatable balls allow people to get inside and try to balance on a 4,000-gallon pool of water. The attraction has been around for less than five years but it usually catches attention wherever it may be. The activity can be used for any type of event and for any age group. Many describe the experience as spinning around like a hamster on a wheel. The Elroy Fair Board sought more youth activity for this year as that is the main age for attraction towards the rides. The water balls will be hopeful on the list of returns for next year’s fair. Other attractions included

a photo area where people could have their picture taken with a live monkey, plenty of carnival rides and Dusty Trail pony rides. Another new addition to this year’s fair included the hog raffle by Dawson Miller. The raffle, sponsored by the Elroy Fair Board, was held throughout the fair and proceeds were divided between the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Fair Board. Miller wanted to raffle off a hog for his friend Tucker Needham, who has cystic fibrosis. About $9,000 was raised during the fair. Dawson had raised his hog Nubby, who had been donated by Cherney Farms of Wonewoc, and family members sold raffle tickets as part of the project. Dawson wanted to help out along with his friends. His mother thought of the idea to hold a hog raffle. The idea grew into a family project. Ben Brancel, secretary of agriculture, trade and consumer protection, set aside time to meet with Dawson Friday morning during the fair to talk about his experience with raising the hog. Spectators were able to see the hog before the rodeo Saturday night and during the Champion Livestock action as bidders had the chance to enter more raffle tickets.

Newly crowned 2013 Elroy Fairest of the Fair, Hana Weber (left) was revealed during the Elroy Fair’s opening ceremony. Lacey Morris (center) passed down her duties to Weber and Allison Kolodzinski is the Fairest Attendant.

Ben Brancel, Secretary of Agriculture, chats with Dawson Miller about the hog he is raising for his friend Tucker Needham for Cystic Fibrosis. All proceeds went back to the Elroy Fair with half and half for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Horse pullers had the crowd marvel at how much the horses could actually pull. Some exceeded 4200 pounds of weight!

Plenty of destruction was hauled away during the demo derby with three different classes of fun-filled mayhem.

Right after the Juneau County Dairy Breakfast was over, Dawson and Tucker, along with the Fairest of the Fair, Fairest Attendant and the Wisconsin Fairest of the Fair all had the chance to pull the top five raffle tickets. The first place winner, rodeo organizer Gene Baldwin, won half of the hog and $75 toward processing donated by the Meat Market in Baraboo. Secondplace winner Jeffie Sorenson of Hillsboro was awarded the other half of the hog and $25 toward processing. Next year’s Elroy fair is

Carnival rides attracted many eager riders during the nice weather on Sunday. already underway, tentative-

ly set for June 26-29.

A new attraction called “Wowballs” made people actually have the capability to walk on water through inflatable balls.


The Messenger Page 14

of Hillsboro

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

July 11, 2013

The Second Annual Musicale in Hillsboro July 11th CONTRIBUTED BY BOB POTTER The second annual “Musicale” will take place Thursday evening, July 11th at the lakeside gazebo in Hillsboro. The free concert will feature nine performances by local artists who have donated their time and talent to benefit the Hillsboro Public Library. “Folks from Hillsboro and the surrounding area will have an old-fashioned summertime get-together,” according to Bob Potter, one of the event organizers, “Brats and such will be sold by a school parents’ organization, and the Hillsboro Women’s Civic Club will be serving their world-famous homemade pies. Bring your lawn chair, and enjoy the music.” Activities will get underway about 5:00 p.m. when food and drinks will be available and the Lions Club will be selling raffle tickets to benefit the library with music provided by D.J. Jacob

Olson and his sidekick, Trent Clark. This will be the time to stake out your spot for the concert. (Jacob has an excellent sound system, but the park is not Carnegie Hall!) Live performances will kick off at 6:00 p.m. with “Musical Mary” Siefert and her Dixieland band, formed especially for the Musicale. They plan to perform the following lively tunes: “Alabama Jubilee,” “St. James Infirmary,” and “Down by the Riverside.” Next on the program is an allfemale barbershop quartet put together by Paula Parker. It will feature Macey Brown, Abbi Munson, Stephanie Munson, and Maddy Tengblad. The third act, fittingly, will be a trio—Beethoven’s Trio No. 1, to be exact, performed by the trio of Ryan Baldridge, Daniel Ray, and Susanna Ray. This will be followed by Cory Paul singing gospel and country

2012 Musicale

and then fifteen-year-old Leroy Peterson who sounds “just like Johnny Cash,” according to many who heard him perform at the H.O.P.E. Walk in June. Next we will enjoy the duet of Krista Dank and Emily Stanek playing “Canon in D,” a sonata, and “The Entertainer,” followed by Emily singing “All in All,” “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” and a third song yet to be announced. Jori Rafel, part of the Dixieland band that kicked off the show, will return with a special surprise performance of her own. The final musical act of the evening will be the Warner Creek Bluegrass Extravaganza, a lively Hillsboro band that will have their audience on its feet dancing. At 9:00 p.m., before the Warner Creek Bluegrass Extravaganza takes the stage, winners of the Lions raffle will be announced. This year’s grand prizes include a

30-minute areal tour of Hillsboro and its surroundings by Henry Peterson, a signed Green Bay Packers football, a Stihl BG 55 blower donated by Hillsboro Equipment Company, beautiful quilts made by Yvonne Chapman and Vicki Sanders, a baby afghan, a handmade morel mushroom walking stick and Wisconsin Outdoors walking cap donated by the Hillsboro Lions, a Port Authority jacket donated by Royal Bank, and a Mikasa wedding picture frame donated by Friends of the Hillsboro Public Library. Tickets for the grand prize raffle are $2.00 each or three for $5.00 and may be purchased at the Musicale July 11th or at the library before that date. Many other community members have donated prizes for the bucket raffle in progress at the library. Gift certificates from Erwin Ltd. Tax and Accounting, Peterson’s Pharmacy, and Deck’m Automotive, “Golf Necessities”

"Musical Mary" Siefert performing at the 2012 concert

Packers football signed, one of the prizes in the Lions raffle to benefit the library.

Western Tech College list of High Distinction

U-W Whitewater Degrees

The following local residents were named to the Western Technical College President's List of High Distinction for spring semester 2013. These students achieved a grade point average of 3.5 or higher and carried 12 or more credits in an associate's degree or technical diploma program: Jamie Hansbery, Associate of Science, Liberal Arts program student and resident of Hillsboro, WI. Christine Minor, Business Management program student and resident of Hillsboro, WI.

U-W Platteville Chancellor’s list TAUBER AND STERBA WEDDING

Lily Miller, daughter of the bride to be, would like to announce the upcoming wedding of her mommy. Miranda Kaylen Tauber, daughter of Tim and Rhonda Tauber will wed Mica Joseph Sterba, son of Roger and Kathi Sterba, all of Hillsboro. Miranda and Mica both attend Western Technical College in LaCrosse with anticipated graduation in April of 2014. Miranda studies Business Management while Mica is in the Diesel and Heavy Equipment program. The couple will be exchanging vows later this month with their reception and a dance to follow.

baskets by Ben Franklin, and prizes from Farmers Bank, the Hillsboro Lions, Friends of the Hillsboro Library and others are on display at the library. Bucket raffle tickets are $1.00 each and may be purchased at the Musicale July 11th or at the library before that date. Proceeds from the Lions raffle and freewill donations at the Musicale will be used to support programs of the Hillsboro Public Library, such as the “Hot Reads for Cold Nights” and “Summer Reading” programs and the DropIn, as well as furniture for the impending expansion of the library and other amenities that may not be covered by the library’s regular budget. Bring a lawn chair, a good appetite, and a smile to the Hillsboro lakeside gazebo Thursday evening, July 11th! Be prepared to enjoy a great free concert with your friends and neighbors.

University of Wisconsin-Platteville announced its 2013 spring semester Chancellor's List. Students receive this academic status by earning a 4.0 grade point average during the semester. Attainment of the Chancellor's List represents the high academic achievement at UW-Platteville. Emily Stanek, a Ornamental Horticulture major from Hillsboro, WI Antonina Welke, a Fine Arts BA major from Hillsboro, WI UW-Platteville, founded in 1846, is located in the southwestern corner of Wisconsin, near the Iowa and Illinois borders. The University, the fastest-growing four-year school in the 13-college University of Wisconsin System, enrolls approximately 7,500 undergraduate students.

The following local student received degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater this spring. Zachary Zeman, from Hillsboro, Wis., who graduated with a bachelor's of science degree in public policy and administration. Students and their friends and families celebrated their achievements at commencement ceremonies on Saturday, May 18, held in UW-Whitewater's Kachel Fieldhouse. The university awarded a total of 1,477 degrees to students from the College of Business and Economics, the College of Letters and Sciences, the College of Education and Professional Studies, the College of Arts and Communication and the School of Graduate Studies and Continuing Education. Students who graduate cum laude had a grade point average of 3.4 to 3.59. Magna cum laude students had a great point average of 3.6 – 3.84. Summa cum laude students had a grade point average of 3.85 and above.

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July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Page 15

Hillsboro sees first of many resignations BY TASHA MUELLER With a long agenda for Monday night’s Hillsboro School Board meeting, the district has seen its first of many resignations that will be happening in upcoming months. Over 140 years of teaching experience will be spanned over the next few months with a total of roughly 11 retirements and resignations coming. The first of four includes Arlene Daines, Title 1 Paraprofessional whom has been with the district for 25 years. Second, Kathy Redington, a Special Education Paraprofessional will be leaving behind 18 years of dedication. First grade teacher Brittany Olson, has been with Hillsboro for the past three years and will be relocating. And the fourth resignation includes school nurse Rhonda Peterson, as she has been with the district for 11 years. A school nursing service contract with St. Joseph’s Gunderson Health Services will be issued with a contract agreement for one individual to be contracted with the district for the 2013-2014 school year. The contract will be 25 hours per week for 178 student contact days. The district would be able to save on costs going this route rather than hiring a separate nurse. The nurse would be avail-

able from 9 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. The board tabled the decision of hiring a first grade teacher since internal movements will be made to the elementary staffing. Current first grade teacher Lori Cherf will be moving to the Title 1 Reading Teacher position and will have stipulations after a one year evaluation a her discretion. The board hired moved Karla Frederick into the fifth grade teacher position after being the districts Title 1 Reading and Math teacher. The board also hired Kelly Krueger at no less that 62.5 percent of the districts pay, which will be determined after final counts of staffing in the district. The elementary will be seeing improvements to the 4K classroom with an accepted bid from Wipf’s Flooring to remove the tattered carpet and put in VET title in the classroom. Additional improvements will be made at a later date. The elementary playground will be seeing new landscaping improvements after accepting a bid from Greg’s New Leaf Landscaping to repair the south side playground. Accepted bid for milk included Prairie Farms for the upcoming school year and for bread with Sara Lee, as County Market was unable to offer another kind of bread the district needed. The primary food service vendor has been decided on Sysco, with secondary being Reinhart.

Vehicle leaves road and hit travel trailer Sheriff John B. Spears reports a crash on July 8, 2013 at approximately 2:57 p.m. in the Village of Stoddard at end of Lake Road. The crash occurred when a pick-up driven by John L. Kellogg, age 79, of Stoddard, WI lost control of his vehicle and struck a bumper hitch travel trailer. Betty J. Hobelsberger, age 68, of Lacrosse WI was inside the trailer and suffered minor injuries. Kellogg was having a medical episode at the time of the crash. Kellogg was transported to Gunderson Health System by Tri-State Ambulance. Kellogg was wearing his seatbelt at the time of the crash. Assisting at the scene was the Stoddard Fire Department, Stoddard First Responders and Tri-State Ambulance Service. The accident remains under investigation by the Vernon County Sheriff’s Department.

A STAR Assessment program will be used for the next school year as the district found MAP testing too difficult for a few of the grades partaking in the testing. The new program will meet with the SLD (Specific Learning Disabilities) law changes. Less class time will be lost and the progress will be bettered monitored. New changes to the 6-12 student handbook included the attendance policy, tardiness and dress code after a committee was able to make the needed changes accurately. The board authorized a plan that will utilize some of the fund balance monies towards a preliminary financing play on a $1.5 million QZAB funding. The plan would have $2.5 million available for projects under the energy exemption project that will be upcoming this school year. The board agreed to take $120,000 from the fund balance that will allow the tax impact to be very small for taxpayers in the district. A special meeting to award Performance Contract for upcoming energy efficiency project will be held on Monday, July 22 at 6:30 p.m. The next regular meeting will be Monday, August 12 at 7 p.m.

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Frederick faces Class II Felony Drug charges Vernon County Sheriff John B. Spears reports the arrest of a 40 year old Cashton woman on four counts of Possession of schedule II controlled substances, stemming from an investigation into missing Fentanyl patches from an area nursing home. Dawn L. Frederick, age 40 of Cashton was arrested on July 5th 2013 following an investigation into reports of missing Fentanyl patches from the Vernon Manor Nursing Home in Viroqua Wisconsin. Under Wisconsin statute 961.41 (3a)(am)

Possession of schedule II controlled substance, is a class I felony. During an interview with Vernon County Investigator Mathew Sutton, Dawn Frederick admitted to taking four Fentanyl patches. Frederick had a partial patch in her possession at the time of her arrest. The theft of the Fentanyl patches occurred while Frederick was employed as the Certified Dietary Manager at Vernon Manor. Frederick will appeared in court on Monday July 8, 2013.

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Motorcycle accident Sheriff John B. Spears reports a single motorcycle accident with one injury that occurred on Maple Dale Road of the Town of Viroqua. The accident occurred on July 6, 2013 at approximately 9:20 p.m. The accident happened when the operator Erin Tindell, age 26, from Chaseburg lost control of her motorcycle; herself and husband Kory Tindell, age 30, struck a guardrail.

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Kory Tindell sustained a non-life threatening injury and was transported by Tri-State ambulance to Vernon Memorial Hospital. Neither of the individuals was wearing a helmet. Assisting at the scene was the Viroqua Fire Department. The accident remains under investigation by the Vernon County Sheriff’s Office.

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Car Crash on State Hwy 71 Monroe County Sheriff Peter Quirin reports a two vehicle crash that resulted in injuries to two parties. The crash occurred at about 11:03 a.m on July 8, 2013 on State Highway 71, .1 mile West of State Highway 131 in the Township of Wilton. One of the vehicles involved is a 2005 Chevy Silverado C1500, driven by Jamie L. Pfaff (age 21) of Melrose, WI, was eastbound on State Highway 71. The vehicle Jamie was driving crossed the centerline of the road and collided with a 2003 Chrysler Town and Country Van, driven by Yvonne L. Pratt (age 22) of Norwalk, WI who was westbound. Both drivers were transported to the Tomah Memorial Hospital, with non-life threatening injuries. The passengers in the Pratt vehicle were not injured and all parties were wearing seat belts at the time of the crash. Assisting the Sheriff’s Department at the scene were the Wilton Fire Department, the Wilton Area Ambulance Service, the Monroe County 9-1-1 center, and the Wisconsin State Patrol. The crash remains under investigation by the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department.

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The Messenger Page 16

of LaValle

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

July 11, 2013

Adjutant General Visits Douglas Legacy Farm BY BEV VAILLANCOURT It’s not often that a Black Hawk helicopter lands in one of Wisconsin’s farm fields, but that’s exactly what happened last Tuesday at the Douglas Legacy Farm on Douglas Road in La Valle. The planned landing brought General Dunbar, the Adjutant General for the state of Wisconsin, his staff, and members of the Yellow Ribbon family support unit to the farm for a two-hour visit. The Douglas Legacy Farm serves as home for the Veterans Equine Trail Service (V.E.T.S), a free program serving veterans and their families. General Dunbar had heard about the V.E.T.S. program’s work with disabled veterans and decided to learn more about it by personally visiting the farm and sharing its work with the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program, a special program that assists service members and their families of the National Guard.

About forty people, including several area veterans, were at the farm to greet General Dunbar. The visitors spent two hours touring the farm and meeting the horses that work with veterans. General Dunbar took a special interest in talking with veterans and learning how horses can help veterans deal with PTSD and other disabilities. Everyone enjoyed lunch provided by a youth ministry from St. Paul’s Church in Baraboo. In all, it was a very special time for veterans at the Douglas Legacy Farm. The Veterans Equine Trail Service is an all-volunteer program that provides quality time for veterans with some very special Morgan horses. V.E.T.S. is a non-profit under the umbrella of the Greater Sauk County Community Foundation. Its services are supported entirely by donations from veterans groups, local churches and service groups, and

private individuals. Individuals can learn more about Veterans Equine Trail Services by contacting Barb Knopf at 608-393-6315. Please feel free to visit our website at www.veteransequinetrailservices.org. V.E.T.S. has an arena building field day Saturday July 13 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. We will be building our outdoor 100X150 foot driving arena. This arena will be a huge part of our services to our disabled veterans who can not ride due to limited mobility, but we can teach them to drive our Morgan horses and have the thrill of real horse power. All kinds of help will be needed, many hands will make fast and light work. If you can come lend a hand for the day or an hour please call Barbara at 608 985-8886 and leave a message.

In the Loop... With the Friends of the LaValle Library It's the Fourth of July - Independence Day. To many Americans this means a day to get together with families and friends, eat, play, talk and watch fireworks. It means all of that to me as well. But more importantly, our Independence is based on the fact that Freedom isn't Free. Our ancestors stood against adversity and paid a high price for it. Therefore, it follows that we all have the responsibility to speak our minds, stand our ground, and work for those things that are important to us. To do less than that is to waste the gifts and liberty we enjoy. This is what is happening soon at the LaValle Library.

Saturday, July 6th - Downtown LaValle was overflowing with Fireworks Watchers. The Friends had a booth selling souvenirs. Thursday, July 11th at 4:30 pm - Summer Library program - Let's Go Caving! This program is an introduction to the fun and adventure of exploring caves in our area. Speaker: Gwen Herrewig Thursday, July 11th at 7pm - Friends Monthly Meeting. If you appreciate the LaValle Library, we would appreciate your ideas and help to make it great! Thursday, July 18th at 4:30 - Summer Library Program - Yoga for Kids! Get your stretch on! Great for kids of all ages.

Saturday, July 20th at 8am - Library Board meeting Saturday, July 20th - Scrapbooker & Cardmaker Festival and Potluck. If you've ever wanted to try out the gadgets in a fun and friendly place, this event will be for you! Adults only, please. Come and go as you wish, or bring a dish to pass and plan to stay through lunch! Any questions, please call the LaValle Librarian. Tuesday, July 23rd at 6pm: On Safari: Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Dorothy Thompson of UW Richland will share photos and stories of her travels to Africa.

As always, to get in contact with the La Valle Library is easy. Email us at lavallelibrary@mwt.net; Our Website is www.lavallelibrary.com and you can call us at 985READ! You can find us on Facebook as “Friends of the LaValle Library” or “LaValle Public Library”. You can also follow us on Twitter! The La Valle Library is Monday thru Thursday from 3-7 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 til noon. I guess that's all I know for now! Pegg Conderman Proud Friend of the LaValle Library Our Mission: To Enrich Lives, Promote Learning and Connect Community


The Messenger July 11, 2013

of Wonewoc

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Page 17

The Informals win main stage at the Battle of the Bands BY TASHA MUELLER Wonewoc is a community striving to bring people to it’s downtown area, located on the 400 State Trail, it has a charm about it. This last weekend was just one example of how the local businesses work to bring people out to celebrate it’s charm. The Battle of the Bands kicked off the 4th of July celebration with the Informals taking the winners spot.The Informals put on a show no one could contend with during

the first Wonewoc Street Dance Battle of the Bands on Saturday, June 29. The Wonewoc Mainstreet Merchants Association sponsored the contest and the band won the grand prize of $500. Three other bands were included in the contest during the fun evening; Cinderbrick, Gideon’s Radio, and Every Second Counts. The W.M.M.A. hopes to put this event on again for next year as it allows local bands the capability to get their names out there and let their music be heard.

Gideon’s Radio put on a rockin’ good show during their appearance in the Battle of the Bands. The group is from the La Crosse area and put on a good flare singing with older song selections. A young group from Platteville, Every Second Counts, was new to the area and could definitely sing during the twostage battle.

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Sunday, July 14 • NOON to 3:00PM The Informals: Winners include Derek Olson (left), Lucas Burch (center) and Kyle Golinski (right).

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Runick Metal Recycling, Inc. Processing All Types of Scrap W9794 HWY. 33 Wonewoc, WI 53968 Local: (608) 464-5552 Toll Free: (888) 464-5552 Fax: (608) 464-5517 Gideon’s Radio

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Cover to Cover Summer Reading Dates Changed By KIM DEARTH Are your kids looking for new ways to beat the heat? Just in time to stave off mid-summer boredom and to celebrate our own digging/construction project, the Wonewoc Public Library is ready to kick off this summer’s reading program, “Dig Into Reading.” Due to a scheduling conflict, the start date has been pushed back to July 16. The program will run each Tuesday through August 20, with children ages 4-6 and 10-12 meeting from 1-2 p.m. and children ages 7-9 meeting from 2:30-3:30 p.m. Also please note that due to construction, the sessions on July 16 and 30, and August 6 and 13 will be held at the Wonewoc-Center School Library. Please enter through the doors that lead directly from the parking lot into the school library. The July 23 session, featuring storyteller Tracy Chipman sharing her Earth Tales for Everyone, will be a joint session for all age groups beginning at 2 p.m. and will be held at the Wonewoc Public Library. Finally, our last meeting on August 20 will be held at the park—more information will be handed out at a later date.

Although some of our summer reading will be held offsite, the library remains open during construction so be sure to stop by to check out books, movies and CDs all summer long. Also, adults and teens, stop by once a week to participate in your own summer reading program. For every book you read, drop your name in the jar for our weekly prize drawings. Kids can also participate in the weekly vegetable guessing game, as well as the “Find the Hidden Garden Gnome” game. In addition, families are invited to stop by any time to have their picture taken in our life-size garden gnome cutout! Stay cool, and see you at the library! Kim Dearth is Library Director of the Wonewoc Public Library.

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The BAR(n) Friday, July 12 @ 8pm Dan Sebranek (Mr. Acoustic) Light rock & country. Stellar musician w/ a golden voice.

Saturday, July 20 ‘88 Class Reunion Hillsboro Class of 1988 with a DJ

Saturday, July 27 Muddy Flats & the Hepcats Light rock & country. come see the rubber fish! S 480 Oregano Rd • Ontario, WI 54651

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Page 18

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY - CLASSIFIED ADS

July 11, 2013

The Messenger of Juneau County’s want ads are just $10 for the first 20 words. Additional words are 10 cents each. To place an ad, call 1-(608)-462-4902, fax to 1-(608)-462-4903 or email to: themessenger@centurytel.net. We reserve the right to reject any ad that does not meet our standards.

APARTMENTS

APARTMENTS

FOR SALE

NEW LISBON: 1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Includes heat, stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer, dryer and garage. Located on Allen Road, New Lisbon. Call Real Estate Management 608-356-5050 or go to www.realestate managementsolutionsllc.com b1tf

ELROY: Nice 2 bedroom upper. Good location. Stove/refrigerator furnished. Rent + utilities, security deposit and references. No pets/smoking. $340/month. 462-5892. b49tf

LAND: Land For Sale, 6.75 Acres located on WW to Farra Road. Beautiful view, Motivated Seller. Contact Steve Hofmeister at 608553-1415 or 608-489-2441. b49-4

FOR RENT: ELROY 2 bedroom apartment $325, 2 bedroom house $425. References, security deposit required. No pets. Call 608462-5595. b19tf NEW LISBON: 1 bedroom, 1 bath. City of New Lisbon. Washing facilities on site. Includes sewer and water. $425.00/per month with $425.00 security deposit. Please call 608-847-3747 or 608-547-2326. b36tf MAUSTON: 1 1/2 bedroom, second floor. Downtown. Includes heat, refrigerator, stove, washer & dryer. NO PETS. Rent $525, Security deposit $525. 1 year lease. 608-853-1396 or 608-562-3577. b45tf HILLSBORO: 2 bedroom rent based on 30% of income. Private entry, storage. On site laundry. Call TODAY 608-489-3258. Equal Housing Opportunity. b47tf ELROY: 2 or 3 bedroom upper. Rent based on 30% of income. On site laundry, edge of town, private entry, storage. Call 608-462-5300. Equal Housing Opportunity. b48tf NEW LISBON: 1 bedroom starting at $416/mo. On site laundry. Call Mel today at 1800-944-4866 Ext. 126. Equal Housing Opportunity. b48tf

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• HEAT, Water, Sewer, Trash included • Appliance package • Washer/Dryer hookup Call today for your personal tour 608-695-5826 riverwood@ premier-real-estate.com Professionally Managed by: Premier Real Estate Mgt. LLC. Equal Housing Opportunity www.premierremgmt.com b49tf NEW LISBON: Available in July Lower One bedroom apartment, Stove, ref, off street parking included. Reasonable rent, security deposit required. Call 605562-3459 b49-2

HOUSES FOR RENT MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT: 2 bedroom mobile homes available in Mauston area. References and Security Deposit Required. Call 608-847-6159. b1tf ELROY: House for rent on Academy Street in Elroy. 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, garage and separate workshop area. $400.00 per month plus security deposit. References required. Available July 1, 2013. (608) 462-5066. b48tf FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house with detached garage on Mauston’s west side. $600 per month, no pets. Call Dennis at 548-5129. b48-2

SERVICES Computer Repair. Contact Dave Heilman 608-4637646 or email: dheilman@centurytel.net. New and refurbished computers in stock. I make house calls! b1tf

FOR SALE FOR SALE: 1998 Dodge Dakota SLT w/134k,4x4; tow pkg, PL/PW, am/fm CD/auto tran, AC, cruise, tilt, bed liner & cap, 2nd vehicle owner, w/maint records, $3200 OBO. 608-547-0024 b48 FOR SALE BY BID: 1995 Nisan pickup Truck for parts. Motor runs. Can be seen at 901 Martin Street, Mauston, WI. Send bids to PO Box 119, Mauston, WI 53948 with your name, address and phone number where to contact you. b49-2 FOR SALE: Cushman utility vehicle used by Milwaukee Police Dept. All steel body, carburetor rebuilt and tuned up last year. $1,500 OBO. Honda Helix 250 CC belt driven, goes 70 mph, gets 80 miles to the gallon, $1,300 OBO. Russian SKS used by Russian military, bayonet attached, perfect condition, $395 OBO. 608-847-5902. b49 BUILDING LOT: on Truman Street in city of New Lisbon. .85 acres. All utilities available. $15,000. Call 352-552-0897 b49

Employment

Easy to-read Classified ads … and they cost just $10 for 20 words.

HELP WANTED: We are currently hiring a Driver to run various errands. This is an “on call” position and experience driving a pickup truck as well as a straight truck is needed. Please apply in person at 113 Railroad St., Elroy, WI 53929 or call (608) 4625066. Equal Opportunity Employer. b41tf HELP WANTED: Maintenance person needed in New Lisbon and Necedah- 15-20hr/wk basic apartment maintenance, plumbing, painting, light electrical, lawn care. Must have own tools. Contact Ryan at 608-784-2935 Ext 123 or rcallender@horizonmanagement.net b49-2 CLASS A DRIVERS: Regional 7/10 out OTR 12/14 out. Dedicated 18/21 out. Full benefits after 90 days. Take truck home. David 320-630-8180. b49-2

Resident Caregiver Part Time Evergreen Manor (CBRF) is currently accepting applications. Will train the right person. Pre-employment drug screen & background check required. To apply pick up an application at: W5205 Buckeye Drive Necedah, WI OR call 608-565-2522

BUS DRIVER WONEWOC HEAD START 23-25 hrs/wk, $10.41-$11.49/hr, Mon-Thurs, 3 runs/day, team meeting Fridays 2 hrs, 9 ½ mth program yr. Driving Head Start children in a mini-bus with automatic transmission; Must have a School Bus Driver's License or obtain one and have a clean driving record for the past 3 years, all paid by agency Please visit our website, www.renewalunlimited.net for an application or call (608) 742-5329. An EEO/AA Employer.

To Place an Ad Call

462-4902 or e-mail themessenger @centurytel.net

OPEN HOUSE Barry and Beth Donovan 878 Klondike Ave. in Hillsboro Hours: 4pm-8pm on Saturday 7/13 11am-3pm on Sunday 7/14 Email donovan@mwt.net or call Barry at 606-1277 for pictures and details. Raised Ranch, 2800 sq. ft of finished space, 4 bedroom/ 2 bath, 24’ x 32’ insulated & sheet rocked garage with stand-up attic storage, 2 fireplaces/ hot tub/ huge corner lot. Great neighborhood only 1 block from school/city park.

Price: $179,900 Flooring Allowance at closing (could be used as down payment) Stainless Steel appliances negotiable All viewers welcome, even if you are just curious about Hillsboro Homes!!!!!!!

Garage Sales MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE: 220 Welch Prairie Road, New Lisbon. The storage box across from the cemetery. Friday and Saturday, July 12 and 13. b49 DEISINGER RESIDENCE: 304 South Main St., New Lisbon. Friday 7/12, 8-5 and Saturday 7/13, 8-1. TV, some stands, household items, Rock Band Play Station, Christmas items, movies, women/boys/girls clothes, and much misc. b49

Certified Chef Milestone Senior Living currently has an opening for a personable and dedicated individual to create, prepare and serve nutritious and delicious meals for our tenants and residents who reside within 24 senior apartments and 16 unit Memory Care community. Duties include: food purchasing, planning, preparation, cooking and serving of food. A person should have excellent cooking/culinary skills, the ability to work independently, and be customer focused while catering to our group of older adults. The ability to communicate well with others, read and interpret recipes and follow directions will be necessary. Must have thorough knowledge of: food safety, sanitation, and nutrition along with either a Culinary Arts degree or 7 years experience working within the industry. This is a full time position. Stop by or send your resume to:

Milestone Senior Living

Attn: Bobbi Richardson RN 504 Salsbery Circle • Hillsboro, WI 54634 EOE

HELP WANTED - SERVICE ADVISOR Necessary qualifications: • General mechanical knowledge • General computer skills • Ability to Work in a Team Oriented Environment • High Ethical Standards • Excellent Communication Skills • Friendly Personality

• • • • •

Disciplined Clean driving record Non smoker Highly Organized Hours are from 7 to 5, Monday through Friday or as necessary

We are a smoke free company, offer competitive wages and benefits, plus the opportunity to work with the nicest and best people in the business! Men and women are equally encouraged to apply.

Rudig Jensen Ford Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram “Where Community Really Does Count!”

Call Mark Rudig or Bobbi Southworth for an appointment at 608-562-3100 or email resume to mark@rudigjensen.com or bobbi@rudigjensen.com


July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY - NOTICES

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY THE NECEDAH BANK, Plaintiff, vs. Defendants. BRIAN W. THOMAS GRACE A. THOMAS (f/k/a GRACE A. UKSAS) d/b/a THOMAS AUTO CLINIC SOUND GARDEN STATE OF WISCONSINDEPARTMENT OF REVENUE PAYLESS TIRE & EXHAUST, INC. Case No. 10-CV-101 Tax ID No. 29161563.3 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on April 19, 2010, in the amount of $116,257.25, the Sheriff or his assignee will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at 10:00 o’clock AM TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts Office at the time of the sale in cash, cashier’s check, money order, or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts Office. Personal checks cannot and will not be accepted. The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts Office in cash, cashier’s check, money order, or certified funds, no later than ten

days after the Court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is”, is not available for viewing, and subject to all liens, encumbrances, and unpaid real estate taxes. PLACE: Juneau County Justice Center, 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Parcel One (1) of Juneau County Certified Survey Map No. 2434, recorded in Volume 9 of C.S.M., Page 186, being a part of Lot One (1) of Juneau County Certified Survey Map No. 1473, recorded in Volume 5 of C.S.M., Page 250; being located in the NE 1/4 NW 1/4 and the NW 1/4 NE 1/4 of Section 13, Township 18 North, Range 3 East, Village of Necedah, Juneau County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1811 North Main Street, Necedah, Wisconsin Dated this 4th day of June, 2013. /s/Brent Oleson Sheriff of Juneau County ATTORNEY INFORMATION: Attorney Thomas J. Casey Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton, S.C. 111 Oak Street, P.O. Box 140 Mauston, Wisconsin 53948-0140 (608) 847-7363 Sales are subject to cancellation at any time without notice. Publish: June 20, 27, 2013 July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY THE NECEDAH BANK, Plaintiff, vs. Defendants. BRIAN W. THOMAS and GRACE A. THOMAS f/k/a Grace A. Uksas, and STATE OF WISCONSIN, Case No. 10-CV-150 Tax ID No. 29161151.012; 29161151.006 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that, by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on May 25, 2010, in the amount of $52,594.94, the Sheriff, or his assignee, will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, July 16, 2013, at 10:05 o’clock A.M. TERMS:Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts Office at the time of the sale in cash, cashier’s check, money order, or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts Office. Personal checks cannot and will not be accepted. The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts Office in cash, cashier’s check, money order, or certified funds, no later than ten

days after the Court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is”, is not available for viewing, and subject to all liens, encumbrances and unpaid real estate taxes. PLACE: Juneau County Justice Center, 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Lot 6 of Assessors Plat #3, Village of Necedah, Juneau County, Wisconsin. Also Lot One (1), Block Two (2) of Kingston’s Addition to the Village of Necedah, per recorded plat thereof, now know as Lot Three (3) of Assessor’s Plat No. Three (3). PROPERTY ADDRESS: 602 Winker Street, Necedah, Wisconsin 54646. Dated this 4th day of June, 2013. /s/ Brent Oleson Brent Oleson, Sheriff of Juneau County ATTORNEY INFORMATION: Attorney Thomas J. Casey Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton, S.C. 111 Oak Street, Post Office Box 140 Mauston, Wisconsin 53948-0140 (608) 847-7363 Sales are subject to cancellation at any time without notice. Publish: June 20, 27, 2013 July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. Defendants. DAVID J. SAUNDERS and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of David J. Saunders; and STACEY L. SAUNDERS and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Stacey L. Saunders; and JUNEAU COUNTY; and THE NECEDAH BANK; Case No. 12-CV-312 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 17, 2012, in the amount of $128,871.30, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 23, 2013, at 10:20 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. Lobby of PLACE: the Juneau County Justice Center, located at 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in the STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; Plaintiff, vs. Defendants. DANIELLE BOLES and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Danielle Boles; Case No. 12-CV-174 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on January 14, 2013, in the amount of $172,671.54, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME:July 23, 2013, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Lobby of the Juneau County Justice Center, located at 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin

Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4 NW 1/4) of Section Twelve (12), Township Seventeen (17) North, Range Three (3) East, Town of Clearfield, Juneau County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of said Section 12; thence S0̊ 27' East, 33.00 feet to the South R/W line of a Town Road; thence S89̊ 52' East along said R/W line 1020.53 feet to the point of beginning; thence continuing S89̊ 52' East along said R/W line, 100.00 feet; thence S0̊ 80' West, 660.00 feet; thence N89̊ 52' West 100.00 feet; thence N0̊ 08' East, 660.00 feet to the point of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: W6427 30th Street, Town of Clearfield. TAX KEY NO.:290040420 /s/Brent Oleson Sheriff of Juneau County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue, Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt. Publish: June 27, 2013 July 11, 18, 2013 WNAXLP

DESCRIPTION: LOT 1 OF JUNEAU COUNTY CERTIFIED SURVEY MAP NO. 2796 RECORDED IN VOLUME 11 OF CSM PAGE 85 BEING A PART OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 15 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST, ALSO BEING A PART OF CERTIFIED SURVEY MAP NO. 1143 RECORDED IN VOLUME 4 OF CSM PAGE 264; LOCATED IN THE TOWN OF LEMONWEIR, JUNEAU COUNTY, WISCONSIN. PROPERTY ADDRESS: N2852 Cassidy Road, Town of Lemonweir. TAX KEY NO.:290181111.1 /s/Brent Oleson Juneau County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue, Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt. Publish: June 27, 2013 July 11, 18, 2013 WNAXLP

County Legals. Juneau County’s official legal newspaper. LEGALS ARE DUE BY NOON ON MONDAY. e-mail to themessenger@centurytel.net

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY BANK OF MAUSTON, a Wisconsin Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, Foreclosure of Mortgage 30404 vs. Defendants. JEFFREY L. HANSON, SR., a/k/a JEFFREY L. HANSON, SUE A. HANSON, OAKDALE CREDIT UNION and UW MEDICAL FOUNDATION, INC., Case No. 13-CV-60 Foreclosure of Mortgage 30404 Tax ID Nos. 292510539; 292510540; 292511560 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that, by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on June 5, 2013, in the amount of $189,788.19, the Sheriff, or his assignee, will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 at 10:15 o’clock A.M. TERMS:Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts Office at the time of the sale in cash, cashier’s check, money order, or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts Office. Personal checks cannot and will not be accepted. The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts Office in cash, cashier’s check, money order, or certified funds, no later than ten days after the Court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is”, is not available for viewing, and subject to all liens, encumbrances and unpaid real estate taxes. PLACE: Juneau County Justice Center, 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Lots 2 and 3 of Block 1 of Edward’s Addition to the City of Mauston, Juneau County, Wisconsin (137 W. Milwaukee Street); Lot 4 and the West One-Half STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Notice Setting Time to Hear Application and Deadline for Filing Claims (Informal Administration) IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: Elaine B. Lorenz Case No. 13PR54 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An application for Informal Administration was filed. The decedent, with date of birth August 25, 1920 and date of death May 31, 2013, was domiciled in Juneau County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of W5593 Cherokee Lane, New Lisbon, WI 53950. The application will be heard at the Juneau County Courthouse, Mauston, Wisconsin, Room 2300, before Diane Mortensen, Probate Registrar, on July 29, 2013 at 1:00 p.m.

Page 19 of Lots 5, 6 and 7 of Block 1, of Edward’s Addition to the City of Mauston, Juneau County, Wisconsin (136 Wisconsin Street); and The Western 55 feet of a part of the NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 12, Township 15 North, Range 3 East, described as follows: Commencing at a point 275 and 6 inches North of the Southeast corner of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 12, in the center of the highway, thence West 19 rods and 6 feet; thence North at right angles 66 feet and 8 inches; thence East 19 rods and 6 feet to the center of said highway; and thence South along the center of said highway 66 feet and 8 inches to the place of beginning; and A part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 12, Township 15 North, Range 3 East, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of Lot 1, Block 1, of Edward’s Addition to the City of Mauston, thence in a direct line South 49.5 feet, thence at right angles in a direct line East 55 feet; thence at right angles in a direct line North 49.5 feet, thence at right angles in a direct line West 55 feet to the place of beginning, intending to convey the West 55 feet of that parcel of land described in Warranty Deed recorded in Volume 119 of Deeds on Page 619, City of Mauston, Juneau County, Wisconsin (112 Wisconsin Street). PROPERTY ADDRESS: 137 W. Milwaukee Street, 136 Wisconsin Street and 112 Wisconsin Street, Mauston, Wisconsin 53948 Dated this 12th day of June, 2013 /s/Brent Oleson, Sheriff of Juneau County Attorney Thomas J. Casey Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton, S.C. 111 Oak Street, Post Office Box 140 Mauston, Wisconsin 53948-0140 (608) 847-7363 Sales are subject to cancellation at any time without notice. Publish: June 27, 2013 July 11, 18, 2013 WNAXLP You do not need to appear unless you object. The application may be granted if there is no objection. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is October 4, 2013. A claim may be filed at the Juneau County Courthouse, Mauston, Wisconsin, Room 2300. This publication is notice to any persons whose name or address are unknown. /s/Diane Mortensen Probate Registrar Dated: June 25, 2013 Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton S.C. William T. Curran State Bar No. 1016520 111 Oak Street P.O.Box 140 Mauston, WI 53948 608-847-7363 Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP


Page 20

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY - NOTICES

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Defendants. DANIEL J. MANCINI and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Daniel J. Mancini, Case No. 12-CV-337 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 19, 2013, in the amount of $92,415.06, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 30, 2013, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS:1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate

Transfer Tax. PLACE: Lobby of the Juneau County Justice Center, located at 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: The North 132 Feet of the South 297 feet of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 30, Township 19 North, Range 4 East, Town of Armenia, Juneau County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: N12417 County Road G, Town of Armenia. TAX KEYNO.: 290020631.2 /s/Brent Oleson Sheriff of Juneau County O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue, Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt. Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Notice Setting Time to Hear Application and Deadline for Filing Claims (Informal Administration) IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE: Stephen C. Hopper Case No. 13PR53 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An application for Informal Administration was filed. The decedent, with date of birth September 1, 1949 and date of death May 27, 2013, was domiciled in Juneau County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of N2681 Franke Road, Mauston, WI 53948 The application will be heard at the Juneau County Courthouse, Mauston, Wisconsin, Room 2300, before Diane Mortensen, Probate Registrar, on July 29, 2013 at 1:00 p.m.

You do not need to appear unless you object. The application may be granted if there is no objection. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is October 11, 2013. A claim may be filed at the Juneau County Courthouse, Mauston, Wisconsin, Room 2300. This publication is notice to any persons whose name or address are unknown. /s/Diane Mortensen Probate Registrar Dated: June 25, 2013 Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton S.C. Catherine C. Orton State Bar No. 1014941 111Oak Street P.O.Box 140 Mauston, WI 53948 608-847-7363 Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff vs Defendant(s) BERNADETTE K. ARNOLD, et al. Case No: 11 CV 321 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 14, 2012 in the amount of $172,362.80 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 6, 2013 at 10:10 AM TERMS: By bidding at the sheriff sale, prospective buyer is consenting to be bound by the following terms: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold "as is" and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3.) Plaintiff opens bidding on the property, either in person or via fax and as recited by the sheriff department in the event that no opening bid is offered, plaintiff retains the right to request the sale be declared as invalid as the

sale is fatally defective. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. PLACE: in the main lobby of Juneau County Justice Center located at 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Lot 9, Harmonisle Addition to the City of Mauston, Juneau County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 110 West Monroe Street, Mauston, WI 53948 TAX KEY NO.: 292510677 Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. /s/Brent Oelson Sheriff of Juneau County Scott D. Nabke Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1037979 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditor's attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff vs Defendant(s) ESTATE OF ARLENE J. MARTIN, et al. Case No: 12 CV 273 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 10, 2013 in the amount of $75,964.36 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 13, 2013 at 10:00 AM TERMS: By bidding at the sheriff sale, prospective buyer is consenting to be bound by the following terms: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold "as is" and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3.) Plaintiff opens bidding on the property, either in person or via fax and as recited by the sheriff department in the

event that no opening bid is offered, plaintiff retains the right to request the sale be declared as invalid as the sale is fatally defective. PLACE: in the main lobby of Juneau County Justice Center located at 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: The North 21 feet and 4 inches of Lot 2 and the South 21 feet and 4 inches of Lot 1, Block 5, Boorman`s Addition to the City of Mauston, Juneau County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 425 North Union Street, Mauston, WI 53948 TAX KEY NO.: 29251-0330 Dated this 11th day of June, 2013. /s/Brent Oleson Juneau County Sheriff Dustin A. McMahon Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1086857 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditor's attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Bank of America, N.A. Plaintiff vs Defendant(s) JEFFREY A. MARTIN, et al. Case No: 12 CV 145 NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 14, 2012 in the amount of $109,053.20 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 6, 2013 at 10:05 AM TERMS: By bidding at the sheriff sale, prospective buyer is consenting to be bound by the following terms: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold "as is" and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3.) Plaintiff opens bidding on the property, either in person or via fax and as recited by the sheriff department in the event that no opening bid is offered, plaintiff retains the right to request the sale be declared as invalid as the sale is fatally defective. PLACE: in the main lobby of Juneau County Justice Center located at 200 Oak Street, Mauston, Wisconsin

DESCRIPTION: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 1 OF HEATH`S SOUTH SIDE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MAUSTON, JUNEAU COUNTY, WISCONSIN, EXCEPT THAT PART DESCRIBED AS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE EAST LINE 10.84 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 5; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE 50.16 FEET; THENCE N886`-55W, 3.13 FEET; THENCE N1-46`-55E, 50.15 FEET; AND THENCE S888`-30E, 2.44 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 115 Grayside Avenue, Mauston, WI 53948 TAX KEY NO.: 292510718 Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. /s/ Brent Oleson Sheriff of Juneau County Scott D. Nabke Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1037979 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditor's attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: Ferdinand S. Aramovich Case No. 11PR42 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An application for informal administration was filed. The decedent, with date of birth May 30, 1930 and date of death December 31, 2009, was domiciled in Winnebago County, State of Illinois, with a mailing address of 5749 Berwick, Rockford, Illinois. All interested persons waived notice.

The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is September 27, 2013. A claim may be filed at the Juneau County Courthouse, Mauston, Wisconsin, Room 2300. /s/Diane Mortensen Probate Registrar Dated: June 18, 2013 William M. Cunningham State Bar No. 1016977 2601 Sarah Lane Beloit, Wisconsin 53511 608-363-1150 Publish: June 27, 2013 July 11, 17, 2013 WNAXLP

July 11, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Bank of Wisconsin Dells, a Wisconsin Banking Corporation, Plaintiff vs. Defendants Judith A. Velazquez, Mary E. Baumann and Specialty Contracting Services-Madison LLC Case No. 13CV136 AMENDED SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To each person named above as a defendant: You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 40 days after July 11, 2013, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is Juneau County Clerk of Court, Juneau County Justice Center, 200 Oak Street, Post Office Box 246, Mauston Wisconsin, 53948, and to Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton S.C., plaintiff’s attorney, whose

address is 111 Oak Street, Post Office Box 140, Mauston, Wisconsin 53948. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the complaint within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated this 1st day of July, 2013. Curran, Hollenbeck & Orton S.C. Thomas J. Casey State Bar No. 1006622 111 Oak Street P.O.Box 140 Mauston, WI 53948 608-847-7363 Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT JUNEAU COUNTY Farmers and Merchants Bank of Kendall, Plaintiff vs. Defendant Isaac T. Rowe Case No. 12CV19 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on the 16th day of February, 2012, I will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Justice Center in the City of Mauston, 200 Oak Street, in Juneau County, on Tuesday, July 30, 2013, at 10:15 a.m., all of the following-described premises, towit; The South One-half of the Southeast Quarter (S1/2 SE1/4) in Section 36; the East One-half of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (E1/2 SE1/4 SW1/4) of Section 36; The East One-half of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (E1/2 NE1/4 SW1/4) of Section 36; Also a piece of land in Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 3 East, Juneau County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at a point 40 rods East of the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4) of Section 36; thence West to the center of the highway; thence northeasterly along the center of the highway to a point 40 rods North of the place of the beginning; thence South 40 rods to the place of beginning; Also a piece of land in Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 3 East, Juneau County, Wisconsin described as follows: Commencing at a point 40 rods East of the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4) of said Section 36; thence south 150 feet to the center of the highway; thence West along the center of the highway 27 rods; thence North 119 feet to the south line of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4); thence East 26 rods to the place of beginning; all of said

lands being located in Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 3 East; EXCEPT Certified Survey Map No. 2102 recorded in Volume 6 CSM, Page 69 being a part of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 SE1/4) and the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 SW1/4) all in Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 3 East, Town of Summit, Juneau County, Wisconsin; ALSO EXCEPTING a parcel of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4) of Section 36, Township 14 North, Range 3 East, as follows: Beginning where the North line of the aforesaid forty intersects the centerline of Lucht Road; thence proceeding Easterly on the North line of the forty to the Northeast corner of the forty; thence proceeding Southerly on the East line of the forty to the centerline of Nemitz Road; thence proceeding in a Westerly direction on the centerline of Nemitz Road to the center of the Lucht Road; thence proceeding Northerly on the centerline of Lucht Road; thence proceeding Northerly on the centerline of Lucht Road to the point of beginning. All the above lands in the Town of Summit, Juneau County, Wisconsin. (W6209 Clark Road, LaValle, Wisconsin) TERMS OF SALE: Cash DOWN PAYMENT: Ten percent of amount bid by certified check at time of sale unless waived by plaintiff’s counsel. Subject to unpaid taxes of record on day of closing, transfer fees and all other exceptions described by plaintiff or a representative of the Juneau County Sheriff’s office at the time of sale. Dated at Mauston, Wisconsin, this 28th day of June, 2013. /s/Brent Oleson Sheriff of Juneau County Chiquoine & Molberg, S.C. Stephen D. Chiquoine P.O.Box 399 Reedsburg, WI 53959 608-524-6717 Publish: July 11, 18, 25, 2013 WNAXLP


July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY - NOTICES

TOWN OF FOUNTAIN

TOWN OF NECEDAH

The Town of Fountain has updated Section 1 and Section 3 of Ordinance 103A: Land Use Ordinance to read the following: Section 1. Building Permits. 1.01 A Building Permit is required in the Town of Fountain for all structures, buildings, dwellings, mobile homes which exceeds 100 square feet including, but not limited to, decks, gazebos, porches or patios, in-ground swimming pools and/or additions thereto, farm waste facilities and/or farm structures whether constructed on-site, prefabricated and erected or moved from another location. A structure is anything erected, the use of which requires a permanent location on the ground, e.g., buildings, stairways, signs, billboards or other advertising medium, detached or projecting decks, porches or roofing, storage sheds and at) accessory buildings, even if movable, shall be construed to be a structure. 3.01 "Mobile home" means a vehicle manufactured or assembled before June 15, 1976, designed to be towed as a single unit or in sections upon a highway by a motor vehicle and equipped and used, or intended to be used, primarily for human habitation, with walls of rigid uncollapsible construction, which has an overall length in excess of 45 feet. "Mobile home" includes the mobile home structure, its plumbing, heating, air conditioning and electrical systems, and all appliances and all other equipment carrying a manufacturer's warranty."Manufactured home" means any of the following: 101.91(2)(am) (am) A structure that is designed to be used as a dwelling with or without a permanent foundation and that is certified by the federal department of housing and urban development as complying with the standards established under 42 USC 5401 to 5425. Sarah Ann Shanahan, Clerk Publish: July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

TOWN OF NECEDAH NOTICE OF BOARD OF REVIEW WEDNESDAY JULY 17, 2013, 6:00 – 8:00 PM STATE OF WISCONSIN Town of Necedah Juneau County NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Town of Necedah, Juneau County, Wisconsin, shall hold its first meeting on Wednesday 17th day of July 2013, from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at Necedah Town Hall 101 Center Street, Necedah, WI 54646. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the board of review and procedural requirements if appearing before the board: • No person shall be allowed to appear before the board of review, to testify to the board by telephone, or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view the property. • After the first meeting of the board of review and before the board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the board of review may contact, or provide information to a member of the board about the person’s objection, except at a session of the board. • The board of review may not hear an objection to the amount or valuation of property unless, at least 48 hours before the board's first scheduled meeting, the objector provides to the board's clerk written or oral notice of an intent to file an objection, except that upon a showing of good cause and the submission of a written objection, the board shall waive that requirement during the first 2 hours of the board's first scheduled meeting, and the board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session or up to the end of the final day of the session if the session is less than 5 days with proof of extraordinary circumstances for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and failure to appear before the board of review during the first 2 hours of the first scheduled meeting. • Objections to the amount or valuation of property shall first be made in writing and filed with the clerk of the board of review within the first 2 hours of the board's first scheduled meeting, except that, upon evidence of extraordinary circumstances, the board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session or up to the end of the final day of the session if the session is less than 5 days. The board may require such objections to be submitted on forms approved by the department of revenue, and the board shall require that any forms include stated valuations of the property in question. Persons who own land and improvements to that land may object to the aggregate valuation of that land and improvements to that land, but no person who owns land and improvements to that land may object only to the valuation of that land or only to the valuation of improvements to that land. No person shall be allowed in any action or proceedings to question the amount or valuation of property unless the written objection has been filed and that person in good faith presented evidence to the board in support of the objections and made full disclosure before the board, under oath of all of that person's property liable to assessment in the district and the value of that property. The requirement that objections be in writing may be waived by express action of the board. • When appearing before the board of review, the objecting person shall specify in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. • No person may appear before the board of review, testify to the board, or by telephone, or object to a valuation if that valuation was made by the assessor or the objector using the income method of valuation, unless the person supplies the assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the assessor’s manual under s. 73.02 (2a), Wis. stats., that the assessor requests. The Town of Necedah has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the assessor under this paragraph, which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their officer or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under s. 19.35 (2), Wis. stats. • The board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the board a letter from a physician, surgeon, or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify be telephone. Town of Necedah Susan Kosinski, Clerk Notice is hereby given this 12th day of June 2013 Publish: July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

VILLAGE OF WONEWOC NOTICE TO RESIDENTS OF THE VILLAGE OF WONEWOC The regular meeting of the Wonewoc Village Board at the Wonewoc Village Hall in the Village of Wonewoc was held 7:00 p.m. 5-22-13 MINUTES Roll Call: Brian Thompson, Nick Baldwin, Randall Norling, Sherry Lankey, Brian Byington, Scott Jennings, Kevin Jennings Bills and Vouchers Motion to approve by S. Jennings, 2nd by Norling, including the $2,700 Crane Engineering invoice – passed unanimously. Public Comment – Don Kissinger presented K. Jennings with 2012 Tree City Award. Minutes of Previous Meeting: Motion by Norling, 2nd by Lankey – passed unanimously 1. Motion to approve Scott Construction and Roehling Trucking contracts to rebuild Hill Street, reset culverts and ditches by Baldwin, 2nd by Norling – passed unanimously. 2. Motion to authorize Attorney Steve Roy to create a new 8 ton weight limit ordinance on Hill Street by Baldwin, 2nd by S. Jennings – passed unanimously. 3. Motion to adopt 2012 Compliance Maintenance Annual Report as submitted by Shane Huebel by S. Jennings, 2nd by Norling – passed unanimously. 4. Motion to allow up to three cremations per grave space and to require cremation vaults. by Baldwin, 2nd by Norling – passed unanimously. 5. Motion to increase the grave opening fee by $100 when the winter weather requires the grave thawer by Norling, 2nd by Byington – passed unanimously. 6. Motion to purchase a new $2,800 Inflow Meter for the waste water treatment plant by Lankey, 2nd by Thompson – passed unanimously. 7. Motion to approve Operators Permit for Sandra Preuss by Norling, 2nd by S. Jennings, passed unanimously. 8. Motion to go into closed session to Review of employee files under 19.85 (1)(f) Considering financial, medical, social or personal histories or disciplinary data of specific persons, preliminary consideration of specific personnel problems or the investigation of charges against specific persons except where par. (b) applies which, if discussed in public, would be likely to have a substantial adverse effect upon the reputation of any person referred to in such histories or data, or involved in such problems or investigations AND Motion to move into closed session pursuant to Wis Stats 19.85 (1) (e) to discuss a public works (Library Project sub contractor) contract where deliberating or negotiating the purchasing of public properties, the investing of public funds, or conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons require a close session by Norling, 2nd by S. Jennings. /s/Lee C. Kucher Administrator/Clerk-Treasurer Publish: July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

MESSENGER LEGAL DEADLINES ARE MONDAY BY NOON

JUNEAU COUNTY SENIOR NUTRITION PROGRAM BID REQUEST FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2014 The Juneau County Committee on Aging and Disability is seeking bids for the 2014 Senior Nutrition Program. Bid quotes will cover the contract year of January 1 through December 31, 2014. Quotes must include labor, overhead, and raw food costs as separate components of the bid. Menus for the program are provided by a contracted dietitian for the Senior Nutrition Program. Bids may be submitted for one or more communities which include: congregate and home delivered meals for Camp Douglas, Elroy, Lyndon Station, Mauston, Necedah, New Lisbon and Wonewoc. Proposals must demonstrate the capacity to provide the minimum requirements identified in the bid specifications. The Bid Specifications may be obtained by contacting the Juneau County Senior Nutrition Program, 220 E. LaCrosse St. Room 6, Mauston, WI 53948. Bids will be accepted until 4 p.m., July 26, 2013. The Committee on Aging and Disability reserves the right to accept or reject any and all bids. Publish: July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

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SCHOOL DISTRICT OF NEW LISBON MILK BIDS The School District of New Lisbon is accepting milk bids for the delivery of milk to the New Lisbon Schools for the 20132014 school year. If interested, please bid the following: Price per half pint carton for delivery of whole milk ______ Price per half pint carton for delivery of skim milk _______ Price per half pint carton for delivery of 2% milk ________ Price per half pint carton for delivery of low cal choc. milk _ Price per half pint carton for delivery of 2% choc. milk ____ No charge for cooler Minimum delivery two times a week. Bids must be received by Noon, Friday, July 26, 2013. Please submit bids in writing to: Dennis Birr, District Administrator School District of New Lisbon 500 S. Forest St. New Lisbon, WI 53950 The School Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to accept the bid deemed most advantageous to the school district. Publish: July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

TOWN OF NECEDAH NOTICE FOR TOWN OF NECEDAH OPEN BOOK WEDNESDAY JULY 17, 2013 4:00 – 6:00 PM NOTICE THAT ASSESSMENT ROLL WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR EXAMINATION BOARD OF REVIEW WEDNESDAY JULY 17, 2013 6:00 – 8:00 PM STATE OF WISCONSIN Town of Necedah Juneau County Pursuant to Sec. 70.45 of Wis. Statutes the Town of Necedah assessment roll for the Year 2013 assessment will be open for examination on the day of Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at the office of the Town of Necedah, 101 Center Street, Necedah, WI 54646 from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm. Further Be Advised that the assessor for the Town of Necedah will be present on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm. for Open Book. Further Be Advised that the Town of Necedah Board of Review will be held on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 at 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm. Please call the Town of Necedah (608) 565-3140 to make an appointment for Wednesday, July 17, 2013. If you have any questions, please contact Lori Scully, Assessor, for Town of Necedah at (608) 847-2022. Notice is hereby given this 12th day of June 2013. Susan Kosinski, Clerk Town of Necedah Publish: June 27, 2013 July 11, 2013 WNAXLP

ROYALL SCHOOL BOARD Royall School District Special Board Meeting Royall Intermediate School June 10, 2013 IN ATTENDANCE: BOARD: Present: Preuss, Friedl and McKittrick. Palamaruk arrived at 7:07. Waterman absent. ADMINISTRATION: Gruen and Lankey. VISITORS: Four community members attended the meeting. A list is on file in the official minutes book. 1. CALL TO ORDER, AGENDA VERIFICATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE: The meeting was called to order at 7:00 pm, McKittrick presiding. It was declared an open meeting. Motion by Friedl/Preuss to verify the agenda as presented. Motion approved 3-0. Pledge of Allegiance was recited by board members and audience. 2. COMMUNICATION: 3. BUSINESS a. Personnel: Motion by Friedl/McKittrick to approve the employment of Carmen Zant as Kindergarten Teacher. Motion approved 2 yes, 1 abstained, 2 absent. Motion by Preuss/Friedl to approve the employment of Kelsey Betthauser as 2nd Grade Teacher. Motion approved 4-0. Motion by Preuss/Friedl to approve the employment of Kathy Buening as 5th Grade Teacher. Motion approved 4-0. Motion by Friedl/Preuss for approve the employment of Nikki Logan as 4K Aide. Motion approved 4-0. Motion by Preuss/Friedl to approve the employment of Stephanie Hyer as LD EEN Aide. Motion approved 4-0. Motion by Preuss/Palamaruk to approve the employment of Louis Hurd as High School Social Studies Teacher. Motion approved 4-0. b. September Meeting Date change to coincide with Annual Meeting date. Motion by Preuss/Palamaruk to change the September meeting date to September 16, 2013 to coincide with the Annual Meeting. Motion approved 4-0. c. Special Meeting date for sale of Kendall building. Motion by Friedl/Preuss to approve a Special Meeting on Monday, June 24, 2013 at 6:30 pm for the sale of the Kendall building and property. To be followed by the regular meeting. Motion approved 4-0. 4. ADJOURNMENT: Motion by Friedl/Palamaruk to adjourn. Motion approved 40. Meeting adjourned at 7:18 pm. Jill Brown Recording Secretary Publish: July 11, 2013 WNAXLP


The Messenger Page 22

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Bill’s Corner slightly reworded, several times to emphasize a point and make sure the jury understood what they trying to say. At times as I watched the trial I had the feeling I was watching paint dry. Oh, how I wished the lawyers would jump to the point! Yet, it all was fascinating and I had little desire to turn the TV off or search for something else to watch. As I write this early in the week, the trial is still going on, and it is on my TV screen as I pound this into the computer. I would hope that the lawyers could pick up the pace a bit as they give their summations, but we'll have to see what their decisions are. And when the trial is over, I'll undoubtedly go back to following the news on CNN.

Like a lot of you, I have spent too much time the past week or so following the Zimmerman trial on TV. When it was first announced the trial would be available for television, I vowed I would not spend my time watching it. I had managed to stay away from much of another trial that recently been on TV--that of a young woman who stabbed and shot her boyfriend. But I gave up on the idea that I could avoid the Zimmerman trial when I found that much of it was being carried live by both of CNN's two channels. And I did find it hard to pull away from once I had started watching. Among other things, I was amazed at how long it took the attorneys to tell their versions of a story that lasted a comparatively short time on a rainy night As a newspaper person, my entire working life has been spent getting as much information as possible into as few words and sentences as possible. I was well aware that the average reader tends to drift away after reading a headline and the lead sentence on a story. I tried to make sure they got as much information as possible before they went on to another story. The lawyers obviously were operating on a different pattern. It seemed to me that they often asked the same question,

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Hi, I am a 12 year old kid and when I was at one of my cousin’s party in Elroy, we were lighting fireworks on July 4th. Then a cop drove by and told us that we can’t light them because of a city ordinance and I was upset because it’s a day to celebrate our country’s birth and all the people who fought for this land. I just hope you can revoke that rule in the town I really want to see some fireworks. I don’t see why we can’t celebrate our freedom. It’s very disappointing that I live in a town where we can’t be excited about our freedom! Ethan Vierck

To place an ad or Letter to the Editor in

JUNEAU COUNTY CROSSWORD “July” 2

July 11, 2013

Letter to the Editor

BY BILL SMITH

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BY NANCY J SCHNEIDER Well we all had a week off (for good behavior?) at the Messenger but now we’re back. Hope you missed us! It’s kinda funny how missing one week can mess with my mind. I’m not sure what date to put on the darn thing at first glance. I always have to have my column in before hand, so it gets confusing. Sometimes when people make a comment on one of my columns I have to stop and think what it was about. By the time you read it I already sent the next one in so sometimes it gets difficult for my old brain to know what they are talking about. I usually say something like, “What was it that you liked?” or “Which one was it?” They give me a wee bit of a funny look until I explain that I wrote the one they just read two weeks ago. It was even harder when I was writing for all three papers years ago. Then it was almost impossible to know which one they were referring to because they were different, but it was always nice that they commented. But remembering which one was always a bit tricky. I can’t believe it’s totally “old age” related either. It simply gets confusing. It’s like once I write it and send it I forget it. When the paper comes I reread it just to remember what I wrote. Now that’s not old age, that’s a little on the crazy side. I reread my own writing? Yea I do. That’s when I find things I should have said different or added something or sometimes just enjoy them. But I always read them when the paper comes. Weird I know, but totally me. I wrote the book “A Tribute to Brandy” way back in 1998 and each time I reread that one I cry. Now that’s a bit on the weird side too, don’t you think. I mean I know how the story goes, I lived it and I’ve read it many, many times. But there are certain parts of that book where I tear up each and every time I read it. Anyway getting back to this column, if I had been smart I would have written one the same as always and then I’d have it done a week in advance and wouldn’t have to worry about trying to get it done and remembering which date to put on it. However, I thought it was nice to have a small vacation so now I’m paying the price.

It isn’t a big price and it was nice to have a vacation. All I have to do now is get back in the swing of things and write it when I always wrote it. It shouldn’t be that hard of a problem. Write it on Monday, think about it on Tuesday, tweak it on Wednesday and hit the send button. That’s the way I always do it and that’s the way I should continue to do it. Holiday or no holiday. But let me see, what day is this? Oops already I’m behind schedule. However no one would know if I didn’t broadcast it all over the column. They always got my stuff on the Wednesday a week before publication. And here it is Thursday. Well, they aren’t in the office today because of the holiday so it doesn’t matter. I still have a week to get back to my normal schedule. I really need a schedule to keep me on track. That brings me to another thought. For many years I was on a regular, reliable schedule. I knew where I was supposed to be and on what day. I worked at the Thrift store in Mauston on Mondays. Tuesday I had the library meeting once a month. Wednesday I worked at the Community Closet. Once a month had Ladies’ Aid. Thursday was Ladies Bible Study. Friday was meet my sister once a month for lunch and gab fest. Along the way was shopping, mid week church services at certain times of the year, going to my Mom’s house, and somewhere in there do laundry and clean the mansion. Nowadays I don’t do hardly any of that stuff. I need to get back to doing things, having a schedule. I guess I’ll have to work on that a bit. I know Ray doesn’t like it when I’m gone and busy all the time, but it sure beats just sitting around the house all day, every day. I need to do a few adjustments that’s for sure. Wish me luck. So until next week when I’ll be back on my writing schedule I’ll leave you with this NO-nonsense thought: I may look like I’m doing nothing, but inside my head I’m very busy. n Nancy J Schneider is a member of The Wisconsin Regional Writers Association and writes freelance. Nancy can be reached at njswritingnook@yahoo.com.

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The Messenger always welcomes Letters to the Editor. Fax them to 462-4903 or e-mail themessenger@centurytel.net


July 11, 2013

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

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Letter to the Editor As we celebrate the most important of our national holidays, perhaps we should take stock. No knock raids, warrantless searches, indefinite detention, a dramatic increase police brutality occasionally resulting in death to innocent people, secret charges, secret courts, holding prisoners without charges, 30,000 drones flying and spying on us, or soon will be. Serious suggestions that these drones be armed for use against citizens. We have FEMA camps that can inter hundreds of thousands if not millions of people. WHY? OUR TSA wants to expand its policies of groping grandmas and babies in the name of security at airports, and do so at bus and train stations, and perhaps even stopping people on our open highways. We have a president who has not only declared the right to kill American citizens without due process, but has exercised that “right” more than once. He is known to have a “hit list” of enemies that he would “take out” and has used the IRS, NSA, Secret Service and other agencies to harass and intimidate reporters and political enemies. Indeed, before the last election, Obama's right hand, Valerie Jarrett is quoted as saying, “After we win this election, it’s our turn. Payback time.... we don’t forget.…..There is going to be hell to pay.” It looks as if the Obama administration is being true to this threat.

Our president has exercised powers far in excess of those granted by the constitution, setting budgets, (de facto if not real) and talks openly of using executive orders to make new law in order to get around Congress. No where in the constitution is legislative power delegated to our chief executive. Friends of our president claim he has a file on virtually every American, and he is using student loans, medical records act, and now the so-called Common Core “State” Standards to accumulate mountains of personal information on everyone, and not coincidentally, further indoctrinate our children into collectivist ideology. Today, privacy is non-existent and property rights are a joke. Today, our federal government has aligned itself with rebel movements in the Middle East that are aligned with Muslim Brotherhood and al Queada. The rebels want to and have installed Islamic governments that are or will be worse than the ones they replaced, and both are the sworn enemies of liberty and the United States. Our support amounts to treason, and undermines the cause of liberty throughout the globe. To be fair, a considerable amount of the erosion of our rights and our privacy has taken place under Republican administrations, but that does not excuse the excesses of

Taking Refuge

An Outdoorsman’s Journal

BY STEVE NORLING There is good news on the cranes. There is at least one new crane colt. The nest that was on the refuge has hatched at least one chick. At the time I write this I am not sure if there are one or two chicks hatched. There were two eggs in the nest but until someone can get a better look we will not know for sure whether there is one or if there are two youngsters. As for the nest on Meadow Valley, we are not sure what is going on there. That nest was also due to hatch about the same time as the one on the refuge but at this time nothing has happened. If there are no youngsters by the time you read this the people from The International Crane Foundation (ICF) will have checked the eggs to see if they are in fact fertile. Things do not always happen on time but after the best is a week overdue it is time to check. I will let you know in next week’s column whether we have double good luck and also how many colts are on the refuge. It is berry-picking time again on the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. The blueberries are doing good in some spots and not so good in others. It almost looks like a late frost got some in low spots. The picking season opened on July first but I do not believe there were any ripe berries then. The spots I looked at on June 30th were not at all ripe. A few of the berries were just getting some color but the bulk of what I saw were all still green. In talking to others who also are watching the crop, we feel that it will be after the fifteenth before the picking gets decent. The season ends on August 15th and I hope that the blackberries will be ripe by then. During the berry picking season you are allowed to walk anywhere on the refuge. You still cannot drive on the roads inside the refuge but you can park along any township road and walk in. Just make sure that wherever you park you do not block any of the gates. There is a limit of one gallon per day per person of berries so stay legal. You may also find huckleberries, dewberries, or raspberries and those are legal to pick also. So go out and get some good tasting wild berries and enjoy. One thing I would warn you about is that you bring your mosquito repellent. Some years I do not use repellent at all but this year I rarely go out on the refuge without it, those mosquitoes are real killers this year. Some of the roads through the refuge are still not in very good shape. A couple of them are still closed and a couple more have standing water in them. I would not take a low riding car through some of them but with a truck, SUV or other high vehicle you should be able to make it through any of the roads that are not completely closed. By the time you read this it is possible that, if we have no more rain, all of the roads will be open and passable. However take precautions, I do not want to see where someone had to be pulled out of a mud hole. This year’s second flight of Karner Blue butterflies looks to be about two weeks late this year. That means they will be out and about sometime after the middle of July. All of these delays are still due to the goofy spring we had. This was the year to draw down Rynearson Pool #1 to promote aquatic plant growth and the wet spring made that difficult too. It would normally be totally drawn down by mid-June but due to the wet cool spring it is just getting to the desired level now. However, there seems to be good growth of the aquatic plants even though the draw down did not get complete on time. So it looks like the migrating waterfowl will have enough to eat this year. Check out the eagle nest along Headquarters Road and take look at the young eaglet. I sits up on the edge of the nest most of the time and with binoculars or a spotting scope you can get a real close-up look at the youngster. He will probably fledge in a couple of weeks so you still have a little time. Until next week, “See you at the refuge.”

either this or past presidents. I used to warn of the coming police state, but guess what folks, it is here. All that remains is full implementation. Could it be that the terrorists we ought to fear most come from Washington DC and Madison Wisconsin, and are agents of our own governments? So Happy 4th of July. Today may be the last day that we are able to stand up to this thuggery and tyranny with any likelihood of successfully rolling it back. My question to you, Americans, is what are you going to do about the above, so that we may have something to celebrate on future Independence Days? Ken Van Doren Mauston, WI 608-547-0227

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Shultz Lake, tips, memories and advice BY MARK WALTERS Hello friends, I always write two columns on my fishing trip to Canada because there is so much information and because I use a good ten-days of my life on that yearly adventure in one way or another. This week, I will write about some of our most interesting experiences and what works for us over the last 31-years, as we experience a complete getaway thanks to my friends Pete and Elizabeth Hagedorn, owners of Chimo Lodge and Outposts www.chimolodgeandoutposts.com. Saturday, June 15th High 71, low 48 On our first day in the Canadian bush, I was fishing with my daughter Selina and close by my friend, Jeff Moll, who was fishing with his son Grant. From out of nowhere a bald eagle was overhead, dropped almost straight down to the shoreline and the next thing we knew a loon swam into the water and started wailing a mournful cry. Loons nest on the shore edge as they cannot walk on land and I believe that the eagle discovered the loon’s nest and ate either its young or egg. Within seconds of the attack, a raven appeared and stayed near the nest for a good half hour. For at least four years, we have been witnessing incredibly, steady fish catching, especially for walleye. If I could only take two lures on a Canadian fishing trip they would be the bottom bouncer (weight 1.5 ounce) with a night crawler harness on it, and the Red Eye, which is a spoon type lure. I like the “Musky” Red Eye but the smaller size will catch you more walleye. Thirty years ago these two setups were winning our daily and weekly fish bets and they did this year as well. Something else that we do is have our kids join in on our work load. When we start the trip, we take a deck of cards and start with an ace and go up as high in numbers as we have people. This year we had six people in our gang including two 12-year-olds and a boy that was 15. Everyone in camp gets their own workday and that means all cooking and dishes. On your workday you are responsible for cooking two quality, and filling meals and doing the dishes. The group of men in our gang, in one way or another, numbers about 12, we have raised or are still raising about 35 boys and girls. We have always taught our kids to work and to be responsible for their actions. When we start an adventure, we shake hands and when we end it, we do the same. Teaching our kids to help out makes life much easier for everyone involved. Something else that we do, especially this year, is to teach our kids how to handle a fillet knife and cleanly remove the fillets from a fish. My 12-year-nephew, Dylan Walters, can take the fillets off a fish without any waste and clean the fishcleaning table in the blink of an eye. This year we had two members of our group have large hooks become embedded in their flesh. Any fishermen or woman should have a hook removal kit in their boat or at least in the cabin. A quality, side cutters that you are confident will cut through hardened steel is the difference between ten minutes of stress or a possible flight out of camp. A fishhook embedded in the flesh is an instant buzz killer. On the other hand, the relief from the hook being removed is

just as fast. Try to make sure you have some type of antiseptic in camp as well. If a hook mishap does happen, someone has to take charge. After spending fifty-years in a boat, I can tell you all kinds of things that I have done wrong, as far as, to my long-term health. Sun protection is no accident! Carry and use a 50 spf sunscreen. Wear a wide brimmed hat. Not only will this advice slow down the aging of the skin it will help prevent you from being burnt out that night in the cabin. Anyone over 50 knows that we used to be able to smoke in high school. Could have a beer at the local pub during lunch hour if we were 18 (or looked at least 16) and what the heck was a seat belt? Once upon a time someone invented the wheel and we have progressed ever since. Take care of yourself and maybe you could be heading to a paradise on earth like Shultz lake for 30 or 50 years and enjoy every minute of it just like I have. Set the hook and keep your line tight! Sunset

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Page 24

THE MESSENGER OF JUNEAU COUNTY

Little round barn has family history BY EVA MARIE WOYWOD Sitting in a field just outside of Mauston and southwest of the intersection of county highways O and K rests a little round barn. The replica was erected just last week and represents a history on how the Walsh family came to call Cattail Valley home. That history was highlighted last Friday, July 5, when generations of the Walsh family came together for a barn raising celebration. A celebration honoring the 100 year anniversary of the original round barn which was first built in Cattail Valley in 1913. The original round barn stood strong for many generations of the Walsh family to enjoy. A landmark in the area it stood strong up to the time when a new owner of the land decided it was time to make way for more crops and had it burned down in 1993. According to Pat Walsh it was his grandfather, PJ Walsh, who fulfilled a dream in building the once proud round barn. It was a dream that came to fruition on land settled by PJ's father, James, who settled in the area after arriving to Ellis Island from Ireland.

"He was a true pioneer," stated Pat. Pat went on to explain that James arrived at Ellis Island in the mid 1800's and ventured off to claim land in an area wide and free enough for his dreams to grow. That adventure and pioneering spirit brought him to claim his homestead in Wisconsin. Soon after, he sent a message back home to Ireland and to his girlfriend to inform her of a new home waiting for her and that he would meet her at Ellis Island. After sending that long distance love telegram he made his way back to New York. Just how he got there really didn't matter to him as during part of his trek there were times he walked, times he may have hopped a train, and perhaps even hitched a ride. All that truly mattered was by the time he made it back to Ellis Island his future wife, Johanna, was there waiting for him to take her to her new home where they would raise a family and spend their years together watching the dream of a new life in a new land take flight. Their story and more came to life last week when the descendents of James and Johanna Walsh came to celebrate the 100 year

anniversary of the round barn. An event which was born after Pat Walsh decided to make use of some molds he had from the original round barn built by PJ. "I spent the winter in my basement working on it and I have to say my wife (Annie) gave up a lot, including a vacation, for me to work on this, something on my "bucket list," stated Pat. Pat went on to say that many hands made the replica barn a reality and that just as many helped to make the 100 year anniversary a party to remember for the 220 plus who came out for it. As for the newly erected replica - Pat built it on land just across the road from where the original barn stood and on land he holds the deed to. "This land is always going to be preserved and passed down to the generations to come starting with my grandchildren," he said. He went on to state that the plan is to hold a party and reunion every 10 years so that the stories and history of the Walsh family stay alive in generations to come. "We have to keep it alive, and remember them, our ancestors - the pioneers," he stated.

Thank You!

The SEA of Change, Juneau County would like to thank the following businesses that so generously collaborated with us to make our first transitional home a reality. Berkos Law, Custom Foam Corporation, D & G Improvements, DeVoe Painting, Gray Electric, Lange Plumbing/Heating, Laridaen Glass, Lutz Tax Service McKinney's Home Decorating. We would also thank the University of Wisconsin extension office personnel Kathy Metzenbauer and Nancy Zobal for their guidance. Special thanks to Sheila Alderman and the more than 50 volunteers who put the efforts into making this project complete. The financial support from our donors is greatly appreciated and essential in continuing the mission. The quarterly business meeting will be held on July 23, 2013 at the Hatch Public Library at 6:00 p.m. Community members, volunteers and supporters are encouraged to attend. Please RSVP at 608-547-7006 if you plan on being there. For more information please view our website at: www.seaofchangejc.org or become a friend of ours at Facebook - Juneau County Sea of Change (Community outreach)

July 11, 2013

Insufficient evidence in road salt case BY EVA MARIE WOYWOD In a May 8, 2013 letter issued by Monroe County District Attorney Daniel Cary to Juneau County District Attorney Michael Solovey, Cary summarizes his conclusions as serving as special prosecutor during a recent investigation into Ryan Rattunde and road salt being taken from Juneau County Public Works Department's facility in Necedah. In the letter Cary writes: "I have had the opportunity to thoroughly review the investigation conducted by Investigator Robert Walensky of the Tomah Police Department, including police reports prepared by officers of Juneau County Sheriff's Department and recordings of telephone communications between 911 callers, emergency dispatchers, and law enforcement officers. Following a comprehensive review of the above materials I have concluded that in my opinion there is insufficient evidence to prove any criminal wrongdoing beyond a reasonable doubt. In particular it appears as though there would be insufficient evidence to Ryan Rattunde intended to permanently deprive Juneau County of possession of the salt that he removed from the salt shed in Necedah. It seems clear to me that Mr. Rattunde fully intended to replace the salt that he removed from the shed with salt that he expected to receive from his private supplier." Cary does however go on to state that Rattunde demonstrated a significant lack of judgement in the in the manner in which he went about obtaining the salt from the

Juneau County facility. The letter goes on to state that Rattunde told Juneau County Deputy Tony Green that he had obtained permission from a Juneau County employee to borrow the salt and that permission had occurred prior to him taking it. Cary then points to Rattunde telling Investigator Walensky that he had sent a text message to Carl Bezemek advise the County Highway Commissioner that he had obtained a bucket of salt and that he would replenish it when he obtained his shipment from his private supplier. Rattunde further said that he was sending the text message at the time Deputy Green called him inquiring about the salt. "If this is true, then Rattunde already obtained the salt prior to sending the text to Bezemek," wrote Cary. Cary further points out that the message would have been sent after the incident had been reported via a 911 call and could be perceived as Rattunde attempting to cover his tracks. "At best this shows extremely bad judgment, but more likely shows that Rattunde provided false information to Deputy Green who Rattunde knew was a law enforcement officer performing his official duties," states Cary. Cary then gives his opinion that further prosecution be declined due to evidence showing that had Rattunde asked prior to obtaining the salt the permission would have been given. At this time no charges in the matter have been filed against Rattunde.


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