SKIMOUNTAINEERING IN THE DOLOMITES

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ENRICO BACCANTI, FRANCESCO TREMOLADA

SKIMOUNTAINEERING

in the

DOLOMITES

over 100 itineraries 6 multi-day traverses

EDIZIONI VERSANTE SUD | COLLANA LUOGHI VERTICALI | SKI


First edition January 2013 Second edition February 2020 ISBN 978 88 55470 032 Copyright © 2018 VERSANTE SUD – Milano (I), via Longhi, 10. Ph. +39 02 7490163 www.versantesud.it All translation, reproduction, adaptation and electronic registration, either totally or partially, by any methods, are rights reserved for all countries.

Cover image Uphill towards the Antersasc peak, Puez Odle Natural Park, Val Badia. ©Francesco Tremolada Text

Enrico Baccanti, Francesco Tremolada

Photos

Enrico Baccanti, Francesco Tremolada

English translation

Alexandra Ercolani

Maps

Tommaso Bacciocchi, Silvia Ruju © Mapbox, © Open Street Map

Symbols

Tommaso Bacciocchi

Layout

Giulia Mezzadri

Printing

Tipolitografia Pagani - Passirano (BS), Italy

s ZERO mile ook is This guideband locally homegroprwn oduced

ZERO miles!

This is a “zero-miles” guidebook. It’s locally produced! It has been compiled by local authors, who live and promote skiing in the area reviewed. Skiers benefit from local authors: – locals know the latest news and updates – locals don’t promote only the most “commercial” tours – locals invest the revenues from the guidebook in exploring new itineraries Local authors promote and respect their area: – they review with a local attention to the territory – they pay attention in the same way to any different tours – they meaningfully interact with local actors

Note

Ski mountaineering is a potentially dangerous sport in which participation is entirely at your own risk. All the information in this guide has been updated based upon information at the time of publication, however it is vital to evaluate every situation yourself before placing yourself in a life threatening situation or to seek the advice of experienced and qualified individuals.


ZERO miles This guidebook is homegrown and locally produced

ENRICO BACCANTI – FRANCESCO TREMOLADA

SKI MOUNTAINEERING IN THE DOLOMITES More than one hundred itineraries + 6 multi day traverses

EDIZIONI VERSANTE SUD


INDEX Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Technical introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 European avalanche hazard scale . . . . . . . 18 Legend of symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

1 PUEZ - ODLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Forcella di Mezdì . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Odla di Valdussa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forcella dla Roa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Col Toron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sas Ciampac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Col dla Sonè . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cime Cocene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tour Ciampanì . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crep de les Dodesc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antersass Northern Couloir . . . . . . . . . Piz Somplunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forcella Somplunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cima Puez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Munt da Medalges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Piccolo Sass da Putia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sass da Putia - East Face . . . . . . . . . . Sass da Putia - North couloir . . . . . . . Walscher ring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26 30 32 34 36 42 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88

2 FANIS – CONTURINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

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Cima San Antonio da La Valle . . . . . . . 92 Cima San Antonio da Fanes . . . . . . . . . 96 Furcia dai Fers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Sasso delle Nove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Sasso delle Dieci . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Piz Stiga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34.

Piz de Lavarela - Traverse . . . . . . . . . Piz de Lavarela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cima Fanis di Mezzo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cadin di Fanis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monte Castello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Furcia Rossa III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Furcia Rossa II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Col Becchei Dessora . . . . . . . . . . . . . Col Becchei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Croda Ciamin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

110 112 118 122 126 130 132 136 140 146

3 CRODA ROSSA - VALLANDRO . . . . . . 150 35. Lavinores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36. Taè . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37. Monte Sella di Sennes . . . . . . . . . . . . 38. Col de Riciogon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39. Piccola Croda del Becco . . . . . . . . . . 40. Croda del Becco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41. Piccola Croda Rossa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42. Campo Cavallo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43. Giavo Grande (Gr. Jaufen) . . . . . . . . . 44. Picco di Vallandro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45. Gran Piramide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46. Cadin di Croda Rossa . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47. Forcella del Pin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48. Croda Rossa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49. Forcella Colfiedo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

152 154 156 158 160 164 166 168 170 172 178 180 184 186 188

4 TOFANE – CRISTALLO – ANTELAO . . . 192 50. 51. 52. 53. 54.

Tofana di Rozes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forcella Vallon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tofana di Mezzo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tofana di Dentro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Passo del Cristallo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

194 198 202 204 210


55. Canale Nord del Cristallo . . . . . . . . . . 56. Val Cristallino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57. Val delle Bance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58. Antelao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

214 216 218 220

5 PELMO - MONDEVAL – CRODA DA LAGO . 224

83. Punta Rocca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84. Punta Penia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85. Forcella Marmolada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86. Piccolo Vernel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87. Colac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

316 322 324 330 334

Col de la Puina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Canali di Cima Forada . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Cima di Forca Rossa . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Monte Pelmo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 Monte Pelmo - Southern Couloir . . . 242 Monte Cernera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246x Monte Mondeval – Corvo Alto . . . . . . 248 Cima Loschiesuoi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Lastoni di Formin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256

8 SAN PELLEGRINO – MONZONI . . . . . . 340

6 COL DI LANA – NUVOLAO . . . . . . . . . . 260

95. Traverse of Fanes—Sennes-Braies . . 366 96. Traverse of San Pellegrino-Marmolada374 97. Traverse of Sassolungo-Sassopiatto . 378 98. Puez Traverse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 99. Classic Dolomites Haute Route . . . . . 392 100. Special Dolomites Haute Route . . . . . 406

59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67.

68. Monte Sief - from Corte . . . . . . . . . . . 69. Monte Sief - from Castello . . . . . . . . . 70. Piccolo Settsass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71. Col di Lana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72. Piz Ciampei - Prati di Camera . . . . . . 73. Settsass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74. Col Gallina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75. Monte Nuvolao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76. Ra Gusela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77. Monte Pore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

262 268 272 274 276 282 288 290 294 296

88. Passo Selle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89. Forcella del Laghet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90. Cima Cadine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91. Cima Ombrettola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92. Forca Rossa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93. Cima 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94. Vallaccia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

342 346 350 352 356 358 360

9 TRAVERSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364

7 MARMOLADA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 78. 79. 80. 81. 82.

Forca Rossa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Monte La Banca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Cima Ombrettola - from Malga Ciapela 306 Sasso Vernale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Sasso di Valfredda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312

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41 Gruppo > settore itinerario

A22

ANTERMOIA

CH. I

Passo delle Erbe  Sass de Putia

CH. II

de 

Odle

 Piz de Puez

Piz d Lavare

Passo Gardena

Sassolungo

Gruppo

Sassopiatto

Se

a ll

Passo Campolongo

Settsa

Passo Sella

Col di Passo Pordoi

CH. VI

CH. VII

CH. VIII

L. di Fedaia

Monte Colac

Punta Penia (Marmolada)

Sasso Vernale

 Punta Vallaccia

Passo San Pellegrino

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Passo Fedaia


Passo Furcia

L. di Dobbiaco

CH. III

L. di Braies

 Giavo Croda Grande del Becco

M. Sella di Sennes

Rif. Sennes

Piza dales Nü 

Sasso elle Dieci

Rif. Pederü

Croda Rossa

Lavinores 

Rif. Rif. Lavarella Fanes

Bechei  di Sopra

de ela  Piz dles Cunturines

M. Cristallo 

Rif. Scotoni

L. di Landro Passo CARBONIN Cimabanche

CH. IV

L. di Misurina

Tofana di Dentro 

Passo Tre Croci

 Tofana Tofana di Mezzo di Rozes 

ass

Sorapiss Lana Passo di Giau

Rif. Croda da Lago

Cernera 

Antelao L. di Centro Cadore

M. Pelmo 

CH. V

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INTRODUCTION Due to the enthusiastic welcome readers gave our first volume of “Ski Mountaineering in the Dolomites”, we have chosen, also for this second edition, to keep the original descriptive structure of this guide book intact, improving and increasing the work already undertaken without modifying the previous division into chapters. As well as making an accurate revision of every single itinerary, intervening both on the text and parts of graphics and photos, we wanted to enhance the choice introducing new itineraries and new traverses, chosen according to the current tendencies in ski mountaineering in the Dolomites. The collection of itineraries remains limited to the area of the central Dolomites, included between Val Gardena and the Ampezzo basin and from Braies to San Pellegrino pass. Many itineraries take place inside natural parks (Puez - Odle, Fanes - Sennes – Braies, Ampezzo Dolomites) in natural areas which are truly interesting landscape-wise due to the reduced presence of infrastructure and since they are included in the areas known as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Only a few itineraries, situated near ski resorts and entire mountain groups, such as the Sella massif, are not described here since they are widely dealt with in the book “Freeriding in the Dolomites” (ed.Versante Sud). Many itineraries described here have never been published before or are not much frequented and take place in a high mountain environment; it is thus important to tackle them with preparation and experience or better still together with a Mountain Guide. the authors

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Tofana di Dentro and Tofana di Mezzo act as background to the descent in Cadin di Fanis towards Val Travenanzes

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Uphill towards the Settsass peak, the Puez Odle group in the background

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TECHNICAL INTRODUCTION The success of a ski mountaineering trip depends above of all on how you plan the trip itself. A destination must be chosen depending on the ability and preparation of the participants and the objective conditions of the itinerary; evaluating all useful elements in executing the itinerary makes up the first rule for a ski mountaineer. PREPARING AN ITINERARY Before heading off on an itinerary it is important to prepare adequately, here are a few general observations: • Carefully check the snow-weather forecast • Be up to date with the itinerary’s snow conditions from whoever has skied it recently (Mountain Guides’ office) • Carefully study the ascent/descent from a good observation point (binoculars) • Carefully read the description and check out the access and total length on the topographic map (important reference points and possible escape routes) • Check your equipment • Make sure that the group’s level of experience is adequate for the difficulties and the effort required throughout the itinerary. THROUGHOUT THE ITINERARY On site observation: • check out your gear (before setting off make sure your ARVA transceiver is on!!!!) • check out the snow conditions (look out to see if there are natural detachments, cornices, evident wind slabs) • observe the weather conditions (temperature, wind, fog) • carefully choose the safest ascent and descent route with special attention to where you choose to stop • proceed at a safe distance (at the same time keeping the group’s unity) • notice if there are any other possible groups along your itinerary EQUIPMENT Nowadays there is a vast choice of equipment for ski mountaineering, which has finally reached the high level of quality and technicality (sometimes even more so) of downhill skiing. The following are some brief indications in helping you pick out the right equipment for the itineraries described in this book. SKIS Simplifying the matter we can divide skis into three main categories which reflect just as many philosophies in their use. The choice will be made depending on one’s needs, considering the kind of bindings and boots used.

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Extralight: narrow and shorter, they are ski mountaineering’s formula 1 skis, fantastic uphill they are ideal for longer trips and speedy ascents. But on the other hand they are more difficult to use downhill, especially with deep or difficult snow. For trips: slightly wider and heavier compared to the first category, they try to combine downhill performance with contained weight for the ascent. Freeride oriented: wider and heavier, with structures which are aimed at enjoying the descent, but with light bindings they can be used for ascents with a lot of vertical height gain. Da gita: un po’ più larghi e pesanti rispetto ai primi cercano di coniugare le prestazioni in discesa, mantenendo un peso ancora contenuto per la salita. Freeride “oriented”: sono sci più larghi e pesanti, con strutture nettamente orientate alla prestazione in discesa, ma che montati con attacchi leggeri possono essere utilizzati anche per salite con dislivello importante. BOOTS The choice is abundant even for ski mountaineering boots and will be made depending on the major or minor importance of the ascent (and the speed of the ascent) and the technicality/enjoyability of the descent. BINDINGS The “Dynafit type” bindings (tech bindings) are definitely the best choice for ski mountaineering. Many companies nowadays produce this kind of binding and thanks to the highly competitive field there has been large technical development and improvement. Leaving out the ultra light models used for competing, it is possible to find different models which are very versatile with easy to insert elevator levels, ski stoppers, adjustment of boot release, (up to 12 din) which are a lot more practical to use compared to the models made a few years ago. A very useful feature is the slides below the binding, to slide it along the ski using it with different sized boots. SKI POLES This piece of equipment is often underestimated, instead, ski poles are very important in this activity and should be efficient and robust. In competitions and speedy ski mountaineering, long ski poles are used just like cross-country ski poles, to improve the push uphill; during a normal activity it is instead preferable to use a shorter length or to use adjustable poles, to avoid having to hold the poles under the handle while skiing downhill. Adjustable telescopic poles are comfortable to use (and safe!) only if the regulation system is really efficient; usually two-piece poles are the best. It is important to make space for self-rescue gear in your back pack (shovel, probe, first aid kit) a cell phone, a topographic map (scale 1:25.000), repair kit etc. Depending on your itinerary you might also need: • • • •

mountaineering gear(crampons, ice axe, rope, harness) ski goggles (for bad weather) an extra pair of gloves and extra clothing GPS, compass, altimeter

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SELF RESCUE GEAR An avalanche transceiver (ARVA), shovel, probe and medical kit and phone must be part of the basic gear just as much as ski boots and skis are. The ARVA (avalanche transceiver) must be strapped to your body, switched on transmission mode and checked before starting the trip. It goes without saying that as well as carrying it around it is fundamental to know how to use it, as well as being very important to get practice in search techniques. The shovel is absolutely indispensable for digging in snow; the probe and a small first aid kit (there are many on sale) complete the equipment together with a mobile phone. This can be crucial in saving a life, but it must not substitute experience, giving a sense of false security; it must be used intelligently, calling mountain rescue “118” only when absolutely necessary! SKINS AND SKI CRAMPONS Skins are very important, they must be chosen depending on the skis used and they should be checked periodically, especially to make sure that their adhesive strength is efficient. They must be the right width so as to cover the ski bottom completely leaving only the edges uncovered. With “fat” skis, wide and with camber, you can get “extralarge” skins made to measure, or buy a model which is adjustable in width, with an elasticated central part, best if they have a “rounded” cut, fifteen centimetres from the ski tail, or else use a “hook” system at the tail. As well as skins it is sometimes necessary to use ski crampons, these are special crampons which clip onto the ski mountaineering binding and allow to progress on hard snow with added safety. Be careful when you choose the size, it has to be compatible with the ski’s width. REPAIR KIT Bring a small repair kit with you to make emergency repairs and/or adjust your equipment since this is often fundamental. Depending on your equipment and on the itinerary chosen the following could come in useful: • a pen knife (a knife with pliers is ideal) • a screwdriver (snowboard screwdrivers are ideal) • ski wax (for the skins) • wire • adhesive tape CRAMPONS AND ICE AXE Crampons are fundamental for climbing up steep terrain with hard snow or ice. For the most part a light aluminium model is more than sufficient in the Dolomites, but for more technical climbs, with rock and ice, it is best to have steel crampons. With ski mountaineering boots it is best to use models with a quick release which make the most of the toe and heel welts on the rigid soles and which can be worn more easily. The ice axe can be used during mountaineering ascents, it is best to choose a short (so as not to get in the way once it is tied onto the back pack) and light ice axe (otherwise it is easy to leave at home!) ROPE AND MOUNTAINEERING GEAR In the Dolomites it is often useful, and sometimes indispensable to bring a rope. It can be used to belay each other on exposed terrain, at the beginning of a couloir (cornice, wind slab, sticking out rocks, icy snow) to overcome a bottleneck section or to abseil over a rock step. Usually a 30/40 m rope is enough, possibly choose a light one (7/8 mm diameter or Kevlar), to join up with a second (same kind) in case of need. As well as a rope, to make various manoeuvres, you will

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need mountaineering gear, but above all you will need to know how to use it! A harness and a descender are indispensable when abseiling down (use a prusik for safety!) slings, Kevlar threads, and carabiners will be needed for other manoeuvres (setting up an abseil point using your skis, belaying your partner, changing an old cordelette on an abseil point). In some cases (not often) a couple of pegs and a hammer will come in useful to strengthen an old anchor point or in case you need to set up a new one. DESCRIPTION OF ITINERARIES The itineraries are divided into 8 chapters which identify the different mountain areas. A summary table (see “symbols”) marks the important aspects of each itinerary, while the detailed description is divided into sections of text. Introduction: summarizes the itinerary’s most important characteristics Starting point: describes the area from where the itinerary starts Access: describes the access by car to reach the starting area Ascent: describes in detail the development of the ascent and its main characteristics Descent: describes in detail the development of the descent and its main characteristics Equipment: describes the extra gear needed to do this itinerary. Basic ski mountaineering equipment which should always be included is not described: skins, ski crampons, self rescue gear, topographic map, first aid kit and repair kit. • Useful info: describes how to return to the starting point, and highlights possible dangerous points and gives suggestions and useful advice. • Other possibilities: itinerary’s variants and other possible itineraries nearby. • • • • • •

15


MATERIAL The right equipment and clothing is indispensable in the practice of ski mountaineering. The choice has to be well thought out since it directly influences performance and above all, the safety of participants.

TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT

When choosing gear you always have to take into consideration, the main criteria which are safety, performance (uphill and downhill) and weight. 01. Skis with bindings – 02. Boots – 03. Ski poles – 04. Skins – 05. Ski crampons – 06. Back pack – 07. Helmet – 08. Goggles – 09. Sun glasses with UV protection 3/4 – 10. Water bottle – 11. Thermos – 12. Head lamp – 13. Crampons – 14. Ice axe – 15. Harness – 16. Rope – 17. Quick draws – 18. Belaying device – 19. Slings and Kevlar threads – 20. Ice screws – 21. Emergency thermal blanket.

SAFETY EQUIPMENT

These are self rescue tools – obligatory for anyone who goes ski mountaineering, freeriding or offpiste skiing – every skier must carry them on every excursion and above all know how to use them. 22. Avalanche transceiver – 23. Shovel – 24. Probe.

CLOTHING

It is always very important to dress in layers, with warm, light and breathable layers, avoiding clothes which limit movement. 25. Leggings and socks – 26. Thermal underwear (base layer) – 27. Soft shell (main layer) – 28. Down jacket (thermal layer) – 29. Waterproof and breathable jacket and trousers (for ex. Gore-Tex) – 30. Guanti leggeri per la salita – 31. Light weight gloves for the ascent – 32. Hat.

Powered by

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07 01

23

32

24

02 04

26

06

05

13 25

30 10

03

31

08 11 09

22 27

29

12

20

21

28

17 18

19

15

16 14

17


GRADING SYSTEM DIFFICULTY OF THE DESCENT

SKI 1

Easy terrain. Wide slopes or sparse woods; gradient < 30° and a contained vertical height gain (< 800m). Exposure and avalanche danger are limited. The snow’s quality determines the difficulty.

MS

S1

SKI 2

Terrain with few technical difficulties. Slopes are steeper and more irregular, but with gradients < 35°. The vertical height gain and exposure can be significant (vertical height gain > 800m). A good skiing technique is required as well as a good evaluation of the snowpack.

BS

S2

SKI 3

Technical terrain. Technical passages and couloirs, slopes at 35° which are very long with short sections at 40/45°. The exposure to possible objective dangers can be important. A very good skiing technique is necessary as well as a good ability in evaluating the snowpack.

OS

S3

SKI 4

Steep skiing and couloirs. Slopes at 40°, can be very long, with short sections at 45/50°. Narrow couloirs, difficult terrain and exposed passages.

S4/5

SKI 5

Extremely difficult itineraries. Couloirs and extremely sustained slopes with gradients above 45° and with important sections up to 50/55°. Very exposed. This level is open and with high numbers (5.4-5.5…) and indicates itineraries above 50/55° rarely in condition.

S5/6

1.1 1.2 1.3

2.1 2.2 2.3

3.1 3.2 3.3

4.1 4.2 4.3

5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5

ALP

ALPINE DIFFICULTY

E

Excursion level Easy terrain. Even with icy snow, crampons and ice axes are not needed.

F

Easy alpinism No specific difficulty, but a good ability in finding one’s direction is required.

PD

Alpinism which is not very difficult Some mountaineering difficulties both on rock and ice/snow. Snow and ice slopes at 35/40°, crampons and ice axes often needed.

AD

Quite difficult alpinism Alpine difficulties both on rock and on ice/snow. Snow and ice slopes from 40° to 50°.

D

18

Scala Scala Blachère Traynard

SKI

Difficult alpinism Mountaineering difficulties, sustained both on rock and on ice/snow. Ice and snow slopes from 50° to 70°.


EXP

EXPOSURE

E1

Uniform slope, connected to the slope below. Rocks and trees do not significantly force the direction, but can be an element of danger in case of a fall.

E2

Quite a wide couloir, slope with rock bars which interrupt the continuity of the slope. A fall could be potentially very dangerous.

E3

Narrow couloirs or slopes with a forced passage or cliffs. A fall in the exposed sections will definitely have very serious consequences.

E4

Long rock faces where it is absolutely forbiddento fall.

EUROPEAN AVALANCHE HAZARD SCALE SCALE OF HAZARD

LIKELIHOOD OF TRIGGERING

The snowpack is well bonded and stable in general.

Triggering is generally possible only from high additional loads** in isolated areas of very steep, extreme terrain***. Only small and medium natural avalanches are possible.

Generally favourable conditions for skitrips.

The snowpack is only moderately well bonded on some steep slopes*; otherwise well bonded in general.

Triggering is possible, primarily from high additional loads**, particularly on the indicated steep slopes*. Very large natural avalanches are unlikely.

Favourable conditions for ski-trips but it’s required to adequately consider local dangerous zones.

The snowpack is moderately to poorly bonded on many steep slopes*.

Triggering is possible, even from low additional loads**, particularly on the indicated steep slopes*. In certain situations some large, and in isolated cases very large natural avalanches are possible.

The possibility of skitrips is limited and it’s required a good ability of local valuation.

4

The snowpack is poorly bonded on most steep slopes*.

The possibility of skitrips is very limited and it’s required an high ability of local valuation.

5

Triggering is likely, even from low additional loads**, on many steep slopes*. In some cases, numerous large and often very large natural avalanches can be expected.

The snowpack is poorly bonded and largely unstable in general.

Numerous very large and often extremely large natural avalanches can be expected, even in moderately steep terrain*.

The ski-trips are generally impossible.

1 LOW

2 MODERATE

3 CONSIDERABLE

HIGH

VERY HIGH

INDICATIONS TO SKIERS AND MOUNTAINEERS

SNOWPACK STABILITY

The avalanche-prone locations are described in greater detail in the avalanche bulletin (altitude, slope aspect, type of terrain). * Moderately steep terrain: slopes shallower than about 30 degrees * Steep slopes: slopes steeper than about 30 degrees. ** Low additional load: individual skier / snowboarder, riding softly, not falling; snowshoer; group with good spacing (minimum 10m) keeping distances. ** High additional load: two or more skiers / snowboarders etc. without good spacing (or without intervals); snowmachine; explosives. *** Very steep, extreme terrain: particularly adverse terrain related to slope angle (more than about 40 degrees), terrain profile, proximity to ridge, smoothness of underlying ground surface.

19


The evaluation of an itinerary’s difficulty and the main data used to choose this itinerary, take into consideration a number of aspects; these should be considered all together and for this reason have been listed in a summary table at the beginning of each itinerary. Altitude, orientation, vertical height gain, both downhill and uphill, as well as the total time of ascent, all give an idea of the general effort required to undertake an itinerary. While the pattern of the slope you will ski down, the skiing and mountaineering difficulty as well as the exposure, define its technical difficulty. You must then add the most important variable to these evaluations, and that is the snow’s condition which, together with meteorological conditions, will strongly affect the difficulty, both in technical terms as well as global terms. DIFFICULTY OF THE DESCENT Compared to the previous edition we have preferred to use a different evaluation scale which is definitely more complex, but a lot more precise especially since it is known internationally. It was elaborated at the end of the 90’s by the Frenchman Volodia Shahshahani (extreme skier and editor of the series Toponeige). It is known as the “Volo” scale or “Toponeige” and is becoming the most well known system in the Alps just the same as what happened with the French rock climbing grading system. This allows a comparison among the most famous descents in the Western Alps, where, especially in the Mont Blanc group, skiers from all over the world can compare themselves on the same itineraries. The grading system is divided into five levels, each one of these has three sub-levels, except for the highest grade (5) which has no limit. The grade only refers to the technical difficulty required along the descent. This system allows us to be more precise, going beyond the grade of OS (very good skier) which is part of the Blanchère scale, very popular among ski mountaineers, but which also includes the difficulty in the ascent and highlights the presence of mountaineering sections by using an “A” (OSA very good ski mountaineer). In this book the grades of difficulty which define the itinerary are given considering a good snowpack (soft snow never too deep: spring snow warmed up by the sun or chalky winter snow), it is obvious that with more difficult snow conditions, or extraordinarily good ones the evaluation will consequently change (an itinerary which is graded 3.3 with hard snow can become 4.1-4.2 or even 4.3); while an itinerary which is graded 5.1, with powder snow can be considered 4.3-.4.2-4.1. In the table of skiing difficulty the equivalent Blanchère and Traynard grades used in other publications have also been listed.

20


Below you will find some examples of this grading system given to reference itineraries in the Dolomites and in the Mont Blanc group: SKI 2 • Lydia, Marmolada, Dolomites 2.2/E1 • Col du Tour Noir, Améthystes glacier, Mont Blanc 2.2/E1 • Col du Chardonnet Sud est, Mont Blanc 2.3/E1 • Val Lasties, Sella, Dolomiti 2.3/E2 SKI 3 • Val di Mesdì, Sella, Dolomites 3.1/E2 • Vallee Blanche, Aiguille du Midi, Mont Blanc 3.1/E2 • Toula glacier, Punta Helbronner, Mont Blanc 3.1/E2 • Punta Penia buttress, Marmolada, Dolomites 3.2/E2 • Mont Blanc, Arête des Bosses 3.2/E2 • Val Setus, Sella, Dolomites 3.3/E2 SKI 4 • Canale Joel, Sella, Dolomites 4.1/E2 • Mont Blanc, north face 4.1/E3 • Aiguille d’Argentiere, Milieu glacier, Mont Blanc 4.2/E2 • Marbrée, Col de Rochefort, Mont Blanc 4.3/E2 • Valscura, Sassongher, Dolomites 4.3/E2 SKI 5 • Canale Holzer, Sella, Dolomites 5.1/E2 • Glacier Rond, Aiguille du Midi, Mont Blanc 5.1/E3 • Cosmiques couloir, Aiguille du Midi, Mont Blanc 5.1/E3 • Canale del Prete, Cristallo, Dolomites 5.2/E3 • Spencer couloir, Aiguille Blaitiere, Mont Blanc 5.2/E3 For further information about the grading system you can consult: Mont Blanc, Lionel Tassan and Pierre Tardivel (Toponeige, 2009) Mont Blanc et Aiguilles Rouges a ski, Anselme Baud (Nevicata, 2002) Or the many internet websites dedicated to ski mountaineering and off-piste skiing.

21


SYMBOLS orientation

Orientation Indicates the main direction of the ascending and descending slopes during the itinerary

total vertical height

Total vertical height Total vertical height gain of ascent and of descent.

slope

Slope This indicates the gradient of the downhill slope referring to the steeper sections and their length. Eventual short sections are indicated as “sect”.

descent difficulty

Descent difficulty Indicates the skiing difficulty downhill. See table Difficulty of the Descent on page 18.

exposure

pictures

Exposure Shows the risk of falling (out of control) while descending, and the consequences that obstacles, cliffs etc present on the slope can cause. See table of exposure on page 19.

Additional pictures The number of the pages in this book where you can find additional photos of the itinerary described or of its variants.

QR-Code Parking

tracks

ascent descent

35

22

Starting point

time of ascent

Time of ascent Approximate ascent time in good conditions (calculating a maximum speed of 300/400m of vertical height gain/hour).

alpine difficulty

Alpine difficulty Indicates the ascent’s difficulty in alpine terms and possible mountaineering passages throughout the descent. See table of alpine difficulty on page 18.


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23


Puez - Odle

1.PUEZ - ODLE Geographically speaking the Puez Odle group is situated on the north side of the western Dolomites, between the valleys of Funes, Gardena and Badia. Its territory in its entirety, is contained within the protected area of the Puez Odle natural park which has preserved its surroundings from any kind of intense tourism. The group’s different sectors offer very different landscapes between them: to the south and to the west the slender spires of the Odle and Pizzes da Cir in contrast with the vast plateaus of Stevia and Gardenaccia while to the north the grassy slopes and the steep sides of Antersass and the Odle di Eores prevail. These contrasts, due to the complex morphology, offer ski mountaineers a varied choice of itineraries both in technical terms and for the opportunity to encounter changing scenery throughout the same itinerary. These characteristics, with the vicinity of important tourist areas and the possibilities of accessing ski lifts for a few of the trips, make this entire group an extremely interesting ski mountaineering destination. Along the more remote sides of these mountains there are long and isolated itineraries.The following pages describe a collection of itineraries, among the most important of this group, many have never been published before and of high technical profile, from which ski mountaineering lovers will be able to choose the destinations which are ideal for them.In chapter n°9, dedicated to the traverses, you will find a three day traverse across the Puez-Odle Park

01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09.

24

Forcella Mezdì – Traversata Odla di Valdussa Forcella della Roa – Traversata Col Toronn Sas Ciampac – Val de Lietres Col de la Sonnè Cime Cocene - Sassonger Val Scura Ciampanì – Traversata Crep dales Dodesc

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Antersasc - Canale Nord Piz Somplunt - Canale Nord Forcella Somplunt – Traversata Cima Puez – Traversata Munt da Medalges Piccolo Sas De Putia Sas De Putia - Parete Est Sas De Putia - Canale Nord Walscher ring - Canale nord


A22

17

Passo delle Erbe

18

 Sass de Putia

Tullen  

Walscher Ringspitz Ring

15 16 14 09-13

Rif. Malga Brogles

Rasciesa di Dentro

Sas Rigais  

Grande  Fermeda Odle

Seceda

Col Raiser

 Piz de Puez

Rif. Firenze

Sassongher 

01 02 03

Sass  da Ciampac

04

06 07 05 08

Passo Gardena

Sassolungo 

Passo Campolongo 

Sassopiatto

Plan de Sass

Passo Sella

25


01

Puez - Odle

FORCELLA DI MEZDÌ [2597m]

SOUTH-NORTH TRAVERSE

SOUTH - NORTH orientation

560+200m / 700+380m total vertical height

3h

Great itinerary, which passes from Val Gardena to val di Funes, traverses the Odle mountains seizing the contrasts of the view from the sunny south side to the imposing northern face. Being so popular the itinerary has become very busy, but this does not diminish the charm of this trip in a unique Dolomite environment. It is best to ski down this beautiful north face with powder snow. STARTING POINT. Santa Cristina in Val Gardena (BZ) 1551m – rifugio Firenze in Cisles (Regensbuger Hütte) 2037 m.

time of ascent

35°/400m

ACCESS. Along the Val Gardena road (242) to Santa Cristina, following the sign posts you will reach Col Raiser’s cable car starting point (large paying car park).

slope

3.1

descent difficulty

ASCENT. Take the cable car to Col Raiser hut 2107 m from where you ski down the slope and then along the summer path (n.4) reach the Firenze in Cisles hut (Regensburger Hütte) 2037 m. As an alternative it is possible to reach the Firenze hut from Santa Cristina by skinning directly up the slope and the forestry road. (h 1,30 ca. – 550 m). A few metres before the hut, coming from Col Raiser, you will find a signpost which indicates path n.13 leading to forcella di Mezdì. Take the

F

alpine difficulty

E1

exposure

-pictures  2317 Rasciesa di Dentro

2924 

Rif. Malga Brogles

Sas Rigais

Sas dal Ega

3025 

2597

Forc. di Mesdì 2762  2873  Grande Sas di Mesdì Fermeda

Seceda

Furnes Col Raiser

26

Rif. Firenze

Kanzeln


The uphill route   The descent from Malga Brogles  

27


26

Fanis – Conturines

PIZ DE LAVARELA [3055m] SOUTH-EAST-NORTH orientation

1335 - 1013 m total vertical height

5h

Piz de Lavarela is one of the most interesting three thousand metre peaks in the Dolomites skiing wise, especially making the complete traverse. STARTING POINT. San Cassiano - Badia (BZ) – loc. Capanna Alpina 1720 m.

35°/150 m

ACCESS. From San Cassiano follow the provincial road towards passo Valparola, before the bridge over Rio Sarè where the road for rifugio “Capanna Alpino” starts. Large car park.

3.1

ASCENT. From the hut head in an easterly direction towards the vast plateau covered in dwarf pines and cross over a small bridge, con-

time of ascent

slope

descent difficulty

PD

alpine difficulty

E2

exposure

pag.95,111,368,369 pictures

Rifugio Lavarela Passo del Limo 2174

 2776

Piz Stiga

Piz de Lavarela3055

Passo dal’Ega 2157  3062

Piz de Conturines

Capanna Alpina

112


The summit ridge of Piz de Lavarela

113


In the access couloir of Val Parom

114


115


33

Fanis – Conturines > Col Becchei

COL BECCHEI [2794m]

VAL D’ANTRUILLES

WEST-SOUTHEAST orientation

734 -1350 m total vertical height

A high level itinerary which is impressive due to its exposed traverse below the peak of Col Becchei which requires optimal snow conditions to be tackled. This long descent makes up one of the area’s most beautiful traverses. STARTING POINT. Rifugio Fanes 2060 or Lavarela 2042 m.

2h30’

ACCESS.From San Lorenzo in Pusteria follow the Val Badia (244) road up to Longega to then continue towards San Vigilio di Marebbe. From here, following approx.20km on asphalt road, you reach rifugio Pederü 1548 m, situated at the end of Val di Rudo.

time of ascent

sect 40° slope

3.2

From the car park to rifugio Pederū you take the tracked road which leads to the mountain huts Fanes and Lavarela.

F+

ASCENT. From rifugio Fanes continue, along the tracks, which are usually wide, to Limo pass 2174m from where, level with the lake, the Col Becchei ascent begins.

descent difficulty

alpine difficulty

E2

exposure

pag. 137, 138 pictures

The first section is steep, approx.200m and with a western exposure, it leads to the wide and gradual slope which overlooks “Parei di Col Beché” which you follow to the summit where you will find the ruins of a war construction. The ascent continues facing south aiming di-

Rifugio Fanes Passo del Limo

 2794

Becchei di Sopra

140


“hanging” turns to reach Val d’Antruilles

141


33 Fanis – Conturines > Col Becchei

The access couloir to Val d’Antruilles

142


143


65

Pelmo - Mondeval – Croda da Lago

MONTE MONDEVAL – CORVO ALTO [2455m] WEST-NORTH orientation

700 m

total vertical height

2h30’

time of ascent

This itinerary offers a wide slope which leans towards north which is ideal for skiing, almost always offering excellent snow, all this, as well as a great view overlooking the Dolomites and the relative ease of this itinerary make it a very busy destination throughout the winter and spring season. STARTING POINT. Passo Giau road, north side. Parking is found near a hair pin bend at an altitude of roughly 2000 m.

sect. 30° slope

2.1

descent difficulty

E

alpine difficulty

E1

exposure

pag. 258 pictures

Rifugio Passo Giau

Col Piombin

Monte Formin

Forcella Giau 2360

Malga Mondeval

2455 

Monte Mondeval

248


Climbing up from Malga Mondeval towards forcella Giau   In one of the couloirs just above forcella Giau which allows an interesting downhill variant  

249


65 Pelmo - Mondeval – Croda da Lago > Monte Mondeval

Downhill into the valley to the side of forcella Giau

250


251


41 Gruppo > settore itinerario •Along the upper part of the descent, with one of the most beautiful views in the Dolomites

320


321


Traverses

9. TRAVERSES This chapter describes a few ski mountaineering traverses lasting two or more days as well as the typical Haute Route week long trips which are so common in the western Alps. The traverse is probably the best form of ski mountaineering, ideal to fully appreciate ski mountaineering in the Dolomites. Due to their conformation, these mountains rarely offer skiable summits, but many passages through saddles and couloirs with an extraordinary variety of landscapes in contained spaces which favour, when possible, a traverse instead of using the approach itinerary as the return. This allows a more complete vision of each itinerary’s potential. Traverses which last more days provide further inspiration for tackling more complex ski mountaineering trips which become more like a journey, a journey towards discovering and appreciating the Dolomites even more throughout the winter season.

95. Traverse of Fanes—Sennes-Braies 3 days 96. Traverse of San Pellegrino-Marmolada 2 days 97. Traverse of Sassolungo-Sassopiatto 2 days

98. Puez Traverse 99. Classic Dolomites Haute Route 6 days 100. Special Dolomites Haute Route 6 days

Downhill, North of Tre Cime di Lavaredo torwards Val di Rienza  

364


The uphill couloir to the saddle Alta di Longeres, itinerary 99, sixth day

365


100

Traverse

SPECIAL DOLOMITES HAUTE ROUTE This version of the Haute Route retraces the classic itinerary (itin.99) in the first three days, but from the fourth day it moves into the Fanes Sennes Braies Park. In this way it is possible to sleep overnight at altitude in the mountain huts which can be reached on skis, avoiding transfers by taxi which are instead necessary with the classic Haute Route in the Cortina area. Compared to the Fanes Sennes Braies traverse described in itinerary 95, on the fourth and last day an easier route is followed, but as always different variants are possible. During the past few years this itinerary’s solution has always been appreciated thanks to the better connection between mountain huts and the extraordinary environment found in the park, natural UNESCO site. STARTING POINT. Passo Rolle 1.980 m. ACCESS. From Predazzo, in Val di Fiemme or from San Martino di Castrozza, drive up to Passo Rolle. Driving down from the pass towards San Martino di Castrozza, park level with the first hair pin bend (beginning of path which leads to baita Segantini). From passo Rolle to Falcade (Molino), go across Passo del Mulaz 2619m, with the possibility of climbing up to the summit of Mulaz 2906m. A beautiful and varied ascent followed by a long descent. Transfer then by using the ski lifts in the passo San Pellegrino ski resort area, skiing down the groomed slopes and a last off piste ski to reach rifugio Fuciade. The vertical drop indicated is relative only to the traverse of Mulaz to Molino. The sun peeps out behind the Vezzana summit, to the right of Cimon della Pala, Pale di San Martino

406


In the starting couloir which leads into Val di MesdĂŹ, Sella

407


100 Traverse  Haute Route Dolomiti Special

DAY I

TRAVERSE OF MULAZ 2906 M AND TRANSFER TO PASSO SAN PELLEGRINO

WEST-SOUTH orientation

900/1200m-1400/1700m total vertical height

4-5 h time of ascent

sect. 35° slope

3.1 descent difficulty

F+ alpine difficulty

E2 exposure

pag.395 pictures

ASCENT. From the hair pin bend along the state road skin up the side of the magic carpet and Then to the right (east), on the side of the groomed slopes, until you reach the ridge where you will see baita Segantini 2170m (you can reach this point even by using the ski lifts saving roughly 200 metres of vertical height gain.) Once you take your skins off, ski down along open terrain towards Cima Vezzana and then to the left, following the valley’s natural course, to the base (roughly 1940m) of the steep slope which leads to Passo del Mulaz. Climb up with various kick turns below the steep northern couloir of cima Bureloni, on terrain which becomes progressively steeper. Up high traverse decisively to the left heading into the valley at the base of the passo delle Farangole, where you climb up steeper terrain, to then turn left and reach Passo del Mulaz 2619m. To reach the peak continue along the steep southern slope, climbing up the left side up to a snowy ramp at the base of the summit rock step. Traversing to the right along this, head to the east face, where shortly you reach the summit bell (you often walk up the steep section of the ascent which reaches the peak, especially with scarce snow cover). DESCENT. From the peak carefully descend along the steep ascent line to the pass, where on the left the large valley opens up and goes down to Falcade. Ski down towards east near Rifugio Mulaz 2571m (winter room always open) and along the slope below this, traversing then to the right

Passo San Pellegrino

Molino

 2305

Cima Valles o Venegia  2401 Cima della Venegiota Mulaz2906 Baita Segantini Rifugio Capanna Cervino Passo Rolle

408

Passo del Mulaz 2619


to avoid the rock step to the centre of the valley. Further down the terrain becomes more regular and following the centre of the valley you reach the characteristic canyon of the Focobon torrent (roughly 1700m). With a good snow cover ski down directly inside the canyon to the successive forestry road. Alternatively you follow the summer path on the right initially gaining altitude to then descend diagonally to a more open area, from where you can descend along a more direct route to the forestry road below. Following the road, with a long and fun route, you reach Molino di Falcade. Here, with a last section on foot along an asphalt road, you cross the bridge and reach the ski lifts on the left. DESCRIPTION OF TRANSFER TO PASSO SAN PELLEGRINO. Using the ski lifts climb up towards Col Margherita and ski down to San Pellegrino pass (follow sign posts towards the pass). Always using the ski lifts cross the state road and pass onto the opposite side of the valley and climb up with the two chairlifts of Cima Uomo. From the top station (roughly 2480m), ski down the groomed slope in a northerly direction, but where it turns left, ski off piste towards east crossing over to an area with large boulders at the base of cima Uomo. From here continue on open terrain lowering down to the left until you reach the ridge which climbs up to Col de Le Salae 2227m; cross over it and ski down into the little valley to the north of the col shortly reaching the road towards rifugio Fuciade 1982m, just below it. With a last uphill section along the road you reach the mountain hut. EQUIPMENT. Crampons, ice axe. USEFUL INFO. This itinerary should be tackled with good snow cover and a stable snow pack. Rifugio Fuciade also offers a snow cat service from Passo San Pellegrino. There are other opportunities to stay overnight in the Passo San Pellegrino area. OTHER POSSIBILITIES. From the top of Mulaz it is possible to ski directly down the steep north east face (different possible lines) joining up further down with this itinerary. This solution requires excellent orienteering ability and a careful, previous study of the descent line, as well as optimal snow conditions.

ď ° 2483

Om Picol

ď ° 2227

Rifugio Fociade

Col delle Salae Rifugio Cima Uomo

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