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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net NOVEMBER 3, 2011

HESHVAN 6, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 25

Pittsburgh, PA

Southern Israel attacked

$1.50

New Jewish lecture series here looking forward in 2011-12 BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

Anav Silverman photo

Ashkelon resident Liz Sheetrit stands in front of her rocket-damaged home. Rockets from the Gaza Strip pounded southern Israel this past weekend leaving one civilian dead. The attack preceded a vote by the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to admit “Palestine” as its 195th member. The United States, which voted no, responded swiftly by canceling a $60 million November payment to UNESCO.

Lawyers turn to Jewish ethics for continuing education BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Like all attorneys licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania, Lynn Irwin is required to take 12 hours of continuing legal education (CLE) courses each year. And like many local Jewish attorneys, she has found a way to avoid sitting through dry lectures on such subjects as “The Life Cycle of an IRS Trust Fund Case,” or “Hot Topics in Oil and Gas Law.” For several years, local Jewish educa-

tion purveyors such as the Agency for Jewish Learning, Chabad, the Kollel Jewish Learning Center, and the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, have been offering a viable alternative for lawyers needing to satisfy their CLE requirements by presenting fully accredited classes. Those classes are on such topics as “Adultery in Jewish Law,” “Finding Kedusha, Holiness in the Legal Profession,” and “Intermarriage: A Halakhic Perspective.” “I have been attending these classes

for a number of years,” Irwin said. “I attend mostly because they tend to be on interesting topics that combine legal questions with aspects of Judaism I might not have previously considered.” Last week, Rabbi Danny Schiff, the former AJL community scholar, flew in from Israel to teach a CLE course on “Democracy in Jewish Law.” More than 85 people, the vast majority of them lawyers, attended the session. Covering the topic of whether Judaism, at its core, embraces democracy, Please see Education, page 23.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh has released its initial speakers schedule for its new two-year lecture series, which begins this month. The schedule for the first year of the series, called “Conversations for Jewish Future Speaker Series,” will run from November through September 2012, and will include four expert speakers in the fields of history, theology, philosophy and social sciences. The names of speakers for the second year of the series have not yet been released. Here are the speakers for the first year of the program: • Jonathan Sarna, professor of American Jewish History, Brandeis University and chief historian of the National Museum of American Jewish History, Monday, Nov. 14, 7 p.m., Eddy Theatre on the Chatham Uni- Jonathan Sarna versity campus; topic: “The Ever Dying People: Jewish Continuity and the Future of Our Community.” • Rabbi J.J. S c h a c h t e r, Yeshiva University professor of Jewish history and Jewish thought, Saturday, Dec. 17, 7:30 p.m., Jewish Community Center Robinson Rabbi J.J. Schachter Please see Lecture series, page 23.

B U S I N E S S 1 8 /C L A S S I F I E D 2 1 /O B I T UA R I E S 2 2 /O P I N I O N 6 R E A L E S TA T E 2 0 /S I M C H A S 1 6 /S T Y L E 1 0 /T O R A H 2 1

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:56 p.m. DST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:55 p.m. DST.

2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

Metro Gray speaks at Kollel

Chicago woman took circuitous route to conversion BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

When asked how she is, Ahuvah Gray answers in the manner common among Orthodox Jews: “Baruch Hashem.” But there is nothing common about this 65-year-old resident of Bayit Vegan, a Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) neighborhood in Jerusalem. Gray, an African-American former Christian minister, whose grandparents were sharecroppers in Mound Bayou, Miss., is a true original. “I like to say I went from one black neighborhood to another black neighborhood,” she told the Chronicle from her home in Jerusalem while preparing her Shabbat dinner. “But here, it’s all black hats and black coats.”

Want to go? What: “Ahuvah Gray: Prayer Through the Eyes of a Convert” When: Sunday, Nov. 6, 7 p.m. Where: Kollel Jewish Learning Center For women and teenagers

Ahuvah Gray

Gray will be coming to Pittsburgh Sunday, Nov. 6, to address women at the Kollel Jewish Learning Center, recounting the story of her journey from airline stewardess, to minister, to entrepreneurial tour guide, to Orthodox Jew. Although as a young woman growing up in Chicago she could not have fore-

seen that one day she would become a Haredi, in retrospect, Gray says that the strong spiritual roots planted by her parents and grandparents ultimately led her to her conversion. “My upbringing led me to my Yiddishkeit,” she said. As a child in a devout Christian home, her favorite Bible story was that of Abraham. She so connected with the patriarch that she frequently would fantasize he was her great-grandfather, and that together they would travel the Holy Land. So when she finally visited Israel in the early 1990s, something felt familiar and right. “I was leading a Christian pilgrimage to Israel, and when I got off the plane, my heart started pounding in my chest,” she recalled. “I said, ‘My God, I’m home.’ ” Having been feeling unfulfilled with the teachings of Christianity, Gray said she was looking for something more, and found it in Judaism. “I came from a very disciplined Christian background,” she said. “But I had reached my plateau in Christianity. Nobody could answer my questions. I knew it was time to move on.” For five years, Gray stopped attending church, saying she found many “discrepancies” in Christianity. “The more I discovered the Torah, the more discrepancies I found in Christian-

ity,” she said. After visiting Israel 14 times in five years, Gray presented herself before the Jerusalem Beit Din (rabbinical court) as a candidate for conversion to Judaism. But the court rejected her three times, even closing her file, as it suspected her of being a Christian missionary. Gray persisted, though, and with the help of the chief rabbi of Haifa, She’ar Yishuv Cohen, got her file re-opened and was finally allowed to begin her conversion process. Two years later, she became a fully practicing member of the Haredi community, praying three times a day, keeping kosher, and even teaching at Miklalat Esther, a division of Neve Yerushalayim, a girl’s seminary in Israel. “I have been loved and accepted into my community since the day I came here,” she said of Bayit Vegan. “The Haredi community felt like home. This is the umbrella Hashem placed me under. He wanted everything I learned to be learned properly.” Still, she sees the incongruence of someone of her background living among the ultra-Orthodox. “I laugh at myself,” she said. “I say, ‘Hashem, You have a great sense of humor.’ ” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011— 3

METRO Briefly Kollel Jewish Learning Center will dedicate a new Torah Sunday, Nov. 13. The final letter writing will be completed at a private residence in Squirrel Hill, but the Torah procession itself, during which the new scroll will be paraded under a chupa accompanied by music and dancing, will begin at 10:45 a.m. at 6401 Beacon St. Contact Rabbi Aaron Kagan at (412) 420-0220 or akagan@kollelpgh.org for more information. A local Jewish family is sponsoring overnight camp attendance for Jewish children next summer. The Papernick Family Foundation, administered by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh will give local Jewish children $1,000 to attend Jewish overnight summer camps. The grant will benefit girls and boys who have never attended overnight camp. The Centennial Fund for a Jewish Future will disperse the grants for local children to attend Jewish overnight summer camp for the first time through the One Happy Camper program. Contact the federation’s government relations associate, Sally Stein, at (412) 992-5243 or sstein@jfedpgh.org for more information. The Pittsburgh premiere of “Torn,” by director Ronit Kertsner, will

be held Sunday, Nov. 13, at 5:30 p.m. at the Regent Square Theater. Twelve years after being ordained as a Catholic priest, Romuald Waszkinel discovered that he was born to Jewish parents who gave him away to save him from the Holocaust. The film follows his journey, from conducting mass in a church in Poland to life as an observant Jew in a religious kibbutz in Israel. Waszkinel is torn between two identities and unable to renounce either religion. Kertsner will speak following the film. The screening is a project of Classrooms Without Borders and JFilm: The Pittsburgh Jewish Film Forum. Contact (412) 992-5203 or info@jfilmpgh.org for tickets. Teen Screen, the free film-screening series for middle and high school groups, has released its 2011-2012 lineup: • “A Film Unfinished” (recommended for grades 11-12 only), which explores the Nazis’ use of “actors” to create a fictitious display of life in the Warsaw Ghetto; • “Angel of Ahlem” (recommended for grades 7-12), a documentary about the Army’s 84th Infantry liberation of Ahlem-Hanover concentration camp in April 1945; • “As Seen Through These Eyes” (recommended for grades 11-12, especially art students), a documentary about the experiences of artists in the concentration camps; Please see Briefly, page 5.

4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

METRO Cuddy Briskin remembered

41st Designer Days held at Monroeville Convention Center BY JESSICA SVEC Chronicle Correspondent

Green and blue sparkle wings attached to 6-foot tall fairies toting raffle tickets, greeted shoppers this past Thursday, Oct. 27, at the Monroeville Convention Center for the 2011 Designer Days patron event. In its 41st year, the “Resale Fairytale” opened its doors a day early for a special sneak peek at this year’s goods. The goods being rows and rows of clothing racks stuffed with new, gently worn or vintage inspired dresses, jackets, sweaters, pants and evening wear ready to be taken to a new home in the name of charity. Designer Days is an annual event founded by the National Council of Jewish Women, Pittsburgh Section. This year’s theme, “Reinventing Fashion/Reinventing Lives,” specifically promoted their newest endeavor, the economic independence of women, and partnered with other women specific programs, Gwen’s Girls and POWER (PA Women in Early Recovery). Designer Days remains one of the major fundraisers for NCJW. “This is about shopping. I repeat, this is about shopping, shopping for a good cause,” event chair Henry Krakovsky reiterated to participants during the opening ceremony. Shoes, shirts and shoppers were just a few of the many things that filled the Monroeville Convention Center that rainy

NCJW photo

Shoppers file in for 41st annual Designer Days.

Thursday evening as one of a kind treasures were found, claimed and purchased. Arms piled high with name brand and vintage finds flitted in between the seemingly endless clothing racks. Every so often one would disappear behind the giant curtain, a makeshift dressing tent, in the far right corner of the massive main room. En route to the dressing room, shoppers were led past a doorway that opened up to whole new room dedicated entirely to women’s accessories and shoes. It truly was a resale fairytale. In addition to Gwen’s Girls, a gender specific program helping young women

break current cycles and live successful lives and POWER, an organization that helps women reclaim their lives from the disease of addiction, Designer Days also honored a third partner for their transformative work in the Pittsburgh community, the Howard Levin Clubhouse, a community for adults whose lives have been disrupted by mental illness. All three groups accepted awards and recognition during the patron event for their contributions to the people of Pittsburgh. The racks stopped squeaking during the ceremony when the late Cuddy Briskin was remembered. His daughters, Nancy Ter-

pack and Barbara Shapira, stood by as members spoke fondly of his dedication and the many volunteer hours he donated to Designer Days over the years. Briskin’s eye for perfection and quality contributed to the success and positive reputation of the annual event. The evening also included a preview of Carl Herrmann’s latest furs, a raffle and silent auction with generous donations from local Pittsburgh companies, including American Eagle Outfitters, Sephora, Salon DeStefino and many more. Honorary Chair Kiya Tomlin donated her fashion sense with two handmade, Vogue inspired outfits that were also auctioned off at the end of the night. The event came to a close with happy shoppers carrying off their hand picked goodies in reusable garbage bags — or in some cases, giant cardboard boxes — and a helping hand by event goer and new NCJW member Amy Platt, who hopped behind the register to lend an extra hand. NCJW President Hilary Spatz began her Designer Days shopping in 1971, first as a law student, and she continues the tradition today as she works the register alongside other volunteer and community members. Nearly 250 volunteers came together this year to help contribute to the cause. (Jessica Svec can be reached at Jessica.svec@gmail.com.)

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011— 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. • “Blessed is the Match: The Life and Death of Hannah Senesh” (recommended for grades 7-12), which traces the life and death of Hannah Senesh, the World War II-era poet and diarist who became a paratrooper, resistance fighter and modern-day Joan of Arc; • “Toyland,” a short-subject German film about a Holocaust-era mother, not wanting to tell her young son the truth, tells him that his best friend’s Jewish family is going away to “Toyland;” • “Inside Hana’s Suitcase” (recommended for grades 6–8), which traces the battered suitcase that inspired the best-selling book “Hana’s Suitcase”; • “Jai” (Life) a short-subject Spanish film about a young girl who asks her elderly grandmother about the number tattooed on her arm; • “Nicky’s Family” (recommended for grades 7-12), a documentary about Nicholas Winton, who saved the lives of 669 children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia by bringing them across Hitler’s Germany to his native Britain; • “The Ritchie Boys” (recommended for grades 9-12), the story of Camp Ritchie, Md., where the Army trained an elite group of young Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany in intelligence work; and

• “Saviors in the Night” (recommended for grades 9-12), a film about German farmers in Westphalia who risked their lives to hide a Jewish family. Teen Screen is a program of JFilm: The Pittsburgh Jewish Film Forum. Call Lori Sisson, Teen Screen coordinator, at (412) 992-5213 for more information. Community Day School Parent Association will present a seminar with Sharon Carver, professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University and director of CMU Children’s School, on the topic, “Supporting Your Child’s Academic Success,” Thursday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m., at CDS. The program will address strategies and partnerships for a lifetime of learning. Admission is free and the seminar is open to the community. Contact bschwhartz@comday.org or (412) 521-1100 Ext. 2116 by Nov. 7 for reservations. Career Development Center of the Jewish Family & Children’s Service will offer job seekers 15 workshops in November. Some of the workshops include: Interview Boot Camp with DDI, Nov. 7; Understanding Unemployment Benefits, Nov. 10; Transitioning to Success, Nov. 15; and Phone Interviews, Testing & Background Checks, Nov 22. Monthly LinkedIn for Beginners, LinkedIn Advanced, AARP WorkSearch 40+, Net-

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working Club and Job Seeker Support group workshops will also be held. Call the Career Development Center at (412) 422-5627 for more information. Christian, Hindu, Jewish and Muslim teenagers will convene Sunday, Nov. 20, from 2:45 to 5:30 p.m., at the Muslim Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 233 Seaman Lane, Monroeville, to share information on their various faith traditions. The group will discuss faith and science and explore Judeo-Christian, Hindu and Muslim Creation stories. Pittsburgh Area Jewish Committee (PAJC) is sponsoring the event. Contact PAJC at (412) 605-0816 or pajc@pajc.net for reservations. Squirrel Hill Historical Society will hold its next free program on “History of Homewood Cemetery,” with speaker Marilyn Evert, Homewood Cemetery historian, Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Church of the Redeemer, 5700 Forbes Ave. Contact Mike at (412) 417-3707 or visit squirrelhillhistory.org for more information. PJ Library in Pittsburgh, the Jewish children’s book gifting program, has received its 1,000th subscriber, an 18-month-old boy from Squirrel Hill. PJ Library will celebrate the occasion with a free party, at this month’s PJ Library Storytime at the Jewish

Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh in Squirrel Hill, Thursday, Nov. 3, at 11:30 a.m. Contact Kristen Keller, PJ Library programming coordinator at (412) 521-1101 Ext. 3001 or KKeller@ajlpittsburgh.org. The PJ Library sends out age appropriate Jewish children’s books every month to participating families in communities across North America.

Eishet Chayil (Woman of Valor) women’s teacher Nami Friedman will explore the meaning of prayer traditionally sung to women before the Shabbat meal, Thursday, Nov. 10, at 7:30 p.m. at Chabad of the South Hills, 1701 McFarland Road. There is a charge. Contact Batya@Chadsh.com or (412) 344-2424 for reservations. The Women of Ohav Shalom will host the second annual Gift Fair and Used Book Sale, Sunday, Nov. 13, from 12:30 to 3 p.m. at Temple Ohav Shalom, 8400 Thompson Run Road, Allison Park. Featured are merchandise from local vendors and crafters, as well as a huge used book selection. Lunch and bake sale will be available while you shop. Proceeds benefit the mission to provide social and educational programs, community service and involvement with Women of Reform Judaism. Contact Cheryl Bradshaw at dcmjcbrad@verizon.net for more information.

6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

Opinion A little courage is too little

P

alestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’ admission last week that the Arab world in general, and the Palestinians in particular, made a mistake by rejecting the 1947 United Nations Partition Plan deserves some kudos from Israel and the Jewish world. As history records, the leadership of the soon-to-be independent Israel accepted the proposed partition of Palestine into Jewish and Arab states, but the Palestinians and their Arab backers rejected it, leading to the 1948 War for Independence. To this day, the vast majority of the Arab street and regimes characterize Israeli independence as a “catastrophe.” They even have a Nakba (catastrophe) Day to correspond with Israel’s independence day. This year, no doubt to turn up the heat on Israel while diverting world attention for internal strife among their own populations, neighboring Arab countries permitted — possibly even paid — mobs to storm Israel’s borders on this year’s Nakba Day. With that kind of blind hostility, Abbas’ statement required a little bit of courage. But only a little bit. After all, he made the remarks on Israel’s Channel 2 TV; it would have been a jaw-dropping development had he made the same statement in the

Palestinian media. He also made the statement on a Friday, the Muslim Sabbath — a time when the Arab world is less likely to be paying attention to what the Israeli media is reporting. In addition, while Abbas gets a couple brownie points for saying what he did, accolades should be tempered for the way he phrased his remarks: “It was our mistake. It was an Arab mistake as a whole,” the P.A. leader said of the rejection, “but do they punish us for this mistake for 64 years?” To answer his question, absolutely not. Israel shows due wariness — not punishment — for the mistakes the Palestinians are making right now. Those mistakes include: • Using the Palestinian media to demonize Jews; • Honoring terrorists by permitting public squares to be named after them; • Seeking reconciliation with Hamas even though its leaders have no interest in peace with Israel; and • Circumventing face-to-face negotiations by going to the United Nations and asking for recognition of Palestinian statehood — a process that advanced this week with the UNESCO vote to admit “Palestine” as its 195th member. And those are just the highlights. While we’re at it, we’d like to see

Abbas, or any Arab leader for that matter, own up to some other mistakes — or, dare we say, crimes — they’ve committed in the past 60 years: • The forced exodus of some 800,000 Jews from Arab lands since 1948; • The banishment of Jews from Jerusalem’s Old City in 1948, the sacking of the Jewish Quarter, and the refusal to let Jews pray at the Western Wall for nearly two decades; and • The Arab world’s rejection, through its Khartoum Resolutions of Israel’s offer to return conquered lands shortly after the 1967 Six-Day War. And perhaps the biggest bonehead move of all: Yasser Arafat’s walking away from a sweetheart peace proposal made by then-Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak in 2000 at Camp David that would have given Palestinians a state and most of what they demanded in negotiations. All-or-nothing negotiators frequently leave the table with nothing. None of this is to imply that Israel should give up on Abbas as a peace partner. His tacit admission shows that, at the very least, he is capable of yielding when necessary. But neither should Israeli leaders be too excited by what he said. Abbas continues to play the aggrieved party. When he finally gives up that long-running role, that’s when peace talks can resume in earnest.

In rebuttal

Schachter may not value library, but Pittsburgh does Guest Columnist SHEILA MAY-STEIN As I finished Abby Schachter’s article on the proposed library funding initiative, all I could thinks was, “Seriously? Is this a joke? The library should have a bake sale to fund itself?” As an alleged “person of the book,” Abby Schachter should hang her head in shame. The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh is a cultural jewel. It provides unparalleled access to the richest, broadest, deepest collection of materials serving the blind, deaf, the young, old and inbetween. It offers MP-3 players for reluctant readers loaded with books for them to listen to as they read, computer access for those who stand on the other side of the digital divide, historical, legal and genealogical resources, homework help, help with resumes and job hunts, and a deeply underpaid and overworked staff who passionately advocate for literacy, first amendment rights and Pittsburgh citizens daily. Libraries serve schools with additional resources that

limited school libraries don’t have by offering teacher accounts. They also offer interlibrary loan service from all over the state to get you what you need. My list of what libraries do is far from complete, but it is the staff that deserves special mention. Before the Squirrel Hill branch of Carnegie Library was renovated, and when my children were small, I would make weekly trips to the children’s department with a hand-held shopping cart. I would describe the books my children loved, and Susan Hughes, then the manager of the children’s section, would simply go to the shelves, fill up my cart, and I’d be on my way. On the weekends we’d go through the stacks of Susan’s recommendations and without fail — my kids would spend their Shabbats devouring her choices. Her encyclopedic knowledge of children’s books and passion for finding the right one for the right child helped my children become lifelong readers. I’m indebted to her for life, as are my kids. My daughter Sarah was so inspired by Susan and the positive impact she made on her life that she devoted her bat mitzva project to the Squirrel Hill branch of the library. Sarah was outraged that the library was going to have to shut its doors on Sundays because of budget shortfalls — she knew that this would

disproportionately affect the Orthodox Jewish community, who find a beautiful, warm and welcoming place to gather and enjoy books after Shabbat. And we are far from Orthodox. As more and more school librarians are cut from public school budgets, children need public libraries all the more. Teachers will, too. Has Schachter considered the impact public library services have on underserved children who don’t have computers or books at home? Doesn’t the Torah demand that we do what we can to help the needy in our communities? Isn’t a few dollars more worth it to keep Pittsburgh children safe, warm, reading and engaged in learning? I am horrified at the shortsightedness and banal ignorance displayed in Schachter’s article. She and her family may not value the library, but our city does. And I look forward with joy to paying my extra tax to help support this service for myself, for my family and my community.

(Sheila May-Stein is a librarian at Community Day School. For further comments on Abby Wisse Schachter’s opinion piece, see Letters to the Editor, page 7.)

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: Letters to the Editor via e-mail The Jewish Chronicle letters@thejewishchronicle.net via fax 5915 Beacon, 3rd Flr. (412) 521-0154 Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Web site address thejewishchronicle.net

Library pursuing all options The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh’s mission is vital to our neighborhoods, providing access to books, the Internet, an expert professional staff and numer-

ous resources. Inadequate funding has resulted in significant cutbacks in library hours and services in recent years. The Our Library, Our Future voter initiative allows all voters in the City of Pittsburgh to have a say in the future of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. In an attempt to ensure that voters are making educated decisions about the Nov. 8 ballot question, we would like to correct some of the misinformation in Abby Wisse Schachter’s recent column about the initiative,” Library had options other than tax hike, Oct. 27. The voter initiative was one of six recommendations that the Joint Task Force developed to ensure sustainable Please see Letters, page 19.

8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

OPINION Two views:

How best to improve Pittsburgh living Guest Columnist COREY O’CONNOR My name is Corey O’Connor, and I am a lifelong resident of Pittsburgh’s 5th Council District. If I am elected to City Council Nov. 8, my top priority will be improving our quality of life by concentrating on the issues of public safety, job growth and Main Street development. I will work hard to ensure that our district gets its fair share of city services. District 5 is made up of 10 neighborhoods: Squirrel Hill South, a part of Squirrel Hill North, Regent Square, Greenfield, Swisshelm Park, Hazelwood, Glen Hazel, Hays, Lincoln Place and New Homestead. Each neighborhood is unique and our council district is as diverse as any section of Pittsburgh, if not more so. This is a diverse community, and because of my life experience here, I believe that I know families on nearly every street in the district. That’s significant because City Council may be the closest relationship possible between citizens and their government. I believe that being accessible and approachable, as well having a reputation for being honest and open-minded, raises people’s confidence that they can always find a fair hearing. When people are willing and able to approach an elected official to talk things over, I believe that’s a valuable step toward actually improving the quality of life for everyone. That’s why I have spent nearly a year walking throughout the district and knocking on doors in all 10 neighborhoods. I have talked with residents

everywhere — on their front doorsteps and often in their homes. I listened to your and concerns my agenda is based on the ideas that you and I have been talking about all year long. Open Corey O’Connor dialogue will be my standard practice, not just at election time but every day that I am fortunate enough to serve in public office. And that’s just one of the ways how together we’ll make this a better place to live. I am a graduate of Central Catholic High School and received a degree in elementary education from Duquesne University in 2006. I had planned to be a teacher, but with my change in family circumstances, I began instead to work for U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle in 2007. As community development representative, I had responsibilities for both constituent services and for community development projects. In the congressman’s office, I worked to secure federal funding for economic development and public safety for Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods. I helped to bring heating and energy assistance to seniors and low-income residents and was also the primary contact person with the Federal Emergency Management Agency when assistance was needed to mitigate disruptions caused by natural disasters, such as floods and tornados. I’m professionally experienced working with federal, state, county and city agencies to Please see O’Connor, next page.

Guest Columnist JOSH WANDER Of course that is a silly statement. Who, in their right mind would consider voting for a candidate solely on the basis of religion? Fortunately, on Nov. 8 you will have an opportunity to choose a candidate, not based on name recognition or party affiliation, but upon hard credentials. The way to improve the quality of life in Pittsburgh is simply by electing qualified individuals to office. This has clearly not been the case. The proof: our population has dwindled to less than half its original glory while we have been struggling with single party rule, which is unhealthy for any city, regardless of which party is in power. There is a good reason that we have a two party system in our country, because it promotes accountability, something that has been missing from our city for many decades. For example, the city’s pension system was a reckless patronage agreement made because the city’s one-party rule created a backslapping arrangement with the unions at the expense of you, the taxpayer. Once elected, I will begin to dismantle that system and replace it with a right-towork initiative that will reward city workers commensurate with their achievements. Also, all of the quasi-governmental authorities need to be reigned in. I would immediately begin a complete audit of the entire city government to see where we can make cuts, work to consol-

idate the duplication of services and how we can stop the out of control waste. This really isn’t rocket science and is something that all of the oversight boards have should done from the Josh Wander get go. We need someone whose hands are not tied by special interest groups, labor unions and old school politics to get this job done. Politics as usual, will not do. We need transparency now. Crime has plagued our city and is begging to spill over into our district. With my background in law enforcement and the military, I pledge not only to equip our first responders with the most advanced tools to battle crime, but I will provide them with new and innovative ways to accomplish this task. Finally, city council needs to understand the limits of their authority. As with all levels of government they swear an oath to uphold the Constitution. My guess is that very few of them have even bothered to read the fundamental documents of which our country and state are bound. Many of the ordinances passed by council overstep their mandate, which is not only a waste of time and money for the city, but opens up the city to possible litigation. Simply put, we need experienced and responsible people running our city. I am a native Pittsburgher and was born in McKeesport. I went to both Hillel Academy and Yeshiva Schools. I Please see Wander, next page.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 — 9

OPINION O’Connor: Continued from previous page. solve people’s problems and to get things done. For a council member, these are the kinds of daily tasks that directly affect the quality of people’s lives. In general policy terms, however, there are a number of overriding issues that have major impacts on our district’s quality of life. I believe in the fundamental priorities of providing clean and safe streets, reliable infrastructure, and top-notch public schools. I understand the importance of dealing effectively with abandoned and blighted properties because this impacts both our public safety and our economy. For the 5th District particularly, maintaining worldclass public parks and commuterfriendly trails is crucial. Trained as an educator, I know that our parks, schools, churches, synagogues and libraries are places where the lives of our young people should be enriched with well organized and safe after school programs. I fully support smart development of the Hazelwood riverfront because it promises to generate about 3,000 family-sustaining jobs that can help grow our en-

Wander: Continued from previous page. moved to Israel after high school to pursue an undergraduate degree in talmudic law. Following the first Gulf War I recognized the need to protect Israel and volunteered in the Israeli army, where I served honorably as a combat commander in Lebanon. Following my military service, I got involved in politics and served as an advisor in the Knesset. I then went on to work as the online editor for the Jerusalem Post. When I returned to the United States, married with children, I continued to serve in my role as a public servant. I was elected to the position of state constable and began my advanced studies in public policy. I earned a master’s degree in public and international affairs, majoring in security and intelligence studies, from the University of Pittsburgh. I also earned an advanced certificate in global studies on the side. Final-

tire district for years to come. Ultimately, family sustaining jobs and affordable housing mean more opportunity for everyone, young and old, to enjoy a higher quality of life. Taken all together, these are the things that will foster sustainable growth in one of America’s most livable cities. Finally, I’ve served on the boards of the Clean Pittsburgh Commission, the Cancer Caring Center, Addison Behavioral Health and First Tee of Pittsburgh, where I’ve met and worked with many people with differing perspectives and expertise. These relationships are a resource. Playing in our neighborhood Little League and then coaching there for 10 years as an adult has enriched me; the experience enabled me to meet many young people and families who are now so vital to our community’s future. I know that I have the experience, the energy, and the ability to bring people together to help us make progress on many important fronts. I respectfully ask you for your support and for your vote Nov. 8. (Corey O’Connor is the Democratic candidate for the Pittsburgh City Council, District 5.)

ly, I began studies toward a doctorate in public policy and administration. Sounds overqualified for the job? Perhaps, considering that a few years ago most people on city council did not have a college degree and some never even finished high school. But, better overqualified than under-qualified. Our city is in receivership on the brink of bankruptcy and “leadership” is not capable of rescuing us from this mess. We have previously elected young and less than qualified individuals to council with the hope that they would learn on the job. We can no longer afford to do this. So, should you vote for Josh Wander because he’s Jewish? Of course not. You should vote for me because I am the more qualified candidate to fix a broken system, which is in such desperate need of repair. (Josh Wonder is the Republican candidate for the Pittsburgh City Council, District 5.)

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10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

Style NOT SO ‘SIMPLE’ A STORY Characters flawed but likable in Agnon novel ends in “happily ever after” is a matter of personal opinion. It is a light read but one with a hidden, deeper meaning, and the author cleverly keeps the reader guessing about the direction of the story. As Hirshl begins a turnaround of his life, Blume’s importance, and her presence in the book, quietly fades into the background. The author teasingly hints that Blume’s life can fill another book, but he died without writing such a book; whether this was a tease or was a plan is unclear. Agnon, who was born in Galicia in what is now Ukraine and emigrated to Jaffa in 1908, won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1966, just four years before his death at the age of 81. Agnon’s birth name was Shmuel Yoself Halevi Czaczkes; he adopted “Agnon” following a story he wrote called “Agunot.” Agnon was a prolific author with a slew of titles to his credit, much of which has been translated into English. In addition, his daughter published many of his works posthumously. Agnon was the pride of Israel in his lifetime and is still celebrated there 40 years after his death.

RETRO REVIEWS BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondent

“A Simple Story,” by Israeli author Shmuel Yosef Agnon (writing as S.Y. Agnon) is not as simple as the title would have the reader believe. The story, originally published in 1935 but not translated into English until 1985, starts off simply enough: in a fictional town in Poland at the beginning of the 20th century, a young woman named Blume is left orphaned and penniless. She is taken in by her cousins, Boruch Meir and Tsirl, and works as their housemaid. Their son, Hirshl, falls madly in love with Blume, causing discomfort and discord between the two young cousins. Eventually, Blume moves out and becomes a housemaid with another family. That’s when the story veers into an unexpected direction; the focus shifts from Blume to Hirshl. Seemingly in circumstances beyond his control (or possibly, because of his lack of gumption to live life his own way), Hirshl inadvertently becomes engaged to Mina Ziemlich, a shy, reserved girl from a good (i.e. wealthy) family. Hirshl’s conniving mother has been planning this match as soon as she finds out how much Mina’s father is worth. Hirshl goes about his days in a stupor; he helps his parents run their shop and marries the unassuming Mina. However, Hirshl goes mad with his love for Blume, the strength of which is equal to his lack of feeling for his bride. His feelings for Mina were so pointedly summed up by Agnon: “Do I mind her? He asked himself. No more than I mind anyone. It’s just that she’s always around. It’s like having to wear a coat all the time that never keeps you warm.”

(Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hdaninhirsch@gmail.com.)

Hirshl’s descent into madness leads to insomnia and ultimately, he is put in a mental institution. “What a pitiful thing human life was. A man slept all night in order to rise in the morning, and looked forward all day to sleeping again at night. And between sleeping and waking, what a lot of guff he had to take.” In a unique method of writing, the author addresses the reader, i.e., “Indeed, how can we have mentioned Tsirl so often without having mentioned her eyes?” “A Simple Story” is set against the background of up-and-coming Zion-

ism, of the changing face of marriage, and about daily Jewish life at the turn of the century in Eastern Europe. Agnon rewards the reader with many amusS. Y. Agnon ing, even laugh-out-loud passages. While the characters are flawed (Tsirl for her patrician ways, Hirshl for his lack of backbone, Boruch Meir for being a people-pleaser), they are multidimensional and imminently likeable. The story could almost be described as a romance, though whether the book

Book Review “A Simple Story” by S.Y. Agnon Translated from the Hebrew by Hillel Halkin, Syracuse University Press, 252 pages.

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011— 11

BOOKS ‘One Hundred Great Jewish Books’ an engaging, must-have synopsis BY N EAL G ENDLER For the Chronicle

Long ago, I learned that you can’t judge a book by its title. But when I picked up Rabbi Lawrence Hoffman’s “One Hundred Great Jewish Books,” my reaction was: Who’d want this? My answer after reading: Every Jew should. To my delighted astonishment, Hoffman has not produced another ho-hum book of lists, biographies or even just synopses of 100 books he considers Jews’ greatest. Hoffman has created an intelligent, very engaging overview of the history of Jews, Judaism and Jewish thought. Many other books with short chapters, each about a different person, are easy to pick up and put down, reading randomly. “One Hundred Great Jewish Books” can be read that way, but at a big cost: You don’t get the benefit of the development of our people that comes from reading the book in order. Hoffman makes reading from front to back compelling, each chapter distinct from yet building on the one before. Hoffman says the book presents a long-held idea “to see Judaism not just as a religion, a culture or even a civilization, but as an evolving conversation over time.” His goal is to let readers “traverse time and space and listen in on the conversation as it has expanded.” That’s how he presents the 100, a few of which are series, such as Elie Wiesel’s “Night” trilogy — largely chronologically, from Genesis through “Start-up Nation,” Dan Senor and Saul Singer’s recent hit explaining Israel’s entrepreneurial spirit and success. Hoffman thus begins with The Book, although people who believe that God dictated the Torah and the oral law to Moses at Sinai probably won’t like the fact that Hoffman does not. His overview of the section on the Tanach gives his logical view of when and by whom the Torah, the Prophets and the Writings were assembled and canonized. Throughout, Hoffman’s explanations go beyond each author’s life and times. Each chapter centers on a single significant work, but it tells more about the development of Jewish practice, culture and thought and the internal and external disagreements that accompanied many of the changes in the author’s time. The book is divided into nine sections, each with a short, context-setting introduction. His divisions are sensible. For example: Bible; rabbis;

Book Review “One Hundred Great Jewish Books: three millennia of Jewish conversation,” by Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman, Blue Bridge trade paperback, 352 pages.

Middle Ages, enlightenment, emanci2011_WANTED Subscription ad 5/23/11 8:02 PM Page 1 pation and tradition; theWANTED turn ofSubs 19th to 20th centuries; Holocaust and Israel, and so on through today. And he’s a very good writer. His book is a joy, even a breeze to read — explaining terms without talking down to readers who already know. Almost every chapter is so interesting you want to go on to the next, even if you’ve never heard of the author. I’ll confess to not knowing about many of them, especially those before the late 19th century, but familiar names include: Moses Maimonides, Judah Halevy, Moses Mendelsson, Theodor Herzl, Milton Steinberg, Sholem Aleichem, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Amos Elon, Clifford Odets, Joseph B. Soloveitchik, Primo Levi, Chaim Potok, Joseph Telushkin, Art Spiegelman, Martin Gilbert, Abraham Joshua IF YOU GIVE A GIFT SUBSCRIPTION OR Heschel, Cynthia Ozick, Philip Roth, Amoz Oz and Hillel Halkin. REFER A NEW SUBSCRIBER Chapters are about two and a half pages — not enough to converse at length about a book or author, but will reward you with a $10 coupon to apply to your own more than enough to avoid the embarrassment of knowing nothing of them. subscription. Send this form with the new subscription. Hoffman can be forgiven for calling Your Name the series he edited, “My People’s Prayer Book,” “the most comprehenAddress sive way to approach the siddur.” It’s hard to imagine anything more thorCity State Zip ough than 10 volumes written between 1997 and 2007 written by people of all NEW SUBSCRIPTION four major U.S. denominations, men, Name women and scholars from North American and Israel. Address He calls “One Hundred Great Jewish Books” a “synopsis of the things City State Zip Jews talk about — and the sources PA* Rates: J 1 year $45 J 2 years $85 J 3 years $121 Jews cite when they do the talking.” I’d call it a welcome and valuable *Please call for rates to other areas addition to any Jew’s library. J Check enclosed Bill my credit card: o VISA o MasterCard

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12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMER 3, 2011

GLOBE ‘Amos Rules’ Retired IDF General: Terrorist threats can be countered without silver bullets BY JACOB KAMARAS JointMedia News Service

Over the course of 40 years and two weeks in the Israel Defense Forces, including five as chief of military intelligence, Amos Yadlin developed the “Amos Rules”— honed while he manned the cockpit of an F-15 and later applied to his desk job. Speaking at a recent dinner in Belmont, Mass., sponsored by the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs (JINSA), Yadlin explained his principles as follows: never panic, never be in euphoria, be slightly paranoid, be very suspicious of what you read in the headlines, and understand that “there are no silver bullets anymore.” With threats like an unstable Middle East, strained relations with Turkey, a unilateral Palestinian statehood bid, and the prospect of a nuclear Iran, Israel could use a silver bullet these days. In the absence of one, Israeli intelligence operatives have the duty “to look into the future, but not as prophets,” according to Yadlin. “There is so much information today in the world, that the problem is to be able to find the relevant information, the [information] that can help you predict the future,” Yadlin said in an interview with JointMedia News Service. “The good information that will give your assessment strength and knowledge.”

Robert D. Ward photo

Maj. Gen. Amos Yadlin (left), in 2005 the defense attache at the Israeli Embassy in Washington with then-Israeli Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz, and U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld.

Yadlin said that when he served as chief of military intelligence, he opposed potential deals for Shalit’s freedom because he “thought that justice has a meaning,” and was wary of losing more IDF soldiers to captivity in the future. That would create complex dilemmas similar to the Shalit or-

deal for both the Israeli government and parents of soldiers, he said. However, he told JointMedia News Service that the deal bringing Shalit home in exchange for 1,027 Hamas prisoners was “better than it was a year ago or two years ago.” Yadlin told the audience that the 550 prisoners to be released in the second phase of the deal are “not important,” as opposed to the first 477 prisoners, where “each one is a problem.” The Shalit dilemma is “tragic,” he said, because the government on the one hand has a system of compulsory military service and therefore owes a “debt” to Israeli society to do “a lot” to bring back imprisoned soldiers. But, on the other hand, there is the question of “What is too much?” “I will not underestimate the difficulty to decide on such an issue,” Yadlin said of the Shalit deal. “It’s a very tough dilemma with arguments for both sides.” Yadlin used his address to apply the “Amos Rules” to the various threats facing Israel. After four decades in the IDF, Yadlin said he is “still an optimist” about Israel’s situation, citing that Hezbollah not fired at Israel since the 2006 Lebanon War, as well as a strong Israeli economy. “If you only read the headlines, you

may think Israel has a big, big problem,” Yadlin said. Still, Yadlin acknowledged that Israel’s enemies are now more sophisticated than ever and are in a “learning competition with us.” With due respect for the Palestinian statehood bid and the threats posed by Egypt and Turkey, Yadlin said the top issue facing Israel is a nuclear Iran, “because we don’t have the silver bullet to solve it.” “Iran is the only existential threat to Israel,” he said. Asked when Iran might have a nuclear program, Yadlin said that reality will come when the country decides it is “going to the last stage.” Iran has the ingredients ready but is moving “cautiously, slowly, step by step,” he said. “They will break out one day, could be tonight, could be two years from now,” Yadlin said, adding that after they “break out,” it will take 12-18 months to develop the bomb. While the U.S. strategy of engagement with Iran didn’t work, and sanctions had some success but ultimately proved “like twisting somebody’s arm, but it doesn’t hurt enough that it will change his behavior,” the best possible strategic development to deal with the Iranian threat would be the toppling of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s regime, Yadlin said. That’s a much better alternative than simply living with the prospect of Iran’s future bomb, he said. “We can live with Iran. [We can say,] ‘We will deter them, we will contain them,’” Yadlin said. “I hardly agree with this, but it’s a strategy.” But is regime change a real possibility in Iran? Yadlin told JointMedia News Service “you have to be very, very careful, because nobody predicted the collapse of the Soviet Union, nobody predicted the collapse of [Hosni] Mubarak [in Egypt].” “Intelligence agencies are very much concentrated on the leadership,” he said. “They cannot see what’s going down in the undercurrent stream in the universities, in the factories, in the mosques. So it is a possibility, but you have to be very cautious to give it a likelihood, a probability. But you can do something to accelerate it.” Unlike Iran, Palestinians do not pose an existential threat to Israel because when it comes to their tanks, missiles and Please see Yadlin, next page.

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 — 13

GLOBE Yadlin: Continued from previous page. submarines, the IDF will always have the advantage, Yadlin said. Palestinian rockets, Yadlin said, are missiles with inaccurate guidance systems, and therefore “more of a terror system and less of an efficient military operation.” There is no “silver bullet” to solve the Palestinian threat, but many layers of strategy to fight it, including cooperation with the U.S., he said. The Arab Spring is a “very substantial issue” not to be underestimated, and is possibly the most important event in the Middle East since the 1970s, Yadlin said. Each country’s circumstance must be looked at differently in what is a “very slow process,” he said. “It is not a domino effect and it is not going to be one season,” Yadlin said of the Arab Spring. The “romantics” of the Arab Spring think Facebook is the key to freedom, but in Syria, Bashar al-Assad “understood that the bullets can win the Facebook revolution,” Yadlin said. In Saudi Arabia, the government’s solution to revolution was money, he said—$136 billion, and free education and healthcare. Since Saudi Arabia and Iran control most of the region’s oil, the Arab Spring, at the end of the day, is limited, Yadlin said. “[Facebook] is changing the way things are done everywhere, but remember my rule, it is not a silver bullet,” he said. For Israel, while the Arab Spring’s benefit for radical Islamic factions like

the Muslim Brotherhood means things will get worse before they get better, Yadlin recommended another one of his rules: “Don’t panic.” The Arab Spring isn’t necessarily bad for Israel in the long run, he said, because Arab countries are starting to share values like democracy with Israel—democracies never go to war with each other. Europe was not a democracy in a year or in a season, but after two world wars, while not too long ago the U.S. had slaves and women couldn’t vote, Yadlin noted. The development of democracy in the Arab world “will take time, but since I’m an optimist, I think it will be much faster [than it was elsewhere in the world]” because of the Internet, he said. For the first time, Yadlin said, Arabs have “looked inward, to themselves” rather than solely blaming Israel and the U.S. for their problems. If there is regime change in Syria, Yadlin said “the devil we don’t know will be different,” stopping the transfer of weapons and ideology from Iran to Hezbollah and Hamas. In Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan is a charismatic Islamist looking to lead the Arab world, Yadlin said. “How can you be a leader? If you bash Israel,” he said. However, Yadlin said, the good news for Israel is that Turkey “is not Iran” and is not developing nuclear weapons. “I think we are at the height of [Turkey’s] hate to Israel and it may reverse,” he said. (Jacob Kamaras is the Editor-in-Chief of JNS.)

14 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

Dining Guide

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 - 15

Dining Guide

11/30/11

16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

Simchas Weddings

Heyman/Baylis: Anita and Ted Heyman of Monroeville announce the marriage of their daughter, Elyse Renée Heyman, to Yakov Moshe Baylis, son of Dr. Barry and Helen Baylis of Lincolnwood, Ill., Aug. 14 at the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center. Rabbi Ely Rosenzveig of New Rochelle, N.Y., officiated. Elyse’s grandparents are Carl and Diane Gzesh of Boca Raton, Fla., the late Mayer and Eleanore Handley and the late Milton and Sylvia Heyman. Bridesmaids included Malka Frazin, sister of the groom, and Rebecca Hertzberg. Groomsmen included Jeremy Heyman, brother of the bride; Mike Frazin, brother-in-law of the groom; and Yoni Glassner.

Elyse graduated from Case Western Reserve University with a bachelor’s degree in communication disorders and psychology and a master’s degree in social work. She is a clinical case manager at Heartland Human Care Services, Inc. Yakov graduated from Loyola University of Chicago with a bachelor’s degree in finance. He is a financial professional with Prudential Insurance Company of America. Elyse and Yakov reside in Chicago.

Andrea graduated with a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania and completed a master’s of science degree in health care at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. Adam graduated from Oxford University. He and Andrea are enrolled in the master’s of business administration program at Harvard Business School. They look forward to a wedding trip to India and the Maldives in January. Andrea and Adam reside in Cambridge, Mass.

degree in history and earned a master’s degree in education at Cabrini College. She is a history teacher in the Cherry Creek School district in Denver. Daniel, 30, also graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, with a bachelor’s of science degree in mechanical engineering and economics as well as a master’s degree in systems engineering. He is a reliability engineer at Lockheed Martin working on the Orion space vehicle program for NASA. Rachel and Daniel reside in Denver, and are planning a December honeymoon in Australia.

B’nai Mitzvahs

Michel/Berlin: Andrea Michel, daughter of Drs. Elliot Michel and Lita Rothenberg of Fox Chapel, and Adam Berlin, son of Debbie Welch and Michael Berlin of London, celebrated their marriage at the Ritz Carlton, South Beach, Fla., June 27.

Silverman/Marcus: Fern and Barry Silverman of Penn Valley announce the marriage of their daughter, Rachel Arielle, to Daniel Morris Marcus, son of Rochelle and David Marcus of Parkland, Fla., Oct. 23, on the grounds of Belle Voir Manor in Bensalem, followed by a reception in the adjacent mansion. Rabbi Dennis Beck-Berman from Petersburg, Va., a longtime family friend, officiated. The bridal party included Rachel’s grandmother, Lila Margolis Weiss of Pittsburgh, and Daniel’s maternal grandmother and paternal grandfather, Zipora Zucker and Max Marcus, both of south Florida. The groom’s friend, Vikram Ramakrishnan, escorted grandmothers down the aisle. Bridesmaids were the groom’s sisters, Monica, Lindsey and Nicole Marcus. Ushers were Ted Paulakis, friend of the groom; and Joel and Daniel Silverman, brothers of the bride. Stella Muzin and Jeremy Zucker, cousins of the groom, served as flower girl and ring bearer. Best man was Adam Greenbaum and maid of honor was Maxine Yeung. Rachel graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor’s

Ariana Gabrielle Finkelstein, daughter of Lisa Schlar and Alan Finkelstein, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Nov. 5, at Congregation Beth Shalom. Grandparents are Myrna Finkelstein of Mt. Lebanon, and Avis and Edward Schlar of Phoenix. Greatgrandmother is the late Etta Epstein. Sophie Golomb, daughter of Jodi and Zeb Golomb, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Nov. 5, at Temple B’nai Israel. Grandparents are Janice and Louis Greenwald of White Oak, Mary Kay and Robert Golomb of Mt. Lebanon and Donna Rosen of Oakland. Anna Elaine Rosengart, daughter of Matthew Rosengart and Janet Lee, became a bat mitzva Saturday, Oct. 22, at Rodef Shalom Congregation. Grandparents are Carl Lester and Elaine Rosengart and Won Ro and Kyung Ja Lee.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 — 17

Community Couple honored

A C L O S E R L O O K

Pittsburgh native Jeff Hast, a 2008 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, has entered the Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program at Brandeis University. Hast has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a certificate in children’s literature. He spent a year in Israel with OTZMA, living in various cities in the north and south, and volunteering in a variety of social and educational settings. The Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program at Brandeis University is a 21-month dual degree graduate program with approximately 600 alumni Jeff Hast working in all aspects of Jewish life on five continents. Located on the Brandeis campus in Waltham, Mass., the coursework integrates Jewish studies and professional perspectives with supervised fieldwork and leadership seminars in Israel, New York and on campus. Along with a master’s degree in Jewish professional leadership, students choose a second degree in conjunction with Brandeis’ Heller School for Social Policy and Management, or in Near East and Judaic Studies. Nina S. Butler was appointed as director of innovative collaborations by SLB Radio Productions, Inc. Butler will lead the continued expansion of educational projects and programs at SLB, and will develop partnerships for amplifying the voices and ideas of children, youth and families. The newly created position was established to leverage new and strengthen existing key partnerships with a variety of local and regional educational, cultural and social service entities. Founded in 1978, SLB owns and operates a $250,000 digital broadcast studio and training facility in the Children’s Museum of Nina S. Butler Pittsburgh. Butler holds a doctorate in educational administration and policy studies, and master’s degrees in special education and the art of teaching from the University of Pittsburgh. Prior to working at SLB, she served as educational consultant to the Avi Chai Foundation and director of the Day School Educational Leadership Think Tank, both based in New York City.

President Barack Obama has appointed Pittsburgh attorney David Ehrenwerth to a major national leadership position at the U.S. General Services Administration. Ehrenwerth will serve as associate commissioner of the Public Buildings Service, the division of GSA that develops and manages the federal government’s substantial real estate portfolio across the country. PBS is one of the largest and most diversified public real estate organizations in the world. Ehrenwerth previously was a partner in the K&L Gates law firm’s Pittsburgh office and has David Ehrenwerth been serving for the past year as Mid-Atlantic regional administrator of GSA. In his new capacity, he will deal with broad policy issues, including innovative ways to reduce the federal government’s space needs, disposal of numerous excess properties and creative new approaches for providing sustainable and cost-effective space for all federal employees.

Shirley and Morris Shratter received a “longevity award” for producing continuously for over 20 years for Pittsburgh Community Television during their 25th anniversary party at the Hazlett Theater. Executive director John Patterson presented the trophy. The Shratters have received four other awards from organizations for their program, “More Than Just Learning.”

Milestone birthday

Margaret Reich celebrated her 102nd birthday with friends at Weinberg Terrace in Squirrel Hill. Pet therapy dogs Toby and Daisy, pictured below, are active in Highmark’s PALS with Pets program and joined the celebration.

18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 — 19

OPINION Letters to the Editor: Continued from page 7. long-term funding for the library. Instead of a tiered list, the six recommendations are intended to work in conjunction with one another. Though the ballot referendum is the most public of the six, the library is putting in the same effort to pursuing the other five. Local volunteers have been working since June to collect signatures, get the referendum question on the ballot, and canvass the city to get people out to the polls on Nov. 8. The process to pass a referendum of this sort is difficult, however it is critical to the long-term sustainable funding that the library requires. When voters cast their ballots on Nov. 8, they will be voting specifically for a 0.25 mill tax. The rate is fixed and cannot be raised without going through another ballot measure. Our elected officials recognize the importance of libraries to their constituents. Many have worked diligently on library funding and support the six approaches, including the voter referendum, as the best options to sustain our system. The library staff, trustees, elected officials and volunteers are doing everything we can to ensure that the library can continue to provide the critical resources that the community wants and needs. Libraries make a difference as will your vote on Nov. 8. Carolyn Hess Abraham, Carol Robinson, Pat Siger (The authors are trustees of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.)

Support our library, our future On Nov. 8, our community will vote to decide if Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh will have a dedicated source of funding that will help to sustain the critical services that the library has provided for more than 115 years. In addition to hundreds of thousands of books and reference works, our library provides invaluable programs for children, classes and job training opportunities that engage the community in literacy and lifetime learning, computer access, and help for people looking for jobs, seeking to improve their knowledge or intending to help their community. My 4-year-old twin grandsons, Zachary and Eli, go to the Squirrel Hill branch every week. They love story time, borrow piles of books, and are on a great start to a life of literary engagement and growth. Supporters of the Our Library, Our Future initiative are asking Pittsburgh residents to vote YES on a referendum on the ballot in November for a 0.25 mill special tax on all taxable real estate in

the City of Pittsburgh to be allocated and used only for the maintenance and operation of Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. (This is the equivalent of $25 per year or $2.09 per month on $100,000 of assessed value.) This initiative was not undertaken lightly. Our libraries are underfunded and desperately need steady funding. The voter initiative was one of six recommendations that a Public-Private Task Force on Sustainable Library Funding suggested for the library. The library has reduced staff, reduced hours and has successfully pursued efficiency, but it must have reliable and dedicated funding in order to continue serving the community. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh is about more than books — it is about education, learning, and equal access to information. With more than 2.5 million visitors each year, the library is a community anchor. Just visit any library and you will find a beehive of activity. I know that times are tough for many people in Pittsburgh, but this vote is worth it. When we vote for the library, we see a strong return on our investment in the form of after-school programs, job search assistance, computer access, and a place for our community to come together. If we want Pittsburgh’s economy to grow, if we want Pittsburgh to remain one of the best places to live, and if we want to see our economy grow, we must support this essential service. Ray Baum Squirrel Hill

Contributions are not enough The Carnegie Library and its task force worked long and hard to find solutions to the library’s financial problems. Contrary to Abby Wisse Schachter’s opinion piece (“Library had options other than tax hike,” Oct. 27), a modest tax hike to support the libraries would not be controlled by the libraries or politicians but by the voters. We are being asked to accept or reject a raise of .025 percent, $25 annually per $100,000 of property, not a raise of however much the city or its leaders desire. The amount of the tax would be raised only if the voters agree to raise it in another referendum. How Ms. Schachter could believe that selling T-shirts, hats or bags or having bake sales would raise $5 million is unfathomable. The libraries do conduct used book and other sales, but the amount raised doesn’t and can’t begin to approach the shortfall. Remember, we almost lost five of the 19 branches in 2009 for lack of funds. The library does intend to continue asking for voluntary contributions, but that, too, cannot be the entire solution. Do we ask for voluntary contributions to build and repair our roads and bridges or underwrite city pensions?

Ms. Schachter also suggests the city should prioritize the library over other services if we value it so much. Surely anyone who follows news of the city knows that it does not have sufficient funds to meet the library’s needs. A small, fixed property tax is the best way to avoid closing libraries and reducing hours and services. Please vote yes to the referendum on Nov. 8. Eleanor Hershberg Squirrel Hill (The author is treasurer of Friends of the Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill Branch.)

Independence needs protection Kudos on the Chronicle’s recent designation as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. It is clear that the Chronicle is taking steps to protect its future as a vital community resource in these hard times for newspapers. In your article announcing the change, you quote Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation President Rich Kitay as saying “The grants from various private foundations along with corporate and individual tax-deductible donations will help to ensure that the Chronicle will continue to be an informative and strong voice of the Jewish community.” Under this new status, can you also ensure your readers that the Chronicle will continue to be an independent voice in the Jewish community? What safe-

guards are being put in place to ensure that editorial content does not fall under the sway of major donors and that the honest journalism the Pittsburgh Jewish community has come to depend upon isn’t tainted by the need to placate corporations, organizations, and individuals who are filling revenue holes? Jennifer Bails Squirrel Hill (Editor’s note: The Chronicle has been called many things over the years, and of those that are printable, “tenacious” is one of the most often used. The Chronicle has a reputation of doggedly sniffing out the truth, regardless of where that truth may be found, and there are no plans to change that. As for biting the hand that feeds you, if anything, 501 (c)(3) money makes it easier to seek out the truth, to maintain objectivity and credibility, than advertising; donations are an up-front commitment — an investment based on the big picture — whereas advertising can be erratic and volatile — affected by the heat of the moment. The Chronicle will never hesitate to create friction in the Greater Pittsburgh Jewish community so long as that movement is in the direction of making the community a better, more just place for all its members; you cannot have movement without friction. More than any mechanism or policy, the publication of opinions on all sides of an issue, be it in the form of letters to the editor and/or contributing guest columnists, will ensure the Chronicle’s ongoing objectivity and credibility.)

20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

OBITUARY Hannah Flamberg was Haganah member, community activist BY ABBY GORDON Chronicle Correspondent

Hannah “Ruthie” Flamberg, a Toronto native and longtime resident of Squirrel Hill, was a news junkie. “She had opinions about everything … she was totally informed,” said her son, Danny. When Flamberg died Wednesday, Oct. 5, at the age of 83 as a result of complications related to lung cancer, she was something of a local legend. A one-time member of the Haganah, she became active in Jewish charities when she moved here, which earned her a spot one year on Pittsburgh’s Leading 100 Community Activists by the Post-Gazette. Flamberg owned a vintage consignment shop, Clothes Faire, in Braddock from 1970 until 1992. “A lot of Jewish people contributed clothes and the money went to Jewish charities,” Danny explained. “That was her idea of how you

do business: in charity, and all together.” He described his mother as the ultimate people person. He said, “People joked that even though Pittsburgh didn’t have a chief rabbi, we had a chief yenta. That was her.” Yet for all her avid interest in affairs large and small, international and local, Flamberg did not act as though her own considerable accomplishments were something to obsess or boast about. She never bragged or thought her work was a big deal, her son said. “She was motivated by a deep emotional connection to Israel,” adding that she also loved people and the chance to meet and work with all kinds and large numbers of people. “She had an amazing way with people,” Danny said. “She could meet you for five minutes, you would tell her your whole life story and she would remember it. And she would call you and remember all those details and have ad-

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vice about something you’d told her. She would connect to people all the time.” While Flamberg never boasted or expected accolades for her accomplishments, Danny said she felt very proud and connected when she was named to the Post-Gazette list and when she was invited to the opening of the Haganah Museum in Tel Aviv. “She wasn’t saint-like,” he explained; “She was a real person.” She was not only a real person, but the kind people easily remembered. “She had a raspy voice,” Danny recalled amusedly. “People would joke that Maude from the TV show could have been modeled after my mother. She was tall, out there, had opinions. “She was very active in politics, she knew every mayor personally, she had an opinion about every rabbi in Pittsburgh.” He added that her informed opinions reached far away as well; she read three newspapers a day for her entire life and was always listening to

MSNBC or KDKA. Danny mentioned that while he and his siblings, Zachary and Nancy, have all been active in their local Jewish organizations and synagogues over the years, the influence of their news-filled upbringing has been most apparent. All three worked in the media and as journalists at some point or another, and Zachary even worked for a time at KDKA. Growing up in Flamberg’s household was anything but a dull experience, and not just for the excitement on the constantly-playing news channels. “We’d come home for Shabbat and there would be 12 strangers there,” Danny recalled “Half of them might not even speak English. She invited everyone because she had this incredible sense of openness.” (Abby Gordon can be reached at abbygordon@me.com.)

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 — 21

TORAH Rabbi marks three anniversaries; reflects on the meaning of family Portion of the Week RABBI SARA RAE PERMAN CONGREGATION EMANU-EL ISRAEL GREENSBURG Lech Lecha, Genesis 12:117:27

The Biblical commentator, Rabbi Meir Leibush ben Yehiel Michael better known as Malbim (1809-1897), asks about the order of the command given to Abram in this week’s Torah portion. He notes that Abram is told, “leave your country, leave your birth place, leave your father’s house.” But there is something wrong with the order. If we take a trip, one normally would leave his father’s house first, then his birthplace or home community and then his country. Malbim asks why the order is reversed. He answers that God is using psychology, helping Abram break the bonds that tie him to home gradually. It is easy to leave one’s country, as emotionally one is not as tied to one’s country as one is tied to one’s home community. It is a little harder to leave one’s home community and the hardest is to leave one’s family. Of course, if we read the Bible carefully and go back to the end of last week’s Torah portion, we know that Abram’s father, Terach, at least began the journey with Abram leaving their country Ur for the land of Canaan and settling in Haran. Abram does leave his father’s body buried in Haran and continues on to the land of Canaan with some of his family in tow — Sarai, his

wife; and Lot, his nephew. But the Torah tells us in Genesis 12:5 that Abram also took person(s) (in Hebrew, nefesh or soul) that they had made. Generally, this is understood as people who had converted to the belief in one God that Abram and Sarai worshipped. I believe though that the Torah is suggesting that “family” can be defined beyond being just biological or marital. Recently, my congregation and my community helped me celebrate three major milestones in my life that occurred this year: my 60th birthday, my 30th year as a rabbi and my 25th year serving as the rabbi of Congregation Emanu-El Israel in Greensburg. At this point in my life, I have lived the majority of my life in Greensburg and my congregation has become my family. That is not to say that family and friends from outside the area were not included in the celebration; they were. But, as even my sister Esther noted, CEI has become family. Abram and Sarai learned long ago, and as our people have experienced throughout the centuries, our country is not always our country forever. There are times we leave our birthplace and our father‘s (and mother’s) home without ever returning. But we can create a new home and new family. To all of you who are not native Pittsburghers, not native western Pennylvanians, welcome to the family. To you who have made us feel like family — Thank You. (This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011

OBITUARIES BLOCK: On Friday, Oct. 21, 2011 Mimi “Miriam” Block, 89; beloved wife of the late Robert Block; dear mother of Bennett Block, Judi (Charles) Brenner; grandmother of Michael and Scott Brenner; great-grandmother of Elyse Brenner. BRENNER: On Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011, Alfred H. Brenner; beloved husband of the late Bess M. Brenner; beloved father of Susan (James) Brown, Charles (Judi) Brenner and Cathy Reifer (Sam Braver); grandfather of Jessica Smith, Joshua Brown, Jed Reifer and Michael and Scott Brenner; great-grandfather of Eli and Maya Smith, Isiah Brown and Elyse Brenner. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Mount Lebanon Cemetery/Temple Emaunel Section. Contributions may be made to Temple Emanuel of South Hills, 1250 Bower Hill Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15243.

Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com FOX: On Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011, Ida Fox; beloved wife of the late Aaron Fox; sister of Lillian Katzman, Libby Eisenstat and the late Ben Simon; beloved mother of Bernard (Shirley) Fox and Maureen Fox; grandmother of Yosef (Rachel) Fox, Rachali (Aaron) Zimmer, Moshe (Svetlana) Fox and Chaim Fox; great-grandmother of Rebecca and Joshua Zimmer; services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Shaare Torah Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Poale Zedeck Congregation, 6318 Phillips Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Hillel Academy, 5685 Beacon St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

GUSKY: On Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011, Elayne R. Gusky; wife of the late Bernard “Babe” Gusky; daughter of the late Abram “Abe” Reznik and late Ray Brenner Reznik; sister to the late Sylvia Reznik and the late Annetta “Hunny” Reznik; loving Mother of Ray (Judy) Gusky and Jeffrey (Leanne) Gusky; grandmother of Adam (Christina) Gusky, Kristopher Gusky, and Matthew Gusky; great-grandmother of Allison Gusky and Breanna Gusky; she was a longtime employee of Saks Fifth Ave. Services and interment were held at Tiphereth Israel Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Tiphereth Israel Cemetery, c/o Ray Gusky 1100 Penn Center Blvd., #1113, Pittsburgh, PA 15235. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com LEOF: On Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011, Gertrude Siegal Leof; beloved wife of the late Milton Leof; beloved mother of Dr. Edward and Joan Leof and Dr. Marjorie Leof; cherished grandma of Carrie, Sam, Hannah and Emma Leof; sister of the late Dorothy and Shoal Berer and the late Ben and Ethel Siegal; aunt of Marge Berer, Steven Berer and Nancy Mickelwright, Ellie Siegal, Billy Siegal and Charles and Sondra Siegal; great aunt of Josh and Cal Berer; also survived by dear friends Dee Jay Oshry and Bart Rack and Elliott Oshry. Services were held at Temple David; interment Temple Sinai Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to Temple David, 4415 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com LEVENDORF: On Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2011, Nancy Levendorf Smith, 72, of Orange, Calif., formerly of New Kensington; beloved wife of Jerry Smith; loving mother of Larry (Cindy) Recht, Toby Recht (Scott) Wallace, and step children Alison Turner and Brad Smith; daughter of the late Abraham and Katherine (Tapolsky) Levendorf; grandmother of Ryan, Chad, Jake, and Nick; and sister of Melvin Levendorf. Services were held at Temple Beth Shalom in Santa Ana, Calif., interment Fairhaven Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to The Nancy Smith Fund, University of California Irvine Health Advancement, Attn. Rhonda Halverson, 333 City Blvd. West, Suite 605, Orange, CA 92868. SCHAER: On Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011, Cookie Bress; beloved wife and best friend of the late Sidney S. Schaer; beloved mother of Andrew Shaer and Judy Balk and Dana and Daniel Nestel; sister of Norman Bress; adored “Cha” of Jordan, Brady, Maya, Emily and Julia; also survived by loving nieces, nephews and friends. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Mount Lebanon Cemetery/Beth El section. Contributions may be made to The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, 234 McKee Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 or Family House, 233 McKee Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.

Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com SCHMUCKLER: On Friday, Oct. 21, 2011, Grace Schmuckler; wife of the late Israel (Tom) Katz and Nathan Schmuckler; mother of Stephen A. Katz (Cindy) of Pittsburgh and Arnold J. Katz (Svea) of Durham, N.C.; sister of the late May and Marcus Cohn, Pauline and Nathan Isaacs, Bernard and Lillian Lauar, Mollie and Herbert Rothman and Henrietta and Sanford Hartman; grandmother of Sol (Sandi) Oster Katz and Leah Oster Katz; great-grandmother of Nathan Kenyon Oster Katz; also survived by many nieces and nephews. Grace was a lifetime member of Rodef Shalom Congregation and was active in the Sisterhood and Gift Shop. She was a longtime member of The Westmoreland Country Club. Services were held at Rodef Shalom Congregation; interment private. Contributions may be made to Alzheimer’s Association (Greater Pittsburgh Chapter), 1100 Liberty Ave., Ste. E-201, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 or Presbyterian Senior Care, 1215 Hulton Road, Oakmont, PA 15139. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com STERN: On Friday Oct. 28, 2011, Bessie S. Stern, 90 of McKeesport. Born on June 27, 1921 in Jeannette and was the daughter of the late Isaac and Annie Friedman Gross; wife of the late Ben Stern; mother of Diane (Steven) Shattls of Huntington, W.V.; grandmother of Aly Shattls of Lewisburg, W.V.; also survived by nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her sister Sylvia Greenwald. Mrs. Stern was a business school graduate. She worked for her father in the family’s butcher business and also worked in the real estate industry. She was a member of Temple B’nai Israel, its Sisterhood, Hadassah, Jewish War Veterans, and the National Mahjongg League. Services were held at the Jennifer S. Jordan Funeral Home in White Oak with Rabbi Paul Tuchman officiating; interment B’nai Israel Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Temple B’nai Israel 2025 Cypress Dr. White Oak, PA 15131. Arrangements by Jennifer S. Jordan Funeral Home, Inc., 1638 Lincoln Way, White Oak, PA 15131.

UNVEILINGS BARENT: A monument in loving memory of Rae Melnick Barent will be unveiled Sunday, Nov. 6, at 12:30 p.m. at New Light Cemetery, 750 Soose Road. Family and friends are welcome. BINSTOCK: A monument in loving memory of Dorothy Binstock will be unveiled Sunday Nov. 6, at 10:30 a.m. at B’nai Israel Cemetery on Blackadore Road. Rabbi Daniel Wasserman will officiate. Family and friends are invited. REIDMAN: The headstone unveiling for Sylvia Joy Reidman has been postponed until Nov. 13, 2011 at 11 a.m.

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011 — 23.

METRO Lecture series: Continued from page 1. Building, Katz Theater, Squirrel Hill; topic: “Will there be a Jewish religion in the future of our community?â€? • Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove of the Park Avenue Synagogue, Manhattan, Tuesday, May 15, 2012, 7 p.m., JCC’s Katz Theater; topic: “What About Me? Personal Meaning and My Future in Jewish Our Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove Community.â€? • Steven Cohen, research professor of Jewish social policy at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and director of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at New York University Wagner, Wednesday, Steven Cohen Sept. 5, 2012, 7 p.m., JCC’s Katz Theater; topic: “Enough Talk ‌ Now Prove It: Predicting the Future of our Community with Real Data.â€?

Education: Continued from page 1. Irwin found the session to be “extremely interesting.� “It was something I had not previously thought about,� she said. That particular CLE was sponsored by the Papernick family, in honor of Alan Papernick, and was free to all those attending. Other CLEs can cost hundreds of dollars per session. In contrast to some CLEs offered by professional legal associations, the CLEs of Jewish ethics can be much more engaging, said attorney Jan Levinson. “These CLEs are much different and, in many ways, on much more interesting subjects than you can get elsewhere,� said Levinson. “In your [legal] practice area, things don’t really change much from year to year. And with the AJL’s CLEs, the quality of teaching is much higher. “When you are at some of the other CLEs, you are often looking at a video screen, watching some guy from Philadelphia,� Levinson continued. “Everyone is on their laptops, or reading the newspaper. In these [CLEs on Jewish topics], you never see anyone doing that because they are interested in the subject matter.� The AJL began offering CLE courses 12 years ago to meet the needs for Jewish educational opportunities for study, and legal education credits mandated by the state, said Amy Karp, its adult education administrator. Local rabbis and instructors have taught the courses, as well as national

Anathan Club Adult Day Services The Agency for Jewish Learning is partnering with the federation on the project. For now, at least, the federation is not committing to an annual speakers series. “It is going to be a two-year series,� said federation President and CEO Jeffrey Finkelstein in an e-mailed response to the Chronicle. “We’re not committing at this point to an annual series, but we have funding for two years.� According to Finkelstein, a private donor, who prefers to remain anonymous, is financing the series through the Centennial Fund for the Jewish Future. “This is someone who believes we need to continue to raise awareness in the community about some of the major issues affecting the Jewish people,� Finkelstein said. “The series features top-notch speakers from around the world, leading experts in their respective fields. We have not talked about these issues with speakers of this caliber in our community on a steady basis, and it’s very exciting to be able to have these discussions here. “Our hope is that we can inspire the members of community to get more engaged in Jewish life and really make a difference in the Jewish world,� he added. Charges vary for advance registration, payment at the door and for series packages. (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

speakers such as Neil Gillman, Rabbi Mark Warshofsky and Jonty Blackman. “We are always looking for populations to engage in Jewish learning,� said Ed Frim, executive director of the AJL. “This was a population with a niche.� “The feedback we get from attorneys is that what we offer is more stimulating than what is offered outside the Jewish community,� Frim continued. “They say the classes contribute to their personal growth.� A CLE course in medical ethics was offered last year by the Jewish Learning Institute of Chabad of Pittsburgh, according to Rabbi Yisroel Altein of Chabad. Chabad presents approved CLE courses in almost every state throughout the country. The medical ethics course met one and a half hours a week for six weeks, providing its participants with nine hours of CLE credits, said Altein. Around 30 to 40 participants took the course locally last year. Jews are not the only group to offer faith-based CLEs in Pennsylvania. Last month, the Duquesne University School of Law presented “Why Annulments Aren’t Divorces,� covering the history of marriage in the Catholic Church, and “explaining how the Church’s understanding of marriage as a sacrament developed and what its requirements are in the canon law of the Catholic Church,� according to the University’s website. Those interested in obtaining Jewish-themed CLE credits online can look to Gratz College, which is also an approved provider in Pennsylvania. (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net)

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WE ACKNOWLEDGE WITH GRATEFUL APPRECIATION CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE FOLLOWING: DONOR

IN MEMORY OF

HARRY & JANE ACKERMAN . . . . .ROBERT SCOTT ACKERMAN ANONYMOUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GOLDIE FISHMAN HOWARD S. BERGER . . . . . . . . . .SELMA BERGER SYLVIA S. BRAHM . . . . . . . . . .DANIEL SOLOMON JEAN BRILL AND FAMILY . . .LILLIAN E. PRETTER FRAN S. CHIZECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SAM CHIZECK PHYLLIS R. COHEN . . . . . . . . .ESTHERITA COHEN BEVERLY STEIN DAVIS . . . . . . . . . .SIDNEY STEIN ROBIN FRIEDMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MEYER WALK ALVIN & GLORIA GREENFIELD . . . . . .CHARLOTTE GREENFIELD RHONDA HUTTNER . . . . . . . .HENRY ROSENFELD

DONOR

IN MEMORY OF

HAROLD & CINDY LEBENSON . . . . . . . . .MICHAEL NIDERBERG LINDA LEVINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ARTHUR LEVINE MARY B. MARKS . . . . . . . . . .HERBERT B. MARKS MARY B. MARKS . . . . . . . . . . . .SYLVIA B. KARPO KARL F. MEYERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ALVIN MEYERS DONALD PROTETCH . . . . . . . .MINNIE PROTETCH ALLAN ROTH . . . . . . . . . . . .DAVID MORRIS ROTH ROSALYN SHERMAN . . . . . . . . . .GOLDIE GROSS FRANK SMIZIK . . . . . . . . . . . .HARRY SAM SMIZIK CINDY STEINBERG . . . . .ABRAHAM STEVENSON IRENE RUDICK WANDER . . . . . . . .SIMON RUDICK ROBERT WEINTHAL . . . . . .ROXINE M. WEINTHAL

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6: BESSIE ALPERN, PAULINE BERZOSKY, ANNA BIRNKRANT, LEONARD FARBER, HANNA FICKS, EUNICE FINGERET, HARRY KLATMAN, JEANETTE KOHEN KUPERSTOCK, HANNAH RAE LEVINE, BARNETT MARCUS, HARRY MORRIS, RACHEL MORRIS, LILLIAN PRETTER, HENRY ROSENFELD, LIBBY RUTTENBERG, SAM SCHLESSINGER, DR. ABRAHAM SCHMIDT, PETER SHAFFER, MEYER SHEPMAN, SARAH SIRVAN, LEAH VIESS, ALBERTA MYERS WALKEN, ADOLPH WEITZEN, MIRIAM YAHR, WILLIAM H. YOUNG, MAX ZWEIG. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7: HENRY BARR, MILDRED CAPLAN, FRANCES CITRON, LAZARUS EDELSTEIN, MARCIA GREEN FARBSTEIN, EVA FRANK, REVA COHEN GOLDBERG, SARAH B. GORDON, LAWRENCE L. GREEN, SARAH B. IVES, SAMUEL E. JACOBSON, ROSE K. JUDD, MAX KOPELMAN, LOUIS KRAUS, DR. ARTHUR LEONARD LENCHNER, JACOB LEVINSON, HARRY MAGIDSON, HYMAN B. MARCUS, BENNY MERMELSTEIN, SAMUEL NATHAN, ADOLPH NETLER, ROSE L. OPPENHEIM, MAX PERLMAN, HENRY PROTECH, SARA RECHT, SAM SAMBOL, JAMES SCHACK, ALLAN SCHNITZER, BERNATH D. SCHWARTZ, HERMAN SOLOW, TILLIE FISHER SPEER, DAVID SRULSON, JULIUS STEINER, LENA WIMMER STERN, TOBE L. UNGER, MORRIS WANETICK, DR. GEORGE H. WOLFF. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8: LOTTIE BARNHOLTZ, LOUIS BRENNER, HYMAN KORNSTEIN, ARTHUR LEVINE, ALEXANDER C. LICHT, SOLOMON LINDER, JACOB MANKIN, IDA MARKS, HARRY MILLER, ISRAEL L. MILLER, SARAH MYERS, SIMON PASCAL, JENNIE ROSEN, JOEL YALE ROSENSTEIN, MAYER ELI RUBEN, JENNIE RUBIN, PAULINE ETHEL SAMELSON, LILLIAN CORN SCHMIDT, BESSIE SHAPIRA, ROSE SHAPIRO, FREDA SIEGEL, SAM SINOWITCH, JULIUS SPITZLER, MORRIS N. STEIN, ROSETTA WEILL, RACHEL WEINSTEIN, CHARLES WEISS. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9: CHAIM ALTER BIERMAN, BENJAMIN C. BROWN, RUBEN COHEN, DR. BERNARD CRAMER, SAMUEL T. GREENBERG, FRANK GROSSMAN, IDA KAPLAN, DENA KATZENBERG, LENA KEROVITZ, MAX KLOMAN, MORRIS KRANTZ, MINNIE M. LAVINE, RAYMOND PAUL LAZIER, RITA E. LEFF, GEORGE A. LEVENSON, MORRIS HIRSH LEVINE, ROCHEL L. LEVINE, DORA LIEBER, HERMAN W. LISOWITZ, SABINA LOEVNER, LOUIS NEAMAN, REUBEN NUSBAUM, REBECCA PARIS, JOSEPH POSER, SAM RAPPORT, FANNIE REDLICH, ADOLPH ROTH, FRANK H. ROTHMAN, NINA RUBEN, ANNA SADOWSKY, HANNAH K. SANDUSKY, LEONARD SCHULHOF, ROSE SCHULMAN, HELEN R. SEIAVITCH, GEORGE SHERMAN, SADIE M. SIMON, HARRY SOKOLE*, REBECCA SOLOF STEIN, MIRIAM SUNSTEIN, ABE (CY) SUSSMAN, LOUIS SUSSMAN, DORIS WECHSLER, ESTHER ZWANG, ESTHER ZWERLING. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10: GOODMAN GEORGE ALTMAN, ETHEL ANTHONE, JACOB L. BERKOVITZ, LEO BERKOVITZ, SYLVIA BRAUN, SYLVIA BREMAN BRAUN, MAYER R. COHEN, WILLIAM COHEN, SIDNEY LEO FRIEDMAN, JENNIE GERNSTAT, WILLIAM GLASSER, HELEN B. L. HERSH, SAMUEL KAPNER, NORMAN KATZ, RACHEL KLAHR, ARNOLD KLEIN, NATHAN A. KOPELMAN, JOSEPH KREGER, JANET ROM KWASSER, BEN LEVENSON, NATHAN LEVENSON, PHILLIP LEVY, EDWIN E. LICHTENSTUL, KATIE M. MANDELBLATT, BERTHA MARMONT, BELLE H. MERVIS, MOLLIE MEYERS, ABRAHAM P. MILLER, MICHAEL J. NIDERBERG, PAUL NUMEROSKY, ISADORE RACK, DAVID ROSEN, CHARLES ROSENBERG, FANNIE ROSENBLOOM, MEYER DAVID ROSENTHAL, HARRY H. SAMUELS, DR. SAMUEL SCHWEBEL, JOSEPH SHAPIRO. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11: BILL BAROTZ, FLORENCE R. BERNSTEIN, WILLIAM DARLING, DOROTHY DICKSON, ETHEL FELDMAN, DAVID FRIEDMAN, MIRIAM MAGADOF GLANTZ, SADIE GOLDBERG, GOLDIE GROSS, SAM L. HERER, SUE KALSON, HENRY KAPLAN, LOUIS KAUFMAN, SARAH KRIMSKY, SARAH KURLAND, LOUIS MAX LABOVICK, MARGARET R. LEVINE, JOSEPH LUBICH, MEYER MAHARAM, HARRY H. MIDDLEMAN, HARRIS OPPENHEIM, HENRY ROSEN, CAPT. MORRIS A. RUDICK, HARRY SAKOLSKY, PHILIP GEORGE SAVAGE, GOLDIE SCHWARTZ, MORRIS N. SCHWARTZ, ETHEL LITTLE SILVERMAN, GEORGE P. SILVERMAN, MANUEL SMALL, MARY SMALLEY, HARRY J. SMITH, SARA R. SOLOW, DR. MARSHALL STEINBERG, REBECCA SYMONS, FAY HOFFMAN TAUBER, ABRAHAM VICTORIUS, SAMUEL DAVID WASBUTZKY, BETTY WEISS. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12: BELLE ABRAMSON, LEROY E. BRODER, SAMUEL CHABAN, BELLA CHOTINER, LEAH COHEN, OLGA ENGEL, EDWARD GOLDSTEIN, ISADORE GOODMAN, SAMUEL GREENE, REGINA LABOWITZ, JOSEPH LIEBERMAN, SARA MELNICK LIPMAN, CAPT. FRANK MANDELL, RACHEL MARCUS, SAM MARKOWITZ, SADIE R. MORRIS, JENNIE MURSTEIN, MARK H. NOLAN, MINNIE PERER, LAWRENCE PIKOVSKY, ABRAHAM PITTLER, MINNIE PROTETCH, HENRIETTA S. RENEKER, ESTHER ROBBINS, SYLVIA ROSCOW, RACHEL ROSENBERG, GITTLE ROSENBLOOM, SAMUEL SEGAL, LEAH SEIAVITCH, ELICK B. SHAPIRO, SIMON SHER, BEN SMOLAR, CELIA SOLOF, BEN VINOCUR, FLORENCE H. WEISS, MEYER WERNER, PHILLIP WOLF, DELIA YARCHEVER, JOSEPH YOUNG.

Call DeeAnna Cavinee at 412-521-1975 or e-mail donations@jaapgh.org for more information or to make a contribution to the Jewish Association on Aging.

24 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 3, 2011


The Jewish Chronicle Nov. 3, 2011