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INCLUDING: WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT BUYING YOUR TEEN A CAR

g n i z

MEET LAKE NORMAN’S “GIRLS ON THE GO”

a m a THE ANNUAL IS S U E !

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STAFF

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volume x, number i

PUBLISHER DANA NIETERS

dana@lakenormanwoman.com AT TH E AG E OF

EDITOR AMY HALLMAN

17!

June

lkn amazing girls!

amy@lakenormanwoman.com

G I R LS N E E D TO F I N D T H E I R V O I C E S . As OPERATIONS SUPPORT & CONTRIBUTING WRITER LESLIE OGLE leslie@lakenormanwoman.com

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a teen and even as a young woman in my 20s, mine was most definitely lost. A bit shy, I often found myself sitting among my peers in silence as they animatedly told stories and exchanged jokes. And heaven forbid that a controversial topic came up, especially if I found myself disagreeing with the group. That situation rendered me completely mute, gazing at my shoelaces throughout the discussion, even though on the inside I was nearly bursting with the desire to share my own views. But I lacked the confidence. In my mind, my own opinions seemed too silly and unimportant—unworthy, even—to discuss with them. Without a great deal of coaxing from my friends (or a great deal of alcohol), I was voiceless. There are so many things that girls today need to learn in order to grow into smart, productive, creative, and happy women. As mothers, we strive to provide our children with a strong foundation and all the tools they will need to launch themselves into this orbit of successful adulthood. Heck, sometimes we just want to wrap ourselves around them—or at least wrap their hearts in bubble wrap—and protect them from the dangers we know are ahead. But while our support is so very important, I think we often neglect to nurture their voices. Imagine how much smoother their journeys would be if we also helped them to build the confidence to feel empowered by their own voices and their own ideas. In this broken world we live in today, that skill is more important than it ever has been before. Marriage rates are declining. Our economy is stagnant at best. Islamic extremism threatens women not just abroad, but here at home, too. Christianity is routinely maligned and vilified. But there is hope. The young women of today are in the unique position to alter this course and make a tremendous difference in the future of our country. Women make up 51 percent of the population, after all. We contribute economically and politically to our nation’s welfare, and I think it’s time for our young women to take a stand and be heard. It is my hope that the girls of today, unlike the 20-something-year-old me, will feel free to express themselves. It is my hope that rather than choking back their words in fear that others won’t approve, they will respectfully express their opinions and say what they think. It is my hope that instead of staring at their shoelaces, they’ll lift their eyes to their peers and challenge the status quo with confidence. We can teach our daughters all kinds of important things, but let’s also cultivate their voices. It’s just a matter of helping them to articulate what they believe and why it matters. It’s a matter of giving them the resources and the courage to share their beliefs in a way that, if nothing else, makes their peers stop and think. And who knows? Perhaps in speaking up, our daughters can affect real change. Each spring we ask our readers to nominate area tweens and teens who amaze them. Strong, confident, fearless, creative, motivated, imaginative, and generous, this year’s nominees are already well on their way to finding their voices. They inspire me with their unique skills, visions, and their indelible senses of self. You can read all about them starting on page 22. I hope you enjoy their stories—and their voices— as much as I have!

-dana

DANA NIETERS

. PUBLISHER

C O N TAC T D A N A V I A E - M A I L AT D A N A @ L A K E N O R M A N W O M A N . C O M


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A VERY SPECIAL THANKS to our photo-shoot location, Discovery Place KIDS Huntersville, located at 105 Gilead Road in Huntersville.

5 THINGS TO DO IN LAKE NORMAN THIS MONTH

10

22

8 AMAZING LKN GIRLS

in every issue 38

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5 TH I NG S TO D O I N J U N E

40

SCENE WITH LKNW

Amazing Girls MONTHLY QUESTION: What Is Your Dream Vacation?

14

Girls On The Go

22

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Muskan Uppal

24

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Carly Correll

26

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Jocelyn Porter

28

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Kailyn Sutton

29

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Lydia Nusbaum

30

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Abby Kircher

32

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Grace Dirig

34

LKN AMAZING GIRL: Nicole Chinundet

© Traj43 | Dreamstime.com

Contents


14

GIRLS ON THE GO!

20

12

HOT WHEELS!

© Valentin Armianu | Dreamstime.com

{

Hot Wheels!

42

Making Heads Or Tails Of Dog Food

46

Why Playing Is Best For Children

O N THE C OVER:

DISCOVERY PL ACE KIDS

48

HUNTERSVILLE PH OTO G R A PH Y BY:

CHELSEA BREN

Behind The Closed Doors Of A Typical Teen Or Is It Serious Depression?

20

LKN AMAZING GIRL,

NICOLE CHINUNTDET AT

Family

50

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CELEBRATES

Health

A Holistic Approach To Treating Migraine Headaches

Self

years SEE PAGE 43 ABOUT SPECIAL GIVEAWAYS!

MIND BODY SPIRIT: A Grandfather's Grace And Guidance

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This month we asked our 8 LKN Amazing Girls …

What Is Your Dream

Vacation? ABBY KIRCHER

I’d love a road trip around Europe to see the historical places, buildings, and monasteries—all the beautiful things I read about in European history.

JOCELYN PORTER

My dream is to go to somewhere tropical with clear water and a nice view to relax, like Turks and Caicos, the Greek Islands, or Barbados.

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GRACE DIRIG

Australia is somewhere I’ve always wanted to explore—to camp in the Outback, to see stars not normally visible because of city lights, and to scuba dive off the Great Barrier Reef!

CARLY CORRELL

Hawaii just seems like paradise. My brother chose to go there for his Make-A-Wish trip, but we didn’t get to go before he passed away.

NICOLE CHINUNTDET

I’ve never been on a mission trip; it’d be great to experience different environments, people, cultures, and religions. Somewhere like to Nepal, to build schools and teach kids to speak English.

MUSKAN UPPAL

I have always wanted to see the Northern Lights. Just the photos have amazed me, so I cannot even imagine what they’d look like in real life. It would be surreal!

KAILYN SUTTON

Brazil is ideal because being around its tropical nature and having fun (with its amazing night life) makes me stress free and happy. I think I’d have the time of my life.

LYDIA NUSBAUM

My dream vacation would be touring Europe. There’s such a variety of things to see from beaches to art museums.


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BEHIND THE CLOSED DOORS OF A TYPICAL TEEN OR IS IT

SERIOUS DEPRESSION? A H , T H E I N FA M O U S T E E N Y E A R S — most parents can relate to the eye-rolling, the

slammed doors, the omnipresent worry. After all, weren’t we warned about this stage of parenting? But what about when the slammed doors become isolate barriers and the once vivacious kids become quiet and withdrawn? How do you know if it is normal teen behavior or something more serious? The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) defines teen depression as “a serious mental health problem that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest in activities. It affects how your teenager thinks, feels, and behaves; and it can cause emotional, functional, and physical problems.” It goes beyond just feeling sad or blue; lifestyles and behaviors are significantly altered. The important thing to remember is to never dismiss your parental instincts. If things seem out of the norm, talk to your teen. Depression is a brain illness, but it is treatable. How plugged in are you to your teen? Here are some factors and questions to consider: • According to the NIMH, girls are twice as likely as boys to experience depression. Self-image and rapidly changing bodies can be a lot to handle for young, underdeveloped brains.

© Michalakis Ppalis | Dreamstime.com

• Mood swings are typical during teen years (especially with hormonal and physical changes); but take notice if your child is sad, hopeless, angry, or frustrated on a daily basis.

• Pay attention to their activities and social life—have they lost interest? Would they rather stay locked up in their room than go out with friends? • Weight loss or weight gain can also be a sign of depression, if either is going in an extreme direction. • Is their affect slow? They may physically show signs of depression by moving and talking slowly.

• Too much sleep or insomnia can be a red flag. • Do they talk about feeling worthless or unattractive much of the time? • Do they have trouble concentrating or making decisions? Are their grades suffering? • Do they talk about violence or suicide?

If you suspect your teen is clinically depressed, contact your family physician. For more information on teen depression, contact the National Institute of Mental Health at www.nimh.nih.gov.

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girls on the go

OU R COM MU NI TY RE A L LY IS B RIMMIN G W IT H A N UNL I M I TE D N UM BE R O F TA L E NT ED, SELF LESS, AN D P OISED YOU N G WO M E N WHO STA ND AT THE RE ADY F OR A G OOD C AU SE OR F R IEND I N NE E D. T HE S E GI RL S ON TH E G O AR E JU ST 1 0 OF OU R LAK E NO RM A N GI RL S WHO AR E P U T T IN G T H IN G S IN MOT ION! COMPILED BY: AMY HALLMAN

K E LS Y G R E E N E

East Lincoln High School junior Kelsy Greene has won presidential honors for her volunteer efforts, including mission trips and caring for horses and helping with camps at local barn Cherry Acres. Donating that kind of time involves quite a bit of juggling for Kelsy, who started her own pet walking and sitting business when she was still in elementary school. Now, at 15, she has already purchased her first car. She attributes her savvy money skills to studying finance and following Dave Ramsey’s financial management concepts via his radio show.

Photo: Melinda Urban

Pine Lake Preparatory freshman and varsity tennis player Hanna Berger participates in the Excel club, a community service club. “Everybody should give back to the community that gives them so much,” Hanna, now a Young Elites Ambassador, says. “I love hearing the specific impact of HANNA BERGER

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Faith is most important to Kelsy, however. While she has been an acolyte and crucifer, she enjoys modern Christian music and attending Elevation Church LKN. “Everyone has opportunities to share God’s love," she says. "Each of us, no matter where life takes us, has been gifted and can give back accordingly.”

| JUNE 2016

my contribution, like how much money was raised for AGSF, or how many trash bags were collected with a cleanup event.” Hanna is a marketing promoter for A Giving Spirit Foundation (AGSF) in Davidson where she contributes flyer and t-shirt designs as part of her work with the Teen Council. Through her volunteer efforts and her involvement in Young Elites, Hanna has not only grown in confidence, the joy she finds in helping others has blossomed as well, as she believes strongly in giving without expecting anything in return.


THIS SUMMER, Zoe Ganis, a determined South

ZOE GANIS

G I R L S ONTH E G O

Iredell sophomore, will go on a 28-day California community-service trip and earn 70 volunteer hours, working with local Boys & Girls Clubs and the elderly.

Zoe is also a promising cinematographer who enjoys being on both sides of the camera. She created a YouTube channel where she creates makeup-demonstration and fashion-tutorial videos, and attends Reel Academy of LKN, in Mooresville, where she writes, casts, and films movies.

Photo: Tanya Topazio

Zoe is a cancer survivor, since the age of 3. She was diagnosed with Rhabdomyosarcoma, which only about one in 250 Americans are diagnosed with each year. She travels to New York City for scans every other year: “These trips have been nice bonding time with my dad,” she says. “Sometimes you just have to make the best of a situation.”

MADDIE HUECKER MADDIE HUECKER

Brianna Shehane is a Pine Lake Preparatory junior who saw a need in her school for a Young Life club. Brianna first became involved with Young Life when church friends from another school invited her to their meetings, and Young Life leader Becky Whitten encouraged Brianna to invite classmates to attend summer camp with her as a first step. After camp, BRIANNA SHEHANE Brianna invited any interested PLP student to a party at her house to discuss Young Life. Also, Brianna distributed candy canes adorned with Bible verses. More than 30 people came and almost all returned for the next Young Life event. “I feel it’s important to share our faith in a welcoming, fun way,” says Brianna of her accomplishment. She also shares her faith with youngsters at her church, where she teaches first grade Sunday school.

MOORESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL junior Alexis

Lynch is an avid athlete, playing for the Lake Norman Soccer Club and the school varsity basketball and soccer teams. But last year, she was so inspired at a Young Elites Leadership Summit that she recently founded a Young Elites

is a Brawley Middle School 6th grader, who has already done something that most of us will never do: she sang the National Anthem at a sold-out Carolina Panthers game last December! She has sung the National Anthem for the Charlotte Knights and the Kannapolis Intimidators, as well. Also a competitive SwimMAC swimmer, Maddie has been singing publicly since age 7, and with the band Indefinite for a year. “I was pretty scared the first time I sang publicly,” Maddie says. “But it’s exciting when I finish a song and hear the crowd respond….the whole experience is just fun!” Maddie’s first solo was at her firstgrade talent show where she sang Carrie Underwood’s “Jesus, Take the Wheel.” In addition to singing, Maddie is now working on improving her guitar and piano skills.

chapter at her school. In its first year, the club enlisted 30 members and hosted eight guest-speaking and volunteer events. “I’ve realized my leadership skills and developed my weaknesses,” she says. “Every day, I try to become a better leader, one that people around me can rely on.”

In addition to multiple academic honors, Alexis serves as assistant membership director of the Mooresville Junior Civitans Club. “We enjoy helping others, so my friends and I’ve worked service into what we do together. Also, my mother’s work in nonprofits inspires me to make an impact like I have seen her do.”

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G I R L S ONTH E G O M c K AY L A

For her Girl Scouts Gold Award, McKayla Wabalas WA B A L A S created the Pattering Paws 5K and the Feline Fair, focusing on safe, effective feral-cat management, reducing euthanasia numbers, and general awareness. Her goals were to gain support from her classmates through the 5K and raise awareness for various local animal-welfare organizations with the fair. McKayla obviously reached her goals. According to Robin Byrd, her project manager and director of Lake Norman Lucky Cat, the number of cats spayed or neutered increased exponentially after her events. Thanks to McKayla’s hard work and the sponsorship of Lake Norman Chrysler, the 5K will be an annual event. “It’s truly a great feeling to know that my team’s efforts were successful!” says McKayla.

JESSICA GENTRY

Mount Mourne IB 8th grader Jessica Gentry is a member of the writing club and is Student Government Association treasurer. A pitcher for both her recreation and her travel softball teams, Jessica has practice or a game five days a week. In addition to her athletics, Jessica also tours as an actor and singer with Testify Ministries, a Christian organization that performs for churches, juveniledetention centers, homeless shelters, and other groups. Last year the ministry took Jessica to Tennessee; this year the group will travel to Florida to perform. These activities have allowed Jessica to create great leadership and teambuilding skills. “I love spreading the word of God, making connections, and knowing I was part of making an impact on others’ lives and faith.”

ALANNA BERGSTROM Alanna began tap class when senior Alanna Bergstrom is an she was 9 years old. At 14, she assistant teacher at Grand Central competed solo against 32 other Academy of Performing Arts regional dancers and won 1st where she teaches preschool overall with her tap routine, classes and a beginner teen tap winning her an invitation to dance class. “It’s remarkable to see perform at the National Starbound students grow from something Competition in Atlantic City, New you started,” Alanna says. But her Jersey. At school, as secretary of students aren’t the only ones the International Thespian Society, who are growing: “I have Alanna planned and participated in learned empowerment and theatrical events, such as Bye Bye responsibility,” she adds. Birdie and Shrek the Musical. PINE LAKE PREPARATORY

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E M I LY R A M A N ATA EMILY RAMANATA is an

8th grader at Bailey Middle School, who leads community outreach for Horsepower (the school’s mascot is a Bronco) STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) Ten80 team. This year, Emily started a Project UNIFY chapter to help students with special needs and those new to the school adjust and make friends. Project UNIFY is a student-led mentor club for special-needs students, in which students are part of a team in which they all learn from one another. “I’ve seen many new friendships grow, and I love to hear how much our mentors and special-needs students look forward to the meetings every Wednesday," Emily says. “One special-needs participant in 7th grade always stops me in the hall to ask if we’re meeting, and if he’ll be playing games in the gym.”


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PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

Women’s Health Symposium WHEN SHOULD MY DAUGHTER HAVE HER FIRST GYNECOLOGICAL EXAMINATION? WITH THE SCHOOL YEAR coming to

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends the first gynecologic or reproductive health visit occur between ages 13 to 15 years old, whether or not menstrual cycles are present. This can be a visit with the family physician or pediatrician instead of a gynecologist. The initial reproductive health visit provides an excellent opportunity for young women to start a patient–physician relationship, to build trust, and to counsel her and parents regarding healthy behavior, and to dispel myths and fears. It also serves to familiarize them with the health-care system for when she later has a specific reproductive-healthcare need. Health care for young women should include review of normal pubertal development and menstruation; diet and exercise; immunizations; depression; substance use; healthy sexual decision-making; healthy and safe relationship development; sexually transmitted-infection screening; and pregnancy-risk reduction and prevention. The physical examination will vary depending on the patient, her concerns, and previous encounters with other health-care providers. Again, an internal pelvic examination generally is unnecessary during the initial gynecologic visit. But a general examination, visual breast examination, and external pelvic examination may be needed. The pap-smearcervical-cancer screening is not recommended until age 21, and then every 3 to 5 years, if the results are normal. If she has had sexual intercourse, yearly testing for pelvic infections is recommended.

© Galina Barskaya | Dreamstime.com

We are excited to present the first article in a quarterly series dedicated to women’s health topics. Our goal is to discuss topics of interest for women of all ages, including pap smears, painful periods, hysterectomy, and intimacy.

an end and summer upon us, it's time for family vacations, summer camps, and working in those dental appointments and annual physical exams. One question often asked of pediatricians, family physicians, and gynecologists this time of year is: “When should my daughter have her first gynecological examination?” Typically, the question follows the dawn of the first menstrual period. While the menstrual cycle is a milestone in a young woman’s normal growth and reproductive development, it alone is not the only reason for a gynecologic or reproductive-health checkup.

Preventive counseling can also benefit parents or other supportive adults, and can include discussions of physical, sexual, and emotional development; signs and symptoms of common adolescent conditions; and healthy lifelong behavior. The first gynecologic visit can be scary, but knowing the purpose of the examination and what to expect can reduce anxiety. Before scheduling the first visit, discuss with your daughter whether she prefers a female, male, younger, or older physician. Seek recommendations from other parents for physicians suited for caring for younger patients. Ask whether or not your daughter will see the same or different physicians when she returns. While many parents want to be in the exam room during the entire office visit, it’s recommended there is time for the doctor and your daughter to speak confidentially. They may have issues that they don’t feel comfortable discussing in your presence, and it’s important for their growth and development to express themselves without fear of judgment. Finally, I recommend you have her bring in a health journal. It should include information on when she started hair growth, breast development, a calendar of their menstrual cycles, and a list of questions for the doctor, such as “What is a pap smear?”; “Why do I need it?”; “What can I take for menstrual cramps?”; “When should I expect my period to start?”; “When will my period stop?”; “Can I swim on my period?”; “Is vaginal discharge normal?” After the office visit, discuss the experience with your daughter. If she didn’t feel comfortable and reassured, consider seeking another provider for future appointments.

For more information about first gynecologic examinations, visit the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists at www.acog.org, and click “For Teens” under “For Patients.”

DR. G. BERNARD TAYLOR is an assistant clinical professor at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and assistant program director of the Carolinas Healthcare System Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery fellowship program in Charlotte. He is a fellow in the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology and in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive pelvic surgery.

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HOT

wheels!

What to consider for your teen’s first car Buying a car is one of the most exciting, confusing, and intimidating purchases we can make; and it seems the rules to the game are always changing. But consider these points before your teen gets his or her first car: Don’t fall in love with a certain model.

Focus instead on thoroughly researching a vehicle’s ratings, reviews, reliability, safety, and pricing information. Kelley Blue Book is one of the most common—and complete—resources (www.kbb.com). Don’t skip the test drive.

You should drive the car for at least 30 minutes on different types of roads and making turns in all directions to conduct a thorough test. Research safety features.

Antilock brake systems, electronic stability control, and head-protecting, side air bags are effective and well worth the money. Watch out for unnecessary extras.

Be cautious of such things as rustproofing, and fabric or paint protectants. According to Consumer Reports, “Vehicle bodies are already coated to protect against rust, and recent reliability surveys show that rust is not a major problem with modern cars. You can treat upholstery and apply paint protectant yourself with good off-the-shelf products that cost only a few dollars.” Negotiate up from what the dealership paid for the vehicle.

The dealer invoice sticker price is not its true cost. A simple online search will show you what the dealer actually paid. Don’t focus on the monthly payment.

Some salespeople tend to “bait the hook” with what you can pay each month, but from there, it can be a slippery slope of manipulated numbers. You could end up overpaying. Settle on the vehicle’s price first.

After that, then discuss a trade-in, financing, or leasing. Do not bring up your desire to lease until after you’ve agreed on the price. Compare different financial institutions and get prequalified for an auto loan before you go to the dealership. Check interest rates at banks, credit unions, or online financial sites for the best rate. If the dealer can offer you better, great!

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For more information on buying your next car, visit www.consumerreports.org.

© Crashtackle | Dreamstime.com

Shop for financing terms


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G azing amLKN girls

olf challenges even the best players, testing their skills and character every time they step on the greens. But that’s what Muskan Uppal, a rising sophomore at Cannon School, loves most about the game. Or as she admits, she loves it most days. “Golf has taught me many valuable lessons,” says the 3.9 handicapper, who is ranked 4th in North Carolina in her class. “It’s taught me the importance of honesty, respect and most of all, patience. It’s also taught me that things will not always go my way, but I just have to keep going!” Originally from New Delhi, India, Muskan’s parents, Puneet and Abhilasha, planned to be in the United States for only three years when they moved here in 2008. Puneet’s project kept getting extended, however, and both Muskan and her brother, Uday, came to feel that the U.S. was home. “It wasn’t always easy,” she recalls. “We had to adjust to a new country, new people, a new culture, a new accent, new food, etc….[But] soon I felt like a part of the community. My mom says that now I am more American than Indian!” The family decided to stay. They will apply for citizenship next summer. As a youngster, Muskan wanted to do everything Uday did. So when the family moved to Birkdale and he began taking golf lessons, Muskan tagged along. By the age of 10, Muskan was taking lessons as well: “Over the years, my game became better and better. These days, I often beat my dad and brother!” Between her golf schedule, her volunteer schedule, and school (she’s a straight-A student), Muskan stays very busy. While she enjoys hanging with her friends in the summer, she also took time last year to help out at First Tee as the assistant to the head coach. First Tee provides youth with character-building educational programs through golf. Says Muskan of her experience: “I love First Tee’s message. I loved watching other kids enjoy golf; they learn great values that will help them their entire lives.” 

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Muskan didn’t stop there, though. She also organized an equipment drive for First Tee and collected 1,500 golf balls, 181 golf clubs, and various other golf accessories. Currently, she is raising money through the American Junior Golf Association to help First Tee as well as talented junior golfers who lack the financial resources to compete nationally. Her goal is $2,000, and she is already 60 percent there. Much of Muskan’s passion comes from her belief that golf brings out the best in people. “It has its up and downs,” she says, “but everyone gets through it together, and in the end it is worth it.” One thing is for sure, Muskan brings her best to the course and gives her best to the whole community: “It really makes me happy that I can use my passion for golf to help so many aspiring golfers!”

BY: DANA NIETERS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CHELSEA BREN


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ADULTS | CHILDREN | ATHLETES | PREGNANCY

PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINING NUTRITION

704.896.8112 21031 Catawba Ave, Cornelius | zimmermanfamilywellness.com

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carly

CORRELL O N THE OUTSIDE,

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she looks like a happy, healthy, model 11-yearold. Her favorite Bible verse is Philippians 4:13: “I can do all things through Christ which strengthens me.” In just one conversation with her, you may start to believe she has a little superhero within her.

Carly Correll is a 5th grader at Pumpkin Center Intermediate School in Denver. Last fall, when she was just 10 years old, Carly already had more wisdom than some may ever know. In September 2012, her older brother, BJ, had been diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia; and Carly quickly and quietly took up the slack with their chores at home. When his leukemia recurred last spring, she became her brother’s champion. Perhaps it was because she understood the value that even a simple kindness brings— especially in one’s time of need—that Carly decided that she wanted to make pillows for breast cancer patients. She didn’t have the means to go out and buy the necessary materials (or know how to sew), so she turned to what she knew: Carly sold her crocheted scarves and used that money to buy the fabric, stuffing, and thread to create her little pillows of love. At first, she started sewing on her mother’s old, hand-me-down sewing machine; and after a while she was able to upgrade to a new machine. In all, Carly sewed 78 pillows for patients. She and her

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mom, Michelle Love, delivered them to Carolina Breast Friends last October. But Carly, according to her mother, has always been precocious and sensible. She started crocheting in first grade. It quickly became more than a hobby—she taught herself how to read actual patterns and became skilled in the complex stitches. Last year, while she and Michelle spent every day and night at the hospital with BJ, she crocheted the time away when she wasn’t studying. She quickly realized that she was building up a veritable yarn fort, and she put a small sign on BJ’s hospital door to alert passers-by of the crocheted goods for sale inside. This young girl who loves gymnastics and to play volleyball and aspires to become an anesthesiologist one day was only away from the hospital and her family to go to school. “She maintained the A honor roll throughout this year, despite some extended absences,” Michelle says, “and the emotional trauma of watching her brother die [this March] in a horrible way.” Another testament to Carly’s strength: She stayed with her brother’s body in the pediatric intensive care unit room, even after Michelle went into another room. “Carly helped clean him up, and made his handprints and footprints,” Michelle says. “She is stronger than she realizes; she is much more special than she knows.”

BY: AMY HALLMAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CHELSEA BREN


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f you go to the Huntersville Family Fitness and Aquatics’ indoor pool and look up…about 16 feet up … you’re likely to find Jocelyn Porter balanced on the edge of the platform, preparing to tuck and spin into the water below. She climbs up the stairs to the platform or the 3 meter springboard about 45 times a day. Jocelyn had to overcome some fears along the way; but she soon got used to it, and has been in love with the sport of diving ever since. “You have to be careful and trust yourself,” she explains, “but it’s a lot of fun once you get over the fear factor!” Jocelyn began diving in 2006 when, at the ripe ol’ age of 7, she was becoming burnt out on gymnastics. Her parents, Stephanie and Ross Porter, suggested diving lessons since many of the skills were similar to those required in gymnastics. She was a natural, competing just three years later at the AAU Nationals in Bloomington, Indiana, and placing 2nd in all three of her events. The very next year, she traveled to Tucson, Arizona, for the USA Diving Junior Olympic Nationals where she competed with more elite divers and took 2nd place on the 1 meter. Today, Jocelyn dives for the Carolina Diving Academy under Coach Aaron Hintz, who has coached her since she began. She practices five days a week, 3.5 hours per day. The rising senior also dives on the William A. Hough High School team. That’s some serious time in the water. But don’t worry, Jocelyn knows how to have fun, too. At a recent Carolina BIG DIVE AAU Invitational, she won the “smack” part of the rip/smack contest for her goofy belly flop that made the biggest splash. And though Jocelyn placed 8th in the nation last year in the 3-meter at the Junior Olympic Nationals, this champion diver enjoys the things most teens do when she has the time to relax: hanging out with friends, watching movies, listening to Lady Ga Ga, checking out Instagram, snacking on some Sour Patch Kids, and dressing up and going to prom. Jocelyn is just starting the recruiting process for college, though she does not yet have a frontrunner. She thinks she might like to stay in the Southeast—or maybe venture out to California: “My options are wide open!” she asserts. As far as academics, she plans to dive into a program in the sciences, perhaps in the biomedical, biomedical engineering, or medical field. University coaches will begin calling her in July, and this eager teen can’t wait: “I am so excited to see where this journey takes me!”

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BY: DANA NIETERS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CHELSEA BREN


The North Mecklenburg Woman’s Club wishes to express its sincere gratitude to the following partners and sponsors:

gh PLATINUM PARTNER 2015-2016 Lowe’s Home Improvement NMWC PARTNERS 2015-2016

North Mecklenburg WOMAN’S CLUB BRAN C H IN G O U T TO T HE COMMUNITY

North Mecklenburg Woman’s Club PO Box 1872, Huntersville, NC 28070 www.nmwclub.org

Celebrating 102 years of community service to the Lake Norman area

Armin’s Catering & Events LLC Aspire Private Capital Cotton’s Woods Dillard’s at Northlake Hahn Family Wines

Langtree Plantation The Lily Rose Bill and Sharon Maloney Metrolina Greenhouses Purser Oil Company

Paul & Tammy Ramsay Judith Roberson Mark and Kathy Smith Starr Miller Interior Design, Inc.

Dana Greshko and Pepper Stanford – Wilson Realty Michael Honeycutt – Fisher & Phillips LLP James Funeral Home Kwik Kopy Ladd, McCall & Associates CPAs – Huntersville Lake Norman Winery Maestro Travel The McIntosh Law Firm NorthStone Country Club Steven Oliver & Janice Caesar (In memory of our parents) PMB Financial Peninsula Club

Perry’s at SouthPark Ragin’ Uptown Isaac & Gia Read Redhot Marketing Design Respectability Foundation – Arlene Berkman River Run Country Club Bob Schrader Anne Shields The Shoppes at Home Heart & Soul Standpoint Technologies Suite Designs Inc., Interior Design Thebeau and Associates, P.A. Edmond & Lisa Vadnais Judy Wallace

NMWC SPONSORS 2015-2016 After Hours Jazz Band Anonymous Donor ANSWER Scholarship Endowment Board Bill & Dawn Bradford Brusters/Nathans Juliana Calabria Carillon Assisted Living Jeff & Denise Carter Susan Christensen The Cork and Cask Deborah Young Photography Keith & LuAnn Driscoll Elite Fitness Roy and Valerie Franco Sandie & Rick Gambill

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lydia

NUSBAUM W hen I was in high school, my mother lamented how easily I was distracted from what should have been my number-one priority: my education. I’m certain that in today’s world filled with tweets, texts, and YouTubing, the teenage me would be completely lost.

Bob and Kathryn Nusbaum won’t share my mother’s worry lines and gray hairs over their teen, at least. Their daughter, Lydia, a rising sophomore at Lake Norman High School, has set a course for an Ivy League college, and there’s no doubt she will stay on track.“Academics are my top priority right now,” she explains. “My job is to be a student. I know it’s not always easy now, but putting in the work will pay off in the future when I can go to my dream college!” She’s well on her way. Lydia is currently ranked fourth in her class, an achievement that has not gone unnoticed. The Duke University Talent Identification Program recognized her as part of a select group of students qualified to attend its Center for Summer Studies; and last June, the U.S. Naval Academy’s Summer STEM program selected Lydia as one of two rising freshmen to participate. You might expect that Lydia spends most of her spare time studying. After all, academic accomplishments like hers don’t come without hard work. However, Lydia is a gifted musician who spends much of her spare time perfecting her skills on the double bass with the Charlotte Youth Symphony Orchestra and studying under Kurt Riecken, the Charlotte Symphony’s principal bassist. Her hard work on the bass has paid off: She was recently

accepted into the summer program at the Manhattan School of Music for the second year, where she will study music for three weeks with talented young musicians from all over the world. “Music is my second top priority,” Lydia says. “It’s my passion. It’s how I express myself!” And, fortunately for the members of Williamson’s Chapel United Methodist Church, worship service is one of the places Lydia most enjoys expressing herself. She is a committed volunteer to the church’s music ministry, giving between 150 and 200 hours of her time every year. “I love watching people experience God’s message through our music,” she asserts. Somehow, Lydia still manages to find time to just be a teen and hang out with friends. She admits that getting her driver’s license will make her life much easier (one year to go!), but in the meantime, she does so well what many teens find so difficult: prioritizing. “I try to prioritize the things that will benefit me the most in the long run,” she says. “It’s often not easy fitting everything in!”

BY: DANA NIETERS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CHELSEA BREN

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ne afternoon, 16-year-old Abby Kircher was craving something sweet. Stuck at home with not much in the kitchen, she began to concoct a snack to satisfy her sweet tooth but also fit her healthy lifestyle—Abby’s Better Nut Butter was born. “I had nuts, a food processor, and some natural sweeteners,” Abby says. “I continued to play with different flavors and recipes until I came up with five delicious tastes that are all-natural, with no additives or preservatives.” Little did Abby know that her product would launch like a rocket, and is now offered in stores throughout the Southeast. With flavors such as Coconut Cashew, Date Pecan, Honey Almond, Strawberry Cashew, and Coffee Almond, Abby has set her sights on adding more products, such as granola-nut bars and foods for people with allergies. Abby says being homeschooled has been an enormous advantage for her. Not only does she succeed academically in this atmosphere, but the schedule allows her to run her business. “I am very blessed,” Abby smiles. “My family is everything to me and they have been nothing but supportive. This is my passion, and I want to continue to provide healthy snack alternatives and grow my business.” Embracing a love for writing as well, Abby is considering a degree in journalism after graduating next May, but she would like to combine that with a business degree from Davidson College. “I like to be challenged academically,” she says, “and Davidson would certainly do that for me.”

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Not your average teen, Abby looks to get away from all the technology that consumes much of our youth today. Her favorite authors include Thomas Hardy and John Keats, and she relies on the Bible for guidance. “I think teens today focus too much on phones and other devices,” she points out. “I love to open a book or talk with my grandmother. I really enjoy and value face-to-face discussions. Otherwise, you would miss out on important social cues, facial expressions, and gestures. Also, my dad stresses the importance of sitting in silence to contemplate life and truly learn about yourself.” This young entrepreneur seems to be on the right track, remaining humble and grateful as she journeys down life’s highway. Mostly, she wants people to understand that she is not prideful or boastful; she wants to share her products with others because it makes her happy. Understanding that the future is not set in stone, one of Abby’s life mottos is: “Let go and let God.” “I know other teens struggle with what their futures hold, just as I do,” she shares, “but if you do your best, the rest will fall into place. I am a perfectionist so it can be hard for me; and that is why I put my faith in God and know that things will work out according to His plan.”

BY: LESLIE OGLE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CHELSEA BREN


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utting the “grace” in gracious, Pine Lake Preparatory senior Grace Dirig is well poised to begin her college years at the University of South Carolina this fall. Having worked in her father’s dental practice since she was a young girl, she has learned the valuable lessons of hard work, compassion, and giving back to her community. “From an early age,” Grace says, “my parents wanted me and my sister, Lauren, to understand that you have to work for the lifestyle you enjoy. We have worked in Dad’s business, answering phones, filing insurance, or cleaning the office for years now; and we love it.” Grace was instrumental in creating the cheerleading squad at her school as well as the girls’ golf team. She was also awarded the key to the city of Statesville and won the Miss Statesville’s Outstanding Teen award for speaking to more than 1,800 students about dental health and logging more than 1,000 hours of community service. Her entire family volunteers for Missions of Mercy, providing free dental care, and she is very involved in her church, also. “My parents have always stressed the importance of having a service heart,” Grace says. “I am so grateful for my family; they have been so supportive, and we do everything together. We like to be spontaneous, so we will take off for the beach or mountains or head out to the golf course on a moment’s notice. We also love to scuba dive, especially in the Florida Keys.”

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Post-undergraduate school, Grace plans to attend the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston for her degree in dentistry. With her love of the ocean, she is looking forward to living in this historic, coastal city. “I can’t wait to live by the beach,” she smiles. “Scuba diving is amazing; what an incredible natural habitat to explore. During previous dives, we have seen sharks, dolphins, whales, lobsters, sea turtles—and one time we saw a grouper the size of a minivan!” With a fondness for coaching and mentoring youth, Grace is particularly proud of her work with pageants and wishes the stereotypes were not so negative. As a former participant and a mentor for pageant contestants, she understands what incredible young women they are. “They all love and support one another,” she shares, “It’s a family, and they treat each other that way.” Grace also understands that “it takes a village,” and she is the first to thank her family, her community, her teachers, and her church for the person she is today. “I want all young girls to know that if they follow their hearts and lean on those around them, they can succeed at anything they put their minds to," she says. "And don’t listen to negativity; what people say about you does not define who you are. If someone says something bad about you, prove them wrong by your actions. It’s OK if some people don’t like you because there are plenty of people who do. Take the high road, be yourself, and follow your dreams.”

BY: LESLIE OGLE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CHELSEA BREN


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CHINUNTDET A s teenagers, we can all probably recall a time or two that we wanted to get as far away as possible. But how many of us had the wherewithal to devise a sound argument— complete with a detailed PowerPoint presentation—and the resolve to effectively win over our doctor-mother and our attorney-father? Nicole Chinuntdet is one of those rare gems.

“I’ve never wanted to be ordinary,” this Mooresville native says. “For as long as I can remember, I’ve always dreamed of doing what some say is impossible. I wanted to be a fashion designer, an actress, a National Geographic photographer, a writer for The New York Times, and an entrepreneur.” At first, though, Nicole knew more about what she didn’t want. “In middle school, on the outside I would try to fit in,” she recalls. “In the situation I was in, what I wanted to achieve in my four years of high school was impossible.” So, Nicole told her parents she needed to leave her private-school setting and begin school online. “They laughed at me,” she smiles. “But deep down I knew there was something out there bigger for me. And in order to do something extraordinary, you have to be a little crazy—crazy enough to believe in yourself.” Last year, at 17, Nicole interned for the archivist at Oscar de la Renta in New York City. This summer, she will intern in public relations at Oscar de la Renta. “When I interviewed, they said they’d never had a high-school intern,” she says, “making me their youngest intern ever!” Also, Nicole has traveled the world, modeling. A year ago, Nicole created a blog: Cashmere & Roses, a personal narrative to share her travels, modeling and wardrobe, and inspiration. “My blog is so precious; it’s a place I can record all of my creativity. There’s no better feeling than when someone emails me and says my inspirational post helped them.” Nicole’s mother, Dr. Tonya Crowe-Chinuntdet, says it wasn’t so easy—at first. “Most of my friends have asked me at some point if I was a little crazy for going down this path with Nicole,” she laughs. “I never thought I’d have a child who did school online, or was so intent to enter the fashion and media world. Her drive and work ethic have made it possible for her years before her peers are ready to step out on their own. John and I are so proud of Nicole and can’t wait to see all she’ll accomplish in the future.” Nicole says she is regularly asked if she ever regrets skipping traditional high school. “Not for a second,” she says. “If I’d changed anything, I wouldn’t be who I am today. Life is all about your choices.” She credits her parents for their support and trust and for teaching her strength, independence, and confidence. “I have just accomplished a fraction of my dreams,” she says. “This is just the beginning. I can never take this life for granted.”

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BY: AMY HALLMAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CHELSEA BREN


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LAKE NORMAN WOMAN'S 4

TH

ANNUAL

you do

know an

lkn woman

who:

• Demonstrates exceptional leadership & passion? • Makes a difference in the lives of others? • Serves as an inspirational role model? • Is gutsy, determined, & strong? NOW ACCEPTING NOMINATIONS VISIT W W W.LA KE NO R M A N W O M A N . CO M TO NO M I NAT E H E R !

AWARD C E R E M ON Y DEC . 8 TH


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5 THINGS AN LKN OMAN SHOULD DO IN JUNE

5

THURSDAY, JUNE 16

MOVIES IN THE PARK: STAR WARS, EPISODE VII, THE FORCE AWAKENS Richard Barry Park, 13707 Beatties Ford Rd., Huntersville Dusk This family-friendly event is sponsored by Novant Health and the Town of Huntersville Parks & Recreation. Get there early and secure your spot!

FRIDAY, JUNE 17:

CHARLOTTE SYMPHONY CONCERT AT MCGUIRE NUCLEAR STATION Duke Energy’s Energy Explorium 13339 Hagers Ferry Rd., Huntersville 8 p.m. Free concert on the lawn. Pack a picnic, and bring your blankets or lawn chairs. Boaters may anchor in the cove.

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3

S ATURDAY, JUNE 25:

© Patrickmak039 | Dreamstime.com © Traj43 | Dreamstime.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 18:

4TH ANNUAL CORNELIUS FOOD TRUCK INVITATIONAL Oak Street Mill, 19725 Oak St., Cornelius Noon to 8 p.m.

Like a little friendly food competition? Like being the judge? Categories will include best-looking truck, most creative menu, most nutritious, and people’s choice. A panel of local celebrity judges will determine the coveted critic’s choice trophy. This is a family-friendly (including your pets!) event.

4

SATURDAY, JUNE 25:

SYMPHONY IN THE PARK & FIREWORKS Bailey Road Park, 11536 Bailey Rd., Cornelius 6 to 10 p.m. 6 p.m. gates open; 7 p.m. prelude; 8:15 p.m. Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Celebrate America! Sponsored by the McIntosh Law Firm, fireworks immediately follow performance.

15TH ANNUAL 4TH OF JULY FIREWORKS FESTIVAL East Lincoln High School, 6471 NC 73, Denver 5 to 10 p.m.

Sponsored by the Denver Area Business Association, this annual family event is a time to talk with your community, with games, food, raffles, and live music by Shenandoah!


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“ Scene”

W I T H

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BE SCENE LAKE NORMAN WOMAN is getting out and about each month, looking for great events and the fabulous and exciting Lake Norman people who are making them happen! So next time you’re at a chamber event, a new business in the area, or just out having fun, look for Lake Norman Woman and our camera. Who knows, you just might find yourself in next month’s

“SCENE WITH LAKE NORMAN WOMAN!”

LKNW’s Amy with a storyteller at the Loch Norman Highland Games

LKNW’s Stephanie with Chef Joy Turner at Chillfire

LKNW’s Amy with Rachele Caputo, from YOUtopia Counseling, at LKN State Park LKNW’s Dana with Janine Ripp and Debra Nieters at Cowans Ford Golf Club

View more Scene photos & more at our Facebook page:

LKNW’s Dana with Doris Johnson, Nancy Beard, & Sandy Barton at the 13th Annual UCHS Foundation Golf Tournament

Facebook.com/ LakeNormanWoman

LKNW’s Amy at Discovery Place KIDS

Why pay mall prices, when you can pay our “gently used” prices?

We pay you CASH On-the-Spot We buy and sell clothing, shoes, accessories, toys and equipment. Our stores are fun, organized and easy to shop... So you can find what you are looking for without hunting through a jungle of product.

Resale for children sizes 0-14

10035 Biddick Lane, Huntersville | 704-237-4441 | childrensorchard.com

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When you have the right financial advisor, life can be brilliant. You’ve worked hard for your money. You want your money to work hard for you. Using our Confident Retirement® approach, we’ll work with you to develop a customized plan that can help you realize your financial goals – today and well into the future. Becky L. Johnson, CFP® Private Wealth Advisor Retirement Direction Group A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. 17810 Statesville Rd, Ste 312 & 322 Cornelius, NC 28031 704.892.7575 becky.l.johnson@ampf.com ameripriseadvisors.com/ team/retirement-direction-group The Confident Retirement® approach is not a guarantee of future financial results. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. © 2015 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. (10/15)

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Here are a few things wise pet owners should consider:

family

CHOOSE FOODS WITH HIGHLY DIGESTIBLE PROTEINS.

Look for beef, chicken, or lamb, not grain-based, such as corn. Corn is not digestible.

MAKING HEADS OR TAILS of

AVOID FOODS WITH “MEAT BYPRODUCTS” OR “POULTRY BYPRODUCTS.”

These are lower-cost ingredients, made of leftover animal parts, and are often not stored or handled as carefully by the processors. BEWARE OF A GENERIC FAT SOURCE, SUCH AS “ANIMAL FAT.”

food

This can literally be any fat of animal origin, including old restaurant grease and fats from various slaughterhouse carcasses. AVOID ADDED INGREDIENTS.

Pets have no need for sweeteners, artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives. This can be harmful over time. LOOK FOR THE NUMBERS.

can be as daunting as shopping for our own. The pet-food industry is fraught with vague standards and statements that leave too much room for misconception and confusion in the marketplace. SHOPPING FOR OUR PETS’ FOOD

For example, the “Guaranteed Analysis” on food labels lists minimum levels of “crude protein” and fat and the maximum levels of fiber and water. The term crude should be a warning sign, as it can mean many things. According to peteducation.com, listed proteins © Jeroen Van Den Broek | Dreamstime.com and fats are only general sources, which is not the same as digestible sources. Depending on their sources, proteins’ and fats’ digestibility vary widely. To make a point, a pet-food manufacturer made a mock product with a guaranteed analysis similar to what you see on many canned pet-food labels— however, the ingredients were leather boots, used motor oil, crushed coal, and water. The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) develops guidelines, or standards, for the production, labeling, and sale of animal foods. Food labels will contain statements such as “formulated to meet AAFCO’s nutrient requirement” or “animal-feeding tests using AAFCO’s procedures substantiate that this product provides complete and balanced nutrition.” However, manufacturers still have plenty of wiggle room in meeting these standards. The information in this article is based on average, healthy, adult dogs without allergies or health issues. For more information on pet foods and health, visit www.petmd.com or www.peteducation.com.

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Protein content should be at least 30 percent; and fat should be at least 18 percent. Also, you want Vitamin E and/or C, and Omega fatty acids. KNOW GRAINS AND GLUTEN.

Gluten found in grains is not bad for your dog and is a decent source of protein; however, grains should not be a primary ingredient. And some dogs are allergic to grains, so watch for signs of allergies. SUPPLEMENT CAREFULLY.

According to PetMD, aim for at least 50 to 60 percent commercially prepared “complete” foods for a majority of nutrients. In moderation, you can add canned, raw, or cooked meats, people food, fresh vegetables, or other nonprocessed foods to your pet’s food to boost the overall diet and nutrition. RESEARCH.

Information on manufacturing sourcing and quality control is not required on pet-food labels, so search the company website or call consumer relations. Reputable companies are glad to disclose this information.


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P R O M OT I O N A L F E AT U R E

LangTree Emerges As The “Go To”

summer survival spot W E ’ V E A L L been there.

After a day on the boat or in the water, your hair is starting to look more like Albert Einstein’s than Jennifer Aniston’s. No worries. You got this. Before anybody seriously dateable happens to see you, you can breeze over to LangTree Lake Norman and step up to the blow-dry bar at Beth and Company. With another location of Beth Davidson’s legendary salon and spa now open, you can easily avoid an I’ll-never-livethis-down hair moment. General Manager Logan Hartness says Lake Norman women also love to come to their full-service L’Oreal Elite salon and spa for keratin or smoothing treatments to help survive hair-raising heat and humidity. If it’s a Thursday, it gets even better. You and your gorgeous hair can leave Beth and Company and walk right over to a LangTree Live concert. Season Two of the free concert series is in full swing on Thursday nights through October. But before the band takes the stage at 6:30 p.m., why not pop

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into Slate Boutique? Though it’s billed as “casual street styles with a Boho vibe,” seven If you’re going… words can’t truly describe Get the GPS address, how much fun it is to shop plus info about the at Slate. What’s not to love shops, restaurants about a women’s clothing and the LangTree Live store with a lounge area for band schedule at relaxing and chatting over a www.LangtreeLKN.com. soft drink or cocktail? “For up paddle summer 2016, I love easy boarding,” he says. “From sales dresses that go from a sunset and rentals to watersportboat ride to dinner out and can specific clothing and sunglasses, be dressed up or dressed down,” we have anything you need.” says Slate owner Brittany Payne. “Fringe detailing is popular, and After your retail therapy session, gladiator sandals are still mustyou can relax with a glass of wine haves.” Payne says she and her or beer at the indoor-outdoor bar staff of personal stylists will help at Novanta 90 Pizzeria. Pair it you find your best looks. with a caprese appetizer that all If the Summer of 2016 finds you itching to cross off another item from your bucket list, you’ll want to stop by LangTree’s Swell Board Shop. Jason Bowles, this area’s unofficial “chairman of the board” knows lake sports better than anyone. “We work with people who are ready to take their lake experiences to the next level, as well as first-timers who have always wanted to buy a surf board or long board or try wakeboarding or stand-

but screams “Summer!” delicious pasta, or some authentic Neapolitan pizza baked to be crusty and bubbly in a Stefano Ferraro wood-burning oven built in Italy. Yum. No doubt about it. It’s easy to survive the long, school’s-out days of summer and to have lots more fun at LangTree Lake Norman, right beside I-77 at Exit 31.

WHILE YOU’RE AT LANGTREE, VISIT… Bacchus Wine and Tapas Beth and Company Block and Grinder Café Sky Cool Renewal Spa Johnny Rockets Kilted Buffalo LangTree Market Mona’s Lounge Mooresville CVB Novant Health Novanta Pizzeria Orchid Nails Orient Express R. Gregory Jewelers Regus Office Roost Real Estate Shell Gas Station Slate Boutique Spectrum Eye Care Sun Up Café Swell Board Shop


704.608.9470 AnnieLewisEventPlanning.com Over 20 years of experience planning Corporate, Non-Profit & Milestone events

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family

playing

Why

Is Best For Children BY: BERNIE WILDMAN

“Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children, play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood.” –Fred Rogers

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Play is how children learn and how they discover who they are and how they fit into this world. From birth, children form neural connections—700 new connections every second! In today’s society, play is often missed for scheduled activities like dance classes or organized sports. There’s nothing wrong with organized activities, but in our quest to create the world’s next leaders, we are missing out on the enrichment of social and emotional skills through creative play. Children need an unstructured environment to explore and make mistakes. Yes, mistakes! We sometimes want to shelter our little ones from failure, but these mistakes are safe ways to learn problem solving, critical thinking skills, flexibility, and self-regulation. When children make mistakes, the consequences are different and less serious than for adults. It’s important for children to learn that mistakes are an essential tool for learning and not failure. For babies, you are their favorite play partner. When they hear your voice and look

at your face, it helps them understand our language, including verbal and nonverbal cues. It’s important to sing songs, read to them, and explore the community, describing it all with rich vocabulary. Toddlers and preschoolers thrive when they can experience new materials, roles, ideas, and activities. Allow them to engage all their senses and make a mess. Pretend play is important to help children express themselves and make connections to their world through symbols, drawings, and words. Sure, everyone wants his or her child to learn to read by the age of 3, but the human brain is not necessarily designed for that. We need to slow down the academics and concentrate on the entire child. These connections are formed through experiences, laying the foundation for all future learning, skill-building, and social-emotional development. There are only 2,000 days from birth until our little learners enter kindergarten, and there is a lot to learn in that time. The good news is that a great deal of learning comes naturally through play.

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Bernie Wildman is a program specialist at Discovery Place KIDS-Huntersville, a children’s museum that seeks to maximize the whole child by providing extraordinary and rich play experiences that value imagination, fun and learning. Discovery Place KIDS is located at 105 Gilead Rd. in Huntersville. For more information, visit www.discoveryplacekids.org, or call 704.372.6261.

Play is a process that is freely chosen, personally driven and directed, and intrinsically motivated. In a nutshell, it’s what the child chooses to do rather than what an adult is asking them to do. Play helps children develop physically and learn about the world around them.


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environmental factors can affect frequency and severity. While approximately 15 percent of the population is plagued by migraine headaches, hormonal factors make them two to three times more prevalent in women than men. A comprehensive evaluation by a headache specialist can help control your headaches.

health

In an evaluation, your physician will assess your triggering factors. Common triggers include skipping meals, stress, weather changes, and certain foods. Common food triggers include monosodium glutamate (MSG), found in Chinese food; tannins in red wine; Aspartame (NutraSweet and Equal) found in diet foods and sodas; and excessive caffeine. Caffeine withdrawal can trigger the headache, which usually presents as an early morning headache or awaken you from sleep. Foods rich in tyramine, such as chocolate, aged cheeses, and fermented products can also be a strong trigger. Other triggers include nitrites, found in hot dogs and deli meats; and sulfites, found in dried fruits, wine, and many processed foods. Slowly tapering off all caffeine and other food triggers, as well as making healthy lifestyle changes, can lead to significant improvement for frequent-headache sufferers.

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A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO TREATING

migraine

HEADACHES BY: DR. LORI SCHNEIDER

I F YO U H AV E S U F F E R E D F R O M A M I G R A I N E H E A DA C H E you know how debilitating and frustrating

it can be. These moderate to severe headaches are usually throbbing in nature, and frequently associated with nausea, vomiting, and light and noise sensitivity. Approximately 20 percent of migraine sufferers experience vision distortion. Migraines can also be associated with focal tingling, numbness, weakness, and language dysfunction. During a migraine, most people prefer to be in a dark, quiet room. These headaches are usually hereditary, but

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Your physician will also learn your use of pain medication. Overuse of pain medication, even over-the-counter products, such as Advil, Excedrin, and Tylenol, can convert an occasional migraine headache into chronic daily headaches. Stopping these medications is essential to controlling your headaches. If your headaches are frequent (two or more per week), you will most likely benefit from a prophylactic agent, which could be either a daily natural supplement or prescription medication. Many natural supplements, including magnesium, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, feverfew, and butterbur root, can be effective in preventing migraine headaches. Also, Botox injections can be an effective treatment for chronic migraines. Recently, the FDA approved a transcranial electrical stimulator called Cefaly to treat migraine headaches, which appears to be safe and well tolerated. Aerobic exercise, at least 40 minutes per day, three days per week, can be very effective at preventing migraine headaches. Some patients also benefit from biofeedback and acupuncture. Your physician will also provide you with a prescription for an effective abortive medication, which is only used as needed to relieve the headache. These products include triptans (Imitrex, Relpax, Maxalt), ergotamines (Migranal), and NSAIDs (Cambia, Anaprox). Also, there are natural abortive agents, including Ausanil nasal spray and Migrelief Now. Medications that contain opiates such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, etc., and butalbital such as Fioricet should be avoided, due to the high risk of converting an occasional migraine headache into chronic daily headaches. No one should suffer from migraine headaches in silence. Effective treatment can be custom-tailored to your needs, by a physician who specializes in treating headache disorders. Lori Schneider, MD, is a board-certified neurologist at Lakeside Neurology, 19615 Liverpool Pkwy., Ste. A, in Cornelius. She offers patients a more natural way to achieve good health. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please contact 704.896.5591, or visit www.drlorischneider.com and www.drlorischneiderstore.com.


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better me

better you

better world

The mind, body, and spirit are intimately connected. Because unhealthy thoughts and emotions can create a vicious cycle that leads to unhealthy physical patterns, we can choose a victorious path that includes a positive, healing, uplifting spiral. By mixing the ingredients of attitude and action, we can change the flavor of our own lives. Learn to nurture your body and soul to lead a more balanced life.

A Grandfather’s Grace & Guidance BY: BILL CRESENZO

1 John 1:8: “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.” EDITOR’S NOTE:

When my own son started Hough High School last fall, I was surprised by how little information is published about the man behind the name of the school. As a child, I knew Mr. Hough, and I spent a great deal of time at his house with his three grandchildren. As part of my desire to share with you what an amazing community figure and human William A. Hough was, I invited his grandson, Bill, to write a few words… just to scratch the surface of this man’s legacy. Enjoy! Amy

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Whenever I think of my grandfather, William A. Hough, I think of these words: “Billy, anyone who says they’ve never made a mistake is a liar, and the truth isn’t in them!” He’d always said it with such authority that I knew that the words were true. The words he said to make me feel better whenever I messed up were words that I’ve internalized. Of course, he said them on other occasions, too; even though he quoted the Bible, it was never out of fear—but to assuage my fears and to encourage me to my Jesus’ words. My sisters and I spent almost every weekend with him and my grandmother in Huntersville. Never, not once in the 24 years that I knew him, did I ever hear him say anything bad about anyone. Truly. He had his opinions, of course, and he taught me how to express mine without vitriol. He was very gentle, yet very strong. He was the kindest, nicest man that I have ever known. Whenever my sisters and I would start talking “smack” about someone, or when we’d inevitably fight, he was there: “Whoa, now!” he’d bellow, holding up his gigantic, tractor-driving hands. And we would shut our all-knowing, teenage mouths, and he would smile and ask us if we wanted ice cream or a tomato sandwich. He was the most diplomatic man I have ever known. When my parents divorced, Granddaddy never wavered in support of both his daughter and my father. He knew they shared

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Mind Body Spirit three children, his grandchildren; and he and his wife, Ruth Starling Hough, our grandmother, put our needs above their own and their own daughter’s.

In 1984, my sisters, ages 13 and 15, pranced out of their bedroom in Huntersville, dressed in black and purple lace, looking like Madonna wannabes, ready for my grandparents to take them to the Charlotte Coliseum to see Prince—their “ride” had apparently “fallen through.” Even my innocent 11-year-old self knew they were dressed like tarts. I couldn’t believe that my grandparents would take them out like that. But take them they did—in their station wagon, stopping in Charlotte along the way to pick up my sisters’ friends—and they waited the entire time in the coliseum concourse for them until the Prince concert ended! My mother recently told me that they had, in fact, very much “enjoyed watching all of the concert-goers.” I was also fortunate to know this great man as an adult, and it’s not surprising that this was exactly the kind of man I wanted—and still want—to be. To realize his lessons about real love, real compassion, and real forgiveness. He and my grandmother provided us a safe haven; and I know now that he provided a safe haven for all of those who walked through the doors of North Mecklenburg High School. I know that my grandfather was not perfect, yet he never let those mistakes or regrets overshadow his humanity, his love of God, and his love for other people. Bill Cresenzo is W.A. Hough’s grandson and a reporter. He lives in Burlington, NC.


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New Listing

7736 Old Post Road - Denver

Sprawling and spacious full brick Ranch style home on 10+ private and secluded acres. Meticulously maintained in and out. 3 BRS/2.5 baths on the main level living space as well as a large Great Room w/fpl. Lower level is fully finished with BR, bath, recreation room And a fully equipped 2nd Kitchen. Enjoy the outdoors on your large deck, in your in-ground salt water pool or under your outdoor cabana with bath. TRULY A SPECTACULAR HOME!!! MLS # 3170450

Under Contract

Available

Covington At LKN - Denver

New Construction! Craftsman style 2 story Landis Reed home with 4BRs/2.5 Baths. Many upgrades incl. H/W floors, 42” cabinets and Roman shower in Owner’s bath. MOVE IN READY. MLS # 3072300

$299,990

Available

.75 acre home site in the upscale community of Falls Cove. No time frame in which to build. Bring your builder or build with ours. MLS # 3156468

Under Contract

Lot in Sailview

.706 acre interior cul-de-sac home site in the ever popular Sailview community. Call listing agent for Crescent Communities’ building requirements. MLS # 3148294

$109,900

Available

Individually Owned Lot Falls Cove

$40,000

$654,000

Under Contract

The Farms – Mooresville

Beautifully wooded 1.152 acre cul-desac home site in this popular Lake Norman area community. Great amenity package and facility w/full time Activities Director. Boat storage within the community. MLS # 3145108

The last 2 remaining Developer owned home sites. Sites #31 and #61. $40,000 each

MLS # 3145038

$143,900

$133,900

Reduced

Falls Cove Troutman

The Farms – Mooresville

WATERVIEW .89 acre wooded home site in this sought after community. Unlimited timeframe to build. Easy access to Lake Norman.

The Sanctuary Charlotte

Available

Northview Harbour Sherrills Ford

The last 3 remaining Developer owned home sites in this stunning community. Sites #123, #137, and #150.

Developer owned lot bordering open space. Available boat slip MUST BE PURCASHED WITH LOT FOR AN ADDITIONAL $15,000.

$30,000 to $35,000

MLS # 3042247 $24,900


Profile for Lake Norman Woman Magazine

Lake Norman Woman Magazine June 2016  

June 2016 Lake Norman Woman Magazine

Lake Norman Woman Magazine June 2016  

June 2016 Lake Norman Woman Magazine

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