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THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to thank the following persons for assistance in revising this document for use during the Fall Semester 2009: Students in the Fall 2008 student teaching class who made several suggestions for improving the Student Teaching Guidelines. Dr. Patricia Hutchinson for volunteering her time and expertise in redesigning the cover of the Guidelines. Dr. John Karsnitz for reviewing and suggesting changes to the final draft. Dr. Susan K. Donohue for reviewing the final draft, preparing it for printing and posting it on the Departmental website. Mrs. Judy Smedley for coordinating the duplication of the Guidelines.

Robert D. Weber Professor Emeritus August 2009

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F O R E W O R D1 Congratulations on having reached a milestone in your education: namely, satisfying the various requirements that qualify you to begin your internship as a student teacher of technology/pre-engineering. As a student teacher you will assume many roles besides "teacher." Throughout the internship, you will be an observer, planner, developer, facilitator, evaluator, learner, motivator, arbitrator, illustrator, producer, communicator, director and administrator! We anticipate that the many roles you assume during your full semester of student teaching will prove to be challenging, sometimes frustrating and most importantly, fulfilling. You should find the experience of being a technology/pre-engineering teacher enjoyable and valuable, both personally and professionally. Undoubtedly, this full time internship as a teacher will be the culmination of your program of studies at TCNJ and one of the most significant, valued and memorable experiences of your professional career. Keep in mind that your words and actions will often reflect two key concepts, namely (1) your own personal ideals and aspirations relative to planning, teaching and learning and (2) the program of studies that you have completed within the Department of Technological Studies at The College of New Jersey. All of the people who come in contact with you, including your students, other teachers, school administrators, and parents will judge the College and our profession by the personal and professional standards which you set and maintain as a teaching intern at your cooperating school. We are confident that you will be a worthy representative of both your College and the teaching profession! There will be times when you will need help and guidance in making the most of the opportunities and obligations which student teaching entails. The purpose of this handbook is to help you understand your responsibilities and to suggest methods and procedures for meeting those responsibilities. Consequently, a key step in becoming a successful student teacher is to read this handbook carefully and ask questions when you need clarification or additional information.2 In addition to describing your responsibilities as a student teacher, this guide delineates the role and responsibilities of your cooperating teacher and college supervisor. We recommend that you understand their roles and seek the guidance of your supervisors during your student teaching internship. Best of luck to you as you embark on this exciting professional internship! Robert D. Weber, Professor Emeritus

1

Some information in this Foreword was excerpted from: Sakley, E.H., Ed. Handbook for Teacher Certification Students. Glassboro, NJ: Rowan College, 1986. 2 Each student teacher is also encouraged to read two AAEE articles: Making the Most of Student Teaching Opportunities, Job Search Handbook for Educators,1998, AAEE; and Managing Your Student Teaching Experience, Job Search Handbook for Educators,2001 AAEE. (www.aaee.org)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS........................................................................................................... 2 FOREWORD............................................................................................................................. 3 STUDENT TEACHING - PURPOSE AND OUTCOMES.......................................................... 5 OVERVIEW OF STUDENT TEACHING PROGRAM ............................................................... 6 1. Planning and Observation Period - Segment One ........................................................ 6 2. Full-time Student Teaching - Segment Two.................................................................. 9 3. Assignments & Requirements....................................................................................... 11 OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION..................................................................................... 12 1. Attendance & Length of School Day ............................................................................. 12 2. Reporting Absences...................................................................................................... 12 3. Liability and Medical Insurance ..................................................................................... 12 STUDENT TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS and RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................ 12 1. Written Assignments ..................................................................................................... 12 2. Weekly Schedule & Narrative Report ........................................................................... 12 3. Laboratory Planning and Supervision ........................................................................... 14 4. Laboratory Environment and Facility Improvement ...................................................... 14 5. Planning, Presentation and Evaluation of Teaching ..................................................... 14 6. Assistance from Cooperating Teacher.......................................................................... 15 7. Beginning Teaching Assignments: Segment One ....................................................... 15 8. Teaching Plan Format (Refer to Appendix for Approved Format) ...................................... 16 9. Teaching Plan Details ................................................................................................... 16 10. Number Of Teaching Presentations............................................................................ 16 11. Teaching Plan Log ........................................................................................................ 17 INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING ASSIGNMENT........................................................................ 17 Part 1 - School Background and IPA Course...................................................................... 18 Part 2 - Planning Instruction and Assessment .................................................................... 19 ADOLESCENT STUDY ............................................................................................................ 22 INSTRUCTIONAL OBSERVATIONS....................................................................................... 24 STUDENT TEACHING PORTFOLIO ....................................................................................... 25 ADDITIONAL STUDENT TEACHER ACTIVITIES................................................................... 26 SAFETY AND HEALTH ........................................................................................................... 26 COLLEGE SUPERVISORY VISITS ......................................................................................... 27 EVALUATION OF STUDENT TEACHING............................................................................... 28 IMMEDIATE COLLEGE ASSISTANCE ................................................................................... 29 APPENDIX................................................................................................................................ 30

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STUDENT TEACHING - PURPOSE AND STUDENT OUTCOMES The student teaching program in the Department of Technological Studies at The College of New Jersey provides the student with the opportunity to develop excellence in the use of professional knowledge and skills to carry out the duties and responsibilities of a Technology Education/Pre-Engineering teacher in a public school setting. This goal is accomplished under the supervision of both a master teacher, who serves as a cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. It is anticipated that the following student outcomes3 will be accomplished as a result of the student teaching experience. As a result of completing the student teaching experience, each student teacher should: 1.

Become familiar with the overall management and organization of a school, including the student code of conduct as well as services available to students.

2.

Effectively manage and control the classroom environment associated with individual, small and large group instruction.

3.

Be able to select appropriate content and instructional methods to complement the learning characteristics of a diverse group of learners.

4.

Successfully plan, organize, teach, assess, and revise an instructional unit that focuses on technology within a STEM context and encompasses national/state curriculum standards as well as, instructional strategies for equity and diversity.

5.

Design, present, and assess a variety of instructional strategies used in both classroom and laboratory settings that meets the needs of a diverse student population.

6.

Assess learning using a variety of methods and make recommendations for improving learning and teaching based on those assessments.

7.

Communicate effectively and work cooperatively with students, staff, administrators, parents, and community and business leaders.

8.

Demonstrate effective management skills by meeting deadlines related to assigned work and other student teaching responsibilities.

9.

Manage and maintain a safe facility for teaching about technology.

10.

Demonstrate initiative in introducing innovative activities in the classroom and modeling instructional practices which support the Constructivist theory of learning.

11.

Participate in professional activities within and outside of the school which will contribute to your effectiveness as a beginning teacher and educator.

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Outcomes based on the five themes which comprise The Conceptual Framework of the College of New Jersey - School of Education. 1. Knowledge & Inquiry; 2. Multiculturalism, Diversity, Inclusion; 3. Multiple Contexts & Communities; 4. Leadership & Advocacy; 5. Excellence in Practice

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OVERVIEW OF THE STUDENT TEACHING PROGRAM The student teaching experience is part of a professional semester. In addition to a full time observation and teaching responsibilities at the cooperating school, each student teacher returns to the college one evening each week to participate in two professional courses, TED 480 Content and Methods in Technology Education/Pre-Engineering (1st quarter) and TED 481 Seminar in Technology Education/Pre-Engineering (2nd quarter). Your total semester load is four course units: TED 490 Student Teaching (2), TED 480 (1), and TED 481 (1). Given the full time nature of student teaching plus the additional two courses at TCNJ, it is recommended that no other courses may be taken during this semester. The full semester student teaching period of 14 weeks is divided into two major segments. The first segment, normally between five to six weeks in length, is the Planning and Observation Period. The second segment, consisting of the remainder of the semester, is the Full-Time Teaching Period.4 For Fall 2009, the fourteen week period officially runs from September 8 to December 18. Thanksgiving week is not included. Please refer to Week 1 activities if you are scheduled to start at your cooperating school before September 8.

1. THE PLANNING AND OBSERVATION PERIOD - SEGMENT ONE The Planning and Observation Period has been set aside for very specific student teacher activities. During this time period, a student teacher should become familiar with:  school policies, procedures and regulations related to student behavior.  school support services available to students and teachers.  the program of studies in the Technology Education/Pre-Engineering department including lab policies/procedures.  the learning characteristics of the students involved in the program.  effective techniques for teaching and classroom management through daily observations of the cooperating teacher and other master teachers at the Cooperating School. Additionally, each student teacher must complete a variety of assignments associated with their Thursday evening courses (TED 480, Content & Methods in Technology Education/Pre-Engineering and TED 481, Seminar in Technology Education/Pre-Engineering) including a scope and sequence Instructional Planning Assignment (IPA) which will be implemented during the second segment of the student teaching experience. The student teacher may be anxious to start teaching immediately and feel that this process is very slow in developing. Nonetheless, it is felt that problems can be avoided by a gradual introduction to the teaching experience. The student teacher will have many new experiences during the first few weeks of the internship, most of which have already become routine and second nature to the cooperating teacher. To assist the student teacher in a successful introduction to student teaching and a gradual assumption of full time teaching responsibilities, the following schedule is suggested: 1ST WEEK (WEEK OF 9/7; CLASS IS 9/10)— 1. Attend preliminary school or department meetings and participate in new teacher orientation meetings scheduled prior to the first day of school. 2. Meet with the cooperating teacher and observe Technology Education/Pre-Engineering classes. 3. Verify accuracy of travel directions for use by the college supervisor from TCNJ to the cooperating school. 4. Reintroduce yourself to the school principal, vice principal and guidance counselor. materials will be available for use when conducting the Adolescent Study.

Determine what

5. Become familiar with the TE facility including material processing/storage areas. 4

Prior to the fall student teaching semester, all students complete a series of “Summer Assignments” related to their cooperation school. These assignments, which are listed in the Appendix are to be completed once the student has received official placement at the Cooperation School via the TCNJ STEP office. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 6


6. Begin to learn names of students in all of your technology classes. 7. Become familiar with regulations, safety issues, and student behavior code related to both the school community as well as the technology facility. 8. Verify that all information on the Student Teaching Information Sheet is correct and unchanged; email a copy of Information Sheet & travel directions to cooperating school to your college supervisor. 9. Assist as a teaching aid; provide individual and small group instruction as directed by your cooperating teacher. 10. Consult with the cooperating teacher to identify the topic, or theme for the Instructional Planning Assignment; ensure that all work on the IPA is coordinated with the cooperating teacher5 . 11. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 2ND WEEK (WEEK OF 9/14; CLASS IS 9/17)— 1. Make arrangements to conduct the first formal Instructional Observation of a master teacher during week three or four. 2.

Identify a prospective student for the Adolescent Study assignment and begin to gather data for the Adolescent Study, Part I. (Note: Verify feasibility of conducting the Adolescent Study with school administration first! If the study is not permitted, an alternate study of the School’s Child Study Team can be substituted.)

3. Continue observations in the cooperating teacher's classes and other classes within the department.

Focus especially on techniques used by the cooperating teacher relative to classroom organization, class control and management. (Make note of these techniques in your narrative report.) 4. Continue assisting the cooperating teacher as a teacher's aid. Begin the process of developing student rapport by providing individual or small group instruction. Please ensure that your individual instruction complements the procedures already established by your cooperating teacher. 5. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 6. Finalize the topic for Instructional Planning Assignment. (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s] -- Include projected start and end dates for the IPA at Cooperating School.) 3RD WEEK (WEEK OF 9/21; CLASS IS 9/24)— 1. Complete the first Instructional Observation (submit in class) Make arrangements to conduct the second instructional observation of a master teacher. 2. Continue work on Part I of the Adolescent Study or alternate Child Study Team report. 3. Continue work on the Instructional Planning Assignment - coordinate work with the cooperating teacher.6 (Submit completed sections of IPA for assessment per due dates established by Content & Methods Instructor.).

4. Continue observing and assisting the cooperating teacher. organization, class control and management.

Focus on techniques used for classroom

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To ensure a successful and efficient planning effort, student teachers must consult with the cooperating teacher on a continuing basis as the Instructional Planning Assignment is developed. Frequent consultation enables the cooperating teacher to provide timely feedback, which can be incorporated into the Instructional Planning Assignment. 6 Your Content & Methods instructor will provide you with a schedule of due dates for various sections of the Instructional Planning Assignment. This will facilitate receiving timely feedback (formative assessment) on your planning as you complete various sections of the IPA.

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5. Consult with cooperating teacher regarding the planning and implementation of a teaching presentation (lesson) for week four. (Note: All written lesson plans must be submitted for cooperating teacher’s review & approval at least two days prior to the presentation!)

6. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 4TH WEEK (WEEK OF 9/28; CLASS IS 10/1)— 1. Complete Part I of the Adolescent Study and begin anecdotal notations of the student that has been selected for the study (Part II). Continue cumulative observations for six to eight weeks. (Note: If doing the alternate assignment [e.g. the Child Study Team report], submit an outline of the report you plan to do in lieu of the Adolescent Study.) 2. Continue work on the IPA assignment; coordinate work with cooperating teacher. (Submit completed sections of IPA for assessment per due dates established by Content & Methods Instructor.)

3. Assume responsibility for teaching one or two formal instructional presentations* (lessons) and managing one class. *Approved written teaching plan required. (Note: Prior to presenting your “first” lesson, please email a “draft” copy of your lesson plan to your college supervisor(s) for review and comment! 4. Consult with cooperating teacher regarding teaching assignments for week five. For week five, plan on video taping one of your teaching demonstrations/presentations for review by the student teacher, cooperating teacher and college supervisor. (Note: Check school policies regarding the use of a video tape for improving your instruction…most schools will permit video taping a student teacher provided that students in the class do not appear on the tape.)

5. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 6. Organize student teaching portfolio, including cover design with tabs (word processed) for all sections of the portfolio; ask your College Supervisor to review and approve the format you intend to use. 5TH WEEK (WEEK OF 10/5; CLASS IS 10/8)— 1. Continue planning the IPA assignment; coordinate work with cooperating teacher.

(Submit completed

sections of IPA per due dates established by Content & Methods Instructor.)

2. Assume additional teaching assignments, managing two or three classes. 3. Video tape a lesson presentation for self evaluation and feedback from cooperating teacher/college supervisor. (Verify that school policy allows for video taping of student teachers for self evaluation purposes.) 4. Consult with cooperating teacher regarding teaching assignments for week six. 5. Complete and submit second Instructional Observation. 6. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 6TH WEEK (WEEK OF 10/12; CLASS IS 10/15)— 1. COMPLETE THE IPA ASSIGNMENT. (Submit completed sections of IPA per due dates established by Content & Methods Instructor.). [Special Note: Ideally the Instructional Planning Assignment should be completed at the end of the sixth week of student teaching but no later than the seventh week which is the mid point of the student teaching experience. Extensions of IPA due dates should be discussed with the TED 480 instructor PRIOR to the due dates.] NOTE: FAILURE TO COMPLETE THE INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING ASSIGNMENT BY THE SPECIFIED DUE DATES MAY RESULT IN A WITHDRAWAL FROM BOTH STUDENT TEACHING AND TED 480/481. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 8


Successful completion of the written portion of the IPA requires:  Effective and continuous planning  Creative thinking  Effective time management to meet deadlines7  Ongoing collaboration with cooperating teacher, TED 480 Instructor & college supervisor  Effective writing skills 2. Continue with teaching responsibilities, and management of three or four classes. 3. Consult with cooperating teacher regarding teaching assignments for week seven as well as implementation of the IPA. 4. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 5. Have cooperating teacher complete the Support for Teacher Education Program Interim Assessments of Student Teacher’s Progress and discuss results with student teacher and college supervisor. (The college supervisor also completes an interim assessment “on line” using the TCNJ Artie program.) 2. THE FULL-TIME TEACHING PERIOD - SEGMENT TWO Now that student teachers have been responsible for instruction and class management, they should be ready to increase their responsibility towards a full teaching load beginning with week seven. Full-time student teaching may begin during week seven, although this date is not mandatory. The decision to assign all instructional responsibilities to the student teacher must be made carefully with input from the student teacher, cooperating teacher and college supervisor. If possible, the student teacher should assume full-time teaching responsibilities for a minimum period of three to four weeks during this time period. The following schedule is suggested for the remainder of the student teaching experience. Depending on a variety of circumstances, the cooperating teacher may need to adjust this schedule to provide every opportunity for a successful experience for both the student teacher and students. (Note that at approximately the mid point or the semester the TED 480 Content & Methods course will end and the TED 481 course will begin with new assignments specified by the seminar instructor.) 7TH WEEK (WEEK OF 10/19; CLASS IS 10/22)— 1. Begin implementing the Instructional Planning Assignment. 2. Increase teaching responsibilities towards a full time teaching load, circumstances permitting. 3. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]) 4. Submit student teaching portfolio for interim review by college supervisor. 8TH WEEK (WEEK OF 10/26; CLASS IS 10/29)— 1. Continue implementing assigned teaching responsibilities. 2. Continue implementing IPA. 3. Attend and participate in one day Annual Profession Conference sponsored by the Department of Technological Studies at TCNJ. (starts 8:30 am on 10/28;see http://www.tcnj.edu/~tstudies/conference.htm) 4. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 7

The most frequent reasons for not completing the various segments of the Instructional Planning Assignment by the specified deadlines are poor time management and procrastination. If possible, please identify your Instructional Planning Topic when you make your one day visit to the school during the spring semester. Using the summer months to research and gather appropriate teaching resources for the topic will enable you to complete the IPA in a timely manner.

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9TH-11TH WEEK (WEEKS OF 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, AND 11/23; CLASSES ARE 11/5, 11/12, AND 11/19)— 1. Continue with full teaching load. 2. Continue implementing IPA. 3. Complete and submit Parts II and III of the Adolescent Study or submit alternate Child Study Team report. 4. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 12TH WEEK (WEEK OF 11/30; CLASS IS 12/3)— 1. Continue implementing assigned teaching responsibilities. 2. Continue implementing IPA. 3. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 13TH WEEK (WEEK OF 12/7; CLASS IS 12/10)— 1. Continue implementing assigned teaching responsibilities. 2. Continue implementing IPA. 3. Have cooperating teacher complete the Support for Teacher Education Program Final Assessments and discuss evaluations with both the student teacher and college supervisor). 4. Complete Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report (submit hard copy in class and email copy to supervisor[s]). 5. Submit student teaching portfolio for final assessment by college supervisor. 14TH WEEK (WEEK OF 12/14; CLASS IS 12/17) — 1. Gradually return teaching responsibilities to the cooperating teacher. During the last week, student teachers should gradually turn the classes back to the cooperating teacher and slowly terminate their formal teaching responsibilities. This procedure is designed to provide a smooth transition in the class from one instructor to another, but must be flexible enough to accommodate local conditions. As their load lightens, student teachers will use the time to again observe the cooperating teacher's instructional strategies. Some schools allow the student teacher to maintain full responsibility for the class through the last day of student teaching and in most cases, this is acceptable to the college. 8 2. Submit self evaluation of IPA assignment. 3. Submit last Narrative Report in seminar class and email/fax copy to college supervisor(s).

8

Some student teachers may wish to continue assisting at the cooperating school after the final end date for student teaching in December. Student teachers wishing to extend their student teaching experience (e.g. usually through the first or second week of January) should consult with their college supervisor and the STEP office since any extension must be approved by both the college and cooperating school. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 10


In summary, a list of requirements related to student teaching which have been noted in the preceding 14 week schedule appears below. Listing of Assignments/Requirements Associated with Student Teaching9

Assignments/Requirements 1. Summer Assignments (Five assignments)

Remarks10 Assigned in May, due prior to Fall student teaching. Note: A copy of Assignment # 1 – Student Teaching Information Sheet complete with travel directions to the cooperating school should be emailed to your assigned college supervisor .

2. Daily schedule & weekly narrative report (Approx.14) 3. Instructional Planning Assignment 4. Instructional Observations @ Coop. Sch. (2) 5, Adolescent Study or alternate Child Study Team Report 6. Video tape a teaching lesson at Cooperating School. 7. Organize student teaching portfolio for review by college supervisor 8. Self evaluation of IPA Assignment 9. STEP Interim Assessments of Student Teaching (Teaching Dispositions & Teaching Performance) 10. STEP Final Assessments of Student Teaching (Teaching Dispositions & Teaching Performance) 11. Register and take appropriate ETS Praxis exams for certification; apply for graduation and certification 12. Review college supervisors summative narrative evaluation & final grade for student teaching; sign assessment form for placement in Career Services folder. (Spaces below left blank)

9

One weekly schedule and 5 narrative reports* for each week of student teaching; Copies to C&M/Seminar instructor & copies emailed to college supervisor Thursday of each week. *Narrative reports completed on a daily basis. Ongoing due dates for segments of IPA determined by C&M instructor; completed IPA assignment due week #6 First observation due week #3; second observation due week #5 Start assignment in week #2; complete assignment week #11 Schedule taping with assistance from cooperating teacher for week #5 Reviewed by college supervisor on week #4 and #7; completed portfolio submitted to college supervisor for final assessment on week 13 Submitted to seminar instructor week #14 Both the cooperating teacher & college supervisor complete these interim assessments ~ week #6 or #7; all assessments are collaborative and discussed with the student teacher (complete on SOCS by college supervisor) Both the cooperating teacher & college supervisor complete these final assessments ~ week 13; all assessments are collaborative and discussed with the student teacher (complete on SOCS by college supervisor) Take ETS Praxis exams in summer or fall if graduating in December; take exams in fall or winter if graduating in May. See http://www.tcnj.edu/~educat/step/index.html. Check with college supervisor regarding appropriate date to review assessments near the end of the fall semester.

(Spaces below left blank)

Note: This is a general overview of requirements associated with student teaching. Check with your instructor to determine additional requirements associated with the C and M and Seminar courses. 10 Note: All due dates are approximate and may be modified by the college instructor. Some assignments are part of the C&M course while others are connected with the Seminar course‌.for details, please consult the appropriate instructor. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 11


OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION 1. Attendance & Length of the School Day - Student teachers are to report to their schools daily at the same time as regular teachers. They will remain at least for the length of the formal school day, and as long after school as their services are required. 2. Reporting Absences - All absences or schedule changes related to the student teacher's schedule should be reported immediately. It is especially important to notify the cooperating teacher regarding your absence as well as the college supervisor regarding either an absence or a change in the daily schedule. It is the student teacher's responsibility to see that their college supervisor receives any information related to absences and schedule changes. Student teachers should discuss the procedure for notification with their respective college supervisor(s). In the event that the college supervisor(s) cannot be contacted regarding an absence or schedule change, the student teacher should notify the Department of Technological Studies at (609) 771-2543. The student teacher must also notify the cooperating school as far in advance as possible regarding an absence for illness or personal reasons. This includes absences associated with the professional conference previously noted. In the event that a student teacher is absent without notifying the cooperating school, the cooperating teacher should notify the college supervisor as soon as possible by calling the college supervisor directly or calling the department office at (609) 771-2543. 3. Liability and Medical Insurance - In most cases, when student teachers are approved for student teaching by a NJ school district Board of Education, they are eligible for the same liability protection that is provided to teachers employed on a regular basis within the district. It is recommended that the student teacher consult with the cooperating teacher or school Principal regarding liability protection.11 Regarding personal medical insurance, the Department of Technological Studies encourages all student teachers to carry special health insurance made available through the college. (Medical costs resulting from illness or injury to the student teacher are not covered by the cooperating school or the college.)

STUDENT TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 1. Written Assignments - The quality of the written work completed by the student teacher must meet acceptable standards. All written assignments should be:  properly referenced using the American Psychological Association Style Guide  word processed  "spell checked" / proofread and  submitted with a completed Cover Sheet. It is also required that both the paper copy of the student teacher’s written work as well as electronically stored files of work be maintained throughout the student teaching experience. The Departmental style guide for writing and listing references is the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), Sixth Edition. Examples of the APA style can be reviewed in any ITEA Technology Teacher Journal or your can review a tutorial at: http://www.apastyle.org/learn/tutorials/basics-tutorial.aspx. 2. Weekly Schedule & Narrative Report - Each week, with the assistance of the cooperating teacher, the student teacher plans the activities for the following week. This schedule of activities is to be reported to the college on a standard form, which is provided at the beginning of the semester. (See Appendix) The completed weekly schedule along with the narrative report on the reverse side should be word processed and brought to the college each week for submission during the Thursday evening class. Student teachers should complete the weekly schedule using the following guidelines:

11

Information related to acceptable professional practice, which includes circumstances that could lead to negligence, are part of the instruction in selected professional courses required of all Technology Education/Pre-Engineering student teachers. Student teachers may also qualify for professional liability insurance if they are members of the International Technology Education/Pre-Engineering Association

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2.1 Supervision Code - Place an "S" in the code box provided, if the student teacher is going to be supervising or assisting in any way with the class, usually in conjunction with a laboratory activity. 2.2 Teaching Code - Place a "T" in the code box if the student teacher will be teaching a planned lesson. Include title of the lesson on the schedule, space permitting. Please note that the “T” designation is used by your college supervisor to schedule a visit to observe you teach a formal lesson with an approved lesson plan. Consequently, if you are not teaching a planned lesson with an approved lesson…..do not use the “T” designation! 2.3 Class Period Times - In the blank for "time", indicate the time that the period begins and ends. Also indicate period and room number in the appropriate box. Some schools have a very complex period system. Additional sheets may be attached to further explain complex scheduling systems. 2.4 Weekly Dates - At the top of the form, the student teacher designates the week being planned by giving the month and dates e.g. Oct. 4 to Oct. 8. Also, in the space provided, list the name of the assigned college supervisor. 2.5 Weekly Narrative Report - A form is provided on the back of the weekly schedule for the student teacher to summarize the activities from the previous week. Since the schedule and narrative report must reach the college on Thursday, the narrative report starts on a Wednesday and goes through the following Tuesday. (Thus the narrative report covers three days of the previous week and two days of the current week!) The purpose of this report is to provide the college supervisor and content/methods instructor with information regarding the student teacher's activities and progress. It also enables the cooperating teacher to complete a weekly evaluation of the student teacher. The student teacher should complete the narrative form on a daily basis. Information in the narrative can include:  unusual activities  instructional highlights  teaching or discipline problems which have occurred during the day and/or  new constructs or reflections about teaching/learning. (Generally, a narrative report of a day's activities will be 40 to 60 words. Limit writing about what you did during the day. Instead, reflect on new insights or concepts you have learned…your narrative should have an impact on the reader and describe how your teaching skills are developing and how you are reconstructing your knowledge about teaching and learning!) Additional sheets may be attached to describe major activities in more detail. These daily narrative reports are to begin with the first day of observation in the student teaching semester and will continue through the last day of full-time student teaching. In regards to "time in and out" section, student teachers should indicate the time they arrive at school as well as their departure time on a daily basis. This time log is important; it serves as a record of the time spent student teaching. Consequently, the log should be kept accurate on a daily basis. This log serves as the Department's record of the student teacher's attendance and is confirmed by cooperating teachers when they sign the weekly narrative report. 2.6 Weekly Evaluation by Cooperating Teacher - A place is provided at the end of each weekly report for a rating of the student teacher's work by the cooperating teacher and a written comment. These comments are very helpful to the college supervisor. Some cooperating teachers include only the written comments without the rating for the first few weeks during the student teaching experience.

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Special Note - The completed weekly schedule/narrative report, signed by the cooperating teacher, is to be hand carried by the student teacher to the College and submitted during the Thursday evening class session. It should also be emailed to your college supervisor on Thursday evening so your college supervisor can review your narrative report and plan visits for the following week based on your teaching schedule. In the event that you are absent from the TED 480/481 class or class is canceled, the following procedure must be followed: Mail, fax or email a complete copy of the schedule and narrative directly to your college supervisor unless other arrangements have been made. If mailed, the schedule should be postmarked on either Thursday or Friday of the week preceding the schedule.12 Email your schedule and narrative to your TCNJ course instructor (Preferred Method). Alternately, the schedule and narrative can be faxed to: The College of New Jersey, Department of Technological Studies, P.O. Box 7718, Ewing, NJ 08628-0718, ATTN: Content & Methods/Seminar Instructor - ST Schedule. The schedule should be faxed on either Thursday or Friday of the week preceding the schedule. Ultimately, it is the responsibility of the student teacher to ensure that his/her schedule is accurate, complete and submitted during the Thursday evening class. Fax # is 609.637.5135 3. Laboratory Planning and Supervision - The student teacher is encouraged to begin working with students early in the observation period. As the student teacher gains experience, the cooperating teacher should assume the role of an observer/assessor. Special Note: College policy requires the cooperating teacher or a properly certified teacher to be present at all times to observe and monitor whenever the student teacher is teaching or performing any school related activity with students at the cooperating school. Although student teachers are not required to prepare formal teaching plans for laboratory activities, they are encouraged to do so if the activity is complex or being introduced for the first time13 . Follow-up conferences between the cooperating teacher and student teacher should include a review of the success of the laboratory/activity portions of the program. 4. Laboratory Environment & Facility Improvement - The student teacher is encouraged to assist the cooperating teacher in maintaining a classroom and laboratory environment, which is supportive of the educational program. This might include activities such as maintenance of instructional kits, tools, and equipment, as well as the development of a variety of instructional aids. In addition to facility maintenance, each student teacher is encouraged to prepare and use a minimum of one "bulletin board" display or other instructional aid during the student teaching experience.14 5. Planning, Presentation and Evaluation of Teaching - Teaching using short demonstrations, discussions and performance based learning gives the student teacher an opportunity to plan for instruction and demonstrate effective teaching strategies. The emphasis in the Junior Practicum Experience has been on short, well prepared presentations, spaced on a timely basis throughout the length of the course. As noted previously, during Segment One, each student teacher will be required to develop an Instructional Planning Assignment that identifies content (Scope) and, arranges that content in a time line for presentation (Sequence). The student teacher will then present and evaluate the scope and sequence of the Instructional Planning Assignment during Segment Two of the student teaching experience. The instructional unit prepared 12

Keep in mind that many college supervisors will plan their school visits, especially Monday visits, during the preceding weekend. Thus, it is important for the college supervisor to have an accurate weekly schedule beforehand, in order to plan visits to the cooperating school. 13

For example, introducing and implementing a design challenge could require a presentation plan approved by the cooperating teacher. 14

Displays reflect back on the designer‌.they should be professionally done, carefully edited and approved by the cooperating teacher.

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by the student teacher must be aligned with state and the national Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (ITEA, 2000) curriculum standards. The unit can be coordinated with an existing course of study or it may be a unit of instruction that needs to be developed or revised at the cooperating school. The actual instructional plan can span a time period of three to six weeks. 6. Assistance from Cooperating Teacher - In regards to the Instructional Planning Assignment, the cooperating teacher can assist the student teacher in the following ways: 6.1 Explain existing instructional plans already in place within the program, pointing out why content has been selected and the basis for sequencing instruction to meet the needs and learning styles of students. (Understanding the scope and sequence of existing courses will be helpful to the student teacher as they begin their Instructional Planning Assignment). 6.2 Assist the student teacher in selecting appropriate Curriculum Standards, important Cumulative Progress Indicators (Applies to NJ Curriculum Standards for Technology Education/PreEngineering) and a theme or content area that can be used for the instructional planning assignment. Keep in mind that the actual student teaching instruction relative to the content or theme selected will occur during Segment Two of the student teaching experience. Segment Two can start as early as mid October, which is approximately six weeks into the student teaching period. Therefore, to allow sufficient time for planning, the content area for the instructional planning assignment should be identified in early September.

6.3 Assist the student teacher on a weekly basis relative to planning both the scope and sequence of instruction for the Instructional Planning Assignment. Most student teachers need guidance and advice from the cooperating teacher in the following areas: 

Developing a STEM based “mind map” or topic web that illustrates the major content areas of the theme or topic that might be taught to the class or classes that will be involved in the IPA

Deciding “what” content is essential to teach and ”how much" content can be covered in a given period of time, with respect to the nature of the learner, individual learning styles, class meetings per week and length of course.

Estimating the time that should be allocated for both formal teaching lessons and lab activities. (Difficult for a beginning teacher!)

Developing and implementing design / problem solving activities for students that are challenging, developmentally appropriate, safe, relevant to the content being taught and manageable within the cooperating school setting.

Developing and implementing a variety of student assessments, which are valid, reliable, manageable and ultimately, improve the teaching/ learning process.

7. Beginning Teaching Assignments: Segment One - Although Segment One is primarily a planning and observation period, the student teacher should have an opportunity to teach during this time period. To facilitate planning, it is helpful for the student teacher to discuss with the cooperating teacher, the content of the proposed lesson(s), as well as recommended teaching strategies. For some of the first teaching assignments, it would also be desirable for the student teacher to have at least two or three days to plan and practice the presentation. Student teachers should also make arrangements to have a formal teaching presentation or demonstration video taped for self review and review by the cooperating teacher or college supervisor.

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8. Teaching Plan Format - The Department of Technological Studies uses a standard format for all teaching (lesson) plans in Introduction to Teaching Technology Education/Pre-Engineering, Junior Professional Experience, and in the Senior Student Teaching Internship program. The student teacher is required to use this format but can add other categories to the format, depending on the requirements of the cooperating school. The cooperating teacher is asked to review and sign all teaching plans prepared by the student teacher at minimum of two days before the scheduled presentation. Additionally, the cooperating teacher is asked to provide both written and verbal feedback to the student teacher after each teaching presentation. Written comments can be noted on a separate sheet of paper or directly on the student teachers written teaching plan.15 9. Teaching Plan Details - Listed below are some important details pertaining to our expectations for student teachers preparing and submitting teaching or lesson plans. These details should be verified by the cooperating teacher and college supervisor(s) when visiting the student teacher. 9.1 Teaching plans are required for all teaching assignments. All plans must contain complete identification of school, teacher's name, date, grade level, subject, section (period), and length. 9.2 Teaching plans may be written in outline form. presentation should be word processed.

The final copy for use during the actual class

9.3 A final copy of the written teaching plan is submitted in duplicate; the original to be used by the student teacher during the presentation and the second copy for use by either the cooperating teacher or the college supervisor. It is especially important for the college supervisor to review the written teaching plan and become familiar with the content and instructional strategy prior to the student teacher's presentation. The student teacher should take the initiative and provide the college supervisor with a duplicate copy of the teaching plan for review prior to beginning the presentation. Alternately, the lesson plan could be emailed to the college supervisor prior to the scheduled visit. 9.4 Written teaching plans must be presented to the cooperating teacher for approval a minimum of TWO DAYS IN ADVANCE of the scheduled presentation. All plans should be signed by the cooperating teacher as evidence of final approval before the plans are used. Approval should be given if the student teacher can show evidence of preparation for the scheduled presentation. No teaching presentation in a Technology Education/Pre-Engineering subject should be taught by a student teacher unless the cooperating teacher has reviewed and approved the plan. 9.5 When preparing the teaching plan, student teachers should follow the format carefully. Particular attention should be directed at the techniques that will be used to involve the students in the presentation. (Student involvement in the teaching process supports the Constructivist theory of learning.) The review/summary section of the teaching plan should provide evidence that the instructional objectives have been accomplished. See the Appendix for a copy of the teaching plan format that student teachers are expected to use. 10. Number Of Teaching Presentations - The number and extent of teaching presentations taught by the student teacher will vary with each school. The cooperating teacher should ensure that the student teacher is given the opportunity to plan and present a variety of formal, planned presentations while at the cooperating school. In addition, presentations made to both large (full class) and small groups working in various areas of the laboratory are essential to the student teacher's development as an effective teacher.

15

It is suggested that time be set aside each day, for the cooperating teacher and the student teacher to discuss the content and techniques associated with each day of teaching. Regarding the review of teaching presentations made by the student teacher, a suggested technique is for the student teacher to evaluate the presentation first and then discuss suggested improvements with the cooperating teacher. In part, professional growth can be judged by the ability of the student teacher to identify areas that need to be improved. This reflective technique also supports the Constructivist theory of learning.

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It is recommended that each student teacher prepare a minimum of 20 different formal teaching presentations (lessons). These presentations may be given more than once, therefore the total number of presentations may be 40 or more. This number of formal teaching presentations should enable both the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor to develop an accurate assessment of the student teacher’s teaching effectiveness. 11. Teaching Plan Log - The student teacher must keep a cumulative, up-to-date log of all teaching plans that have been presented. The log should be kept in the student teaching portfolio and can serve as an index to all of the instructional plans presented to date. Use the form provided for the Teaching Plan Log.

TEACHING PLAN LOG 1 2

Date of Presentation

Title of Presentation

Length of Presentation

# of Times Presented

Grade Level

Evaluation Comments

3 4 5 6

INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING ASSIGNMENT (IPA) FORMAT The purpose of this assignment is to guide the student teacher in developing the scope and sequence for an instructional unit, which will be taught during the second segment of student teaching. The instructional planning assignment should be designed to span a minimum of three weeks and a maximum of six weeks. Planning for the IPA is accomplished during Segment One of the student teaching experience. Prior to the implementation date, the Instructional Planning Assignment should be:    

completed by the student teacher in consultation with the cooperating teacher approved by the cooperating teacher approved by the TED 480 instructor by mid October. submitted to the college supervisor for review and comment

In most situations, the instructional planning assignment will be keyed to an existing course of study at the cooperating school. In some cases, student teachers have used the instructional planning assignment to revise an existing unit of instruction or develop a new unit of instruction at the cooperating school. As noted previously, all planning and development related to the IPA must be completed and approved before implementing the IPA. This includes all components of the IPA except the actual teaching (lesson) plans which are normally prepared sequentially as the IPA is implemented. Please remember that this planning assignment will require a substantial time commitment by the student teacher during the Planning and Observation Period (Segment One). The ability of each student teacher to successfully plan, develop, implement and evaluate a unit of instruction dealing with technology is a primary outcome of the student teaching internship. Student teachers are encouraged to work closely with their cooperating teachers, the Content and Methods course instructor and their college supervisor in order to complete this assignment in an efficient, timely manner. It should also be noted that the final result of the IPA is a PLAN...that is, a course of action that may need to be changed or adjusted as the plan is implemented in a dynamic school setting. The IPA format described on the following pages is to be used to develop the scope and sequence for the instructional unit or theme that has been selected and approved by the cooperating teacher. It is important that

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component parts of the IPA be developed IN A SEQUENTIAL MANNER as they are listed in the format16. When submitting sections of the IPA assignment, please type each of the format headings along with the question or statement and then include the information requested. The Instructional Planning Assignment is divided into two major parts. Part 1 is designed to provide background information about the school. This information will be of assistance in planning the actual instructional sequence described in Part 2. (Note: Various due dates for the completion of all sections of the IPA will be assigned and communicated to the student teacher by the TED 480 instructor. As noted previously, all planning as well as resubmitted work for the IPA should be completed by the mid point of the semester.) Special note to the student teacher: Information appropriate to a particular question may be photocopied from an original source rather than retyped (e.g. courses of study at the cooperating school) All material in the planning assignment must meet minimum standards as described in these Guidelines; sequential ordering and appropriate labels are a “must”! In all instances, give complete documentation of any source material including references you have used. You will receive feedback from your Content and Methods instructor as segments of the assignment are completed; you should also ask your college supervisor to review and comment on the Instructional Planning Assignment.

Part 1 - School Background and IPA Course 1.1

Name of the school, mailing address, phone and fax numbers, name of Principal and cooperating teacher(s).

1.2

School philosophy and educational objectives Obtain a copy of the school philosophy and/or educational goals.

1.3

Department objectives Obtain a copy of the department philosophy and/or objectives for Technology Education/Pre-Engineering.

1.4

Course descriptions and titles Identify each course offered in the department and provide a brief description for each course (e.g. a paragraph), showing the general scope and objectives of the course. In many cases, you can find this information in the school Course/Student Handbook. Copies of courses are acceptable as long as they are appropriately labeled as “1.4.” Do not waste time word-processing the entire course descriptions offered!!

1.5

Information related to the course selected for the Instructional Planning Assignment 1.5.1 State the title of the course you and the cooperating teacher have selected for the Instructional Planning Assignment, e.g. Introduction to Technology, Energy Systems, Invention/Innovation, Video Productions, Electronic Control Systems, etc. 1.5.2 Grade level(s) that the IPA will address. 1.5.3 Learning characteristics of students at the grade level(s) to be addressed. Describe the physical, social/emotional and intellectual development of students giving special attention to developmental characteristics that will be helpful to a beginning teacher. (Note: Your response to 1.5.3 should not exceed two pages and should include at least two cited reference sources that were used to identify the learning characteristics. See, for example: http://kendrik2.wordpress.com/2007/04/16/characteristics-ofadolescents/.

16

Curriculum development involves both linear as well as iterative planning! The planning format for developing the IPA in this guide provides beginning teachers with an important foundation and sequential technique for ensuring that classroom instruction is clearly aligned with curriculum standards and assessment.

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Another source should be an interview with an experienced teacher or administrator in the school that would confirm your research findings. The goal here is for you to know your audience: to understand the NEEDS and expected BEHAVIOR of adolescents so you can use this knowledge to influence your instruction. In addition to the specification listed above, work graded as excellent should list a minimum of three factors under physical, social/emotional and intellectual development of students that you feel will have a direct impact your teaching. 1.5.4 Length of each class period, the number of periods per week, and the number of weeks in total. (e.g. The total amount of time devoted to the course) Also indicate if the course is required of all students or offered as an elective. 1.6

Course Objectives Obtain a copy of the objectives or student outcomes for the course. (Please include a brief paragraph describing how the course objectives have been correlated with State or National Standards (e.g. NJ Core Curriculum Standards 8.0, ITEA Standards for Technological Literacy).

1.7

Course Overview Using the existing course of study, identify the "big ideas" or major content areas that make up the course. Place these topics on a time line, showing the approximate number of days assigned to each topic. (Note: You may need to consult with the cooperating teacher regarding the time line. Your response to 1.7 should not exceed one page.)

1.8

IPA Content Using the information developed for 1.7, identify that portion of the course to which your Instructional Planning Assignment will address. This section should be more detailed than that found in 1.7 showing more specific sub-topics. (Note: Your response to 1.8 should not exceed a half page.)

Part 2 - Planning Instruction and Assessment Part Two contains specifications for the scope, sequence and assessment of instruction to be given. Remember, you must have a minimum of three full weeks of instruction associated with the Instructional Planning Assignment. In addition, student teachers are not permitted to start the IPA until it has been approved by the Content and Methods instructor. 2.1

Resources List and ANNOTATE the specific resources you have reviewed that can be used to determine the scope and/or sequence of the content for your IPA. Include at least five annotated sources/publications related to the course content. Finding and using appropriate, relevant resources frequently makes the difference between a mediocre and outstanding IPA! The goal is to expand your knowledge of the content by researching how other experts have classified and organized the content. Please take time to locate these resources by consulting with experts, using library publications and/or the Internet.17

2.2

Content Taxonomy (Illustrated “Mind Map” and outline required) Brainstorm the major concepts (big ideas) related to your IPA. Use expert opinion and the REFERENCE SOURCES annotated in 2.1. Develop a graphic display or mind map of the first level concepts (e.g. major concepts that describe the big ideas associated with the content and the second level concepts related to the content…. see sample taxonomy mind map for “Curriculum” in the Appendix.) This will serve to visually introduce the "mind map" or topic web. Obtain feedback from your Content and Methods

17

Resources you select should not be “one shot” references that are used to simply satisfy an assignment “number”, e.g. a total of five resources. To be considered valuable, resources should be selected for their use throughout the planning, implementation and evaluation of the Instructional Planning Assignment.

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instructor, college supervisor and cooperating teacher regarding your initial mind map 18. Then develop an outline of the content that includes first through third (or fourth) level concepts; use the format which follows: IPA Topic: Product Design 1.0 First level concept (e.g. The Design Process) 1.1 Second level concept (e.g. Steps involved in the iterative process) 1.1.1 Third level concept (e.g. Defining a problem) 1.1.1.1 Fourth level concept (e.g. Asking closed and open questions) 2.0 Second major concept (e.g. Establishing a Design Team) 2.1 Second level concept 2.1.1 Third level concept 2.1.1 3.0 etc. The taxonomy you develop should provide you with the "scope" of the content associated with your topic or subject area. From this point, you will need to consult with your cooperating teacher regarding the breadth and depth of content in your taxonomy that can be covered during the allocated instructional time e.g. three to six weeks. Note that typically, instruction should address or review major first level concepts first, e.g. the big picture and then progress to more in depth concepts as time permits. 2.3

Identifying Core Curriculum Content Standards Review and select Curriculum Standards/Cumulative Progress Indicators (CPI’s are unique to NJ Core Curriculum Standards) that directly relate to the content that will be addressed in your IPA. Clearly identify all standards that will be addressed using their title and number. After each entry, cite the source of the standard. Note: Work graded as “Excellent” will:  cite at least two reference sources: e.g. at least one State and one STL. As appropriate, address standards related to mathematics, science and/or career and technical education. See: http://education.state.nj.us/cccs/?_desc_standard;c=9;s=1  List three to five essential understandings students will acquire as a result of completing your instructional unit, e.g. the five most important things that students will understand after completing the unit of instruction!

2.4

Planning Learning Experiences and Instruction Develop a daily schedule (Day 1, Day 2, etc...) indicating how the content identified in the taxonomy will be sequenced. Include the following information in the daily plan: 2.4.1 Titles of instructional lessons to be taught along with a brief description of the presentation and estimated time needed to present 2.4.2 Individual and group instructional activities such as design challenge/briefs or other performance based activities. Note: Attach design challenges you expect to use in your Instructional Planning Assignment. They must be submitted with the 2.4 assignment….no exceptions! See Appendix for Design Brief format. 2.4.3 Suggested due dates for homework/reading assignments, and completion of design challenge(s). 2.4.4 Anticipated dates for formative and summative assessments including quizzes or tests. 2.4.5 Notation on daily schedule regarding Standards previously listed and being addressed for individual instructional activities.

18

Your illustrated mind map should be designed to fit on a single sheet of paper; it should give readers the “big picture” relative to the major topics and sub topics associated with the content area you have selected. Plan on giving your students a copy of your final mind map to serve as an overview of what will be covered in your IPA.

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2.5

Instructional Materials Include a listing of instructional materials, and specialized equipment needed to successfully complete the IPA for the number of students in one class. (See following table)

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS LOG Item Description

Quantity per Class

Unit Cost

Total Cost: One Class

Vendor Name, Mailing Address and Phone #

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 2.6

Student Assessment Develop a two part plan to address both formative and summative evaluation. Part I, formative assessment will provide ongoing feedback to the student and teacher regarding learning progress on the standards and objectives as well as mid course corrections that students may need to take. Formative evaluation can include such things as quizzes, performance on problem based activities, class participation, quality/quantity of written assignments, homework and feedback on design/problem solving challenges. Part II, summative assessment is usually at the end of unit instruction and is designed to assess the degree to which students have obtained the standards addressed in the IPA, e.g. have they acquired the essential understandings you have listed under the standards?. Summative assessments typically are final exams or term projects that may be combined with the results of formative assessments done during the instructional term. In most cases, school policy requires teachers to measure student achievement and performance on all assigned work in order to arrive at a student grade for the course or unit of instruction being addressed. Since the IPA may only be a portion of the student’s term grade, the proportional weight needs to be specified and put in writing in this section of the IPA. Thus, the summative or final evaluation must answer the following questions from a student’s perspective: 1. “What do I have to do to get an A (or other lower grade) for the unit of instruction which is being taught via the IPA?” For example, will the teacher use a “point system” to determine the grade that will be received? 2. “If I get an "A" and my friend gets a “B”, would another teacher reviewing our work award the same grades?” In other words, does the summative evaluation system being used discriminate between A, B, C, and D grades and would it yield consistent results if used by different evaluators? Your assessments should contain a rubric which ensures rater reliability. 3. “Will the grade received for the IPA unit of instruction be the grade I receive for the course or will it be a portion of my grade? If a portion, how much? “ This information needs to be recorded in the IPA assessment section and explained to the students.

2.7

Equity and Diversity Plan List at least five specific strategies that you will use during the course of instruction to enhance and reinforce principles related to equity and diversity. Also include in this section, information or any suggestions related to enhancing career education. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 21


2.8

Self Evaluation Each student teacher will perform a self evaluation of the IPA after implementation. An appropriate format for this evaluation will be provided in the TED 481 Seminar class.

ADOLESCENT STUDY An in-depth Adolescent Study of a selected student is a recommended activity. The Adolescent Study provides the opportunity for the student teacher to observe a student’s behavior and social interactions with teachers and peers over a period of time, usually five to eight weeks. Information from these observations combined with other data that is accessible can be useful to the student teacher in addressing the learning style and individual needs of the subject being observed. The following prerequisite information should be considered before starting this assignment:

1. Determine if the cooperating school will allow the student teacher to obtain the majority of personal information relating to Part I of the Adolescent Study. Some schools do not allow access to student records; other schools will allow limited access via the guidance counselor. 2. Will a suitable subject for the adolescent study be available for observation over a period of five to eight weeks (Part II of the Adolescent Study)? In addition to observing the adolescent study subject in Technology Education/Pre-Engineering classes, will it be possible to observe him/her in other classes with different teachers? 3. Prior to making the final selection of a student for the study, the student teacher should consult with the student's guidance counselor and obtain the approval of the cooperating teacher.19 Special Note: It is important that a student who is selected for this study does not realize that he/she is being observed. Any material that is collected and put in writing should protect the identity of the student. Change the name of the individual reported in the study and delete the student's real name on all written documents or copies of records. All materials related to the adolescent study are to be kept strictly confidential. If the Adolescent Study is not feasible, the student teacher should do a comprehensive report on the operation and services provided by the School Child Study Team. ADOLESCENT STUDY: Part One Part I of the adolescent study requests a detailed outline of pertinent statistical and other factual data about the subject. As noted previously, in some schools, test scores and other data included in student records may not be available to the student teacher. Where it is available, many schools do not allow it to be used in reports of this nature. Where these problems exist, the student teacher is to describe in writing the problems preventing them from obtaining this information and/or the type of information that could be reviewed but could not include in this report. The following outline of a typical adolescent study is included here to provide an overview of the items which should be obtained for Part I of this study20 . a. Personal Data (1) Age (2) Sex (Do not include name and address)

19

Confidentiality must be maintained including all notes and written material. Students selected for the adolescent study may be considered “students at risk.� They may need assistance relative to their attitude about school, behavior in school or lack of academic progress. 20

Information relative to all three parts of the Adolescent Study must be preceded with the question being addressed. Follow the format noted in Parts I, II & III by entering the question and then your response. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 22


b. Time Spent Out of School List any factors related to the subject’s time out of school, including home or community influences that might impact his/her academic performance or attitude towards school c. Intellectual Status (1) Intelligence rating (if test has been given)21 (2) Results of achievement and aptitude tests (3) Special interests of the subject (career aspirations and probable chance of attaining goals, recreational interests, hobbies.) (4) General attitude toward studies (5) Academic strengths (6) Academic weaknesses (7) Remedial measures used or which have been proposed d. Physical Status (1) Health history (if administrative records are available) (2) General health habits (3) Outstanding health needs e. Social Status (1) Relationship of subject to classmates with objective evidence (a) a cooperative member of the group, indifferent, aggressive, uncooperative (b) a leader, an accepted member, non-accepted (c) friends and their influence (d) attitudes of other students towards the subject (2) Relationship to teacher (3) Good social habits and social habits in need of improvement (5) Evidence of good adjustment or maladjustment (6) Group affiliates in class, out of class, in school, out of school f. Emotional Status (1) General emotional stability (2) Nature of maladjustment, if any ADOLESCENT STUDY: Part Two Part Two consists of a series of cumulative, dated notations of observed behavior, chronologically arranged. (Similar to a daily journal) These written observations should be complete enough to adequately describe the events that have been observed. The total number of notations should be recorded on a daily or consecutive basis and span a period of five to seven weeks. In addition to observing the subject in scheduled Technology Education/Pre-Engineering classes, the student teacher should try and observe the subject in other classes. These "other class" observations should be made during Phase I of the student teaching experience. (NOTE: Subjects should not be aware that they are being observed and that notes are being written about them) ADOLESCENT STUDY: Part Three Part Three is a summary of your findings including individual characteristics of most concern to the teacher and suggestions for meeting the individual needs of the adolescent study subject. The written section of Part Three should be a critical analysis that is linked to and documented by information collected or observed primarily during the observation phase – Part 2.

21

Under this heading, please discuss your judgment of the student's potential relative to any of the intelligences identified by Howard Gardner. See http://www.tecweb.org/styles/gardner.html for the original 7 and http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.html for an expanded list. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 23


INSTRUCTIONAL OBSERVATIONS Student teachers are required to complete two observations of master teachers within the cooperating school. Although the student teacher should observe as many presentations as possible made by the cooperating teacher, the two required observations should be made of teachers outside of the technology department. It is recommended that student teachers observe both a mathematics and a science teacher to satisfy this requirement. In completing this assignment, the student teacher should first consult with the cooperating teacher and the school principal regarding suggestions for master teachers who might be observed at the cooperating school. Based on the recommendations received, the student teacher should contact two individual teachers and make arrangements for scheduling the observation. Strive to observe presentations that are unique, creative presentations‌.master teachers’ favorite lessons. Before the observation, meet with the teacher to discuss the objectives for the presentation. During the actual observation, the student teacher should obtain information which can be used to respond to the following statements. (Please enter statement first and then your response.) 1.

Identify subject, grade level of students and instructional topic(s) addressed

2.

Briefly describe the type of teaching presentation you observed e.g. demonstration, illustrated lecture, group discussion.

3.

Comment on student arrangement and control. Include any special techniques used to control the class or anticipate problems.

4.

What pre-teaching preparation was done? (Evidence of planning, instructional aids, handouts, classroom arrangement)

5.

Introduction - Describe the techniques used to introduce the content associated with the lesson and capture student attention. E.g. What was the hook? Was prior student knowledge of the subject solicited by the teacher?

6.

Presentation of Content - What techniques were used to involve the students in the teaching...e.g. techniques used to motivate and make students active learners. Include any questioning techniques used by the teacher to encourage active student participation. Where students asked to elaborate on their answers?

7.

What was done to conclude the presentation...e.g. summary questions, group discussions, or other form of review?

8.

At the end of the presentation, what evidence was observable that could be used to verify that the objectives, e.g. items to be learned, had been accomplished.

9.

List any of the teaching behaviors you observed that would support the Constructivist theory of learning. Brooks J. and Brooks, M (1993). In Search of Understanding: The Case for Constructivist Classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ISBN 0-87120-2115. See Chapter 9 "Becoming a Constructivist Teacher".

10.

What recommendation would you make to improve the presentation?

11.

Please list the important concepts/content areas in mathematics or science that the teacher intends to cover or has covered already with the class during the marking period22 . Make note of these concepts below and then indicate the concepts you might reinforce in your Instructional Planning Assignment.

22

This may require a follow up conference.

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 24


Reminder: When completing this assignment, please include the question that you are answering. Answer the questions in the order that they appear on the format.

STUDENT TEACHING PORTFOLIO

Student teachers are expected to assemble a portfolio23 which can be used to document their teaching internship over the course of the semester. The portfolio should be designed with an attractive cover and include a "favorite educational quote" as the central focus of the cover. Include also your name, cooperating school, cooperating teacher, college supervisor and date‌.Fall-20??. The portfolio should be organized by the fourth week of student teaching and maintained each week during the remaining portion of the student teaching period. The final due date for submitting the portfolio for assessment by the college supervisor is week 13. The following sections should be tabulated and included in the portfolio. Please tabulate the sections in the order they are listed. 1.

Table of Contents - information in detail with corresponding tabulations

2.

Student Teaching Guidelines

3.

Teaching (Lesson) Log - there should be one for each course

4.

Teaching Plans: All teaching plans prepared and presented during student teaching. These are to be grouped together by activity or subject units, and in a logical sequence according to grades, classes, dates taught. They must follow the approved format and include any suggestions made by either the cooperating teacher or the college supervisor.

5.

Instructional Planning Assignment

6.

Adolescent Study or Child Study Team Report

7.

Instructional Observations

8.

Cumulative Instructional Media Log

9.

Instructional materials used in teaching include all media which appeal to the senses. Each student teacher is required to carefully select and use several instructional aids to complement their teaching. A cumulative log of the significant instructional aids (up to five examples) used during student teaching is to be developed and kept in the student teaching portfolio. This log should include four categories, namely (1) the date media was used, (2) a description of the aid, (3) source of the aid and (4) a rating of its effectiveness. {Photographs of instructional aids made by student teachers should be included in this section.)

10.

Weekly Schedules/Narrative Reports and Assessments - Include weekly schedules and narrative reports along with appropriate assessments of your teaching in this section: College supervisor’s assessments, cooperating teacher assessments, assessments by other school administrators, e.g. the school Principal or Director of Curriculum, copies of all assessments completed for the STEP office (Support for Teacher Education Program) e.g. both interim and final assessments completed by the cooperating teacher and college supervisor.

23

We have found the portfolio to be very useful to our graduates in employment interviews as well as the first year of teaching. Your portfolio should be organized by the fourth week of student teaching and should be available for review thereafter at your cooperation school location. Please keep your portfolio up to date!

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 25


11.

Special Student Teaching Projects. Description or explanation of the project and a self evaluation of same. Include appropriate photographs of special student teaching projects in this section.

12.

Clipping file of news or events related to the cooperating school district, or educational articles at the State/National level; Resources obtained through the Internet; Research on teaching/learning. (An excellent source for educational articles available via email is the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development [ASCD} Smartbrief available free at http://www.smartbrief.com/ascd/.)

13.

Summer Assignments (Total of 5)

14.

Appendix - Include any duplicated material that may interest you concerning such items as classroom administration, faculty meetings, guidance, extra curricular activities (clubs), parental consent and attendance forms.

ADDITIONAL STUDENT TEACHER ACTIVITIES School Related Meetings - The student teacher is expected to attend all staff meetings unless requested not to by cooperating school officials. These meetings include the preschool orientation meetings for new teachers. Attendance at staff social events, upon invitation, is encouraged. Consistent with the role of the regular teacher, student teachers are encouraged to attend the social and athletic events taking place at the cooperating school as long as these activities do not interfere with their teaching responsibilities. Club Activities - Student teacher are encouraged to participate in club activities (e.g. Technology Student Association) within the cooperating school providing that primary student teaching responsibilities are not affected. Other Activities - Many other types of school related activities play a part in a teacher's normal schedule. These include field trips, home room assignments, bus duty, and the supervision of social events at the cooperating school. The student teacher is encouraged to participate in these activities with the cooperating teacher as long as they do not interfere with the primary responsibilities of the student teacher. Substitute Teaching - Student teachers are not permitted to serve as substitute teachers, advisors, or coaches (with or without pay) at the cooperating school at any time during their internship period.24 In addition, the student teacher should not be assigned a class to teach or monitor where an appropriately certified teacher will not be present at all times.

SAFETY AND HEALTH Safety continues to receive emphasis in pre-service teacher education programs in New Jersey. Some years ago, the State of New Jersey recognized the need for the standardization of eye protection within the State's public education programs where eye hazards exist. The Department of Technological Studies feels that our students should set the best possible example for the students within their classes in the public school. For this reason the following policies should be observed:. Clothing - Student teachers should wear appropriate clothing for the conditions in which they are teaching. A clean lab coat or apron should be worn in situations where materials are being processed. Additionally, student teachers should “dress for success.” Dress should meet or exceed the professional standards established by the cooperating school. Eye Protection - Safety glasses will be used by the student teacher as recommended in Article 7, Chapter 14 of Title 18, The Revised Statutes, State of New Jersey. This requirement meets the State requirements set forth in the following act:

24

Any student participating in student teaching will not be permitted to be hired as an employee, in any capacity, (i.e. substitute, teacher aid, coach) by the school district where the field placement is taking place. Source: “Creating Exemplary Professionals - The Culminating Clinical Experience Handbook”, TCNJ STEP Office 2007. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 26


Be it Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey. The board of education of every public school district shall require each pupil and teacher in the public schools of the district to wear industrial quality eye protection devices while attending classes in vocational or industrial arts shops or laboratories in which caustic or explosive chemicals, hot liquids or solids, hot molten metals, or explosives are used or in which welding of any type, repair or servicing of vehicles, heat treatment or tempering of metals, or the milling, sawing, stamping or cutting of solid materials, or any similar dangerous process is taught, exposure to which might have a tendency to cause damage to the eyes. Visitors to such classrooms or laboratories shall also be required to wear such protective devices. The Commissioner of Education, by rule or regulation, shall prescribe the kind, types and quality of such protective devices and in doing so, the Commissioner shall be guided by the standards promulgated by the American Standards Association, Inc. for such protection devices. This act became law July 1, 1965.

This policy is endorsed by the Department of Technological Studies to cover TCNJ student teachers only. Others within the school should follow the policy established and enforced by the local board of education. In addition to wearing safety glasses, student teachers must also observe safe work habits in the school. The student teacher is encouraged to be a role model regarding safety especially since many students in school learn through observation. Safety Publications - Each student teacher should be familiar with Safety System Design for Technology Education by V. William DeLuca and W. James Haynie III, Reston, VA: ITEA, 1989 as well as the Safety and Health requirements specified by the NJ Department of Education. See http://www.njsafeschools.org/pub.html and Pennsylvania Department of Education: Safety Guidelines for Technology Education at http://www.pde.state.pa.us/science_tech/lib/science_tech/Final_safety.pdf. Laboratory Safety Procedures - Each school system has standard procedures which are to be followed when emergencies occur. Each student teacher should learn these procedures during their first week of observation. Information such as emergency procedures, phone numbers and location of the school nurse should be known. The student teacher should be familiar with the location of various types of emergency equipment including fire extinguishers, and fire alarm stations in addition to fire evacuation procedures. Tuberculosis Test - All student teachers must present evidence of a current test fortuberculosis to the campus health office before beginning student teaching.

COLLEGE SUPERVISORY VISITS Travel Directions - A form (See the summer assignments package) is provided for each student teacher to create travel directions to the cooperating school. Travel maps (e.g. MapQuest) should be detailed and indicate the best route from the college campus to the cooperating school for a “directionally challenged� person! The map must be in proportion to the actual distances and must include as many details as are necessary. Include directions for visitor parking at the school and the location of the Principal's office. The college supervisor should always report to the main office before each visit to the cooperating teacher's class. Supervision by the College Supervisor - Seven visits (approximately one visit every two weeks) will be made to each student teacher by a college supervisor. The procedure for establishing a time for visitation will be the responsibility of the individual supervisor who will be guided by the weekly schedule prepared by the student teacher. For this reason, it is essential that any schedule changes be reported to the college supervisor immediately. (The first visit is designed to give the supervisor a chance to meet the school principal, and cooperating teacher, observe the student teacher, and become familiar with the student teaching situation. During subsequent visits, more time will be spent observing the planning and teaching done by the student teacher.) Supervisory Conferences - Time should be provided near the end of each visit for individual conferences between the college supervisor, the cooperating teacher, and the student teacher. The supervisor will wish to discuss all phases of the student's efforts at the school including strengths and areas needing improvement.

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 27


EVALUATION OF STUDENT TEACHING One very important aspect of the teacher's experiences is the evaluation procedure. The evaluation of the student teacher's work includes the following categories: Student Teacher Self-Evaluations Several opportunities are provided for the student teacher to perform self-evaluations: 1.

Instructional planning and presentation - Each student teacher should evaluate every teaching plan after teaching the respective presentation: e.g. What worked, what didn’t work, what to revise, and what to keep when the lesson is presented a second time!

2.

Narrative report - Each student teacher completes a daily narrative report of teaching/learning activities. One of the purposes of this report is to give student teachers an opportunity to reflect on their work and offer insights regarding teaching and learning.

Cooperating Teacher Evaluations 1. Lesson planning and presentation - The cooperating teacher is asked to provide feedback regarding the development of the student teacher’s written lesson plan; the final draft of the lesson plan must be approved by the cooperating teacher via his/her signature. In addition, the cooperating teacher will assess the student teacher’s presentations and demonstrations. This can be done by placing brief notes on the lesson plan and discussing aspects of the presentation with the student teacher after the lesson has been completed. 2.

Laboratory activities - each cooperating teacher is asked to evaluate the student teacher's ability to organize and direct laboratory activities in the same type conference that is provided after lesson presentations.

3.

Weekly Schedule/Narrative Report Form - A rating scale at the bottom of this form gives the opportunity for the cooperating teacher to evaluate the student teacher's progress on a weekly basis.

4.

Support for Teacher Education Program Interim Assessments – Two assessments, namely a Teaching Dispositions and a Teaching Performance assessment are completed by the cooperating teacher at the mid point of the semester. These formal written reports enable the cooperating teacher to identify professional strengths as well as areas that the student teacher should focus on improving during the remaining portion of the student teaching experience. The cooperating teacher should discuss the completed evaluations with the student teacher and the college supervisor.

5.

Support for Teacher Education Program Final Assessments - The final two assessments (Teaching Dispositions and Teaching Performance ) are very similar to the Interim Assessment forms completed at the mid point of the semester. It is a summary report which focuses on describing professional strengths, as well as noting areas which will need continued professional development. Once the final assessment is completed, the cooperating teacher should review the results with both the student teacher and the college supervisor.

College Supervisor Evaluations Supervisory Visits - The college supervisor will review and evaluate the student teacher’s progress during each visit to the cooperating school. If an instructional presentation is observed, the college supervisor will normally review the results of the presentation with the student teacher and leave written comments relative to teaching strengths as well as areas requiring additional focus during the next visit. Support for Teacher Education Program Assessments – The college supervisor is also responsible for completing both the STEP Teaching Dispositions and Teaching Performance assessments at the mid point as

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 28


well as the end of the semester. Assessments are to be shared with the cooperating teacher and the student teacher. 25 Final Grade and Summative Narrative Evaluation for Student Teaching - The college supervisor, with input from the cooperating teacher, is responsible for the final narrative summative evaluation as well as determining the final letter grade for the overall student teaching experience. Each supervisor will complete the “Supervisor’s Summative Evaluation” form and review the results with both the cooperating teacher and the student teacher. After reviewing the form, the student teacher may request a copy of this evaluation for placement in their Career Services placement file at the college by signing and dating the form in the appropriate space. (See Appendix for copy of the form to be used by the College Supervisor)

IMMEDIATE COLLEGE ASSISTANCE Student teachers and cooperating teachers are encouraged to call the college or college supervisor(s) whenever assistance is needed. To reach the department, call 609.771.2543 from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday. After hours, please leave message on the voice mail system.

25

Please note that the cooperating teacher completes a paper copy of all STEP assessments; the college supervisor completes the assessments “on line” using the College’s ARTIE grading system and must print out paper copies for distribution to the cooperating teacher & student teacher. The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 29


APPENDIX Teaching Plan Format Design Challenge Brief Format College Supervisor’s Summative Evaluation Forms Assessment Form – Final Evaluation of Student Teaching Weekly Schedule and Narrative Report Forms Sample Taxonomy Mind Map: Curriculum Mind Map Articles: Managing Your Student Teaching Experience & Making the Most of your Student Teaching Opportunities Definition of Terms Related to Student Teaching Placement Policy and Procedures for Student Teaching TED 480 – Summer Assignments

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 30


Teaching Plan Format Name of Presenter ___________________________________ School _________________________________ Class and Grade Level _______________________________ Estimated Time for Presentation________(minutes) Date of Presentation __________________ Number of Students Participating______________ Cooperating Teacher Approval __________________________________________________ (signature and date) Presentation Topic ____________________________________________________________________________ RATIONALE: Why are you presenting this topic to the class at this time? ANALYSIS OF PRIOR KNOWLEDGE: How will you assess students’ prior knowledge about this topic and how will you use that knowledge in your presentation? CORE CURRICULUM STANDARDS and LESSON OBJECTIVES 26 Standards/Cumulative Progress Indicators Lesson Objectives (Using this table format, list appropriate State or National (List your lesson objective(s) here that correspond to standard Standards in spaces below, e.g. one to three standards))

on left. Note that there may be multiple objectives for one standard; see also the footnote a bottom of page!)

INTRODUCTION: Use the introduction to create interest and suspense; attract the attention of your students!! As an teacher turned “actor,” use a “hook” to stimulate interest. "Sell" your presentation by convincing students that information to be discussed will be exciting, useful and help them solve problems! Inform students of your expectations; give them an overview of what you want to accomplish and what they should learn from the presentation! Use students��� prior knowledge assessment in the introduction and body of your presentation

BODY OF THE PRESENTATION: Divide this section into two vertical columns. In the left column, use "key word" phrases to organize the information (content of the presentation) to be presented in a sequential, logical fashion. Next to each concept or phrase insert the time in minutes you plan to spend on that topic. In the right column, indicate how you will involve the class in the presentation. Llist questions you will ask in order to determine what or how much students already know, as well as possible misconceptions e.g. prior knowledge, they have about the content to be presented. Also use the right column to list any instructional aids you plan to use. As you present the body of the presentation plan, use continuous evaluation and redundancy to verify that students are reconstructing or reinforcing their understanding of the information you are presenting. Notes: 1. Using continuous evaluation to obtain feedback from students will help you verify that learning is occurring and identify concepts that are not fully understood. 2. If time permits, consider rehearsing the body of the presentation to test the logical flow of information to be presented as well as determining the time needed to present.

REVIEW AND SUMMARY: In this section, list questions you will ask to determine understanding and how well objectives have been accomplished. Consider reinforcing what has been taught with an in class or homework activity where students must apply what has been learned. Notes: 1. Reviews are important because they help reinforce information presented. Ask review questions that are directly related to the lesson objectives. Correct answers from students helps verify that objectives have been accomplished. Incorrect answers identify concepts that need to be clarified before completing the presentation.

NEXT STEPS / FOLLOW UP ACTIVITIES: forthcoming.

List and inform class regarding activities or assignments that will be

REFERENCES - List sources of information used to prepare the presentation. Give complete APA Style bibliographic data. Include at least three references....get different viewpoints about the topic to be presented; none of us are experts!!

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND AIDS - List the equipment/materials that you will use during the presentation. Notes: Keep a cumulative list of items needed as you plan the lesson. Then use your completed list as a mnemonic aid to gather needed items prior to your presentation.

EVALUATION COMMENTS - Leave this section blank. After your presentation, use this space or back of the page to write a self-critique of the presentation. Additionally, ask your cooperating teacher to provide written feedback regarding the presentation on a separate piece of paper.

26

A well-written instructional objective should address the following: 1. What the student should know or be able to do after the lesson is completed; 2. under what conditions will the student be able to perform and 3. to what extent will the student be able perform? Notes: 1. Consider objectives at varying levels (e.g. recall vs. contrast) which represent cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains. 2. If safety is relevant to the presentation, it should be addressed as an objective along with appropriate/related career information

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 31


DESIGN CHALLENGE (BRIEF) FORMAT 1.

Design Challenge Overview (1 page): Identify title of activity, grade level addressed, types of things students will learn and do, estimated time needed to complete the activity, special resources (tools, equipment, software - include source of supply) needed and any special preparation necessary to conduct the design challenge. Note: The one page overview should enable a person to obtain a good understanding of the nature of the design work to be accomplished by the student participants. (For best results do this overview last, after you have completed item # 2, below!).

2.

Design Challenge (two to three pages): A complete description of the challenge that students are to be given relative to the selected theme. The challenge should address the following components in order:

Scenario or Setting - Background and introduction to the problem. Consider a “hook” you will use to motivate student participation. Make the scenario intriguing, relevant and interesting to the students’ world!

Problem Statement - A concise statement of the problem or challenge that students will address.

Constraints and Specifications - Limitations regarding use of resources and details pertaining to important specifications that must be met.

Assessment - How individual and/or group performance will be evaluated when students finish the design challenge. (Generally, assessment of a design challenge looks at how well the student has performed the following activities: Investigation, Brainstorming, Research/Planning, Documentation Modeling (making), Testing, Redesign and Final Report (oral or written).

In most cases, a targeted student portfolio can be one technique used to document progress in all of the above areas. Bottom line: Students participating in the design challenge should be able to review the assessment section of your design challenge in order to clearly understand (1) what it is they have to do and (2) how well they have to do each task or performance.

DESIGN CHALLENGE WORK SHEET: Preliminary Self Evaluation Directions: Please complete and submit this worksheet with the completed Design Challenge.

1. EXISTING KNOWLEDGE: What strategy will you use to determine what students already know about the topic, namely, their understandings, misunderstandings and suppositions? (Constructivist Principles # 3 and #4)

   

KNOWLEDGE BASE: As a result of completing the design challenge What content standards will be directly addressed? What new knowledge do you expect students to learn? What knowledge will be reinforced or reviewed?

2. STUDENT EVIDENCE: List below the evidence you will accept from students, indicating their mastery of the content standards that will be addressed in the design challenge. (Please list each content standard and then list the acceptable evidence.)

3. GOOD PROBLEM CRITERION: Illustrate how your design challenge complements each of the five “good problem” criterion.27 (Testable prediction, inexpensive equipment, multiple solutions, group effort, and relevant problem)

4. EQUIPMENT/MATERIALS/SUPPLIES: Include any special requests for equipment, materials (designate quantity and source of supply) or media that are needed.

5. PUBLIC RELATIONS: Describe how you will “PR” your design challenge activity within the school and/or community! Examples include displaying student work, digital photos for hallway display, recognition on school website, VIP invitations to observe event, local press release.

6. GENERAL COMMENTS:

27

See Brooks & Brooks, The Case for Constructivist Classrooms, 1999, p. 36. (ASCD) The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 32


THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY School of Education

STEP Office

Supervisor’s Summative Evaluation Final grade – These assessments and the day-to-day observation of the teacher candidate’s performance coupled with the observation of The College supervisors are used in arriving at the teacher candidate’s final grade. The College supervisor is responsible for determining the final grade. However, the College supervisor(s) and cooperating teacher who observe the teacher candidate must confer prior to the completion of the final assessment. For Secondary Education majors, the subject matter supervisor will contact the Secondary Education Department supervisor for input prior to determining the final grade. Collaboration among supervisors and cooperating teacher is essential in arriving at the final grade.

Student__________________________________________________

Undergraduate__________

College Supervisor(s)/Program______________________________

Graduate

Cooperating Teacher(s) ______________________ ______________________

School ________________ ________________

Grade/Subject ___________ ___________

__________

Student Teaching Dates ______________________ ______________________

Observation Dates for College Supervisor: 1.____________ 2._____________ 3.________________ 4._______________

5._______________

6._____________ 7._____________

College Supervisor’s Narrative Assessment

_____ I certify that I have consulted with the cooperating teacher and TCNJ personnel who observed the teacher candidate before determining the teacher candidate’s final grade. _____ I certify that this candidate has successfully completed his/her culminating field experience. College Supervisor’s Signature _____________________________ Date ________ Final Grade ____ If one of the above statements is not checked, please add an explanation on the reverse side of this form. Copies to:

Supervisor ___

Student

___

STEP Office

___

RELEASE A COPY TO CAREER SERVICES: Y ______ N ______ Student Signature ______________________________ SS# ______ ____ ______ Date _________

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 33


THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY - DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES

ASSESSEMENT FORM – FINAL EVALUATION OF STUDENT TEACHING28 FALL SEMESTER 2009

DIRECTIONS: The college supervisor, in collaboration with the cooperating teacher, will use this form as a guide for determining the final grade for student teaching. Please rate the student teacher for each element by placing a numerical value in the “RATING” column. For elements that you are unable to rate or are not applicable, use a “NA” rating. When you have rated all of the elements, add up the total number of ratings and divide by the number of elements rated to obtain a final numerical value. Use this average final numerical value to assign the final grade. NAME OF STUDENT TEACHER TOTAL SCORE OBTAINED

ELEMENTS 1. PEDAGOGICAL KNOWLEDGE

2. PLANNING FOR TEACHING

3. IMPEMENTING INSTRUCTION

28

EVALUATOR NUMBER OF ELEMENTS RATED

PROFICIENT – ADV.

DATE

NUMERICAL AVERAGE

PROFICIENT

FINAL GRADE

EMERGING

(A = 4.00; A- = 3.67)

(B+ = 3.33; B = 3.00; B- = 2.67)

(C+ = 2.33; C = 2.00; C - = 1.67)

Clearly understands the nature of the learner; consistently applies this knowledge to select/organize content, determine effective teaching strategies and establish effective class control. Develops detailed, sequential lesson plans that exceed TCNJ standards in all categories; anticipates planning problems and prioritizes tasks so that planning is completed in a timely fashion.

Has a good understanding of the nature of the learner; uses knowledge to guide selection of content, teaching strategies and establish satisfactory class control.

Knowledge of learners limited and/or not effectively used to determine the selection/presentation of content or establish a consistent level of class control.

Develops detailed, sequential lesson plans that satisfy TCNJ standards in most categories; anticipates most significant planning problems and is able to prioritizes tasks to accomplish primary objectives

Consistently prepared with content, materials, tools and other needed resources; Instruction is clear, effectively organized, addresses major concepts and actively involves students in the presentation. Instructional technology is used creatively to enhance instruction; teacher understands and can lead students through the design/problem solving process.

Generally prepared with content, materials, tools and other needed resources; Instruction is clear, and satisfactorily organized; major concepts are usually addressed and student involvement in most presentations is satisfactory. Instructional technology is used to enhance instruction; teacher understands and can lead students through the design/problem solving process in most settings.

Exhibits difficulty in consistently developing comprehensive lesson plans that satisfy TCNJ standards. Has difficulty anticipating or planning for instructional problems. Designating time for planning, prioritizing tasks and completing planning in a timely manner needs improvement Lacks consistency in fully preparing content, materials tools and other needed resources. Instruction is sometimes unclear and may need to be better organized for the particular audience. Some difficulty experienced with identifying or teaching major concepts associated with content. Instructional technology used occasionally. May have difficulty leading students through the design/problem solving process.

RATING

Developed by Robert D. Weber, Department of Technological Studies, with assistance from Mr. Al Lyons, TCNJ College Student Teaching Supervisor.


ELEMENTS

4. REFLECTION ON TEACHING

5. STUDENT RAPPORT /CLASS CONTROL

6. STUDENT ASSESSMENT

7. SAFETY

8. TECHNOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE

PROFICIENT - ADV.

PROFICIENT

EMERGING

(A = 4.00; A- = 3.67)

B+ = 3.33; B = 3.00; B- = 2.67)

C+ = 2.33; C = 2.00; C - = 1.67

Demonstrates consistent ability to selfevaluate all aspects of his/her teaching; actively seeks / implements suggestions for improving teaching; reflects on teach / learning problems and develops alternative instructional strategies Establishes excellent rapport and positive interaction with students. Skillful at using questioning techniques to involve students, determine their understanding and obtain feedback. Parameters are established regarding classroom rules/regulations, which are enforced in a consistent and fair manner. Uses creative and varied strategies to maintain effective class control and keep class focused on instructional objectives. Demonstrates excellent ability to develop valid / reliable assessment strategies/instruments for evaluating learning and rating student performance. Exhibits creativity in designing assessment rubrics for performance based learning. Keeps accurate student records and consistently uses assessment results to improve instruction Safety is consistently emphasized, demonstrated and integrated into instruction. Unsafe conditions are recognized and rectified immediately. Safety is consistently assessed via student written and performance testing, observation and effective laboratory supervision of all students Demonstrated strong technical background in courses taught; able to solve technical problems creatively; effective at learning new technologies using previously learned knowledge.

Exhibits ability to self-assess teaching performance and is able to suggest alternate strategies for solving instructional problems. Accepts suggestions for improving teaching and successfully demonstrates implementation of those suggestions Establishes good rapport and positive interaction with students. Satisfactorily uses questioning techniques to involve students, determine their understanding and obtain feedback. Parameters are established regarding classroom rules/regulations and usually enforced in a consistent and fair manner. Uses appropriate strategies to maintain satisfactory class control and keep class focused on instructional objectives.

Has limited ability to self-assess teaching performance; experiences some difficulty in proposing alternate instructional strategies and/or implementing suggestions for instructional improvement.

Demonstrates good ability to develop valid / reliable assessment strategies/ instruments for evaluating learning and rating student performance. Capable of designing assessment rubrics for performance based learning. Keeps accurate student records and frequently uses assessment results to improve instruction

Has difficulty developing either valid and/or reliable assessment strategies/ instruments for evaluating learning and rating student performance. May need more experience designing assessment rubrics for performance-based learning. Student record keeping may need improvement; assessment results infrequently used to improve instruction.

Safety is integrated with instruction and is satisfactorily addressed using various instructional strategies. Unsafe conditions are usually recognized and addressed. Safety is frequently assessed via student testing, and effective laboratory supervision of all students

Safety infrequently emphasized and not consistently demonstrated or integrated into instruction. Unsafe conditions not always recognized and addressed. Has some difficulty monitoring an entire class relative to safe practices in a laboratory setting

Demonstrated good technical knowledge in courses taught; effective at solving most technical problems independently; needed some assistance in learning new technologies

Technical background limited, frequent difficulty solving technical problems independently without consulting with cooperating teacher.

RATING

Difficulty in establishing effective rapport and positive interaction with students. Occasionally uses questioning techniques to involve students, determine their understanding and obtain feedback. Parameters for classroom rules/regulations may not be consistently enforced. Lacks a variety of techniques for maintaining class control.

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 35


ELEMENTS

9. DIVERSITY

10. COMMUNICATION SKILLS

PROFICIENT - ADV.

PROFICIENT

EMERGING

(A = 4.00; A- = 3.67)

B+ = 3.33; B = 3.00; B- = 2.67)

C+ = 2.33; C = 2.00; C - = 1.67

Recognizes student diversity within the school and is proactive regarding the needs of diverse learners in a classroom setting. Instructional strategies and class assignments consistently accommodate and support a diverse class of learners. Exhibits persistence and creativity in assisting students who may lack motivation, self-esteem or peer acceptance. Exhibits excellent speaking writing and non-verbal communication skills. Speech is well paced, and annunciated with effective voice inflection; eye contact is appropriate and gestures enhance oral communication. Writing is consistently of high quality, e.g. proofread, well organized, and impacts the reader.

Is aware of student diversity within the school and supports policies designed to address the needs of diverse learners. Instructional strategies and class assignments are usually designed to accommodate and support a diverse class of learners. Exhibits satisfactory level of persistence in assisting students who may lack motivation, self-esteem or peer acceptance. Exhibits satisfactory speaking writing and non-verbal communication skills. Speech pace, annunciation and voice inflection is adequate, eye contact is appropriate and gestures enhance oral communication. Writing quality is good, e.g. usually proofread, good organization with potential for impacting the reader.

Lacks a comprehensive understanding of diversity issues and may not address the needs of a specific group of diverse learners. Instruction and/or class assignments may need additional refinement to accommodate the interests of a diverse class of students. Students with low motivation, self esteem or peer acceptance may not be recognized or closely monitored. Speaking writing and/or non-verbal communication skills need improvement. Speech pace, annunciation and/or voice inflection may need additional attention, eye contact and/or gestures may need further development. Writing quality is below standards and could be improved with better organization, impact or accurate proofreading.

RATING

TOTAL NUMERICAL SCORE: _________ Grading Scale A = 4.0 – 3.68 A- = 3.67 – 3.34 B+ = 3.33 – 3.01 B = 3.00 – 2.68 B- = 2.67 – 2.34 C+ = 2.33 – 2.01 C = 2.00 – 1.68 C- = 1.67 – 1.34 D+ = 1.33 - 1.01 D = 1.00 - .01 F =0

Grading Formula:

TOTAL NUMERICAL SCORE = FINAL GRADE TOTAL ELEMENTS RATED

SAMPLE CALCULATION: 34.40 = 3.44 10

FINAL GRADE = A-

Qqq

The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 36


THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY - DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES STUDENT TEACHER: COOPERATING TEACHER: PD. TIME MON BEG. TO END # SUBJECT

* CODE:

ROOM

*

SCHOOL: COLLEGE SUPERVISOR: TUE ROOM WED SUBJECT SUBJECT

*

ROOM

*

WEEK OF TO SCHEDULE #: THURS ROOM SUBJECT

*

FRIDAY SUBJECT

ROOM

*

“S” = Supervising students; assisting the cooperating teacher as a teacher aid. (Note: If only observing, leave the * column blank) “T” = Teaching a planned lesson or presentation (Approved plan required – Please include “topic” of lesson in SUBJECT block) The College of New Jersey/Department of Technological Studies -- Page 37


Student Teacher’s Narrative Report FRIDAY:

TIME IN:

TIME OUT:

MONDAY:

TIME IN:

TIME OUT:

TUESDAY:

TIME IN:

TIME OUT:

WEDNESDAY:

TIME IN:

TIME OUT:

THURSDAY:

TIME IN:

TIME OUT:

Weekly Evaluation by Cooperating Teacher:

--------|------------------------|------------------------|------------------------|------------------------|-------Needs Improvement Satisfactory Outstanding

Cooperating Teacher’s Comments:

_____________________________________

_________________

Cooperating Teacher’s Signature

Date

Note: Copies of the weekly schedule/narrative report should be submitted on a weekly basis to your college instructor and faxed or emailed to your college supervisor on Thursday evenings.

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 38


The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 39


The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 40


The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 41


Definition of Terms Related to Student Teaching STUDENT TEACHING: A planned experience involving observation, participation and supervised teaching by a candidate preparing to become a certified teacher. STUDENT TEACHER: A senior or graduate level college student who has met all of the preliminary requirements for student teaching and has been accepted for student teaching at an approved cooperation school. STUDENT TEACHING ASSIGNMENT: The grade(s), subject(s), and/or teacher in the cooperating school and school district to which the student teacher has been assigned for student teaching. COLLEGE SUPERVISOR: A full time or adjunct faculty member assigned by the college who visits the cooperating school in order to assist, and evaluate the student teacher's professional development during the student teaching experience. COOPERATING SCHOOL: A school within a school district, which is recommended by the college and subsequently approves the acceptance of the student teacher for a full time student teaching experience at the respective school. COOPERATING TEACHER: A qualified, master teacher in an approved school who guides the professional development of the student teacher through effective supervision and evaluation techniques. STANDARDS AND CONDITIONS FOR ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING In order to be considered for placement as a student teacher the following conditions and standards must be met at the beginning of the spring semester preceding student teaching: 1.

Senior status with a minimum of 96 semester hours of credit with a college overall grade point average of 2.75 or above., 3.00 for graduate students.

2.

Department grade point average of 2.75 or above for all technical and professional courses.

3.

Grade of C or above in all professional courses.

4.

Satisfactory completion of TED 380 Junior Professional Experience including proper endorsements.

5.

Submission of a physician’s certificate of health if requested.

6.

Submission of a certificate of mental/emotional stability from a qualified professional source, if requested.

7.

Approval by the faculty of the Department of Technological Studies. PROCEDURES AND POLICIES FOR STUDENT TEACHING PLACEMENT

Technology Education/Pre-Engineering majors expecting to be placed for the Fall semester student teaching internship must satisfy all appropriate standards and conditions one full semester prior to the beginning of their student teaching experience, e.g. no later than the beginning of the Spring Semester, in January. A complete listing of standards can be found at http://www.tcnj.edu/~educat/step/prereq.html. This site also provides information regarding how to obtain teaching certification in NJ. Students who do not meet the standards and conditions within the appropriate time line but who do achieve acceptable standards at a subsequent time cannot be guaranteed placement. 1

All standards must be maintained until the student teaching experience begins. Failure to maintain these standards will result in withdrawal of students previously placed for student teaching.

2.

Placements are usually limited to schools within a 40 mile radius of the college. Since the student teaching semester is a full time experience (four units of coursework), student teachers must obtain approval from the Department Chairperson to take additional coursework.

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 42


PLACEMENT PROCEDURES 1.

Students expecting placement for the fall semester are required to attend a departmental meeting early in December prior to the September starting date, in order to start the application process. At this time, the placement procedure will be explained and each student will be given a series of forms to be completed. Forms completed by the prospective student teacher must be reviewed and signed by their advisor and returned to the Support for Teacher Education (STEP) Office within the specified deadline.

2.

The Department of Technological Studies reviews requests for student teaching placement and makes specific recommendations relative to the cooperating school and teacher. These recommendations are then forwarded to the STEP Office.

3.

The STEP Office then makes formal contact with the designated cooperating school in order to arrange for the placement. Since the Superintendent, Board of Education, Principal, Department Chairperson and prospective cooperating teacher are all involved in the process, the actual placement process may take up to four months. In addition, the school may wish to interview the prospective candidate prior to accepting the placement request.

4.

The STEP Office notifies students of their placement as soon as a cooperating school and school district have approved their acceptance, usually at an April or May Board of Education meeting. Please note that during the application process, the student teacher will not be told the name of the school district, school, or teacher.

5.

The Department of Technological Studies conducts a special student teaching meeting in early May to update students regarding their placement along with information about scheduling a one day visit to the cooperating school which is arranged after official placement is verified by the STEP office. The May meeting also covers the “Summer Assignments” that need to be completed by each student teacher prior to the start of student teaching in the fall.

6.

Students whose academic records drop below the required standards will not be placed. If they have been placed, their placements will be withdrawn. They will not be placed until they meet the approved conditions and standards previously noted.

7.

Most school districts hold meetings for new and returning teachers prior to the first day of school. As a student teacher, you should determine when these orientation meetings are scheduled and plan on attending them.

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 43


TED 480 Content and Methods Summer Assignments Directions: Please complete the assignments described below and submit work by the due date indicated. Address each part of the assignment separately, indicating the part you are addressing. Each assignment should contain a completed cover sheet; see cover page format included with this packet. Mail completed assignments to by the due date listed for each assignment: Dr. John Karsnitz, Chair Department of Technological Studies The College of New Jersey 2000 Pennington Road Ewing, NJ 08628

LIST OF SUMMER ASSIGNMENTS AND DUE DATES •

Assignment #1 Cooperating School Visitation Report/July 1

Assignment #2 (Discipline Assignment)/July 15

Assignment #3 Annotated Resources/August 1

Assignment #4 (Philosophy of Education)/August 15

Assignment #5 (Read Guidelines for Student Teaching and SOE Culminating Clinical Experience Handbook)/Quiz # 1 on this material first class meeting

ASSIGNMENT #1 (Due by July 1st) Cooperating School Visitation Report, Information Sheet, and Thank You Letter [40 Points] Cooperating School Visitation Report (16 Points/See attached form). Complete all categories; obtain needed information for summer assignments, e.g. student conduct handbook, school philosophy and topic for Instructional Planning Assignment. Information sheet (16 Points/see attached form). Please complete all categories including directions to Cooperating School, Floor Plan of School and designated area for College Supervisor Parking. Include phone numbers, addresses, and travel directions to cooperating school. Thank you letter (8 Points/see attached guidelines). Include a copy of the thank you letter sent to your cooperating teacher after you have completed the one day visit. Use attached letter format as a guide. Please…..PROOFREAD and spell check™ your letter, and have someone review your first draft before mailing!

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 44


Cooperating School Visitation Report Directions: Please complete this form after your one-day visit to your cooperating school and return the form to Dr. Karsnitz. This form confirms that you have completed the one day visit to the cooperating school and enables you to obtain information about the TE program as well as the initial date that you should report to the Cooperating School in September.

Date of Visit: __________________ Time In: Time Out: 1. List below the teachers, administrators and support staff you were able to meet. (e.g. Principal, Vice-Principal, Guidance Counselor, Librarian, Department Chairpersons, Secretaries and content specialists in math, science and technology.)

Name

Title

______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 2. Did you obtain all information needed to complete the Student Teaching Information Sheet, including a floor plan of the school? Yes__ No__

3. Did you obtain the most recent edition of the Cooperating School Student Hdbk. or Disciplinary Code? Yes__ No__ (Needed to complete Disciplinary Assignment prior to Student Teaching in September)

4. Did you obtain a copy of the School's Philosophy and/or Educational Goals? Yes____ No_____ (Needed to complete Philosophy of Education Assignment prior to Student Teaching in September)

5. Does the cooperating school conduct an orientation meeting for new teachers? If yes, indicate date, time and location: ___________________________________________________________________ Are you planning to attend this meeting? Yes__ No__ Comment: 6. List the date you should report to your Cooperating School in September. (Usually one or two days before students arrive) DATE:__________________ 7. Describe resources that will be available to you as a student teacher, including the library, internet/email access, and media equipment. 8. After conferring with your Cooperating Teacher, list and briefly describe below the grade level and technological content area that you will address in connection with your Instructional Planning Assignment (IPA). Indicate the estimated number of weeks you will have to teach the content. Note: The recommended time span for the IPA is three to six weeks, starting in mid October and ending in late November. GRADE LEVEL ______ NUMBER OF WEEKS _________ (Estimate) CONTENT TITLE and DESCRIPTION: 9. General Comments Section (List below any concerns you may have and/or assistance you might need relative to student teaching during the upcoming fall semester.)

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 45


Student Teaching Information Sheet29 Department of Technological Studies Student Teacher's Name:

_________

Email Address: Street Address: City:

State:

Home Phone: ( Cell Phone: (

)

Zip __

____

_________________

)__________________________

Cooperating School:

Grade Levels:

Cooperating Teacher's Name:

__________________

Email Address: Street Address: City:

State:

School Phone: (

)

Dept./Office Phone ( Fax Number: (

Zip __

____

_________________ )

)

Location of Fax:

School Principal's Name (Dr. Mr. Ms.Mrs.) Chairperson Technology Dept. (Dr. Mr. Ms. Mrs.) Other Technology Teachers in the Department: Name: ____________________________________________ Subject______________________ Name: ____________________________________________ Subject______________________ Cooperating Teacher's Home Mailing Address Address:

___________________________

City:

______________ State:

ZIP

Travel Directions to Cooperating School Please attach the following items to the completed Information Sheet: (1) Written travel directions to the cooperating school from The College of New Jersey. Feel free to use “MapQuest” for this assignment. Please indicate an appropriate parking space at the school for the college supervisor. (Note approximate traveling time from TCNJ: __________) (2) A floor plan of the school. Note location of Principal's office and technology labs.

29

This form, along with travel directions will be used by your College Supervisor…..please ensure that it is accurate and complete! The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 46


Recommendations for Thank You Letter - Re: Initial Visit to Cooperating School See also: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Letter

Your Street Address Your City, State and Zip Date Cooperating Teacher’s Name with proper salutation School Name Address City, State , ZIP Dear (Salutation and Last Name of the Cooperating Teacher): Write the letter and include items such as: • Appreciation for your being accepted as a student teacher at the school • Acknowledge people that you met • Indicate positive things that you observed at the school • Indicate that you are looking forward to being at the school and working with their students in the fall • Thanks again for your willingness to participate as your cooperating teacher Sincerely, (Sign your name here)

Your Name here – word processed Your Title here - (Student Teacher) CC: School Department Chairperson (if appropriate) School Principal (List name followed by title) Dr. John Karsnitz, Chair, Department of Technological Studies

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 47


ASSIGNMENT #2 (Discipline Assignment – Due: July 15) The Discipline Assignment [36 Points] is designed to familiarize student teachers with the cooperating school’s discipline policy prior to starting the full time teaching internship. (As a beginning teacher, you need to be informed regarding a schools’ disciplinary policy as well as how those policies should be enforced by teachers and administrators.) Part 1: Cooperating School Student Conduct Handbook (8 points) Review the cooperating school’s student conduct handbook. Create a list of five to seven significant infractions that you may have to address as a student teacher (#1 should be the expected most common infraction). Part 2: Compare and Contrast (16 points) For the infractions you have selected, list the school’s recommended consequence and briefly state your impressions or concerns as the person expected to enforce those consequences. Find at least one other reference (Internet or otherwise) concerning each infraction you are addressing and briefly summarize the consequences noted for the infraction. Don’t forget to document your source! Part 3: Resources (12 points) Research resources that you feel will be helpful to a beginning teacher relative to classroom control30. Annotate three to four resources and explain why you feel they would be helpful to you and other student teachers relative to classroom control and discipline. FYI, a sample resource can be found at ( http://www.honorlevel.com.) Select your “best” resource and email the title/website along with your annotation to all Technology Education/Pre-Engineering student teachers.

30

Lack of classroom control is the most frequent reason that beginning teachers are not rehired. The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 48


ASSIGNMENT 3 (Annotated Resources Due: August 1) The Annotated Resources (24 points) assignment is designed to help students locate specific resources for their Instructional Planning Assignment (IPA). (Special Note: In order to complete this assignment, you will need to determine the content area associated with your IPA by consulting with your Cooperating Teacher during your one day visit or shortly thereafter.

Annotate at least five (5) resources that directly relate to the content area associated with your Instructional Planning Assignment you will be teaching. Resources should be a mix of print materials (books, journals) media, software and/or websites. Note: The resources you select should have a high probability of being used during the implementation of your Instructional Planning Assignment. Avoid selecting unrelated or secondary resources that would have a limited impact on the content area you are addressing.

ASSIGNMENT 4 (Philosophy of Education Due: August 15) Philosophy [80 Points] Part 1: What is your current Philosophy of Education? (12 points, one page max) Write your personal philosophy regarding what you feel education should be accomplishing with students in schools. (You may want to review the Cooperating School’s Philosophy of Education)

Part 2: Expand on your Philosophy of Education (24 points, two page max) Section A (12 Points two page max): Use research on educational philosophies to expand and refine your philosophy (see bibliography for books on reserve in the library such as Wiles, J. and Bondi, J.). Prepare a brief summary of at least two recognized experts concerning philosophy of education. Strive to make your revised philosophy interesting to read with a level of specificity. Avoid generalities that are vague, universally assumed and have little "substance". Your written philosophy should have an impact on someone who reads it. Consequently, it is recommended that you do at least two drafts of your philosophy and have someone read those drafts before submitting a final copy of the assignment. Section B (12 Points): In this section, use a bulleted list (see format below; include at least six items) of your beliefs that you could verbally communicate to a school Principal during an interview for a teaching position. In developing your bulleted list, focus on student outcomes that tend to be unique to the area of Technology Education/Pre-Engineering, e.g. student outcomes that are not readily accomplished in other content or subject areas of the curriculum, such as: •

Students will have an opportunity to explore technological careers related to product design and engineering.

Students will experience …

Students will be able to …

Part 3: Why does my son/daughter need Technology Education/Pre-Engineering? (12 Points, two pages max): Assume that a parent or guardian of one of your students has asked you this question! Prepare a response that is highly readable and makes sense to a parent who is concerned about the best education for a son or daughter. When preparing your response, work that is graded "excellent" should address the following: The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 49


The confusing and multiple meanings of the word "Technology." •

The current emphasis on using educational standards for all school subject areas. http://www.iteaconnect.org/TAA/Publications/TAA_Publications.html http://www.state.nj.us/education/aps/cccs/ http://www.mcrel.org/standards-benchmarks/

What parents expect from schools in terms of educating their children for the present and for their future roles as learners, consumers, workers and citizens.

(Remember that you are writing to a parent, not a college professor! If you want the full 12 points in this section you must address all three categories noted above!) Part 4: Objectives of Technology Education/Pre-Engineering (12 Points, two pages max) Prepare a comprehensive list of important objectives (five to ten) that are especially unique to a Technology Education/Pre-Engineering curriculum. Cite and document at least two different reference sources for the objectives listed. http://www.iteaconnect.org/TAA/Publications/TAA_Publications.html http://www.state.nj.us/education/aps/cccs/ http://www.mcrel.org/standards-benchmarks/ ASSIGNMENT 5 (Reading Assignment prior to first class) Read Guidelines for Student Teaching in Technology Education/Pre-Engineering and the SOE Culminating Clinical Experience Handbook in preparation for 1) class discussion 2) a report of 1 – 2 pages identifying and briefly discussing five important points from each document.

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 50


REFERENCES American Association for the Advancement of Science - Project 2061, (1994). Benchmarks for Science Literacy. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-508986-3. (On Reserve in Library) American Psychological Association (1994). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. ISBN 1-55798-243-0 (Recommended but not required) Brooks, J. and Brooks, M. (1993). In Search of Understanding: the Case for Constructivist Classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ISBN 0-87120-211-5 (Recommended.... not required) (On Reserve in Library) Chamuris, C. [Editor] (1996). A Framework for The Study of Technology in New Jersey. Trenton, NJ: Technology Educators Association of NJ. (On Reserve in Library) International Technology Education Association (2000). Standards for Technological Literacy. Reston, VA: ITEA. ISBN 1-887101-02-0 (On Reserve in Library) Jones, V. and Jones, L. (1998). Comprehensive Classroom Management. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon. ISBN 0-205-27107-3 NJ State Department of Education (2009). Core Curriculum Content Standards. Trenton, NJ. PTM1400.06. http://www.state.nj.us/education/cccs/ Raffini, J. P. (1993) Winners Without Losers: Structures and Strategies for Increasing Student Motivation to Learn. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon - Simon and Schuster, Inc. ISBN 0-205-14008-4. Saphier, J and Gower, R. (1997). The Skillful Teacher: Building your Teaching Skills. Carlisle, MA: Research for Better Teaching. ISBN 1-886822-06-9 Sprick, R. S. (2006). Discipline in the Secondary Classroom - A Problem Approach to Behavior Management. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. ISBN 13:978-0-7879-7795-5 (On Reserve in Library) Sprick, R. Misbehavior Occurs for a Reason. On line at http://www.cfisd.net/dept2/studentservices/reason.pdf Thompson, J. G. (1998). Discipline Survival Kit for the Secondary Teacher. West Nyack, NY: Center for Applied Research in Education. ISBN 0-87628-434-9 (On Reserve in Library) Wiles, J. and Bondi, J. (1998). Curriculum Development - A Guide to Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall ISBN 0-13-262098-7 (On Reserve in Library) Wong, H. and Wong, R. (2004). The First Days of School: How to Be An Effective Teacher: Mountain View: CA: Harry K. Wong Publications. Wood, Chip (1997). Yardsticks - Children in the Classroom Ages 4-14.Greenfield, MA: Northeast Foundation for Children. ISBN0-96 18636-4-1

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 51


TOPIC # 1: Citing Print References (Provided by Dr. Weber) Several student teachers have asked for an example of an annotated bibliography as well as recommendations for citing either a reference from printed material and/or an electronic media source. Please use the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual (Fourth Edition) as a style guide for citing work. You should give proper credit via reference to any sources you have quoted or referenced in the written work you are producing. (This point also applies to written references or web sites that you are using.) When creating an "annotation" of a reference, keep in mind that your brief description should accomplish two objectives, namely, (1) provide the reader with a clear, descriptive overview of the publication and (2) motivate the reader to obtain and read the publication! A sample annotation follows using the APA style for citing the reference: Brooks, J. G. and Brooks, M. (1999). In Search of Understanding - The Case for Constructivist Classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ISBN 0-87120-211-5 This book, co-authored by a college professor and a school superintendent is "must reading" for any educator who: • is trying to get students to be responsible for their own learning • wants students to think for themselves and move beyond simple recall and recognition • think that learning should be structured around "big ideas" or primary concepts • seek and value students' points of view • see the teacher as a facilitator and the student as a thinker, creator and constructor • Within ten chapters and 130 pages, the authors address the above topics and illustrate several ways teachers can use alternate forms of assessment to verify that Constructivist learning has taken place. • The last chapter of the book gives 13 specific recommendations that the classroom teacher might use to become a Constructivist teacher. TOPIC # 2: Citing Electronic Media References Please refer to the APA Publication Manual, ISBN 1-55798-241-4, fourth edition, page 218, for guidelines used for citing references obtained electronically. An example of a format for citing a web site is: Hutchinson, J. (1997) Design Projects for Technology Education/Pre-Engineering [On-line]. Accessed on (date). Available at http://www.tcnj.edu/~teched/designproj.html Please note: 1.

Read and understand the specifications for an assignment before starting. Ask questions if there is any uncertainty.

2.

Adhere to the TCNJ Student Guide to Academic Integrity (1998-99). See also TCNJ Student Handbook. The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 52


3.

Document all ideas, quotations or information taken from another source. Use the APA style manual to document and record all references used in the assignment.

4.

Unless otherwise indicated, all assignments should be word processed using a standard text format.

5.

You are expected to keep a copy of all assignments submitted for this course.

6.

All assignments should be submitted in class, not in instructor's mailbox or office, unless otherwise specified!

7.

In the event that an assignment is submitted after the due date, please check with the instructor regarding where it should be submitted.

GRADING CRITERIA FOR TED 480 ASSIGNMENTS A Excellent; 100-95% A- = 94-90% All aspects of the assignment are completed fully and in a comprehensive manner. Work in this category exceeds the basic requirements, is done in a neat, accurate manner, is well organized and has high impact on the reader. Student effort and "time on task" is at a high level.

B Good; B+ = 89-87%

B = 86-84%

B- = 83-81%

Assignment completed in a satisfactory manner. Work in this category meets assignment specifications. Minimal errors (10-15%) allowable in this category. Student effort and time on task is appropriate and expected for the assignment.

C Fair;

C+ = 80-78%

C = 77-75%

C- = 74-72%

Submitted work does not completely satisfy assignment specifications. Error level within 16 to 25 % range. Time on task may be below expectations for the particular assignment.

D Minimum Pass;

D+ = 71-69%

D = 68-66%

Submitted work is significantly below the required specifications for the assignment. Error level within the 26 to 40 % range. Time on task, effort level estimated to be low/very low for the particular assignment.

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 53


COVER SHEET Directions: A completed cover sheet must accompany every written assignment associated with this course. Please supply all information requested and staple the cover sheet to the written assignment being submitted. Print or word process the form; please sign the form where indicated

NAME(s): PHONE: (

EMAIL ADDRESS: )

COURSE: NAME OF ASSIGNMENT:

TODAY’S DATE: DUE DATE FOR ASSIGNMENT:

(Please see syllabus or semester schedule)

1. This assignment was completed by: An Individual_____ A Group______ (Check one) 2. Check here_____ if this assignment is being submitted for the first time. Remarks: 3. Check here _____ if this assignment is being resubmitted. (Note: Please submit the original assignment (e.g. marked copy returned by instructor) with the resubmitted assignment so instructor can determine revisions that were made.)

Remarks:

4. Signature(s) below verifies that I (we) have: •

• • •

read and understand the specifications for this assignment before starting to complete it. adhered to the TCNJ Student Guide to Academic Integrity (1998-99). See also the TCNJ Student Handbook. documented any ideas, quotations or information from another source that were not mine. used APA style manual to document and record all references used in the assignment.

STUDENT SIGNATURE(S):

If a group assignment, all members of the group must sign the cover

sheet.

Please Note: 1. 2. 3.

Unless otherwise indicated, all assignments should be word processed and submitted on 8 1/2 x 11 paper. You are expected to keep a hard copy and disk back-up copy of all assignments submitted for this course. In the event that an assignment is submitted after the due date, please check with the instructor regarding where it should be submitted.

The College of New Jersey – Department of Technological Studies – Page 54


guidelines