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Page 1

refresh & renew

you Embracing

THE NOW! pg. 38

When Too Much Really is Too Much pg. 44

Get Plugged In... by Unplugging! pg. 14

featuring

Dr. Julianne Colvin of Crawford & Colvin Family and Cosmetic Dentistry l ake nor m an om an.c om APRIL 2020

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lake

norman

v o l u m e

x i i i

,

Find Us On

woman

n u m b e r

x

womenpower I ’ v e w a n t e d t o b e a w ri t e r s i n c e I fir s t l e ar n e d h o w t o r e ad. When I was a child, and then a young adult, I spent hours writing

short stories and plays, pretend newspaper columns, letters to family and friends. I had something to say all the time, and I spent most of my spare time, and a lot of the time when I should have been doing homework or working at something else, saying it on paper. And now, I am lucky enough to make my living with words. So you would think that I would still have plenty to say, right? Not so much. But oh, how I suffer when the time for me to turn in my publisher’s letter rolls around each month. This month’s agony over my writer’s block has led me to ponder on how easy it is to dream of doing things … and how very hard it can be to turn those dreams into reality.

DANA JORDAN

It’s not that I’m lazy. I don’t spend my day eating bon-bons and watching Jerry Springer reruns (not that there’s anything wrong with that). In fact, I sit down at my desk in preparation to write, with every intention of really writing, but then I immediately have the urge to take up bonsai tree cultivation or to clean out the garden shed. In short, what I’ve discovered is that my talent for writing is only exceeded by my talent for coming up with ways NOT to write.

kim cross

Thank goodness renowned procrastinator and fellow writer Robert Benchley came up with a solution that I think might work for me—one that will refresh and renew my energy and initiative for publisher letter writing. And who knows? If you are distracted from your to-do lists as easily as I am, maybe it will work for you, too. What Benchley discovered is that anyone can do any amount of work, provided it isn’t the work she is supposed to be doing at that moment. Isn’t that genius? According to Benchley, the only way to complete a project is to commit yourself to something even bigger. So, I am going to commit to writing the next great American novel. I figure that if I dedicate the top of my to-do list to that, in order to avoid actually writing it, I’ll be able to get my bonsai trimming done, get the shed cleaned out, and sit down and knock out my letters to you in pretty short order. And then I can turn to even more lofty goals. There are other mundane chores that I need to tackle, but I’m thinking I’m going to give my bucket list of important things I want to accomplish during my time here on earth a makeover by adding some intangible and personal things that mean something. For instance, I want to learn how to be a good golfer so I can actually play a round with my sons and not simply spend four hours looking for my ball in the woods. I want to learn Spanish. I want to be the daughter and mother and friend my loved ones deserve. I really do want to write something spectacular. I want to change someone’s life for the better. So I’m going to do it. I’m going to top my list with novel writing and then follow that up with things that really matter. I’m going to stop dreaming and start realizing … right after I watch this video on bonsai tree trimming. w

dana jordan publisher

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APRIL contributors:

Doug Balog; Cyndy Etler; Michelle Love; Vanessa Richardson; Tiffany Spach; Katie Stankiewicz contact us:

704.895.6168

PO Box 1000 | Corneli us, NC | 28031

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Lake Norman Woman reserves the right to deny any advertisement or listing that does not meet Lake Norman Woman standards. Submissions are welcome but unsolicited materials are not guaranteed to be returned. Lake Norman Woman assumes no responsibility for information, products, services, or statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. An advertised special printed in this publication is subject to change without notice. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.


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contents april

celebrating the

success

of

women

2020

14

p

p

32

Stay plugged in by UN-plugging!

Easter traditions from around the world

features

38 karen

18

leading the way: Claudia Kepner

24

womEn to watch: The Power of Three!

28

cover story: A Reason To Smile

38

success story: Embracing the Now!

p

schmidt

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Photo: toni lovejoy

on the cover: dr. julianne colvin of Crawford & Colvin Family and Cosmetic Dentistry p h o t o g rap h y : toni lovejoy


p

22

8 fun jokes, pranks, & foolishness in time for April Fools'!

family 26

self

Lessons Of Military Operational Security Applied To Family Safety: Part 1

health 20

What’s New In Poison Ivy?

50

What's All The Buzz About Bees?

46 Getting Into Indoor Cycling

p

14

Stay Plugged In By Un-Plugging!

22

8 Things: 8 Fun Jokes, Pranks, And Just Plain Foolishness!

32

Easter Traditions From Around The World

34

Tips, Tricks, & Hacks: Easter Edition

44

Pathways To Inner Peace And Wellbeing

48

Doing Your Part For Earth Day!

54

mind, body, spirit: We Are Responsible For Our Own Experiences!

34

24

Tips, Tricks & Hacks to brighten up your Easter!

in every issue 12

40

live, learn, grow scene with LKNW

52

36

42

p Iredell Family Medicine

women on the move

5 things to do in april

words matter

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"

Live, Learn, Life takes practice! And though they don’t always come wrapped in a shiny red bow, the lessons we learn along the way are invaluable gifts that are worth sharing. Here are a few noteworthy examples featured in this issue:

“Mindfulness is simply

being aware of what is happening right now without wishing it were different.

Enjoying the pleasant

without holding on when it changes, which it will. Being

with the unpleasant

without fearing it will always be this way, which it won’t.” – James Baraz

Smile your way on over

to page 28 to see how a mission trip to Guatemala led Dr. Julianne Colvin, co-owner of Crawford & Colvin Family and Cosmetic Dentistry, to her career path and passion. Dr. Colvin shares with us her discovery of true compassion, gentleness, and a genuine concern for the well-being of others.

Flip to page 24 to learn about

three amazing women with Iredell Family Medicine. Jodi Stutts, Kristie Smith, and Lori Sumner are stellar examples of balancing work and family as well as finding “me” time in their busy schedules. From keeping a mindful balance in their worlds to sharing life strategies, these three will give you a boost of positivity and a can-do attitude.

Karen Schmidt, owner of Homestyled Interior Design in Mooresville, knows how

to embrace the NOW! Being a mom and starting a business is always a challenge, but Karen demonstrates determination and a positive strategy of stick-to-itiveness on page 38 from which we can all learn.

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You will definitely want to catch

Leading the Way

on page 18 where Claudia Kepner (Raymer-Kepner Funeral Home

and Cremation

Services) shows us how her role in

leadership thrives in a business that has excessively

long days, along with emotional

experiences that can’t always be

left at the office.


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self

Stay Plugged In by UN-plugging! As humans we need personal contact and interaction. So next time you want to “Plug-In” to your family, try unplugging— Have dinner as a family without electronic devices of any type (including television). Whether it’s around the kitchen table, at a local restaurant, or even a picnic in the park, take the time to engage with phones OFF. While technically you are still “plugged in” when using the phone, try calling instead of texting with your family and friends. Isn’t it much nicer to hear, “Mom, I love you,” rather than to read, “Later…xoxo.” esign © Yud

| D rea

mstim

e.com

W e d o n ’ t n e e d s tat i s t i c s to t e l l u s

we spend A LOT of time plugged in—hooked up to our computers, our cell phones, our tablets, and TV’s. The concern for many is that our social skills are deteriorating, especially for our youth who are getting “plugged-in” during their early, formative years. According to a recent article in Psychology Today, families are feeling it, too. “Ask any parent,” suggests one report, “and you will see that many teens seem to have fallen into a tech sinkhole. And their constant texting and abuse of social media may even be holding them back from attaining social and developmental milestones.”

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Have the entire family take a month break from social media. It gives you a chance to step back and live life instead of just posting about it. You might be surprised how much more time in the day you have. Exercise without electronics. If you exercise with someone, engage with conversation. Or if you go it alone, simply be with your thoughts and the sounds of nature. Schedule game night with the family— board games NOT videos. Be more tangible and hands-on. Read a real book, for example, or do some crafting or home improvement projects. Get back to nature—take the family camping or go on a hike. Being in the great outdoors is a must for our human brains, and uninterrupted time with family is priceless!

For more information on the values of unplugging and how technology affects us, visit www.psychologytoday.com.


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lk n w f e a t u r e

leading

the way As we rise into leadership roles, it’s not always easy to navigate the leadership path. After all, there are as many leadership traits as there are leaders. Lake Norman Woman talks to area leaders in the hope that we can learn from each other’s successes and failures in confronting leadership challenges. claudia kepner, Secretary/Treasurer and Financial Administrator, Raymer-Kepner Funeral Home & Cremation Services

When it comes to leadership, Claudia Kepner not only knows the importance of keeping an open door, she knows it’s just as essential to keep an open mind. Without open mindedness, she explains, you can’t be a good listener. And when your employees feel heard, they feel trusted enough to openly share their ideas and provide honest feedback, which in turn, helps create a healthy work environment. So in a nutshell, open mindedness is the core trait around which Claudia’s leadership skills revolve. She learned that life lesson from both her father and her father-in-law. Her dad taught her that accepting others as they are doesn’t just facilitate good leadership— it’s what makes the entire world go round. “Not everyone is alike,” Claudia remembers her dad saying, adding, “When we respect our similarities and our differences, it opens the doors to many other opportunities, be they positive work relationships, increased work productivity, enhanced innovation at work, or simply a wider understanding of the world in which we live.” And her father-inlaw, with his open-door policies and family-oriented management style, provided an excellent role model for Claudia as well.

he r de f i n ition of leadership:

"

Leadership is empowering others by listening and responding to their ideas, issues, and ways of thinking in order to achieve a common goal."

life as a leader 18

APRIL 2020

First Job: Weather

Being open minded, though, doesn’t just mean considering opposing or contradictory views—it also means being flexible and adaptive to new experiences. In 2011, Claudia and her husband, John, jumped wholeheartedly into a new experience when they expanded their family funeral home business in West Virginia by purchasing Raymer Funeral Home and moving to Lake Norman. And Claudia recently accepted that challenge again when she took on the role of secretary/treasurer and financial administrator of Raymer-Kepner. “It’s so important to keep our minds growing and always be open to learning new things,” she explains. “I’m gaining confidence in my new skills, and perhaps most importantly, I’m learning that asking for help is not a bad thing!” w

Comfort Food:

reporter on college radio station

Mashed Potatoes

Best Career Advice:

Instacart

Stay true to your faith and values

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Best TimeSaver: I Wish I Had More:

Time with my parents

Favorite Snack:

Popcorn and Ice Cream (but not together!)

Biggest Work Pet Peeve: Cars speeding

thru our parking lot

writer Dana Jordan

Last Thing You Researched on the Internet: Travel

destinations to celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary

photographer Sydney Cunningham


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health

What’s New In Poison Ivy? It’s still poisonous and it’s still ivy! But to answer the question, let’s look at the basics as we begin to enjoy the warm weather and all the amazing outdoor activities that our area affords us. Poison ivy thrives in our neck of the woods, so to speak, and produces an oil called urushiol that causes a rash in most people who come in contact with it. The rash in and of itself is not contagious; this is because it’s the skin’s reaction to the oil, so it is the oil that spreads so easily from person to person. Urushiol is tenacious! It’ll stick to almost anything: your shoes, clothes, camping gear, yard tools and equipment … even to your pets. It can transfer to and from your hands to your cell phone or any object you touch. The oil is in virtually every part of the plant—the leaves, stems, and roots. And learn to identify the plant during all seasons because while poison ivy dies down in the winter, it is not dormant so it can still cause a rash.

Here are a few sprigs of advice regarding treatment options: l k n e x p e rt

Rinsing your skin with lukewarm, soapy water or rubbing alcohol within about an hour of touching poison ivy can help remove the oil, helping you avoid a rash — or at least make it less severe. You’ll also need to wash anything else that’s come into contact with the plant because, as noted, it sticks to everything!

Doug Balog is the owner and compounding pharmacist at HealthSmart Pharmacy. Serving the Lake Norman community for more than 20 years, the pharmacy is located at 108 Leaning Oak Drive in Mooresville. For more information, visit www.healthsmartnc.com or call 704.658.1184.

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If preventive measures are what you seek, you can get over-the-counter (OTC) creams that can delay urushiol from penetrating the skin. Consult your local pharmacist for barrier creams that are right for you. Calamine lotion and other OTC cortisone creams can help ease some of the itchiness as well. Once a rash develops, water can be a soothing aid to help ease itching and burning. Soak in a cool-water bath containing an oatmeal-based product which your pharmacist can also help you choose. Placing a cool, wet compress on the rash for 15 to 30 minutes several times a day should help with the discomfort. OTC antihistamines such as loratadine (Claritin) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl) can help ease your itching and inflammation. Benadryl has the added benefit of making some people sleepy which could be helpful at bedtime. Don’t apply an antihistamine cream to your rash, though, as it can actually make the itching worse. writer DOUG BALOG


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self

8 things

Add a few drops of food coloring to the bottom of your kids’ cereal bowls and cover it with dry cereal; when they pour milk in their bowls, it turns colors!

Knock-knock. Who’s there?

A little old lady.

A little old lady who?

All this time, I had no idea you could yodel.

April

For a harmless prank, put a rubber band around the kitchen sink sprayer! ;)

april

1

Mark Twain

“The first o

day we rem

said,

f April is th

ember wha

we are the

other 364

days of th

e

t

e year.”

In 1957, the BBC reported about “spaghetti crops” in Switzerland and many requested information on growing their own spaghetti trees, completely oblivious to the April Fools’ joke.

FOOLS’! ?? ?

8 fun jokes, pranks, and just plain foolishness!

No one is quite sure how the tradition of April Fools’ Day began.

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What do you call a bee that can’t make up its mind? A Maybe

In Scotland, April Fools’ lasts two days.


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self

featu re

Most people agree, there is power or even magic in the number three—whether it be the scripture’s reference to a cord of three not easily broken, the Holy Trinity itself, the geometrical sturdiness of a triangle, or even that sometimes things happen in a succession of three. Here, we learn about three of Iredell Family Medicine’s Women to Watch: Jodi Stutts, MD; Kristie Smith, MSN-FNP; and Lori Sumner, PA-C.

women to watch

on Being Mindful of Balance:

Lori: I know that you learn to juggle a lot of hats as a working mom. While I am dedicated to my career, being a wife to Mark and mom to our three boys has always been my top priority.

lori sumner jodi stutts kristie smith

Kristie: I think it’s very important to incorporate rest in your day – both physically and mentally. A lot of women get burned out because they don’t put that part of selfcare as a priority.

Iredell Family Medicine Mooresville

Jodi: I believe that being aware of and grateful for all my blessings is an important part of mindfulness. I know that life is short and unpredictable, so making every day count is very important to me. It is also important to carve out time for self-care, which is undervalued by so many women today.

on Overcoming Challenges:

Lori: My greatest life challenge was when I was diagnosed with breast cancer almost three years ago. It was a humbling place to be in the role of a patient and gave me a new perspective on the vulnerability they sometimes feel. My favorite quote is on a coffee mug given to me: “You Got This!” Kristie: I always keep in mind one of my favorite verses: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” This helps me know I can overcome whatever I face. Jodi: Being a working mom is an everyday challenge. I had to take a step back at a point in my life and evaluate what I was doing. I still struggle every day to get it all done, but I’m more at peace with where I am in my life. I try to remember to not stress – God’s got it all planned out. We just need to enjoy the ride.

on Support of Family and Friends:

LORI sumner, JODI stutts KRISTIE smith

&

LKNW recognizes women doing exceptional work in the L a k e N o r m a n c o m m u n i t y, l e a d e r s w h o ARE pav i n g t h e w ay t o c h a n g i n g o u r at t i t u d e s a n d i n s p i r i n g c o n f i d e n c e i n t h e f u t u r e .

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Lori: Working in family medicine allows you to really get to know your patients, and sometimes even the entire family. I’ve been lucky to work beside some amazing co-workers. Each of these relationships has helped me grow. Kristie: I feel so fortunate to have a wonderful support system, both at home and at work. It’s important to surround yourself with people who believe in you and what you are doing. Jodi: Having family and friends to rely on is key to being a working mom. It really does take a village! Hands down, my passion in life is my family. Our lives are full, but we wouldn’t have it any other way. w Lori Sumner, PA-C; Kristie Smith, MSN, FNP; and Jodi Stutts, MD, are all part of Iredell Health System’s Iredell Family Medicine located at 544 Brawley School Road, Suite A, in Mooresville. You can reach them at 704.360.5190 or visit them at www.iredellfamilymedicine.com. writer michelle love

photographer toni lovejoy


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family

Lessons of Military Operational Security

Applied to Family Safety Part 1

This month starts a two-part article that explores measures parents can take with their children and continues with measures parents can take on their own. A s a n e w m o t h e r , I w a s s t r u ck b y m y n e w s e n s e o f v u l n e ra b ili t y.

A former U.S. Army officer, I rarely felt unsafe. Kids completely changed that sense of security. As any parent could have told me, small children are slow to move, won’t listen, and do not sit quietly anywhere. They make security difficult.

Speaking with neighbors I discovered I was not alone. Recent national events from school shootings to targeted kidnappings leave parents wondering, “How safe are our kids? How can we feel confident dropping our kids off at school?” I adapted a list of operational measures I learned in the military for everyday use. These may be considered by anyone without a suspected or known threat.

- Limit social media. As proud kids are of their team’s win or tempting as those gorgeous pictures are, children and parents should limit posting any content identifying their locations, birthdate, or identity. Consider the internet a global community of billions of people. Not all people share your values about your children. Security is routinely hacked. Ask family, schools, guardians to avoid posts. Grandma and Grandpa will love a photo book!

l k n e x p e rt

Ms. Richardson is a former military officer and owns Cygnal Consulting, LLC, a consulting firm focused on providing clients with processes, tools, and leadership for Project, Enterprise, and Emergency Risk Management. She is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. The statements here do not represent advice or risk assessment.

- Teach your children to be “rude” to strangers. We feel obligated to be nice. It is OK to respond to a stranger with nothing or “No, thank you” and keep walking. It is perfectly fine to ignore the door, a post, message, ding, snap, or tweet (!) when kids don’t personally know the sender offline. Teach your kids personal confidence and to ignore what others think of them.

- Keep names off clothing and personal items. Kids love seeing their names everywhere. Labels (monograms, jewelry, tattoos) help strangers endear themselves to your children. They can make statements like, “Hi Taylor. Your Mom is sick. She sent me to pick you up.” Consider initials, or omitting labels entirely. - Use Passwords. Let your children identify a password to discretely tell you they feel unsafe or want to come home early. Practice making up sentences to use in everyday conversations. “Hi Mom. I don’t feel well. I think it was the cucumber sandwich.” Or “Oh no! Seriously? Cucumber salad again?” Don’t ask questions, just say, “I phoned because I need to pick you up now.” Discuss the reason and appropriateness later.

© Kiattikhun Nilsophon | Dreamstime.com

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writer vanessa richardson


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featu re

cover story

a reason to

smile

S

o m e f o lk s h av e a car e e r . They go to work; they do their job; they bring home a paycheck. Other folks have a calling. They do the thing they love, knowing that their efforts serve and benefit others, deriving much gratification from the process. Dr. Julianne Colvin, co-owner of Crawford & Colvin Family and Cosmetic Dentistry, falls squarely into the latter group.

She didn’t always know she wanted to be a dentist. Her parents were pharmacists, so she was surrounded by, and felt drawn to, the healthcare field. She heard hints of her calling, but wasn’t quite clear on the path she was meant to take. Through high school, she volunteered and shadowed the professionals in hospitals but didn’t quite feel that click. Then, her childhood dentist invited her to observe his practice for a day. “That’s when I knew what I wanted to do,” Dr. Julianne says. “I went home that day and announced to my mom, ‘I want to be a dentist!’” She was initially drawn to dentistry for the most logical reason you’ve never thought of: the results are immediately tangible. “I had observed how, in other areas of healthcare, patients’ issues could rarely be resolved in an immediate, hands-on way,” she says. “With dentistry, I have the

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writer cyndy etler

photographer toni lovejoy


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support is vital,” she says. “We are both business owners so we give and take based on the other’s availability—physically and mentally.” Giving priority and energy to her faith and her family allows everything else in her life to fall into place.

ability to address my patients’ pain and problem in a single visit. They leave better than they arrived, which is extremely satisfying for me and them!” However, Dr. Julianne describes a transformational mission trip that gave her perfect clarity of purpose in this career. During dental school at West Virginia University, she went to Guatemala to provide dental care to those in need. “There was such an extreme physical need for care; however, what people responded to was the service through compassion, gentleness, and a genuine concern for their well-being. There was a language barrier, but I learned there is no compassion barrier.” Producing genuine smiles that reflected more than just healthier teeth became the motivation behind her career.

“True success is measured through the creation of joy and hope in the lives of those around us.” After completing an Advanced General Dentistry Residency at UNC in Chapel Hill, she and her husband, Jason, moved to Huntersville in 2006. Dr. Julianne worked as an associate dentist for several years until

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her desire to make a practice her own led her to partner with a colleague, Dr. Brent Crawford. “We shared a similar vision for dentistry and our patients, and we felt the partnership would be a good fit,” she recalls. Together, their goal was to have an office centered on service—an experience that surpassed great dentistry alone. A dental experience that left a lasting impression because patients felt valued and cared for beyond their dental needs. Crawford & Colvin Family and Cosmetic Dentistry was established in 2012, and Dr. Julianne is very proud of the amazing team of hygienists, dental assistants, and treatment coordinators who have made this service goal the daily reality for their patients and community. “We truly love our patients. Dentistry is such a vulnerable area of healthcare for so many people. Some have fear and anxiety that stems from previous experiences, and we work to build their confidence. We listen and present options to make the process as smooth and easy as possible. It’s not just about teeth … it’s about building trusted relationships.” But it’s not her expert dental care that Dr. Julianne is most proud of. Stating faith and family as the foundation of her life, that designation goes to her marriage and her two boys, 10-year-old Tyler and 6-year-old Carson. “My husband Jason’s

This lesson was not inborn, though. It came, in fact, after the birth of her second son, with a diagnosis of thyroid cancer. “I gained a new perspective on life, of the fragility and gift of the days we are given,” she says. “I grew as a listener, becoming more aware of God’s presence, direction, and hand in my life.” She began to understand that life’s disappointments and failures are His way of reminding her that she can’t do it all on her own. “Things may not always go the way we would choose, but when this happens, it’s for a greater purpose,” she says. “This gives me peace and hope for anything the future may hold, personally or professionally.” Today, Dr. Julianne’s passion for serving others is reflected in the non-profit work her dental practice is involved in. These include participation with Team Smile, the Wounded Warrior organization, school presentations, holiday angel tree drives, and free dental care provided with the Ada Jenkins Center and the Mission of Mercy clinics. “True success is measured through the creation of joy and hope in the lives of those around us,” Dr. Julianne says. She strives to instill the lessons she’s learned, and her faith in God, in her sons’ lives. She encourages them to “be the reason someone smiles today” … something this smile-maker was born to do. w


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Happy Easter from Lake Norman Woman Magazine! Here are some interesting Easter traditions from around the globe that might have you grateful for the simplicity of an Easter Egg Hunt!

1

Butter lambs.

In Russia, the Easter meal is accompanied by a pat of butter that is made into the shape of a lamb. It dates back to ancient times when it was considered lucky to come across a lamb.

The Easter Bilby.

Bilbies are small rabbit-size marsupials that are endangered in Australia--confectioners there have taken to making chocolate likenesses of the animal with monies going toward preserving the species.

3

Leave it to the French.

Every Easter Monday, the residents of Haux in France crack more than 4,500 eggs into a gigantic pan to create an enormous omelet that serves over 1,000 people.

A Hungary splash!

In Hungary, women dress up in traditional clothes on Easter Sunday and get splashed with water. This ritual is associated with fertility and cleansing rites left over from pagan times.

5

In Papua New Guinea, Easter trees at the front of churches are decorated with sticks of tobacco and packs of cigarettes.

Easter traditions around the globe include multi-colored, decorated eggs, but in Greece you will find only red eggs. Red is the color of life as well as a representation of the blood of Christ.

APRIL 2020

4

Tobacco at Easter?

Easter Red in Greece.

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Information gathered from www.wanderlust.co.uk.


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self

We know how busy life can get—kids, work, family, friends … sometimes just getting dinner on the table is a Herculean feat! So in an effort to save our readers some time, effort, and money here are a few tips, tricks, and hacks that might come in handy in your busy world!

Colorful deviled eggs will be an Easter fav!

Use Kool-Aid to dye your eggs …

just pour one envelope of each Kool-Aid color and 2/3 cup water into separate glasses, stirring to dissolve the drink mix; submerge eggs until the desired color is reached.

Tips,

tricks,

Boil as usual then shell them and remove the yolk. Put the halved eggs into food dye (add three drops of food coloring and one teaspoon vinegar to a small glass of water— filled about 2/3 of the way full—for each color you want to create). The eggs will color fast so for pastels, keep a watchful eye. And don’t worry about the eggs tasting like vinegar; they have no more vinegar taste than if you had dyed them in their shell.

& Hacks For a special Easter brunch item,

dip your French toast in a coating of corn flakes right before you put it in the pan.

easter edition Use colorful marshmallow Peeps for S’mores … kids love ‘em!

Accidentally drop a piece of eggshell into your bowl?

Simply wet one of your fingers with water and gently touch the piece of shell; it will easily stick to your finger. Also, a larger piece of shell will retrieve the broken shard.

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women

move on the

Kristen Ingram was recently appointed to the Steering Committee for the Town of Huntersville to represent the residents in regards to the Huntersville 2040 Community Plan. The plan details Huntersville’s visions, goals, policies, and strategies to manage growth and provide high-quality public facilities and services for all citizens.

Jill Bieber is proud to

announce the grand opening of Pinkies On Main. Located at 162 North Main Street in Mooresville, Pinkies is a full-service nail salon offering manicures, pedicures, acrylics, and more.

connect with us!

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Jenn Majus is

a self-published author of a young adult Dystopian novel, The Landry Chronicles: Exordium. Also a teen mentor, she aims to “inspire the next generation to make their dreams a reality, even when it’s not easy.”

Lake Norman area youth Emily Parker and Danya Tyler are currently serving 18-month missions with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints. Emily has completed almost two years of coursework on academic scholarship at Brigham Young University, studying psychology and political science; and Danya will be studying civil engineering at Brigham Young University upon her return.

Whether you are a woman on the move, looking for events, new businesses in the area, or are willing to contribute your opinion, follow us by visiting www.facebook.com/lakenormanwoman or e-mail leslie@lakenormanwoman.com.

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featu re

“The time I spent at home with my kids when they were young was priceless,” she says. Watching Alan build his business from the ground up was also invaluable in the years ahead when Homestyled Interior Design was born. Karen appreciates that for everything there is a season, and now that the season has changed, she has more time to focus on her business.

success story

karen schmidt HOMESTYLED INTERIOR DESIGN Mooresville

Karen and her family have called Lake Norman home for the past 15 years. “We had outgrown our little home in Southern California, and a good friend who worked in NASCAR suggested we should check out Mooresville. We flew out to North Carolina on a weekend and bought a house!” Mooresville was the perfect small town to raise their four children: Austin, Tanner, Travis, and Lillie.

Embracing

the Now!

“I’m my own enemy and my o w n b e s t fri e n d,” says Karen

Schmidt, owner of Homestyled Interior Design in Mooresville. She adds, “I know that I have to make the best decisions that will move my business in the right direction, which can be overwhelming sometimes, but I’m learning that I can’t let the fear of failure stop me from moving forward.” Being a mom and starting a business is quite the challenge, and most find that the greatest obstacle in starting a new business is just that – getting started. “I finally realized,” Karen continues, “that I had to jump in with both feet and, thankfully, I’ve been earning a profit ever since.” She credits family support, time management, and discipline as the keys to her success.

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Karen’s true passion lies in transforming spaces from start to finish. “My favorite part is seeing the look on our client’s face when we reveal the new space,” she grins, “and it brings me so much joy!” Seeing that joy has kept her in the business of taking outdated spaces and breathing new life into them. It all sparked 20 years ago. Karen and her husband, Alan, bought their first fixer-upper home when Karen was still in college. She enjoyed the process so much that it prompted her to change her major from communications to interior design. However, Homestyled Interior Design wasn’t to burgeon until their children were older. While Karen was home, she helped manage her husband’s landscape business, Greenway Lawn Management.

“I’m so proud of my family,” she says, with twinkling eyes. “I have four great kids and one amazing husband, and I couldn’t be prouder of them.” Alan inspires her daily with his support, advice, and work ethic. He is her biggest fan and believes in her even when she doubts herself. Karen knows that even though everything in the business depends on her, she in turn fully relies on God. “He has provided for me and my family in countless ways and has shown me that I am never alone.” w

writer MICHELLE LOVE

photographer toni lovejoy


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w

with LKN

Be SCENE with the staff of Lake Norman Woman or the magazine we create!

Art Director Chelsea Bren arranging a photoshoot for a cover article in 2019.

Our fearless leader, Dana, poses for the camera at a staff workshop/retreat.

LKNW’s Stephanie Sullivan and Jack Stevens with the Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce.

LKNW’s Stephanie, Michele, and Chelsea enjoy some much-needed spa treatment.

cheese!

Send or tag us in a photo of you with an issue of LKNW & see it here!

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Editor Leslie Ogle with the April 2019 issue at her home in Delray Beach, Florida—Bloom Where You’re Planted!


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5 An

things woman

13

LKN

should do in

april

2

Saturday, April 11:

Annual Latta Easter Egg Hunt

Sunday, April 4:

Katherine M. Bray Women’s Leadership Conference

This year’s conference “Women Making Change” features speakers, workshops, and conversations exploring 21st-century leadership and entrepreneurship. $25 / 9am-2pm Lily Gallery 405 N. Main St., Davidson

Children ages one to ten hunt for eggs filled with treats and dozens of grand-prize eggs. Day includes photo opportunities with Baxter the Bunny, story-time, crafts, and farm animals. $8 / 10am-3pm Historic Latta Plantation 5225 Sample Rd., Huntersville More information: www.lattaplantation.org

More information: www.davidson.edu

Friday, April 17-Sunday, April 19:

26th Annual Loch Norman Highland Games

Highland dancing, bagpipes, athletics, Kids’ Zone, merchants, hearth cooking, NC beer and wine, whiskey tastings, kilted running events, competitions and more. $8-$20 / Times Vary Historic Rural Hill 4431 Neck Rd., Huntersville

5

More information: www.lochnorman.com

Saturday, April 25 – Sunday, April 26:

Davidson’s Art on the Green

Enjoy art, live music, and food at this juried art festival featuring booths filled with top-quality art works from artists throughout the region. Free Admission / Times Vary Davidson Village Green 216 South Main St., Davidson More information: www.ci.davidson.nc.us

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4

Friday, April 24-Sunday, April 26:

Lake Norman Hospice Regatta

Festivities include a sailor social, refreshments after racing, an interfaith Memorial Moment, Saturday dinner and auction, and Sunday donation cookout. Registration Fees & Times Vary Lake Norman Yacht Club 297 Yacht Rd., Mooresville More information: www.lnyc.org


LAKESHORE PEDIATRIC 1/3 PAGE

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self

Pathways to Inner Peace and Wellbeing “In today’s rush, we all think too much, seek too much, want too much, and forget about the joy of just being.” –Eckhart Tolle

If you stop and sit for just 30 minutes, what churns in your mind – silence and openness, memories and dreams, OR problems and responsibilities? In most minds, there is no stillness or silence. Our minds reel trying to solve problems while balancing life and work. It is a maze of who, what, where, how, and what-ifs.

l k n e x p e rt

Offering equine assisted psychotherapy and business development, Katie Stankiewicz is a Certified Leadership Coach and Advanced Certified Equine Specialist. She is the owner of Willow Equine (www WillowEquinetherapy.com) and Sole to Souls Connections, a program dedicated to our military and their families’ mental health. You can reach Katie at 704.237.0644.

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Our days are bombarded with distractions and stressors, which become a deterrent to inner peace. Life is fragmented and disconnected. Our minds race at a frenetic pace creating an unenjoyable state of being. We live in a hurry-up, go-do state of life.

A helpful mindfulness exercise is to close your eyes, take a deep breath in, hold it, and then release all the air and heaviness out. Repeat your breath work two more times and on the last breath imagine your roots extending from your feet, which are connecting to Mother Earth. Your roots extend deep into her soil, allowing whatever negative thoughts, emotions, or experiences to be released from your body into the core of Mother Earth. It is at this point you begin your journey toward meditation and mindfulness. Terms which are increasingly used in conjunction with improved mental, physical, and spiritual

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wellbeing. You detach from outside stimuli and quiet yourself. Your focus is on being in the present, totally engaged in experiential experiences without judgement. It is the pause, the deep breath, the emersion of yourself that produces the calm inner peace. This practice slows you down, engaging your world and allowing you to live in the moment. Make a commitment to slow down, be present, and connect. Active listening is a hard and important skill. You commit to a conversation to truly hear and feel what is being said. You are centered and engaged in that moment. Release random thoughts and judgmental nuances. Eye contact binds the moment. This solidifies your intention to be more aware. It is the measure of what is going on around you. You are choosing to live, to be more creative, and to be more considerate of yourself and others. Mindfulness engulfs the senses. Notice your world through your senses with pleasure. Immerse yourself in tastes, sights, and sounds. Nature and mindfulness go hand-in-hand so enjoy the beauty around you. Take in the rays of sunshine, the intricacies of a wooded path, the song of a bird … stop, breathe, embrace. You are in that moment and that moment alone. You are grounded and subsequently freed from negative energy. writer KATIE STANKIEWICZ


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health

Getting Into

Indoor g! Cyclin

Everyone’s seen the new cycling boutiques out there. If you have decided that you want to try one, but find them a bit intimidating, here are some tips on getting started. The most important decision is to address your fears head-on. Once you confirm they are unnecessary thoughts, you will be ready to tackle the challenge! TRYING SOMETHING NEW Confront your own demons when trying something new—you know, the ones that say “I’m not fit enough; why did I let myself go; I’ll never make it through 45 minutes; I’ll have to sit in the front row; It’s easier to just not go.” There is no better time than the present. Live your best life today! Be the woman, the wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend that you want to be. Be the example you want to set for your children. Take charge of your health now, one pedal stroke at a time. GETTING INTO SHAPE Everyone is a welcome friend … people will not judge you even if you feel you are not in good enough shape. Once the lights go down and the ride starts, the bikes and instruction accommodate every skill level. You can even customize your workout to where your need is on any given day. IT’S NOT JUST FOR LEGS Yes, riders can develop great legs, toned quads and bum, as well as more flexible joints, but did you know rides utilize the full body with dedication to the core at intervals throughout and a focused portion of most routines to working each arm

l k n e x p e rt

Tiffany Spach is an instructor at CycleBar Lake Norman located at 20601 Torrence Chapel Road, Suite 5A, in Cornelius. You may contact CycleBar at 704.940.4850 or via their website at www.cyclebar.com.

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muscle?! Benefits of indoor cycling also include an endorphin rush that releases happy hormones that can put you in a great mood and help you sleep better, and you can even develop more youthful, glowing skin through sweating!

FRONT ROW FEARS Reserve your bike ahead of time. Choose the spot where you feel most comfortable. For example, our studio has a diagram that allows you to decide—maybe it’s on the side, the back row, or a dark corner … better yet under a fan!

Understand you can live your best life now. Reprogram your way of thinking for your best potential outcome. Take these four simple steps: 1 Register for a class that best suits your schedule. 2 Arrive 10-15 minutes early to get set up on the bike; water bottle, locker, shoes, and a towel are provided. 3 Conquer your fears one pedal stroke at a time. 4 Sit proud and let your inner child smile … You are amazing!

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writer TIFFANY SPACH


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self

A pril 22nd Is Earth Day !

Doing your part …

GameDay Recycling Challenge This friendly competition encourages colleges and universities to implement waste reduction programs and events during home football games. More information is available at www.gamedaychallenge.org. © Sorsillo | Dreamstime.com

Upcycle Turn trash into treasure! Old metal objects can become birdhouses; tattered wood becomes furniture, décor, or art; and plastic containers have an array of up-uses! Visit www.upcyclethat.com.

the non-profit Keep America Beautiful (KAB) was founded. The organization is dedicated to protecting and preserving the environment. Americans produce about 200 million tons of garbage each year and while 70 percent of it is recyclable, we only recycle about 30 percent. Beyond refuse, we leave our sloppy footprints on our planet in various other ways as well. What can you do to become a better steward of our planet?

M o r e t h a n 5 0 y e ar s a g o,

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Just Say NO According to www.plasticpollutioncoalition.org, “In only the past twenty years, people have come to expect plastic straws in every drink, in an example of extreme waste being generated for minimal convenience. These short-lived tools are usually dropped into a garbage can with no further thought, instantly becoming one of the biggest sources of plastic pollution.” Help make these unnecessary pollutants a relic of the past by just saying NO!

Do More Most of us recycle to some degree but there is a greater need for understanding and implementing the proper and most efficient ways to recycle. Visit www.iwanttoberecycled.org to go from an occasional “trash separator” to an everyday recycler. Kick Butt Cigarettes are the most littered item in the country. Visit KAB’s Cigarette Litter Prevention Program website at www.kab.org to find out how to create an initiative in your community.


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health

what’s all the

buzz

bees?

about

and how it needs to be maintained, we often tend to focus on the human footprint and the roles played by other animals and birds. Consequently, we overlook the roles insects play in making the world a livable place. They are, however, quietly— and sometimes not-so-quietly—doing their jobs, and some are making quite the buzz about it. Let’s take a look, for example, at our friend the honey bee: W h e n w e talk a b o u t t h e e ar t h ’ s e c o s y s t e m

Sweet as honey.

Honey has so many uses besides being delicious and healthy. It never spoils and is extremely resistant to bacteria. Ancient Egyptians used honey as a natural bandage to protect cuts and burns from infection. Today, honey is still used as a natural treatment for dandruff, stomach ulcers, sore throat, and cough.

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Light a candle. Spread the love.

Bees are critical to the process of pollination. While some plants can pollinate themselves, others rely on insects, birds, the wind, and animals to spread the pollen.

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The other product from bees that has found widespread use is wax. Besides candles, beeswax is also used in a variety of cosmetic products such as cold creams, moisturizers, lotions, lipsticks, and salves.

A delicate ecosystem.

Bees are doing their job to ensure that the soil remains cultivable, the air breathable, and the food edible. They play a vital role in our very delicate ecosystem. Today, these wonderful insects are at risk of becoming endangered, and it is imperative that we do all we can to prevent their extinction.

For more information about bees and preserving our planet, visit www.onegreenplanet.org.


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s d r o w matter

Words are magic. They actually change our brain chemistry! As wordsmiths here at LKNW, we are

be happy in the moment,

that’s enough.

Each moment is all we need, not more.”

especially fond of words

“If you want to conquer the anxiety of life, live in the moment, live in the breath.” – A m i t R ay

–Mother Teresa

that will resonate with our readers, in hopes

“What day is it?” asked Pooh. “It’s today,” squeaked Piglet. “My favorite day,”

they will help guide & inspire you:

said Pooh.”

“Be the silent watcher of your thoughts and behavior. You are beneath the thinker. You are the stillness beneath the mental noise. You are the love and joy beneath the pain.” –Eckhart Tolle

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– AA M i l n e

“Few of us ever live in the present. We are forever anticipating what is to come or remembering what has gone.” – L o u i s L’ A m o u r


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self

b e t t e r m e … b e t t e r y o u … b e t t e r w o rld

Mind body spirit

By mixing the ingredients of attitude and action, we can change the flavor of our own lives. Learn to nurture your body and soul to lead a more balanced life.

we

“No dark fate determines the future. We do. Each day and each moment, we are able to create and recreate our lives and the very quality of human life on our planet. This is the power we wield. Lasting happiness cannot be found in pursuit of any goal or achievement. It does not reside in fortune or fame. It resides only in the human mind and heart, and it is here that we hope you will find it.”

APRIL 2020

Mindfulness and gratitude can be extremely helpful in becoming responsible for our own experiences and thus overall happiness. Mindfulness is defined as “the practice of maintaining a nonjudgmental state of heightened or complete awareness of one’s thoughts, emotions, or experiences on a moment-to-moment basis.” (Merriam-Webster) Here are some ways to become more mindful and bring on the experiences and joy you seek: • Be aware of your actions.

Speak to people with forethought and intent; be cognizant of not only what you say but how you say it.

–From The Book Of Joy by the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu

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are responsible for our own experiences!

• Keep your focus purposeful. If something needs your attention, make a conscious

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effort to dwell on that and that alone, but only for a specific period of time in solution-based thought. Once you have a plan of resolution, move on. • Practice letting go of the past.

This can be difficult but it only breeds negative energy. The past is over and you cannot change it … let it go! • Avoid getting caught up in the future.

It’s perfectly fine to plan for your future but when those thoughts become allconsuming and turn to worry, you are not being in the present moment. • Allow yourself to do nothing.

Take time each day to just be still—sit outside and listen to nature; try to clear your mind and just breathe.

• Let go of judgments and negative emotions.

Once you become present in the moment, you may begin to notice things you hadn’t before, such as others’ circumstances, needs, and nuances. Take this opportunity to really hear the person talking to you and appreciate it for what it is with no judgments, no rebuttal. • Don’t swim in deep waters too long!

It is important to embrace negative feelings as well. We are human after all, and we must recognize and appreciate what is not-so-pleasant at times. But negativity begets negativity, so it’s important to search for the positives in all situations … breathe in, breathe out, move on.

writer leslie ogle


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Profile for Lake Norman Woman Magazine

Lake Norman Woman April 2020  

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