Page 1

UK EDITION 

BEYOND THE ORDINARY

WILD WATERS

LIFE SKILLS

A windsurfing first in the Faroe Islands

How to survive a bear attack

AOKI, DIPLO, MAC & MORE

MASTERS OF THE NIGHT Success secrets of superstar DJs

GET MORE VIDEOS, PICTURES, STORIES

REDBULLETIN.COM FEBRUARY 2016 £2.50

DEADMAU5 has 9 million Facebook fans and a net worth of $53 million


All-New All-New

Renault RenaultKADJAR KADJAR Start Start living living

The TheAll-New All-NewRenault RenaultKadjar KadjarXtreme XtremePack Pack

€€249 249per permonth monthwith: with:

From From

5 Years 5 Years Warranty Warranty 5 Years 5 Years Roadside Roadside assistance assistance 3 Years 3 Years Servicing Servicing included included Book Book a test a test drive drive Model Model shown shown KADJAR KADJAR Signature Signature Nav 1.5 NavdCi 1.5RRP dCi €29,290. RRP €29,290. PricePrice excludes excludes metallic metallic paint,paint, delivery delivery and dealer and dealer related related charges. charges. Maximum Maximum recommended recommended payments of €249. APR APR 6.9%.6.9%. TotalTotal cost of credit €2,779 inc doc completion fee €75 Optional final final payment €10,296. Excess mileage plus plus payments of €249. cost of credit €2,779 inc&doc & completion fee each. €75 each. Optional payment €10,296. Excess mileage agreement. Subject to lending criteria. Terms and and conditions apply,apply, see renault.ie. [Warning: You will thesethese goods untiluntil the final agreement. Subject to lending criteria. Terms conditions see renault.ie. [Warning: You not will own not own goods the final


delivery delivery charge charge €725.€725. Finance Finance example example Renault Renault Kadjar Kadjar Expression+ Expression+ RRP RRP €24,490 €24,490 includes includes 3 year 3 year Service Service Plan.Plan. Deposit Deposit €8,359. €8,359. TermTerm 36 monthly 36 monthly excess and charges tear charges return of Vehicle. exclusive a Renault Finance is made under hire purchase excess wearwear and tear may may applyapply uponupon return of Vehicle. OfferOffer exclusive to a to Renault Finance offer.offer. OfferOffer is made under a hirea purchase payment is made]. 5 Year / 200,000km Manufacturer’s Warranty as standard. payment is made]. 5 Year / 200,000km Manufacturer’s Warranty as standard.


THE WORLD OF RED BULL

32 WILD TIMES

The hostile waters around the Faroes gave windsurfer Dany Bruch his toughest test – and his biggest thrill

The subjects gracing this month’s pages of The Red Bulletin aren’t fans of taking it easy. From the world’s biggest superstar DJs, such as Skrillex and Diplo, who travel the globe throwing parties, to the windsurfer becoming the first to brave the freezing waters of the Faroe Islands, there’s not a lot of relaxing going on. Throw in Hard Enduro riders doing battle on a beach, Aussie actress Teresa Palmer filming underwater with leg weights and no air, and South Africa’s biggest street artists scaling walls and tagging trains in the name of community, and there’s a chance you might get the urge to jump out of your seat while reading about it. Enjoy the issue. 08



“Bedroom geniuses will one day take over the world” SKRILLEX AND DIPLO, PAGE 42 THE RED BULLETIN

F.SCOTT SCHAFER (COVER), SERGIO VILLALBA/WE PHOTO AGENCY, WARNER MUSIC

WELCOME


FEBRUARY 2016

70

AT A GLANCE

UPHILL STRUGGLE

GALLERY

Beach, forest, mountains – the elite of Hard Enduro face it all at Red Bull Sea To Sky

18  GOOD SHOTS! Photos of the month

BULLEVARD

54

25  INSPIRATIONS Movers and shakers

FEATURES 32 Surfing the Faroes

Making waves in the North Atlantic

LUKASZ NAZDRACZEW/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, FALKO ONE, GETTY IMAGES (2), DENNIS BRANKO

42 Superstar DJs

The rise and rise of the deck-spinner

56 SPRAY FOR TODAY

How South Africa’s street artists are leaving their distinctive mark and giving something back to the community

50 Heroes of the month TOUGH ACT TO FOLLOW

What makes a real man? Tom Hardy, who has played violent characters from Charles Bronson to the Krays, opens up

Actress Teresa Palmer, astronaut Chris Hadfield, actor Tom Hardy and social entrepreneur Thato Kgatlhanye

56 South African street art Four of the scene’s leading lights

64 Amsterdam nightlife Party harder in the Dutch capital

70 Red Bull Sea to Sky

Kicking up dirt on the Turkish Riviera

ACTION!

64

50 BREAKING PHOBIAS

When a fear of water struck on the set of Point Break, actress Teresa Palmer deployed her secret weapon: meditation THE RED BULLETIN

GOING DUTCH

Amsterdam has a party scene like no other – and clubland snapper Dennis Branko has the best insider knowledge

77  SEE IT. GET IT. DO IT. The best travel, gadgets, films, music, watches, wheels and events. Plus Wings for Life World Run, our cartoon, and fending off a bear 93 INNOVATIONS The latest hi-tech gear 98 FLASHBACK Tusks and tricks

09


CONTRIBUTORS INSIDE THIS ISSUE FEBRUARY 2016

WHO’S ON BOARD

RÜDIGER STURM

Weatherproof: Dany Bruch takes on the North Atlantic

Windsurfing in the Faroes “Dany is built from different materials,” says journalist Jenni Doggett of extreme windsurfer Dany Bruch. “He would just walk casually into the crazy freezing sea as if he was in the Caribbean.” On her trip to the remote Faroe Islands, Doggett found herself hanging out of a helicopter and braving the waves in a sea survival suit as she witnessed German-born Bruch become the first windsurfer to battle the brutal conditions in this stretch of the North Atlantic. See the results on page 32.

The Munich-based film and TV journalist is known for his interviews with Hollywood’s A-list. In this issue he talks to The Revenant star Tom Hardy about masculinity, violence and the joy of being caring. Page 54.

DENNIS BRANKO

The Dutch photographer has spent the last 11 years documenting nightlife in his hometown of Amsterdam. Read his expert guide to the perfect night in Europe’s capital of tolerance on page 64.

THE RED BULLETIN AROUND THE WORLD The Red Bulletin is available in 10 countries. This feature on snowboarding star Anna Gasser is from this month’s Austrian edition. Read more: redbulletin.com

IN FOCUS BEHIND THE LENS

“Once you get a taste of this event… it’s an addiction!” CLAUDIUS VASILESCU, PHOTOGRAPHER Claudius Vasilescu travelled to the Turkish Riviera for Hard Enduro competition Red Bull Sea to Sky, which saw him shoot incredible scenery from a helicopter as well as getting his hands dirty on the ground. Admire his handiwork on page 70.

10



High flyer: Romanian action sports snapper Vasilescu (right)

THE RED BULLETIN


THE RED BULLETIN: WEB HIGHLIGHTS

Video: cold water windsurfing Dany Bruch ventures into the Faroe islands’ subarctic waves. Watch the documentary of this stunning world first. redbulletin.com/danybruch

REDBULLETIN.COM Get all our stories instantly Subscribe to our newsletter or follow The Red Bulletin on Facebook, Instagram or YouTube.

NATURE’S NAKED MUSE

SEVEN STEPS TO BECOMING A PRO DJ

Photographer Magdalena Wosinska documents her travels on Instagram. Each place highlighted by her nude back.

Don’t release too much music, stick with your crew and party hard. House icon Seth Troxler reveals his golden rules.

redbulletin.com/nakedmuse

redbulletin.com/dj

12



THE RED BULLETIN

SERGIO VILLALBA/WE PHOTO AGENCY, MAGDALENA WOSINSKA, CARLO CRUZ/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

EXCLUSIVELY ON


NICE TO MEET YOU


/redbulletin

Visual Storytelling Beyond the ordinary

THE CAPTAIN OF ADVENTURE ALL-ROUND ACTION HERO WILL GADD IS A LIVING LEGEND IN THE TRUEST SENSE.

„IT‘S THE THRILL OF THE CHASE.“

PRINT

|

WEB

|

APP

|

SOCIAL


redbulletin.com

Š John Wellburn/Red Bull Content Pool


Editorial Director Robert Sperl Editor-in-Chief Alexander Macheck Editor-at-Large Boro Petric Creative Director Erik Turek Art Directors Kasimir Reimann, Miles English Photo Director Fritz Schuster

THE RED BULLETIN United Kingdom, ISSN 2308-5894 Editor Ruth Morgan Associate Editor Richard Jordan Music Editor Florian Obkircher Chief Sub-Editor Nancy James Deputy Chief Sub-Editor Davydd Chong Country Project and Sales Management Sam Warriner Advertisement Sales Mark Bishop +44 (0) 7720 088588, mark.bishop@uk.redbull.com Printed by Prinovis Ltd & Co KG, 90471 Nuremberg UK Office 155-171 Tooley Street, London SE1 2JP Tel: +44 (0) 20 3117 2000

Production Editor Marion Wildmann Managing Editor Daniel Kudernatsch Editors Stefan Wagner (Chief Copy Editor), Ulrich Corazza, Arek Piatek, Andreas Rottenschlager; Contributors: Muhamed Beganovic, Werner Jessner, Martina Powell, Clemens Stachel, Florian Wörgötter Web Kurt Vierthaler (Senior Web Editor), Christian Eberle, Vanda Gyuris, Inmaculada Sánchez Trejo, Andrew Swann, Christine Vitel Design Marco Arcangeli, Marion Bernert-Thomann, Martina de Carvalho-Hutter, Kevin Goll Photo Editors Rudi Übelhör (Deputy Photo Director), Marion Batty, Zoe Capstick, Ellen Haas, Eva Kerschbaum Illustrator Dietmar Kainrath Publisher Franz Renkin Advertising Placement Sabrina Schneider Marketing and Country Management Stefan Ebner (manager), ­Manuel Otto, Elisabeth Salcher, Lukas Scharmbacher, Sara Varming Marketing Design Peter Knehtl (manager), Simone Fischer, Alexandra Hundsdorfer, Mathias Schwarz Head of Production Michael Bergmeister Production Wolfgang Stecher (manager), Walter O Sádaba, Matthias Zimmermann (app) Repro Clemens Ragotzky (manager), Claudia Heis, Maximilian Kment, Karsten Lehmann Office Management Kristina Krizmanic IT Systems Engineer Michael Thaler Subscriptions and Distribution Klaus Pleninger (distribution), Peter Schiffer (subscriptions) General Manager and Publisher Wolfgang Winter Global Editorial Office Heinrich-Collin-Strasse 1, A-1140 Vienna Phone +43 1 90221-28800 Fax +43 1 90221-28809 Web redbulletin.com Red Bull Media House GmbH Oberst-Lepperdinger-Straße 11–15, A-5071 Wals bei Salzburg, FN 297115i, Landesgericht Salzburg, ATU63611700 Directors Christopher Reindl, Andreas Gall

16



THE RED BULLETIN Austria, ISSN 1995-8838 Editor Ulrich Corazza Sub-Editor Hans Fleißner Country Project Management Lukas Scharmbacher Advertisement Sales Alfred Vrej Minassian (manager), Thomas Hutterer, Corinna Laure anzeigen@at.redbulletin.com Subscriptions Subscription price €25.90 for 12 issues/year, getredbulletin.com, abo@redbulletin.at Printed by Prinovis Ltd & Co KG, D-90471 Nuremberg Disclosure according to paragraph 25 Media Act Information about the media owner is available at: redbulletin.at /imprint Austria Office Heinrich-Collin-Strasse 1, A-1140 Vienna Tel: +43 1 90221-28800 Contact redaktion@at.redbulletin.com

THE RED BULLETIN France, ISSN 2225-4722 Editor Pierre-Henri Camy Country Co-ordinator Christine Vitel Translation and Proof Reading Étienne Bonamy, Susanne & Frédéric Fortas, ­ Frédéric Pelatan, Claire Schieffer, Ioris Queyroi, Gwendolyn de Vries Country Project and Sales Management Leila Domas Advertisement Sales Cathy Martin; 07 61 87 31 15 cathy.martin@fr.redbulletin.com Printed by Prinovis Ltd & Co KG, 90471 Nuremberg France Office 12 rue du Mail, 75002 Paris Tel: 01 40 13 57 00

THE RED BULLETIN Germany, ISSN 2079-4258 Editor Arek Piatek Sub-Editor Hans Fleißner Country Channel Management Christian Baur, Nina Kraus Advertisement Sales Martin Olesch, martin.olesch@de.redbulletin.com Subscriptions Subscription price €25.90, for 12 issues/year, www.getredbulletin.com, abo@de.redbulletin.com

THE RED BULLETIN Ireland, ISSN 2308-5851 Editor Ruth Morgan Associate Editor Richard Jordan Music Editor Florian Obkircher Chief Sub-Editor Nancy James Deputy Chief Sub-Editor Davydd Chong Advertisement Sales Deirdre Hughes 00 353 862488504 redbulletin@richmondmarketing.com Printed by Prinovis Ltd & Co KG, 90471 Nuremberg Ireland Office Richmond Marketing, 1st Floor Harmony Court, Harmony Row, Dublin 2, Ireland Tel: +353 (1) 631 6100

THE RED BULLETIN Mexico, ISSN 2308-5924 Editor Luis Alejandro Serrano Deputy Editor Pablo Nicolás Caldarola Contributor José Armando Aguilar Proof Reader Alma Rosa Guerrero Country Project and Sales Management Giovana Mollona, Paula Svetlic Advertisement Sales Humberto Amaya Bernard; +55 5357 7026 humberto.amayabernard@mx.redbull.com Printed by RR Donnelley de Mexico, S de RL de CV (RR DONNELLEY) at its plant in Av Central no 235, Zona Industrial Valle de Oro en San Juan del Río, ­Q uerétaro, CP 76802 Subscription price $270, for 12 issues/year

THE RED BULLETIN South Africa, ISSN 2079-4282 Editor Angus Powers Chief Sub-Editor Nancy James Deputy Chief Sub-Editor Davydd Chong International Sales Management Lukas Scharmbacher Country Project and Sales Management Andrew Gillett Advertisement Sales Ryan Otto, ryan.otto@za.redbull.com Printed by CTP Printers, Duminy Street, Parow-East, Cape Town 8000 Subscriptions Subscription price R228, for 12 issues/year, www.getredbulletin.com, subs@za.redbull.com Mailing Address PO Box 50303, Waterfront, 8002 South Africa Office South Wing, Granger Bay Court, Beach Road, V&A Waterfront, Cape Town 8001 Tel: +27 (0) 21 431 2100

THE RED BULLETIN South Korea, ISSN 2465-7948 Editor SchinSu Bae Deputy Editor Jung-Suk You Sub-Editor Bon-Jin Gu Publishing Director Michael Lee International Sales Management Lukas Scharmbacher Advertisement Sales Hong-Jun Park, +82-2-317-4852, hjpark@kayamedia.com South Korea Office Kaya Media, 6 Samseong-ro 81-gil, Gangnam-gu, Seoul Tel: +82-2-317-4800, Contact redbulletin@kayamedia.com

THE RED BULLETIN Switzerland, ISSN 2308-5886 Editor Arek Piatek Sub-Editor Hans Fleißner Country Channel Management Antonio Gasser Product Management Melissa Stutz Advertisement Sales Marcel Bannwart, +41 (0)41 7663616 or +41 (0)78 6611727, marcel.bannwart@ch.redbull.com Subscriptions The Red Bulletin Reading Service, Lucern Hotline: 041 329 22 00, Subscription price 19 CHF, for 12 issues/year, www.getredbulletin.com, abo@ch.redbulletin.com

THE RED BULLETIN USA, Vol 5 issue 9, ISSN 2308-586X is published monthly by Red Bull Media House, North America, 1740 Stewart St, Santa Monica, CA 90404. Periodicals postage paid at Santa Monica, CA, and additional mailing offices. Editor Andreas Tzortzis Copy Chief David Caplan Director of Publishing and Advertising Sales Nicholas Pavach Country Project Management Melissa Thompson Advertisement Sales Dave Szych, dave.szych@us.redbull.com (LA) Jay Fitzgerald, jay.fitzgerald@us.redbull.com (New York) Rick Bald, rick.bald@us.redbull.com (Chicago) Printed by Brown Printing Company, 668 Gravel Pike, East Greenville, PA 18041, bpc.com Mailing Address PO Box 1962, Williamsport, PA 17703 US Office 1740 Stewart St, Santa Monica, CA 90404 Subscribe www.getredbulletin.com, subscription@redbulletin.com. Basic subscription rate is $29.95 per year. Offer available in the US and US possessions only. The Red Bulletin is published 12 times a year. Please allow four to six weeks for delivery of the first issue. For Customer Service 888-714-7317; customerservice@redbulletinservice.com

THE RED BULLETIN


THE MOUNTAIN IS YOURS

Live the dream and book your place on the piste at crystalski.ie from â‚Ź349pp

Terms and conditions: Offer applies to new bookings only & is subject to availability & change. Please see website for full details.


GALLERY


FINE LINE DOM DAHER/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

LA PLAGNE, FRANCE PHOTO: DOM DAHER

“Everything is about balance in life,” says world champion trial biker Kenny Belaey after reaching the safety of solid ground. But never was it so important. The Belgian rode his bike 18m along a slack line barely as wide as his tyres 2,700m above sea level, and 112m from the ground. “This was my trickiest obstacle so far,” admits Belaey. He isn’t exaggerating: it took him 80 attempts to manage the crossing. More Belaey bike tricks: belaeytrials.com



19


SUPER BOWL

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK PHOTO: MICHAEL TÆRSBØL JEPSEN When drought hit California in the late 1970s, many swimming pools stayed empty and skateboarders turned the concrete basins into playgrounds. Bowls have been a skatepark staple ever since and they still look like swimming pools. The creators of the Danish Faelledparken even put a so-called loveseat in their bowl, which local hero Bjørn Lillesøe uses for a frontside tailslide. Skateboard highlights: redbull.com/skateboarding

20




MICHAEL TÆRSBØL JEPSEN/RED BULL CONTENT POOL


MARCO CAMPELLI/RED BULL CONTENT POOL


WAVE RIDER RIMINI, ITALY PHOTO: MARCO CAMPELLI

At Red Bull Aqua Battle, 16 motorbike pros compete in one-on-one duels on 290hp jetskis off the Adriatic Coast. Czech rider Karel Hanika, 19, finished third – not a bad result for the former Red Bull Rookies Cup champion. But he’s still happier racing on the hallowed asphalt of the world’s best race circuits. Follow Hanika: twitter.com/98hanika



23


LUXE BODY WASH APPLE & BEARS True style starts in the bathroom Find out more at appleandbears.com


BULLEVARD THE HOME OF PEOPLE WHO INSPIRE, ENTERTAIN, EDUCATE, INNOVATE

JEFF VESPA/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

ACTION HERO ADAM DRIVER PROVES THAT A TRENDING TWITTER FEED AND PERFECTLY POSED INSTAGRAM SELFIES ARE NO MATCH FOR DISCIPLINE AND GOOD OLD-FASHIONED FOCUS Adam Driver’s had an unusual career trajectory: choirboy to US Marine to Kylo Ren, of the Star Wars dark side. The 6ft 3in Californian’s looks are as unconventional in Hollywood as his path to fame. Then there’s the fact his chest has its own Twitter page, but he doesn’t – the 34-year-old actor isn’t on social media. Driver does things differently, not as a result of a strategy meeting with his brand consultant, but a love of more old-school methods. He has a rep for applying his armed forces-bred discipline to every role he takes, from a priest in upcoming Scorsese flick Silence, to acting out unorthodox sex scenes on TV series Girls. Semper fidelis, as his Marines brethren say.

THE RED BULLETIN

25


BULLEVARD 1993

2016

Born in a rough district of Hollywood, DiCaprio says he could “see this other world out there”, and he swore that if he got a shot, he wouldn’t waste it. Sure enough, at 18 he shines in This Boy’s Life, his first big role. Impressed, his costar Robert De Niro tells director Martin Scorsese to check out “the kid”.

The actor teams up with Birdman director Alejandro González Iñárritu for The Revenant, an ambitious, epic Western thriller. Rumours are that his committed performance is a shoo-in for Oscar success – could it be fifth time lucky? “I don’t have any expectations,” says an ever-modest DiCaprio.

2014 1994 DiCaprio gets his first Oscar nomination, aged 19, for his turn as Johnny Depp’s learning disabled brother in What’s Eating Gilbert Grape? To take the indie movie role, he turns down an offer of “more money than I ever dreamed of” to appear in Disney film Hocus Pocus. “I’m proud of being a young man who stuck to his guns,” he says. Though nominated three times since, he hasn’t won… yet.

DiCaprio, who drives an electric car, uses solar panels and donates millions of his own money to charity, is appointed a UN representative on climate change.

2013

HOW I GOT HERE A CHILD ACTOR WHO HAS STAYED ON THE RAILS. A MEGASTAR WHO DOESN’T WANT TO PLAY A SUPERHERO. LEONARDO DICAPRIO IS ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S MOST UNCONVENTIONAL TALENTS. HERE’S HOW HE MADE HIS WAY TO THE TOP…

His portrayal of corrupt stockbroker Jordan Belfort in the controversial The Wolf Of Wall Street — his fifth film with Scorsese — wins DiCaprio some of his best reviews yet. “I want to make movies that take chances like this,” he says. “I want studios to say, ‘Hey, look at what this was able to do.’ Maybe they’ll take a chance on this kind of material in the future.”

1996

Blockbuster Titanic cements DiCaprio’s rep as box-office gold. But, despite the spotlight, he remains tight-lipped about his private life. “I want to be like Robert De Niro,” he says. “Being discreet has allowed him to be even more credible on screen.”

26



He turns down the lead in Spider-Man — the part goes instead to his pal Tobey Maguire — to star in Gangs Of New York. It’s DiCaprio’s first movie with his hero Martin Scorsese, almost 20 years after De Niro’s endorsement. “I was so impressed by his dedication, his willingness to try anything,” says Scorsese. “Leo will do whatever it takes.”

2012 DiCaprio plays sadistic plantation owner Calvin Candie, his first real villain, in Quentin Tarantino’s film Django Unchained. “Playing a bad guy opens you up to not having as many rules,” he says. “It takes you to your darkest place as a person and lets you indulge in that.”

THE RED BULLETIN

TIM MÖLLER-KAYA

1997

2002

DANNY MOLOSHOK/REUTERS

Passing up the Robin role in Batman Forever, he instead chooses Romeo + Juliet, despite misgivings about being a mainstream leading man. Getting him involved “high drama”, says director Baz Luhrmann.


BULLEVARD

HIDDEN TALENTS NICKI MINAJ HOW DO YOU BECOME NUMBER ONE? DO IT LIKE NO ONE ELSE CAN The most successful female rapper of all time is a woman of rare and substantial talents. Nicki Minaj walks the tricky line between rap credibility and pop celebrity, managing to remain authentic even when wearing shoes made from children‘s toys. Now, the 33-year-old has been offered a sitcom based on her childhood in Queens, NY. The only problem with being unique? Finding someone to portray you.

HOWARD HUANG

“JUST BEING MYSELF, I TOUCH A LOT OF PEOPLE WHO MIGHT NEVER HAVE PAID MUCH ATTENTION TO A FEMALE RAPPER” THE RED BULLETIN

27


BULLEVARD

THE DUEL THE MASTER OF THE GRAND SLAM TAKES ON THE KING OF THE SLOW JAM. WHO WILL EMERGE VICTORIOUS?

Vs

ANDY MURRAY British. Age 28. One of the world’s top tennis players.

$85 million

NET WORTH

Earned an estimated $16m from endorsements in 2015, in addition to $6.3m in prize money.

0 :1

DRAKE

Canadian. Age 29. One of the biggest rap stars on the planet.

$100 million

Took home $39.5m in 2015, and allowed Virgin America to put his face on their planes, swelling both his coffers and his ego.

TRANSPORT

0:2 BUGATTI VEYRON His first car was an old Chevrolet Malibu, but more recently he’s been cruising in a flashy limited-edition Bugatti sportscar, worth a modest $3.4m.

VOLKSWAGEN POLO Ditched his Ferrari as it made him “feel like a bit of a prat”, preferring the humble anonymity of his first car, a Polo. He kept his Aston Martin DB9, though.

LOVE LIFE

1:2

DOMESTIC BLISS No melodrama here. Murray’s romantic life is sorted — he married girlfriend-of10-years Kim Sears last April, and is set to become a dad any day now.

SOLO STAR With former squeeze Nicki Minaj dating Meek Mill, Drake’s least favourite rapper, rumour has it he’s now after tennis star Serena Williams.

SOCIAL MEDIA POWER

1:3

3.4 million TWITTER FOLLOWERS Visiting

26.9 million

TWITTER FOLLOWERS That’s six times the population of the Republic of Ireland. Some fanbase.

his Twitter account is like entering a gentler, emoji-sprinkled world.

STYLE

1:4

ACCIDENTALLY TOTALITARIAN Some thought the logo of his sportswear line was a bit... Teutonic, more like an emblem you’d see on the neck of that dodgy bloke on the bus.

NORMCORE IDOL Regarded by those in the know as a rising style icon, Drake has an owl-branded clothing line, October’s Very Own. Long live the sweater.

1:5

ENDEARINGLY DOUR Polite? Yes. Sportsmanly? Absolutely. But not known for his sense of humour.

BULLISH EXTERIOR His recent feud with Meek Mill was hardly Tupac vs Biggie, though.

FAMOUS FRIENDS NO A-LISTERS Even Federer and Djokovic were left off the wedding invite list.

2:5 BIGGEST WINS

35 CAREER TITLES, 2 GRAND SLAMS Stole the British nation’s hearts with a Wimbledon win.

28

3:5

MARIO BALOTELLI He’s pally with the Liverpool Football Club striker (on loan at AC Milan).

51 AWARDS, 1 GRAMMY Picked up the coveted Best Rap Album award at the 2013 Grammys for Take Care.

GETTY IMAGES (7)

ATTITUDE


BULLEVARD

WHAT I’VE LEARNED AMERICAN LONG AND TRIPLE JUMPER WILL CLAYE TOOK BRONZE AND SILVER MEDALS AT THE 2012 OLYMPICS. THESE ARE SOME OF THE PEOPLE INSPIRING HIM TO PUSH FOR GOLD IN 2016

QUEEN HARRISON

Girlfriend and hurdler “The sacrifices that Queen makes to achieve her goals inspire me, and her dedication motivates me and makes me push harder. It’s why I’m excited for the 2016 Olympics: I’m putting in 100 per cent to take myself to the next level.”

SAFFIE TUNIS

Mother and mentor “My mother escaped war in Sierra Leone, then in the US she raised three boys while getting a doctorate in nutrition. She was there for every meet, but didn’t push me. She just wanted me to get good grades and have fun. She taught me to hold myself to certain standards.”

DEION SANDERS Former American Football player

“I grew up liking Sanders. He had substance, but he was flashy. He made football more entertaining. His motto was, ‘Look good, feel good, play good.’ That always stuck with me. Pro sports are entertainment. I never take for granted that fans are watching.”

CARLO CRUZ/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, GETTY IMAGES (4)

KENDRICK LAMAR

US hip-hop artist “I feel so connected to him. Every song on his good kid, m.A.A.d city album is something I’ve been through growing up in Phoenix, from friends being shot to avoiding jail. I’ve seen how passionate he is on stage. Ever since, every competition, I try to bring as much passion as he does.”

THE RED BULLETIN

BRUCE LEE

Legendary martial artist and actor “Lee said, ‘The stiffest tree is most easily cracked, while the bamboo or willow survives by bending with the wind.’ That resonated as I’ve had to adapt a lot: switching schools, travelling, changing coaches. I’ve always done what I needed to do.”

29


BULLEVARD

SAY WHAT? FEELING THOSE NEW YEAR FITNESS RESOLUTIONS SLIPPING ALREADY? THE BRIGHT AND THE BEAUTIFUL HAVE SOME WORDS OF WISDOM TO HELP STRENGTHEN YOUR RESOLVE

“Cardio is the key. I have a personal trainer who travels with me if we have a big event coming up. I work out every day, but I need a trainer to motivate me”

UNIVERSAL MUSIC, GETTY IMAGES (5)

RIHANNA

30



THE RED BULLETIN


BULLEVARD

VIRTUAL INVESTMENTS WHO TO FOLLOW, FRIEND AND FIND OUT ABOUT ONLINE

“Training for me is a metaphor for life, period. The dedication, the determination, the desire, the work ethic, the great successes and the great failures… I take that into life”

MUPPETS WITH SYNTHS twitter.com/ SynthMuppets

DWAYNE JOHNSON, AKA THE ROCK

“I hate saying, ‘I like exercising.’ I want to punch people who say that”

“The best time of day to train is whenever you feel the strongest and you feel like you can actually perform at your best and get stuck in” HENRY CAVILL

JENNIFER LAWRENCE

“If I don’t feel confident about my body, I’m not going to sit at home and feel sorry for myself… It’s all about taking action and not being lazy” KIM KARDASHIAN

“The by-product of spending that much time in the gym is that you can fit into a catsuit” “Put a picture of what you want your body to look like in your kitchen. It’s a constant reminder where you need it most”

“Try to find something you can improve at, because that will keep you doing it. And that will make it fun” MATT DAMON

“You’re only human… so eat the damned red velvet cupcake” EMMA STONE

THE RED BULLETIN

THE NAKED DIARIES instagram.com/ thenakediaries

SCARLETT JOHANSSON

BRADLEY COOPER

Thanks to dodgy Photoshoppery, this feed unites two great things. Experience the simple joys of Animal geeking out with a modular synth, and the Swedish Chef espousing the virtues of the Korg Mono/ Poly in his own special way (“Korg! Korg! Korg!”).

No filters, no lighting: just women in their natural glory. What started as a kickback against the digital touch-up now has a following of more than 28 million. The Naked Diaries are an archive of true beauty in all its un-tweaked forms.

HOW WE GET TO NEXT facebook.com/ howwegettonext

This techno paradise of innovation stories concentrates on the really cool stuff the future has in store. Why own a robot pet? What will we all be eating in 2100? Which planet will we inhabit? It’ll also clue you into the amazing things happening right now.

31


COLD FRONT No windsurfer had ever attempted to tame the icy wilds of the Faroe Islands – until Dany Bruch took on the challenge of a lifetime

Words: Jenni Doggett  Photography: Sergio Villalba/WE Photo Agency


Bruch launches off at HĂşsavĂ­k amid lethal jagged rocks and reefs hidden by the swell



33


“Every time I went out, I wondered if I’d return. I was the first to do this, so I had no way of knowing”


Bruch acclimatises his hands by dipping them into the icy water. It’s a very painful process



35


“With eight-knot currents clashing with the wind and waves moving in opposite directions, I didn’t think I’d make it back at this point”

A local survival expert warned Bruch that if he fell into the sea, he’d die from hypothermia before reaching land

36




“I’ve always been fascinated by the Faroes. The conditions are so unpredictable and exposed. I’m driven by tackling the unknown”

Though beautiful, Tindhólmur has strong, unpredictable currents flowing along its narrow ridges

38



THE RED BULLETIN


he sea is furious. On its surface, a battered old fishing boat is being thrown around by white-tipped waves, but the captain is transfixed by something else: a shape in the sky. Above the wheeling blur of storm petrels, extreme windsurfer Dany Bruch hangs sideways for a second in the air. His feet are welded to a fluoro orange board, frozen hands clenching the boom, the sail raining silver spray onto his face. The fisherman shakes his head in disbelief. This is a sight never seen before in the Faroe Islands. Too many people have died in these capricious seas for the locals to go out there for THE RED BULLETIN

fun. Bruch drops back into the vicious swell and disappears. As an international windsurfing pro, German-born Bruch has competed all over the world, but this trip is personal. The 34-year-old has travelled almost 6,000 miles to the Faroe Islands from the Canaries, which have been his home for decades. Located halfway between Scotland and Iceland, the Faroes comprise 18 jagged volcanic islands sitting directly in the storm channel of the wild North Atlantic. They’re an adrenalin junkie’s wet dream. Being a long way from home – and from his comfort zone – is what brought Bruch here: he wants to do what no one else has ever done. “I’ve always been fascinated by the Faroes,” he says. “The conditions are so unpredictable and exposed. I’m driven by tackling the unknown. No one has attempted to windsurf in the Faroes, so I had to try.” Bruch is here to experience unique clifftop lakes, lethal reefs and 80kph snowstorms. “If I jump 10m today, I want 39


The subarctic Faroe Islands have high mountains surrounded by a very deep sea, resulting in extreme pressure systems. At their worst, freezing conditions have been recorded in August. This partly explains why Bruch is the first windsurfer to take on the dangerous open water here – and why the trip has been his most exhilarating yet “Even just approaching the water, you get a huge rush of adrenalin,” says Bruch. “I was bracing myself for 3°C water, and on top of that I was heading into unknown territory. Choosing the right moment to launch is everything”

to jump 20m tomorrow,” he says. “But surfing in extreme, unknown territory is another way to satisfy that need.” Having seen footage of Dany’s first attempts, Faroese meteorologist and survival expert Hanus Kjølbro is impressed by the lone windsurfer, but also has his concerns. On Bruch’s first day here, he hitched a lift into a vast, open channel where 5m swells clash with treacherous currents. Kjølbro is amazed that in such conditions, at least 2km from land and with a very real risk of hypothermia, Bruch made it back in one piece. “You’ve been jumping out of a plane without a parachute and luckily landing on haystacks,” is how he puts it. He offers to help Bruch track the unpredictable weather and points him in the direction of Húsavík, a pincer of dark rock framing explosive waves, where he’ll be protected from the full force of the North Atlantic. After several days of driving back and forth through blizzards and deep sub-sea tunnels, waiting for the right conditions, the time has finally arrived for Bruch to take to the water at Húsavík. Black grasshatted houses and wild sheep dot the hills, and relentless grey columns of rain pass through. Bruch preps his gear, snaps waterproof split-hoof boots into place and faces the sea. Something shifts in his stance and he’s off across the beach, wrestling with his sail against the strong wind as he enters the icy water. The swell tosses Bruch around and it’s starting to look like a losing battle. Then suddenly he catches a gust and he’s up, 40



racing across the bay, leaning back with one hand on the boom as if flying across subarctic seas was the easiest thing in the world. A full hour of flips and tricks passes before Bruch sails back to shore. If he had stayed any longer, there would have been a real danger of him seizing up in the cold, which would have prevented his return to land. He manages to raise a hand to the local bystanders who stand on the shore, fascinated by what they’ve witnessed. His hands are blistered and raw from the water, but Bruch is alive in the way only someone who’s just jumped into the unknown and survived can be. “I’ve surfed all over the world and in all sorts of conditions for more than 20 years,” he says when back on dry land. “But nothing has ever come close to this. The fear, the adrenalin… it was wild.” Watch our exclusive video of Dany Bruch taking on the Faroes at: redbulletin.com/faroes THE RED BULLETIN


Superstar DJ Steve Aoki has an estimated net worth of $55 million. His performances, like this one, feature Champagne and cake fights

42




Partying is the great cultural form of our age. It’s an end in itself: letting go and dancing the night away are a way of life. In this world, superstar DJs are cultural icons.

They influence trends on a global scale, fill stadiums and earn Hollywoodscale salaries. So who are they? What motivates them? And what can we learn from them?

Party

ERIK VOAKE

Gods


The Christopher Columbus of the DJ scene travels the world, discovering musical subcultures – such as baile funk in Brazil – and helping break them globally. Diplo, now 37, made his name in 2008 with rapper M.I.A. and the track Paper Planes, which sold more than four million copies in the US alone and featured in the film Slumdog Millionaire. Since then, he has produced hits for his band, Major Lazer, and for pop stars including Beyoncé, Justin Bieber and Madonna.

Social media: Almost 2.3 million likes on Facebook Worth: An estimated $15m Performances: 72 in 2015, plus gigs with Major Lazer

The Explorer:

DIPLO His trademark: He doesn’t merely follow trends, he creates them.

What can we learn from him? You won’t find inspiration on your doorstep. Travel the world and get yourself a new perspective.

Cool: He even managed to make Justin Bieber appear credible.

Uncool: Critics accuse him of cultural appropriation, profiting by sniffing out exotic subcultures and exploiting their commercial value.

ROMINA ROSALES

“One of the reasons I’m successful is that I can see things before other people do”


The Godfather:

SVEN VÄTH

“Stay true to yourself. And don’t forget to party!” When Väth began his career in 1982, it was still part of the DJ’s job to clear up the club at the end of the night. His breakthrough came in 1986 with the track Electrica Salsa (credited to OFF), and two years later he opened Omen, Germany’s first techno club. An inspiration to superstar DJs such as Tiësto, Väth, 51, still plays the world’s top clubs every weekend, for up to 30 hours at a time.

His trademark: Väth got where he is today – and remains relevant – because of his sincere passion for dance music. While other veteran DJs are content to merely manage their legacy, he’s still discovering, promoting and working with new talents.

What can we learn from him? It doesn’t matter what other people say: if it feels right, do it, and you’ll be successful.

Cool: The catchphrases he shoots out from behind the decks, such as, “The message is gude Laune, Alda [a good mood, man]!” You’ll find a selection on Väth’s fan page: gudelaune.de

Social Media: Almost 1.1 million Uncool: likes on Facebook  Worth: An estimated $14m Performances: Papa Sven is not a nickname to be proud of. 106 in 2015

The Visionary:

KIDKUTSMEDIA(2), CARLO CRUZ/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, GETTY IMAGES

RICHIE HAWTIN “When I started making music, there was no rule His trademark: Hawtin is viewed as the cobook; we had to founder of minimal techno, which make it up. That’s strips the genre down to its bare how I still work” bones, to hypnotic effect. On In 1990, at 19, the Canadian started a techno revolution with his debut track, released under the name FUSE. Then, 14 years ago, he played a part in the development of software that allowed DJs to mix MP3s. At first people laughed, now it’s standard.

the technical side, he has helped develop new DJ controls and the first DJ Twitter app.

What can we learn from him? Never settle for the status quo.

Cool: In 2015, the University of Huddersfield granted him an honorary doctorate – the first time an electronic music DJ had earned such an award.

Social media: 1.2 million likes on Facebook Worth: An estimated Uncool: $9m Performances: 82 in 2015 Although many DJs now have lighter loads to carry thanks to Hawtin’s technological input, he’s seen as sounding the death knell of good old vinyl culture. 45


“If I can win Grammys, then that means all of you yet-to-beseen bedroom geniuses will one day take over the world” Before 2010, many rock fans weren’t interested in club music. Skrillex went a long way to changing that with his EP Scary Monsters And Nice Sprites. Recorded in his bedroom and publicised by the 22at-the-time DJ himself via social media, the EP went on to sell two million copies and win two Grammys. Skrillex now has six of the awards in his trophy cabinet – more than any other DJ – and has worked with artists as varied as Justin Bieber, Bob Marley’s son Damian, and former members of The Doors.

Annie Mac, 37, isn’t a music producer, but a DJ in the most traditional sense. Mac discovers new talent and presents it to the public through her weekday BBC Radio 1 show, in her club sets and at her music festival, Lost & Found.

The Tastemaker:

ANNIE MAC

SKRILLEX His trademark: He couldn’t care less about the rules of the business; he releases his songs spontaneously with no ad campaign and publicises his music via smartphone apps.

What can we learn from him? Waiting for help is a waste of time. Do your own thing, even if it looks like you have no chance of success. “See obstacles as an opportunity to create something new.”

Cool: Skrillex was considered the most hated person in club music because of his signature sound. How did he react to that? “Sorry, I don’t have much time for those haters on the internet.”

Uncool: His style: long hair with an undercut, and horn-rimmed glasses. For a wonderful pastiche, go to the photoblog Girls That Look Like Skrillex.

Her trademark: Mac has an incredible ear for hits and turns raw talent into stars. They remain loyal, giving her exclusive mixes and new tracks, which only reinforces her reputation as a tastemaker.

What can we learn from her? You can get to the top by looking out for others.

Cool: Mac is a woman who has asserted herself in the male-dominated world of nightclubs, where far too often women are stood behind the bar rather than behind the decks.

Social media: Almost 300,000 likes on Facebook Worth: No data Uncool: No one has managed to find available Performances: 48 in 2015, plus five radio shows a week anything uncool about Annie Mac.

HOUSETRIBECA.COM(2), BREE KRISTEL CLARKE/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

“The most important thing about being a broadcaster is believability – someone knowing that everything that comes out your mouth is real. It’s your job to have an opinion”

Social media: More than 19.5 million likes on Facebook  Worth: An estimated $36m Performances: 81 in 2015 (in 2011, it was a staggering 322)

The Boy Wonder:


47


The Businessman:

CALVIN HARRIS His trademark:

Business savvy. For years he was remixing for other musicians such as Florence + The Machine, and instead of payment he would ask to visit the studio. That’s how he can spruce up his singles with vocals from stars like Rihanna.

What can we learn from him? For true success, you need patience and a long-term plan.

Cool: Models and pop goddesses can’t get enough of him. He’s dated Rita Ora and Anne Vyalitsyna, and is currently linked to Taylor Swift.

Uncool: Posing as an underwear model for Giorgio Armani and saying that he’s trying not to be a Justin Timberlake kinda guy. Not good.

Calvin Harris, who turns 32 this month, hates interviews and says he can’t dance or sing, but what does that matter when you’re the world’s highest-paid DJ, pulling in $400,000 per performance? The Scot reckons his success is down to pure luck, but anyone who has heard We Found Love, his huge hit single featuring Rihanna, knows that Harris has an uncanny talent for a catchy tune.

Social media: More than 13 million likes on Facebook Worth: An estimated $160m Performances: 77 in 2015

GETTY IMAGES(4), DREW RESSLER/RUKES.COM, NICOLAS KANTOR

“I know how to treat my voice to make it sound as good as it possibly can – which is still not that good”


The Bad Boy:

DEADMAU5

“Get out there and immerse yourself in the world you created” Best known for wearing a mouse’s head mask, Deadmau5 is a 35-year-old Canadian who likes creating Twitter storms. There’s a reason why superstars react to his attacks – these days, he’s in their league.

Social media: More than 9 million likes on F­ acebook  Worth: An estimated $53m Performances: 34 in 2015

His trademark: The bad boy of the mainstream DJ circus loves confrontation. He informed his former protégé Skrillex via Twitter that his new music was sh-t. He accused Madonna of promoting drug use. His fans – who he calls “The Horde” – love him for it, and for pioneering the livestreaming of recording sessions. After one such studio session, a fan named Chris James sent him some song lyrics – and Deadmau5 used them. Their joint venture, The Veldt, went on to be a hit.

What can we learn from him? Be upfront and say what you think. Some people will have a problem with it, but you’ll stand out and earn people’s respect.

Cool: Disney made a legal challenge regarding his mouse’s head mask. Deadmau5 showed the corporation the middle finger… and won.

Uncool: The speed freak had his Ferrari 458 Italia custom-wrapped with an image of rainbow-farting internet meme Nyan Cat. Ferrari was so appalled by the garish makeover that the car company issued a cease-and-desist order against Deadmau5.

The Entrepreneur:

STEVE AOKI “I still feel like a young punk with $200 in the bank” When Aoki was just 18, he was organising concerts for hardcore punks and running a record label. He went on to become a DJ entrepreneur. Now, at 38, Aoki runs four restaurants, a DJ management agency and a clothing line, and markets headphones. Cameo roles in films and on TV have tapped into new target audiences.

Social media: Almost 7.5 million likes on Facebook  Worth: An estimated $55m Performances: 143 in 2015

His trademark: He was the first to understand that a 21st-century DJ couldn’t just play records, but had to be a brand and sell a lifestyle. How does he juggle his business, produce music and manage to perform 217 times a year, as he did in 2014? With the discipline of a top-level sports star. Aoki, who doesn’t drink and works out daily, is redefining what it means to be a DJ: party with a passion, but without the hangover.

What can we learn from him? You can be authentic and rich at the same time.

Cool: Aoki has turned the DJ into a rock star. He headbangs on stage, cracks open bottles of Champagne and showers it over the ladies in the front row. The highlight of any Aoki show is the legendary cake fight with the crowd.

Uncool: When the satirical website Wundergroundmusic.com made fun of Aoki’s stage antics, he threatened to sue.

49


HEROES

“ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE” TERESA PALMER The Aussie actress overcame her fear of water when filming Point Break by concentrating hard – on becoming a mermaid

the red bulletin: Your son has the same name as one of the main characters in Point Break. Is that a coincidence? teresa palmer: Yes, as my son was born before we started shooting the film. But both were named for the same reason; in Buddhism, Bodhi means ‘enlightenment’. So one of the main stars in an action-packed blockbuster is linked to Buddhist enlightenment? In Point Break, Bodhi follows the beat of his own drum. He 50



knows it’s important to love yourself and follow your own path. It’s a philosophy that my husband and I and our close friends follow. Was it difficult to find that path? After your parents’ divorce, you lived with your manic-depressive mother in social housing, which can’t have been easy... I certainly didn’t have a traditional upbringing, but that helped me find my grounding. Having to rely on myself equipped me to navigate through life’s peaks and valleys. But in the past,

How did you cope with your fear of water in such a stressful situation? First, I meditated. I learned to understand that my fear was to do with experiences in my childhood and how to let go of that fear. It also helped that I was trained by a freediving champion. She was like a mermaid underwater, so calm and peaceful. I focused on wanting to transform into her. And I thought of giving birth to my son, which happened just before we started shooting the movie, and which was a really empowering experience. So you work with the power of your imagination? Yes. I’ve believed in the power of my intuition since I was

“I HAD TO ACT 6M BELOW THE SURFACE OF THE WATER FOR THREE HOURS WITH WEIGHTS STRAPPED TO MY LEGS” I also made a lot of decisions out of a sense of fear. Instead of having faith in myself, I looked for comfort in external places. What do you mean by external places? Relationships, mainly. I found comfort in other people, not in myself. I found it in my career and the attention I was getting from being an actor. All these fleeting and unstable things. But when I started cultivating self-love, I recognised that this was the only way to move

weights while filming. And we didn’t have any oxygen tanks in the scene. Wait… You were underwater without oxygen? When you were running out of breath, you gave a sign and someone dived down with an air cylinder. It was really scary. Because you knew that when you panicked, you couldn’t go straight up to the surface. Otherwise your lungs would explode. It was quite a mental challenge for me.

a teenager. When I was 15, I wrote in my journal: I’m going to star in films, I’m going to be represented by the William Morris Agency, have babies and a husband and live in LA. And that’s how it happened. There’s such magic in the world. Anything is possible. My grandmother taught me that, and it’s something I’ll pass on to my children. Rüdiger Sturm twitter.com/tez_palmer THE RED BULLETIN

JUSTIN R. CAMPBELL/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

B

orn in Adelaide, Australia, Teresa Palmer always knew she was destined for Los Angeles living. The 29-year-old mum of one has worked hard to establish herself as a Hollywood actress, but never more so than in upcoming film Point Break, an action-packed remake of the Keanu Reeves classic in which she stars with Édgar Ramirez, Luke Bracey and Ray Winstone. Meditation, mindfulness, motherhood and mermaids all helped her go deeper than she ever thought possible.

through life in a healthy and conscious way. That was thanks to my husband. He taught me to break out of the old patterns. What do you have to do to adopt that mindset? I read books, I meditate and I surround myself with people who live consciously and think in a similar way to me. I also practise mindfulness. How does practising mindfulness help you? I had a pretty transformative experience when I was shooting Point Break. I had to act 6m below the surface of the water for three hours, with weights strapped to my legs, despite the fact I’ve never been comfortable in the sea. They’d only remove the


Teresa Palmer, 29, swapped humble beginnings in Australia for the heights of Hollywood and found her way back from fame through the power of mindfulness


Since retiring from his job as an astronaut, Chris Hadfield, 56, no longer has to take his protein pills or put his helmet on


“VISUALISE ANY FAILINGS” CHRIS HADFIELD The Canadian is the best-known astronaut since Neil Armstrong. Here, he explains the power of negative thinking

D CHRISTOPHER WAHL/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

uring his 21 years as an astronaut, Chris Hadfield spent almost 4,000 hours in space and orbited Earth more than 2,000 times. He became a star three years ago when, on his final mission, he took his guitar and performed an acoustic cover version of David Bowie’s Space Oddity from the International Space Station. The video, filmed 400km above Earth, became a YouTube sensation, receiving more than 27 million views. In his bestselling book, An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth, Hadfield writes about everyday life in space. Here, he explains what we can take from the experience and apply to life on our planet. the red bulletin: You faced life-threatening risks as an astronaut. Even at lift-off, all you could do was hope the rocket didn’t go up in flames. How do you cope with fears like that? chris hadfield: The problem and the answer are in your question. As soon as you’re hoping, you’ve already lost, because hoping means THE RED BULLETIN

you’ve lost control. If you’re relying on luck, you’re no better than a Chihuahua, a quivering, helpless little dog. An astronaut isn’t helpless before his fate – he checks exactly what could go wrong during a rocket launch. In my book, I call that the power of negative thinking. What do you mean? Self-help gurus are always advising us to think positively and envisage success, but it’s about as helpful as thinking about cupcakes. Just thinking about them isn’t going to help. It’s more important to think

Even though you’re aware that being an astronaut is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world? I never experienced any fear when I got into a spacecraft – not because I was brave, but because I’d practised solving every problem, thousands of times. Being well prepared makes all the difference. It minimises any fear and gives you confidence. Doesn’t negative thinking make you depressed in the long term, though? Hang on a minute! I’m not saying you should give up all hope. The main thing is to visualise failure, not defeat. Can you give an example? You’re giving a talk… what

different from a rocket launch. There’s just a slightly different level of preparation. But what about risks that are beyond your control, even with the best preparation? A better question to ask would be: how does one correctly assess risk? We’ve all got to die some time. The sooner you come to terms with that, the better. You have to take risks if you want to live your life to the fullest. But you should still prepare yourself for the risks as well as you possibly can. It sounds so easy when you put it like that… Let’s say someone puts you behind the wheel of a racing car hurtling along at 250kph. If you haven’t got a driving

“YOU HAVE TO TAKE RISKS IF YOU WANT TO LIVE YOUR LIFE TO THE FULLEST, BUT PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THEM AS WELL AS YOU CAN” what could go wrong with a mission. Visualise failure, not success. That’s what’s essential to survival as an astronaut. I was an astronaut for 21 years, but I only spent six months in space. The rest of the time, I was looking into every detail that might go wrong during a mission. Once you’ve understood all the potential risks and you’re forewarned against them, fear no longer plays a part in your thought process.

might happen? You might forget your lines! OK, so if you forget your lines, you can crack a joke about the weather and try to get back to where you should be that way. What else might go wrong? Your microphone might malfunction, or you might get thirsty. Work out strategies to deal with the five things most likely to go wrong, so that you can remain in control whatever happens. In that sense, giving a talk isn’t any

licence, it’s not going to turn out well. But if you’re a racing driver, we can assume you’ll be able to control the car. It’s the same situation, but you’re the one who makes the difference. In other words, don’t let your fears be an excuse for you to hide under the blankets all your life. Get rid of the fears and make your dreams come true. Florian Obkircher chrishadfield.ca

53


Tom Hardy, 38, has had many violent roles, from jailbird Charles Bronson to Bane in The Dark Knight Rises


“BE MASCULINE, NOT MACHO” TOM HARDY The actor pulls no punches on

screen, but knows that being a real man means taking care of someone in a very different way

SYDELLE WILLOW SMITH, JAY L. CLENDENIN/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES

T

he red bulletin: What’s the relevance of the wristbands you’re wearing? tom hardy: They’re for organisations like Help For Heroes. I have a lot of friends in the Army, and some of them have lost limbs or suffered serious mental trauma. These are people who fight for our freedom. Soldiers are a specific type of person, and I feel a little bit guilty that I’m not one myself. It’s important to know that there are people like that in this world we live in. We shouldn’t turn our backs on them. But everyone’s afraid of violence, aren’t they? I can only speak for myself. Art often comes from a dark place. It’s my job to find out everything there is to know about a character, regardless of how awful they are. So you must have discovered a lot about the nature of violence? Real violence is horrible in a f--ked-up way, but at the same time it’s sober and prosaic. When something violent happens, it’s usually a shock and comes from nowhere. At the same time, perpetrators of violence can be really paradoxical. Take Ronnie Kray, one of the gangster twins I played in Legend. If he wasn’t taking his medication, he was prone to these massive fits of rage. But he could also be infectiously funny. He was an utterly warm-hearted person. THE RED BULLETIN

Is a certain degree of violence also an expression of masculinity? You have to fully accept your own masculinity. But that has nothing to do with being macho. It also means that you can be like a mother; you can have a caring role. It’s about consideration, patience and cognitive skills. And if you can manage that, then when you die, someone will turn around and say, “Now, he was a good man…” What makes a good man in a professional sense? Showing mutual respect. You have to give your colleague that much when you know that he’s been a master of his craft for a good while already. You know he isn’t just sleepwalking through his career. You say to yourself, “I’ll help this guy however I can. I’ll try and make his job easier.” But there needs to be reciprocity. You help the other guy and he helps you. Would you say that’s the way to win battles? That, plus discipline, and the right amount of pressure applied to yourself and the talent you have. You also need to know that you can balls it up, look stupid and fail. But you carry on. You can’t win a fight if you haven’t been knocked out first. You don’t know what winning is if you don’t know what losing feels like.  Rüdiger Sturm Catch Hardy in The Revenant, out now. foxmovies.com/movies/ the-revenant

Bags of drive: Thato Kgatlhanye is repurposing waste materials

“SHARE YOUR VISION” THATO KGATLHANYE The 22-year-old Red Bull Amaphiko graduate and social entrepreneur is using waste to turn a profit and do good the red bulletin: How important is it to share your dream? thato kgatlhanye: I think all leaders who have managed to do great things were able to share their visions and have others champion their visions far more than they possibly could have. Your company, Rethaka, makes solar-panelled schoolbags from recycled plastic, which charge during the day to allow children to study at night. Does a great idea sell itself? What we’ve accomplished with pretty much no marketing budget – reaching the likes of Bill Gates – is huge. It has shown me you don’t need to be a scientist to make an impact. Are you enjoying the journey? When you start something, you need a clear vision of what you’re trying to do and where you want to go with it. Then, embrace the journey. I need to learn as much as I can and set audacious goals that I’m going to look back on 10 years from now and say, “God damn, you did it!”  Setumo-Thebe Mohlomi repurposeschoolbags.com

55


THE WRITING IS ON THE WALL

56



THE RED BULLETIN


Falko One, City Of Gold Urban Art Festival, Johannesburg 2015

The power of street art lies in its ability to subvert the status quo and inspire new possibilities in those who view it. Four of South Africa’s finest artists explore their work with The Red Bulletin

PHOTO BY THE ARTIST

Words: Dylan Muhlenberg

THE RED BULLETIN

57


Whether it’s a word sprayed under a bridge, an image festooned on the façade of a building, or an artist’s tag scrawled on the side of a train, the unstoppable rise of both commissioned and unsanctioned street art is a provocative force with the ability to inspire and uplift. For the people, by the people, street art challenges the viewer to stop, think and engage with the city they inhabit. The best art tells a story, and the best artists compose a narrative with a rhythm that’s not unlike a piece of music. More jarring work impresses with its sheer audacity. Not destined for the trophy cabinet of a privileged few, street art is a democratised visual feast that serves all and acts as a foil to a landscape littered with marketing, media and government messaging.

58



LUKE DANIEL/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

Each of the artists The Red Bulletin spoke to has a unique and instantly recognisable style. But although so much separates and differentiates the four artists, they’re united – all contributing to the soul of their streets. THE RED BULLETIN


Falko One, Once Upon A Town, Westminster 2015

FALKO ONE The OG Having spent close to three decades painting as a graffiti artist, Falko One is finally doing the type of work that he wants to do. “You have to realise that when we started hip-hop, we never thought we could get paid for it,” says Falko One. “Especially graffiti. Yes, some people would come and ask you to do their shop sign, or paint their girlfriend’s name on a page, and you’d get five rand here or there, but never this.” Falko One first realised he could live off his talents when, in 1994, he was paid 1,000 rand to paint a train heading up to the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, in the Eastern Cape Province. The following year, he toured Sweden with a rap group. Then the commissions and corporate work started rolling in. “It’s taken 23 years to put my foot down and say, ‘No more dumb commercial work.’ Your artwork is going to have no value if you’re always doing someone else’s stuff. Now I’m older, I realise that you don’t express yourself if you’re mimicking what you see. There’s nothing of yourself in your work until you discover who you are. That’s very important. So now I want to push my own cause.” This is where the Once Upon A Town project comes in. In 2011, Falko One painted the small town of Darling, and since then the initiative has grown into a journey with endless possibilities. “It’s about going into a place – whatever the culture, language, race or religion of the people – and staying three or four days. No matter how poor, or what we perceive as poor, these people are, their little home is still their cherished possession; even if it doesn’t have windows, it’s where they eat, raise their kids and lay their head. Being given permission to paint these homes is what Once Upon A Town is about: making these people living in the middle of nowhere feel like they belong.” falcostarr.wix.com/graffitiart THE RED BULLETIN

59


FAITH47 The Enigma

In the same way that street art pioneers Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat went from painting directly onto their urban environment to exhibiting in galleries, when Faith47 isn’t working outside she’s channelling the streets to create art in a wide range of media, ranging from graphite, spray paint, oil paint and ink to photography, video and collage. When The Red Bulletin spoke to her, Faith47 was in New York with her show Aqua Regalia, an exploration of the sacred and the mundane by way of shrines made from discarded objects she collects on her travels. An artist in the truest sense of the word, Faith47 is able to jump from medium to medium and express herself in myriad ways. This approach has attracted international recognition of her work and led to her participation in numerous projects worldwide. “I allow my visual exploration to bleed into any medium that I’m interested in,” she says. “I don’t subscribe to the belief that you have to categorise yourself – in my case, either as a ‘street artist’ or ‘photographer’. Instead, I’m interested in how all the different mediums I use, which include video, printmaking, oil painting and collage, help to further my imagery as a whole.” While Faith47’s work is undeniably beautiful, there is always more to it than just a pretty picture. For example, her latest work, Estamos Todos Los Que Cabemos, which she painted on the side of a building in Harlem as part of the Monument Art NYC project, has the theme of immigration. “For that work, I referenced the symbolic migratory patterns of animals,” she says. “Nature sees no borders, but humans have developed a system of exclusion and segregation, drawing imaginary lines around the planet. When studying nature, we are reminded that the Earth is one living body and belongs to no one. So each person born on this planet should essentially have the same right to travel on it.” Faith47 aims to create an intimacy and sensitivity within a harsh environment, merging softer visual storytelling within harder, emotive textural backgrounds. While highly personal and reflective of what she’s experiencing and exploring in her life, it’s a necessary and therapeutic way for her to exist. “I believe that if any of my work resonates with someone else, it would be because we’re fundamentally very similar at a subconscious level,” she says. “And what people resonate with are not my thoughts, but their own, which the visuals I create conjure up from within.” faith47.com

60



THE RED BULLETIN


LEBOGANG RASHETABA, REYNALDO ROSA

Faith47, The Psychic Power Of Animals, New York 2015

THE RED BULLETIN

61


Freddy Sam, I Am Because We Are, Johannesburg 2014

FREDDY SAM Huge works create an impact with their size alone, but when serving a purpose that goes beyond mere aesthetics, big art grows bigger still. And heights don’t come much headier than Freddy Sam’s 10-storey-high painting of a young Nelson Mandela sparring. Sam suffered for his art – he’s terrified of heights. “Don’t look down,” is the artist’s advice for conquering your fears and getting the job done. “That’s also a metaphor,” he says. “Focus on the art. Know yourself. It’s about complete focus, and it’s exhilarating being able to do it.” Sam’s murals put a spotlight on various social issues and have been commissioned by international organisations including WWF, Google and Doctors Without Borders. “It’s important for me to create work that the community I’m painting for is proud of,” he says. “Through interviews, I try to make murals that are relevant and that the community feels a sense of ownership of.” By the time you read this, Sam will have been in New Orleans working on a project with Amnesty International, then the Dominican Republic for a residency, followed by Los Angeles for a mural commission, Hawaii for a street art festival and then right back to LA to work on more murals. “What I’m grateful for are the experiences my art has provided,” he says. “I realise the meaning of my work is the very action of it, and therefore I must just keep on practising, exploring and experimenting, and the work will evolve naturally. As soon as you apply your mind to something, the world starts to provide for that.” freddysam.com instagram.com/freddysam

62



THE RED BULLETIN

BRUCE HORACK, PHOTO BY THE ARTIST

The New Muralist


TOE

The Trainspotter

GLOK CREW

Above and top: Toe’s canvas is 100m long and motorised

The act of painting a train is done in the belief that art should be integrated into the life of a city. And there’s no better way of getting your work seen than having it transported around the metropolis. “I’d catch the train to school every day,” says Toe, who now runs his own business, “and seeing things on the track line was a big inspiration for me.” Toe progressed from painting trains to taking commissions for walls and trainers at event activations, but, unlike many of his peers, he still gets a rush from bombing trains. “If you want to do a proper piece, especially a train, you need to find a space, recce it, create the piece as quickly as possible, then get out of there,” he says. “Witnessing people’s reactions and seeing it running in full colour for the first time – when you paint it at night, it’s too dark to see – makes everything worthwhile. The production that Toe painted with Blak, Wer, Sure, Ink, Slate, Name and Raze in 2013 was not only a personal pinnacle, but a benchmark for South African street art in general: the country’s first graffiti-ed ‘whole train’. “To paint something like that was really hard because a train is, like, 100m long and can be seen from so many different positions. After seeing an opportunity with some new trains being introduced, we checked every week for months and when we finally found a break in the routine, we painted the whole thing in 35 minutes. Eight guys, eight carriages – it was amazing!” The next day, there was another train parked in front of the one they’d painted, and as the crew arrived to photograph their efforts, it started pulling away slowly, like a huge curtain being drawn back. “Nobody paints like they were painting five or six years ago,” says Toe. “The streets are dead. That’s why I want to keep on painting trains. I’d rather make a living in a different way than doing commissioned jobs. It’s good money, but if you have this subversive form of art and are using it for what’s essentially marketing or advertising – well, that doesn’t work for me.” graffitisouthafrica.com

THE RED BULLETIN

63


Club-hopping by bike, ritzy strip shows, live music in former churches, and a mayor determined to keep the part y going... Clubland photographer Dennis Branko gives us his 10 tips for the perfect night out in the Dutch capital WOR DS: ANDR E AS ROT TENSCHL AGER  PHOTOGR APHY: DENNIS BR ANKO

T HE A MST ER DA M NIGH T L IF E GUIDE

VICE


CIT Y

A L’Elephant du Congo: “No one’s shy here when night falls,” says Amsterdam nightlife expert Dennis Branko

65


1

NIGHTLIFE LIKE NOWHERE ELSE

“Welcome to the city where you can be whoever you want to be. Amsterdam likes to celebrate its tolerance – that much I can tell you after 11 years as a nightlife photographer. It doesn’t matter if you’re a hip-hop kid, a punk or a tourist, whether you’re gay, straight or dressed ludicrously, you’re going to have fun in the 1,500-or-so clubs and bars that the city has to offer. Dress code is a foreign concept. The crowd comes from all over the world. And quite aside from the liberal drugs policy and the world-famous Red Light District, you can also rely on help from our Night Time Mayor, Mirik Milan. Yes, you read that right: in Amsterdam, there’s a Night Time Mayor to represent the interests of club owners. One of the things Milan fights for is your right to party longer into the night. So you want to stay out till 7am? No problem.” amsterdam.info

Dancing in Amsterdam: “Women here hate show-offs”

66

2

PARADISO: A MUST-SEE WHEN YOU’RE IN THE DUTCH CAPITAL

“If you haven’t been to Paradiso, you don’t know Amsterdam. The club is near Leidseplein, a square in the city centre. It was a church until 1968 and then became a bastion of counterculture. The Sex Pistols and The Rolling Stones have played there. Hippies have smoked pot there. Now you can discover two scenes jostling for space on a single night at Paradiso: from 9pm, there are live acts, then at midnight the first DJs get going. I recommend any set by Yellow Claw, whose dubstep tracks have had a huge impact on the sound of the city.” paradiso.nl


4 3

WIN OVER AMSTERDAM’S WOMEN ON YOUR BIKE

“The women of Amsterdam hate show-offs. You’ll get further if you’ve got an exciting story to tell than if you try to be flash with your fast car. And as the bouncers usually let more women than men into the clubs, you’ll have several chances to try your luck. My tip is to make the most of your exoticism as a tourist and tell them something about your hometown. You should also hire a bike – it’s the classic way to get around Amsterdam at night. That way, you can chauffeur your belle to the next club at 3am. The police will only stop you if your light’s broken, so check your bike before you get going.” rentabike.nl

A L’ELEPHANT: GO FOR AN EARLY DRINK

“I’m a regular at A L’Elephant du Congo, a newly done-up dance venue at Reguliersdwarsstraat 37, which used to be home to April, one of the city’s best-known gay bars. This is where Amsterdam’s in-crowd hang out. They’re a mid-20s set who love the intimate club atmosphere of the huge dance temples. And with its wood-panelled walls, the A L’Elephant is as cosy as your living room. The music it plays is stylish pop, anything from Pharrell Williams to Lykke Li. And this is the place to come if you want your first drink early – it opens at 4pm.” elephantducongo.com

“HIR E YOURSEL F A BIK E A ND CH AUF F EUR YOUR BEL L E TO T HE NE X T CLUB AT 3A M. T HIS IS A MST ER DA M, A F T ER A L L”

Clubgoers at Jimmy Woo: “There’s no such thing as a dress code. Just be whoever you want to be”


On the dancefloor at Jimmy Woo: the clubs are jam-packed from midnight

6

5

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX AND SMOKING JOINTS “Sooner or later, you’ll end up in the Red Light District, which has a surprisingly relaxed atmosphere, more like being in an open-air museum than in a dodgy area – the oldest church in Amsterdam is here, too. The female sex workers have trade unions, and the city battles against illegal prostitution. You can see the infamous live sex and striptease shows at Casa Rosso. And yes, you can smoke joints in Amsterdam. You can do it at coffee shops, on the street or in parks, but not in public places, regular cafés or on the dancefloor in clubs – they have special smoking areas. Stick to these rules and you’ll be fine.” c­ asarosso.nl

BITTERZOET, THE CLUB THAT SHOWCASES THE LATEST MUSIC TRENDS

“Amsterdam’s music scene is divided into two large camps: house and hip-hop. For fans of rap, the Bassline party at Paradiso has been a must for more than 25 years. But I recommend Bitterzoet. Since 2007, the club has been playing the latest tracks from every sub-genre at its BBQ night, every first Saturday of the month. Often, when I go there, I have to switch on the Shazam app on my phone to identify the tracks. Whether it’s West Coast rap or the latest tracks from Amsterdam, there are always songs I haven’t heard before.” bitterzoet.com

A hip-hop fan at Paradiso, Amsterdam’s nightlife temple

“ T HE R ED L IGH T DIST R ICT F EELS L IK E BEING IN A MUSEUM. T HE CI T Y ’S OL DEST CHURCH IS HER E, TOO”


9

7

GREAT LATENIGHT EATING

“The bad news is, the only thing available to eat in Amsterdam after midnight is bad fast food. So I recommend you have a late dinner at Cannibale Royale in Handboogstraat. You can’t beat the 600g L’Exceptionnel steak. And it’s right next to Disco Dolly, an address you’ll be needing later in the night.” cannibaleroyale.nl

OUT ABOUT THE 8 FIND LOCAL TALENT

“Joost van Bellen is an icon of Amsterdam nightlife. The moustachioed veteran DJ made house music popular in the city with his sets at the RoXY in the late ’80s. Sadly, the RoXY burnt down in 1999. Joost now curates the Valtifest music festival, which is one of the highlights of the year.” joostvanbellen.nl

AFTER-HOURS: WHERE YOU CAN DANCE AFTER 5AM

“Most clubs in Amsterdam close at 5am. If you want to carry on after that, you’ll have to go to Disco Dolly or Club NYX. These venues have special licences, meaning they can stay open till 7am. NYX is a multilevel club that mainly plays electronic music. At Disco Dolly, the DJs will play whatever keeps the party going. If you still haven’t had your fill by 7am, make friends with the people on the dancefloor – the afterhours parties are normally in people’s homes.” clubnyx.nl; discodolly.nl

10

LET THE NIGHT CHANGE YOU

“My career as a chronicler of Amsterdam’s nightlife began 11 years ago when a friend gave me his Sony DSC-F717 camera because I’d been using a cheap one up till then. I like the way people’s characters change when they’re out at night; quiet people let their hair down and show their emotions. I want to record those moments. Amsterdam’s nightlife will open you up if you let it. A few years back, a DJ dared me to jump off the stage at Paradiso and into the crowd. I used to panic at the thought of crowd-surfing. But I did it – and the people carried me.” dennisbranko.com

Nights at A L’Elephant du Congo: “Where the in-crowd goes out”

69


LUKASZ NAZDRACZEW/RED BULL CONTENT POOL


HAIL OF STONES Red Bull Sea To Sky is a Hard Enduro event in the Turkish resort of Kemer, where the world’s motocross elite go head-to-head for three days solid, across beaches, through forests and finally up a mountain. Avoiding flying pebbles is the least of their worries.

HEAVEN AND HELL SUN, SEA AND SUFFERING: AT RED BULL SEA TO SKY, THE ELITE OF THE HARD ENDURO WORLD FIGHT IT OUT ACROSS THE TOUGH TERRAIN OF THE TURKISH RIVIERA WORDS: ANDREAS ROTTENSCHLAGER



71


JUMP CLEAR

OFF-ROADING ADVICE FROM THE PROS: “ANALYSE THE 5M AHEAD OF YOUR WHEEL AS QUICK AS A FLASH”

NURI YILMAZER/RED BULL CONTENT POOL, CLAUDIUS VASILESCU/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

The UK’s Mike Slater (front) rides the training circuit in Kemer, ahead of the Forest Race on the second day of competition. The stage comprises 46km of forest, gravel and trial track. Fellow Brit Graham Jarvis, the defending champion, knows how to get through it as quickly as possible – and in one piece. “You have to analyse the 5m ahead of your front wheel as quick as a flash and choose the line with the most grip.”


SANDSTORM The Beach Race at Kemer on day one determines the starting order for the two main stages: the Forest and Mountain Races. After a mass start, there’s a high-speed section leading into a motocross course complete with turns, hills and trialstyle obstacles. Here, Britain’s Jonny Walker, who dominated the 2015 Hard Enduro series, takes first place.

THE RED BULLETIN

73


WINNER GRAHAM JARVIS: “EVERYONE EXPECTED A THREE-WAY RACE. BUT I HAD ANOTHER ACE HIDDEN UP MY SLEEVE”

A CHAMPION’S TACTICS

MAHMUT CINCI/RED BULL CONTENT POOL(3), LUKASZ NAZDRACZEW/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

Above: Enduro veteran Graham Jarvis after crossing the finish line. The 40-year-old missed his pit stop during the Mountain Race, got past rivals Jonny Walker and South Africa’s Wade Young, and went on to win his fourth Red Bull Sea To Sky title. No less exhausted at the end were Jonathan Richardson (below) and Paul Bolton (bottom).

74


OFF-ROAD RACERS Showdown on day three. Race favourite Jonny Walker thrashes his KTM 300 EXC through the Kesme Bogazi gorge in Kemer. The crowning stage of the Mountain Race leads from the beach downtown up to the 2,365m volcano Lycian Olympos. Despite having suffered a heavy fall when he overshot a cliff, the 24-year-old keeps the race exciting all the way to the end. “The adrenalin kills the pain,� he says later.


Free Advertisement

THE ONLY RACE WHERE THE FINISH LINE CATCHES YOU ONE DAY AT THE VERY SAME TIME ALL OVER THE WORLD

MAY 8, 2016 CAMBRIDGE 12:00 PM DÚN LAOGHAIRE 12:00 PM

100% OF THE ENTRY FEE GOES TO SPINAL CORD RESEARCH

WINGSFORLIFEWORLDRUN.COM

BE A

PART OF IT!


See it. Get it. Do it.

AC T I O N !

TRAVEL

SPIN CYCLE

Race through the world’s best tubular waves

GETTY IMAGES

Surfing doesn’t have a monopoly on high-seas action. If you really want to experience the inside of a wave, bodyboarding offers a whole new perspective. To take it up a gear, seek out the world’s best tubular waves. You’ll find them in a tropical paradise on the edge of civilisation…



77

79

82

84

88

91

TRAVEL

GEAR

WHEELS

CULTURE

EVENTS

HOW TO 77


TRAVEL Tube travel: the Mentawai islands are renowned for tubing waves

Mentawai, Indonesia Padang Want to tackle big waves? Head to: bodyboardholidays.com

With a variety of formidable waves, each with their own unique challenges, the Mentawai island chain, just off the coast of West Sumatra, Indonesia, is bodyboarder heaven. The rolling surf and large swells make for a skatepark-style playground in the water, with perfect set-ups all a short boat ride away. “It’s a real adventure to get there, but it’s worth it,” says Rob Barber, director of Bodyboard Holidays. An experienced bodyboarder himself, he’s used to taking people of all abilities to various locations around the world. The waters of Mentawai aren’t for beginners… “Mentawai is really for boarders looking to catch some of the most perfect waves in the world,” he adds, “which you do need a level of skill to ride.” Unlike surfing, the main aim of bodyboarding is to travel through the waves rather than over them. “It’s the ultimate ‘tube riding’ vehicle,” says Barber, referencing the ride through the hollow



More to explore

Going deep With some amazing reefs and a vast array of colourful marine life, the waters of Mentawai are just as dramatic under the surface as they are on it. Go for a dive and see for yourself. www.aloitaresort.com

THE INSIDER “GET EQUIPMENT THAT’S UP TO THE TASK,” SAYS ROB BARBER. “YOU’LL NEED A BOARD WITH A LIGHT POLYPRO CORE AND A GOOD STRINGER [A STABILISING ROD THAT RUNS THROUGH THE CENTRE]. AND WEAR LOTS OF SUNSCREEN!”

Boarding school: coaching staff offer daily tuition

78

INDONESIA

Tribe quest

A short boat ride to the action

‘tube’ that’s formed when the wave breaks. “This area of the Indonesian archipelago is renowned for those fantastically clean tubing waves. That’s the ultimate thrill for bodyboarders – to ride within that vortex.” Bodyboarding at this level is much more physically taxing, too. “The biggest demand is cardiovascular fitness,” says Barber, who recommends cycling as the best preparation if you don’t usually have waves to ride. “There’s a lot of paddling. Cycling helps strengthen your leg muscles and mimics the same sort of movement you’ll be doing in the water.” The shoulders and back feel the strain, too. “You’ll need solid core muscles to be able to gain and maintain speed across the waves, and a strong lower back to be able to duck-dive big waves,” he says. “The most invaluable exercise other than bodyboarding itself is yoga – the flexibility and muscle strength it gives you will keep you on top of your game.” You’ll want to record the great waves and the unspoilt setting. “Make sure you take a GoPro,” says Barber. “You’ll get some amazing action footage from what you’re experiencing inside the wave. It’s guaranteed to make your friends jealous.”

A challenging but worthwhile trek through the unspoilt jungle of the islands will introduce you to the welcoming native Mentawai tribe and their unique traditions. indonesia tripadvisors.com

Hook up If you’re looking to slow down the pace, Mentawai is also home to some serious fishing. Take to the sea by boat and get up close with fish such as wahoo, barracuda and tuna. wavepark.com

GETTY IMAGES

ACTION

THE RED BULLETIN


ACTION

GEAR

LIFE THROUGH A LENS

The best kit to help you take award-worthy photos Sony

7R II

Sony’s latest compact camera has a backilluminated 35mm image sensor with 42.4 megapixels, giving you impressively hi-def pictures for a palm-sized device. There’s also a powerful image stabiliser and a 4K movie-recording option to capture your adventures on video.  sony.com

The deadline for Red Bull Illume, the world’s greatest photography contest for action/adventure sports, is March 31. New for 2016 is the Mobile category. redbullillume.com

Broncolor FT System

COOPH Photo Glove Original

TAMRAC Anvil 27

Light your subjects perfectly with this innovative hybrid combining an umbrella with a ‘focusing tube’ lamp. The high light output makes for soft, three-dimensional results.  bron.ch

Keep warm on winter shoots with these techfriendly gloves. ‘Naked-finger sensitivity’ allows you to make camera adjustments easily and offers full touchscreen usability.  yodobashi.com

This pro-grade pack contains a plethora of adjustable compartments to carry every piece of equipment you’ll need, with specially engineered foam to keep it safe and snug.  tamrac.com

iBlazr2

G-Drive ev RaW SSD

DxO One

Smartphone cameras are better than ever, but they still struggle in low light. Fear not: this mini LED flash clips on and connects via Bluetooth for perfectly lit phone pictures.  iblazr.com

A sturdy hard drive that’s perfect for outdoor photographers who need to back up their photos on the fly. The chunky impact bumper provides 2m drop protection.  g-technology.com

Turn your smartphone into a DSLR-rivalling camera with this miniature attachment. It even has microSD card storage and shoots in the professional SuperRAW format.  dxo.com

THE RED BULLETIN

79


ACTION

GEAR

WATCHES

Edited by Gisbert L Brunner

BRONZE AGE

Anonimo Nautilo Automatic

Watches with a bronze casing are, it has to be said, not for everyone. While rich in old-world associations, the copper alloy is given a wide berth by many watchmakers because of its trademark patina – while it starts off a shade not dissimilar to gold, bronze becomes darker and more discoloured over time thanks to body heat, humidity and other climatic factors. It’s this surface oxidation, though, that gives a bronze watch its own character and adds a vintage look – the major selling point for fans of this underappreciated mixture of metals. Swiss/Italian outfit Anonimo has specialised in bronze timepieces since 1997, and its latest model, the Nautilo, uses ‘marine bronze’ with a thin coating of aluminium for additional resistance to mechanical stress, salt water and corrosion. Water resistant to 20 bar and housing a Sellita SW200-1 selfwinding movement, this carefully crafted throwback to the diving watches of yore is a modern twist on a classic. anonimo.com

Bronze watch casings pick up a natural, unique tarnish (or patina) over time thanks to contact with the air, moisture and oils from the skin. But if you’re not a fan, it can be easily cleaned off. Traditional methods include applying a paste made of lemon juice and baking soda.

NEW METAL

Our pick of the best bronze watches Zenith Pilot Type 20 Extra Special This bronze beauty resists water to 10 bar, and its automatic calibre has a power reserve of up to 50 hours. SuperLuminovacoated digits and hands ensure optimal readability even in poor light. zenith-watches.com

IWC Aquatimer Chronograph Edition: Expedition Charles Darwin This ode to the godfather of evolution has an

80



aluminium bronze shell – water resistant to 30 bar – and a SafeDive one-way rotating bezel system so that divers can accurately time their return to the surface. iwc.com

Bulgari GG Gefica GMT Moon Phase Inspired by watchmaking legend Gérald Genta, this limited edition boasts a solid bronze case, and the automatic calibre GG 1006 triggers a jumping hour and 24-hour display, as well as a moon-phase indicator. bulgari.com

THE RED BULLETIN


YOUR TICKET TO THE FIA WORLD RALLY CHAMPIONSHIP 6 1 0 2 C WR

SEASON PASS 2016 SAVE 20% NOW! LIVE STAGES Rally action live - up to three hours per event.

LIVE MAPS Exclusive live tracking of drivers and cars.

ONBOARD ACTION Unique rally experince through the eyes of the drivers.

FULL HIGHLIGHTS The WRC video highlights in full length.

www.wrcplus.com


ACTION

WHEELS Czech it out: the R1R brings Le Mans looks to le high street

MOTOR MERCH Classy gear inspired by cars of yesteryear

Land Rover Heritage Celebrating Land Rover’s first overland London-to-Singapore expedition 60 years ago, this new range nods to the light- and dark-blue colours of the original vehicles. shop.landrover.co.uk

COMEBACK KING

Praga returns with a super speedster Sportscar maker Praga hasn’t built a road car since 1947. But now, after dabbling in endurance racing for the past few years, the firm has decided the world needs a Czech supercar on the streets, hence the decision to build a limited run of 68 (one for each year’s absence) of the R1R. Looking like something that should really be whizzing round the track at Le Mans, the R1R features a 2.0-litre supercharged engine, throwing out up to 390hp. That’s not headturning in the modern supercar

stakes, but the R1R weighs in at just 670kg, which is lighter than a Formula One car, ensuring drivers get a lot of bang for their buck. Those who want to upgrade on the basic package can add features such as ABS, traction and launch control, and also extras that Praga deems ‘luxuries’, such as air-conditioning and Alcantara upholstery. This is perhaps the best illustration of the thinking behind the R1R – a race car with just enough street manners to get by. pragaglobal.com

Blue thunder: a lot of bang for your buck, but air-conditioning will cost you extra

Porsche classic cooler This piece of retro chic echoes early air-cooled 911 models. ‘Optional’ (read: essential) extras include a bottle opener and stopper. shop.porsche.com

SCALE MODEL

BMW proves bigger isn’t always better You know you’re getting old when BMW M-class sportscars start shrinking. The new M2 is aimed at those who want a smaller (or cheaper) M4. It uses BMW’s new 3.0-litre straight-six TwinPower Turbo engine, producing 370hp, and is limited to 250kph; when fitted with the M DCT gearbox, it sprints to 100kph in 4.3 seconds. The high-end derivative of the 2-Series coupé has many of the mechanicals of the M4 coupé, with the usual M division set-up for the brakes and the bodykit, plus the standard Dakota leather interior. bmw.co.uk

82



The Jaguar Collection The latest collection of merchandise is inspired by 1957’s Jaguar XKSS and includes made-inEngland leather jackets, leather holdalls, driving gloves, wallets and polo shirts. jaguar.co.uk

THE RED BULLETIN


WHAT´S NEW IN JANUARY

ON DEMAND

ON DEMAND

WATCH NOW

WATCH NOW

RED BULL CRASHED ICE GERMANY, MUNICH The second Red Bull Crashed Ice race of the 2015/16 Ice Cross Downhill World Championship moves to Munichs Olympiapark as reigning World Champion Scott Croxall looks to strengthen his lead in a fight for his second title against a pack of hungry racers.

ON DEMAND WATCH NOW

CHALLENGE THE EXPECTED “Far From Home“ retraces the journey of snowboard legend Brolin Mawejje from his painful childhood in Uganda to his struggles in America, while documenting his road to the Olympics and medical school. Brolin’s story holds the power to change lives as it isan embodiment of what so many strive to find – true potential.

WALK IT HOME – THE WANTON BISHOPS “Walk It Home“ is the musical discovery journey of a blues†rock duo from Lebanon uncovering the cultural heart of the music they love. With music as their passports, they head from Beirut to the bayou as they embark on a true road trip to discover local blues heroes, swamps, records, gigs and crawfish.


ACTION

CULTURE COMING ATTRACTIONS The best new entertainment to binge on

GAME Plants Vs Zombies: Garden Warfare 2

Deadpool: the superhero who always adds insult to injury

FILM

MASKED MENACE

As Ryan Reynolds suits up to play a wisecracking antihero in Deadpool , director Tim Miller tells us how he broke the mould of the comic-book movie The Red Bulletin : A violent, fourth-wall-breaking superhero film with an unhinged, foul-mouthed protagonist is a tough sell for a studio. Is that why Deadpool took five years to make? Tim Miller : Everything was lined up, but the studio decided they weren’t going to make it. It sat there for a few years, but I didn’t give up. Then our test footage leaked online and the reaction showed there was an appetite for it. We went from 0-60 in a day! I think they saw the time was right to do something different. The movie makes fun of other superhero movies – especially X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Reynolds’ first film as Deadpool… We have a lot of outright anger and jokes at the expense of that film, because of the way they portrayed Deadpool (see box, right). Traditionally, Hollywood has this arrogant belief that it knows better than the fans, and I think that’s bullsh-t – there’s a reason why people love this character. What did Reynolds bring to the role? It was like he was born for it. He’s athletic enough to do the stunts and look like a superhero, but he’s also really funny. There are 50 or 60 jokes in the movie that he came up with on the day. What sets this apart from other superhero movies? The humour. It’s pretty relentlessly funny, even in the dark parts. The action is scrappy, too. It’s a bit down-and-dirtier, and I think that’s why people love him. He’s not Superman, he’s not a moral paragon and he doesn’t always win. People can relate to that. He’s a very flawed, human superhero. Deadpool is in cinemas from February 4. deadpoolwebsite.com

84



The ridiculously addictive mobile game, in which you have to defend your house from a zombie onslaught by planting projectile-spewing flora, gets another console spin-off – bigger, better and three-dimensional. Available on PS4, Xbox One and PC from February 25.  pvzgw2.com

COMIC-BOOK GUY Ryan Reynolds’ previous superhero smackdowns… Blade: Trinity (2004) His first foray into comicbook movies, in the finale of the Blade trilogy. Despite a difficult shoot, he showed heroic potential as vampire hunter Hannibal King. X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) Reynolds’s debut as Wade Wilson, aka Deadpool. But fans were infuriated by the depiction of the character as a two-dimensional villain who couldn’t speak.

FILM Zoolander 2 It’s been 15 years since director/star Ben Stiller’s hapless male model, Derek Zoolander, first hit the big screen. Prepare for more catwalk-inspired silliness as Zoolander and frenemy Hansel (Owen Wilson) get to grips with Europe’s fashion scene. In cinemas from February 12. zoolander.com

Green Lantern (2011) In this flop, Reynolds plays super-suited Hal Jordan. He riffs on this in Deadpool, asking for an outfit that’s not “green… or animated”.

GAME Street Fighter V As Reynolds found out, it ain’t easy being green

The fifth proper edition of the classic beat-’em-up, Street Fighter V introduces new characters, including the tornado-throwing Rashid and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu expert Laura, alongside Ryu, Chun-Li and the rest of the gang. Available on PS4 and PC from February 16.  streetfighter.com

THE RED BULLETIN


CULTURE

ACTION

CAN ART

DIETMAR KAINRATH

Dietmar Kainrath’s pointed pen

“NO ONE TOLD ME IT WAS GOING TO BE A VERTICAL TAKE-OFF”

THE RED BULLETIN

85


CULTURE

THE PLAYLIST BLOC PARTY

WHO TO FOLLOW Snapchat is one of the fastest-growing social networking apps, so many music acts are using the video messaging service to interact with fans. These three artists do it best.

With its rough new-wave guitar riffs and existential lyrics, Bloc Party’s 2005 debut album, Silent Alarm, was a declaration of war on macho rock clichés – the perfect soundtrack for the anxious Generation Y. Acclaimed by critics, Silent Alarm sold more than a million copies and set the London-based indie-rock quartet on the road to global success. Now, following a four-year hiatus, frontman Kele Okereke and his band are about to release their fifth album, Hymns. As the title hints, the new record is subtly influenced by spiritual music. Here, the 34-year-old reveals the songs that inspired him. blocparty.com

Donna Summer

The Consolers

State Of Independence

May The Work I’ve Done Speak For Me [from The Best Of…]

“Every time I hear this song, I’m blown away by the reverence in the music and in Donna’s voice. The backing track is almost industrial-sounding, but as the song evolves it becomes this huge gospel piece. The idea of marrying synthetic elements with something soulful is fascinating and magical to me. This song was my starting point for what I wanted the new album to sound like.”

“I’m not a religious person, but I’ve listened to a lot of gospel music over the last months. I discovered this CD by accident in a music shop in London. I picked it up because of the cover, which shows the musicians – husband and wife – in their Sunday best. Their incredible blues songs prove that faith and devotion can elicit amazing responses in art. They can transform the spirit and take it somewhere else.”

Julio Bashmore

John Coltrane

Battle For Middle You

A Love Supreme, Part 4: Psalm [from A Love Supreme]

“I met Julio at Frankfurt airport a few years ago when we spent an afternoon waiting for a plane. I told him that of all the great house tunes he’s made, Battle For Middle You is my favourite. I don’t know if it’s down to the sound of the track or the gospel sample he uses on it, but it just completely energises people. The energetic and soulful feel of our album was influenced by this tune.”

“When we started making music as a band, I had such a resistance to jazz. But the older I get, the more I see that the stuff I discounted as a young person is now the music I love. You have to take time out to listen to this record, because it’s not pop music. You need to focus to fully experience Coltrane’s spiritual journey. This mood is something I tried to emulate on our album.”

Stevie Wonder As “In 2013, I saw Stevie play a great set at a music festival in Alabama, and afterwards I revisited his album Songs In The Key Of Life, which my parents had owned. As is my favourite track. There’s something very deep about the imagery in the lyrics; he’s talking about loving someone from the start until the end of time. That’s such a strong idea, and it resonated with me when I was writing the lyrics for Hymns.”

86

Rihanna



It’s no surprise that pop music’s social media queen is an avid Snapchatter. She uses Instagram to post polished shots, and Snaps to document her flamboyant life behind the scenes.

Dev Hynes (Blood Orange) The hipster producer (Florence + The Machine, Solange) posts videos of intimate recording sessions and live gigs. He also occasionally reveals sketches of new songs to fans.

THE GADGET SubPac M2

In 2013, LA-based SubPac launched the S2, a chair pad that turns bass frequencies into vibrations so you can feel the music. Now there’s the M2, the world’s first wearable subwoofer. Connected to your smartphone via Bluetooth, this 2.3kg backpack rocks your body when you’re on the go. thesubpac.com

Schoolboy Q The LA-based rapper is arguably the most hilariously entertaining music star on Snapchat. His subscribers see Schoolboy poking fun at his peers and his little daughter, playing with his dog and wearing animal costumes.

THE RED BULLETIN

NEIL KRUG, GETTY IMAGES (3)

ACTION


STEREO 160

MOVE MOUNTAINS , RIDE CUBE

CUBEBIKESUK

CUBEBIKESUK

CUBEBIKESUK

WWW.CUBE.EU


ACTION

EVENTS SAVE THE DATE Shake off the winter blues with these comedy must-sees

18 January Eddie Izzard

Afan Forest kicks off the Enduro Mash Up calendar, with seven more events planned this year

February 21 Uphill battle Glyncorrwg, West Glamorgan

February 18-28 Reel legends

Stratford, London

Dublin, Ireland

“Stripes will be earned, world titles will be won...” The slogan of the 2016 UCI Track Cycling World Championships is especially apt as the event takes place ahead of this summer’s Olympics. British hopefuls Jason Kenny and Philip Hindes are among those making their case for Rio. trackcyclingworlds2016.london

Since its debut in 2003, the Dublin International Film Festival has screened more than 1,500 films – many of them world premieres – and welcomed more than 500 “major guests”. It’s a fair description, given that last year alone they included Al Pacino and Russell Crowe. diff.ie

18 February Frankie Boyle

Glasgow, Scotland



Now in its 23rd year and spread across 19 days, the LCF is one of the UK’s biggest comedy festivals. Tip: check out Mark Watson’s taster for his 2016 tour (February 15). comedy-festival.co.uk

Former DIFF winner Al Pacino

The notorious Scottish comedian and former regular on TV’s Mock The Week brings his new show, Hurt Like You’ve Never Been Loved, to London’s Eventim Apollo for two nights. Not for the faint of heart. frankieboyle.com

THE RED BULLETIN

DAN WYRE, DANNY NORTH, DAVID MANNION, BRITISH CYCLING

March 2 Spinning class

February 26 Bringing the beats back

88

3

February Leicester Comedy Festival

Enduro is going from strength to strength, engaging mountain bikers and spectators with its fascinating mix of rough-and-ready timed downhill trails and gruelling uphill transfer stages. The Welsh Gravity Enduro Mash Up, set in the moody Afan Forest, tweaks the format to allow for multiple attempts at the race stages, offering even more gnarly action. welshgravityenduro.com

Rudimental’s single Bloodstream, featuring Ed Sheeran, sold 600,000 copies in the UK alone. Their second album, We The Generation, repeated the success of its predecessor, going to number one. It’s fair to say 2015 was a successful year for the London drum and bass/pop foursome. Now they’re celebrating by taking their hits on the road in the UK, kicking off in Glasgow. rudimental.co.uk

For the last three years, comedy doyen Izzard has been touring his stand-up show Force Majeure in 28 countries, performing in four languages. Now he’s back on home soil for five weeks at London’s Palace Theatre. eddieizzard.com


Never miss an issue …

TH E PE R FE CT G I FT FOR Y OU RS E LF O R TH E R UNNE R I N YO U R LI FE

Easy to subscribe 12 months, 6 issues for only €30

www.irishrunner.com


ACTION

EVENTS STEP IT UP Four ways to make your run more exciting

Turn around Does running the same laps every time bore you senseless? Go the opposite way and well-trodden ground becomes exciting again.

Be prepared

Catch me if you can: Neuschwander won the German Wings for Life World Run in 2015 and is a favourite this year

BREAKING NEW GROUND

Seizing the opportunity gets you places. If your running backpack is always ready, you can set off whenever and wherever the chance arises.

Wings for Life World Run winner Florian Neuschwander runs for several hours a day – and never gets bored. Here are his tips on how to keep your training fresh

90



It’s not just a spare-time activity, he says – running is a cheap and healthy means of transportation, too. “I run to work or to visit friends. There are showers everywhere, after all.” And rather than be put off by really long distances, he’ll take the train or bus, get off halfway, then run from there. “I look up the approximate route home on Google Earth, then get going. That way, I stumble across places I’ve never been before. People who travel a lot for work, in particular, should be able to find wonderful running options. Don’t be scared to combine training with your daily routine. There’s room for a pair of trainers in any suitcase. Get out of your hotel and into a whole new world.” The 2016 Wings for Life World Run takes place simultaneously in 34 countries (the UK event is in Cambridge) on May 8. But if you can’t make the event, don’t worry – download the app on iOS or Android and do the Wings for Life World Run – Selfie Run. For more info, go to wingsforlifeworldrun.com

Change route Are you already on first-name terms with every bump in the road? Head off the main drag and onto the side roads and country lanes.

Get connected Fact: running in a group is more fun. Seek out like-minded people, but remember: if you don’t have a starting number, it’s not a race.

THE RED BULLETIN

RED BULL CONTENT POOL/HANS HERBIG, ISAAK PAPADOPOULOS

Whether it’s an 800m, an ultra-marathon or an extreme course through the Rocky Mountains, Florian Neuschwander, winner of Germany’s 2015 Wings for Life World Born to run: 34-yearRun, will take it on. old Neuschwander “Even when I’m at home, I rarely run the same route twice,” he says. “For me, running is about discovery. If you take a route you’ve never run before, the time passes a lot more quickly than if you always do the same route. Variety is key.” As well as changing the scenery, he uses social media to add zing to his routine. “I arrange to meet people I don’t know and go running with them via Facebook,” explains Neuschwander. But there’s one thing that sets him apart from the others. “I run to our meeting point and then, after training, I run home, too.” Now that’s dedication.


ACTION

HOW TO

FEND OFF A WILD BEAR What would you do if you were hiking in the wilderness and came across a wild bear? Once it’s seen you, is it possible to avoid a mauling? “They’re smarter than primates,” says bear trainer Ruth LaBarge, who’s been working with them for 48 years. “You can’t fudge it.” Based near Calgary, Canada her animals have appeared in Doritos commercials, the Dr Doolittle movie and an upcoming HBO miniseries on explorers Lewis and Clark. Here, she tells us how to survive a grizzly worst-case scenario. bearwithus.biz

1

Know your seasons

“Bears are very intelligent and emotional creatures. They’re very cyclical. In the spring, bears are in breeding season and they’re not in their right mind. Their heads are not where they normally are. In summer, they’re in the feeding season and they go crazy if they don’t eat. In the winter, they’re in hibernation.”

MARK THOMAS

2

Make lots of noise

“Brown bears seldom ever go looking for you. They’re not predatory in that sense. What happens normally with a grizzly is that they feel threatened – and by that I mean you are walking in the woods not making a sound. Being quiet in bear country is the most dangerous thing you can do. Bring a radio and blare it out.”

THE RED BULLETIN

3

Cause a stink

“Carry bear spray. It contains cayenne pepper in a very strong concentration and it’s got a 6m range. For a bear, it’s like being sprayed by a skunk. Instead of attacking, it thinks, ‘Oh God this stinks, get me out of here!’”

4

Stand your ground

“Bears will bluff charge you. They’ll lower their head, pin their ears back and scream at you. Stand your ground. If you do this, don’t make noise and don’t look them in the eye, they’ll go away. Except black bears. If it’s a black bear, then fight for your life – they’re very predatory animals.”

5

Pretend to be dead

“If you get knocked down, then it’s time to be quiet. You have to play dead. Don’t scream – that will only pump adrenalin into the bear. Instead, lie on your stomach and put your hands behind your neck, because that’s the first part of your body that a bear will to go after. And if they roll you, keep rolling.”

91


AEP KINEMATICS. A NEW MOVEMENT.

• Underarm ventilation zips • Detachable performance fit technical hood with adjusters • Detachable snowskirt with stretch panel and gel gripper tape • Waterproof and breathable Ared V02 20000 polyester 4-way textured stretch fabric


T H E R E D B U L L E T I N I N N O VA T I O N S

BRIGHT

FUTURE ISPO BRANDNEW: OVERALL WINNER

THESE IDEAS AND INVENTIONS COULD CHANGE Y O U R L I F E … A N D T H E S M A R T E S T I N N O VAT I O N S BECOME ISPO BRANDNEW FINALISTS

ICAROS What is it? A piece of kit that plunges you into a virtual world while giving you a workout at the same time. Why do we need it? To play computer games and save you the hassle of going to the gym. Virtual 3D sightseeing flights – through Space, into the Grand Canyon, over the Alps – are cool, and ICAROS takes things to the next level by also improving your balance and concentration, and stimulating your muscles. When can we get our hands on it? You can pre-order now for this year. icaros.net

THE RED BULLETIN

1

93


I N N O VA T I O N S

ISPO BRANDNEW: ACCESSORIES

BIOLITE CAMPSTOVE What is it? A camping stove that charges your gadgets. Why do we need it? Why not? Solar panels become useless after dark, but fill this little stove with wood and light it and it’ll charge your mobile while cooking your beans. Twenty minutes of charging will give you 60 minutes’ talk time. When can we get our hands on it? Now. biolitestove.com

ISPO BRANDNEW: WHEELER

2

94

I S P O B R A N D N E W: H A R DWA R E S U M M E R

A S TA N D - U P PA D D L E B O A R D T H AT L E T S YO U D I T C H THE ROOF RACK OR THE PEOPLE-CARRIER

TRIPSTIX What is it? An inflatable stand-up paddleboard with hard-board properties. Why do we need it? To save room in the boot of the car. Throw it in a bag, fling it over your shoulder (its 10kg should be manageable) and off you go. The board, which has multiple granule-filled vacuum chambers to give it perfect rigidity, is ready to use in just three minutes. When can we get our hands on it? Now. tripstix.de

ONEWHEEL What is it? An electric skateboard. Why do we need it? Because one wheel is all you need; just shift your weight onto your front foot and off you go, with none of the legwork of conventional skateboarding. Thanks to the broad tyre, you can also take the single-wheeler cross-country. It can reach speeds of up to 20kph and has a range of about 11km. After charging for just 20 minutes, the Onewheel is ready to go again. When can we get our hands on it? Now. rideonewheel.com 

THE RED BULLETIN


I S P O B R A N D N E W : AT H L E I S U R E

I N N O VA T I O N S

S AY S K Y What is it? Performance wear for sportsmen and women. Why do we need it? To combine urban style with sport. This Copenhagen-based clothing manufacturer focuses on the endurance sports of running, triathlon and cycling, as well as performance training. Its stylish range of tops and shorts is made from a functional (and fashionable) mix of Merino wool, cotton and spandex. When can we get our hands on it? Now. saysky.dk

THE SMART COMMAND CENTRE FOR YOUR BIKE

ISPO BRANDNEW: WEARABLES

COBI What is it? A bike partner for all conditions. Why do we need it? It makes every bike a smart bike. Frankfurt-based firm COBI has developed the first interconnected bike system, which, in combination with your smartphone, equips your ride with over 100 functions. These include LED front lights, a navigation system, brake light, fitness interface, alarm and music player controls. When can we get our hands on it? Early 2016. cobi.bike

SPECIALIZED FUCI

CARSON BLUME

I S P O B R A N D N E W: H A R DWA R E W I N T E R

What is it? The racing bike of the future. Why do we need it? It’s not only cars that must move with the times. The fUCI’s inventor, Robert Egger, is the Creative Director of US manufacturer Specialized. With its 33.3in wheels, unconventional frame and aerodynamic design, Egger’s answer to over-regulation at the International Cycling Union (UCI, hence the bike’s name) may sadly never reach the shops. When can we get our hands on it? Possibly never. veryspecialthings.specialized.com

THE RED BULLETIN

3

DMOS COLLECTIVE S T E A LT H S H O V E L What is it? A snow shovel for freestyle sportsmen and women. ­Why do we need it? Because it’s small yet practical. This 1.5kg shovel, which has a telescopic shaft that extends up to 142cm, allows you to shape your own kickers; even blocks of ice are no problem. Keep it in the boot of the car in preparation for any sudden snowfall. When can we get our hands on it? Now. dmoscollective.com

95


I N N O VA T I O N S

DRAS PHONE

ISPO BRANDNEW: STYLE

What is it? A fold-up smartphone. Why do we need it? Because small is beautiful. When folded, the DRAS (Digital Resistive Area Sensing) phone is hardly bigger than a lighter. A big bonus: if you drop it, you won’t crack your screen. When can we get our hands on it? Hopefully in the not-too-distant future. rndcore.com

4 A S M A R T P H O N E T H AT W I L L F I T IN EVEN THE SMALLEST POCKET

AZTECH M O U N TA I N What is it? Performance sportswear. Why do we need it? To look as chic on the mountain as you do around town. The ski and outdoor jackets don’t come cheap, starting at around $895, but this is outerwear made in Europe from the very best materials. And you’ll cut a fine figure on and off the piste. When can we get our hands on it? Now. aztechmountain.com

BLUESMART What is it? A smart suitcase. Why do we need it? Demand more from your luggage. This really is useful when you’re on the road. If you move too far from your case, it’ll lock itself. And if it gets lost at the airport? The integrated GPS tracking system will help you out. It’ll also charge your smartphone or tablet. You’ll still have to wheel it around, though. When can we get our hands on it? Now. bluesmart.com

SKARP LASER RAZOR What is it? The first razor powered by lasers. Why do we need it? For a thorough, high-tech shave. The bad news is that Californian firm Skarp Technologies has yet to produce a functioning prototype, despite raising more than $4million via crowdfunding, so the project had to be removed from Kickstarter. When can we get our hands on it? Good question. skarptechnologies.com

96



THE RED BULLETIN


I N N O VA T I O N S

I S P O B R A N D N E W: S O C I A L AWA R E N ES S GORILLA DEUTSCHLAND Professional freestyle sports stars and experts in nutrition give young Germans extra motivation to stay fit and healthy

BLOCKS What is it? A modular smartwatch. Why do we need it? Because it’s tailor-made for you. Each of the modules that make up the watch’s strap has its own feature, such as contactless payment, GPS or kinetic charging. The BLOCKS project, which is based in London, raised $1.6million on Kickstarter. When can we get our hands on it? June 2016. chooseblocks.com

ISPO MUNICH J A N 2 4 - 2 7, 2 0 1 6 EUROPE’S LARGEST S P EC I A L I ST T R A D E FA I R FOR SPORTS ITEMS AND SPORTSWEAR munich.ispo.com

The world has a weight problem. For example, according to a WHO study, almost 13 per cent of German children are overweight and five per cent are obese. The consequences include increased rates of illness and a huge strain on the healthcare system. GORILLA wants to provide a remedy. The

centrepiece of this initiative is a daytime workshop where kids and young people aged 10-20 are given advice by experts on movement, a balanced diet and sustainable consumption. There is also an eLearning Module, plus videos and smartphone apps. A particular highlight for schoolchildren is meeting and greeting freestyle sports stars, such as Germany’s former world champion skateboarder Tobias Kupfer, who pass on their expert fitness tips. gorilladeutschland.de

5

ICON A5 What is it? A mini seaplane. Why do we need it? For those scenic little weekend trips. Forget your caravan – just hook this 7m-long, two-seater plane up to your car and head off to the sea. This private jet, which comes complete with its own parachute system, can reach speeds of 176kph, but you’ll have to shell out upwards of $189,000 for the privilege. When can we get our hands on it? Now. iconaircraft.com

M3D MICRO

JO HEMPEL

AN AFFORDABLE 3D PRINTER FOR EVERY P R I VAT E H O M E

THE RED BULLETIN

What is it? A mini 3D printer. Why do we need it? Because 2D printing is so last year. If there’s a chess piece missing from your set, you need a small vase to display your flowers, or there are no clean cups in the house, just print one out. This handy household item is no bigger than a coffee machine. When can we get our hands on it? Now. printm3d.com

See all the ISPO BRANDNEW finalists at redbulletin.com

97


MAKES YOU FLY

“My way to explore Africa? Freestyle Safari!” FMX pro Rémi Bizouard, discovering Africa’s wildlife in his own unique way

Ahead of the South African stop of the Red Bull X-Fighters World Tour, freestyle motocross rider Rémi Bizouard showed off a Seat Grab Heart Attack, his signature jump. The elephant on set seemed less impressed by the Frenchman’s trick than the 17,000 fans who showed up at the dirt track three days later.

THE NEXT ISSUE OF THE RED BULLETIN IS OUT ON FEB 9 ALSO WITH THE IRISH TIMES ON FEB 8, AND WITH THE EVENING STANDARD ON FEB 11 98



THE RED BULLETIN

JÖRG MITTER/RED BULL CONTENT POOL

PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA, September 9, 2015


The Red Bulletin February 2016 - UK  
The Red Bulletin February 2016 - UK