A Practical Guide

Page 1

THE ITALIAN DELEGATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR GAME AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

A PRACTICAL GUIDE to the

CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies

Nicolò Amosso

Enzo Berzieri

Supervision

Fritz Heje Hansen

Szečko Žerjav

Final overview

Tony Dalby-Welsh



This document is endorsed by the International Council for Game and Wildlife Conservation (CIC).



A PRACTICAL GUIDE to the

CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies

Nicolò Amosso

Enzo Berzieri

Supervision

Fritz Heje Hansen

Szečko Žerjav

Final overview

Tony Dalby-Welsh


ISBN: 9791280561039

First edition, February 2022 Layout and graphics: Elisa Bossotto Printed in Italy at Tipografia Botalla s.r.l. – Gaglianico (BI)

© 2021 The International Council for Game and Wildlife Conservation | CIC - Conseil International de la Chasse et de la Conservation du Gibier All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior permission of both the copyright owner and the below publisher of this book. This includes the text, measurement criteria and images set out in this Handbook which may not be reproduced in any form without the prior written consent of the CIC. Permission to use this material may be requested from the Authors. Unauthorised reproduction and use will result in legal proceedings.


INDEX Premise by the Authors ..................................... page 7 Preface by George Aman ................................... page 9 Preface by Tony Dalby-Welsh ............................ page 11 Preface by Bruno Lauro Vigna ........................... page 13 Red Deer ......................................................... page 15 Roe Deer ......................................................... page 31 Fallow Deer ..................................................... page 49 Alpine Ibex ..................................................... page 65 Chamois .......................................................... page 75 European Mouflon ........................................... page 83 Wild Boar ........................................................ page 89



Premise by the Authors This Practical Guide was born thanks to our international experience after the publication of the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies, in order to contribute to its important objective of standardizing the measurement and evaluation criteria of the trophies at a national and international level. It is not a text of trophies in its own right, but an integrative manual intended for those who work in the actual field with the trophy “in hand”. We have dealt with some crucial points and cases of particular interest, motivated by the desire to overcome the critical issues encountered during the many Italian Evaluation Commissions in which we have taken part. To be consistent with this approach we have only studied some sections of the CIC Manual in depth, deliberately neglecting others, which we believe are already complete. The CIC Handbook is the official text for Trophy Measurers and is the authority for Trophy Evaluation in the CIC, while this Practical Guide provides a useful collection of examples, photos, processes and hints to help interpret the Handbook correctly. We are aware that it is not possible to deal with the matter in a comprehensive way given its complexity. Therefore, the content of this booklet, now updated according to the decisions taken during the International Trophy Evaluation Board held on the 19th May and adopted as official textbook by the CIC on the same date, is subject to revisions, bearing in mind what will be approved in future International Trophy Evaluation Board meetings and the experiences gained in the field during International Commissions of Evaluation. We are very grateful to our colleagues STJs Fritz Heje Hansen (DK) and Srečko Žerjav (SLO) for their supervision and advice, respectively on the following chapters: Red Deer, Roe Deer, Fallow Deer, Wild Boar and the chapters: Chamois, European Mouflon and Alpine Ibex. We especially thank Tony Dalby-Welsh, Co-Chairman of the International Trophy Evaluation Board, for his important and useful final revision and for presenting our work to the ITEB; our friend Luna Milatovíc CIC Conservation Officer, for her invaluable encouragement and support; our CCM friends Franco Bagnis and Vittorio Fusinato for the photographic contribution. We extend a sign of special gratitude to the Fabbrica d’Armi Beretta S.p.A. for the generously granted support to our initiative.

Nicolò Amosso

Enzo Berzieri

7



Preface by George Aman President of the CIC Dear CIC Trophy Measurers, it is with great pleasure that I present you with this Practical Guide, which has been prepared to complement the existing CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies. Put together by Italian Senior Trophy Judges, Nicolò Amosso and Enzo Berzieri, the guide will further assist measurers in the evaluation of trophies, and is a new step for the Trophy Evaluation System and the CIC. As most of you will know, the Trophy Evaluation System was overhauled in 2013 with the aim to standardise the evaluation criteria and measuring policies, as well as to make the system more transparent, accountable and consistent across countries. The decision to create a new manual based on the Red Book, today known as the ‘CIC Handbook’, was one of the key outcomes of this overhaul. The fact that the Handbook is referred to as ‘the bible’ for CIC measurers is a testament to its value. Over the last nine years, it has served as an invaluable resource for measuring tens of thousands of trophies by our measurers. There is no doubt, however, that the Handbook has also come with its own challenges. Limited in size and with only so many included examples, the need for additional guidance was recently recognised by Italian measurers. The Practical Guide in front of you has been made to help you overcome challenges when measuring trophies that might not be covered by examples in the Handbook. Nature is capable of creating infinite variations and no document will ever be able to cover all possible outcomes. Nevertheless, this guide is a good start that will surely help you when you are in doubt over which score to assign to a trophy. I trust you will all make a good use of it! On behalf of the CIC, I would like express my deep gratitude to Nicolò Amosso and Enzo Berzieri for their commitment and motivation towards creating this document. Measuring activities have been a core part of the CIC during all its history but particularly in recent years, in part due to the efforts of measurers like Nicolò and Enzo. The creation of the Practical Guide is most certainly an evolution to the Trophy Evaluation System, and I am excited to see where this new resource will take us going forward.

George Aman

9



Preface by Tony Dalby-Welsh Co-Chairman International Trophy Evaluation Board It was no surprise to me when I heard that Nicolò Amosso and Enzo Berzieri had the foresight to see a need to assist CIC Trophy Measurers in interpreting the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies. Neither was it a surprise when they then also produced this Guide, with its examples and careful guidance on how to deal with the many non-typical trophies that our measurers have to deal with. These two STJs have always been at the forefront of improving the Trophy Evaluation System, to the CIC’s benefit. There is no doubt that the production of the new CIC Trophy Evaluation System in 2013 and the publication of the Handbook introduced the means to ensure that measurers across the world had the tools that they needed to produce consistent and accurate assessments of trophies. But measuring is not yet a complete science and the craft of assessing trophies is as much in the subjective and objective judgement of features, as it is of accurate measurement. This Guide gives measurers an additional tool in making both those judgements and measurements and I commend it to all of our STJs and CCMs for the benefit that it will provide in fulfilling their obligations as CIC Measurers.

Tony Dalby-Welsh

11



Preface by Bruno Lauro Vigna President of the Grand Gibier Commission - Italian CIC Exhibitions and Trophies It sometimes happens that, absorbed in reading, before we reach the end a thought arises spontaneously: “Here is a text whose need was not felt at all”. One certainly cannot think this of the Practical Guide to the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies. If anything, the opposite thought arises: “How come no one has ever written this before now and it was necessary to wait for Nicolò Amosso and Enzo Berzieri to fill this gap?” Now there is finally an integration to the CIC Manual and it is both welcome and commendable. The text not only fills a gap, but also combines legibility and scientificity. With painstaking precision, the two Authors proceeded to give clear, logical, easy explanations without technical abstractions, despite the extreme scientific rigor. There are many qualities in this book: unparalleled precision, iconographic richness, icasticity of images of each trophy showing merits (and additions), faults (and deductions), doubts concerning the spread, additional information and a list of non evaluable items. Despite its wealth of examples and details, this Practical Guide is never verbose and/or redundant; when the Handbook for the Evaluation is adequately clear Amosso and Berzieri simply refer to it, or in some rare cases, make very concise clarifications. As an old hunter and passionate trophy enthusiast, I cannot but hope that this text be appreciated and esteemed, that the Authors enjoy the right satisfaction for their (cherished) literary efforts and that readers find answers to their evaluative doubts and joy for their cultural and hunting successes.

Bruno Lauro Vigna

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RED DEER

CIC GOLD MEDAL CROATIA 260.48 Points CIC


RED DEER

2

Length of brow tine

Let us examine the additional or bifurcated points of the brow tine. The bifurcated tines can have a horizontal or vertical development as in the example (fig. CE 01). Horizontal tines: proceed normally by choosing the most appropriate route to reach the tine that gives the maximum score. Vertical tines: the measurement may present some difficulties. The longest element of the brow tine is measured as far as possible using the underside of the tine.

CE 01

3

Tray tine lengths

Bifurcated tray tines (fig. CE 02 and CE 02-A) which have a single root for their second tips will not be part of the crowns. Normally the measurement starts from the bisector of the lower corner up to the apex of the first tip, but in this case it is preferable to start from the bisector of the upper corner to the apex of the second tip most favourable to the trophy score.

CE 02

CE 02-A

Both paths are valid, but the most favourable for the trophy should be chosen. 16

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RED DEER

In fig. CE 03 we have a bifurcated tray tine on the right beam: the second tine on the right beam at the bottom is not considered a bay tine as it has the same root.

CROWN

CE 03

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17


RED DEER

5

Lower beam circumference H1

6

Upper beam circumference H2

• If the tray tine is broken, it is still the reference point for the measurements of H1 and H2 (fig. CE 04). • If the beam is without a tray tine, then the thinnest point between the brow tine and the tray tine will be valid for the measurement of H1 and H2 (fig. CE 05). • If the beam has no crown or fork, H2 is identified as the mid-way point between the tray tine and the top end of the beam (fig. CE 06).

H2

H1

CE 04

18

CE 05

CE 06

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RED DEER

7

Number of tines

It is useful to clarify more in depth the general concept of the tine and how to proceed, in the light of the statement, in the CIC Handbook.

A

It should be noted that the measurement for scoring purposes does not always coincide with that used to determine if it is actually a tine.

B2 C2

B B1

C1

Faced with a questionable or broken tine (fig. CE 07) you should proceed in the following way:

C

D2

D

D1

• Draw the line D1-D2 on the base of the outer edge of the beam following the natural line of the antler, as if the tine did not exist. • Draw the centre line A-D from the tip of the tine to the line D1-D2 and check whether A-D is equal to or greater than 2 cm. If it is, then measure D1-D2 and compare it with A-D. If it is less than this last, then it is a tine.

CE 07

• In the case of a tine or a large and tall “stub”, start at the apex A and measure down 2 cms to point B, draw the line B1-B2 at right angles to A-D. • If B1-B2 is less than A-B it is a tine. • If it is not less, go down and draw a further line at a point considered promising for the height/ width comparison and take the measurements. • Proceed with further attempts before rejecting as a tine. not a tine

A

not a tine a tine

B B2 C2 C

G

B1 C1

A

GH = 3.5 cm AD = 4.3 cm It is a tine

AD = 3.5 cm GH = 5.5 cm AB = 2.5 cm B1B2 = 3.0 cm

not a tine not a tine

A

H

AD = 6.0 cm GH = 6.9 cm AB = 2.2 cm B1B2 = 2.4 cm AC = 3.0 cm C1C2 = 2.6 cm

G

D

B1

D H

CE 08

CE 09

G

D

B B2 H

CE 10

Short or broken tines that do not meet the criteria do not score any points. © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

19


RED DEER

9

Inside spread

Measurement of the inside spread can cause some problems due to the great diversity of shape and height of the trophies. The measurement should be taken at right angles to the axis of the skull between the beams as in the following examples. •

Trophy without a fork or crown: the measurement should be taken at the maximum internal distance (fig. CE 11).

CE 11 • Trophy with two forks: - symmetrical: the measurement is taken from the starting point of the forks (fig. CE 12); - asymmetrical: the measurement is taken from the lower fork towards the inside of the other beam (fig. CE 13).

CE 12 20

CE 13 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.


RED DEER

• Trophy with a fork and a crown: - fork at the same height as the crown: the measurement is taken from the fork to below the crown (fig. CE 14); - fork is lower than the crown: the measurement is taken from the fork towards the opposite beam (fig. CE 15);

CE 14

-

CE 15

the trophy represented in fig. CE 16 could be misleading since the fourth point on the right beam is an additional tine belonging to the crown. The inside spread could be erroneously considered to be B. In the measurement of the spread however, an additional tine is not considered part of the crown and therefore the correct measurement is A.

A B

CE 16 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

21


RED DEER

• Trophy with two crowns: - symmetrical: the measurement is the maximum inside spread below the crowns (fig. CE 17); - asymmetrical: the measurement is taken below the lower crown towards the inside of the opposite beam (fig. CE 18).

CE 17

22

CE 18

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RED DEER

14

Formation of crowns

To measure the tines correctly it is necessary to start from the graphical description of the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies which allows for a very favourable measurement

of the trophy, but omits to indicate the starting point hidden by the fork in the foreground to be identified, however, at the centre of the crown. Dissect the crown to locate it by calling A the foreground section and B the second section.

Section A

HB

Section B

The dotted lines that start from the crown cup up to the apexes of the two bifurcated tips A and B are the most favourable measurements for the trophy. In the case of webbed crowns it is necessary to draw a line at the base of each tip to proceed with the measurement. Since the lengths of the crown tips cannot be inserted into the photographs, the paths have been chosen by exclusively analysing the trophy morphology, knowing that it is possible to identify other paths if these prove to be more favourable. The crown points of the Hromas table assigns the same score to different combinations of both medium and long tines. Please bear in mind that, in fig. CE 20, CE 21, paths were outlined on the outside of the crown which could not have otherwise been graphically created internally and is only for demonstration purposes.

CE 19 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

CE 20 23


RED DEER

CE 21

24

CE 22

CE 23

CE 24

CE 25

CE 26

CE 27

CE 28

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RED DEER

15

Deductions

The red deer, because of the conformation, size and weight of the trophy, rarely presents large anomalies, thus the formula provides only 3 points for deduction, limiting the analysis of the irregular positioning of the beams, of clearly unequal beam lengths, marked asymmetry and irregularities of the brow, bay and tray tines. The crowns, because of their variety cannot be penalised for the number of tines and form. Some examples of deductions:

CE 29 Asymmetry of brow tine Bay tine Tray tine Unequal beam length

CE 30 -0.5 pts 0 pts 0 pts -0.5 pts

CE 32 Brow tine Bay tine absent Tray tine Unequal beam length

Brow tine Bay tine absent Asymmetry of tray tine Length of the beam

CE 31 0 pts 0 pts -0.5 pts 0 pts

CE 33 0 0 0 -1

pts pts pts pt

Asymmetry of brow tine Bay tine Asymmetry of tray tine Length of the beam

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Brow tine Bay tine absent Tray tine Unequal beam length

0 pts 0 pts 0 pts -0.5 pts

CE 34 -0.5 pts 0 pts -0.5 pts 0 pts

Brow tine Bay tine absent Asymmetry of tray tine Length of the beam

0 pts 0 pts -0.5 pts 0 pts 25


RED DEER

The following is an anomalous case that is very interesting but perfectly measurable (fig. CE 35). The first tine of the left beam is not the brow tine but a tip that starts directly from the skull. The brow tine is the second tip; then there is a bifurcated bay tine and finally the tray tine which is symmetrical to the other. The tine that comes out of the skull contributes to the weight of the trophy and to the total number of the points, but will be penalised by 0.5 points for asymmetry. The same applies to the bifurcated bay tine and the different shape of the brow tine. We deduct 0.5 points for asymmetry to both of them.

CE 35

Not connected to the trophy is a further example of a tine that grows directly from the skull outside the trophy, which should be counted as a tine but penalised by 0.5 points in box 15 for asymmetry (fig. CE 36).

CE 36

26

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RED DEER

NON - MEASURABLE TROPHIES Mounted trophies cannot be evaluated. This is the same for trophies to which previously broken original tines or artificial tines have been glued. Then there are trophies where it is not possible to identify the parameters that must be examined. In these cases the trophy cannot be evaluated. This can be seen in the extreme cases of the trophies CE 37 and CE 38.

CE 37

CE 38

In the cases of figures CE 39 and CE 40 the broken tines have been reconstructed in resin. The different sound obtained by tapping the suspicious points confirms the manipulation. As previously mentioned, in these cases, the trophies must be declared as non-measurable.

CE 39 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

CE 40 27


RED DEER

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Tip-to-tip spread (t) The tip-to-tip spread is measured between the centre points of each tip at the highest point on the main beam, without the need for that line to beat right angles to the centre line. Greatest spread (g) The greatest spread is measured between the external points of the beams at right angles to the vertical line of the skull. As expressly required in the CIC Handbook, these measurements are mandatory for gold medals and do not contribute to the CIC score, but only to the identification of the trophy. It is not considered necessary to dwell on the other information required (maximum length and width of the skull) as it is sufficiently described in the HB chapter. Some examples of tip-to-tip spread (t) and greatest spread (g):

t

g

CE 41

28

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RED DEER

CE 42

t

g

CE 43

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29



ROE DEER

CIC GOLD MEDAL LITHUANIA 210.48 Points CIC


ROE DEER

1

Main beam length

Main beam length: overspanning From zero line on the lower edge of the coronet go up for all its thickness. Imagine a line two centimetres higher than the upper edge of the coronet and from that point continue to measure the length of the beam. In the case of an inclined coronet follow the profile of the coronet (fig. CP 02).

CP 01

CP 02

CP 03 Two anomalies (fig. CP 04 - CP 05) that can occur quite frequently are coronets that either extend below or above the general line of that coronet, at the point where the beam measurement should start. The rule remains that the measurement must start at the point of intersection between the centre line of the pedicle and the lowest point of the coronet, whether that point is above or below the general line of the coronet or not.

CP 04 32

CP 05 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.


ROE DEER

3

Weight of dry antlers

4

Antler volume

In the case of a trophy with an additional tip that originates from the skull (fig. CP 06) and not from the beams the trophy is evaluated with this tip. Proceed normally for the dry weight of the trophy and also for the volume even if the tip mentioned will only be partially immersed. The same goes for any tine that starts from the beam and enters into the water.

CP 06

6

Additions for the pearling

In allocating points for pearling it is useful to divide each beam into 4 sectors, the inside and outside of each beam, and assign the score to each according to the presence of pearling and their importance. A trophy with diffused but small pearling on 4 sectors could have the same score as another with remarkable or exceptional pearling on two or three sectors. In consideration of the different types of pearling present in the roe deer trophies we wish to dwell on how to distinguish the latter from any additional tip with some examples. In fig. CP 07 we have an example of a beam, practically without pearling, but with two asymmetric additional points that are not present on the other beam. In fig. CP 08 (detail) and CP 09 the pearling, of exceptional quality, cannot be considered points.

CP 07

CP 08

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CP 09 33


ROE DEER

In the example shown in fig. CP 10 we have, on the right beam, two well highlighted pearlings whilst on the left beam there is an additional tine.

Pearlings Tine

Tine

CP 10

Evident asymmetric additional tine (fig. CP 11). CP 11 34

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ROE DEER

This is an interesting case (fig. CP 12) in which, on the left beam, we find an asymmetric additional tine and a pearling because the base is too wide compared to the height.

Pearling

Tine

CP 12

Tine

The Measurer will have no difficulty in considering the following trophy (fig. CP 13) as an asymmetric additional tine. CP 13 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

35


ROE DEER

9

Additions

Regularity, symmetry and form

Some examples of classic forms of roe deer trophies Frontal view:

CP 14 These trophies, viewed from the front, all deserve 1.5 points for regularity and symmetry without any deduction. In the case of asymmetry and irregularity of beams, front tines and rear tines can be highlighted in both the frontal and lateral views. It will be necessary, starting from the three assignable theoretical points, to deduct the relative penalties attributable to the previously mentioned defects. Beams having dissimilar shapes and inclinations, different heights and being atypical are considered anomalies, being asymmetric, dissimilar to each other, and not having a uniform position of the tines when comparing both beams. The following box 12 lists the possible detectable deductions that will reduce the three assignable theoretical points mentioned above. Box 12 is used to penalise, with a maximum of 1 point, trophies with undesirable conformations.

36

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ROE DEER

12

Deductions

Irregularity and asymmetry

Before addressing this point it is necessary to make a premise. The fundamental principle is that a trophy can never be penalised twice, so any penalties already applied to box 9 , Regularity, symmetry and form, cannot be repeated in box 12 . A) Asymmetries Frontal Lateral

-1.0 point -1.0 point

List of possible deductions for irregularities and asymmetries found in the frontal and lateral views of the trophy: • • • • • • • • • •

different length of beams different form of beams different front tine form different front tine inclination different front tine positions different form rear tine different rear tine inclination different position of beam different side shape of the beams asymmetries of front and rear tine

-0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points each

CP 15: rear tine of different form -0.5 points deduction in box 9 We have indicated generically the penalty of 0.5 points for the various forms of irregularity and asymmetry not because we want to give a standard value but because it is the penalty that is generally used more. In cases of greater severity it is possible to foresee a greater penalisation. Any penalties found will reduce the three theoretical points that can be assigned in box 9 up to a maximum of two points.

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37


ROE DEER

B) Undesirable forms

- 1 point

The task of the Measurer is to identify the essential form, isolating the excess elements to assign or not the deductions: in the following drawing (fig. CP 16), starting from a standard form, some tips have been added to provide some examples and declare the relative scores for numerical asymmetry.

CP 16

Deduction

symmetrical

asymmetrical

symmetrical

asymmetrical

asymmetrical

0

0.5

0

1.0

max 1.0

In the evaluation of the additional tines, the typical six tines of the species are excluded, so that if a front tine, a tip of the beam or a rear tine is missing or broken, the homologous tine present will not be considered an additional tine. Some examples of irregular, asymmetric and undesirable forms: Fig. CP 17: a very complex trophy at the limit of measurability. The left beam is attributable to one of the classic forms, with a very marked pearling but not considered a tine, and the rear tine just visible. On the right, the beam (B) has been judged with the rear tine (C) and at the base a tine is considered a rotated front tine (A). The coronet ends with a series of 4 additional tines (D-E-F-G).

Deductions in box 9 : • • • •

different position of beams difference in beam length asymmetric beams asymmetrical front tines meaning that (3-2) = 1

-0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points

Deductions in box 12 : • supernumerary tines (D-E-F-G) -1 point The four oversized and asymmetrical tines would impose the trophy to be penalised by 2 points, but the maximum allowable deduction is 1 point. CP 17 38

© 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.


ROE DEER

In the case of the fig. CP 18 the rear tine A is awarded 0.5 points for its length in box 10 . The right beam with tine B has 4 tines, while the left has only 3. The numerical asymmetry will be penalised by 0,5 point only in box 12 .

CP 18

Fig. CP 19. An example of a symmetrical trophy: two front tines, two rear tines, two tips of the beam, two symmetrical additional tines but in a slightly unequal position. Limiting analysis only to the tines, in box 9 we assign a reduction of 0.5 points for the right front tine lower than the left and in box 12 we do not assign any deduction.

CP 19

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39


ROE DEER

The trophy represented by fig. CP 20 has a lower left beam (-0.5 points), with a different shape on the right (-0.5 points) and a lower left front tine (-0.5 points). 1.5 points will therefore be deducted in box 9 . The left beam is missing the rear tine which will not generate penalties in box 12 but will have a deduction of 0.5 points to box 11 .

CP 20

Fig. CP 21. Considering the tine A as an additional tine we will have in box 9 a penalty of 0.5 points for the shape of the beams, in box 11 a penalty of 0.5 points for the missing right rear tine and in box 12 a penalty of 0.5 points for additional tine.

CP 21

40

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ROE DEER

An interesting trophy (fig. CP 22). We will have in box 9 the following deductions: -0.5 points for the different shape of the left beam; -0.5 points for asymmetric rear tines in length; -0.5 points for different length of the beams. In box 12 : -0.5 points

for asymmetric additional tine (A).

CP 22

In the photograph fig. CP 23 we have: A-D front tine; B-E tip of the beam; C-F rear tines; G additional tine. In box 9 we will have: -0.5 points (the left beam asymmetric to the right); -0.5 points (shorter left hand beam); -0.5 points (asymmetrical left-hand rear tine). In box 12 : -0.5 points asymmetric additional tine.

CP 23

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41


ROE DEER

The trophy shown in fig. CP 24 is regular with an asymmetrical additional tine between the main beam and the right rear tine. In box 9 : +3 points. In box 12 : -0,5 points.

CP 24 The trophy (fig. CP 25) presents asymmetrical front tines, rear tines and an additional tine (B). The others (A-C) are not considered tines. The measurements have been highlighted inside and not outside the beam only for demonstration purposes. We will therefore have the following deductions: in box 9 : -1 point (0.5+0.5 front and rear tines asymmetries). In box 12 : -0.5 points (additional tine).

CP 25 42

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ROE DEER

Here we can see a trophy brought as an example of a tine that starts from the skull and not from the beams (fig. CP 26). In box 12 we will have a deduction of 0.5 points.

CP 26

The trophy (fig. CP 27) presents asymmetrical front tines and two asymmetric additional tines for which: in box 9 : -0.5 points for front tines. In box 12 : -1 point for the two asymmetric additional tines.

A B

CP 27 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

43


ROE DEER

NON - MEASURABLE TROPHIES Mounted trophies cannot be evaluated. This is the same for the trophies to which previously broken original tines or artificial tines have been glued. Trophies where it is not possible to identify the parameters that must be examined, cannot be evaluated. Some examples of trophies that cannot be evaluated for this reason:

CP 28

CP 29 44

CP 30 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.


ROE DEER

CP 31

CP 32

In the case of fig. CP 33 the broken tine has been rebuilt in resin. The different sound obtained by tapping the suspicious tine confirms the manipulation. The trophies in these cases must be declared non-measurable.

CP 33 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

45


ROE DEER

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Tip-to-tip spread (t) The measurement is taken from the centre of the tips of the beam, without the need for that line to beat right angles to the centre line. Even in the case of broken or damaged tips, the measurement is always taken from the middle points of the tine end. Greatest spread (g) The maximum spread is measured perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the skull between the outside points of the beams or the tip of the tines. As expressly required in the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies these measures are mandatory for gold medals and do not contribute to the CIC score but only as a description of the trophy. It is not necessary to dwell on the other information required (maximum length and width of the skull) as it is sufficiently described in the HB chapter. Some examples of tip-to tip spread (t) and greatest spread (g):

CP 34 46

CP 35 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.


ROE DEER

(t)

(g)

CP 36

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CP 37

47



FALLOW DEER

CIC GOLD MEDAL SLOVAKIA 199.04 Points CIC


FALLOW DEER

There are two conditions that automatically preclude a fallow deer trophy from measurement. They are: • lack of both brow tines; • the lack of a brow tine and a tray tine on the same beam. Broken brow tines and tray tines do not affect the ability of the trophy to be measured. The trophy in fig. DA 01 does not have a tray tine and a brow tine on the right beam due to natural causes; therefore they are not attributable to a mechanical damage, and the trophy is not measurable. DA 01

1

Beam length

B

DA 02

50

A

The first requirement (after Hromas, Ninov and Whitehead) is to establish the limits and shape of the palm in order to define the spellers and the highest indentation from which the length of both the beam and the palm are measured. This is done by describing with chalk the “closed” palm connecting the indentations together as shown in yellow in fig. DA 02. Expansions beyond the arc of the line can be used to measure the length of the beam only when they are equal to, or greater than, half the maximum width of the palm. If this palm is split, then the palm width must be taken below the bottom of the split. Palm widths must not span an air gap. First of all, it is necessary to identify the highest point of the palm, from which the measurement of the beam length is taken. It is normally located in the indentation between two spellers, at the highest point of the palm. From the centre of the chosen indentation, trace with chalk a line parallel to the front edge and continue along the centre line of the beam down to the coronet. Start the measurement of the beam with the cable from the lower edge of the coronet, making a bridge towards the beam three centimetres from the upper edge of the coronet, taking into account the thickness of this last and continuing along the line previously traced. In the example there are two paths, A and B, converging in a single path in the centre of the beam. The solution A would appear to be preferable for its greater length. Solution A is not the correct point from which to measure the beam and palm length; it is B. This is because, in having described the closed palm, point A is a bifurcated speller, (because its width is not more than one half of the palm width) and not part of the palm. Therefore, in this case the beam and palm length measurements should be taken to point B.

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FALLOW DEER

B

A

C

F

E

In the first example, (fig. DA 03) the A-B and B-C measurement is less than half of the palm of the width line E-F so the length measurement cannot start from any indentation included in the two sections indicated. In the second example, (fig. DA 04) the A-D measurement is greater than the half of the B-C measurement so the measurement can start from its indentation remaining parallel to the edge of the palm until it returns in the middle of the beam.

DA 03 Here we have a series of palms with the path of their length measurement:

DA 05

DA 09

DA 06

A

D

B

C

DA 04

DA 07

DA 10

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DA 08

DA 11 51


FALLOW DEER

3

Length of the palm

As for the length of the palm, the subject is fully covered in the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies, so we shall only focus on a particular case in fig. DA 12. The tray tine is missing so the start of the length of the palm is identified at the point at which the circumference is 1 cm larger than the smallest circumference of the beam (H1). In this case the value of H1 and H2 will be the same.

H1

H1+1cm

DA 12

52

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FALLOW DEER

9

Additions

Colour

The conformation of the fallow deer trophy and other natural causes mean that very dark beams and palms are rare. The dark brown colour is the maximum required to assign the two points available, although the colour is unlikely to be evenly spread over the palms: inside it is normally lighter while the exterior it is more pronounced. The Measurer must take this into account, considering the exterior part as the most important. Some examples and relative score:

DA 13

DA 14

DA 15

0 points

0.5 points

1.0 point

DA 16

DA 17

DA 18

1.0 point

DA 19

2.0 points

1.5 points

1.5 points

DA 20

2.0 points

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53


FALLOW DEER

10

Additions

Speller of the palms

It is characteristic of the fallow deer to have, on the edges of its palm flat, triangular spellers often with broad bases greater than the height. From 2018 the CIC has decided to replace, for the palm of the fallow dear only, the term “tine” (and all the relative rules) with “speller”. This simply means if the height is greater than 2 cm, regardless of its width, the speller contributes to the assignment of the score.

H 2cm

DA 21

On the left are two examples of rare quality in relation to the speller of the palm. Fig. DA 22: the three points that can be assigned are indisputable. Fig. DA 23: the palm can be considered to have good spellers over the entire edge despite the lack of a speller at the top and one with a wider base than the height at the centre. The presence of the fork (spur) must also be considered in the score.

DA 22

54

DA 23

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FALLOW DEER

11

Additions

Mass, shape and regularity

Of the five points available, three are assigned according to the net weight of the trophy. The remaining two are decided by the Measurer, evaluating whether the palms are both wide, full and symmetrical and whether the brow tines are correct in shape and symmetry. Starting from two points, 0.5 points are normally subtracted for each of the anomalies found at the points indicated.

DA 24

DA 25

DA 26

Appreciable trophy with well developed brow tines, wide and full, symmetrical palms: addition 2 points.

Deduction for asymmetry of the brow tines (-0.5 points): addition 1.5 points.

Deduction for asymmetry of the brow tines (-0.5 points): addition 1.5 points.

DA 27

DA 28

Fairly symmetrical trophy in the shape of the brow tines, with a not full and very asymmetrical palm (-1 point): addition 1 point. The missing tray tine and the single bay tine will be penalised in the specific chapter on the lack of uniformity.

The shape of the left palm results in a penalty of 0.5 points, due to the lack of symmetry with the one on the right; the brow tines are good +1.5 points. The left palm, visibly split, will be penalised in the following box 13 .

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55


FALLOW DEER

Non-symmetrical brow tines (-0.5 points): addition 1.5 points.

DA 29

Aesthetically consistent brow tines, a poorly filled asymmetrical palm (-0.5 points): addition 1.5 points.

DA 30 56

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FALLOW DEER

13

Deductions

Undesirable form of the palms

Even if contemplated in the CIC Handbook, trophies with palms like those shown here will hardly ever be brought to the evaluation table because they will have no hope of achieving a score of any relevance. The dagger-shaped palm is the most penalised with deductions from 4 points up to 6 for trophies ending with a simple tine.

DA 31 Typical palm 0 deductions.

DA 32

DA 33

Dagger-shaped palms that can be penalised with 4 points.

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57


FALLOW DEER

DA 34

DA 35

DA 36

Swollen, diamond or triangular shaped palms are penalised by 1 to 3 points, such as the swollen palm (fig. DA 34): 1 penalty point as in the triangular shaped palm (fig. DA 35). Fig. DA 36: splitting is not so rare therefore the Measurer could decide for a deduction of 2-4 points.

58

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FALLOW DEER

14

Deductions

Undesirable edge of the palm

The edges of the palm must be sharp and compact. Spongy or rounded ones are penalised. A palm with particularly marked defects can be penalised up to 2 points. Some examples with the deduction applicable to each individual palm:

DA 37

DA 38

Deduction 0.5 points

Deduction 1 point

DA 39

DA 40

Deduction 0.5 points

15

Deductions

Deduction 1.5 points

Lack of uniformity

Any deduction for lack of uniformity in the fallow deer does not concern the aesthetic symmetry of the brow tine and tray tine, but the obvious difference in their length. The presence of a single bay tine is considered negatively and penalised, whereas if there are two, and of a reasonably similar length, there is no deduction. Further deductions are applied to beams with irregular positions and evidently different lengths.

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59


FALLOW DEER

DA 41 Different lengths of beams

DA 43

Different tray tine lengths -0.5 points. The tines not referred to as bay tines are not penalised as they are not contemplated in the CIC formula. .

60

DA 42 -0.5 points

Different lengths of brow tines Only one bay tine

-0.5 points -0.5 points

DA 44

Brow tines of different lengths due to mechanical breakage: no penalty. A twisted tine in a clear bay tine position to the right -0.5 points. The additional tine on the left brow tine, having the same root, cannot be considered a bay tine.

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FALLOW DEER

DA 45 Brow tines of different length Tray tine of different length An asymmetric bay tine

DA 46 -0.5 points -0.5 points -0.5 points

Let us return to a previous example: • brow tines apparently of equal length, tray tine naturally missing, therefore of different lengths -0.5 points • only one bay tine on the left -0.5 points

DA 47 Different lengths of the beams Different tray tine lengths

DA 48 -0.5 points -0.5 points

Different length of brow tines Different tray tine lengths

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-0.5 points -0.5 points 61


FALLOW DEER

NON - MEASURABLE TROPHIES Mounted trophies cannot be evaluated. This is the same for trophies to which artificial tines have been glued to previously broken original tines. There are trophies where it is not possible to identify the parameters that must be examined. In these cases the trophy cannot be evaluated. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Tip-to-tip spread (t) As far as the tip-to-tip spread is concerned, the distance between the indentations is measured from where the measurements of the lengths of the beam started, without the need for that line to beat right angles to the centre line. Greatest spread (g) The greatest spread is measured perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the skull between the most distant points of the beams or of the tine palms. As expressly requested in the CIC Handbook these measurements are mandatory for gold medals and do not contribute to the CIC score but serve only to identify the trophy. We did not consider it necessary to dwell on the other information requested (length and maximum width of the skull) as sufficiently described in the chapter of the HB. Some examples of tip-to-tip spread (t) and greatest spread (g):

t t g

g

DA 49 62

DA 50 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.


FALLOW DEER

t

g t

g

DA 51

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DA 52

63



ALPINE IBEX

ITALY 183.70 Points CIC


ALPINE IBEX

1

Length of the horns

The length starts from the lowest front point of the horn and continues, as indicated by the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies, to follow the curvature of the horn, overspanning depressions up to the tip of the horn. The two photographs (fig. ST 01-02) indicate, in detail, the starting point.

ST 01

66

ST 02

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ALPINE IBEX

5

Additions

Bulge formation

Bulge of males As far as the bulges in the male ibex trophy are concerned, we consider the subject as adequately treated by the Handbook, remembering that in adult animals it is unlikely that there will be good quality bulges on the entire front surface of the horn, but only on the part not affected by chafing and fighting. In young males the bulge formations are normally well distributed over the entire front surface of the horn. We have inserted, just as an example, three photographs relating to strong and well distinct bulges (fig. ST 03), weak bulges or barely hinted bulges (fig. ST 04) and the first part of the horn without bulges for the reasons previously mentioned (fig. ST 05). As specified in the HB, the criterion for assigning the score is to assess the quality and presence of bulges on all of the horn.

ST 03

ST 04

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ST 05

67


ALPINE IBEX

Bulge of females For the evaluation of the bulges in the female ibex trophy, there is, however, no photographic documentation in the Handbook or declaration indicating the evaluation criteria. It must first be taken into account that the bulges of the females are completely different from those of the males and not so evident. The criterion used in evaluating this parameter is related to how marked and highlighted the growth rings are. As an example, we have inserted some photographs that highlight their difference.

ST 06

ST 07

ST 08

In fig. ST 06 the horns are mostly smooth and therefore awarded 0 points. There are some visible hints of growth rings in fig. ST 07 for which 0.5 points should be awarded overall; in the third fig. ST 08 they are more marked in both cases so the trophy can be awarded 2 points.

68

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ALPINE IBEX

ST 09

ST 10

The fourth trophy (fig. ST 09) is particularly appreciable and rare, for this reason the detail is also shown (fig. ST 10) and is awarded 3 points. These considerations, in the absence, as mentioned above, of descriptive and photographic material, are the result of our experience in Commissions throughout the Italian Alpine arc where ibex females are often increasingly evaluated.

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69


ALPINE IBEX

3

Spread The spread is measured outside the horns at the maximum point at right angles to the vertical of the skull (fig. ST 11). In the event of breakage (fig. ST 12) measurement starts from the outside of the broken horn up to the symmetrical external point of the other.

ST 11

ST 12

In fig. ST 13 we have a particular case. The spread is greater than the average of the lengths of the horns. In this case it will be necessary to take the mean length of the horns as a measurement of the spread and not the actual spread itself.

ST 13 70

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ALPINE IBEX

NON - MEASURABLE TROPHIES Mounted trophies cannot be evaluated. This is the same for the trophies to which previously broken original parts or artificial parts have been glued or when the horns have been glued in an unnatural position. There are also trophies where it is not possible to identify the parameters that must be examined. In these cases the trophy cannot be evaluated. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Tip-to-tip spread (t) The measurement is taken from the centre of the tips of the horn, without the need for that line to beat right angles to the centre line. In the case of broken or damaged tips, the measurement is always taken from the middle points of the tine end. Greatest spread (g) The maximum spread is measured perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the skull between the most distant points of the horns or the tip of the tines. As expressly required in the CIC Handbook these measures are mandatory for gold medals and do not contribute to the CIC score but only to the best description of the trophy. We did not consider it necessary to dwell on other information required (maximum length and width of the skull) as it is sufficiently described in the HB chapter. Remember that only the full number of years must be indicated to estimate age and this is determined by analysing the annual growths of the horns, counting the rings that are formed once growth has stopped during the winter period (fig. ST 14).

ST 14 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

71


ALPINE IBEX

Some examples of tip-to-tip spread (t) and greatest spread (g):

g

t

ST 15

72

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ALPINE IBEX

g

t

ST 16

t g

ST 17

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73



CHAMOIS

CIC GOLD MEDAL ITALY 121.33 Points CIC


CHAMOIS

2

Height of the horns

In the vast majority of chamois trophies the measurement of height, measured vertically starting from the cranial suture between the cores to the highest point of curvature of the horns, does not present any particular difficulty or need of attention (fig. CM 01). The case is different when abnormal trophies are to be examined. In the following example (fig. CM 02) the height is measurable as it is perfectly vertical. In the following section “Non-Measurable Trophies”, you will find some cases in which it is not possible to determine the height vertically but only obliquely making its evaluation impossible.

CM 01

76

CM 02

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CHAMOIS

5

Additions for age

We have found that, in the evaluation of the chamois trophy, the only critical assessment occurs in the identification of the age of the chamois, in particular for those who only occasionally evaluate this type of trophy. For this reason, we present some examples, remembering that, for the purposes of scoring (fig. CM 03), only completed years are counted, the last growth ring not being counted.

Additions for age Years

Points

0-5

0

6 - 10

1

11 - 12

2

13+

3 CM 03

3

3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

CM 04 6 years old

CM 05 1 point

13 years old

4 5 6 7 8

CM 06 3 points

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8 years old

1 point

77


CHAMOIS

6

Deduction for horn deposit

In the case of horns with horn deposit, (fig. CM 07), the horn with the maximum circumference of deposit is identified. Then the maximum circumference without horn deposit in the same horn, is identified. The enclosed table, which has already been incorporated in Edition 09-19 of the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies, provides for a quick calculation of the deduction.

CM 07

Tab. CM 1 (A-B)

Difference mm Points deduction

78

1 0,6

2

3

4

0,2 -0,2 -0,6

5 -1

6

7

8

9

-1,4 -1,8 -2,2 -2,6

10 -3

11

12

13

14

-3,4 -3,8 -4,2 -4,6

15

16

-5

-5

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CHAMOIS

NON - MEASURABLE TROPHIES Mounted trophies cannot be evaluated. This is the same for the trophies to which previously broken original tines or artificial tines have been glued, or when the horns have been glued in an unnatural position. There are trophies where it is not possible to identify the parameters that must be examined. In these cases the trophy cannot be evaluated. Some examples of trophies that cannot be evaluated for this reason:

CM 08

CM 10 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

CM 09

CM 11 79


CHAMOIS

CM 12

CM 13

In the case of fig. CM 14, the broken left horn has been rebuilt in resin. The different sound obtained by tapping on the suspicious tine confirms the manipulation. The trophy in these cases must be declared as unmeasurable.

CM 14 80

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CHAMOIS

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Tip-to-tip spread (t) The measurement is taken from the centre of the tips of the horn, without the need for that line to beat right angles to the centre line. Greatest spread (g) The greatest spread is measured perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the skull between the most distant points of the horns which does not always coincide with the tips when these are convergent. As expressly required in the CIC Handbook these measurements are mandatory for gold medals and do not contribute to the CIC score, but only to identify the trophy. We did not consider it necessary to dwell on the other information required (maximum length and width of the skull) as it is sufficiently described in the HB chapter. As for the estimate of age, as already mentioned in box 5 above, only the actual completed years must be indicated. These are determined by analysing the annual growth of the horns and counting the rings that are formed following the arrest of growth during the winter period. Some examples of tip-to-tip spread (t) and greatest spread (g):

g g

t t

CM 15 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

CM 16 81



EUROPEAN MOUFLON

CIC GOLD MEDAL SLOVAKIA 231.25 points CIC


EUROPEAN MOUFLON

The mouflon is very well described in the CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies so it does not need much further comment. Before undertaking the measurements, especially when the horns have a tendency to curl into the body, it is good practice to proceed with the measurement of the spread of the horns to the outer edges and the distance between the tips in order to determine the C-index that could exclude the trophy from the evaluation.

2/4

Circumference of the horns

The CIC Handbook is clear and no further comments are needed other than to measure over any peeling of the horn if it coincides with the largest circumference. It should also be remembered that peeling is no longer considered a defect which is subject to a deduction.

MU 01

84

MU 02

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EUROPEAN MOUFLON

NON - MEASURABLE TROPHIES There are trophies that cannot be evaluated for these reasons: • • • •

C-index lower than 0,7; impossibility of identifying even one of the parameters that must be measured; mounted trophies; trophies to which original previously broken parts of the horn, or artificial parts, have been glued or when the horns have been glued in a position other than the natural one.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Tip-to-tip spread (t) The measurement is taken from the centre of the tips of the horn, without the need for that line to beat right angles to the centre line. Even in the case of broken or damaged tips the measurement is always taken from the middle points of the tine end. Greatest spread (g) The maximum spread is measured perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the skull between the most distant points of the horns. In the Mouflon it coincides with the spread between the outer surfaces of the horns already measured and used for the calculation of the C-index. An example of tip-to-tip spread (t) and greatest spread (g):

t

g MU 03

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85


EUROPEAN MOUFLON

A trophy with a broken left horn (fig. MU 04) has its tip-to-tip measurement starting from the centre of the breakage to the furthest point of the right horn. For the measurement of the distance (b) (necessary to evaluate the C index), the starting point is the centre of the broken horn, to the centre point on the other horn measuring at right angles to the axis of the skull, this point being the centre line of the right horn.

MU 04

86

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EUROPEAN MOUFLON

As expressly required in the CIC Handbook these measurements are mandatory for gold medals and do not contribute to the CIC score, but only to the identification of the trophy. We did not consider it necessary to dwell on the other information required (maximum length and width of the skull) as it is sufficiently described in the HB chapter. Remember that only the full number of years must be indicated for the estimate of age and this is determined by analysing the annual growth of the horns, counting the rings that are formed once growth has stopped during the winter period (fig. MU 05 e MU 06).

MU 05

MU 06 © 2021 CIC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or unauthorized use is prohibited.

87



WILD BOAR

CIC GOLD MEDAL LITHUANIA 135.5 points CIC


WILD BOAR

4

Addition lower tusks

Colouring at the grinding edges Points for colouring on the lower tusks must be awarded for the ring of tartar at the end of the grinding edge, and more rarely for the colouring on the edge itself. Usually, unless they have been damaged during preparation, both lower tusks are similar. Consequently, points can be awarded to the pair following the examples shown in the picture. Colouring of: • first pair • second pair • third pair

0 points 0.5 points 1 point

CI 01

5

Addition lower tusks

Curvature, bend, grinding surface, tips

To award a point for curvature, both lower tusks must meet four conditions: 1. the circular curvature must reach the green 45° line on the Hromas template; 2. the tip must be well formed; 3. the convexity of external surfaces must not have evident longitudinal grooves; 4. the grinding surface must be longer than 5 cm. The absence of just one of the four elements listed above, means that a lower tusk cannot be awarded the declared half point.

90

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WILD BOAR

The Decision Table for awarding the half point to each tusk.

Curvature Hromas >45°

Tips

External surface

Grinding surface >5 cm

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

CI 02

CI 03

CI 04

CI 05

CI 06 The fig. CI 04 shows in section, the extent of the groove longitudinally present on the surface of the lower tusks (fig. CI 06). In this case, it is impossible to award a half point.

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91


WILD BOAR

Here we can see another example (fig. CI 06-A) of longitudinal grooves that do not allow the award of the expected half point.

CI 06-A

Tips of the lower tusks The CIC Handbook for the Evaluation and Measurement of Hunting Trophies states that for the award of the score the tips of the lower tusks must be well formed. Broken or rounded tips of the lower tusks are not penalised. Here are some examples of such tips:

CI 07

92

CI 08

CI 09

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WILD BOAR

Tips of the lower tusks with anomalous conformations are penalised. Here are some examples:

CI 10

CI 11

CI 12

An interesting case. The lower tusks have intermediate colouring, therefore 0.5 points. The right lower tusk, in the foreground, shows a clearly visible longitudinal groove, therefore 0 points as stated in point 3. The left lower tusk, despite the tip being broken, will be allocated 0.5 points for curvature. The upper tusks are broken but have a good colouring, therefore 1 point. They will definitely be awarded a point for curvature, but it is unlikely they will be awarded a point for overlapping. This is the reason why it is mandatory to use the Hromas template.

CI 13

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93


WILD BOAR

6

Addition upper tusks

Colouring on the grinding surfaces A point must be awarded after assessment of the grinding surface of the upper tusk.

CI 14

CI 15

You can see below three examples which show criteria for awarding points for the lower and upper tusks:

CI 16

0 points

94

CI 17

0.5 points

CI18

1 point

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WILD BOAR

7

Addition upper tusks

Curvature The point for curvature of the upper tusks is awarded when they reach or exceed the red 90° line on the Hromas template. In this particular case the upper tusks fully meet the condition and thus a point for curvature is awarded.

CI 19

8

Addition upper tusks

Lock An additional point is awarded if the upper tusks reach the green 45° line, and touch or overlap. In the first example they touch and in the second case they overlap. A point for “Lock” is awarded in both cases.

CI 20

CI 21

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95


WILD BOAR

10

Deductions lower tusks

CI 22 Pair of symmetrical lower tusks Deduction 0 points

Asymmetry in length, width and shape

CI 23 Pair of asymmetrical lower tusks Deduction -1 point

Twisting of the tusks An example, in fig. CI 24, of twisting, not penalised unless contributing to asymmetry.

CI 24

96

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WILD BOAR

11

12

Deductions upper tusks

Asymmetry in length, mass and shape

CI 25

CI 26

Symmetrical upper tusks

Asymmetrical with the maximum penalty

Deductions for imbalance between upper tusks and lower tusks

CI 27 No imbalance

CI 28 0 points

Two examples of imbalance

CI 29 -1 point

Deduction for imbalance between lower and upper tusks are not frequent. It is up to the Measurer to provide an overall evaluation of the volume, mass, length and width of the tusks.

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97


WILD BOAR

NON - MEASURABLE TROPHIES These are examples of trophies with malformations that make them unmeasurable as it is not possible to correctly identify the parameters that must be evaluated.

CI 30

CI 31

98

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WILD BOAR

CI 32 The deformation (fig. CI 32) of the left lower tusks does not allow for the measurement of the length and width. Furthermore the root is spoiled by a rupture that distorts the measurement.

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Nicolò Amosso, from Biella, entrepreneur in the engineering sector, is a mountain hunter and selecontroller. He has always been driven by a strong passion for the mountains and its related activities. In 2002 he took part in the CIC Course in Bologna, obtaining the qualification of Measurer of the CIC Exhibitions & Trophies Commission. In 2014 he took part in the CIC Certified Measurer Course (CCM) in Vienna. He has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Italian Faunal Biometric Academy since its establishment. In 2016, on proposal of the Italian Delegation, he acquired the qualification of Senior International Trophy Judge (STJ) from the CIC of Budapest and since the same year he has been a CIC teacher in CCM courses. He has participated as tutor in the National Commissions, since 2016 in all the Trophy Evaluation Boards of the CIC and in numerous International Commissions in Italy and Hungary. He is the Head of the Italian CIC Delegation and ABIF Vice President since 2019.

Enzo Berzieri, born in Parma, company manager until retirement, selecontroller hunter, writer of hunting topics and collaborator together with numerous hunting magazines. In 1997 he attended the CIC course at the Mendel University in Brno (CZ) held by Professor Josef Hromas. In 2002 he organized the CIC course in Bologna with Veljko Varicak and Michel Nolens as teachers to train the Measurers of many Italian Regions who would prove to be the founding core of national trophies. In 2014 he acquired the qualification of CIC Certified Measurer in Vienna. He founded the Italian Fauna Biometric Academy with Giovanni Persona and Bruno Vigna. In 2015 he was proposed as Senior Trophy Judge (STJ). From that same year he has participated in all the Trophy Evaluation Boards and in numerous International Commissions in Hungary and Italy. From 2017 on he has been part of the operational group of CIC courses held in Italy. He is currently an elected member of the Board of Directors and is part of the ABIF Presidency Office.




0 ,0 lta 20 sso € IVA A