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I C E N I N O R F O L K

ISSUE 83

Focus On: Money

Andy Parsons Interviewed

Teaching Children The Value Of Money

Local Author Releases Hit Children’s Book

Best Of Norfolk

Through The Lens Of Our Readers


Welcome To Iceni Magazine, CONTACT DETAILS

“Springtime is the land awakening. The March winds are the morning yawn.” Lewis Grizzard Welcome to Issue 83! This month’s focus is on Money with Missy sharing why it shouldn’t matter (Pages 46 & 47) and Vicki explaining how important it is to teach your children the value of money (Pages 44 & 45). If February came and went in a flash for you, with the stormy, rainy weather preventing you from venturing out into our glorious county, be sure to check out the Best of Norfolk in photographic form (Pages 37 – 39). Funnyman, Andy Parsons, brings his latest show to the King’s Lynn Corn Exchange on March 22; find out more about its content in an interview with him on Pages 34 and 35. This month’s Green Column (Page 23) by Shona details ways to take a minute for yourself and take care of yourself, using the world around us for inspiration. We hope that the weather calms for March and that you make the most of the lighter evenings. Until next time, enjoy all that Issue 83 has to offer.

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CONTRIBUTORS Becca Hamling, Brian Donaldson, Cheryl Cade, Gemma Sandwell, Keri Beevis, Matt Porter, Mark King, Missy Hitchcox, Patrick Arundell, Serena Fordham, Shona Sundhari, Susan Leigh, Thomas Hamling, Tim Barnes-Clay, Vicki.

Page 3 Image Benjamen Terry - www.definedetail.com

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Copyright © Iceni Magazine Limited. All rights reserved. No articles, adverts, content or design in this magazine may be used or reproduced either in whole or part, online or in print. The views and advice from contributors are not necessarily those of Iceni Magazine Limited. Every effort is made to ensure the contents are accurate, however Iceni Magazine Limited can not assume responsibility for errors, omissions or incorrect information. Iceni Magazine Limited accepts no liability for loss, damage or difficulties resulting from contracts between The Client and their customer. Inclusion within the magazine does not imply a recommendation.


Contents 52

pages

Full of absolute dynamic

creative content!

“You Reap What You Sow”

41

34

ANDY PARSONS

FOCUS ON:

Interviewed

Money

23

26 37

MOTORING REVIEW Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio

06

The Benjamin Foundation Monthly Update

09

Iceni News Big C Launches...

10

Iceni News New Stage Show

12

Iceni News New Musical

14

Iceni News King's Lynn Corn Exchange

17

Iceni News Finny’s Star

19

Iceni News National Garden Scheme

20

Iceni Columnist Mark King

21 22 23 24 26 28 30 32 34

Iceni Columnist Keri Beevis See What Mummy Says How Do You Teach A Child... The Green Column Take A Minute... Do We Need To Make... More Effort To Keep... Motoring Review Alfa Romeo Stelvio Nibbles And Tipples March The Gadget Man Review Vodafone V-Multi Tracker Mini Mindfulness Are We Really Thinking... Andy Parsons Interviewed

THE GREEN COLUMN Take A Minute…?

37 40 41 42 44 46 48 49 50

Best Of Norfolk Readers Images Nova Silver March Focus On: Money Money: What Does It Mean To You? Teaching Children The Value Of Money Money Shouldn’t Matter My Personal Stance Money: Why I Hate Comparisons Iceni Asks... Money-Saving Tips Iceni Horoscopes What Do Your Stars Hold?


THE BENJAMIN FOUNDATION

www.icenimagazine.co.uk

ISSUE 83 2020

The Benjamin Foundation The Benjamin Foundation is a local charity which helps people across Norfolk and Suffolk to deal with some of the challenges that life throws at them. Whether it’s the prevention of youth homelessness, helping families to build stronger relationships or providing positive activities for young people with limited opportunities, our work brings hope, opportunity, stability and independence to the people we support.

“The Tools to Go Forward in Life”

We want to end youth homelessness and we’re tackling the problem locally by providing a home and support to over 100 vulnerable young adults every night. We give the young people a stable home and provide them with the skills they need so they can leave us and forge an independent life. Joe* came to live at our accommodation centre in Norwich in August 2019. Aged just 17, he found himself needing a safe place to stay following a breakdown in family relationships at home.

Assistant Manager, Ray, says: “Joe was happy for us to help him to work towards independence. We helped him to secure a place at college in order to get Maths and English qualifications, alongside a Bricklaying course which he found hard at first - but with the support of the staff, he worked through the difficult times.” Joe says: “The house was a nice place to live and my room was great. We called it ‘The Penthouse’ as it was in the top of the house.”

Joe has been a positive resident and has achieved a lot in a short period of time. He always came to staff when he had any problems and since being with The Benjamin Foundation. His relationship with his family has also improved and now they meet on a regular basis. His family are also supporting him as he prepares for his next step - moving into an independent flat.

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THE BENJAMIN FOUNDATION

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ISSUE 83 2020

Joe adds: “The highlight of my time with The Benjamin Foundation has been the staff helping me to learn independent living skills and supporting me to get my own flat. I feel a lot more confident in doing things myself and getting on with my family. “The future is looking a lot brighter now The Benjamin Foundation has given me the tools to go forward in life and I feel really blessed to have the staff help me. They are people who care about me and help with all my problems.” Thank you to Joe for sharing his story. *Name has been changed.

To get involved and support our work please visit: https://benjaminfoundation.co.uk/events/

Butterfly Treasure Hunt 2020 Can you solve the treasure?

the

clues

and

win

We are bringing our popular Butterfly Treasure Hunt event back to Norwich for a third year and invite you to get together with friends, family or colleagues to enjoy a fun summer evening in support of our work.

Taking place on Friday 26th June 2020, the Butterfly Treasure Hunt is now a regular feature in our events calendar and has proven to be a firm favourite among families, friends and local businesses, with teams competing against each other to explore Norwich city centre while solving clues to unlock a conundrum. The 2020 event will conclude at The Eagle pub on Newmarket Road, where teams can relax and enjoy a BBQ before the winning team is announced. Thank you to Main Event Sponsors, Clapham and Collinge Solicitors.

Book by 20th March to take advantage of the Early https://benjaminfoundation.co.uk/event/butterfly-treasure-hunt/

Bird

Discount!

A Call for Volunteers!

We are delighted to be one of the partner charities for this year’s GEAR10km in King’s Lynn on Sunday 3rd May. We’re looking for volunteers to help to marshal our section of the race between 7:30am and 12 noon. Please contact: events@benjaminfoundation.co.uk if you would like to get involved. Thank you.

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ICENI - NEWS

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ISSUE 83 2020

Big C Launches New Online Support Centre

Norfolk and Waveney cancer charity, Big C, has launched a new online ‘virtual’ support centre to provide information, help and news about Big C services and related care. Big C Brand and Communications Manager, Greg Pye, said, “We are delighted to launch our new online support centre which we have been working on behind the scenes for some time. From patient and visitor feedback, we know it will be a valuable resource for people affected by cancer to access when they need to at home, or when they are out and about, via their PCs, tablets and smart phones. The support provided also complements our in-centre and Telephone Support Line services and will continue to be developed over time. “The Online Support Centre provide vital support for those who can’t travel to our centres and provides a point of access to Big C services for those who may be apprehensive about visiting us for the first time.”

whether you are the patient or caring for a loved one and the point you are at on your cancer journey. An Information Hub helps visitors work through the maze of cancer information and includes a glossary of common words, contact details of local hospitals and a tool for answering questions about medication via the Lead Oncology and Haematology Pharmacist at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. There is also clear signposting of how to access Big C services including counselling and complementary therapies, as well as links to help from other organisations. Dr Chris Bushby, Chief Executive at Big C, said “Our aim at Big C is to provide wide-reaching support, so that those who need to access our care can do so where and when it most suits them. The new Online Support Centre is the next important jigsaw piece in our service provision, so that those in our community affected by cancer, can access Big C services any time of day or night, wherever they are.”

The new resource covers information on all Big C support and provides help depending on

To access Big C’s new Online Support Centre, visit: support.big-c.co.uk PAGE

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Inventive And Creative Storytelling Photo by Manuel Harlan

HOLES - April 15-18, 2020 First it was a multi-awardwinning novel and then it became a blockbuster film. Now Holes is an inventive and creative new stage show bringing a thrilling and offbeat family comedy adventure to audiences at Norwich Theatre Royal from April 15-18. It tells the story of Stanley Yelnats who can’t catch a break. He was born into a family cursed with bad luck, so it comes as no surprise when he finds himself accused of a crime he didn’t commit. Sent to a labour camp as punishment, he is tasked with digging one hole, five foot wide

by five foot deep, every day. He’s told it is to build ‘character’. But the tyrannical Warden is definitely hiding something and Stanley and his fellow inmates have to deal with her demands, her two cronies, plus the fearsome rattlesnakes and yellow-spotted lizards as they try to unearth what’s really going on. The show is perfect for adults and children aged eight and up. A Nottingham Playhouse production, it is brought to Norwich by The Children’s Theatre Partnership (CTP), of which Norwich Theatre Royal is a partner. It is directed by Adam Penford who has been artistic director at Nottingham Playhouse since 2016. Adam’s directing credits include The

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Madness of George III at Nottingham Playhouse, Boys in the Band at the Vaudeville Theatre and Committee at the Donmar Warehouse.

ISSUE 83 2020

Photo by Manuel Harlan

Holes was written by Louis Sachar and won the 1998 U.S. National Book Award for Young People's Literature and the 1999 Newbery Medal for the year's most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. Mr Sachar also wrote the screenplay for the 2003 film adaptation. CTP recently announced the support of Arts Council England for three years from 2020 to 2022, with Holes being the first production in a three-year plan to present bold, ambitious and imaginative theatre for the UK stage and young people in local communities. Originally a partnership between Fiery Angel and Chichester Festival Theatre, CTP now works with a network of venues across the UK in Northampton, Nottingham, Coventry, Newcastle, Plymouth, Liverpool, High Wycombe, Wolverhampton, Canterbury and, of course, Norwich. Director of Fiery Angel Edward Snape, who hails from Norwich and is a former student of Taverham High School, said: “We are thrilled to be collaborating with all of these venues to build new audiences within their local communities and we are truly grateful to ACE for their support in aiding CTP to continue its Photo by Manuel Harlan

legacy of creating great theatre for a young and diverse audience.” Since 2010, CTP has successfully produced and toured five shows and brought two to the West End, reaching over 500,000 people. Previous CTP productions, which have all toured to Norwich, include the Olivier Award-winning Goodnight Mr Tom which enjoyed a successful West End run and three UK tours, a West End and UK touring production of Swallows and Amazons, a UK tour of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, and UK tours of Michael Morpurgo’s Running Wild and The Jungle Book. Amy Vaughan, Director, of Touring at Arts Council England, said: "This is a significant investment for Arts Council England through our National Lottery Project Grants programme and we look forward to seeing how the project reaches a broader range of young people to support wider engagement in the arts." Show Information: Holes, Wednesday 15 to Saturday 18 April, 2020. Thu-Sat matinees 2pm. Evenings 7pm. Tickets £10-£24.50. Discounts for Friends, Under 18s, over 60s and Groups. For more info or to BOOK ONLINE www.theatreroyalnorwich.co.uk PAGE

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ISSUE 83 2020

Pioneers Of ‘Girl Power’ Celebrated In New Musical Photo by Steve Tanner

MALORY TOWERS June 23-27

High jinks, high spirits and high along with a quick temper. Will she learn to drama are promised in a new tolerate the infuriating Gwendoline Lacey or value the kind-hearted Sally Hope? Darrell musical version of a classic Enid also has to save the school play and rescue Blyton novel. terrified Mary Lou from the grip of a One of the original stories celebrating girl power, Malory Towers, will take to the Norwich Theatre Royal stage from June 23 to 27. This brand new production will feature plenty of excitement and adventure plus live music and some breath-taking animation. It tells the story of Darrell Rivers who starts school with an eager mind and a fierce heart

raging storm.

Adapted and directed by Emma Rice, who directed the stunning version of Rebecca which came to Norwich Theatre Royal in 2015, Malory Towers is aimed at all ages who dream of midnight feasts and Cornish clifftops. Emma said the story pays tribute to the women who taught in schools after the Second World

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ISSUE 83 2020

Photo by Steve Tanner

War. She said: “With lives shaped by the savagery of two wars, these teachers devoted themselves to the education and nurture of other women. My adaptation is also for the two generations of men who died in those same wars leaving us with the freedom to lead meaningful, safe and empowered lives. “It is also for Clement Attlee and his Labour government of 1945 who looked into the face of evil and chose to do what was right. These people changed the political landscape in their focus on care, compassion and the common good.” She also likens it to another iconic novel because “I call it my ‘Happy Lord of the Flies’ and it is joyfully radical to its bones. Imagine a world where, left to their own devices, people choose kindness. Imagine a world where difference is respected and arguments are resolved with thought and care. Imagine a world that chooses community, friendship and fun. Now that’s a world I want to live in and, at Malory Towers, you can.”

Brotherston who is known for his long-term collaboration with Matthew Bourne, and it is produced by David Pugh who is known for a wide range of successful productions, which have come to Norwich Theatre Royal including Calendar Girls, Art and The Band. The show is officially licensed by Enid Blyton Entertainment, a division of Hachette Children’s Group (HCG). Karen Lawler, Head of Licensed Content at HCG, said: “Enid Blyton created incredible female characters at Malory Towers who are strong, capable and always, always kind. They are ‘women the world can lean on,’ in Enid’s own words. We share Emma’s passion for these characters and we couldn’t be more excited to see Emma’s vision of Malory Towers come to life.”

The production boasts a strong creative team include the set and costume designer Lez

Show Information: Malory Towers, Tuesday 23-Saturday 27 June at 7.30pm, with Thurs and Sat matinees at 2.30pm. Tickets £10-£37.50. Discounts for Over-60s and Under-18s. To book, log onto: www.norwichtheatre.org

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King's Lynn Corn Exchange Spring/ Summer Season 2020

Spring/Summer Preview 2020 Spring is on its way and so are some fabulous shows coming to the King’s Lynn Corn Exchange over this lovely season. The cover picture of our brochure this season is from the sensational award-winning West End show Buddy (THU 11 - SAT 13 JUN), the musical about Buddy Holly’s story including all his fantastic hits. Other live acts from around the same era and same genre of music as Buddy are Bye Bye Baby - Jersey Boys and music from Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons (FRI 20 MAR), Chicago Blues Brothers (Sat 4 APR), That’ll Be The Day (SUN 19 APR), Bringing on Back The 60s (SUN 26 APR), The Beach Boys - Smile (THU 14 May), The Illegal Eagles (SAT 23 MAY), The Drifters (THU 4 JUN), Walk Right Back (TUE 16 JUN) and The Roy Orbison Story (SAT 20 JUN). Other live music acts covering all musical tastes this season include Sweet Caroline (THU 5 MAR), The ELO Experience (WED 18 MAR), Seven Drunken Nights (THU 2 APR), Rule The World - Take That Tribute band (FRI 3 APR), Thank You For The Music (Thu 16 APR), From The Jam - Setting Sons 40th

Anniversary tour (WED 29 APR). Dominic Kirwan (WED 13 MAY), Michael Starring Ben (FRI 15 MAY), Some Guys Have All The Luck - The Rod Stewart Story (WED 27 MAY), Rumours of Fleetwood (SAT 6 JUN), Hello Again The Story of Neil Diamond (SUN 14 JUN), UK Pink Floyd Experience (THU 18 JUN), The Carpenters (Fri 19 JUN), Whitney - Queen of the Night (Sun 28 JUN) and Luther Vandross Celebration (THU 9 JUL). We are very pleased to welcome a fabulous new show coming here called Viva La Divas featuring 3 of Strictly Come Dancing stars Katya, Nadiya and Janette (FRI 26 JUN). The Russian State Opera brings Aida (FRI 13 MAR) to King’s Lynn, and Ellen Kent Operas return with Madama Butterfly (TUE 31 MAR) & La Boheme (TUE 21 APR). The wonderful Ballet Cymru brings Giselle (TUE 26 MAY), Flawless are back with their world tour show Chase the Dream (FRI 5 JUN), Rhythm of the Dance (WED 1 JUL), another popular dance act especially with the ladies is The Dreamboys (SAT 16 MAY), for a different girls night out filled with entertainment is Menopause the Musical 2 (Sat 18 APR), and Girls Just Wanna Have Fun (THU 30 APR).

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For a fun night and some dancing to 90’s Britpop classics with Supersonic 90’s Night (Fri 22 MAY) and Boogie Wonderland - Experience the best disco party ever! (SAT 30 MAY). Other shows include Neil Sands wonderful cast with Land Of Hope & Glory (MON 30 MAR), some family friendly shows coming include The Wizard Of Oz starring comedy legend Bobby Davro (SUN 5 APR), for some girlie time with songs from Little Mix, Taylor Swift, Ariana, etc, come along to Pop Diva’s Live! (TUE 7 APR). Milkshake! Live returns during the May break (SUN 31 MAY), and we have 2 Sing-a-long-a shows coming The Greatest Showman and Bohemian Rhapsody (SUN 7 JUN). An Audience with Mark Billy Billingham as seen on ASA who dares wins (FRI 29 MAY) Spring brings some fantastic stand-up comedy including Andy Parsons (SUN 22 MAR)

Milton Jones (WED 8 APR), Mark Steel (WED 15 APR) & Joel Dommett (TUE 5 MAY). Already SOLD OUT comedy for this season are Jim Davidson and Josh Widdicombe! Other sold out shows include What’s Love Got To Do With It, Spirit Of The Dance, Joe Brown, and we have the last few seats available for Killer Queen (FRI 17 APR) If you want to see future stars of comedy the King’s Lynn Corn Exchange Comedy Clubs (THU 19 MAR, WED 22 APR, THU 21 MAY, THU 25 JUN, THU 16 JUL) showcase four rising stars from the touring circuit in a relaxed cabaret setting. For the full programme of what’s in store at the Corn Exchange visit: kingslynncornexchange.co.uk Here is the link for the new brochure https://issuu.com/kingslynncornexchange/ docs/final_191ef3b3a13a30 Tickets for all shows are available from Box Office on 01553 764864 or book online: kingslynncornexchange.co.uk PAGE

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ICENI - NEWS

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ISSUE 83 2020

Local Author Releases Hit Children’s Book Author and Attleborough resident Sam Bartram has released his debut novel Finny’s Star. Finny’s Star is a mystery and adventure novel for children and is targeted at the 9 to 13 year age range. Finny’s Star has already featured in Amazon’s top 50 Bestselling Mysteries and Detective Stories for Children. Finny’s Star tells the story of Peter, a thirteenyear-old boy whose life is turned upside down by the death of his best friend, Finny. Concerned about their son’s struggle to cope with this shocking turn of events, Peter’s parents decide to take him away on holiday to a remote Scottish island, hoping that a change of scenery might help. Despite his initial reluctance, Peter is surprised when he starts to enjoy the holiday, helped in no small part by making a new friend who is intent on showing him the beauty of her island. However, it starts to become clear that not all is not as it seems on the island. Mysterious events and chance meetings with a host of unusual characters lead Peter to become embroiled in the adventure of a lifetime. Sam Bartram, Author: “When writing Finny’s Star, my intention was to create a story that the whole family could enjoy together. Finny’s Star is a classic adventure story, with a cast of eccentric and larger-than-life characters. It is also very much a study in friendship and the important role that friends play in our lives. I am very excited and proud to have finally realised the ambition of a lifetime in writing this book”

Finny’s Star can be purchased on Amazon via the below link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/ B08457LMZ5/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_awdo_ cUBmEb6QRDA0P ABOUT THE AUTHOR Sam Bartram lives in Attleborough with his wife and two young children. Sam previously attended Wymondham High School and has a degree in History and Education Studies from Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln. When he is not writing, Sam enjoys running, singing, watching sport (particularly Norwich City FC), travelling, theatre, film and spending time with his friends and family. ‘Finny’s Star’ is the debut novel from Sam Bartram. PAGE

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ICENI - NEWS

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ISSUE 83 2020

National Garden Scheme Norfolk Open Gardens For March

East Ruston

Gayton Hall

March is a time when early perennials begin to flower and bring some colour into the garden.

woodland. Primulas, astilbes, hostas, lysichiton, gunnera and spring bulbs will be on show. A variety of unusual trees and shrubs, many labelled, have been planted over the years.

Crocuses, primroses and hellebores start to take advantage of increased sunlight and a warming of the day. Two gardens are opening their doors during the month of March: East Ruston Old Vicarage will be opening for the NGS on 14th March. A regional finalist in last year’s English Garden's ‘The Nation's Favourite Gardens’, this 32 acre garden has both traditional borders and modern landscapes, walled gardens, rose garden, exotic garden, topiary and box parterres, water features, Mediterranean garden, and a monumental Fruit Cage. Both rare and unusual plants abound. Opening from 12.00 noon to 17.30, entry is £10 for adults and £1 for children. Gayton Hall opens its gates to visitors on Sunday 29th March. This rambling semi-wild 20-acre water garden, has over two miles of paths, and contains lawns, lakes, streams, bridges and

All the open gardens will be serving refreshments. Please check the website for information about wheelchair access and whether the garden is dog friendly. If you have not yet got your free booklet listing all the 2020 National Garden Scheme ‘Gardens to Visit’ then you can find one at your local library, garden centre or tourist information centre. Alternatively you can find out about gardens open throughout 2019 by accessing our website: ngs.org.uk and searching for Norfolk gardens. The booklet and website also highlight gardens that will open by appointment. Saturday 14th March 12pm - 5:30pm East Ruston Old Vicarage, East Ruston, Norfolk, NR12 9HN. Sunday 29th March 1pm - 5pm Gayton Hall, Gayton, King's Lynn, Norfolk, PE32 1PL. PAGE

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ICENI - COLUMNISTS

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ISSUE 83 2020

The Diary of a Norfolk Family By Mark King February came hurtling towards March and as my thoughts turned to spring, the need to make plans for a summer holiday gathered urgency. The holiday adverts were in full flow in the media trying to entice you to one different country after another, so one evening Above: Mark King when there was nothing interesting on the television I settled down with the family in the lounge, fired up the laptop and started to search the internet. Percy, our dog, was spread eagled taking up one of our sofas to himself. He was gently snoring, twitching occasionally dreaming no doubt about gallivanting in some open field with all his doggy pals. Last year the family holiday was in Devon, and we found a very nice place which was dog friendly so Percy could come with us. This year we all wanted to go abroad! As soon as I started talking out loud about potential holiday destinations abroad, Percy’s ears pricked up.

When I started to discuss the duration of the holiday, Percy got up from his slumber, sat up and starred at me. When I mentioned about dog kennels, he jumped down, shot across the room, jumped up next to me, and laid his head on my belly. The look he gave me broke my heart. It was as if he knew we were going away, and that this time he would not be coming with us. I looked down on him, unable to type anything on the keyboard. When I tried, he licked my hand then starred back at me with his soulful brown eyes. For a few minutes, the family discussed if we should have another staycation in the U.K, but a gust of wind swirling around the patio door as the rain lashed noisily against it quickly convinced us that two weeks in the Mediterranean was needed. With a confirmation click on the keyboard, it was booked. Going abroad previously when Sunny our cat was alive, and leaving her in a cattery for some reason didn’t seem as disloyal as it does putting Percy into kennels for the same amount of time! Two weeks after booking the holiday, I still haven’t found the heart to book his place in the kennels! www.always-hanging-around.blogspot.com Follow on twitter: @author_king

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ISSUE 83 2020

One Decision It is amazing, isn’t it, how one decision can change everything? This time last year, I was in a negative place in my day job, my fourth (and first Norfolk based) book was awaiting feedback from my old publisher, and other than Above: Keri Beevis that, life was pootling along, much the same as always. A year later, I am with a new publisher, have a bestselling book (not just in the UK, Dying To Tell recently went top 10 in Australia), plus there have been audio and foreign rights deals from the Czech Republic and Italy. I went a little nuts when I found out about the Italian deal.

Now, rather than nipping to the shops for a sandwich at lunchtime, I have been making an effort to prepare my own lunch to take into the day job. As I am more of a night owl than an early bird, I tend to do this in the evenings then grab my lunch from the fridge before heading out of the door.

The land of pizza wanted my book. (Of course, you can guess how I celebrated).

One lunchtime I reached in my lunch bag, looking forward to the egg salad I had lovingly prepared.

It really is bonkers trying to get my head around the fact thousands and thousands of people have been reading my little Norfolk-based tale, and the success of my book has given me the one thing I desperately craved. Time.

Imagine my horror when I opened the lid and realised I had picked up the wrong Tupperware container? Do you know what I had brought for my lunch?

As of mid-February, I have reduced my day job hours and now have a full official writing day each week. It is bliss.

Now, you would think it would be a case of lesson learnt. Oh no, not with me.

Of course Mama Beev ‘popped in’ on my first writing day, just to say hi. But I will forgive her as it was the first one. Book success and more time to concentrate on writing hasn’t made me any less scatty and it would appear I have a new thing?

A red onion.

Yesterday I opened my lunch container and found a block of Roquefort cheese. My desk colleague, after howling with laughter at me for a solid three minutes, told me I looked like someone had burst my balloon. Note to self. Must try harder.

‘You do?’ I hear you cry. ‘What is it, Beev?’ My new thing, dear readers is ‘surprise lunches’.

My new Norfolk based thriller, Dying to Tell is now available to buy in paperback and Kindle. Follow me on Facebook or Twitter for more information. PAGE

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SEEWHATMUMMYSAYS

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ISSUE 83 2020

How Do You Teach A Child The Value Of Money? It is something we have been Toys are another way we have been trying to (and still are!) trying to teach help our children learn the value of money and that everything they have costs money. There our children. were so many conversations we overheard from If you ask our eldest even at 8 how much a house costs, she will tell you “£5000?” so we clearly still have quite a way to go, but we’re trying. Our children earn pom poms for good behaviour, for tidying up after themselves etc and this is then traded in for magazines, pocket money or a family day out somewhere. They love this and, on the occasions when an item is chosen, the children love asking how much it would usually cost. We talk about how they have earnt that money/reward. We try to give them the money in a variety of formats too, so they can see what that amount relates to. Similarly, we talk to them about people who are less fortunate than us and may not be able to afford food that month etc, so regularly donate to the local foodbank. The children will go round the shop with our list and we will talk about the different pasta brands, for example, and how a lot of things taste very similar however may be twice as expensive or have a smaller amount in the pack. Being able to see the price difference or different size packets definitely helps (especially with our eldest).

children before and after we had children of our own such as when toys were damaged or they didn’t like a certain feature about it “Ok, we can buy another one” or “I’ll just throw it away”. As a result, we decided that we were going to try and make sure our children knew that whilst it’s okay that sometimes things get damaged beyond repair, that they have to look after their toys and belongings as they aren’t just replaceable and sometimes we need to fix something that is broken instead of giving up on it. We also have been trying to find a balance between giving a toy we no longer use to someone who may not have many toys/to a charity shop to raise money for others and selling their toys so they have the money to buy new things they would like. We’d love to know how you tackle this with your family. Thanks for reading! Becca x www.seewhatmummysays.com @whatmummysaysuk

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THE GREEN COLUMN

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ISSUE 83 2020

Take A Minute… Busy day, busy week, busy month… busy life? Life is full of pulls, pushes, needs and wants. I’ve been taking some time out from my pressure filled days and weeks with some much-needed breathing space outdoors. I used to believe that to get the benefits of being out in nature I needed to do a long walk, drive out to the coast, sleep outside, take a picnic and really take my time. Sometimes (more often than not now) I don’t have the time for that, so I have noticed I haven’t been spending as much time out as I would like. For part of my week, I work outdoors and the rest of the week I work in an office in Norwich which deprives me of my nature fixes I need. Recently I have been walking down to a green space near the cathedral and laying on the bench, watching the clouds, listening to birds, taking a flask of tea with me rather than staying at my desk with it. I notice delicate flowers and

new life popping up. It is not my usual ‘nature visit’ as there are buildings and people around, however the benefits to my day and to my mind and soul have been amazing and uplifting. I am more productive when I return to work, my mind feels clearer, I feel part of a community and I am smiling! I encourage you to try and take out 10 minutes to get outside during your day. Take a walk, sit on a bench, watch and listen and take yourself away from your own inner chitter chatter. You deserve it. It doesn’t have to be a big long nature adventure to feel the benefits of being outdoors. If you have a busy family life and going out doesn’t feel possible, perhaps you could sit in your garden or even just open the window to receive the benefits of fresh air coming in. John Muir said “In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks. For going out is really going in.” If I am feeling stuck in my head, in my work, with pressure from others or myself, I try to remember this quote and that I can only ever feel better by taking a break and stepping away. Whatever is happening will not get worse by taking some time with nature. I may look a little strange laying on a bench near the cathedral in the city centre, however when I take care of myself, others see and it may give them inspiration and permission to do the same. I see it as a double win. Wishing you time out and peace... maybe see you on a bench somewhere soon! Article By Shona Sundhari PAGE

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DO WE NEED...

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ISSUE 83 2020

Do We Need To Make More Effort To Keep The Romance Alive?

A few of us went out for dinner on Valentine's Day, instigated by a friend who's in a long-distance relationship. They've been together for several years but at the moment, due to work commitments, are only able to meet up at weekends. I wondered if they'd prefer to make the most of dining more intimately together on Valentine's Day, rather than with us in a group. But he replied, 'no, it's fine, we've been together for years, we're at the no card, no flowers, no gift stage in our relationship.' This led me to later reflect on whether we need to make more effort in our long-standing relationships. Whilst it's lovely to be comfortably settled and not have to constantly be trying to impress our partner surely it's the little things,

that often aren't especially necessary, which help keep the romance alive in our relationships. Those little touches keep the flames flickering and sustain us through the mundane and routine times in everyday life. We may not 'need' that card or bunch of flowers but it certainly can make us smile to be thought of with affection. Here are some romance alive:

ways

to

keep

the

â—? Don't neglect the basics. Look after yourself physically. Keep on top of your hygiene, take responsibility for your health, for looking smart, for your appearance. It's great to kick off your shoes and change into casual clothes after a stressful day but it's not a good look to automatically do that everyday. There are times when looking good is important, both to you and your partner and you'll feel more attractive and confident when you do make the effort.

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DO WE NEED...

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ISSUE 83 2020

● Don't be that partner who's let yourself go. Yes, we all change physically over the years, but exercise, dental check-ups, a healthy lifestyle are our choices that support us in taking the best possible care of ourselves. ● Keep yourself interesting. Rather than flop in a chair with the TV every evening why not sometimes suggest a walk, a pleasant outing or an engaging hobby? 'School nights' can be busy and tiring, but equally so is repeating the same old routine every day. Be up-to-date with current affairs, ready and interested in learning about each other's news. A little planning and effort can help keep the romance alive. ● The simple touches are important. Maybe offer to look after the children so your partner can have a free afternoon for shopping, a game of golf or a leisurely afternoon. Do the chores without having to be asked or, worse still, repeatedly reminded. It makes life so much easier and less stressful for everyone and enables you both to feel invested in all areas of the relationship. ● Why not send a text with a simple, 'thinking of you' message? Not wanting anything other than to say, 'I love you'. Or run a bath for them when they come home after a busy day at work or with the children, or offer to give them a back or foot massage. ● Keeping the romance alive doesn't necessitate spending money. A gift of a framed photo of 'our' favourite place, a compilation of 'our' songs, a pressed leaf or champagne cork

Those little touches keep the flames flickering and sustain us through the mundane and routine times in everyday life. from a special date can all be beautiful, much appreciated gestures that demonstrate love and affection for those significant memories. Thoughtful, romantic gestures are often more appreciated than any expensive department store present. ● Many of us have several groups of relationships that need juggling which can sometimes cause us stress. Work, family, friends can at times be demanding and require extra input. Being romantic is also about being insightful and considerate. Occasionally suggesting something that would ease our partner's stress levels, like visiting their family or inviting them round for a meal could be viewed as romantic. Or being gracious about accompanying them to an event or social occasion that's important to them can mean a lot. On reflection, keeping the romance alive isn't just about red roses and chocolates. Often making the effort with sensitive gestures and actions can be proof enough that we care, and that can be enough to keep the romance alive in our relationship.

Article By Susan Leigh Susan Leigh, counsellor, hypnotherapist, relationship counsellor, writer & media contributor, has published her third book, 101 Days of Inspiration #tipoftheday (ISBN 9781910275160) based on her social media series. A glossy, pocket-sized book, it's full of inspirational quotes & pictures, a treat to give or simply keep for yourself. For more information visit: www.lifestyletherapy.net PAGE

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MOTORING REVIEW

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ISSUE 83 2020

Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio Review

By Tim Barnes-Clay, Motoring Journalist. Follow on Instagram @tbarnesclay Alfa Romeo's Stelvio is a giant salivating, ravenous beast - and with the Quadrifoglio treatment, it's even more of a snarler. Generally, Alfas don't have quite the same build quality as the predictable German suspects, but the Italian brand drives as well as any BMW, Mercedes-Benz or Audi.

you'll be beaming about the 510ps mass under the bonnet that enables this SUV to get from 0-62mph in 3.8 seconds. Yes, you read that correctly - this Stelvio will do the benchmark gallop in sub-four seconds. Drive it somewhere without speed limits, like a disused airfield or a racetrack, and you'll feel like you're about to take off. Why? Because the Stelvio QV can reach an eye-watering, brain liquifying 176mph.

The Quadrifoglio, or QV as we often abbreviate the name to in the UK, is like BMW's M, Audi's RS or Mercedes' AMG. The green cloverleaf badge signifies blistering clout and rapidity - as well as quite a few stops at the petrol pumps.

The beefy set-of-wheels is also able to swap between driving styles – from, for example, “Efficiency” to “Race” - and it can be comfortable, too. This isn’t always the case when it comes to athletic, big-wheeled high-riders.

Of course, if you're a petrolhead at heart, you won't care much about efficiency. Instead,

A 2.9-litre V6 turbocharged petrol engine propels the SUV - and this is joined up to a

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MOTORING REVIEW

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A 2.9-litre V6 turbocharged petrol engine propels the SUV

reassuringly grippy four-wheel-drive system. The Stelvio QV is practical as well - with room in the cabin for five people and a boot offering 525 litres of cargo space. Sure, some of the car’s interior isn't glued together brilliantly, but behind the wheel of such a monstrous motor, you'll, doubtless, be concentrating on the road – and avoiding speed cameras too much to let that get to you.

PROS' N' CONS • Awesome performance ✔ • Great fun ✔ • Be prepared to fork out at the pumps ✖ • Interior fit and finish ✖ FAST FACTS - ALFA ROMEO STELVIO 2.9 TURBO PETROL QUADRIFOGLIO AS TESTED: • Max speed: 176 mph • 0-62 mph: 3.8 secs • Combined mpg: 28.8 • Engine layout: 2891cc six-cylinder (V6) petrol turbo • Max. power (PS): 510 • CO2: 222 g/km • Price: £70,900 PAGE

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NIBBLES & TIPPLES

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ISSUE 83 2020

Nibbles &Tipples March Article By Cheryl Cade, Beer Educator Last month, our area was on a national stage in the beer world. Norwich welcomed the Great British Beer Festival to St Andrews Hall. Alongside this ran the Fringe festival in the local pubs and a Beer & Fine Dining Experience at the Maids Head Hotel.

Following this, the starter of either roast Norfolk chicken & duck terrine, apricot & ginger chutney, toast brioche or Stilton & pickled pear salad, roast hazelnuts was paired with Panther, Mild. This was a very good match with the sweet malts brining out the duck and could stand up to the salty Stilton. The pears, apricot and ginger brought out the soft fruit notes in the beer.

This fine dining experience was an opportunity to match some of our local old and new breweries with an award-winning chef (Magic) from the Maids Head Hotel, locally sourced food and myself to devise a complementary menu.

The main course beers were something of a special, with the launch of a new beer from Humpty Dumpty (Norfolk Broads Brewing), ‘Maid In Norfolk’ a wheat beer with ginger and orange that I helped to brew with Lesley George. The start of their project to celebrate local women in beer.

The night started with an Aperitif from the Ampersand Brewery, Farmhand; this is a light spritzy beer that hides its 7% abv yet refreshes the palette.

Maid in Norfolk was served alongside Elmtrees’ Snetterton Scary Tree, a well-balanced style of bitter enabling the diners to compare and contrast how 2 very different beers can

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enhance subtle elements of the dishes they accompanied. These were: crispy braised pork shoulder, pomme Anna, sautĂŠ savoy cabbage, roasted apple, mustard sauce or the vegetarian option of roasted sweet potato & feta cake, buttered baby spinach, radish & fennel salad, tomato sauce. I tend to think that desserts are my forte, maybe because I love stronger beers. Here though Magic had set a challenge with 2 beautiful dishes that had distinct flavour profiles, Stem ginger pudding, clotted cream ice cream, poached pineapple, toffee sauce, compared with, Frozen Chocolate Parfait, Vanilla Ice Cream, Blackberry, Honeycomb, Orange Puree, Crumb.

ISSUE 83 2020

Here you would normally end a meal with either a brandy or port, not on this occasion, Printers Ink from All Day Brewing served the purpose of a digestive. Its rich mouthfeel that coated the palette is then lifted by the remaining bittering hops to make you think of warm cosy fires. On top of the great food and beers supplied by the Chef and Brewers, the service was without fault, attention being paid to every detail by the staff at the Maids Head Hotel. I will be dining there again very soon. We may even do a repeat performance of the fine dining experience.

This course needed 2 very different beers, and the rich chocolate malt notes of Boudicca, Prasto’s Porter brought out different elements from both dishes. Imagine the marriages of vanilla, orange and toffee with soft bittering chocolate. Whereas the sweet honey notes of Beestons, Magnificent Men a Barley wine, lifted the ginger and pineapple yet balanced the dark rich chocolate.

Cheers Cheryl Visit: https://cherylcade.com

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29


THE GADGETMAN

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ISSUE 83 2020

Vodafone V-Multi Tracker Mini Goodbye Lost, Hello Found I've tried a few different tracking devices over the past couple of years and in the main, they do work, but only if you or another user of the same device happens to be within Bluetooth range of the device. The Vodafone V-Multi Tracker Mini takes this to a whole new level by embedding Bluetooth and 3 different location tracking technologies to pinpoint its exact location in real-time (subject to the network coverage). The tracker is a small device at only 39mm wide and 12mm high, but it packs GPS, WiFi and Cellular technologies, combining these three gives a very accurate location using Satellites, WiFi hot spots and cell tower triangulation. The device then communicates via the Vodafone network to an assistant App on your iPhone or Android device, showing the location on a map. The tracker is water-resistant to 1m for 30 minutes and comes with a carry pouch, hard-

case and clip. Along with carabiner, magnetic USB charge cable and built-in Sim, it can be attached to a key-ring, hung around your neck, clipped to a bag or coat or carried in your pocket. The tracker is small enough to give to your child or elderly friend or relative and give you confidence that they are safe when out and about. You can also set the app to warn you if the tracker goes out of Bluetooth range of your smartphone. It has a handy S-O-S button on the top which can be set to notify the App or send an email if the owner gets into difficulties and send the GPS coordinates of the device. Battery life is around 2 days, but it pays to keep an eye on the battery status via the app if you are planning a long journey to ensure it keeps coverage over that time. There are also useful warnings that can be set to alert if the device has gone over a set speed

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THE GADGETMAN

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ISSUE 83 2020

in the app. A great way to keep on something special that goes over a certain speed. The tracker is powered by the Vodafone network, so it is required to have a data plan, however, the monthly cost is ÂŁ2 and Vodafone have given a price-promise which stops unexpected charges occurring and you are currently covered when abroad in most European countries under the current roaming agreements. When you first purchase the tracker, it will need charging to full before use, but you can take this opportunity to give it time to acquire satellites and pair with your mobile devices. You will also need to register it with Vodafone to enable the cellular data connection. The app is great and you can view a history of the position of the device which is plotted on a map on your mobile. It's a very useful little device with a massive range of potential uses to keep track of your gadgets and technology and to keep loved ones

safe and sound. The data plan is very cheap at ÂŁ2 per month and is really affordable. I purchased the device on a special offer at half price, currently, however, it is selling at the full price of around ÂŁ45. It might seem expensive, but being able to track down property that might go missing is worth the upfront expense in my opinion. Review By Matt Porter www.thegadgetman.org.uk PAGE

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MINDFULNESS

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ISSUE 83 2020

Mindfulness -

Are We Really Thinking About It In The Right Way?

Mindfulness, a big buzz word in the wellbeing world at the moment. Backed by neuroscience, 8 week Mindfulness Courses grow the problem solving and emotional regulation parts of our brain. They also build our resilience through shrinking the fight or flight mechanism. Mindfulness works with helping us with stress and anxiety or simply being more productive and it's a great tool to help build our awareness. In particular, the world we live in nowadays simply seconds are given to each task as we scroll through social media while watching TV, splitting our attention in many areas. Mindfulness can help bring us back to the present moment and focusing on one thing at a time. But are we thinking about it totally wrong? This might be a bit of a controversial one but I’m

interested in what you think. Sometimes when we practise Mindfulness, I feel we are searching for something (I can relate to this myself). We want the calm and nice feeling, so we start searching for it and almost become addicted to it. We become hooked to the calm feeling it gives us and become almost selfish about it. This doesn’t feel right when you go back to the roots of what mindfulness is, wanting to feel calm and wanting it to be a certain way just doesn’t fit with what its meant to be all about. In particular the non-judgemental elements to it, if we are expecting it to be a certain way we are making judgements about it. If we have a bad experience and we think it’s the ‘wrong’ way to practise it then we are making judgements about this too. Yes, sometimes when I practise it, I get the warm fuzzy feeling, but also I sometimes

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MINDFULNESS

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don’t get a calm feeling. I feel anxiety in my chest, feeling the impact of stress on my body, becoming more aware of how busy I am. Yes, over time, Mindfulness will help us find more calm but we don’t always experience calm as we start to build our awareness, so being hooked onto the idea of finding calm every time just isn’t healthy I don’t think. If I sat down to practise and expected to find a warm fuzzy feeling every time, I would get a shock. Although there are benefits, if we do feel good when we practise it we are likely to practice it more and we are then more likely to build a Mindfulness habit, so this is an upside of this! I was thinking about what to do about this and I think as a Mindfulness teacher I should try and provide an answer and be a bit of a thought leader on this one. I think the answer instead of thinking of ourselves and finding our calm when we practise Mindfulness, a better way to think about it is it think of others. If we practise Mindfulness so we are better able to help others then we will ultimately create a better world with the kindness and compassion that comes from the attitude both inside and outside of formal ‘practice’.

I think the answer instead of thinking of ourselves and finding our calm when we practice Mindfulness, a better way to think about it is it think of others.

The Buddhist term for this is ‘Metta’ which means loving kindness and is more of an attitude both within and outside the formal practice, it’s a way of being, treating yourself and others with kindness and compassion. I think there is a difference between self-kindness and compassion and treating mindfulness non-judgementally and the selfish want for calm, a search for something and almost an addiction. I also always hear the term ‘Mindfulness’ used in so many ways and used to describe stuff just because it sounds good, or because its fashionable/trendy (can’t say that without feeling old!). If we are being true to the roots of Mindfulness and practising it in the way it is intended and in a non-judgemental way then I think we are onto a winner, for ourselves, others and the wider world! Are you thinking about Mindfulness all wrong? How long do you really spend scrolling through social media? How could you practise Mindfulness with Kindness and Compassion shifting your focus to helping others rather than finding something yourself? Join our 8 weeks of Mindfulness Flexible Course www.thehappinessbranch.com/mindfulness Article By Gemma Sandwell Bsc Hons TEDx speaker and Mindfulness Teacher PAGE

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INTERVIEW

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ISSUE 83 2020

ANDY PARSONS Healing The Nation Interview By Brian Donaldson Andy Parsons is on a mission with his new stand-up tour. In one simple nutshell, he’s looking to heal this divided nation. The man who was a fixture on Mock The Week for years, has been in a very successful double act (alongside playwright Henry Naylor), worked on Spitting Image and brought us sell-out tours and unit-shifting DVDs such as Britain’s Got Idiots and Gruntled, is calling time on the negativity that reverberates on this split island with his new show, Healing The Nation. “On my Twitter feed currently it says ‘Initially upbeat. Often disappointed’,” says Andy. “The general thrust of everything I’ve ever done has an optimistic note to it, and there is always something in the glass rather than there being something missing from it. Life can get extremely frustrating and your optimism can fade, but I retain the faith and I’m looking forward to getting out there and meeting people in some nice theatres.”

Credit: Andy Hollingworth

Happy to be known as a political comedian, Andy has never shirked from putting the opinions he expresses on stage into full practice, having hosted People’s Votes rallies, including one in Parliament Square to over 100,000 people and fronted the Independent Age’s most recent Campaign Against Loneliness. Plus he created the Slacktivist Action Group podcast in which he chatted to the likes of comics Josh Widdicombe and Angela Barnes, politicians David Lammy and Peter Hain, and commentators Suzanne Moore and Miranda Sawyer. “I think we’re a nation desperate to be healed, in the sense that people would rather come together than diverge,” believes Andy. “In the current media analysis, everyone is in the centre of their own social media bubble, and everything is kicking off left, right and centre. So the idea for the tour was that rather than being incredibly one-sided and partisan and throwing stuff at the opposition, it’s nice to see both sides of the argument. I’ll be taking on viewpoints that wouldn’t normally find a natural home in

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INTERVIEW

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ISSUE 83 2020

when the tour finishes from where it started. This is mainly because of current events, but also it’s good to keep it fresh anyway, not just for the audience but for myself. If you’re performing over 100 shows and just doing the same set every single night then it becomes a job rather than a pleasure.”

one of my stand-up sets and try to genuinely see the other side of that argument.” Andy is clear that while the country seems utterly divided with individuals permanently lodged on their own unwavering side of the debate, he believes that there are always more issues that unite rather than separate us. “The idea in the show is that everything is proving divisive at the moment, and that no one is talking to each other or seeing issues from both sides. Essentially, people have the same concerns whether it’s health or education or jobs, and I want to narrow down the focus of what people do want and bring them together. The blurb of the show says that, if nothing else, we can be proud of some form of tolerance and freedom of speech throughout our history. It’ll be interesting to see where those concepts are going in the next few years.” It was former Labour Prime Minister Harold Wilson who is credited with first saying that a week was a long time in politics. In the febrile and often toxic terrain of modern British politics and society, events seem to alter dramatically on an almost hourly basis. While this might be ideal for political correspondents, it can prove something of a challenge for topical comedians who are trying to take a show across the country over the course of many months.

When you watch Andy Parsons in full flow, it’s clear that you’re witnessing a performer who is not only having a great time, but is enjoying the pleasure he’s passing on to others. Partly, this might come down to a realisation that it’s a good time to be in the topical comedy game with such rich pickings to be had from the various parties and many individuals across the ever-elongating political spectrum of the UK. “It goes in cycles, and for a while political comedy was dead. If you suggested to a TV company that you wanted to have some sort of a political comedy vehicle they’d say ‘why would you want to do that? No one is interested.’ But now, there’s a whole slew of them. The reasons for that are various, but the bottom line is that people are more interested in politics now simply because it’s effecting more of their lives. And now that more people are talking about it, there are comics you wouldn’t associate with politics who will still address it in some way because every aspect of life is somehow influenced by it. That was less true ten years ago.” Whatever the future holds in terms of politics in Britain, Europe, the US and across the wider global landscape, it’s comforting (healing, almost) to know that comedians such as Andy Parsons will be around poking fun at those who claim to lead or speak for us.

Andy, however, is confident about accepting the challenge of updating his material to suit the prevailing circumstances. “When your show is topical then inevitably it will be very different

The show rocks up at the King's Lynn Corn Exchange on Sunday 22nd March, 2020. Tickets are available from the Box Office on 01553 764864 or book online: kingslynncornexchange.co.uk PAGE

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BEST OF NORFOLK ISSUE 83 2020

Best Of Norfolk - Through The Lens Of Our Readers With a huge influx of photographs from our followers on Facebook, our new monthly feature returns for its third month; one which we love to see and hope you all do too. Take a look at these marvellous February images. Angie Giles - Whitlingham Great Broad

Gina Upex - Great Yarmouth beach during Storm Ciara

Lisa Daniels - Norwich Love Light Festival

Neil James Garrod - Thetford Forest

Gina Upex - Potter Heigham

Shiela Denny - Mundesley PAGE

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BEST OF NORFOLK

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ISSUE 83 2020 Shiela Denny - Paston during Storm Dennis

Neil James Garrod Thetford Nuns' Bridge

Gina Upex - Medieval Bridge Potter Heigham

Laura Baxter - Snowdrops at Walsingham Abbey Asylum Shiela Denny - Elm Hill

Shiela Denny - Blakeney PAGE

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BEST OF NORFOLK ISSUE 83 2020 Shiela Denny - Horsey

Vicki Bell - sunset in Great Ellingham

Maria Holloway - Hackford Iceni Magazine - Frosty Morning

To be in with a chance of having your own photographs featured in the future, look out for our regular Facebook posts where you can add your images. Alternatively, send an email with your image and caption to: submissions@icenimagazine.co.uk PAGE

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NOVA SILVER

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ISSUE 83 2020

March At Nova Silver Spring is well and truly on its way now!

The flowers have been trying their best to brighten up our days for a little while, and those long dark evenings seem to be mostly behind us. We’re sure you don’t need reminding, but Mother’s Day is also approaching on the 22nd March. If you’re thinking of gifting jewellery this year, why not take a look at some of our newer designs? We’ve always been inspired by the gorgeous Norfolk countryside around us and we think our Bluebell pendant and earrings set makes for a great present. Who can fail to smile when they see the bluebells peeping through the woods? We’ve got some lovely little earrings in stock at the moment, and have found that we’ve been selling lots this Mother’s Day. If you fancy something a little more sentimental, we’ve just launched a personalisation option too, with our little heart shaped tags that can be stamped with initials and added to a bracelet or necklace. We think this is a great way to add a special meaning to a present, with parents often choosing to have the initials of their children added to a special piece of jewellery. We’ve also noticed a huge rise in the number of gift vouchers we’ve been selling, and we find that often the giver will accompany the recipient when they’re being spent; not only giving them the gift of some new jewellery, but also of their time spent selecting jewellery together. We always find that these gifts are truly treasured!

Contact Details:

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Focus On:

Money


MONEY...

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ISSUE 83 2020

Money:

What Does It Mean To You? “Money is a guarantee that we may have what we want in the future. Though we need nothing at the moment it insures the possibility of satisfying a new desire when it arises.” - Aristotle How much money do you think you need to consider yourself successful? How many people ask themselves that question at any point in their lives? It is said that money cannot buy happiness, but it can certainly make someone’s life a lot easier especially when the bills are due at the end of the month and your bank balance is heaving under the weight of those bills! Aristotle was probably right when he said we don’t need the money instantly, but the possibility of having it, and having lots of it, is what drives people to play that elusive thing called the lottery. Money is a necessary commodity. However, in the search for it, people have allowed their

social circumstances and wants to overtake their moral compass. We live in a society that judges success by the house you own, the car you drive and how much money you appear to have. Your social status is determined by how many material goods you have acquired, the bling lifestyle. “Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.” - Ayn Rand, RussianAmerican, Novelist-Philosopher. People believe that if they have money, their lives will be different. It’s the possibility of what could be that makes people view money in the light they do. For most, it offers the opportunity to escape the 9-5 life, be more entrepreneurial, to live the dream!

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MONEY...

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ISSUE 83 2020

Research has shown that those, who are considered rich, made their money from being able to offer value to people. The more valuable the product, service and convenience to the masses, the richer you become, until another person comes along who offers an additional alternative value. Amazon, for example, offers people what they need delivered to them at their convenience. Similarly, Uber and Airbnb became market disruptors because they recognised a need and set out to plug that gap offering convenient real-time service at a reasonable cost. “It’s good to have money and the things that money can buy, but it’s good, too, to check up once in a while and make sure that you haven’t lost the things that money can’t buy.” - George Lorimer, American journalist, author and publisher. Some very rich people in this and the last century have committed suicide despite their immense wealth. This highlights that having all the money in the world does not guarantee happiness and satisfaction. Money is only good according to what you do with it. A series of studies have been carried out where people were given a certain amount of money: one group was asked to spend it on themselves; the others were told to spend it on someone in need.

“Your social status is determined by how many material goods you have acquired, the bling lifestyle.” The results of the studies revealed that those who spent the money on themselves experienced short-term satisfaction but those who spent on others who were in need, found that their happiness level increased. Money is an amplifier, a catalyst; it can either bring out the best in you or the worse. The key is that you should manage your money, and not allow money to manage you. I like to look as money as an enabler, meaning that making and having it should not be the definitive... ... Being able to use money as a resource to help yourself and others, and by making a difference (no matter how small) in the lives of others and the world, will leave a lasting impression that no-one can take away a legacy!

Article by Serena Fordham, Founder and MD of HER Business Revolution, Glow Virtual Assistants and Mums Empowerment Movement CIC. www.herbusinessrevolution.biz www.glowva.co.uk www.mumsempowermentmovement.co.uk

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VALUE OF MONEY

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ISSUE 83 2020

Teaching Children The Value Of Money I remember as a child being given a twenty pence coin every Sunday when I went to visit my Grandparents in their bungalow. My pocket money was always gratefully received. I would run to the little shop around the corner and carefully choose my penny sweets. Should I buy four large cola bottles for my money or twenty smaller sweets? I would take a while to make my decision and then always regretted it, vowing to make a better one the following week. Nowadays, it seems that, in the age of cashfree transactions, children are finding it more challenging to understand the value of money. If I have my two daughters with me, they don’t witness the exchange of money the majority of time, rather me pressing my card up against a

machine, sometimes inputting my pin number. My children do not see me working as a teacher, tutor and writer to make ends meet. They do not see the guilt I feel when I know I am in need of new clothes for me, but I am so used to spending my money on them. The value of money is lost on my children and it is entirely of my own doing in this digital world. As a result of my mistakes, I am aiming to do the following so that they do understand the sacrifices we have to make and the fact that money does not grow on trees: • Use cash for the majority of transactions Taking money out of the cash machine and using that rather than constantly tapping your card onto a machine not only helps you to see the amount you are spending, but also helps the children to see that too. When the cashier announces the total of shopping is £35.67, you

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VALUE OF MONEY

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ISSUE 83 2020

can tell your children that you have some £10 notes in your purse and ask how many you will need. The skills of rounding and counting in tens are important here. Furthermore, avoiding making online purchases for things the children have asked for, while easier, does not actually teach them anything at all. They simply see that with a click of a button, a product can be ordered and will arrive the following day. There is absolutely no view of the fact that the money had to be earned. Using physical shops rather than online ones ought to help. • Put their pocket money into purses I am guilty of totting up how many weeks’ pocket money they are owed and just saying to them when we are shopping, “That could be what you spend your pocket money on as you have five weeks’ worth to spend.” In fact, this is a pretty silly way of doing it. Putting their £2 a week into a purse for them will show them exactly what they have and gives them a sense of responsibility too. • Role play I love listening to the children playing together, creating imaginary scenes. I’m aiming to introduce the idea of money subtly into their role play games and hope that this will have an

“Nowadays, it seems that, in the age of cash-free transactions, children are finding it more challenging to understand the value of money.”

impact on them. We have the till and a pot of real coins (the plastic ones just don’t feel or look the same), so redirecting them slightly could work wonders for their understanding of money. • Be firmer All I want to do in life is provide for my children and make them happy. As a result, they can be spoilt at times and that is not what I really ought to be doing. I can spoil them with all the love and care in the world, but that does not mean I need to spend an excessive amount of money on them. My children do not understand how much money goes on the mortgage each month (I’m not sure they even understand that concept) or the amount we have to spend on oil, but I am not doing them any favours by being a pushover when it comes to money. Telling them that we cannot afford to buy certain things is an important life lesson. Asking them questions such as, “Would you prefer to have hot meals for the next week or a new doll?” should help them somewhat towards understanding our financial situation. Parenting is probably the most difficult job you will ever have in life. There is no way to get every aspect right every single time, but I am still trying hard. As a mum to two and step-mum to three, money is at the forefront of a lot of things, of course, so instilling a need to save up and make sensible decisions when it comes to our spending is vital. Article By Vicki (Blossom Words) PAGE

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MONEY SHOULDN'T...

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ISSUE 83 2020

Money Shouldn’t Matter Article By Missy Hitchcox

My personal stance with regards I must reluctantly admit that home educating to money is, “it shouldn’t matter”. means finances take the spotlight of my thoughts I say ‘shouldn’t’ as opposed to ‘doesn’t’ because the reality is that, sadly, it does. Without this man-made concept of exchanging paper and metal for everything we possess and use, virtually nothing is possible. That said, I am acutely aware of its unimportance in regards to everything I treasure in this life, and consequently I maintain a purposeful lack of stress where money is concerned. Whether you have a lot or a little, there is one universal truth to money. Sometimes it needs to stretch farther, and sometimes it seems available in abundance. Irrespective of the specific figures, sometimes we are all poorer or richer, and it shouldn’t be something which affects our wellbeing and health through stress or lack of sleep. Because wellbeing is something money cannot buy, and should be valued above all else.

more often than I would ideally like. With the children in my constant care, this means hours available to work are significantly reduced. And the expense of home educating in itself comes as a surprise to many enquirers. I’ve lost count of the amount of times I’ve been asked, “Home schooling, hey? Are you sent work for them to do? Do you get help from the government?” And the answer is no. We don’t sit at home waiting for workbooks and a cheque in the mail. And rightly so, because mainstream schools are available. The choice to educate children without mainstream schools means their interests are free to flourish wherever their curiosity carries them. It is beautiful to watch, but detrimental to the bank account! Currently, we attend four regular group classes per week, all different subjects and content.

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In my eyes, the social aspect of these are beneficial because it gives the children a chance to regularly see familiar faces, form friendships, and it is also important for their confidence to be able to voice their opinions in front of others, share their ideas, and simply feel included as a part of something. The content, although obviously valuable, is not so vital from my parental point of view, because I am happy to be led by my daughter’s interests and waning interests. We enrol in classes and pay each term, but if when one term ends and another begins she has decided she no longer wants to take part in a class, that’s okay. Maybe she has decided it isn’t for her. Maybe she will revisit it later. But I continue to encourage and suggest activities or subjects. Last year she dropped Drama, which had been a hobby of hers since age 3, but this year she picked up Gymnastics after a lengthy absence, and she is still going very strong with Spanish and Science two years down the line. Although I have a rough idea of the monthly figure spent on classes, I honestly don’t want to guess what I spend annually on resources for actual ‘at home’ learning.

ISSUE 83 2020

The workbooks, the informative books, the reading books, the educational toys and games, the art supplies, the stationery. And aside from that, when parents take their children absolutely anywhere it usually means enduring constant pleas of “Can I have this? Please? I really need this…” Well, I take them everywhere. So you can imagine how many items we accumulate in the shopping basket. But in a world where I’m perpetually saying “Yes”, I am getting better at saying “No” when absolutely necessary. And through being in the ‘real world’ every day, my child is learning the value of money. We haven’t yet done a great deal of formal work touching on money. No worksheets such as “Tim has £2 and buys three 10p sweets & a 70p can of drink. How much change will he get?” Truthfully, we would soon be bored. But she is at the shops with me, handling money, making payments, seeing price tags. She will come home and tell me how much Daddy spent on clothes! She will point out when something is a ‘bargain’ in her sassiest voice. And she is gaining a subtle understanding of being economical. We don’t need to buy what we already have. We don’t need to spend for the sake of it. To my surprise, she is appalled by plastic packaging. “The poor turtles”, she says. I don’t think she places much value on actual material things, which is wonderful. I want to show her that managing money does matter. And being conscious of consumerism definitely does matter, perhaps now more than ever. But actual money, it doesn’t really matter. We should prioritise health and wellbeing, family, relationships, happiness, nature, freedom, kindness. Because ultimately, I would like her to develop the following idea about money. “It shouldn’t matter”. PAGE

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WHY I HATE...

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ISSUE 83 2020

Money: Why I Hate Comparisons If you are a social media user, you will undoubtedly have happened upon the oft-shared post comparing the salaries of UK soldiers and professional footballers. I absolutely despise these comparisons when it comes to their finances and feel it is most unhelpful. Let me explain why that is. First of all, both roles are incredibly different. Soldiers are public sector workers, so their pay comes from our taxes, with the government having overall control. Footballers work in a completely different industry: entertainment combined with sport, you could say. Their wages are paid for by the clubs themselves. It is a matter of supply and demand. If footballer salaries were decreased, the UK would not attract the caliber of players from abroad and our home-grown players would choose to work elsewhere. Secondly, it is also a case of supply and demand. Football fans demand their clubs buy the best players. To do that, high wages are necessary. Imagine a player from sunny Spain willingly going to live in scummy Sunderland (disclaimer:

I am a Newcastle Fan and this comment was made in jest... just). It simply would not happen if the money weren’t an incentive. Please do not assume that I believe soldiers are not worthy of a pay rise. That is absolutely not what I am saying, just that the comparisons are not helpful nor are they meaningful. Comparisons, in general, when discussing money can be crude. Discussions about incomings and outgoings do not sit comfortably with me. I was taught by my parents that money should be something kept within the family and I am tempted to agree. As soon as someone tells you what they are earning, the comparison, whether out loud or in your head, is made. You may find yourself feeling quite frustrated that you hold a similar role yet your recompense is a lot less. Conversely, you could find the situation embarrassing if you recognise your job as being less stressful and timeconsuming than a colleague on a lower grade. My advice: be assertive and change the subject when the topic of money crops up. Perhaps try to avoid football though! Article By Vicki (Blossom Words)

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ICENI ASKS ISSUE 83 2020

What are your favourite money-saving tips? “It’s always good to shop around when it comes to insurance and utilities. Once a year or so, I use a price comparison website to check I’m getting the best deals for my household. I’ve definitely saved money this way.” Bryony

“Go to “Feed your family for around £20 a week” on Facebook for cheap and cheerful recipes and food tips. Jack Munroe also does really cheap to make recipes free online, and shows price per portion to make up so if you are really pushed it's very easy to compare costs before writing shopping lists.” Helen

“Halifax have a save the change account. So whatever I spend, say £9.89, it puts £0.11 in my savings account.” Alice

“Get a Friends and family railcard. You can get it through Tesco vouchers for 10 pounds. It will save a third off rail trips.” Sarah

“Use a 'laundry ball' to replace Laundry powder/liquid - they are about £8 to buy, but will do 1500 washes.” Helen

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ICENI - HOROSCOPES

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ISSUE 83 2020

Horoscopes For March Aries 21 March - 20 April Ready to find closure on key

Libra 24 September - 23 October As Venus enters an

issues? This month is perfect for tying up loose ends and letting go of anything that no longer serves. Once the Sun enters your sign on the 19th though, you’ll be truly in your element with more vitality and confidence. From March 21st, you may take your social life more seriously, but as Mars enters Aquarius on the 28th, you’ll also want to have fun.

intense zone, desires may become more pronounced and the urge to go after them more compelling. Consider your motives before you give in Libra. Early on, someone from the past could come back into your life, and this might offer a chance to catch up and to resolve lingering issues. Looking for romance? A person with worldly experience might greatly appeal.

Taurus 21 April - 21 May Venus enters your sign on the 4th, which gives encouragement to nurture yourself and perhaps give yourself a makeover if you need a confidence boost. And with a potent Supermoon in your romance sector on the 9th, an encounter could bring powerful feelings to the fore. Don’t rush into anything though. From week three, it’s time to embrace the spotlight and showcase your abilities.

Scorpio 24 October - 22 November Keen to enhance your relationships? Lovely Venus’s move into your sector of relating can smooth over difficulties and bring harmony. Go easy around the time of the Virgo Supermoon on the 9th though, as feelings may run high and it might be easy to overreact. Ready to make changes at home? With Saturn and Mars moving in, it may be sooner rather than later Scorpio.

Gemini 22 May - 21 June Lively Mercury re-enters

Sagittarius 23 November - 21 December With the

Aquarius prior to turning direct on March 9th, so go easy if you have travel arrangements in place as muddled thinking could be a cause of delays. And with a major lunation in your home zone, family dramas are also possible and may require action. From March 19th, a livelier outlook can enhance your social life and see you reaching for new opportunities.

Sun in a sheltered sector until March 19th, this can be an opportunity to get more nurturing and spend time with those you are closest to. But duty calls around the time of a key lunar phase on the 9th, and getting the right work/life balance can be crucial. From March 19th, leisure options might appeal and from week three, a serious opportunity could call out to you.

Cancer 22 June - 23 July If feelings seem more volatile

Capricorn 22 December - 20 January As Mercury re-

than usual around March 9th, it could be down to the Supermoon in your sector of talk and thought. It helps to think before you speak to avoid any tensions, and to make decisions when you are more settled. Opportunities to shine show up from March 19th, when the Sun in a prominent zone encourages you to promote your skills and initiate key plans.

enters your money zone for a few days before turning direct on March 9th, take care when purchasing big-ticket items or signing agreements. Try to keep any paperwork so you can recoup your cash. Finances will move to the top of your agenda from March 21st as Saturn enters your money zone for a few months, encouraging you to take firm control and plan ahead.

Leo 24 July - 23 August As sweet Venus enters the

Aquarius 21 January - 19 February As lovely Venus

topmost sector from March 4th, the coming weeks can be perfect for liaising with those who can assist you with your goals. Charm can get you places. Avoid the temptation to splurge around the 9th as a volatile Supermoon suggests money could slip through your fingers. From March 21st, you may be keen to evaluate important relationships in your life.

sashays into your home zone, her presence can inspire you to give your place some tender loving care and perhaps a splash of paint. And a Supermoon in an intense zone can be a chance to let go of something that no longer serves. Your sign becomes a priority as Saturn followed by Mars move in from week three, which can see you taking new plans very seriously.

Virgo 24 August - 23 September With inquisitive Mercury

Pisces 20 February - 20 March With the Sun in your

rewinding and moving back into Aquarius prior to forging ahead on the 9th, preparation at work and with daily tasks can help prevent delays. And with a Supermoon in your sign in week two, emotional issues could emerge in a key bond inspiring you to clear the air. Lifestyle issues may become a priority from week three, with the potential for major change.

sign until the 19th, it’s time to focus on those things that give you most happiness. Still, with a Virgo Supermoon on the 9th, relationship issues can come to the fore, bringing an opportunity to clear the air in as sensitive a way as you can. And a New Moon in your money zone suggests that new financial habits can curb spending and leave you better off.

Astrologer Patrick Arundell provides a unique take on Horoscopes and Astrology. Join him daily for your Daily Horoscope and his penetrating insight into this fascinating subject. Also FREE Horoscope Videos. PAGE

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