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Reluctant No More... How Can Change Your Life!

Confidence pg. 42

The Universe is Speaking‌ Are You

Listening?

pg. 44

2020

Summer Camp

march

GUIDE pg. 51

into

spring featuring

Debra Engelhardt-Nash of Cosmetic Dentistry Of The Carolinas

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Imagine your home, totally organized!

Custom Closets Garage Cabinets Home Offices Pantries, Laundries and Hobby Rooms

40% Off plus Free

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40% off any order of $1000 or more. 30% off any order $700 or more. Not valid with any other offer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $1000 or more. With incoming order, at

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Call for a free in home design consultation and estimate

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LNW

www.closetsbydesign.com

2Licensed and Insured MARCH 2020

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lake

norman

v o l u m e

x i i i

,

Find Us On

woman

n u m b e r

i x

from the

womenpower

E v en tho u g h the C aro l i na w i nters are m i l d, I don ’ t l i k e them . Some winter-hating folks like me get SADD (Seasonal

Affective Depression Disorder) when the icy winds and frozen slush set in. Not me. I just get mad—mad that it’s not 78 degrees out and I can’t wear my flip flops.

DANA JORDAN

So now that the weather is starting to turn, you’d think that I would not only be happy to march into spring, but that I would be doing it with a spring in my step, right? After all, is there a better invitation for new intentions, a new mindset, and a new start than spring? I do feel the need to refresh and renew, especially after my winter hibernation. In fact, I’ve got a to-do list the length of the Magna Carta, only I’m struggling with the order and discipline needed to get the “to-do’s” done. And whenever I’m struggling with order and discipline, I think of my father. An Army captain in the 1960s, my dad not only appreciated and thrived on the order and discipline he learned in the military, it was his parenting mission to instill those same qualities in his offspring—a goal that, I admit, was somewhat lost on me.

kim cross

Lucky for me though, my dad was busy running a business and playing golf much of my childhood, so the hours he had for teaching order and discipline were limited. But when he got the urge to impart to me his wisdom on the subject—usually when there was a home improvement project to be completed and he needed a cheap laborer—he would don his official Army captain’s cap, wave around a broomstick as if it were a military baton, and give me my marching orders for the day. Any complaining was met with a broom handle pointed in the direction of my chore and the retort “March on, soldier.” The younger me met my dad’s directives with quiet (albeit whiny) insolence … though I desperately needed the order and discipline he was trying to impart. Even now, at 50-something, my first reaction to the mental image of my capclad, baton-waving, order-shouting dad is an involuntary eye roll. After all, why do something today when I can curl up under a blanket on the couch and put it off until tomorrow? But then I think about how much better I will feel if I can shake off this winter rut, embrace the creativity and renewal that comes with spring, or at the very least, just get off the couch and do something… anything. And it’s then that I realize that perhaps my father wasn’t simply trying to obtain free labor; perhaps he was trying to teach me a lesson about the importance of moving forward, even when I don’t feel like it. And as annoying as a father in an Army cap shouting marching orders can be, instead of an eye roll, I’m beginning to realize that I owe my dad a thank you. If he were here, I would tell him. And though he was not a fan of public displays of affection, I might even give him a hug. In response, I have no doubt, he would wave his broomstick in a direction indicating somewhere forward and issue the order “March on, soldier.” w dana jordan publisher

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March contributors:

Cyndy Etler; Dr. Michael Foran; Michelle Love; Starr Miller; Shelly Quinn contact us:

704.895.6168

PO Box 1000 | Corneli us, NC | 28031

w w w. l a k e n o r m a n w o m a n . c o m

Ad Submissions:

ads@lakenormanwoman.com

Lake Norman Woman reserves the right to deny any advertisement or listing that does not meet Lake Norman Woman standards. Submissions are welcome but unsolicited materials are not guaranteed to be returned. Lake Norman Woman assumes no responsibility for information, products, services, or statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. An advertised special printed in this publication is subject to change without notice. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.


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celebrating the

women of

nevins, inc.

success

of

women

contents march 2020

features 14

leading the way: Kathy McLeod

22

coffee talk: Dr. Swetha Gujja

30

cover story: “It’s About People ... And I Can Do That!”

34

hERE SHE IS: Rachel Roff

46

woman to watch: Joanna Jie Zhao

42

success story: Building Confidence & Changing Lives

on the co v er : Debra Engelhardt-Nash COSMETIC DENTISTRY OF THE CAROLINAS p hoto g ra p h y : toni lovejoy

42

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p

16

gujja

8 Things To Do Around The House

p

family 44

dr. swetha

self

TEENS ALOUD: The Universe Has Spoken. It Wants Us To Start Listening.

health 20

Reaping The Rewards What Is Community Supported Agriculture?

56

How Wise Are You About Wisdom Teeth?

16

8 things: 8 Things To Do Around The House

28

St. Paddy's Day Fun Facts!

58

mind, body, spirit: Adaptation Of Deepak Chopra's 6 Pillars Of Health

Summer Camp

home 18

22

46 joanna jie p

GUIDE

Taking Advantage Of Low Interest Rates … Some Things To Consider

24

Getting Your Home Office Organized

26

What’s Cooking ... In Kitchen Appliances?

SPECIAL SECTION!

52

Summer Camp ... Where Teens Unplug To Reconnect!

54

From Packing To Packages The Adventures of Summer Camp

zhao

in every issue 12

live, learn, grow

40

36

women on the move

scene with LKNW

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Live, Learn, Meet March LKNW Cover Girl Debra

Life takes practice! And though they don’t always come wrapped in a shiny red bow, the lessons we learn along the way are invaluable gifts that are worth sharing. Here are a few noteworthy examples featured in this issue:

Engelhardt-Nash

of Cosmetic Dentistry of the Carolinas to get a close-up look at someone who defines perseverance, gratitude, and success. Born in Hollywood, California, and a foster child by the age of 15, Debra has overcome many challenges and shares her strategies and perspectives with us on page 30.

Life’s short, call now. After more than 20 years in

corporate America, Kathy McLeod (RES Interiors) decided that life was too short and her passion for design and starting her own business too strong to sit behind a desk any longer. Turn to page 14 to see how

Kathy’s leadership skills and entrepreneurial drive led her to success in business and in life!

The power of togetherness! March is

Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month and on page 42 we all learn a valuable lesson, given to us by the fine folks at Nevins, Inc. Meet a young woman with I/DD (intellectual and developmental disabilities) who is just one among thousands who have found their meaning, life purpose, and vocation at Nevins. Through supported employment, vocational support, volunteer opportunities, adult education classes and more, Nevins has made a profound difference for countless families for more than 60 years.

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A healing touch. March on over to page 46 to meet Joanna Jie Zhao (NC Acupuncture & Wellness Clinic) who shares with us the ancient Chinese medicine of acupuncture— the myths, the history, the benefits. As a third generation acupuncturist, Joanna gets to the point, so to speak, and offers some valuable insights.

Coffee Talk. Grab

a cup and sit down with Dr. Swetha

Gujja (Southern Oncology

Specialists) on

page 22 who not

only gives us some valuable advice on juggling

family and work

but, perhaps more importantly,

demonstrates for us how gratitude

for the simplicities

in life can give you new perspective

and lasting joy.

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l k n w feat u re

leading

the way As we rise into leadership roles, it’s not always easy to navigate the leadership path. After all, there are as many leadership traits as there are leaders. Lake Norman Woman talks to area leaders in the hope that we can learn from each other’s successes and failures in confronting leadership challenges. kathy mcleod, Owner, RES Interiors

Every year, millions of people make the decision to leave their job in corporate America to try their hand at entrepreneurship. It’s a huge step, one fraught with mystery, excitement, liberation, and a bit of fear. But big thinking and big action aren’t the only monumental requirements of the transition—the shift demands big leadership skills from the entrepreneur as well. Kathy McLeod understands the nuances of such a move very well. After 20 years working in a corporate environment, Kathy decided to re-engineer her career path and follow her passion for design and renovation by starting RES Interiors. With her experience leading projects and teams, Kathy was able to bring a disciplined approach in budgeting, planning, and time management to her interior design business, making the adjustment from corporate executive to small business owner quite a natural one. “Great leaders have both traits and skills that make them effective regardless of their actual position,” she explains. “Personal traits such as authenticity, confidence, trustworthiness, and insightfulness not only speak to who a person is at his or her core, they are also important to being a respected leader.”

h e r de f i n i t ion of leadership:

"

But excelling in an office doesn’t necessarily mean you’re bound for entrepreneurial success. According to Kathy, you also have to be able to establish a clear vision, communicate it effectively, and then lead by example to its fruition. Kathy accomplishes these objectives by first laying out a precise plan to clients. “I want to make sure they know what’s going to happen when, how long it’s going to take, and what it’s going to cost,” she notes. She also makes operational and financial plans each year based on the successes and setbacks of the previous year. “Moving forward is really important,” Kathy says. “Whenever I make a mistake, I develop a plan for how to avoid the same mistake in the future. You can’t dwell on mistakes or they’ll hold you back from learning and growing.” w

Leadership is inspiring others to act toward a common goal."

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First Job: Movie

theatre concession stand

First Leadership Position: Project

manager at Accenture Career Highlight:  Starting RES Interiors  

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Favorite Down Time Activity: Running and

I wish I had more time for: Spontaneity

spending time with my family

Biggest Work Pet Peeve: When people

Describe Yourself Using Three Words: Optimistic,

don’t do what they said they will do

caring and adventurous

writer Dana JORDAN

How Would Your High School Teachers Describe the Younger You: Well rounded—

good student involved in a lot of different activities

photographer Deborah Young Studio


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sel f

8 things Clean out your fridge and kitchen pantry.

Do meal preps on Su

nday for the upcomin

g week.

Replace furnace and HVAC filters.

around the house

8 Things To Do

Purge expired cosmetics and medicines.

Organize your closets. Decluttering produces positive psychological effects.

Wash or replace shower curtain liners.

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Vacuum behind furniture and appliances. Consider purchasing a highquality HEPA vacuum which traps pet dander and other allergens.

Yard Prep: Once the frosts have passed, you can begin planting summer bulbs.


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Taking Advantage of Low Interest Rates …

home

some things to consider

Rates are again at all-time lows. After they went up slightly a year ago, they have since adjusted back down. It is a great time to build, buy, or refinance your current mortgage. Here are a few things to consider in order to take full advantage of the rates:

© Edhar Yralaits | Dreamstime.com

There are programs available

ms

tim

e. co

m

that allow you to get an appraisal done where the value is based on the completed project. In other words, the value after the renovations. Included are renovations such as new appliances, heating and air, flooring, kitchens and bathrooms, outdoor kitchens and pools, and more. So, you can then take advantage of lower rates and update the home at the same time.

© K at ari

nan

h|

D re

a

If you are considering selling your home in a year or two and need to update and get it ready, a renovation program could be a great way to go. It often gets you a better price for the home, sells more quickly, and you avoid all those last-minute costs to repair things.

© Robert Goebel | Dreamstime.com

Credit scores are of course still the best

way to save money on mortgage rates, insurance rates, and purchases. It is always good that you review your credit scores annually. Each bureau allows you a free report once a year, so you can call them or go online to request a copy. Review it for accuracy making sure nothing is reported that is not yours and that no new tradelines are opened that you were not aware of.

l k n e x p e rt

At this time of the year, when you are gathering information for your taxes, take a look at your current interest rate and also at your homeowner’s insurance. Home values have gone up so you may be able to remove mortgage insurance too.

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Shelly Quinn is the branch manager at Silverton Mortgage located at 16501 Northcross Drive in Huntersville. You can reach Shelly at 704.609.1339 or at Shelly.Quinn@SilvertonMortgage.com.


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health

reaping the rewards What Is C omm u n i t y S u p p orted A g r i c u l t u re ? C omm u n i t y S u p p orted A g r i c u lt u re ( C S A ) programs allow members to get fresh produce and other foods direct from local farms. Many offer eggs, meat, dairy, flowers, herbs, honey, and more! When you join a CSA, you sign up for weekly deliveries, either seasonal or yearlong. There are a few obvious pros to joining a CSA program: the food is local and super-fresh and you know exactly where it’s coming from; it allows you to participate in and support area farms as well as your local economy; and most local farmers use natural, organic growing methods free from harmful chemicals. So how does all this work?

• Costs vary but the average tends to be around $300-$500 for about four months. Many run from late spring to early fall but there are plenty of yearround deliveries as well.

• Some programs allow you to volunteer on the farm to help offset the costs. This is great for families to teach their kids and really be involved.

• Some health insurance providers will offer a CSA rebate. Now that’s an incentive to eat fresh!

• If you like freezing or canning certain fruits or vegetables, ask the farmer; often they will provide you with more of your favorites. • Be prepared to “go with the flow” and be grateful for what is in abundance. If there’s a bumper crop of zucchini, for example, then now’s the time to create new recipes. • If you’re afraid you just can’t consume that much produce, consider sharing your CSA with friends or coworkers— split the cost, split the goods. • For a local list of CSA farms in your area, visit www.LocalHarvest.org.

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For more information on Community Supported Agriculture, visit www.csacoalition.org.


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featu re

coffee talk

: k l a t e e coff A sit-down chat with Dr. Swetha Gujja of Southern Oncology Specialists

I love you a latte!

“I have faced the cancer battle myself with a few family members, so I feel like I have a personal perspective of the challenges my patients face. I always tell them to prepare for the worst but hope for the best. We celebrate victories together and grieve when there is loss … they are family!”

Compassion & Gratitude.

“Don’t let anyone make you believe that the field of oncology is depressing—it is much more gratifying than you might think. The best part is being able to make a difference in our patients’ lives … my goal each day is to remain focused, passionate, and grateful.”

Because life is not always a simple cup o’ joe. Our first cup.

“I grew up in a city in India where I attended the top medical school in the state. After I got married, we moved to the United States and I finished my fellowship in Little Rock, Arkansas, after which we found, and fell in love with, Lake Norman. Everything here is appealing and top notch: the weather, the people, the schools, the proximity to the beach and mountains. It is really ideal.”

Raindrops on roses ...

“I love my career, but it involves some sacrifices and burnout is inevitable. Self-care is essential and I accomplish that with a healthy diet, exercise, and taking “Me” time to relax. And having the support of my husband who helps out a great deal around the house. Our two children, who are 7 and 4, provide me with so much love and comfort as well … I know how blessed I am at the end of the day.”

"My goal each day is to remain focused, passionate, and grateful."

“Some of my favorite things? The organizing tool/app Trello helps me stay organized with my projects and my team … my comfort food is Biryani, an Indian rice dish, and my favorite places I’ve traveled to are Mauritius and Punta Cana. But topping my list are the simple things in life … we all need to be grateful for what we have and appreciate the little comforts … like the joy found in a warm cup of tea in the morning, listening to the birds sing and the children laugh, watching the glorious sunrise, and then watch the sun tuck itself in for the night … all with a heart full of gratitude.”

Dr. Swetha Gujja is a board-certified physician in internal medicine at Southern Oncology Specialists—with offices in Denver, Huntersville, Mooresville, and Charlotte. Visit their team today at www.southernoncology.com.

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writer leslie ogle

photographer chelsea bren


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home

getting your home office

organized

S omet i mes w or k i n g from home can spill over more easily into our personal lives—and not just because the kids are asking you yet another question but in the literal sense too. Papers stacked, files one on top of the other, pens that have dried up months ago, what used to be the dining room now looks like a file cabinet exploded—and what is one to do with all the old electronics? Here are some office decluttering tips to keep you organized:

Don’t buy more storage.

The point is to “get rid of” not “add to” so don’t go buy new filing cabinets or storage bins—that defeats the purpose.

Keep, donate, toss, sell.

You have to begin by decluttering! And donate or sell immediately; the longer it hangs around the more likely you are to keep it. Manage paper flow.

You can do a lot to alleviate unnecessary papers by subscribing to paperless online billing, scanning and saving receipts on your computer, etc.

Organizing the mess of cables.

Cords and cables are unsightly and provide more surfaces for dust and dirt. You can use rain gutter segments to hold cables, or check out products specifically designed for hiding them such as IKEA’s Signum line or Cablox.

Schedule weekly cleanings.

Paper and dust mites dwell in stacks of papers, files, and books, so make it a habit to clean, purge, and disinfect on a regular basis. If you actually see it on your To-Do list each week, it is more likely to get accomplished.

Stay focused and realistic.

While cleaning out your office, ask yourself: Do I need it? When was the last time I used it? Will I need it in the foreseeable future?

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E-cycling begins with you.

On average, televisions are used for less than two years, and for computers, it’s three. Recycling your electronics is critical for preserving landfill space and ensuring that hazardous materials are disposed of properly. Visit www.ecyclingcentral.com for more information and recycling centers in your area.

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home

What’s Cooking ... in kitchen appliances?

are right around the corner and I can tell you they are spectacular! One of the highlights of any home tour is the kitchen, and with three houses the team had the opportunity to design three completely unique, high-end kitchens. Since so many homes in the Lake Norman area are due for a kitchen update, I thought I would share some information on choosing your appliances. To do this, I interviewed the Director of Sales and Merchandise at Queen City Audio Video and Appliances, Ben Willis, to get the real story. Here are some of his answers to my questions. He is a wealth of knowledge!

What are the top considerations for choosing an appliance?

• Budget considerations – 3% of the home’s value should be in your kitchen appliances. • Gas, electric, or induction cooking – What do you have (or what do you want) in your home? • Built-in appliances verse free-standing appliances. • Home aesthetics. Preferences on finishes, handles, and options for knobs or bezels.

Is it ok to mix and match appliances or should you choose one manufacturer?

Most customers prefer to buy within one manufacturer. This creates a cohesive look to the whole kitchen. Consistency in color, finish, and matching handles is usually important when creating a kitchen design. Manufacturers rely on their visual brand language to be unique. How are people using appliances different today than five years ago?

• There is far more emphasis on entertainment appliances such as large cooking surfaces, under-the-counter refrigerators, wine storage, and ice machines. • The introduction of “smart” appliances allows you to communicate directly to the manufacturer on service issues as well as make temperature adjustments via apps on your phone. • People are investing a lot more into their food so we are seeing smarter and healthier ways to cook such as air fry, steam, and sous vide.

What are the most popular finishes?

2020 Southern Living Showcase Home by Southern Cottage Corporation

While stainless steel still dominates, people now have choices such as white, stainless look, true stainless, black stainless, matte black, matte white, slate, dark slate, and Tuscan to name a few. Also, many manufacturers offer an entire color wheel of additional finishes via special order. Modern glass is a new alternative that is coming out as well. Can you share a tip for those beginning the process?

l k n e x p e rt

Before you do too much planning, take the time to write down your “must-haves” for your new kitchen. What are some things you did not like in past kitchens? Give us the quick skinny on the three appliance manufacturers that everyone will see in these homes.

The Modern Resort is showcasing Dacor Appliances. This manufacturer delivers expert innovations, intuitive technology, and handcrafted design. Starr Miller is the president and principal of StarrMiller Interior Design located in Cornelius. Her national award-winning firm specializes in residential new construction and renovations. For more information visit www.StarrMiller.com or call 704-896-3321.

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The Modern Farmhouse is showcasing Sub-Zero/Wolf. This leader in brand recognition, with its characteristic red knobs, has outstanding performance and reliability. The Modern Manor is showcasing JennAir Appliances. They have a bold new look and approach with two distinct product lines. Visit www.idscltshowhouse.com to get your tickets and see what’s new in home design!

© Artmicrone | Dreamstime.com

The Charity Designer Showhouses (see ad on page 45)


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No beer?!

self

Believe it or not, it used to be a dry holiday. For most of the 20th century, St. Patrick’s Day was considered a strictly religious holiday in Ireland, which meant that the nation’s pubs were closed for business.

We love a parade!

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade in NYC is one of the world’s largest. Since 1762, marchers have traipsed up Fifth Avenue on foot – the parade still doesn’t allow floats, cars, or other vehicles.

Chicago—A Green River Runs Through It. Chicagoans have been putting dye into the Chicago River for St. Patrick’s Day since 1962. It takes 40 tons of dye to get the river to the right shade of green.

y a D s ’ y d d a St. P

Fun Facts!

Sa i n t Pat r i c k , pat r o n s a i n t o f I r e l and , was born in Roman Britain in the late 4th century. He was kidnapped at the age of 16 and taken to Ireland as a slave. He escaped and returned to convert the Irish to Christianity. By the time of his death on March 17, 461, he had established churches, schools, and monasteries. Ireland came to celebrate St. Patrick with religious services and feasts, and it was the emigrants, particularly in the United States, who transformed the day into a largely secular holiday of revelry and celebration of all things Irish. Here are a few more shamrocks of wisdom you might not know:

Good news for brewers and pubs. It is estimated that the total amount spent on beer for St. Patrick’s Day celebrations is nearly $300 million—and that’s before tips!

The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

According to Irish legend, the saint used the three-leafed shamrock as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity when he first introduced Christianity to Ireland.

So I stumbled next door to the bar.

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The Irish village of Dripsey proudly claims that it is home to the “Shortest Saint Patrick’s Day Parade in the World.” The route is 26 yards between two pubs.

For more information on St. Patrick’s Day and other historical facts, visit www.britanica.com.


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featu re

cover story

“It’s about people… and I can do that!” 30

MARCH 2020

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writer cyndy etler

photographer TONI lovejoy


T

here’s a theme that plays out in Dickens-era literature: a boy is born into difficult circumstances. He hustles and works and builds a ladder up and out. He becomes a great success…and a bitter old jerk. Okay, fictional old-school male characters. We see you. Now let’s turn the page. What happens when the character is a real-life girl born in Hollywood, California? What does she turn into? Cliffs Notes version: she turns into a loving, generous, gratitudefilled powerhouse.

Today Debra is known as a dental triple threat. She speaks and consults internationally, earning industry titles including “Top 25 Women in Dentistry,” “Leader in Dental Education and Consulting,” and the Academy of Dental Management Consultants’ “Lifetime Achievement and Spirit of Leadership” award. Debra was also the first woman and non-dentist recipient of the Outstanding Lecturer award in 2015. She serves on several boards, including the American Dental Association Practice Management Advisory Committee, The American Academy of Dental Practice, and Speakers Consulting Network.

Meet Debra Engelhardt-Nash, President of Nash Speaking and Consulting. She is co-founder of the Nash Institute for Dental Learning, owner of her own consulting firm and consultant to her husband’s practice, Cosmetic Dentistry of the Carolinas. Debra was a foster child at 15, when her mother was declared unfit to raise her. Within two years she was an emancipated minor. From that moment on, her story is an upward trajectory.

This would be an impressive list of achievements—or rather, a literally impossible list of achievements—for a person who had grown up knowing that the dental field was their calling. But what is the word to describe these feats when the achiever pursued a liberal arts degree? Siri, give me a synonym for “even more impossible than impossible.” Siri: “I’m not sure I can answer that question.” Translation: there is no word to describe Debra Engelhardt-Nash and her accomplishments.

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How proud they would be to see how far Debra has come. In that first job, she learned the technical side of dentistry, and focused on providing patients with an amazing experience. From that first non-liberal-artsy job, she was asked to manage a four-man dental practice; one of the four branched off and took Debra with him. She was then recruited by a consulting firm in California to be a regional lead consultant. That gig opened the door to her true calling. “When I worked for a large consulting firm,” she says, “I was concerned because every client was given the same ‘package.’ The same inoffice consultations, format, and manual.” This didn’t feel right to Debra, given that the clients’ individual needs varied so much. Especially troubling for Debra was this fact: “The client investment continued to increase.” She went to the CFO and asked if they might institute a customized approach, in order to increase effectiveness and improve their clients’ success rate. That idea was rejected, so she submitted her resignation and started her own company. “I was sued for violating a non-compete agreement, but I won that argument.”

Debra was recruited by her dentist to come work in his office. Given that her degree was in secondary education, she thought working in a profession involving the sciences would be a bit of a stretch … but for a woman like Debra, who made it through such challenging circumstances at a very young age, no achievement is a stretch. She quickly excelled at her new job. “I learned very early that whether it be healthcare or childcare or any type of service, it’s about people. And I can do that!” It’s her relationships with people that mean the most to Debra. The people she cares about reciprocate those feelings. “When I met my husband, I lived in Seattle, and he lived in Charlotte,” she says. “We dated for five years coast-to-coast. He was willing to give up his practice, take the Washington state boards, and start all over to be with me. Is that love or what?” She also cites the counselors and social workers who supported her in her youth as pivotal influences. “When the road was rocky, they were great inspirations,” she says. “They advised me how to take charge of my life and guided me through the process of changing my situation and reaching my full potential.”

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You know who else won? The clients she began working with as an independent contractor. The proof of that pudding can be found in the long list of awards and recognitions she’s accumulated throughout her career. And her consulting has stretched beyond dentistry to medical and retail. Nordstrom retained her to help propel their Personal Touch Department in their downtown Portland, Oregon, store. Furthermore, Debra’s fortitude and determination speak volumes. She recovered from a meningioma and broke speed records re-learning how to walk after losing all of the strength in her right side—defying the doctors who said she would not walk again without the aid of a cane or a walker. She has raised a daughter who has committed her life to meeting the needs of the underserved; and Debra resoundingly proved wrong the early employer who told her she would fail in the dental arena because she had no recognition in the industry. Debra is also an advocate to fight human trafficking and has developed a program to increase professional and community awareness. She has presented her program to several audiences throughout the country; and Debra is currently writing a book on customer service and communication skills. w


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H ometo w n : C h i co , C a l i fo r n i a featu re

LK N T o w n : C h a r l o t t e

here she is!

H o u seho l d : D a u g h t e r Ro s i e a n d a b e t ta fish named Baby Girl

What was your inspiration for Urban Skin Solutions Medspa and Weight Loss Center and Urban Skin Rx?

While working at a medical spa as a laser technician, I quickly discovered the lack of education and services available for treating darker skin tones. I developed a passion for making the beauty industry more inclusive, and started Urban Medspa and Weight Loss Center in 2006 in Charlotte as a result. After treating thousands of patients, many of whom traveled from out of town, I realized my expertise was needed outside of the Charlotte area and launched Urban Skin Rx Clinical Skin Care Collection in 2006 so that I could share my knowledge and services with people all over the world.

Running two businesses and being a mom must require some serious juggling and multitasking. How do you manage a work/ life balance?

I run a really tight schedule; I make sure to book time with my daughter and attend her events. I even share my daughter’s events schedule with my entire team so no one books over that time. When I walk in the house, I put my phone down for the first hour and spend time with my daughter. I could do better balancing the two. Sometimes I do not feel like I am putting my daughter first, and sometimes I do not feel like I am giving the right attention to my business … it truly is a balancing act that requires constant calibration.

rachel roff

i am an LKNw oman because…

“I consider myself to be more of a LakeCity Woman because I love the outdoors and having the metro area all at my fingertips. It is just an ideal place to call home!” Rachel Roff is the owner of Urban Skin Solutions Medspa and Weight Loss Center (8535 Cliff Cameron Dr #116, Charlotte) and Urban Skin Rx Skincare. To learn more about Rachel and her businesses, visit urbanmedspacharlotte.com and urbanskinrx.com.

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What personality traits have served you best as a business owner?

Grit, determination, and discipline! Taking my daughter home from the hospital by myself and experiencing heartbreak as a brand-new mom led me to have even more determination and discipline than I ever imagined I could have. And while I could have allowed that situation to break me, instead I used it to motivate me to be a good mother and a good businesswoman. Plus, being a good mom takes a ton of discipline, just as being a good businessperson does. I am working my you-knowwhat off with these businesses for the future, not just for the now. The same can be said of me as a mom with my daughter. Being a disciplined mom and sharing that same energy with my daughter will have positive effects for her in the future.

What is your greatest accomplishment?

Without a doubt, I am the most proud of being a good single mother while growing two businesses. Currently my skin care line is sold in Target, CVS, and Ulta, and I’m very proud of that. And I have to admit, it was pretty cool being recognized by Allure, Forbes, and Essence magazines for being the best in the industry! w writer DANA JORDAN

photographer Toni Lovejoy


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women

move on the

During their December Holiday Luncheon, the Executive Women of Lake Norman

were honored to present a check to ANSWER Scholarship for $10,000. “We were thrilled to hear from someone who has directly benefited from the assistance provided by this amazing charity, which only strengthened our commitment to continue to support them,” says Vice President Denise Williams.

Allison Hamme , co-

founder of Lost Worlds Brewing, announces the opening of the brewery scheduled for this month. With the goal of encouraging guests to “Live Global, Drink Local,” the taproom with an outdoor biergarten is located at One Norman Plaza off the Catawba Avenue corridor.

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Dr. Princess N. Thomas , a breast

surgical oncologist, recently relocated to Mooresville and opened her own private practice, Breast Care Specialists of Carolina, PLLC, across from Lake Norman Regional Medical Center. She completed her general surgery internship and residency at Mercer University’s Medical Center of Central Georgia and completed a formal breast fellowship at Yale University.

Organized Chaos (OC), a nonprofit Dragonboat team in the Lake Norman Area, is proud to congratulate its female team members, Sienna Wyniemko (left) and Yuriko Nagano (right), for representing Team USA in the 2019 International Dragonboat Competitions held in Thailand. Later this year, OC will be showcasing the strength of its ladies team in France in the Club Crew World Championship.

Whether you are a woman on the move, looking for events, new businesses in the area, or are willing to contribute your opinion, follow us by visiting www.facebook.com/ lakenormanwoman or e-mail leslie@lakenormanwoman.com.

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w

with LKN

Be SCENE with the staff of Lake Norman Woman or the magazine we create!

LKNW’s Stephanie and Liz Marshall, master aesthetician with Carolina Age Management, enjoy a recent networking event.

Hayley Sullivan (Stephanie’s daughter) and Maelyn Greist pose together with a copy of our annual Amazing Girls issue 2019 … two amazing LKN girls in their own right!

The Lake Norman Woman Magazine Men’s Photoshoot 2019 … and what a group they are!

cheese!

us Send or tag f o to o h p in a you with an W issue of LKN ! re e h it e se &

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Ashley Roundtree (Believe Media Marketing) and LKNW’s Stephanie combining some business with pleasure. LKNW publisher Dana and her editor, Leslie Ogle, enjoy some R&R at Margaritaville in Florida.

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featu re

success story Developmental Disabilities Awareness month

organization was founded in 1959 by parents like Gwen—caregivers, guardians, protectors, advocates, and most of all loving supporters of their children who were frustrated by the lack of services available to them. They wanted their children to not only be able to work, but to have all kinds of opportunities to grow and have a fulfilled life.

Building Confidence

& changing lives

G w en R o g ers w asn ’ t s u re

what to do or where to turn for guidance. Her daughter, Courtney, had turned 18 and had achieved all the requirements she needed to graduate high school. However, Gwen wasn’t sure what was next for Courtney, who has Down syndrome. She had researched the Internet, visited transition fairs, and called mental health services, to no avail. So she decided Courtney needed one more year of high school to give them time to figure out her future.

According to the NC Council on Developmental Disabilities, an estimated 1,336,000 people living with a disability live in North Carolina, which is 16 percent of the state’s population. And though research has shown that employment is a key part of living a meaningful and inclusive life in the community for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), the majority of people with I/DD remain either unemployed or underemployed despite their ability, desire, and willingness to work.

Begrudgingly, Courtney obliged. And then they learned about Nevins, Inc.

Nevins is working to change that in the Greater Charlotte region. The

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Nevins began as a sheltered work shop back then, where the participants worked on contract jobs such as assembling Christmas packages for Belk, sterilizing headsets for US Air, and dissembling handsets for Southern Bell. Ann McCorkle, the longest-serving Nevins employee, joined the staff in 1975 as part of the cafeteria team. As care for those with I/DD moved toward servicing them in individual and small group settings, so did the programs at Nevins, and so did Ann. Today, she serves as the direct care supervisor, helping participants achieve their life goals by working with small groups daily. “It took brave, determined families to combat the societal norm of hiding these special individuals from the community,” says Ann of Nevins’ beginnings. “People were not comfortable with being around or associating with persons who were presumed different. But those with I/DD have dreams, desires, and interests just like you and me. They want to work, get married, learn and experience life.” According to Pamela Glass, director of development and strategic partnerships, helping these individuals live their best lives through work and community involvement is still the main goal of Nevins 60 years later. Through supported employment, vocational support, volunteer opportunities, adult education classes and more, they help 125 participants a year. Courtney has been one of those participants now since 2008. Gwen proudly notes that Nevins has improved Courtney’s confidence and self-esteem, allowing her to be more independent. Reluctant no more, perhaps Courtney sums up her experience best: “I love coming to Nevins!” w

writer dana JORDAN

photographer chelsea bren


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fami ly

teens aloud!

teens aloud!

Your Teen,

I’m fine.

Translated

© Evgenii Puzanov | Dreamstime.com

The Universe Has Spoken. It Wants Us to Start Listening.

The first share came in the form of a twitter direct message from a New York Times-bestselling YA author with whom I’m friends. It was a picture of fan art given to her by a high school student, illustrating how much the girl had identified with my friend’s books. The art showed the stark-white silhouette of a girl surrounded by black. Block words were written over and over inside the silhouette: “HELP ME. HELP ME. HELP ME.” A dialogue bubble extended from the silhouette’s mouth. In it were two words: “I’m fine.”

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That’s not to say that the adviser and the counselor don’t have good intentions. But it is to say that advising and counseling might not be what teens need most. Perhaps what they need is an unrelenting fan. Or encouragement to try and fail. Or these unequivocally sincere lines from a grownup they trust: “I would love to hear what you’re thinking about these days. I want to hear it if it’s happy. I want to hear it if it’s sad. I want to hear, just, you.”

eamstime.co

The next day, a YA librarian who writes for Teen Librarian Toolbox sent me her most recent article. In it, I found a line that seemed to explain why this high school girl—like so many other high schoolers with whom I work—feel desperate inside but put on a rosy face. In describing how so many adults shift in their relationships with kids as they get older, my friend said this: “Many of us change from fans and cheerleaders when they’re little to overzealous advisers and nosey counselors as kids enter adolescence.”

© Laschi | Dr

When the events wrap and we go our separate ways many of us stay in touch, sharing our works in progress. Our fan mail. Our most recent initiative. This week a few of these pieces, shared with me by my YA compatriots, hit me like anvils. If the whole “message from the universe” thing is real, I got one loud and clear this week. And I don’t know about you, but when I get a message from the universe, I put it on blast.

m

When you’re in the entertainment business, you go to events and hobnob. It’s part of the deal. But when your division of the entertainment world is literary—and especially when you write young adult lit—the hobnobbing is different. Instead of red carpets and competition over “who wore it best,” we in the YA (young adult) world go to events to meet our comrades; to join forces in pursuit of our common goal: supporting teenagers as they wallow through the gunk that is adolescence.

That’s what the universe is telling me to tell you. And how wrong can the universe be? l k n e x p e rt

Cyndy Etler is a board-certified teen life coach and awardwinning young adult memoir author. Her work has been featured on CNN, NPR, CBS’ The Doctors, Huffpost, Today’s Parent, and other international media.

writer cyndy etler


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self

featu re

woman to watch on Her Family Legacy: Traditional Chinese Medicine has been around for thousands of years. I am the third generation in my family to practice. My mother learned acupuncture from her father and she operates a clinic in China. When I was growing up, people would not only come to my mother’s clinic, they would also show up at our house for treatment, so as a very young girl, I saw firsthand how acupuncture can help a wide variety of health issues. on Myths About Acupuncture:

Most people think acupuncture is just for pain. And though it has been used as a way to relieve pain for 3,000 to 5,000 years, that's not its only purpose. Many people have a positive response to treating allergies and asthma with acupuncture, and I’ve also had good results treating digestive issues, anxiety and depression, migraines, menstrual cramps, and even the common cold! In fact, we can really treat anything Western medicine treats, and all without side effects.

Joanna Jie Zhao, L.Ac NC acupuncture & wellness clinic

on One-Time Fixes: Like many medical treatments, acupuncture is not a one-time fix. It is particularly effective as a preventive measure, a way to help patients remain or get back in balance. Because of that, I teach my patients to embrace acupuncture as a lifestyle habit and not just a quick fix for pain. They learn to check themselves on a regular basis and determine what part of their emotional and physical health we need to address. With regular treatments, acupuncture can help them enhance their immune systems, enhance the recuperative powers of their body, and improve overall function and well-being.

Huntersville & Salisbury

on What Makes It All Worthwhile: My patients! I have been

Joanna Jie

zhao

L K N W r e co g n i z e s a w om a n do i n g e x c e p t i o n a l w o r k i n t h e L a k e No r m a n comm u n i t y, a l e a d e r w h o i s pa v i n g t h e w ay t o c h a n g i n g o u r at t i t u d e s a n d i n s p i r i n g co n f i d e n c e i n t h e f u t u r e .

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seeing some patients for many years because they have discovered how much acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine can help them. They have become like part of my family. When my patients are happy, I’m happy, and that makes me smile. And of course, my two sons and my husband always make me smile. w

Joanna Jie Zhao, L.Ac, has been practicing as an acupuncturist for over 20 years and is certified and licensed by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine and the NC Board of Acupuncture. For more information, visit www.ncacupunctureclinic.com.

writer dana JORDAN

photographer chelsea bren


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WatersideDentalCare.com

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r e m Sum p m a C GUIDE

It won’t be long at all before school will be out for summer! But while kids and teachers will be rejoicing over their much-needed break, many parents will be scrambling to make plans for their children that will be interesting, educational, and most important, fun. Why not consider one of Lake Norman’s quality camp experiences for your children? The best part is that there are options for nearly every interest. From nature camps to math and science camps, from dance camps to horseback riding, your child’s summer possibilities are endless!

© Andrey Kozhekin | Dreamstime.com

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anl ©Y

Summer Camp

ev

Where Teens Unplug to Reconnect!

| Dr

eam stim

e. c o m

Every year tons of teens head to summer camp to immerse themselves in the unknown. And doesn’t it seem like it would be tough on them to willingly give up their phones and other comforts of home to spend time away from friends and family in a totally new environment? Yet more teens than ever are enrolling in summer camp because, particularly at this age, they yearn for something new and challenging … something they can do on their own. While all camps (day, overnight, weeks) offer the same benefits and adventures to all age groups, we take a look at why teens tend to thrive at camp: ©A721721721 | Dreamst

Interpersonal Skills

In the unplugged, noncompetitive camp culture, teens build important face-to-face communication and relationship skills. Whether on a backpacking trip, encouraging each other through obstacle courses, or sharing stories around the campfire, the interpersonal skills that teens build are essential life badges.

Safe Risks and Challenges

It is a teen’s job to challenge the norm and take risks, and at camp kids have the opportunity to do just that under controlled, supervised circumstances. Climbing a rock wall or completing a ropes course, jumping waves on a wakeboard, or finishing an endurance hike are all healthy risks they can take at camp.

Character Growth

Camp also teaches teens about leadership, responsibility, and decision-making abilities. They grow considerably in many psychological, emotional, and cognitive areas while away from their home environment.

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Positive Role Models

In today’s crazy techno world, teens may have trouble finding strong folks to emulate and learn from … but stroll on into any well-run summer camp and you’ll be surrounded by wholesome, outdoorsy young people. Camp counselors are most often hard-working college students who are friendly, personable, and genuinely want to help others. Self-Discovery

The teen years are so focused on grades, sports, SATs, college prep, etc. that kids often get wrapped up in that one-way mode of achievement which can lead to a lot of anxiety in a young brain. Camp provides a chance to step back from their over-scheduled, sleep-deprived world and focus on what is really important to them. Many campers report feeling less selfabsorbed after spending a few weeks at camp, learning to focus on others and be of service to their fellow campmates. They also may discover new interests, hobbies, and educational/career paths that they hadn’t considered before.

ime.com


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From Packing to Packages

The Adventures of Summer Camp!

As you and the kids gear up for camp, it can be a bit stressful if you don’t plan ahead, especially if it’s their first experience being away for a week or more. But camp is great for kids’ self-esteem, confidence, and independence … and for the parents, well, hello kid-free time! But before you start planning romantic getaways or adventures with your gal pals, there is some significant prepping to do. If you’ve seen camp lists before, you know they can be a bit daunting, but with some proper planning you don’t have to stress. Here are a few things to consider:

» Start packing sooner than later. Most summer camps publish a

camp packing list well in advance, so start collecting items as soon as you get your copy.

© D my t ro Z i n k e v y c h

» Something old. Consider packing old, worn clothes and gear or go

| Dr

purchase a few items at Goodwill. Camp and kids can take their toll on things so pack sheets, towels, etc. that you won’t mind throwing away if they come back unsalvageable.

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» Whose is this? Purchase a label maker or buy preprinted labels for your child’s belongings.

» Extra, extra! Pack extra underwear, socks, and t-shirts;

double-up on bandanas, hats, and sunglasses. And always pack extra sunscreen … camp stores can be pricey.

» Not too heavy. Make sure your child can handle their

bag(s) by themselves. While there will be assistance, they should be comfortable carrying and being responsible for their own luggage.

» Mail Day! Find out the camp’s mail and care package

policy. Your lil’ campers may forget to send mail, but they will absolutely love receiving it! Drop a couple postcards in the mail the day camp begins, and mid-way through send some treats—be sure to include enough so they can share with their campmates.

» What, no cell? This is difficult because you want

your kids to be able to reach you anytime, but there’s a good reason most camps have a “No Cellphones” policy. Obviously phones are a major distraction in general and give kids an excuse not to participate or socialize; but camp counselors have also found that a direct link to mom and dad makes kids more homesick and diminishes the overall camp experience.

For more information on all things camping, visit www.acacamps.org.

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© Kiriill Ryzhov | Dreamstime.com

health

How

wise Are You About wisdom teeth? A Carolina Oral Q&A

A s ora l s u r g eons , one of the most common questions that we get is, “Why do we have wisdom teeth if they need to be taken out?” While there are several theories proposed for the presence of wisdom teeth, no one particular theory has been proven. What we do know is that their presence, whether impacted or erupted into the mouth, presents an oral health problem. Here are some other common questions regarding wisdom teeth:

Q:

What is the main concern with wisdom teeth? Impacted wisdom teeth create a pocket that bacteria can live in and cannot be effectively cleaned out. When these bacteria multiply, their byproducts destroy the surrounding bone and soft tissue and can damage the adjacent molars and supporting tissues. It can also cause cavities in hard-to-reach places that may not be fixable and cause the loss of those adjacent teeth. Additionally, impacted teeth can have different cysts and tumors form, which need to be removed. Even when wisdom teeth erupt into the mouth, rarely can they be maintained or kept clean, resulting in similar issues.

l k n e x p e rt

Dr. Michael Foran is an oral/maxillofacial surgeon and partner at Carolina Oral & Facial Surgery (as well as Lake Norman Implant Dentistry), located at 19910 North Cove Road in Cornelius. You may reach them at 704.892.1198 or visit them at www.CarolinaOMS.com.

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Q:

When should wisdom teeth be removed? As a general rule, the best time to remove wisdom teeth is between the ages of 14 and 20. Everyone in this age group should have a full mouth x-ray or 3D cone beam CT to check the positioning of their wisdom teeth so a more individual plan can be formulated. Waiting until the late 20s, 30s, or 40s generally makes the removal much more difficult and increases

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the risks for complications and longer, slower recovery periods.

Q:

How much recovery time is involved? When patients have their wisdom teeth removed, they should remember that it is a surgical procedure. It involves having anesthesia, surgical removal of small amounts of surrounding bone and the teeth, and a recovery period. Some patients feel great the next day, while others may take several days to recover. During this time patients should limit their activities at home, especially athletics, and stick to a softer diet.

Q:

What should I expect post-surgery? Syringes are given to patients to care for and clean the extraction sites. Sometimes patients may be slow to heal or have pain that continues beyond a few days. This is generally referred to as “dry socket.” While dry socket is not dangerous, it can be uncomfortable and refractory to oral pain medications. In these cases, patients can see their surgeon to have medicine placed directly into the extraction sites to ease the discomfort. w writer dr. michael foran


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self

b etter me … b etter y o u … b etter w or l d

Mind body spirit

By mixing the ingredients of attitude and action, we can change the flavor of our own lives. Learn to nurture your body and soul to lead a more balanced life.

adaptation of

Deepak Chopra’s

6 pillars of health

We know, we know. You’re too busy caring about other people to take care of yourself. You know, you know. If you’d take better care of yourself, you’d take better care of your loved ones.

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These common phrases are like a merry-go-round, circling with jangly music and lurid color. They’re loud and demanding, and they’re not actually taking you anywhere. If you were able to take better care of yourself, you’d already be doing it, right? But you’re so busy tending to your family, or your students, or your animals, you can’t wedge any self-care into your schedule. And around you spin.

jangle-go-round come to a halt, for me. In Deepak’s words, the painted horses of the self-care cycle are sleep, meditation, movement, emotion, nutrition, and biorhythms, or fluctuating energy cycles. In order to live a balanced life, to be at our best for our self and others, we need to tune in to each of these elements. “The body is literally the metabolism of experience,” Deepak says. “Bodies are a process, not a structure.”

Reading an article about mind-body-spirit guru Deepak Chopra’s speech to the American Academy of Family Physicians made the

By pulling out the individual elements of self-care, then stating that they move each other forward, Deepak helped me

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see that each horse on the ride has its own position and purpose. To turn life’s whirling from stress to fun, we want to make sure we sit on each horse. “Everything we do,” Deepak said, “influences our health because our actions, moods, thoughts, sleep and more affect gene expression.” Reading his philosophy, one can feel the guilty pressure of their Should-Dos—eat your veggies, go to the gym, get enough sleep—fade away, replaced by a curious interest. What would happen if I did meditate regularly? How would regular workouts affect my mood? Some say you catch

more flies with honey than with vinegar. I say you do better self-care with curiosity than with pressure. Which of Deepak’s elements are most appealing to you: more sleep? Meditation? Movement? Awareness of your emotions? Cleaner eating? Tuning in to your shifting energy levels? Over the next week, give ten minutes a day to that practice. And notice if the rest of your life is affected. Dollars to donuts you’ll feel like your days—and those of the family, friends, and furries who love you—are spinning smoother. w

Cyndy Etler is a board-certified teen life coach and award-winning young adult memoir author. Her work has been featured on CNN, NPR, CBS’ The Doctors, Huffpost, Today’s Parent, and other international media.

writer cyndy etler


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Profile for Lake Norman Woman Magazine

Lake Norman Woman March 2020  

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