Issuu on Google+

C Y

M K

C Y

ome Improvement Guide Page 1B

M K ECRWSS

POSTAL RESIDENT

US POSTAGE PAID QUINCY, IL PERMIT #108

Wednesday, January Wednesday, June 19,2014 2013 Wednesday, March 5, 15, 2014

YMCA Gymnastics Team Competes

USPS-299800 Vol. 138 No. 10 La Plata, MO, 63549 • 20 Pages • 2 Sections

Subscribers to the Home Press are the nicest people! This week we salute

Kara Cook Callao, MO Winner Announced

We have a winner for the Macon Tiger Wreath! See page 2A to see if it’s you!

Lucky Turns 50 Need another reason to feel old? In 1964, the Lucky Charms Leprechaun began urging moms, “laddies” and “lassies” to buy Lucky Charms, a “most exciting cereal.” Lucky Charms cereal is marking its 50th anniversary with a 50-day celebration featuring its longtime mascot Lucky the leprechaun starting on St. Patrick’s Day which, of course, is Lucky’s birthday.

On February 15, 2014 the Long Branch Area YMCA Gymnastics Team competed at the Sweetheart Meet in Chillicothe at the Grand River Area Family YMCA. The team, comprised of eleven girls, competed against teams from Chillicothe and Brookfield. Each girl competed in Uneven Bars, Balance Beam, Vault and Floor routines and were awarded placement based on their scores in each event and overall totals in their skill levels. Six of the eleven girls received top placement in their competitive level. Pictured are: Jarah Wilt of Shelbina - Level 3, 2nd place All Around; Madie Ewing of Macon - Level 4, 2nd place All Around; Millie Gough of Shelbina - Level 3, 3rd All Around; Elise Nelson of Macon - Level 3; Asa Fanning of Macon - Level 2; Jaley Hayes of Macon - Level 3, 1st place All Around; Tierney Fouch of LaPlata - Level 2, 2nd place All Around; Brooklyn Anderson of Macon - Level 2; Brooke Weimer of Macon - Level 2; Emma Blackford of Macon - Level 3; and Alyssa Maples of Macon - Level 2, 3rd place All Around. The team is coached by Danielle Theurer with assistant coaches Hannah Hartung and Jeana Noel. They plan to compete in two more competitions this season.

...And Johnny Came Marching Home By Shon Coram, Publisher Continued from February 5, 2014

Attention Bevier Wildcat Fans!

The Home Press is holding a contest for all of our great Bevier Wildcat fans! See Page 2 for details. We will feature a new school each month until we cover all of the schools in Macon County!

In early January, John was part of a detail of fifteen other P.O.W’s sent to cut wood in the foothills of the Alp Mountains near Altotting Germany. They had been issued a civilian guard that had only a pistol. “We did not even know if he (the guard) knew how to use the pistol.” Mr. Cavett took advantage of the time away from the prisoner camp to attempt his fourth escape. John and one of his comrades Elijah Houswright from Tennessee had been planning the escape for days, “We just wanted out of there.” The two

men went out to cut wood and simply blended into the forest. They spent the next fifteen days making their way toward the American lines. They picked up leaflets that were being dropped by the Army Air force to alert German Civilians and troops of the advancing allied armies. They used these leaflets as a map to find their advancing army comrades. On one partly cloudy night the two men were making their way down a country road not sure if they were heading in the right direction. One moment it would be pitch black and the next the moonlight would make their path visible. Continued on Page 9A

John Cavett

Amidei Named 2013 Volunteer of the Year Merlyn Amidei was named the 2013 Community Volunteer of the Year at the Macon Area Chamber of Commerce banquet on February 28, 2014. Pictured are President of the Chamber of Commerce’s Board of Directors, Pat Baumberger, Merlyn Amidei and Todd Davison in the background. The Chamber works to improve the growth, diversity, and health of the business community; encourages residents to shop locally; and supports the efforts to recruit new businesses to Macon County.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR BREAKING NEWS!

Photo Courtesy of Bill Noyes

ly n O

C&R Lenten Special Delicious Fish Filet Sandwich

2

$

C Y

M K

Friday, March 7 11am -- 1pm

I DEL CH LUN IAL! C SPE C Y

M K


2A

C Y

M K

C Y

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

STUMP AND THE WINNER IS...

Celebrating 40 Years

Your Friends

Can You Guess Who these little ones are? Clue #1 From a rural family Give us a call at the office (660) 332-4431or email your guesses to news.homepress@ gmail.com

Annette Mosley of Macon MO

Be Fair Now.... Family Doesn’t Count! (We only call back if you have the winning guess)

Please call 660-332-4431 TO ARRANGE DELIVERY!!

Merlin L. and Annabelle (Cantril) Easley currently of Macon, Missouri are celebrating their 40th wedding anniversary this March. The couple were married on March 18, 1974 in Memphis, Missouri. After their marriage they lived in the Elmer/South Gifford area for 38 years while raising their family. Annabelle has worked for the La Plata RII School District for these past 12 years. Merlin still manages and runs the family farm in Elmer, Missouri. Both enjoy traveling, volunteering, church and visiting family. The Easleys have three sons: Troy Easley of Jefferson City, Ryan & Stefanie Easley of Hannibal, and Kyle & Miranda Easley of Moberly.

Macon Public Library Receives Summer Reading Grant The Macon Public Library received a Library Services and Technology (LSTA) Grant for the Summer Reading Program from the Missouri State Library in the amount of $5,942. With the funds, the library is teaming up with area Day Care Centers and schools to promote reading throughout the summer. Our main goal is to keep children and adults reading throughout the summer while building up an appreciation of what the

Electronics: Flat Screen TV’s Blue-Ray Players • HDMI Cables Digital Cameras • Batteries

library has to offer. When summer begins many children are prone to what’s called the “Summer Slide.” The article called Keeping Kids Off the Summer Slide describes this as the summer months when children are not keeping their minds actively engaged in literacy activities. Experts agree children who read during the summer gain reading skills, while those not engaged in reading slide backwards. According to the National Summer Learning Association, it is estimated that approximately two months or roughly 22% of instruction time is lost

for those children. Participation in the Summer Reading Program at the Macon Library is a great way to keep all minds actively engaged in reading. Programs throughout the summer will support preschool age children through adults. Our program theme goes along with the nation wide theme: Fizz, Boom, Read for out three to twelve year olds; Spark a Reaction for teenagers thirteen through sixteen; and Literacy Ele-

La Plata Mayor’s Report

Appliances: Refrigerators • Ranges Washer & Dryer Sets Deep Freezers

On February 19 the preliminary report from the sewer camera work and smoke testing conducted last fall were reviewed in a public meeting and workshop at City Hall with representatives of Shafer,

We offer the highest quality appliances and electronics in the industry!

Win this Bevier Wildcat Wreath! Simply fill out the form below and mail to:

WINNER TO BE ANNOUNCED APRIL 2, 2014

The Home Press PO Box 57 LaPlata, MO 63549

or email us at news.homepress@gmail.com Please put “Contest” in Subject line

You must be a current subscriber to win!

We also offer full service appliance and refrigerator repairs to better serve our customers which includes Appliance Repair pick up and delivery services.

Not a subscriber yet?

NOW is your Chance!

NEW Macon County $ Subscriptions Only

20.00

Please call 660-332-4431 for rates outside Macon County.

NAME: ADDRESS: CITY, STATE, ZIP: PHONE: Current Subscriber WREATH CONTEST

The

Home Press

ments for adults. There will be a special sign up week, May 27 through May 30. June 2 is the first of eight weeks for our Summer Reading Program. The Library would also like to let the community know how much we appreciate the donations we receive for the Summer Reading Program. These donations are used as incentives and rewards that the grant does not fund. They help make the program a huge success.

New Subscriber

Please include check for $20

THE OLDEST NEWSPAPER IN MACON COUNTY, SINCE 1876 USPS-299800 PO BOX 57, LA PLATA, MISSOURI 63549 Entered for transmission through the mail PHONE: 660-332-4431 • FAX: 660-332-7561 as periodical matter at the Post Office in news.homepress@gmail.com La Plata, MO 63549

Kline & Warren engineers, Dennis Stith and Phillip Wilson. Also a representative from Rural Development, Ms. Le Ann Gleason was present to talk about possible financial arrangements and concerns. A discussion was held about the infiltration and inflow (I & I) problems identified with smoke testing and corrective actions that need to be taken by private citizens. As Mayor, I requested from Rural Development information on what financial assistance may be available to private individuals that need help fixing these problems on their property. These actions are the result of a Notice of Violation by Department of Natural Resources due to a lagoon spill last Spring when heavy rains; fast snow melt; and lots of I & I problems contributed to more water than our system can handle. I had previously met in September 2013 with representatives of the Department of Natural Resources and negotiated an avoidance of a substantial fine and penalty by agreeing to use those monies to help fix the problems than be used for fines and penalties. These same individuals will be attending the City Council meeting to review and answer questions on March 11th. The meeting begins at 6:00 p.m. in council chambers and the public is invited to attend. Charlie Thompson Mayor

CORRESPONDENTS Verna Buck, Marsha Hammons, Pam Burris, Sharron Burns Jayne Roberts, Patty Truitt & Kathy Nickerson

STAFF Shon Coram - Publisher/Sales Sharon Coram - Co-Editor/Graphic Design Randy Bunch - Co-Editor/Distribution

SUBSCRIPTION RATES - As of February 1, 2014 In Macon County - $30 per year Out of County - $48 per year 6-Month Subscriptions 1/2 price of Regular Rates Becky Jeffcoat - Editor Emertius Newstand - 75¢ Sales Tax included in Missouri Subscription Rates - Member of MPA & Macon Area Chamber of Commerce

We reserve the right to reject any advertising or news material as we see fit. Advertising and Editorial Copy Deadline Friday Noon unless Holiday.

C Y

M K

C Y

M K


C Y

M K

C Y

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

The Shepherd Calls

by Dr. H. Wade Paris

The Bible Explains Lent Perhaps you can recall the customary complaints regarding the length of our Christmas celebrations. Often Christmas decorations and Christmas wares are visible in stores shortly after Halloween or before. It is common to hear folk ask rather irritably, why it is necessary to begin Christmas celebration so soon? “It makes the celebration too long”, is a familiar refrain. Have you noticed you seldom hear that complaint about our preparation for Easter? Preparation for Easter? Yes. The Christian calendar has set aside forty days of the year to prepare our hearts for the celebration of the resurrection of Christ. Those forty days are called Lent. Ideally, these days are to be a time of penitence and recommitment. How better could we prepare than to view our sinful selves and ask God to make us more like His son Jesus who sacrificed His all for us? The plan for this time of year is to deny ourselves for Him and focus on His redemptive love. You may think, “Shouldn’t we do that always?” Yes, but this is a time when the total Christian community is asked to focus on the heart of the gospel. It is something like looking through

a telescope. You can see that object with your naked eye, but the telescope brings it close. We Christians are aware of the resurrection always; but ordinarily we share that awareness with many other blessings from the Lord. The Easter celebration is a call to focus on Him who conquered all things, even death. Our preparation to celebrate Jesus’ resurrection takes many forms from the simple to the sublime. After hearing the pastor preach about the resurrection, a child was asking his mother many questions. She became somewhat bewildered trying to explain death and resurrection. Exasperated by his many questions whose answers were beyond the understanding of both, she said, “I tell you what we will do. Tomorrow we will go by the bookstore and get some books to explain it. Okay?” Unwilling to be put off, her son offered a profound bit of wisdom. He asked, “Couldn’t we just read the Bible?” Now that is a novel suggestion. To prepare your heart to celebrate Easter, read the passion stories found in the gospels. That story is repeated four times in the final chapters of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

To Harold Rankin and Family, So sorry for the loss of Doris.You are in our thoughts.

Obituary

Obituary

ErnEst Edward Boyd

Warren Gene “Jack” Lee

July 22 1918 - February 24, 2014

Ernest “Ernie” Edward Boyd, age 95, died February 24, 2014 at Loch Haven Nursing Home in Macon, Missouri. He was born July 22, 1918, at Stahl, Missouri, in Adair County. Ernie was the youngest and eleventh child of Robert Stanton and Mary Margaret (Hoffman) Boyd. He lived most of his life in Macon County Missouri, in and around the communities of Elmer and La Plata. He was preceded in death by his parents, six brothers and four sisters. Ernie is survived by one sister-in-law, Betty (Grother) Boyd of Glenwood, Missouri, and a host of nieces and nephews, greatnieces and nephews and great-great nieces and nephews. Ernie completed 8 years of grammar school at one room Easley School, east of Gifford, Missouri, and the Dover School. He faithfully lived a Christian life, and for over seventy years a Charter member of the La Plata Assembly of God Church. He was gifted musically, playing a variety of stringed instruments and regularly played the steel guitar in church. He was a song writer, and could recite and sing a variety of songs that was taught to him by his parents. He was the “person” family and friends would talk to about the Boyd family history. His recollection of names and dates was amazing. For years it was his job to walk the many cemeteries around Elmer, Missouri and put out the flags on Memorial and Veterans Day holidays. Until almost age 90, he volunteered his service, helping distribute monthly food commodities in the community of La Plata. He was an avid outdoors man who enjoyed squirrel and coon hunting, and fishing. He spent many days fishing the banks of the Chariton River and walking the hills of Macon County with his dogs. One of the rites of passage for the city dwelling nephews and grand-nephews was to ride the train to Elmer and spend time during the summer with their bachelor “Uncle Ernie” hunting, fishing, and listening to stories. He taught several Elmer boys to fish and enjoy the simple pleasures of country living. Ernie never married and had no children, but children loved him. Last July he was blessed to celebrate the 95th birthday with family and friends, enjoying life this week when God called him to his heavenly home. Funeral will be held at 11 am Friday, February 28th, 2014 at Elliott Funeral Home in Atlanta with Rev. Glen Henley officiating. Visitation will be one hour to the service on Friday. Burial will follow at the Bell Cemetery, northwest of Elmer. Memorials may be made to the Bell Cemetery.

Elliott Funeral Home 103 E. Main, Atlanta, Missouri 63530

From Sharon and Joslyn

www.elliottfunerals.com

These Sponsors Urge You to Attend the Church of Your Choice Each Week Atlanta

Atlanta

Atlanta Mt. Zion United Methodist

Atlanta Baptist Church Pastor Chance Glenn 9:30 am Sunday School 10:30 am Morning Worship

www.objg-umc.org/umcmtzion (South of Redmon)

Atlanta Christian Church Minister Daniel Brands

9:30 am Worship Service 10:30 am Sunday School 6:30 pm 3rd Wed UM Women

Pastor Cheryl Flaim

9:30 Sunday School 10:20 Morning Worship 2 pm Sunday Youth Jam

Elmer

Elmer Baptist Church Danny Welte

Atlanta United Methodist Church Larry DeSpain, Pastor 10 am Sunday School 11 am Worship Service

10 am 4th Wed. Loch Haven Bible Study

5:30 pm 1st Thurs. UM Women 3:15-5pm Tuesday Adventure Club

9:30 am Sunday School 10:30 am Church Services

La Plata La Plata Community Presbyterian Reverend John Becker Contemprary Worship

Lighthouse Assembly of God Pastor Denny Sikes

9:30 am Sunday School 10:30 am Morning Worship

10 am Sunday School 11 am Morning Worship 7 pm Sunday & Wednesday

Macon

Zion Lutheran Church Pastor Elden Kohn

Elmer Christian Church Brother David Mason

Ethel Christian Church Pastor Gareth Reese

Chariton Ridge Baptist Church

La Plata

Willow Bend Church Find us on Facebook

9:30 am Sunday School 10:40 Worship 6 am Friday Mens Small Group

Ethel

9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Morning Worship

Gifford

Gifford Christian Church David Moore

10 am Sunday School 11 am Worship Service 8:30 pm Wed. Night Service

10 am Sunday School 11 am Morning Service

Mt. Tabor Baptist Church

M K

Macon County Larger Parish Ethel Presbyterian Church Pastor Mary Ellen Waychoff 10:30 am Sunday School 11:15 am Morning Service

9:30 am Sunday School 10:44 am Worship Service Services Sun at 6 pm Wed. at 3:30 - Children’s Program Wednesday Night Service 7 pm

Illinois Bend Community Church Pastor John Davison 332-7779, Highway 3

8 am Breakfast Every Sunday 8:30 am Sunday Worship

La Plata First Baptist Church Pastor David Gottman 9:45 am Sunday School 10:40 am Worship Service 6 pm Evening Worship Mondays 6 pm Awana (during school year) 6 pm Bible Study

La Plata Christian Church Rev. Scott McNay

10 am Sunday Service 8:45 am Sunday School 8:45 Bible Class

Millard New Hope Methodist Reformed Church 10 am Sunday Worship

June 17, 1927 to February 22, 2014

Warren Gene “Jack” Lee, 86, of Ethel, MO, passed away Saturday, February 22, 2014, at Samaritan Hospital in Macon, MO. He and his twin sister, Wava, were born June 17, 1927, in Ulen, MN. They were the children of Herman Martin and Eva Ethel (Cooper) Lee. In 1928, the Lee family moved to Macon County, MO. Jack attended the rural school of Fairbanks for four years, then three years at White Oak. He attended the eighth grade and four years of high school at Ethel, graduating in May 1945. On September 27 of that year he was drafted into the army at Fort Leavenworth, KS. His training was at Camp Roberts, Fort Ord, and Camp Stoneman in California. In March, 1946, he was shipped overseas to Korea as part of army of occupation of Japanese territory. He returned to the U. S. in January of 1947 with the rank of T4 (Sergeant) and was discharged in February at Fort Sheridan, IL. In the fall of 1947, he entered Northeast Missouri State Teachers College in Kirksville, MO. In May of 1950 he graduated with a Bachelors Degree in Education. Jack began a teaching career in Keytesville, MO. After three years he moved to Los Angeles, CA, to enter the University of Southern California for another degree. Jack graduated in August of 1955 with a Masters Degree in Education. He taught in Lynwood, CA, for fifteen years; and then, returned to Missouri in 1968. He took some college courses for one year; and then began teaching in Pattonville High School in St. Louis County, MO. In 1981 he was selected the Outstanding Teacher of Missouri by the National Education Association of Missouri. Jack retired in 1986 after 35 years of teaching history and had about 7,000 students during that time. Some of his other accomplishments were: served on the Ethel City Council for 24 years; wrote a book, A History of Ethel; served on the Samaritan Hospital Board for nine years; served on the committee that created 911 for Macon County; and was a member of the Macon County Historical Society for over 40 years. He enjoyed attending auctions and collecting unique items. Jack contributed numerous of these items to the Macon County Historical Society Museum. He had the honor of have three items from his collection featured in a Smithsonian Institute Book. He and his brother, Wilmer, put Ethel on the map, or at least made known the correct population of Ethel. They fought and won the battle to have the government recognize the correct population of Ethel. They were interviewed by local TV stations as well as MacNeil Lehrer on PBS. They also assisted MO legislators with changing the Missouri Constitution to give gas tax to the 97 Missouri town with populations of 100 or less. In honor of their parents, Jack and Wilmer planted 95 Autumn Blaze maple trees. They also gave out strings of Christmas lights. He is survived by seven nieces and nephews and two sisters-in-law and one brother-in-law. Jack was preceded in death by his parents, three brothers, Winford, Wilmer, and Wesley; two sisters, Wava Hogenson and Waneta O’Brian. Funeral services were 10:30 am, on Wednesday, February 26, 2014, at the Greening-Eagan-Hayes Funeral Home in Macon with Pastor David Tharp officiating. Burial, with full military honors, was in the White Oak Cemetery south of Ethel, MO. Visitation was Tuesday evening from 4 pm to 7 pm at the funeral home in Macon. Memorials are suggested for the Macon County Historical Society. ONLINE CONDOLENCES MAY BE MADE TO: www. greeningeaganhayes.com

Macon First Baptist Church Phil Bray, Lead Pastor 9 am and 10:30 Services 6 pm Family Worship

Crossroads Christian Church Matt Stieger, Lead Minister

8, 9:30 and 11 am Services 9:30 Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday School March-May 10:40 Worship 8, 9:30 and 11 am Junior Church 6 pm Sunday Eve Bible Study

La Plata United Methodist Church Pastor Karen Coy 8 am Worship 3 pm 2nd Wed. UM Women

Macon United Methodist Church Pastor: Rev. Julius T. Ketsenburg Traditional Worship 8:45 am Traditional Worship 10:45 Contemporary Worship 9:45 Sunday School for All Ages

Death Notices James C. (Woody) Woodland, age 62 of New Cambria, Missouri (Wien area) died Sunday, February 23, 2014 at University Hospital in Columbia. He is survived by his mother Roxanne Woodland, Jefferson City; son Christopher Woodland, Brookfield; daughter Cristina Shearer, Excello. Funeral services were held Thursday, February 27, 2014 at Delaney Funeral Home in Marceline. Scot Eugene Biggs, born March 4, 1963 in Kirksville, Missouri, passed away February 23, 2014. Surviving are his wife Gina Quintana, mother Margaret Harrison Biggs, grandmother Virginia Daniels Biggs, brothers; Darrin Lee and Todd Monroe Biggs,. Services were at Tempe Mortuary in Tempe, AZ. Visitation was at 3:00 p.m. with service at 4:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 26, 2014.

Your Ad Could Be Here! Call Today! 660-332-4431 C Y

M K

3A

C Y

M K


4A

C Y

M K

C Y

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

Deadline Looms for Enrolling in 2014 Volunteers Needed to Fight Missouri Health Insurance Marketplace Fraud

The Missouri SMP (Senior Medicare Patrol) program is recruiting volunteers to take part in the fight against fraud, waste and abuse in Medicare. It is estimated that the Medicare program loses $60 billion each year as a result of fraud, errors, and abuse. For Medicare beneficiaries, it results in reduced quality of care and less money for needed benefits. For taxpayers, it results in wasted tax dollars. SMP volunteers play an important role in fulfilling the SMP mission “Empower and assist Medicare beneficiaries, their families, and caregivers to prevent, detect, and report healthcare fraud, errors, and abuse through outreach, counseling, and education.” SMP volunteers say this work is rewarding because they help protect seniors from falling prey to scam artists, assist them in understanding how to read their Medicare Summary Notice, and how to report any questionable activity. SMP volunteers receive two days of training to prepare them for their work. “We want every volunteer to succeed, so the SMP program

provides outstanding training programs, tools, and coaching to support them,” said Rona McNally, Missouri SMP Project Director. If you are interested in volunteering, call the Missouri SMP at 1-888-515-6565 to learn how you can help fight Medicare fraud. The next training program for new volunteers in Adair and surrounding counties will take place on: Date: April 15 and April 16, Time: 9:00 to 3:30pm, Training Location: Kirksville, Deadline to Register: March 25, 2014, Contact Missouri SMP at 888-515-6565. The SMP program is funded in part by grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Community Living. For more information about the national program and other resources, go to www.missourismp.org.

Shannon Isaacson, AAMS® Financial Advisor .

603 E Union St Macon, MO 63552 660-385-4328 www.edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com

Randolph County Caring Community Partnership the Northeast regional Hub covering 17 counties in Missouri is a not for profit organization working to better the health of the community by helping individuals understand the Marketplace and to answer any questions they may have. Please share our contact information with your congregations by church bulletin/newsletter to let them know we are here to help people make an informative decision regarding their Healthcare options. Time is almost up! Under the new health insurance coverage rules outlined in

the Affordable Care Act, most Missourians will be required to have health insurance by March 31 or pay a penalty. The clock is ticking for Missourians to enroll before this critical deadline passes. As part of the Cover Missouri Coalition, Randolph County Caring Community Partnership is continuing our work to provide factual and unbiased information about the Marketplace and is working to dispel myths. To date, more than 54,000 Missourians have enrolled in health insurance plans through the Missouri Health Insurance Marketplace. To further increase awareness statewide and

help Missourians enroll in the Marketplace, RCCCP and NECAC is participating in a coordinated statewide outreach effort on Saturday, March 8th. Locally, Get Covered Day! At the Macon Housing Authority, 1404 S Missouri St, Macon Missouri from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm Get Covered Day includes: •Chance to check out plans without enrolling •Get informative infor-

Present: Mayor Charles Thompson, Alderman John McGee, Alderman Trent Perry, Alderman Dennis Jones, Police Chief Jason Bunch, City Clerk Bobbie Jacques Present: Susan Hamilton, Kurt Hamilton, Lois Bragg, Tyler Roberts, Gracie Roberts, Ralph Smith and Kelcey Smith. Mayor Thompson declared a quorum present and called the meeting to order at 6:00 p.m. and the Pledge of Allegiance was recited. Alderman McGee gave the invocation. Visitor Comments: Susan Hamilton filed a formal complaint with the Board of Aldermen regarding the property located at 306 West Davis. Susan informed the board the property was full of trash and considered the property unsightly reducing the value of the neighborhood. Ralph Smith told the Board of Aldermen they

had notified the police department of barking dogs in the yard. It was the consensus of the Board of Aldermen to send the property owners a formal request asking them to clean the property within the next 60 days. Consent Agenda: Regular Meeting Minutes 01/14/14* Utility Report* Tax Coordinator Report* Court Report * Park and Recreation Minutes –none submitted Alderman Jones moved to approve the consent agenda, seconded by Alderman McGee. Motion carried ayes-Perry, Jones, McGee, Herron Mayor and Board Committee Reports: Mayor Thompson thanked the city crews for the great clean up done during the last snow storm; he also commended the electric department on all their successful efforts in bringing power to the citizens

of La Plata during the power outage. If it hadn’t been for the electric department’s efforts La Plata would have experienced several additional hours without electricity Department Reports: Police Department: Chief Bunch reviewed the police report with the Board of Aldermen. Sewer Update: City Clerk Jacques told the Board of Aldermen an information meeting would be held in City Hall Wednesday February 19, 2014 at 12:30 p.m. Executive Session: Alderman McGee made a motion and seconded by Alderman Jones to move into executive session at 6:24 p.m. The vote as follows: Alderman Herron – aye, Alderman Jones – aye, Alderman Perry – aye, Alderman McGee – aye. The motion passed. Alderman McGee made a motion and seconded by Alderman Jones to move

La Plata Council Minutes

Nutrition Site Menu (660)-665-9163

SPRING MARKET IS HERE! Interest Rates Remain LOW! NOW IS THE PERFECT TIME!!

Edina

UnderBrashear Contract

Unionville

Kirksville

Darling 3 Bedroom **NEW LISTING** Must see newer 3 **NEW LISTING** 3 Bedroom Ranch with home remodeled 6 years bedroom, 2 bath Ranch Custom Built 5 Bedroom Basement! Great ago includes large home on 20 acres m/l with home in beautiful Family Home Built 1996. attached garage! Full Finished Basement! country setting! Call Judy Williams Susan Chidester Erick Hanson Mark Whitney 660-341-7182. 660-216-4383 660-341-4527 660-341-5014. MLS #18667 $69,900 MLS#17880 $78,000 MLS#17798 $169,900 MLS #18676 $369,000 LaPlata New Cambria Kirksville Novinger lata P La

2 Story 4 Bedroom Beautiful 5 Bedroom, 3 **PRICE REDUCED** Spacious 3 Bedroomhome on 3.3 Acre Lot Bath home with full includes stocked pond basement and Machine home with attached 2 car and detached garage! Shed in private country garage and Garrett Lake Carmen Stanton access. Anita James setting! Evonne Baker 660-216-4044 660-341-1773 660-341-1785 MLS#17573 $75,000 MLS # 16357 $158,000 MLS #18109 $145,000 Kirksville

**NEW LISTING** 2010 Model Fuqua Charming 2 Bedroom Home with full Cape Cod Home with basement and prime oversized Bedrooms and hunting on 95 acres m/l full Basement! Frank Wheeler Anita James 660-341-4231 660-341-1773 MLS#18083 $324,500 MLS#18654 $99,000

Laplata

Move-In Ready 3 Bedroom Ranch Home with hardwoods and updated kitchen with granite countertops! Michael Bradley 660-216-0510 MLS#18306 $110,000

Business Opportunity!! Great Corner location with 4800 sqft of space! Kim Keyes 660-626-3920 MLS #17361 $49,900

Edina

Kirksville

LaPlata

Kirksville

**PRICE REDUCED** 50x40 Vacant Lot with Charming Remodeled 3 Bedroom 3 Bath home 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bath multi purposes! with many updates! In- Lot has electricity, water, Two-Story home on cludes hot tub and 30x60 Corner Lot.! Evonne sewer, phone. Shop! Jerry Gillum Baker 660-341-1785 Judy Williams 660-341-4451. MLS#16440 660-341-7182 MLS #12809 $209,900 $145,000 MLS#18383 $10,000

1605 S. Baltimore, Suite A Kirksville, MO 63501 www.c21kirksville.com 660-665-5678

C Y

M K

Monday, March 10 Pork patty, broccoli rice casserole, mixed vegetables, pears Tuesday, March 11 Swiss steak, salad, corn, French bread, banana Wednesday, March 12 Hot beef sandwich, mashed potatoes, lima beans, apricots Thursday, March 13 Beef stew with potatoes, carrots and onions, cabbage, applesauce, biscuits, sugar cookies Friday, March 15 Chicken fillet, baked potatoes, beets, dump cake.

**NEW LISTING** Beautiful Brick home featuring 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, newer roof, and more! Heather Condon 660-216-4658 MLS#18684 $89,900

into executive session at 6:33 p.m. The vote as follows: Alderman Perry – aye, Alderman Herron – aye, Alderman Jones – aye, Alderman McGee – aye. The motion passed. With no further business the mayor adjourned the regular meeting at 6:33 p.m.

TOPS

TOPS MO 877 La Plata met Tuesday, Feb. 25 in the La Plata Christian Church Fellowship Hall. Gail led the meeting. We opened with our TOPS and KOPS pledges. Karen C. led us in singing “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” Our best TOPS loser was Donnie Joyce with Gail as runner-up. Bobbi and Janet stayed the Same. KOPS Barbara G. remained in leeway. Bobbi earned TOPSi the 5th consecutive month. We believe this may be a record in our club. Donnie Joyce introduced her “Lose the Nickel” weight loss contest. Bobbi won the last weight loss contest, the Dollar Contest. Last week, Janet completed her 6 week lesson on having a healthier heart. Week 4 stressed Finding More Time, week 5 encouraged strength training, week 6 was to form good habits, measure your waist again and get a check-up. Also last week it was voted on and approved to retain our present officers until July re-election.

Atlanta High School Receives Statewide Award for Battle of the Belt Competition

Nice 3 bedroom home with spacious rooms and fenced yard! Michelle Lawrence 660-341-7070 MLS#17494 $37,500

Milan

Greencastle

mation regarding the Marketplace •Find out about penalties •What is true and what is a myth Please contact us at cherr ishambl i n @ rc c c pmo. org or call 660-676-6155 to learn more about upcoming events or to speak with one of our certified specialists. To learn more about the requirements to get covered or upcoming deadlines, visit www.covermissouri.org.

Amy Crawford and Cyndy Bliem-Sharp, representatives for the Northeast Coalition for Roadway Safety and Amber Fiedler with American Family Insurance presented the banner to the students.

Thursday afternoon, February 27th, Terri Magers, school nurse and BOTB coordinator, along with students of the Scrub Club at Atlanta High School, were presented with a silver banner and a $100 check for the school’s dedication and hard work during the Battle of the Belt competition, having 98.68% seat belt usage. Atlanta was one of ten northeast Missouri schools to receive statewide and regional honors in the competition. A special presentation was also made to Ms. Magers for her dedication to safety programs within the school. The Battle of the Belt is a student safety belt competition which runs from October 1 - November 9. The Missouri teen seat belt usage rate statewide is 67%. Educating our young drivers on responsible driving habits doesn’t end with the competition. Please continue to keep reminding them about the importance of wearing their seat belt every time they are in a vehicle and to NOT text and drive.

C Y

M K


C Y

M K

C Y

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

From the Macon County Sheriff ’s Office On March 1, 2014, the Macon County Sheriff ’s Office concluded a theft investigation that occurred on February 19, 2014. The investigation resulted in the arrest of 27 year old Nathan W. Dotson of Bevier, Missouri. On February 19, 2014, Dotson allegedly stole over 50 lottery tickets from the Sinclair Mini-Mart gas

station located east of Macon, Missouri. Evidence located during the theft investigation allowed Macon County Sheriff ’s Deputies to obtain a warrant for Dotson’s arrest. The stolen lottery ticket serial numbers were reported to lottery officials. Dotson is currently being held in the Macon County Jail on a $4,500 cash bond.

The Macon County Sheriff ’s Office is investigating multiple reports of intentionally damaged mail boxes. It is believed the property damage occurred between the night of February 25, 2014 and early morning hours of February 26, 2014. The damages were in rural areas surrounding the city of Macon. The Macon

On 02/16/14 at approximately 12:16am, an officer of the Macon Police Department made enforcement contact with a vehicle in the intersection of Rubey and Bourke Streets. As a result of the contact, police arrested a 27-year old white female of Macon for driving while intoxicated, careless driving and failure to stop at a stop sign. The suspect was transported to the Macon Police Department for processing and was later released pending a municipal court date. On 2/18/14 at approximately 4:40pm, a victim reported to the Macon Police Department their vehicle was damaged while parked unattended in a parking lot in the 200 block of North Rubey Street. The victim’s vehicle sustained damage to the rear taillight area and appeared to have been caused by another unknown vehicle. An estimate of the damage was not available at the time of the report. This case remains under investigation at this time. On 02/21/14 at approximately 5:15pm, the Macon Police Department received a report of a man appearing to be intoxicated, walking in the downtown area and was nearly struck by a vehicle due to his condition. Police responded to the downtown area and located a male subject who was apparently intoxicated in the 300 block of West Bourke Street. Due to the man’s condition, police took him into custody for safety purposes and transported

him to the Macon Police Department until a family member could arrive. A short time later, a member of the man’s family arrived and he was turned over to their care for the night. No arrests were made in this incident. On 02/21/14 at approximately 8:30pm, the Macon Police Department received a report of a man walking in the downtown area who appeared to be concealing a long gun. The report indicated a man was in the 100 block of Vine with a gun concealed under clothing. Macon Police Officers responded to the area, making contact with a white male suspect the officers witnessed exiting an upstairs apartment and then entering a business below. The male suspect appeared intoxicated and denied knowledge of a weapon. Officers then located a weapon, appearing to be an assault rifle, located inside the apartment stairwell entrance which was then cleared for safety and seized. Upon further investigation, the male suspect, a 27-year old white male of Moberly, was taken into custody for unlawful use of a weapon. The suspect was then transported to the Macon Police Department for processing. Officers later learned the

weapon had been stolen from a residence in the 100 block of South Rollins Street earlier the same date. The suspect was later taken to the Macon County Jail where he was placed on 24-hour hold pending formal charges. Formal charges of unlawful use of a weapon and stealing of a firearm were filed against Douglas A. Dale of Moberly, with bond being set at $9,000.00 cash only. Dale remains in custody at this time. On 02/24/14, the Macon Police Department received information pertaining to the possible existence of a meth lab in the 800 block of Locust Street. Due to the nature of the incident, the North Missouri Drug Task Force was called to assist. Through the course of the investigation, officers of both departments were given consent to search a residence and vehicle in the 800 block of Locust Street. Officers seized a meth lab at the location. The Macon Police Department and NoMo Drug Task Force are continuing their investigation. Possible charges are pending the outcome of the investigation. A criminal charge is merely an allegation and the defendant is, of course, presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

DENNIS JONES Stacy L Taylor

Financial Advisor .

219 North Rollins Macon, MO 63552 660-385-6612

www.edwardjones.com

Douglas A. Dale

by Kathy Nickerson

County Sheriff ’s Office encourages anyone with valid information regarding any criminal activity to contact the Macon County Sheriff ’s Office at (660)385-2062.

Nathan W. Dotson

Kris and Martha Palmer and David Barton escaped the cold and traveled to Orlando, Florida, last week to represent Heartland Christian College at the ABHE Annual Meeting. Kris is the president of the college, and Martha serves as the Academic Dean. This year’s focus was “Engaging the Emerging Generation” and speakers focused on today’s generation of students and their needs. The team from Heartland attended workshops, connected with leaders and friends from other Bible Colleges, and enjoyed times of worship with a diverse group of the body of Christ. Our college is in the midst of a long and intense process of accreditation

“The Color Paper!”

with this organization. At this point, the college has been accredited to begin admitting foreign students, which is one of our primary goals. Every time we send a missions team to another country, we see the urgent need for training and equipping of leaders among the churches. Another benefit of the accreditation process is that many of HCC’s credits now transfer to four-year colleges and universities. Several members of our alumni have taken advantage of that to go back to school and earn their bachelor’s and master’s degrees. We look forward to seeing the college help many more students “prepare for life” in the years ahead.

New Subscriptions are Only $20 for a Limited Time! SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

CALL 660-332-4431 For More Information

SALES: (660) 956-0230 SERVICE: (660) 956-0312

2014 Silverado

Whether you're searching for a new or used car, researching financing options, or looking for a quick quote on a vehicle, our friendly, professional staff is ready to provide you with all the help you need. Here at Jim Robertson's it is our goal to provide you with an excellent purchase and ownership experience. Just call or email us if you have any questions regarding a purchase or our site information. We're here to make your shopping experience pleasant and hassle-free. Please let us know if there is any way we can serve your automotive needs. Our staff is ready to help. Serving you as your hometown Buick, GMC and Chevrolet dealer, Jim Robertson Chevrolet has the vehicle you have been looking for. Located in Kirksville, we’re an easy drive from Macon, MO. In addition to our convenient location our excellent selection of new and used cars, trucks and SUVs makes us an excellent choice if you’re looking for a Macon, MO Chevrolet, GMC and Buick dealership. Let your Kirksville Chevrolet and Buick dealer help get you into your next car, truck or SUV!

Jim Robertson's 3607 N. Baltimore St. Kirksville, MO 63501

CREDIT UNION 310 N. Missouri St. Macon, MO 63552 660-385-8205 www.yourHCU.com

C Y

M K

5A

Heartland Headlines

Macon Police Department News

DUE TO OTHER OBLIGATIONS, I WILL NO LONGER BE OPERATING J O N E S S TA N D A R D S E R V I C E EFFECTIVE MARCH 31, 2014 I WOULD LIKE TO THANK ALL MY CUSTOMERS FOR THEIR PAST PATRONAGE.

M K

C Y

M K


C Y

6A

M K

C Y

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

Gifford Items A huge lightening storm occurred the night of February 19th. It brought rain all night and little sleep for area residents, with all the thunder. We even had some hail the next morning, Temperatures ranged in the 40’s. Mike, Jennifer and Timerrick Gunnels, Christy and Rob Bristow, Dillon Huddleston, Nikisha Couch and children enjoyed Sunday supper with Connie and David Gunnels. Roger and Mary Jarman enjoyed a visit from Lana and Mike Daniels. Sunday att4endance at Gifford   Christian Church included Jean Elliot, Don   Mac McRay, Rogna Kelly, er Jarman, Kirby Bailey,  

M K

Debbie Newland, Chad, Amanda, Claire, Morgan and Shelby Belfield, Dean and Marietta Slaughter, David, Donnetta, Ashlee and Will Moore, Terri Perry and Bill Wobkin visited Dean and Marietta Slaughter Sunday evening. Marilyn Sinnock and Carolyn Hill attended memorial services for Dasie Cobb Tuesday. Richard Burns attended the FFA breakfast Friday morning at the La Plata High School during FFA week. The La Plata Community Fire District held its meeting Monday evening. In attendance was James Repogle, Richard Burns, Danny Smithson,

Area Farm Bureau Leaders Annual Legislative Dinner

by Sharon Burns

Steve Shipp, Ray Ivy, Bob Couch, Tammy Carmack, Jeff Crow and Mike Jackson. Jerry Hill of Kansas City visited Thursday with Marilyn Sinnock. The Oklahoma Indians 4-H Club enjoyed skating Friday night at Macon Skate Center. Richard Burns attended La Plata High basketball games Thursday night at the high school. Pearl Perry enjoyed a visit from her daughter, Connie Gunnels, Saturday at La Plata Nursing Home. Donna Gray visited Todd and Leslie Gray in Columbia this weekend. She also enjoyed seeing Alaina Gray play the Show-Me Games Saturday and Sun-

   

Come  support  International  Ag  trip  to  Brazil  this  coming  summer!  We  will   provide  you  with  a  spaghetti  dinner  and  a  live  auction  on  March  8th  at  6:00  PM   in  the  High  School  gym.  Tickets  will  be  $12  for  adults  and  $8  for  ages  9  and   under.  Purchase  your  tickets  now  from  Jarod  Womack,  Rachel  Richardson,  Emily   Wyatt,  Brody  Preston,  Jacob  Beauchamp,  or  Luke  Mosley.    

day. Marylin Sinnock helped Donna Smithson babysit with grandchildren Saturday while Danny Smithson conducted the Aberdeen Angus bull sale. Richard, Sharron and Amy Burns attended the wedding of Robert Burns and Eliza Smith in Lawrence, Kansas this weekend. Amazing enough, the weather was sunny and delightful for this February wedding. Also attending were Bill and Viola Burns or Lawton, Oklahoma, Mike and Beth Burns, Michelle Burns, John Burns and Sarah Burns of Topeka, Kansas, Kimberly, Matthew, Cody and Tyler Robinson of Lawton, Oklahoma, Carolyn and Larry Foster of Peculiar, Allison and Curt Herge of Little Elm, Texas, Steven, Jalyn Burns if Fort Worth, Texas.

MO State Representative Nate Walker of the 3rd District, left, attended the Missouri Farm Bureau’s annual Legislative Dinner in Jefferson City that was held in conjunction with the Legislative Briefing and Commodity Conference. Area Farm Bureau leaders participating in the event from Adair, Sullivan, and Putman Counties included: Bob and Andy Jackson, Jack and Kathaleen Winkleman, Drew Lock, Evelyn and Jack Thomas, Donna and Mike O’Brien, Robert and Kelly Valentine, Chris Dickel and Justin Oaks.

The Home Press is not OUR paper, It’s YOUR paper!

Submit your items of interest today! news.homepress@gmail.com 660-332-4431

Clarence Chronicles

by Patty Truitt

Just one question. Is this horrible, cold, nasty weather ever going to end? I think everyone is so very tired of this never-ending winter. We need spring so badly. The Clarence Community Betterment had an EXPO Saturday February 22 at the Clarence Veterans Building in Clarence. I heard they had a really great turnout and lots of people said it was really fun and had lots of booths for shopping. Breakfast and lunch was served. I always have to work Saturday and my one complaint is that they never give enough notice for us Saturday workers to take

Current  donations  as  of  2/13/14  for  the  auction  will  include:    

     

 

off work. I have spent all my time off work the last 3 weeks getting ready for my Premier Designs Jewelry Party. Well I had it Sunday the 23 at 5pm and I am so glad it was such a great success. I had 11 great women come for the party. My daughter Laura and granddaughter Katherine came; neighbors Donna and Carolyn were here. Friends Shirley, Doris, Krista, Lori, Ashley, Becky, and Sara were all here. The party rep was Brandi and we all had a great time. I served lots of food and everyone said they had a great time. I got lots of free jewelry and had fun my-

self. I am just really glad it is over. I was so anxious to have this. I am always afraid something will go wrong. So glad all of my good friends were here. I am writing this on Tuesday night instead of Wednesday because I have to go to Moberly tomorrow for an eye exam. I think I need new glasses as reading; my favorite pass time is giving me a headache. Hope things go good. I also plan to go to Lowe’s, Goodwill, and 2 or 3 antique shops. I know I will have fun. Praying all of you have a great week. Patty

Clarence Care Center

By: Kim Hutcherson

John and Jazzy Laye led Church services for the residents and their guests Sunday. Cathy Carothers played the piano. Those attending were Darrell McDowell, Virgie Engle, Dorothy Dee Daniel, Jim Hill, Helen Griswold, Colleen Reid, Virginia Clem, Doreena Young, Oreta Imler, Larry Vaughn, Norma Latimer, Frank & Martha Mason, Joann Wood, Blanche Hoffman, Grace Killen, and Isabel Hutcherson. This afternoon, Bill Bevan read to the residents. Holly and the residents played the dice game, Left, Right, Center. Grace Killen and Dorothy Dee Daniel won the most games. The amazing Bingo Volunteers, Helen Sinklear, Lin-

To simplify life, we design around it.

*29 cu. ft. model WRF989SDA. Based on fresh food volume among leading brand French Door refrigerators. ®/™ ©2012 Whirlpool. All rights reserved. WPR13556 | whirlpool.com

The new Whirlpool® Refrigerator has the most fresh food capacity available.* In every detail, it’s made to hold more of everything your family loves. whirlpool.com/kitchen

PUBLIC AUCTION Machinery Auction Thursday, March 20 • 10am

Selling All Modern & Antique Tractors & Machinery Hay Equipment, Heavy Equipment, Trucks, Trailers, Lawn Mowers & Horse Drawn Equipment – Held At: Lolli Bros. Livestock Market, Inc. Macon, MO

Consign Your Items NOW

660-385-5850 WAYNE & ANGELA HELTON Owners C Y

M K

Call: Dominic, Frankie & Tim

660-385-2516 or 660-651-4024 or 660-651-4040

213 N. Rollins Street MACON, MO 63552

Bus 660-385-5850 Res 660-385-3900 Cell 660-676-9082

da Barton, Susan McCarty, Delores Burmeister, and Mary Lee Gingrich, came this afternoon to play our favorite game with us. Those playing were Mary Jane Rainey, Doreena Young, Isabel Hutcherson, Carlene Waack, Colleen Reid, Grace Killen, Blanche Hoffman, Martha Mason, Dorothy Dee Daniel, Helen Griswold, Frank Mason, and Paul Tracy. The grand prize winners were Colleen, Helen, and Blanche. Tuesday, the residents played the Nintendo Wii Charge game. Colleen Reid and Helen Griswold accumulated the most points. Holly hosted the monthly birthday party this afternoon. She served cake and ice cream

to everyone in attendance. Celebrating February birthdays were Birdie Judd, Darrell McDowell, Frank Bowen, Paul Tracy, and Virginia Gibson. This evening, Al Cadwell entertained us with some good ol’ country music playing. It was a great evening with song and fellowship. Harold and Molly stopped by for a visit Wednesday, which brightened everyone’s morning. Holly and the residents played SkipBo before lunch. Carlene Waack won the most games. Pastor Delbert Earlywine, from the Clarence United Methodist Church, led Bible study this afternoon. Scripture was read from Colossians 3:1-17, and Virgie Engle played the piano. The Friendship Design class met Thursday. Holly and the residents made beautiful Mardi Gras masks with the traditional Mardi Gras colors, purple, gold, and green. The residents played Let’s Make A Deal this afternoon. Only one resident received a ‘zonk’, however, no residents were brave enough to go for the ‘big deal’. Everyone still had a lot of fun and Holly made sure everyone received a small prize. Clark Dobbs, from the Macon First Baptist Church, led Bible study Friday. The study title was “If God Is Good, Why Is There Suffering?” Scripture was read from Job 30:26-31; 42:1-6. Holly and the residents played Popcorn Bingo this afternoon. Saturday morning, Ronnie Shores visited with the residents and shared his collection of cd’s. The residents watched “The Long, Long Trailer” during Movie Time with Darrell today. We would like to thank Eadra Beech for her recent donation to the Care Center. We have so much to be thankful for! Have a wonderful week! C Y

M K


C Y

M K

C Y

M K

Wednesday March 5, 2014

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

PAY FOR 3 WEEKS AND GET THE 4TH WEEK

Only $8.00 Per Week for up to 20 words, 25¢ a word thereafter. (Full payment of $24 must be paid to get 4th week free.)

7A

LEGAL IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MACON COUNTY, MISSOURI PROBATE DIVISION In the Matter of Sally Ann Caldwell, Disabled Estate No. 13MA-PR00068 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF CONSERVATOR TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF SALLY ANN CALDWELL, a disabled person:

LEGAL

LEGAL

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MACON COUNTY, MISSOURI PROBATE DIVISION

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MACON COUNTY, MISSOURI PROBATE DIVISION

On February 4, 2014, Richard Caldwell was appointed conservator of the estate of Sally Ann Caldwell, a person adjudicated disabled under the laws of the State of Missouri, by the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Macon County, Missouri.

Mark Spidle, Deceased.

In the Estate of William A. Tuggle, Deceased Estate No. 14MA-PR00006

The business address and telephone f the Conservator are: 7N345 Stevens Glen Road, St. Charles, IL 60175; 630-886-9237.

NOTICE OF LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION GRANTED (Supervised)

All creditors of said disabled person are notified to file their claims in the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Macon County, Missouri.

Estate No. 14MA-PR00009

NOTICE OF LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION GRANTED (Independent) To All Persons Interested in the Estate of Mark Spidle, Deceased: On February 14, 2014, Connie Spidle was appointed the Personal Representative of the Estate of Mark Spidle, Deceased, by the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Macon County, Missouri. The Personal Representative may administer the estate independently without adjudication, order, or direction of the Probate Division of the Circuit Court, unless a petition for supervised administration is made to and granted by the court. The Personal Representative’s address and phone number is: 501 Lamb Avenue, Macon,MO 63552; 660676-1802. The Personal Representative’s attorney’s name, business address and phone number is: Lesa L. Bonnett, 128 Vine Street, P.O. Box 394, Macon, MO 63552; 660-385-2003. All creditors of said decedent are notified to file claims in court within six months from the date of the first publication of this notice or if a copy of this notice was mailed to, or served upon, such creditor by the personal representative, then within two months from the date it was mailed or served, whichever is later, or be forever barred to the fullest extent permissible by law. Such six-month period and such two-month period do not extend the limitation period that would bar claims one year after the decedent’s death, as provided in Section 473.444, RSMo., or any other applicable limitation periods. Nothing in Section 473.033, RSMo, shall be construed to bar any action against a decedent’s liability insurance carrier through a defendant ad litem pursuant to Section 537.021, RSMo. Date of the decedent’s death: October 18, 2013 Date of First Publication: February 19, 2014 /s/ Denice Zebarth, Probate Clerk Publication Dates: February 19, 26, March 5 and 12, 2014.

To All Persons Interested in the Estate of William A. Tuggle, Decedent: On February 7, 2014, Mary J. Tuggle was appointed the Personal Representative of the estate of William A. Tuggle, decedent, by the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Macon County, Missouri. The Personal Representative’s address is: 502 W. Phipps, La Plata, MO 63549. The Personal Representative’s attorney’s name, business address and phone number is: Wallace W. Trosen, One Crown Drive, P.O. Box 267, Kirksville, MO 63501 and 660-665-4070. All creditors of said decedent are notified to file claims in court within six months from the date of the first publication of this notice or if a copy of this notice was mailed to, or served upon, such creditor by the personal representative, then within two months from the date it was mailed or served, whichever is later, or be forever barred to the fullest extent permissible by law. Such six-month period and such two-month period do not extend the limitation period that would bar claims one year after the decedent’s death, as provided in Section 473.444, RSMo., or any other applicable limitation periods. Nothing in Section 473.033, RSMo, shall be construed to bar any action against a decedent’s liability insurance carrier through a defendant ad litem pursuant to Section 537.021, RSMo. Date of the decedent’s death: 11/18/2013 Date of First Publication: 02/ 12/2014 /s/ Denice Zebarth, Probate Clerk Publication Dates: February 12, 19, 26, and March 5, 2014.

Alexandra Pointe

Newly Renovated 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments!

Basic Rent For 1 Bedroom - $360 2 Bedroom - $440

NOW LEASING

“Vouchers Accepted”

Apply in person at 801-802 Ranchland Drive Macon Mo or call 660-395-0022

BID REQUEST

The La Plata Promotional Committee is taking bids to purchase a new track loader for the City of La Plata. All parties interested in submitting a bid for the track loader can obtain information on bidding from the La Plata City Hall at 113 S Gex, La Plata, Mo 63549, or by calling 660-332-7166. All bids must be received by March 12, 2014 at 8:00 a.m. The La Plata Promotional Committee reserves the right to reject any and all bids for any reason.

www.maconcountymo.com

Income Restrictions Apply Open Monday-Friday 8AM-5PM Equal Housing Opportunity

Date of First Publication: 02/19/2014 /s/ Denice Zebarth, Probate Clerk Publication Dates: February 19, 26, March 5 and 12, 2014.

FOR RENT FOR RENT: Homes and apartments in La Plata, Wein, Kirksville, Atlanta, Edina, Novinger. Beautiful 4-bedroom house in Atlanta. Other homes available $350-$1000 per month. 660-332-7421 or 660-341-9081 FOR RENT: 10’x10’, 10’x5’, 5’x5’ and 10’x20’. La Plata Storage. Call 332-7599.

Brookview Apartments of La Plata

FOR SALE

Energy Efficient for Low Electric Costs HUD Approved Vouchers Welcome Call Manager at 660-342-8884 for an application

FOR SALE IN LA PLATA Well maintained 2-3 Bedroom House featuring a full basement, fireplace & sunroom. Large yard with 2-car attached garage. Close to schools. Call 660-341-6690 or 660-341-4687.

www.brookviewapts.com MO RELAY 711 “Brookview is an equal opportunity provider and employer”

T L Ranch

MARCH

Annual Performance Tested Bull Sale Friday, March 14, 2014 6:00 p.m. Edina Livestock Sales Edina, MO SELLING: 30 Registered Angus Bulls* Semen Tested Performance Data & Ultrasound Available

Missouri

802 Locust Columbia, MO 6 PHONE - 573-44 FAX - 573-874-5

Ad Title: Ter Ad Code: TL Ad Size: 1x4

Selling 40 Commercial Two-Year-Old Black Pairs For Information Call: (660) 341-9974 or 397-3333 or 397-9999 TL Ranch • Terry Little Terry Cell (573) 470-0846 Marilynn Cell (573) 470-0847 Call for Brochure

Mowing Bids The City of La Plata is now accepting mowing bids for the La Plata Cemetery. Mowing will be as needed based on mutual agreement with the La Plata Cemetery Board. Bids must be received in the La Plata City Hall no later than Monday, March 17, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. La Plata City Hall, 101 S. Gex Street, La Plata, Missouri 63549, phone 660-3327166 or fax 660-332-7286. EOE

Your Government and Community Online Resource C Y

M K

C Y

M K


C Y

M K

C Y

5, 2014 Wednesday 8A March La Plata Bills Increasing Again?!But You Can Stop It!

Dear Citizens: The City of La Plata is in the process of trying to find funds for a large wastewater project. This project is the repair or replacement of 4.5 miles of old clay sewer mains. In order to keep rates as low as possible we are trying to get as many grants as possible. In order to get a CDBG grant a percentage of residents will get a survey in the mail. It is VERY important for every resident that receives one of these surveys to fill it out the best you can and mail it back. Again this needs to be done in order to keep sewer rates as low as possible. Thanks, Mike Binder La Plata City Water and Sewer Supervisor Side note: I sat down with Mike and wanted to pass some along additional information. The grants Mike is talking about DO NOT have to be repaid (good for us as in NO increase in bills). And if we don’t get an 80% return on these surveys, then alternative means will have to be secured. i.e. Loans - which do have to be repaid, and you know what that means - it will come out of our pockets in the form of increased bills. So it vital we fill these things out and return them!!! Please don’t blow this off. I beg each and everyone of you who receive a survey to do your part as a community and sit down and do it. We are only hurting ourselves if we don’t. Additionally Mayor Thompson had a recent meeting and found there may be funds “grants” available for private citizens through Rural Development for fixing major problems on their property. These people have been notified as a result of the smoke testing in the lines done awhile back. All citizens are welcome to attend the next City Council meeting on March 11 where SKW engineers and a representative from Rural Development will be there. So you’ll be able to find out more about this or any other questions you may have. Randy Bunch, Co-Editor, The Home Press

Mention this ad for a year's supply of batteries with the purchase of any hearing aid

MICHELLE WOODWARD, M.S. CCC-A GUTENSOHN CLINIC 700 W. JEFFERSON ST., 4TH FLOOR KIRKSVILLE, MO 63501

We accept most insurance plans • HEARING TESTS • HEARING AIDS • HEARING AID REPAIRS

CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT

660.626.2777

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

By Carolyn Mueller

A cloudy dawn broke over Joplin on May 23, 2011.

Tara Prosser and Lily woke to a new world. Though their house suffered only cosmetic damage, the landscape surrounding them was greatly altered. Lily and Tara were sent to search the Home Depot on Rangeline. Rangeline is the aorta of Joplin, running right through the middle of town, host to major shopping centers, day cares and the high school. The Home Depot was split wide open by the storm, its contents spilling across the ground. When Tara and Lily arrived, they encountered an alien world. It was a foreign war zone. It could not be Missouri. It could not be her hometown. First, there was the lumber. Everywhere. Businesses and trees had simply become piles of wood, strewn about in every direction, as if monsters had shaken life-size Lincoln Logs across the ground. Then there was the glass. It sparkled, a fine sheen across the wreckage, a deceptively dangerous dusting of glittering ice. It could not be avoided. Glass embedded itself in Lily’s paws. The ground was littered with sharp objects. Tara stepped on a nail. She saw twisted metal. Automobiles bent, crushed as easily as tin cans. She saw the impossible, everywhere. Then, there was what was no longer there. Street signs. Stoplights. Roads. Tara used her phone’s GPS to navigate her own town. The daycare was missing. So was the roof of the high school. The park, whole neighborhoods were gone. And every, single tree. It was another planet to Tara and Lily. They slowly picked their way through the wreckage, as they began their search

CHAPTER 6: The Aftermath through the roofless, rickety remains of the Home Depot. More storms rolled in. Lightning flashed in the sky above the roofless store. Dark clouds showered a city that already seemed beyond repair.

shelters. They squatted amongst what was left of their homes and belongings, protecting them from looters, dishonest people who might try to steal anything of value left in the rubble.

Joplin saw no relief. Cold rain poured over the wreckage, followed by a humid, searing heat as rescue work continued.

Looting happened. But goodness happened too. Cases of bottled water were left at stoplights for anyone in need. Residents of neighboring towns arrived bearing food and supplies. Hugs were given freely. Someone painted a single, surviving tree in a smattering of bright colors, hanging birdhouses on every available branch, so that the winged residents of the treeless town could find a perch and a home. Volunteers were everywhere. The President arrived to assess the wreckage.

At first, Tara and Lily, along with other search and rescue teams, searched for survivors. Tara was terrified about Lily’s

Lily and Tara picked through the shards of Joplin. They searched for survivors, attempted to offer closure to those missing loved ones, tried to help Joplin to move forward and began to put their home back together piece by little piece. health. She knew that the heat was hard on her furry companion. She worried about the glass in her paws and how her so recently ill body would hold up during the long days of rescue work. Luckily, veterinarians in the area flocked to Joplin, setting up tents to serve as makeshift animal clinics. The vets checked on Lily everyday, making sure she was feeling well and handling the heat. They cleaned the glass from her paws and tended to her needs. For 14 days, Tara and Lily plodded through the remains of Joplin, picked over the glass and then returned at sunset to their own home, its structure miraculously saved by some kind of good grace. Tara luxuriated each night over a microwaveable dinner and a shower. She knew others weren’t as lucky. They camped out in churches and makeshift

Dig A Little Deeper! Tara used GPS to navigate her way around Joplin after the tornado. Visit the Library of Congress Everyday Mysteries website: loc.gov/rr/scitech/ mysteries/global and find the five questions that GPS can answer? What are the three segments of GPS? In the News: Tara enjoyed the luxury of a hot shower and a microwavable meal. Use the newspaper to find examples of necessities (needs) and luxuries (wants). Create a T chart labeled “necessities” and “luxuries” and write your examples in the appropriate column. Explain why you classified each item as such. For a companion teacher guide, visit mo-nie.com and use code: teachmo14. CCSS: R.CCR.1, R.CCR.2, R.CCR.3, R.CCR.4, R.CCR.5, R.CCR.7, W.CCR.4,SL.CCR.3, L.CCR.4

©2014, Missouri Press Foundation

Illustrations by Nick Hayes • Design by Sharpe Design

SPEED MATTERS Sign up for HIGH-SPEED WIRELESS INTERNET as low as

$25 /MONTH for 3 months.

Wireless Modem included at no charge.

SHIFT INTO OVERDRIVE WITH HIGH-SPEED WIRELESS INTERNET With speeds up to 15 Mbps,* we have the FASTEST Wireless Internet in the area, and will more than meet your need for speed. So cruise the web with your local, reliable High-Speed Internet provider—Chariton Valley.

25.00/month promotional pricing is valid for 3 months on the 10GB Data Plan. All High-Speed Wireless Internet plans are ½ off for 3 months. After promotional pricing the normal monthly rate applies. Promotion pricing requires a 24 month service agreement. Activation fee of $30 applies. Certain restrictions apply. Contact us for details.

*

Call Today 660-395-9000 | www.cvalley.net C Y

M K

phone internet cable tv wireless

C Y

M K


C Y

M K

C Y

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

...And Johnny Came Marching Home They decided to cut across an open field that had been recently plowed. They passed a barn as they made their way across the open space. A German soldier on guard duty outside the barn shouted out for them to halt. “We just continued going until he fired a round over our head.” The two men were captured and thrown into a prison cell in Munich. “When you attempt to escape, only one in a hundred attempts was successful. I only had ninety-six more attempts to go.” He said with a smile. Elijah asked him what we were they going to do now. John simply replied “I don’t know what you’re going to do but I’m going to bed.” The American army had advanced to within artillery range of the city. The shelling of Munich had intensified to the point the Germans moved John and the other allied prisoners to the basement of the Spatenbrau Brewery. The following day Mr. Cavett was liberated by none other then his own 45th Infantry Division. “The first one I recognized was our Mail Clerk. I asked him were the hell was my mail.” He said with a laugh. “He said were have you been?” John Replied “Waiting for

Home loans you can make from home Macon-Atlanta State Bank makes it easier than ever to apply for a home or refinance loan. With our new online tools, the entire process is electronic — Of course, we still give you the option of mailing or dropping off documentation, so it’s flexible, too. And, we’re always just a phone call away if you need us. The only thing you’ll have to do in person, is visit our branch to close on your loan if you’re approved. Get started now by visiting: homeloans.mabank.com

1513 N. Missouri Macon, MO 63552 mabank.com

660.385.3161

you bastards”. John was sent to recover and be processed in a camp in France named Camp Lucky Strike. John spent a week there under a rigid diet program that included all the milk you could drink. “They kept it in 50 gallon garbage cans all over the camp.” John was then sent back stateside to finish his recovery. Mr. Cavett then received 66 days for rest and recovery at home. John was in Miami Beach to begin training for the invasion of Japan, when word finally came that Japan had surrendered and the war was over. Mr. Cavett left the Army to join the newly formed Untied States Air Force. John was assigned to a Radar Unit in Germany and was on duty the night the Russians began the blockade of Berlin. This was one of the first crises of the Cold War. The Russians cut off all routes into the city in an attempt to gain complete control of the German Capital. John’s commanding officer asked for volunteers to form a convoy to break through the Russian blockade “Like a damn fool I volunteered, we set out on the autobahn for three days. I thought to myself, you idiot your going to get yourself killed

NOTICE The Annual La Plata High School Alumni Association meeting will be held May 24th, 2014 in the La Plata High School gymnasium. Please be making plans to attend. Additional notices will be forthcoming at later dates.

M K

Wednesday March 5, 2014

9A

Continued From Page 1A with these stunts.” The call never came to proceed and Mr. Cavett spent the next year as part of the biggest air supply efforts in history. The western powers flew over 200,000 flights and supplied over 4,700 tons a day to Western Berlin until the Russians were forced to lift the blockade. John was also stationed at Okinawa when hostilities broke out in Korea as part of an Air Control and Warning unit. The first American bombers B-17’s of the 19th Bomber Group sent to strike back at the North Korean invasion took off from the base John was stationed at on the 25th of June 1950. Mr. Cavett served throughout the Korean War and left military service after 20 years in 1963. I asked John what he was most proud of during his time in service to his Country. John said it was a medal he received while stationed at an airbase in Peshawar Pakistan. This was the same base Francis Gary Powers took off from when his U-2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union in 1960. John said that a group of US servicemen dug out a hole for a swimming pool for some of the local youths. “We dug it out with pickaxes, shovels and wheel barrels.” John said “It was nice to help people and not tear up the country and killing people.” For this action he received the Medal for Humane Action. I was struck by the fact Mr. Cavett, after everything, was most proud of this moment. I want to be one of many to say “Thank You John for your service.” We can only read the events that shaped the world we live in, while John lived them.

Deere SeaSon is here x739 signature series lawn Tractor • 25.5 hp (19 kW)3 engine • Exclusive 4W steering • Full-time 4WD • 4-year/700-hour bumper-to-bumper warranty4

0

% 60 For monThs &

400 oFF1

$

Get incredible deals on reliable John Deere equipment – ready for hard work or adventure! GatorTm rsx850i • 62 hp (46.2 kW)4 engine • 53 mph • Multi-link independent suspension • Full-locking, true 4WD system

3.9

% 60

&

For monThs

1000 oFF2

$

Your Partner in Growing a Better Tomorrow. Visit us at www.sydenstrickers.com. mexico Hwy 54 South 573-581-5900

currYVille 3691 Hwy 54 573-594-6493

PalmYra Hwys 61 & 24 573-769-2112

kirksVille Hwy 63 North 660-665-1500

macon Jct 36 & 63 660-385-2177

TiPTon 31217 Hwy 5 660-433-5596

moscow mills 155 John Deere Drive 636-366-9400

chillicoThe Hwy 36 East 660-646-5493

rochePorT 1500 North Route J 573-446-3030

hermann 1854 Hwy 100 West 573-486-3204

Authorized Dealer Offer ends 4/30/14. Subject to approved installment credit with John Deere Financial. Some restrictions apply; other special rates and terms may be available, so see your dealer for details and other financing options. Up to 10% down payment may be required. Save $400 USD on all new X739 Signature Series Tractor. 2Offer ends 4/30/2014. Subject to approved credit on Revolving plan, a service of John Deere Financial, f.s.b. Some restrictions apply; other special rates and terms may be available, so see your dealer for details and other financing options. Available at participating dealers. Prices and models may vary by dealer. 3.9% APR is for 60 months only. 3Hour limitations apply and vary by model. See the LIMITED WARRANTY FOR NEW JOHN DEERE COMMERCIAL AND CONSUMER EQUIPMENT at JohnDeere.com for details. 4The engine horsepower and torque information are provided by the engine manufacturer to be used for comparison purposes only. Actual operating horsepower and torque will be less. Refer to the engine manufacturer's website for additional information. Before operating or riding, always refer to the safety and operating information on the vehicle and in the Operator’s Manual. SFL10X100306HMP-4C 1

C Y

M K

C Y

M K


C Y

5, 2014 Wednesday 10A March

M K

C Y

No Jail in Macon County?

Plans for the renovations can be since inside the courthouse. By Sharon Coram their historic integrity. Funding for these needed facilities Why does Macon County is to come from a 1/2-cent need a new jail? Simply put, capital improvements and there are two reasons: the a 1/4-cent law enforcement building is over 100 years old sales tax that appear on the and beyond repair and, ac- ballot for the April 8, 2014 cording to Judge Rick Tucker, election. The 1/2-cent capital the County has been directed improvements sales tax is to by the Grand Jury that the fund the principal and interbuilding to be condemned. est payments on the leaseFrom the tour the Home hold revenue bonds issued to Press staff was given, we found finance the new jail construcamong the many problems tion and courthouse renovathat the foundation is crack- tions. According to the ballot ing and the floors are pulling language of away from the walls, the baseProposition 1, this tax will ment floods and the joists are expire on September 30, cracking. The condition of the 2034 or upon final payment building does not allow for of the financing, whichever dignity, respect or safety of the occurs first. Since additional inmates nor the staff work- funding is necessary for the ing there. It is not a matter operation and staffing of the of cleaning, painting, or other new jail, and additional law cosmetic upgrades. This is a enforcement activities, the structural problem that can- 1/4-cent law enforcement not be repaired. In addition, sales tax is included on the there is no handicap accessi- ballot as Proposition 2. It exbility in the jail or in the other pires (sunsets) on September County buildings in the com- 30, 2024 unless extended by plex. the voters. Below is what Macon CounOf particular interest on the ty Commissioners shared with sales tax matter according us at their Media Day and to Presiding Commissioner requested we share with the Alan Wyatt is that County public: residents are only going to have this additional 3/4-cent On Thursday, February sales tax for three years as the 20, 2014 the Macon County 1/4-cent County Park CapiCommissioners, Alan Wy- tal improvement Sates Tax att, Jon Dwiggins, and Drew ceases on September 30, 2016 Belt, and the Macon County and the 1/2-cent Highway 36 Sheriff, Kevin Shoemaker, Transportation Development met with various members Sales Tax is to expire by Januof the media including The ary 1, 2018. “At that point Home Press and KTVO. the total sales tax will be the The primary purpose of this same as it is now,” Mr. Wyatt session was to fully explain responded. the proposals for constructThe combined temporary ing a new jail and completing increase in sales taxes of renovations to existing court- 3/4-cent results in 75 Cents house and courthouse annex for every $100 of purchases buildings while preserving made in Macon County.

Therefore, a new refrigerator costing $1,000 carries $7.50 of sales tax as part of the transaction. Research for Macon County completed by the University of Missouri Extension Service estimates the monthly expense due to the combined sales taxes for an average family in Macon County to be $4.26. “This study also projects that more than one-half of these taxes will be paid by visitors to Macon County,” Mr. Belt stated. “We hope that the citizens of Macon County realize that while no one likes paying extra taxes, the problems that we have with the jail and courthouse is something we can no longer ignore.” Mr. Dwiggins remarked. First on the agenda for the members of the media was the viewing of a DVD about the project explaining the County’s needs and how the proposed project works to solve these needs. It was produced for the County by CVTV, Chariton Valley Telephone Corporation’s local content station and is to be shown at most of the public meetings scheduled between now and the election. Anyone desiring to watch this DVD can do so by going to

RV PARK Bevier, MO

St Patrick’s Camper Specials Saturday March 15 9 Am –5 Pm $1000 Off Any In Stock New Camper + A Free Anderson or Reese Hitch W/ Any Camper Purchased That Day!

HERITAGE GLEN

WILDWD XLITE

Shoemaker

WILDWOOD

TRADE-INS ARE COMING IN CHECK shoemakersrv.com FOR DETAILS!

M K

problems with the 105 yearold building as well as giving the group a view of the cells and an explanation of why all female prisoners have to be transported to Randolph County. “It does not have the ability to provide the sight and sound separation required under the safe jail federal guidelines for detaining male and female inmates in the same facility,” said Shoemaker. Shoemaker then reviewed the findings of the Grand Jury appointed by Circuit Judge Division I Frederick (Rick) Tucker conducted in 2012. The Grand Jury composed of Macon County residents issued an order to Judge Tucker that the jail be condemned and closed due to the unsafe conditions. Judge Tucker is holding off on that final action while the County pursues this effort to procure the funding to correct the problem. “It is not a question of whether or not the Macon County Jail will be closed. It is a matter of when,” Sheriff Shoemaker said. “Closing the jail means that all of Macon County’s prisoners will need to be transported, housed and cared for, at the taxpayers’ expense, in other jails that meet safety

standards. It is estimated that this expense will exceed $400,000 per year. Macon County remains liable for its inmates housed in other County jails and this is only an option as long as space is available in other Counties. Otherwise the distance travelled to find other facilities becomes longer and the associated expense greater. “Our citizens should not believe that voting against our sales tax proposal will save them money, The cost of transporting and boarding our inmates outside of Macon County will be nearly the same as the payments are expected to be for the jail construction and courthouse renovations.” Sheriff Shoemaker concluded. Copies of the proposed plans for the new jail were displayed and discussed with the media representatives. The next stops included walking through the courthouse and courthouse annex. Since Court was in session the group was better able to visualize the need for improved security and safety as well as the risks associated with not being able to separate the inmates transition from the jail to the courthouse from the court officers, witnesses, victims, family members, and the public. Improving security and safety in the courthouse and courthouse annex is a primary goal for the proposed facilities improvements with another high priority being to bring easy accessibility to all buildings into full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The County officers reviewed the

The floors can be seen pulling away form the walls. plans for the renovation improvements suggested for the courthouse and courthouse annex and talked about the overall benefits expected to occur. A summary of those conversations follows: “Once all construction of the jail and renovations to the courthouse and courthouse annex are completed, separation is going to occur between regular County government functions and those of the criminal justice system,” said Jennifer Wilson, Principal Architect with Nform Architecture. “Currently inmates going to court walk past the public who may be in the courthouse on County business. After the improvements are made, the County offices will be separated from the court and jail functions. The proposed plan also provides one secure entrance to the court functions with the Sheriffs office located adjacent to the single secure courthouse entrance. This is to grant increased security awareness and a faster response time.” Wilson went on to say: ‘The Historic Courthouse presently has an elevator but the Annex does not. A building addition will connect the two buildings permitting access to the elevator for all courthouse functions. The architect team has experience in historic preservation and renovation work, and the County Commissioners are working closely with us to develop solutions that respect the historic traditions of the Macon County Courthouse and maintains the east courthouse square area in its current state to continue the traditional functions that take place on the east lawn.”

It will be up to citizens to decide whether to build a new jail or to have inmates shipped to another county. It is a matter of a small sales tax increase for 4 years, or $400,000 per year expense that could go on indefinitely. In less than 20 years, this cost at taxpayer’s expense will exceed the renovation and rebuilding costs! Regardless of the outcome, the building will be torn down. Should the new tax not be approved, there will still be need to house the Sheriff ’s Department somewhere and there is no room in the current courthouse. One more benefit to think about should the project be approved, the Commission does plan on using as many local contractors as possible and that will help Macon County economy. Be sure to attend one of the meeting planned to help you make your decision. Each event starts at 7:00 pm and are at the following dates and locations: February 24th Ethel City Hall; 25th Macon Expo Center; March 3rd La Plata Elementary; 4th Atlanta School; 6th New Cambria School; 10th Bevier School and March 25th Macon Expo Center.

The photos above show a small example of how the basement becomes wet and/or flooded causing concern over damage to items stored there. The basement is the only place to store certain items. You can also see in the basement that joists are breaking causing a major concern.

2013 MODELS @ BLOW OUT PRICES WILDWD 261BHXL $13800 WILDWD 291FBXL $19200 JUST A FEW OF OUR 2014 MODELS CRSRD CRUISER 355BL $45500 stk 132 2 – WILDWD 28DBUD $20185 stk 138 WILDWD 5TH WHL 29RKSS $24600 stk 141 WILDWD 27RKSS $21995 stk 142 WILDWD 5TH WHL 26DDSS $23700 stk 143 HERT GLEN 327RES $38900 stk 144 WILDWD XLITE 241QBXL $17000 stk 145 HERT GLEN 300BH $33500 stk 160

Opportunities were made available to all media representatives in attendance to ask questions, Mr. Wyatt emphasized that members of the public wanting to learn more about it are welcome to come to the regular Monday and Thursday morning meetings of the County Commissioners or attend one of the special meetings on the issue being held around the county to ask additional questions. “We want everyone to have an opportunity to know what out plans are and why we believe now is the time while interest rates remain attractive and construction bids are likely to be competitive for the project to correct these facility problems,” Mr. Wyatt concluded.

Left: Cracks in the walls of the basement are allowing water to seep in. Above: Shows the cracking foundation at the current jail house.

CROSSSROAD CRUISER

FULL SALES & SERVICE RV PARK 955 N. Macon St., Bevier, MO 63532 660-773-5313 ● Fax 660-773-6977 shoemakers@cvalley.net C Y

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

Damaged and rusting cot frames can be seem throughout the jail cells. YouTube at the web address of http://www.youtube.com/ cvtv22. Afterwards, the media group went on a tour of the existing jail, the courthouse, and the courthouse annex to see firsthand the reason many improvements need to happen. At the Macon County Jail Sheriff Shoemaker pointed out some of the structural

M K

For La Plata Paid For By Dusty Sawyer, Mayor Candidate

Macon Elks Bingo

Macon Elks Bingo is held every Thursday night starting March 6, located at 212 North Rollins in Macon. Doors open at 4:30 pm, early bird 6:30 pm and regular Bingo starts at 7:00 pm. For more information, call 66038502333 after 4:00 pm. Macon Elks is a nonprofit organization.

New Subscriptions are Only $20 for a Limited Time! SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

CALL 660-332-4431 For More Information

C Y

M K


1B

C Y

M K

C Y

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

The Home Press Guide Color Underfoot to Thinking Spring! Spring really is just around the corner even if it’s hard to believe when you look out your window. While you wait for this long cold winter to finally be over, it is a good time to start planning and thinking of Spring. While you think about being outside with the warm sun hitting your shoulders, you might be considering painting the house, or starting your garden. Now is the time to plan ahead

while you wait for the first spring flowers to bloom. We hope this guide will help you in your dreams of Spring!

Is your home starting to look a little worn? Would you like to freshen it up but don’t have a lot of time or cash to spare? No problem. Try these quick, inexpensive fixes. Paint is one of the easiest, most inexpensive ways to spruce up a space. You can paint almost any surface and achieve a variety of finishes using faux painting techniques. And, you can paint as much or as little as you would like. You can paint an entire room, from top to bottom, or just one wall for a pop of color. You can add a few stencils on the stair steps or paint a windowsill. The choice is yours. Lighting is another quick, easy update that doesn’t have to cost a bundle. You can save on your utility bills, too, by installing energy-efficient fixtures. Several stylish options are available, and depending upon your talents and skills, you might even be able to convert something old like a bucket into a fashionable light. New shades and energy-efficient bulbs are other quick fixes. Woodwork can take a real beating over time, especially around doors and windows. Take a look at your woodwork. Could it use a little TLC? Clean and touch it up, or consider replacing it. Trim is relatively inexpensive, and with the right tools and knowledge, very easy to replace. Want to really spruce up your space? Add some crown molding, chair rails or decorative appliqués. Hardware can easily be replaced. Many styles are available, and some are very inexpensive. For less than $50, you can give your kitchen or bathroom a fresh look with new pulls and knobs. New hinges, handles and doorknobs are also relatively

inexpensive fixes. While you’re at it, why not replace the switch plate covers? Several styles are available from the basic bright white to shiny stainless steel. You can even paint or wallpaper old covers. Furniture can easily be updated with slipcovers, pillows and throws. But don’t stop there. Take inventory of your furniture. Are there pieces you no longer need? Could anything be repurposed? Clear out what you don’t need and give whatever remains a facelift with paint, stain and fabric. Make those old dining chairs new again with a fresh coat of paint and reupholstered seats. Polish up the table, conceal the scratches with a stain stick, and you’re all set for your next dinner party. As you make your way through other rooms, pay attention to the furniture arrangement. Could it be better? It’s amazing how much of a difference a simple change in the furniture arrangement can make. These are just a few strategies for sprucing up your space on a shoestring budget. There are many other quick fixes. You could: • Reface cabinets. • Install new faucets and toilet seats. • Replace appliance face panels. • Regrout tile. • Hang new blinds and drapes. • Switch out rugs. • Add some artwork and accessories. • Change out photo frames. • Roll out new rugs. • Bring in some plants and flowers. And, don’t forget the importance of a good cleaning. Clearing away the clutter and cleaning the space from top to bottom can make it look like new.

Quick, Inexpensive Updates

C Y

M K

It’s been quite some time since you’ve bought new carpeting for your home, and it is starting to show. What was once soft and stain free is no longer. It’s time you replaced the carpeting, and while there are many factors to consider from pile cut to fiber to performance rating, the one that has got you stumped is color. You know you don’t want white or black carpeting, but beyond that, you have no idea. Carpeting can be costly, and once you purchase it and arrange to have it installed, there’s usually no turning back. You’re stuck with the color you selected, so it better be right. Here are some tips to help you through the color dilemma. What is the size of the space? Generally, lighter colors open up a space, while darker colors close it in, making for a cozier feel. While dark colored carpeting will hide more stains, it could make your small spaces appear even smaller. How much traffic does the space receive? While lighter colors are more easily soiled than darker colors; darker colors will show dust and lint. If the room(s) where you are replacing the carpet receives a lot of use, you might want to consider a color in the medium range to minimize the appearance of dust, dirt and lint. What is the purpose of the space? Brightcolored carpeting might prove a real distraction in a room intended for work or relaxation such as a home office or bedroom. It might do wonders, however, in a playroom or workout space, adding to the energetic feel. How is the space designed? If you are satisfied with the design and plan to live with it for a long time to come, you might want to choose carpeting that will enhance it, such as an Oriental patterned carpet for an Asian-inspired dining room. If, on

the other hand, you like to change things up, then you might to opt for a neutral colored carpet. That way, you won’t have to worry about designing around the carpeting. You can just add an Oriental rug on top and switch it out when ready. What kind of flow do you want to create in the space? Some people want a continuous flow from room to room, and flooring is one of the best ways to create this. If you have wall-to-wall carpeting throughout your home and you want to keep the flow continuous, stick to one color like tan or gray to create a neutral backdrop. Just make sure the color you select varies somewhat from that of the walls and furniture, else you will end up with one big box. Most importantly, what color do you like? It won’t matter how attractive that silvery gray carpet looks in your home if you hate it. Choose a color that appeals to you that you can live with for a long time to come. Take home samples and review them at various times of the day in different types of light to get a real sense of how they will look in your home. What looks like an elephant gray at the store may look more like a pewter in your home. Know what you are getting and choose the color of carpeting that will best serve your needs today and for many tomorrows to come.

With temperatures eventually heating up, you will spend more and more time outdoors. You’ll be working on your flower beds, sprucing up your garden shed and more. Oh, how you love the warm weather. It makes you want to throw open your doors and windows and bring the outdoors in. Lucky for you, you can. Here are some tips. Bring in the natural light Replace those heavy window coverings with lighter ones wherever possible. Use sheers instead of drapes. Pull up those blinds. Clean your doors and windows, open them on good days and remove anything obstructing the view outdoors. Opt for lighter, earthier colors Planning to do a little repainting this spring? Choose lighter, earthier shades, like greens, blues, browns and yellows. Any color that reminds you of nature will help bring the outdoors in. If you don’t plan to repaint, you can still bring in natural colors by changing out accessories like pillows and throws. Add natural materials Bamboo, hemp, jute, rattan, seagrass and wicker are just some of Mother Nature’s offerings you can bring into your décor. Replace your plastic mini-blinds with rattan blinds, purchase some wicker baskets for your magazines and throw down a couple of seagrass rugs. Incorporate natural accessories Mother Nature provides some of the best accessories around, from pinecones and seashells to pebbles and stones to fruit and vegetables. Incorporate these

into your décor wherever possible. Trade in that artificial floral centerpiece on your mantel for a bowl of seashells. Add a tray of lemons and limes to your dining room table. Stack some rocks on your hearth. Entice the senses Invoke the feel of Mother Nature everywhere you can in your home. Freshen the air with some woody incense, fragrant potpourri or fresh-cut flowers. Bring the sound of water to your space with a fountain or two. Hang some nature photos or murals. Although not real, a wall-size mural of a bamboo garden or a wooded forest can make you feel like you are right there in the outdoors. Go green Anytime you make a new purchase, look for the most eco-friendly option available. When shopping for flooring, consider bamboo, cork and wood over man-made materials. When shopping for paint, look for brands low in VOCs, fungicides and biocides. Natural paint and milk paint are ideal. When shopping for linens, look for earth-friendly ones. Of course, one of the best and easiest ways to bring the outdoors is through houseplants. Accept all seedlings and shoots, visit your local nursery for other options and place all of your houseplants where they can be seen. It doesn’t take much to bring the outdoors into your space. Start sprucing it up now, and when the sun goes down and you’re forced to come inside, you might not mind it so much.

Bring The Outdoors In

C Y

M K


2B

C Y

M K

C Y

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

Budget,

, n a l P

… e t a e Cr

DECKS • DOORS • WINDOWS • INSULATION • POLE BARNS • METAL BUILDINGS NEW CONSTRUCTION • CUSTOM HOMES • REMODELING

This is what we have done for others...

SEE WHAT WE CAN DO FOR YOU!

MIKE COOK - OWNER

314-660-1812 C Y

M K

PLSBUILDERS@YAHOO.COM

C Y

M K


C Y

M K

C Y

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

M K

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

3B

Refreshing Reinventions Is Your Home Ready for Warmer Weather? It is not uncommon for homes built in the 1970s to have paneled walls. Paneling was quite popular then, but not so much anymore. If you have paneling in your home, do not despair. You can reinvent it with a little elbow grease. Here are some ideas. Paint is one of the easiest and most inexpensive ways to reinvent wood paneling. You can go with any color you want, and depending upon the look you are after, you can fill the grooves or leave them unfilled. If you are looking to create stripes, for example, you might want to leave the grooves as are and use them as a guide to mark off the stripes. After a light sanding and cleaning, you will be all ready to prime and paint. If paint is not your thing, perhaps wallpaper is. Wall-

paper comes in a variety of texture and patterns. You can use almost any wallpaper you want, and the prep work is fairly easy. Just fill the grooves with joint compound, sand, clean and apply liner or sizing and the wallpaper. Plaster is another option, but it will take some time to do. There are many types available for novices. For the best results, you should prime the paneling, attach the metal lath and apply the plaster as recommended. Depending upon your needs, you can create a smooth, glossy finish or an earthy, flat finish. Love the look of your paneling? Keep it and give it an update with a new finish or new trim. You can sand, stain and varnish solid wood paneling just like you would any solid wood furniture piece. You

can even use stencils and painter’s tape to create a pattern. Laminate wood paneling is a bit more difficult, but can still be sanded and stained. The stain may not penetrate evenly, however, so you might want to experiment in a corner first. You can create any number of patterns on paneling with molding. Just cut the trim, nail it to the paneling, putty the holes and paint or stain the trim as you see fit. None of these ideas appeal to you? Check online and at your local hardware store for further suggestions. And remember, if nothing appeals to you, you can always remove the paneling. Just be aware that what you uncover may not be in the best of condition. Installing new drywall can be time consuming and costly.

an assessment, it’s possible you’ve acquired a substantial collection of electric openers, dicers, slicers and spinners. If all these tools help you cook, that’s fabulous. If not, they are simply taking up valuable cabinet, cupboard and countertop space.  Take a look at what you have and eliminate anything that’s duplicative, broken or somehow unnecessary. Improve Functionality: Re-think your appliances. These days, you don’t need to settle for antiquated appliances that perform just one function. Innovations are making cooktops and ovens more functional and versatile, providing greater opportunities for spatial kitchen layout. For example, you could pair a gas cooktop with an electric oven or install electric ovens side by side. Flexibility is also being built

into today’s appliances. For example, some new cooktops come equipped with an exclusive, one-ofa-kind removable griddle that allows for numerous food preparation options on an all-in-one cooking surface. You can steam, grill, warm and more with the included griddle -eliminating the need for additional space-hogging appliances like steam ovens and warming drawers. This is a great way to be a more flexible cook in a small amount of space. Maximize Storage: Creative storage solutions ill increase your work area and cabinets, while affording more space to move around. For example, an over-the-door spice rack can give you more room to prep food. A wall-mounted wine rack that holds both bottles and glasses can free up cabinet space and reduce the furniture footprint of your kitchen. Magnetic panels on the wall can be used to store pots, pans, knives and metal utensils. When it comes to your kitchen, don’t settle for anything less than top-notch, flexible appliances and an ideal use of the space you have. Whether you’re a serious chef or a casual cook, your kitchen can benefit from key upgrades and a thorough organizational sweep.

Improve Your Kitchen Without Renovating It The kitchen is perhaps the most functional room of any home, but often it doesn’t feel large enough or flexible enough. And great cooking starts with a comfortable kitchen. While renovating your kitchen may not always be practical, there are steps you can take to improve it without breaking the bank or your kitchen walls. Here are a few ways to make the most of your kitchen: Evaluate Your Kitchen: It’s time to weed out the good, the bad and the ugly. When is the last time you did a thorough inventory of your kitchen gadgets? After several years without

Show Me Me Excavation Excavation &&Plumbing Show Plumbing Stan Schrock Schrock ••816-284-0510 Stan 816-284-0510 Greentop, MO. Greentop, MO.••660-766-2636 660-766-2636

*General *GeneralMini Mini Excavation Excavation&& Skid SkidSteer SteerWork Work *Serving *Serving Northeast Northeast Missouri

Warmer weather is just around the corner, which means higher temperatures. But does it have to mean higher energy bills too?  The answer is no. There are numerous ways to keep your home cool and bills low this summer. After a few months off, it is vital to check that your air conditioning system is still working in an efficient and optimal manner.  If you have a central air conditioning system, for peace of mind, you might want to have your system checked by an HVACR professional.  Once your system has been inspected for efficiency, there are a number of things you can do to keep energy bills low: • Clean your air filters. Check them every couple of weeks and change them at least twice in the season, or as directed by the manufacturer.

• Don’t obstruct airflow around air conditioner units -- keep them clear of plants and debris. • Raise the thermostat about five degrees, because each degree you raise the thermostat will save you a percentage off your cooling energy bill. • Compare energy bills from last year.  If your costs have significantly increased, simply contact a qualified HVACR technician -- they can help determine the source of the

Go into any furniture store showroom, and you’ll come across hundreds of groupings, some that were manufactured to match and others that are similar in style and coordinate well together. Furniture retailers know how to stage their showrooms to maximize the look of each piece and help shoppers envision how a certain group of furniture would look in their home. Whether you choose to buy a matching set or mix it up with pieces that complement each other is up to you. A common misconception is that all of the furniture in the room must match. While you can purchase a complete furniture set, you do not have to. You can select a matching table and buffet for your dining room and chairs from some other area of the showroom or another store altogether. The key to a coordinated room is furniture that suits each other and the style of the room. A heavy, ornamental mahogany table and buffet might look out of place in a beach-themed sunroom filled with white wicker. Before you make any decisions, you need to ask yourself a few questions. What rooms are you shopping for? How much fur-

niture do you need? What is the style of the rooms and existing furniture? If you’ve got a blank canvas to work with, the sky is the limit. You can choose any furniture you want for the room and design around it. If you already have some furniture you don’t intend to part with or move to another room, you will want to select furniture that complements it and speaks to the style of the room. You must also consider your design skills and time constraints. If you don’t have a knack for interior design or a lot of time to shop, then you might want to look solely at furniture sets. The manufacturer will have already taken the time to coordinate the pieces. You can purchase the set that best suits the style of your room and be done with it. If, on the other hand, you enjoy putting rooms together and have the time to shop for furniture, then you might want to mix it up a little and look at everything on the showroom floor. Depending upon your needs and wants, you might select a couple of pieces from a set and coordinate them with other pieces from around the showroom. Or, you might forgo the sets altogether and make up your

problem.                                 Remember, just because you have an energyapproved, eco-friendly, high-efficiency product, it does not mean automatic money and energy savings.   For substantive results, proper installation, service and maintenance are important too.  By taking preventive measures, you can rest assured that this season you will be cool while saving money and energy.

Match Or Mix It Up

own grouping of pieces from several furniture showrooms around town. Remember, it is your home, so buy furniture that suits you and the style you have or long to create. If you hate rattan, then don’t buy it, no matter how good it might look in your sunroom. Buy something that you like and will use for years to come. Just make sure it complements whatever is already there, and never overlook the comfort factor. There is no use in spending a small fortune on a sofa that looks good but feels lousy. The same goes for function. What’s the point in shelling out hundreds of dollars on an antique chest in need of substantial repairs you’ll never make? More often than not the purchase of furniture evolves over time. Most people can’t afford to replace all of their furniture at once. They buy a little at a time and work it in here and there until they have their home the way they want it. Styles and needs do change over time, so keep in mind that what you select for a room today might not work later down the road. When possible, choose pieces that can stand the test of time, in design as well as form and function.

*Waterlines *Waterlines & & Sewer Systems Sewer Systems *Livestock *Livestock Watering Systems Watering Systems *Footers and *Footers and Concrete Demo Concrete Demo

Missouri

La Plata Lumber & Hardware BUILT

"The Gettin' Place" You need it? Come get it at the "Gettin' Place"... If we aint got it we will get it!!!

u o Y r o f t s Ju From this..............To This!

Call for a quote today! (660) 332-4411 C Y

M K

C Y

M K


4B

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

C Y

C Y

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

The Color Quandary

Warm days are coming again, and it’s time you got serious about your home’s exterior. It could use some work, and while a paint job would do wonders, you’re thinking about taking a different route—vinyl siding. That’s right. You’re ready to shell out some bucks to rid yourself of the hassles of painting. No more hauling five-gallon buckets of paint home, hoisting everything up the ladder and spending long hours under the sun with a paintbrush in hand. You’ve found a siding installer. You’ve selected a siding style. Now all you need to do is choose the right siding color for your home. Vinyl siding is easy to install, requires very little maintenance and lasts a long time, making it a popular choice among homeowners. It costs more than paint, however, so you will want to make sure you choose the right color the first time around. If the exterior of your home has been the same color since you bought it and you like

that color, then the choice might be a no-brainer. Look for a siding color similar to the paint color already on your home. If you are not real fond of the color of your home’s exterior and are ready for a change, the decision might be a little more difficult. Here are some tips to ensure you select the right color. Consider your neighborhood Study your neighborhood. What color are most of the homes in the area? Brown, white and gray? If so, then you might want to stick to a neutral shade. A bright pink home in a sea of brown, white and gray will get the neighbors talking and might even bother some of them. Take your color cues from your neighbor’s homes. If there is quite a mix of colors, then you may have more leeway. Just be careful that you don’t pick a color that draws unwanted attention. Consider your landscape Study your yard and the yards around your home.

M K

What do you see? Lush, green lawns? City streets? Desert landscapes? Select a siding color that will accentuate the landscape. A lavender home might look out of place in a desert landscape but work well in an urban landscape, especially one known for its array of colors. Consider your home’s architectural style Study the architectural style of your home. What colors would suit it best? Some architectural styles lend themselves to a certain color palette. Colonials, for example, look best in white, cream or beige, while Craftsman homes look best in darker colors like browns and reds. Do a little research on the architectural style of your home and find out what colors traditionally work best on the exterior. Consider your home’s features Study the features of your home. What do you see? Red brick? Ornate columns? Rustic window boxes and shutters? Black

shingles? White gutters? The siding color you select should complement the features of your home. Red brick and black shingles might not work with buttercup yellow siding. While you could paint the brick, you don’t want to cause undue work for yourself. Do yourself a favor and choose a siding color that will complement all of the features of your home. Consider your own preferences Study your preferences. Do you want your home to stand out or blend in? Do you have a color in mind for your home’s exterior that you can’t live without? It’s your home, so choose a siding color you can live with for years to come. If you want your home to stand out and complement your rose beds, go ahead and choose the rosy pink siding. If you want your home to blend in and complement your red brick, choose the reddish-brown siding. If you cannot bear the thought of your home

being any color but yellow, then go ahead and choose the buttercup yellow siding. Consider the limitations of vinyl While vinyl siding does last, it will fade over time. Understand that the siding color you select today may not be the same color years from now. That deep blue could be a much softer blue 10 years from now and a really pale blue 30 years from. Try to choose a siding color that will fade less or you can live with as it fades. Selecting the color of vi-

nyl siding takes time. Don’t rush it. Study the color choices carefully, select the ones that appeal to you most and start narrowing down the options based upon the criteria above. When you have three or four choices in mind, ask for a list of homes featuring those vinyl siding colors and drive by them to see what the colors look like in the sunlight. Vinyl siding is a costly endeavor that you do not want to have to redo. Make sure you choose the right color!

Brick can be a great feature in any home, but like most things, it can wear down over time. You can clean brick, you can repoint brick, and you can even replace brick. Replacement, however, can be difficult and costly. If you have brick that has seen better days and replacement is not an option, you might want to consider painting it. Painting brick is not hard, but it does take some work, and once done, it can be hard to undo. Removing paint from brick is a painstaking process, so you need to make certain you are ready to proceed. If so, here are some pointers.

Choose the right supplies. Brick in general is porous. For the best results, you will probably need a conditioner paint and a brick paint. You will also need the right rollers and brushes for easier coverage. Consult the professionals at your local hardware store for recommendations. Prep the surface. To ensure the paint sticks, you will need to prepare the brick properly. Start with a good wire brushing, particularly if the brick has a lot of chalkiness. This will also remove any loose material from the brick. Inspect the brick. See any cracks or missing mortar? You should seal the cracks

with caulk and repoint the mortar. Finally, give the brick a good cleaning with soap and water. For exterior brick, you may want to use a power washer. If you have mold, mildew or moss, make sure you use a bleach solution. Put in the time. Because brick is so porous, it takes longer to paint. In addition to the conditioner paint, you will probably have to apply two to three coats of the brick paint. When you are done, make sure you give the brick ample time to dry. Just because it feels dry to the touch after a few hours doesn’t mean it is totally dry. Brick is so porous that it usually takes a few days for it to dry com-

pletely. Painting brick takes time, time to research, time to prepare and time to complete. Make sure you allow ample time in your schedule to get the job done right.

Brick Basics

O p e n H o u s e To o B I G F o r O n e W E E K E N D ! ! ! Refreshments!!

*New Design For 2014*

OPEN HOUSE

NEW! S a l e m Ha m i sp h re C r u i s e Li te

Travel Trailers Starting @ $10,900 WOW!!!

S i l v e r a d o 5t h W h e e l s

Starting @ $41,900

Each Saturday In March!!!

Huge Selection Of Pre-Owned Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes and Pop-Ups

P r o w l e r & Ly n x

Starting @ $12,900 WOW!!!

Beilstein Camper Sales 800-748-7187

Hwy. 61

B i g H o r n 5t h W h e e l s

Served On Saturday’ s During March!!

LaGrange, MO.

Quincy, IL.

Beilstein Camper Sales Hannibal

Palmyra

Mississippi River

Hwy. 36

Hwy 61 South • 4 Miles South of LaGrange, MO www.beilsteincampersales.com www.beilsteincampersales.com C Y

M K

C Y

M K

www.beilsteincampersales.com

www.beilsteincampersales.com

Month of March

www.beilsteincampersales.com

www.beilsteincampersales.com

www.beilsteincampersales.com


C Y

M K

C Y

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

Get the Most Nutrition From Your Calories Taste drives most food choices, “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right,”! This is the 2014 National Nutrition Month® theme for March, and the Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages everyone to choose a variety of the most nutritionallypacked foods. Charging up your plate with superfoods provides your body with amazing energy and health benefits with relatively few calories.

These taste-great, feelgreat nutrient rich foods work wonders to keep your mind and body healthy. The added bonus here is once you start enjoying superfoods on a regular basis, you will start noticing the difference in not just how you feel, but also how you look. Need ideas on how to add superfoods into your daily routine? -Mix in raisins, dried cranberries, cherries or blueberries, with almonds

LIBRARY

CORNER

vegetables and reduced-fat cheese and yogurt parfaits made with strawberries and blueberries. -Drink nutrient-rich, low-sugar beverages such as low-fat or fat-free milk or 100-percent fruit juice. -Top foods with chopped nuts or reduced-fat sharp cheddar to get crunch, flavor and nutrients from the first bite. -Cruciferous Vegetables cabbages, cauliflower, broccoli rabe‹contain a powerful range of disease

fighters are great mixed in to a salad or chopped up and put in baggies for a crunchy snack. -Whole grains. Breads for sandwiches, pasta for your favorite Italian dish, quinoa to feel great. -For dessert, enjoy a tropical treat by blending mango, plain low-fat milk, ice and a splash of pineapple juice, or stir chocolate syrup into a cup of coffeeflavored yogurt, freeze and enjoy. Visit the Academy’s web-

site to view a library of recipes designed to help you “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.” As part of this public education campaign, the Academy’s National Nutrition Month website includes a variety of helpful tips, games, promotional tools and nutrition education resources, all designed to spread the message of good nutrition based on the “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right” theme.

J.R. Flores State Conservationist

Health in Omaha, which was sponsored by the Howard G. Buffett Foundation. The national and local forums brought together farmers, researchers, business leaders and conservationists to look for ways to work together to harvest the potential of improving our nation’s soil health. Why focus on soil health? The answer is simple: By restoring the health and function of our cropland soil, we can transform production agriculture, making our farms more productive, profitable, resilient, and better prepared to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Moreover, the importance of this effort some might even call it a revolution will only grow in the years ahead as we look to feed the world’s growing population on fewer acres, with finite resources, in a sustainable manner. From a national perspective, soil health is important to every U.S. consumer because cover crops and soil health management systems impact drinking water quality and the usability of recreational surface waters. Soil health management systems re-

duce sediment loss from farms, sequester carbon, create biodiversity in our rural landscape and increase the resiliency of our farms and our food production system. By using no-till and cover crop mixtures, a growing number of farmers have not only stopped losing soil from their fields, but they have actually regenerated the soil. In some instances, and over time, they’ve increased their soil organic matter by 3 or even 4 percent. While that might not sound like much, consider that every 1 percent increase in organic matter allows the soil to soak up and hold an additional 15,000 to 20,000 gallons of water, PER ACRE. On a large scale, improved soil health would greatly reduce flooding and would provide weather resiliency for food production. Improving the nation’s soil health represents an unprecedented opportunity for American agriculture. Of course there are also challenges. For example, climate, cropping and local resource conditions will require new production methods, new technologies and new plant genetics. Most im-

portantly, improving soil health requires a willingness by many farmers and ranchers to change the way they have been doing things for many years. The good news is that our nation’s farmers, researchers and ag business leaders are courageous and tenacious problem solvers who realize that each journey begins with that first step. We must remember that the road to soil health is a journey, a constant building process of using conservation cropping systems over time to improve the health and function of the soil. It is a journey of discovery and of learning and, yes, sometimes of failures. But if our generation is to meet the mounting production, climate and sustainability challenges of the 21st Century, there is no better time than now to make a long-term commitment to improve the health of our nation’s soil. I am confident that if we commit to this effort, we will leave a legacy of conservation that will transform the landscape and ensure the health and productivity of our nation’s soil for generations to come.

Harvesting the Potential of Soil Health

We owe our very existence to the soil. But rather than treating it like our future depends on it, too often we’ve treated it like dirt. Increasingly, farmers, researchers, business leaders and conservationists recognize that if we are to increase production, make our farms more resilient to weather extremes, and minimize the off-farm impacts of agricultural production, we must focus on improving the health and function of living and lifegiving soil. Recently, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and University of Missouri Extension hosted several forums on cover crops and soil health throughout the state. These local forums took place concurrently with the National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil

***Book descriptions are written from information found on book covers, internet reviews and personal perspectives.

Friends of the Library needs YOU! Join today or renew memberships! Visit your local library today!

SALE EVENT! Carpet • Accents • Pictures Prices SLASHED!

NAMES YOU KNOW! QUALITY YOU TRUST! Broyhill • La-Z-Boy • Serta • Lane • Best •Vaughn Shaw • Mohawk • Riverside • LaCrosse and more!

YES! NO!

BROYHILL

YOU DECIDE HOW YOU PAY... including

SOFA

DOWN PAYMENT

1/2 PRICE!

and

$

INTEREST

5 YEARS* for

NOW!

CARPET SLAHED TO SELL!

No Interest til

One Room of Carpet as LOW as......

2018* BEST

$

Glider

299

Reg. $54990

549

98

Reg. $1099 95

No Money Down

$

49 !

SERTA BEDDING

199

$

Reg. $59995

00

LAZYBOY RECLINER

1/2 PRICE!

$349

98 NOW!

Reg. $69995

COME PREPARED TO BUY!

BRING YOUR TRUCK AND CHECKBOOK FOR MAXIMUM SAVINGS!

8:30 - 5:00 Wed. - Fri. 8:30 - 1:00 Saturday

• with approved credit & min. purchase. Clearance items for cash & pickup. Cannot be combined with other offers. Get all the details at Brown’s. Pictures may vary slightly from actual item.

Downtown, Shelbina

210 S. CENTER • SHELBINA, MO C Y

M K

5B

to your morning oatmeal. -Add slices or cubes of avocado to sandwiches and salads. -Sweet potatoes are great smashed or roasted in the oven with garlic, onion and olive oil. -When eating out, look for nutrient-rich choices, such as entrée salads made with dark leafy greens like spinach or kale topped with grilled seafood and low-calorie dressing, baked potatoes topped with salsa, grilled

Get Ready, Get Set, READ... Fear Nothing by Lisa Gardner is the sixth Detective D. D. Warren novel. This high recommended psychological thriller will keep you awake at night. Detective D.D. Warren remembers walking to the crime scene, a creaking floorboard, and a low voice whispering in her ear. What she doesn't remember is shooting her weapon three times. She is seriously injured, unable to mover her left arm, and unable to return to work. Six weeks later, a second woman is discovered murdered in her own bed, her room has the same calling cards; a bottle of champagne and a single red rose. The only person who may have seen the killer is D.D. Even now she can't lift her child, load her gun, or recall a single detail from that night. D.D.'s captain suggest she speak with Dr. Adeline Glen, a pain specialist. Dr. Glen is one of the daughters from former murderer Harry Day. Harry Day was a serial killer who has been dead for forty years. Dr. Glen also has a sister who began killing at age fourteen and is currently in prison. Something odd is going on as the 'Rose Killer' knows things about Harry Day that shouldn't be known. What has D.D. been put in the middle of? Who should she trust? Read it today and find out the answers. A Grown Up Kind of Pretty by Joshilyn Jackson tells the story of three generations of women who are plagued by hardships and torn by a devastating secret. Mosey, a fifteen year old, sassy and spirited young girl is shaken when a small grave is unearthed in the backyard. The story over time unfolds as Mosey's determination for the truth endures. Check out this southern fiction novel today. Jo Nesbo fans Cockroaches awaits you. The Norwegian ambassador to Thailand is murdered in a Bangkok brothel. Harry Hole is wanted on the case by government officials. While officials want the case hushed up, Harry finds out more is going on than expected. He also cares more about getting to the truth than keeping a case quiet. When he lands on CCTV footage everything gets even more complicated. Oh, you may need to know that the ambassador has very close ties to the Norwegian prime minister. Pick this novel up today.

M K

CROSSWORD

Across 1. More agile 8. Caribbean island country 15. Oily, poisonous liquid used to make dyes and plastics 16. The process of mountain formation 17. Put into words 18. Performances 19. Bank job 20. Bunk 22. “Let it stand” 23. Certain surgeon’s “patient” 24. Newswoman Zahn 26. “The Adventures of ___ and Otis,” film 27. ___ Master’s Voice 28. Hansen’s disease 30. Black gold 31. Come by 33. Wisdom 35. Contact, e.g. 37. Water barrier 38. Temporary substitutes 42. Survivor from an earlier different environment 46. Popular retrieving dog 47. Covers up 49. Density symbol 50. Times to call, in classifieds 52. Kitchen counter? 53. Extinct, flightless birds of New Zealand 54. Bombard 55. “What’s ___?” 56. Some people can’t take them 57. Short poem with ab,aa,abab rhyme scheme 60. Flatter servilely 62. Fire up 63. Figure 64. More vulnerable 65. Honors

9. Parenthesis, essentially 10. All the rage 11. Discrimination against older people 12. Bring up 13. Really good 14. Part of a heartbeat 21. “One of ___” (Willa Cather novel) 24. Nautical flag 25. Ambitious person 28. Feudal lord 29. “Holy cow!” 32. Matterhorn, e.g. 34. Moray, e.g. 36. 100 meter runner 38. Stayed in bed longer (2 wds) 39. Greek cafe

40. Dagger reference mark 41. “___ Like It Hot” 43. Period in history marked by tools and weapons (2 wds) 44. Movable personal property (law) 45. Horseshoes players 48. Lament 51. Steplike mine excavation 53. Distance runner 56. Bantu person inhabiting Rwanda and Burundi 58. Ceiling 59. “... ___ he drove out of sight” 61. Chain letters?

Down 1. Petroleum distillate used as a solvent 2. Receive something specified in a will 3. Most swampy 4. Nonchalantly unconcerned 5. “Schindler’s ___” 6. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 7. Railroad station porter 8. Slew C Y

M K


6A

C Y

M K

Wednesday March 5, 2014

C Y

M A C The O Macon N Tigerettes traveled

Macon, MO 660-385-4639• 660-651-0415

The Macon Tigers faced off against the top seeded Palmyra Panthers on Thursday February 27th in District action. The Panthers took an early lead on the Tigers with both offenses clicking early. Macon was able to penetrate the paint and work a solid inside outside offense. After one quarter the Tigers trailed 12 to 17. The two teams went into a lockdown defensive mode in the second quarter. Neither team was able to break double digits in scoring. Macon was able to corral the second chance points by the Panthers and hold them within striking range. The Tigers offense woke up in the third as they attempted to chip away at the Panther lead. The Panthers used the long range jumper to slowly extend the lead with Macon packing the paint. After three quarter Palmyra led 34 to 44. The Panthers were able to hit clutch shots down the stretch and fend off the Tigers in the forth quarter. Macon’s season ended with a 46 to 61 loss to a very good Panthers squad. For the Tigers, Jon Murray had 13 points, Craig Smith and Josh Turner 9 points.

to Lewistown to face the Mark Twain girls in the Class Three District Seven first round game. Macon got down early to Mark Twain with the Ewing girls shooting lights out from the floor. The Tigerettes were able to keep it close with good work on the offense boards and turnovers. After one quarter Macon trailed 5 to 11. Mark Twain continued their hot shooting in the Photo by Julia Adami second half, as they would all game (54%) from the field. The Tiger offense started to click but could not maintain the pace set by the other Tiger team. At the half the Tigerettes trailed 16 to 28. A fired up Macon team came out of the locker room for the second half. The Tiger defense shutdown the Mark Twain offense and forced numerous turnovers. Macon took advantage with several break away buckets and chopped off chucks of the Mark Twain lead. A stirring comeback saw Macon close to within 30 to 32 going into the forth. The cardiac kids continued to roar back in the forth to tie up the game with 13 seconds on the clock. Martin coolly put the game on ice with a good ahead free-throw and Macon completed the comeback 48 to 47. For Macon Katie Claap had 13 points, Chalee Britt 10, Shelbe Butner 4, Makenzie Jemes 10, Cassie Martin 5, Lauren Arnold 3 and Shelby Schaefer 3 points. Macon advanced to play the top seeded Palmyra Panthers. The Tigerettes were shell shocked by the Lady Panthers early. Everything was going in the bucket for the top seed and it stunned the Tigerettes just off the bus. After only one quarter Macon trailed 4 to 18. The girls picked their selves up in the second quarter and showed the fight they had displayed in the first district contest. Macon’s defense held down their opponent’s offense with pressure on the ball. The Tigers offense still struggled but they were able to close slightly on the early deficit. At halftime the score was 11 Macon 24 Palmyra. The Tigerettes battled against the very strong Panthers ladies team all through the second half. Palmyra was able to slowly add to their lead by identical 11 to 13 scores in both of the final frames. The season for the Tigerettes closed with a 33 to 50 loss. For Macon Katie Claap had 4 points, Chalee Britt 14, Shelbe Butner 5, Makenzie Jemes 2, Cassie Martin 3, Lauren Arnold 2 and Rachel Richardson 2 points.

The Bulldogs traveled to Madison to play in the first round of Districts against the neighbor the Atlanta Hornets. “A great shooting effort by the entire team allowed us to coast to a victory against Atlanta tonight. As a team we shot 70% from the field, including 86% from 2, 38% from 3, and 75% from the free throw line. Tonight’s game also saw five Bulldogs in double figures including Tanner Riggins with 14, Matt Safley with 13, Ty Davison and Ben Bolden with 11, and Hunter Howe with 10. Tonight we moved the ball very well and got a lot of good looks under the basket. As a team we were able to get 23 assists off of 30 makes. Every player that dressed out tonight was able to score.” Coach Fleshman Baylon Belt added 2 points, Seth Brown 7, Kirk Larson 7 and Jace Brown 2 points. The Bulldogs advanced to play the Raiders of North Shelby. “North Shelby was able to knock down their free throws and controlled the game down the stretch. Tanner Riggins went out with a bang and finished the game with 27 points and 19 rebounds. Matt Safley was able to hit some tough shots from the three point line for us tonight and was the second leading scorer with 9. Tonight we say goodbye to our only senior Hunter Howe who fouled out of the game. He played hard for us the last couple of years and will truly be missed next year” Coach Fleshman For La Plata Baylon Belt added 8 points, Ben Bolden 6, Seth Brown 6, Hunter Howe 2 and Ty Davison 2.

“First game was against North Shelby, a team that had beaten us twice already this season. We won 47 to 39. I thought we defended well that day, the girls held their post player to just 11. Offensively we scored above our season average. We were led by Kalie Lene who had 24 points. She knocked down 4 three pointers and was 6 of 8 from the free throw line, with 4 of those FT’s coming down the stretch to hold our lead. Morgan Kimmel followed in scoring with 8 points (2 three pointers), Laryn Pinkston had 5, Kelsi Hemmerling with 4, and Ally Photo by Vanita Weber Gregory, Jessica Davison, and Hannah Larson each had 2. Semi final game vs the one seed Marion Co. My girls fought hard but couldn’t stay with their girls. We got beat 60 to 44. Marion Co shot the ball extremely well (from the floor as well as from the free throw line) and played a great game. We were again led in scoring by Kalie Lene who had 15, followed by Morgan Kimmel with 13 (3 from 3 point land), Kelsi Hemmerling had 9, Hannah Larson with 3, and Ally Gregory and Laryn Pinkston each had 2. It was a tough way to end the season, but we were out matched that night. I can’t express enough how proud I am of this group of girls. They worked their tails off all season. They continued to get tougher and better. We will miss the contribution from our seniors, Hannah Larson and Morgan Kimmel. We’ll collect our thoughts, take some time off of course, and then plan on hitting it again this summer. Go Lady Bulldogs.” Coach Steve Lightle

Let us

light up your life!

City of Macon & Macon Municipal Utilities Representative

Tim Remole District 006 Republican

573-751-6566 Tim.Remole@house.mo.gov

Photo by Julia Adami 111 Vine Street • Macon, MO 63552 (660)385-3213 • simsjewelry@cvalley.net

660-395-8880 Cell 660 676-6935 906 S. Missouri St., Macon MO 63552

SHANE HALL 109 N Rollins Macon, MO 63552

660-385-2422

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

BASKETBALL

FULLER ELECTRIC

Jewelry and Gifts

M K

213 N. Rollins Street MACON, MO 63552 660-385-5850

CIA

660-385-5123 cianet@cvalley.net

Consolidated Insurance Agency

MIKE MILLER LARRY STARK

208 North Rollins PO Box 365 Macon, MO 63552

LA PLATA

Gary Simmons 660.332.7034

La Plata R-II Schools 201 West Moore La Plata, MO 63549 660.332.7001 125 South Church Street La Plata, MO 63549

Serving La Plata, Missouri and surrounding communities since 1980

Farmers Mutual Insurance Company of Macon

Roger Jarman

123 W. Sanders LaPlata, MO • 660-332-4478

La Plata Veterinary Clinic

David H. Moore D.V.M. John D. Moore, D.V.M. 660-332-4452 30743 US 63 La Plata, MO 63549

FERREL A. MOOTS, D.O. Family Practice Village Clinic La Plata, MO 63549 660-332-7022

Representative

Tim Remole District 006 Republican

573-751-6566 Tim.Remole@house.mo.gov

204 E Moore St, La Plata, MO 63549 660-616-4686

BRASHEAR

The Brashear Tigers took to the road this past week for the Class One District Ten first round game against Marion County. The game started poorly for the Tigers as the Mustangs got out of the gates running. The Mustangs piled up 26 first quarter points on Brashear and led after one frame 3 to 26. The Mustangs were able to dominate the paint in the first half and limit the Tigers to one shot. At halftime the boys from Brashear trailed 10 to 46. The start of the second half unfortunately did not fair any better for the Tigers. The Mustangs forced too many turnovers which lead to break away buckets for the Mustangs. The two teams emptied the benches in the forth frame and at the final horn the Tigers season came to an end with a 19 to 85 loss. For the Tigers Devin Morrison had 2 points, Colt Acton 3, Sam Smith 3, Chance Hill 5 and Jacob Reeves 6 points.

www.lostbranchlodge.com

Travis-Noe Funeral Home 1008 W. Potter Ave. Kirksville, MO 63501

Backroads Bar & Grill 106 E Adair St., Brashear 660-323-5794

660-665-1300 E-mail: info@travis-noe.com

C Y

The Lady Tigers of Brashear traveled to Madison Mo for the first round of District Basketball against the number one seeded Marion County Mustangs. The Lady Tigers played good defense in the first quarter holding the high powered Mustangs to only 11 points. Brashear however was not able to take advantage as they also struggled on offense and trailed after one frame 2 to 11. The Mustangs were able to kick start their offense in the second by forcing the Lady Tigers into turnovers. With the Mustangs penetrating the paint against Brashear the Tigers trailed at the half 4 to 27. The girls from Brashear would not go quietly into the night at the start of the second half. The girls were able to match the Mustangs bucket for bucket and maintain pace with the Mustangs. The forth quarter saw the Tigers rally and make a short run at the Mustangs lead. Time feel short for the girls and they returned home with a 24 to 44 loss. For Brashear Ashley Moncrief had 2 points, Abigail Kerby 2, Sidney Sykes 2, Allison Thompson 5, Meredith Thomas 5, Abby Hall 1 and Mandy Taylor 7 points.

M K

215 W Jefferson St., Kirksville, MO 63501

Lost Branch Lodge

Retreats, Weddings, Reunions, And More.

660-627-2500

Heritage House Rentals

Your Weekly Newspaper Covering ALL of Macon County

660-665-2787

C Y

M K


C Y

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

C Y

A T L A NThe TLadyAHornets of Atlanta

Atlanta C-3 School District 600 South Atterberry Street Atlanta, Missouri 63530 660.239.4211

Representative

Tim Remole District 006 Republican

573-751-6566 Tim.Remole@house.mo.gov

Photo by Vanita Weber

The Hornets traveled south to Madison to take on the old rivals to their North the La Plata Bulldogs in the first round of District play. The Hornets go off to a bad start against the Bulldogs. La Plata was able to dominate the paint against the Hornets and force them to too many one and done shots. The Bulldogs were able to pour the points in under the basket and led Atlanta after one quarter 8 to 22. The outside jumper was not going in for the Hornets in the second frame. Long rebounds led to breakaway scoring for the Bulldogs. At the half Atlanta trailed 19 to 42. Out of the locker room things looked to spark a little for the Hornets but it was short lived. Atlanta went cold again form the floor and La Plata continued to put space between the two teams. At the final buzzer the boy’s season ended with a 41 to 75 defeat. For the Hornets, Garrett West had 9 points, Tristen Collier 8, Lane Waddle 6, Korbin Gunnells 5, Matt Howlett 4, Collan Thrasher 4, Lance Weber 3 and Justin Grigsby 2 points.

CHARLEY’S SERVICE 111 S. ATTERBERRY P.O. BOX 385 ATLANTA, MO 63530 PHONE 660-239-4450 TIRES•REPAIRS•BATTERIES•USED CARS charles@charleysservice.com SUPERIOR MOTOR GROUP

THE ABSOLUTE BEST PRICES IN THE STATE 1114 S. MISSOURI ST. MACON, MO 63552

ricmac@cvalley.net www.motorgroup.biz

RICK MCKENZIE

GENERAL MANAGER

660-395-0077 CELL 660-349-5079

660-248-6251/gocmu.org

FULLER ELECTRIC

Macon, MO 660-385-4639• 660-651-0415

Let us

light up your life! Jewelry and Gifts

111 Vine Street • Macon, MO 63552 (660)385-3213 • simsjewelry@cvalley.net

FERREL A. MOOTS, D.O. Family Practice Village Clinic La Plata, MO 63549 660-332-7022 Representative

BEVIER

City of Bevier

7B

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

BASKETBALL entered the Class One District Ten Playoffs as the number 2 seed. Atlanta kicked things off with a first round game against the host Madison girls. The Lady Hornets and the Lady Panthers pawed at each other in the first quarter trading bucket for bucket. After one quarter Atlanta held a slight 8 to 6 lead. The Hornets were able to apply pressure and force the Panthers into numerous second quarter turnovers. The Lady Hornets were able to extend the lead before halftime to 21 to 17. Atlanta continued to force the Panthers into mistakes in the second half. The Hornets forced 21 steals for the game. The girls won the game in the third frame as they lapped Madison in scoring 14 to 7. The two teams went neck and neck in the forth which saw the Hornets win the game 44 to 33 and advance. For Atlanta Samantha Reed had 23 points, Sheyanne Klamert 8, Shalyla Collier 8 and Madeline Cuppy 5 points. Atlanta advanced to tangle with the Lady Raiders of BMC in the second round. This one would turnout to be a nail biter. The Lady Hornets got behind early to the Raiders as BMC came out of the Locker room hitting everything in sight. Both teams burned up the court in the first quarter but went ice cold in the second. The Hornets were able to keep the Raiders in sight and went to the half trailing 19 to 25. The Lady Hornets were the girls on fire in the third frame. Atlanta was able to control the boards against the Raiders and pull to within 36 to 38. The two teams went back and forth in the forth frame. The two squads did not want the season to end for them. As the horn blew it was the Hornets that advanced over a tough Raider team. The Hornets moved on with a 56 to 55 victory. For Atlanta Samantha Reed had 6 points, Sheyanne Klamert 17, Shalyla Collier 15, Ashton Ross 13 and Madeline Cuppy 5 points. The Lady Hornets advanced to the Championship against the number one seeded Marion County Mustangs. Marion County was able to force the Hornets into too many turnovers over the course of the ballgame. Atlanta was able to put forth a valiant effort but the size and speed of the Mustangs were able to outpace the Lady Hornets. Atlanta was not able to bring home the victory 27 to 57 but the girls made a great showing for the school and community at Districts.

M K

Tim Remole

Photo by Vanita Weber

District 006 Republican

102 E Platte St Bevier, MO 63532 660-773-5314

573-751-6566 Tim.Remole@house.mo.gov

“Repairs of All Sizes”

218 N. Chestnut Callao, MO 63534

“Dependable Honest Service” Shop: 660-768-5859 Cell: 660-676-9043

Patrick Wicker Owner/Operator 24 HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE

COMPTON’S LIQUIDATION New items arriving daily! you never know what you’ll find!

708 S. Missouri (Hwy 63) • Macon, Missouri 63552 Open Monday - Saturday 9-6 • Sunday 1-5

660-395-4055

Matt’s Market 660-773-5412 110 S Macon St., Bevier, MO 63532

Rick’s Service & Tire 954 N Macon St Bevier, MO 63532 660-773-5113

The Bevier Wildcats battled the BMC Raiders in the first round of District Playoffs. The Wildcats got off to a solid start against the Raiders. The Wildcats shot for a high percentage from the floor (40%) and built a early lead 16 to 9 on BMC. The Wildcats did not cool off in the second frame adding another 16 to there total but they allowed the Raiders to stay in sight before the halftime buzzer. At the half the Wildcats had a 32 to 23 lead. BMC made a run at Bevier to star the second half. The Wildcats offense slowed down with solid interior defense by BMC. At the start of the final frame the score stood Bevier 44 BMC 40. The Wildcats were able to fend of the Raiders in the final frame with clutch free throws. Bevier opened Districts with a solid 57 to 54 victory. The Wildcats were led by Luke Long with 4 points, Andrew Peter 2, Brett Peukert 16, Aaron Peter 3, Colby Peukert 11, Tony Humphreys 2 and Jesse Ashenfelter 19 points. The Wildcats moved on to face the top seeded Marion County Mustangs in the second round. The Mustangs pushed out to an early lead on Bevier behind solid defense on the Wildcats. The Mustangs used transition offence to get out to an 8 to 17 lead on Bevier. The Wildcats were able to recover in the second quarter but were having problems fending the Mustangs off the boards. At the half Bevier trailed 19 to 31. The second half started with solid defense from both squads as each packed the paint and limited each other to under double digits in scoring for the quarter. Marion County was able to pull away from the Wildcats in the final frame. At the buzzer the season ended for the Wildcats with a 41 to 64 defeat. Leading Bevier was Luke Long with 3 points, Seth Shurvington 1, Andrew Peter 3, Brett Peukert 2, Aaron Peter 2, Colby Peukert 16, Caleb Richardson 2 and Jesse Ashenfelter 19 points.

Shelmadine Tire and Service LLC

102 Old Hwy 36 West Bevier, MO 63532

660-773-6877 Photo by Vanita Weber

The Bevier Lady Wildcats traveled to Madison to face the BMC Lady Raiders in the first round of the District playoffs. The two teams got off to an even start with both teams playing solid defense. After one quarter the Lady Wildcats trailed 7 to 12. The second quarter found the Lady Raiders getting hot from the floor. BMC too was able to take advantage of the shorthanded Lady Cats and put in sixteen to Bevier’s six. At the half the Lady Wildcats trailed 13 to 28. Both teams went to work in the paint at the start of the second half. The girls traded bucket for bucket with neither side finding a advantage. Going to the final frame Bevier trailed 32 to 48. The Wildcats could not mount a comeback in the forth as they played even more short handed then normal with the lost of Memphis Buster. At the final horn the girl’s season ended with a 41 to 60 defeat. For Bevier, Caiti Bradley had 21 points, Karissa Harrington 2, Beth Ashenfelter 18 and Rachel Lowe 3 rebounds.

New Cambria & Bevier www.banknewcambria.com 200 S. Main St. New Cambria, MO 660-226-5211

1003 St. Hwy C. Bevier, MO 660-773-5201

FULLER ELECTRIC

Macon, MO 660-385-4639• 660-651-0415

Let us

light up your life! RV PARK Bevier, MO

955 N. Macon Street • Bevier , MO 660-773-5313

BUCKLIN/MACON COUNTY R-4

RV PARK Bevier, MO

Photo by Vanita Weber

955 N. Macon Street • Bevier , MO 660-773-5313

660-385-5627

410 North Missouri Street Macon, MO 63552

Macon County R-IV

“Repairs of All Sizes”

218 N. Chestnut Callao, MO 63534

“Dependable Honest Service” Shop: 660-768-5859 Cell: 660-676-9043

Patrick Wicker Owner/Operator 24 HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE

Representative

Tim Remole District 006 Republican

573-751-6566 Tim.Remole@house.mo.gov

New Cambria & Bevier www.banknewcambria.com 200 S. Main St. New Cambria, MO 660-226-5211

1003 St. Hwy C. Bevier, MO 660-773-5201

C Y

The BMC Raiders traveled to Madison to face the Wildcats of Bevier in the first round of District play. “Bevier came out and shot the ball very well and we did not which got us in an early hole that we never could fight out of. Bevier would out score us 16-9 in the first quarter. Late in the second quarter we finally got some offense going as Dillan Nolte would score 8 quick points and 10 in the quarter to help us stay in the game but Bevier still out scored us 16-14 in the second quarter to take a 32-23 lead into the half. In the third quarter we would out score Bevier 17-12, highlighted by Dakota Petersons buzzer shot 3 to pull us within 4 (44-40). In the 4th quarter we battled hard and extended the game but Bevier would hit just enough free throws to win the game. We did have a three point shot at the buzzer but it wouldn’t fall as we fell short. We scored 14 to Bevier’s 13 in the 4th for a final score of 57-54. Dane Robertson 2 points, Dylan Epperson 6 points, Dakota Peterson 3 points, Daniel Hernandez 6 points, Damon Porter 10 points, Brady Duncan 8 points and Dillan Nolte 19 points. Finish up at 14-7 on the year and 6-2 TCC.” Coach Daniel Liebhart M K

501 S. Main New Cambria, MO 63558 660-226-5615

The BMC Lady Raiders traveled to Madison to take part in the Class One Division Ten District Playoffs. Their first round opponent was the Lady Wildcats of Bevier. The Lady Raiders would get things rolling early against a fired up Bevier squad. The Lady Raiders would get out in transition offense and hold the Bevier in single digit scoring. After the first quarter BMC led 12 to 7. The Lady Raiders were able to get there jump shots to fall with even frequency in the second frame and they continued to pressure the Wildcat’s offense. At the end of the first half the score stood 28 to 13 BMC. Both teams came out of the locker room fired up for the second half. The Lady Raiders were able to bottleneck the lanes on defense and drive to the bucket on offense. The Lady Raiders kept the Wildcats at arms length through out the third quarter. A short handed Bevier squad tried to rally but the day belonged to the Lady Raiders 60 to 41. The Lady Raiders would advance to the second round to face the Atlanta Hornets. The first half was a game of contrasts. Both squads were hitting everything from the floor in the first quarter but then could not buy a bucket in the second. At the half the Lady Raiders had forged ahead and held a 25 to 19 lead. The Hornets chipped away at the Raiders lead in the third quarter. BMC was getting beat-up on rebounds and allowing too many put back points by Atlanta. After three the Raiders held a slim 38 to 36 advantage. The Forth and final quarter was similar to the third. Atlanta was able to get second chance scoring and overtake the BMC led late in the quarter. BMC looking a little frazzled was unable to recover and dropped the heartbreaker by a single point 55 to 56.

Auto Repair by the People Who Care 19 N Livingston St, Bucklin, MO 64631

660-695-3314

ALSO BUYING SCRAP IRON & CARS FOR SCRAP

660-248-6251/gocmu.org

Suzie Q’s 101 W. Front Ave. New Cambria Missouri 63558

660-226-5999

C Y

M K


8B

C Y

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

M K

C Y

M K

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

Girl Scout Week March 9-15: Local Troops Have Had a Busy Year!

Jazlyn Jackson, Lillian Crooks, Angel Neeson, Hallie Cross, Kari Russell are working on a service project. Quilt for the children’s hospital.The funny faces was personal care at a meeting. Troop 9513 troop leader Amanda Albright

Troop 9501 served Milk & Cookies at the Macon Fire Department in celebration of Girl Scout Cookie Week in February 2014. Pictured are, in front, Fire Engineer Olin Roper and Girl Scout Madie Ewing. The girls also played cookie trivia with the Firemen, to include important Girl Scout cookie facts.

Lillian Crooks, Angel Neeson, Hallie Cross are pictured delivering their handmade quilts to the Children’s Hospital after spending hours together learning how to quilt as a part of a community service project they planned. Troop 9513 Cadettes.

Troop 9501 Cadette Girl Scouts pose for a photo before leading the Pledge of Allegiance at Veteran’s Day Ceremony at Macon High School on November 11, 2013. Girls are from left to right: Kayli Perry, Jillian King, Amanda Fraley, Savannah Truitt, Madie Ewing, Brth Summers, Elizabeth Wibberg and Kayla Russell. Not pictured: Haleigh Mazuch and Valerie Stuck. Troop is led by Modeste sewing and Suzanne Truitt.

Girls from Troop 9501 enjoyed a cool Fall evening having a “CampIn” and cooking S’mores over a fire pit. Pictured are Amanda Fraley, Savannah Truitt, Kayla Russell and Valerie Stuck. Cadette Troop 9501 is led by Modeste Ewing and Suzanne Truitt.

Left to Right: London Griffin, Sarah Wiggans, Cathryne Wiggans (Daisy “in-training”)

Troop 9501 helps the Macon Food Pantry re-stock shelves with supplies collected during their April Showers Showering the Community collection day in April 2013. Every April, Girl Scouts collect personal items from the community to donate to the Macon Food Pantry. These supplies help provide for needy families within the community.

Troop 9511 giving out information in front of WalMart. Pictured are Megan Baase and Ashlee Moore. Leaders are Sheila Wilcox and Donnetta Moore.

Dakota Bettes, Alyssa White, Mercedes Summers, Haylle Brown, Chloe Summers, pose for a photo during a recent meeting. Not pictured are Megan Wibberg and Renna Lake. Troop #9507 is led by Peggy Chalgren and Kristina Blaise.

Troop 9511 hosted a World Thinking Day event in February 2013 for younger Girl Scouts. Pictured is the group “standing around the world”. Troop 9511 planned the entire day to include activities, snacks and group discussions.

Daisy Troop 9504: Sarah Wiggans, Asst. Leader Sheila Wilcox, Jessie Holman, London Griffin, Leader Rachel Wiggans, Cathryne Wiggans (Daisy “in-training”). Not pictured: Keeley Hicks, Emily Hartman, Alexis Billingsley, Kensley Clem. C Y

M K

C Y

M K


C Y

M K

C Y

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

Macon County Commission Minutes

Monday January 13, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins Commission met with road supervisor, Chris Waddle to discuss various road & bridge projects. Worked on budget preparation and Courthouse complex project. The Commission spoke with Aaron McVicker from SKW the Weir project at Hart by phone. The Commission spoke by phone with Shelby County regarding truck bids. Richard Burns called the Commission regarding conditions on Flagpole Avenue. Meeting Adjourned. Tuesday Jan. 14, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins Work session for budget preparation. Aaron McVicker with SKW, met with the Commission regarding the Weir project at Hart and to present a supplement to the existing agreement. The Commission met with Josh Meisner, Prosecuting Attorney regarding budget issues. Meeting Adjourned. Thursday Jan. 16, 2014 Members present: Alan

Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins Commission met with road supervisor, Chris Waddle to discuss various road and bridge projects. Krista Bruno, Macon County Treasurer presented a summary of the treasurers settlement of all funds. Work session on budget preparation. Meeting Adjourned. Friday Jan. 17, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins Work session on budget preparation. Meeting Adjourned. Monday Jan. 20, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt & Drew Bel.t Work session on budget preparation. Meeting Adjourned. Tuesday Jan. 21, 2014 Members present: Drew Belt and Jon Dwiggins Commission met with road supervisor, Chris Waddle to discuss various road & bridge projects. Work session on budget preparation. The Commission met with Bill White regarding converting the rest of Nickel Avenue from dirt to rock. Meeting Adjourned. Wednesday Jan. 22, 2014 Members present: Alan

Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins. Work session on budget preparation. Meeting Adjourned. Thursday Jan. 23, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins The Commission met with Sheriff Kevin Shoemaker regarding budget issues. Bernard Hepworth met with the Commission concerning the Courthouse Complex project. The Commission met with James Replogle regarding a road issue. Meeting Adjourned. Friday Jan. 24, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins. Work session on budget preparation. The Commission attended the Economic Development luncheon meeting. Meeting Adjourned. Monday Jan. 27, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt and Jon Dwiggins Commission met with bridge supervisor, Isaiah Curtis to discuss various bridge projects. The Commission met with Shannon Howe and Beth Moots of Benton and Associates. The yearly budget hear-

ing was held with Treasurer Krista Bruno and County Clerk Shirley Sims in attendance. A motion to approve the budget was made by Commissioner Dwiggins and seconded by Belt. After discussion a motion by Commissioner Wyatt to amend the motion to approve the budget with corrections & additions, seconded by Dwiggins, passed 3-0. First motion then approved 3-0. The Commission met with Ryan Johnson & Brandon Bickhaus with Chariton Valley Telephone. Meeting Adjourned. Thursday Jan. 30, 2014 Members present: Drew Belt and Jon Dwiggins Commissioner Belt was sworn in as Presiding in Wyatt’s absence by Deputy Clerk Brenda Groza in the absence of County Clerk Shirley Sims. Commission met with road supervisor, Chris Waddle to discuss various road & bridge projects. Bob Strait with the Railroad Yard met with the Commission. The Commission met with John Larrick regarding the courthouse complex project. Reviewed & approved accounts payable. Meeting

A Little Ink Is A Good Thing By Daniel Jones

The ink on your local, daily newspaper is different than any kind of ink you might find in a textbook. The ink in your newspaper  is fresh — it is only a day or two old, coming from

C Y

a printing press inside or nearby your local town. It tells stories of your community that a textbook could never tell. In a way, a newspaper is a continuing textbook — a living history, if you will — of your community. It documents the important characters, the talking points, the social issues, and every once in a while, it provides a public forum for opinion. Textbooks teach; newspapers also teach. Newspapers — updated, read and maintained on a daily basis — teach in the present

M K

moment. In today’s world, social media does that too. Twitter can also teach in the present moment. Social media allows everyone to be a journalist. Newspapers provide context, which social media often doesn’t allow for. Usually, 140 characters — the maximum amount of letters, numbers and spaces allowed in one tweet — can’t tell the whole story. Twitter has proven that 140 characters is enough to report an event, but isn’t enough to tell why that event is really important,

what the event’s impacts are, or why you should care about it. You can learn from your television as well, so long as you are tuned into the right station. Your daily newscast can be informative, detailed, and can provide context. It can tell you what events were important and why. But television news no longer provides a forum for public opinion. The only time the public opinion is ever broadcast is if it makes news — during a protest or rebellion, perhaps — or if a reporter

M K

March 5, 2014 Wednesday

9B

Adjourned. Monday Feb. 3, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt and Jon Dwiggins Commission met with road supervisor, Chris Waddle to discuss various road & bridge projects. The Commission held an Officials meeting, those attending were: Prosecuting Attorney Josh Meisner, Sheriff Kevin Shoemaker, Circuit Judge Rick Tucker, Recorder of Deeds Sherry Muncy, Treasurer Krista Bruno, Collector Jeanette Ronchetto, County Clerk Shirley Sims, Public Administrator Lois Noland, & Assessor Alan Spencer. Shawn Bongard with Image Technologies print management met with the Commission regarding a bid. The Commission met with Emergency Management Director Michael Shively, Superintendent of Macon R-1 Schools Chuck Stockton & Tyler Hendricks regarding the impending storm & possible road conditions. Meeting Adjourned. Thursday Feb. 6, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt and Jon Dwiggins The Com-

mission met with Circuit Judge Rick Tucker and Chief Juvenile Officer Cindy Ayers. Commission met with road supervisor, Chris Waddle to discuss various road & bridge projects. John Czuba met with the Commission regarding a road to be bladed. The Commission met with Linn Lyda concerning the blading of Southwest Blvd. Shane Mayes met with the Commission regarding the old MoDOT building. Aaron McVicker with SKW was in to check on RFQ proposals. Meeting Adjourned. Monday Feb. 10, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt and Jon Dwiggins Commission met with road supervisor, Chris Waddle to discuss various projects & snow plowing. Reviewed & approved add-on’s & deletions. Reviewed and approved accounts payable. Meeting Adjourned. Thursday Feb. 13, 2014 Members present: Alan Wyatt, Drew Belt & Jon Dwiggins. No meeting held, Commission training.

asks for it. In a newspaper, public opinion is shared freely. Editorialists and columnists provide citizens an opportunity to express their values and beliefs. Letters to the editor are often published in the first section of the newspaper. In a newspaper, thoughts are shared, feedback is valued, and a reporter doesn’t have to ask you about your opinion for it to be published. This is why the ink in a newspaper is different. It tells our story — the story of the news that happens around us, the news that

we find important and tells us why it is important. It does this in a way that allows for us to share our thoughts and opinions with the rest of our community. Just don’t let the ink get stain your hands. Daniel Jones is a student at the University of Missouri in Columbia. He is originally from Kansas City, Mo. He is an avid sports fan and newspaper reader. His work has been published in the Columbia Missourian, on KOMU-TV in Columbia and on NPR.

C Y

M K


C Y

5, 2014 Wednesday 10B March

M K

C Y

The Home Press maconhomepress.com

CIA 213 N. Rollins Street MACON, MO 63552 Bus 660-385-5850 Res 660-385-3900 Cell 660-676-9082

M K

WAYNE & ANGELA HELTON Owners

660-385-5123 cianet@cvalley.net

Consolidated Insurance Agency

208 North Rollins PO Box 365 Macon, MO 63552

MIKE MILLER LARRY STARK

Fat Rabbit IT, LLC Information Tecnology Services Business & Residential

Network Administration Info@FatRabbitIT.com Ph. 660-773-5110 Computer Repair 25795 Hickory Rd. Data Services Bevier, MO 63532 Owners: Curtis Langwell & Dora Eitel Consultations

660-385-5627

902 N. Missouri St. PO Box 135 Macon, MO Macon, MO63552 63552

Macon County Economic Development works to provide for balanced growth and an ever increasing quality of life.

March - April 2014 MARCH 2014 1 2 Day Horse & Saddle Sale – Lolli Borthers Livestock Market Inc. 3&5 Family Literacy Center GED Orientation – Macon Area Education Center 8:30 am 7–9 Carousel Productions Spring Musical – Les Miserables @ Royal Theatre 8 Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast – United Methodist Church 6:30am 8 Ben Franklin Spring Open House – Downtown Macon 13 – 15 Carousel Productions Spring Musical – Les Miserables @ Royal Theatre 13 – 15 ” Old West Sale ” Lolli Brothers Livestock Market 15 Saint Patricks Celebration – Shoemaker RV Park 9 am – 4 pm 18 Macon Area Chamber of Commerce Membership Luncheon @ Noon 20 Machinery Sale – Lolli Brothers Livestock Market Inc. 22 Whitetails Unlimited Long Branch Chapter Banquet – Macon Expo Center 5pm APRIL 2014 2 Family Literacy Center GED Orientation – Macon Area Education Center 8:30 am 4&5 Opening Weekend @ the Island – The Island Miniature Golf 4&5 KWIX, KRES, the Captain & Glory 97.3 Family A Fair Trade Show – MACC Activity Center 5 Sydenstricker Lawn & Garden Open House – Sydenstrickers Macon 5 All Class Registered & Grade Horse Sale – Lolli Brothers Livestock Market Inc. 5 ConAgra Foods 2nd Annual Child Hunger Ends Here 5K Run/Walk – Fairgrounds 8 am 7 Family Literacy Center GED Orientation – Macon Area Education Center 8:30 am 11 Lions Club Fish Fry – Macon High School Cafeteria 5pm 9 – 12 Exotic Animal & Taxidermy Sale – Lolli Brothers Livestock Market Inc. 9 MHCC & CVTV Volunteer Banquet – Macon Health Care Center 5 pm

Missouri Farm Bureau Legislative Briefing

From insights on the meat industry, to hearing from experts about weather and market patterns for the year, farmers and ranchers gained insight at the annual Missouri Farm Bureau Legislative Briefing and Commodity Conference held in Jefferson City Feb. 24-25. The conference is a time to hear from experts in the industry, discuss issues among Farm Bureau commodity committees, and for district FARM-PAC committees to review the upcoming election season. Members were able to visit with their elected officials at the State Capitol and at

a legislative banquet. A number of speakers spoke to the group. Author Dr. Maureen Ogle talked about her book “In Meat We Trust.” She explained the history behind what she calls the paradox of agriculture. She said consumers still want inexpensive food, yet they do not want the large scale production required to keep food affordable. “They want their hamburgers, but not the feedlots,” she said. Dr. Joshua Hawley with the University of Missouri covered Hobby Lobby’s law suit challenging the Affordable Care Act now

before the U.S. Supreme Court. The company is contesting certain provisions of the act as unconstitutional. Farmers always talk about the weather and speaker Dr. Elwynn Taylor, Iowa State University Extension Climatologist and Agronomist, told them it may be a cool spring and dry year in the Corn Belt. He said in the long term – within the next 20 years – historical trends show more volatility in weather patterns, which will affect crop yields. .And, Dan Manternach, Ag Services Director for Doane, said to expect hog and beef prices

to remain high, while corn and soybean prices will continue their lower pricing trend. Many livestock farmers are concerned about proposed federal Food and Drug Administration regulations controlling the use of antibiotics. Dr. Tony Martin, staff veterinarian and manager of health for MFA, Inc., said the proposals comfort consumers and the biggest change livestock farmers can expect is improving management by working more closely with their veterinarians. State legislators were welcomed to a Monday even-

ing banquet at the Missouri Farm Bureau Center to visit with their local Farm Bureau members. Legislators attending the banquet included Representative Craig Redmon of the 1st District and Representative Nate Walker of the 3rd District. Area Farm Bureau leaders attending from the counties of Adair, Sullivan, Putnam, and Clark included: Bob and Andy Jackson, Jack and Kathaleen Winkleman, Drew Lock, Jack and Evelyn Thomas, Donna and Mike O’Brien, Robert and Kelly Valentine, Chris Dickel, Justin Oaks, and Terry Daw.

Only 14 Days Until Spring!

ELECT LOIS BRAGG CITY OF LA PLATA MAYOR **Served 10 yrs. in City Hall **Served 10 yrs. at La Plata R-II

**10 yrs. experience as business owner **Has over 45 yrs. accounting/clerical experience

“Committed to open-mindedly listening to the concerns of ALL citizens & business owners & to keep the City Council informed of those concerns.”

YOUR VOTE COUNTS ON TUESDAY, APRIL 8TH PLEASE REGISTER TO VOTE ON OR BEFORE MARCH 12 TH TO VOTE IN APRIL ELECTION !!

C Y

M K

PAID FOR BY CANDIDATE

C Y

M K


3 5 14 home press edition