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plus:

YOU DON'T WANT TO MISS

AN LKN MOM WHO TURNED

challenge INTO opportunity Pg. 44

pink pages issue

7TH ANNUAL

IN HONOR OF BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

OCTOBER

events

featuring ALLISON KNOX, DR. SWETHA GUJJA, & SHELBY JONES OF SOUTHERN ONCOLOGY SPECIALISTS

Pg. 38


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STAFF

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PUBLISHER DANA NIETERS

dana@lakenormanwoman.com

EDITOR LESLIE OGLE

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SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE STEPHANIE SULLIVAN

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DISTRIBUTION MANAGED BY CAROLINA CONSULT, LLC

O C TO B E R CO N T RI BU TO RS :

Dr. Carolina Fasola; Antionette G. Kerr; Allison Knox; Michelle Love; Dr. Lindsey Mashburn; Kari McCormick

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L A K E

N O R M A N V O L U M E

X I I

,

woman N U M B E R

from

THE PUBLISHER

WHILE I GRABBED A BITE

in a hospital cafeteria after visiting a friend recently, an elderly gentlemen with a carton of milk and a package of cookies sat down next to me. We exchanged pleasantries, and he mentioned that his wife was undergoing tests related to complications resulting from her battle with breast cancer. An hour-long conversation later, I was certain that though she may be fighting for her life, his wife is the luckiest woman in the world. If you ask him, though, he is the lucky one. “I’ve pinched myself every day for 53 years because I can’t believe someone like her chose me,” he confessed. Tearing up, he continued: “She is still the most stunning girl I have ever seen.” This loving husband also took his obligation to protect his wife extremely seriously. He told me how he had confronted a nurse who was about to remove his wife’s chest tube after a bout with pneumonia. With tears filling his eyes once more, he said with great indignation, “She wasn’t going to sedate her. But I wasn’t about to let my sweetheart go through unnecessary pain. Not on my watch!” And as much as his admiration and protectiveness for his wife struck me, his recognition of the two of them as an indivisible unit also gave me pause: “There are no ‘his and her’ problems in this marriage,” he explained proudly, “there are only our problems. That’s because we go together just like this milk and these cookies!” We walked together as we left the cafeteria, and I knew her as soon as I saw her because her eyes lit up the moment we came into sight. “Here’s my girl,” he said as he bent to kiss her. “Here’s my greatest

joy.” This time my eyes filled with tears—though they faced the scariest challenge of their life together, the joy they found in one another was as moving as it was palpable. My son is getting married this month to a wonderful girl, and I pray he has a marriage like that. It won’t be easy. There will be difficult—agonizing even—times when they hurt each other and have to swallow pride and the need to be right in order to forgive one another. There will be instances they’ll find it excruciating to have to admit that they are wrong. On occasion, they might even be downright terrified when they catch glimpses of traits in the other that alarm them. I hope they love each other through these trying times, because one thing I know for sure, they will come. Many couples decide it’s just not worth it. But as my friend showed me, there is so very much to be gained. I hope my son decides it’s worth it, and I hope that in doing so, he too has a marriage in which the joy he receives brightens even his darkest days. And if he’s really, really lucky, he’ll also gain the unexpected bonus of always having milk with his cookies.

Dana

DANA NIETERS PUBLISHER

Contac t Dana via e -mail at dana@lakenormanwoman.com

I V


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5 THINGS TO DO IN OCTOBER

contents w

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ANNUAL

MELISSA HARTWICK Lifetime Sensory Solutions

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| OCTOBER 2018

PAGES

14

Don't Be Blue … Go Pink!

16

Breast Cancer Myths Debunked

18

Reduce Your Risk!

22

SUCCESS STORY: Life Can Change In The Blink Of An Eye

24

Living It … One Day At A Time!

26

"I'm Finished Receiving Treatment For My Breast Cancer … What Now?"

28

Potential Overuse Of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy

32

COVER STORY: Approaching Breast Cancer With Care & Compassion

{

44

Photo: Toni Lovejoy

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pink

O C TO B E R 2 0 1 8

O N THE C OVER: ALLISO N K N OX , DR. SWET H A GU J JA, & SH E L BY J O N ES OF SO U T H E RN ONCO LO GY SPEC IA L ISTS PHOTOG R APHY B Y : C H E LS EA BRE N


40

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"SCENE" WITH LKNW

54

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FEATURES 44 WOMAN TO WATCH:

Photo: Lisa Crates Photography

Melissa Hartwick

54

HERE SHE IS: Kimberly Baumann

HEALTH 50 Is Your Sadness Depression?

52

KIMBERLY BAUMANN

Lakeshore Pediatric Center

12

p

LKNW'S ANNUAL PINK PAGES

Keeping A Clean Work Environment

KITCHEN 46 RECIPE:

Zesty Dill Cucumber Salad

SELF 42 8 THINGS:

Eight Foods That Help Fight Cancer

48

A BOOK LOOK: Fear, Faith, And A Fistful Of Chocolate

58

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT: Trust Is A Powerful Force

in every issue 36 38

WOMEN ON T H E MOV E

5 THI N GS TO DO I N OC TOB ER

56

40

SCENE WI T H L KN W

MEMOR AB LE MOMENT S

p

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DANIELLE SWEET & HER TEAM AT SOUTHEAST RADIATION ONCOLOGY GROUP (SERO)

OCTOBER 2018 |

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LAKE NORMAN WOMAN'S ANNUAL

pink pages A SPECIAL SECTION IN HONOR OF BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

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2

1

Better chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and other drugs are prolonging lives and improving quality of life…not to mention boosting cure rates to their all-time highs.

D O N ’ T

B E

AS SO APTLY DESCRIBED ON

www.bourncreative.com,

“Pink, a delicate color that means sweet, nice,

playful, cute, romantic, charming, feminine, and tenderness, is

associated with bubble

3

Since 1990, breast cancer mortality has decreased by 37 percent. And, according to the Komen website, “nine out of ten women with breast cancer are alive five years after their diagnosis.”

The awareness and importance of mammography, MRI scans, and other screening techniques have aided in the early diagnoses of over 90 percent of breast cancers, allowing treatment to begin in early stages when it’s most effective.

go pink ink

B L U E …

4

gum, flowers, babies, little girls, cotton

New drugs, as well as preventative surgeries, have reduced the risk of breast cancer in many women, including those with genetic mutations (BRCA gene) that predispose them to the disease.

candy, and sweetness. The color pink is the color of universal

love of oneself and of

others. Pink represents friendship, affection, harmony, inner peace, and approachability.” SO, WITH THE HAPPINESS OF THE COLOR PINK IN MIND, HERE ARE SOME GOOD NEWS FACTS ABOUT BREAST CANCER:

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Thanks to improved radiation treatments, recurrence rates are down significantly, and fewer women have to undergo surgery.

6

Once upon a time, it was common for women to have their entire breast(s) and even part of their chest wall removed, but today’s surgeries are far less invasive. Early-stage breast cancer is often treated with lumpectomy only.

5

For more information on breast and other cancers, contact www.cancer.gov or www.komen.org.


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breast cancer myths

© Branislavp | Dreamstime.com

DEBUNKED

ACCORDING TO THE BREAST CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION,

1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer within her lifetime, and about 40,000 women will die from the disease. While we’ve come a long way in prevention, early detection, and treatment, there is still a lot of ambiguity out there. Here are some myths debunked—

MYTH:Most breast

MYTH:Breast implants put

cancers run in families.

you at a greater risk for cancer.

FACT: Only 5 to 10 percent of breast cancers are thought to be hereditary, making lifestyle and environmental factors most culpable.

FACT: Research shows that women with

implants are at no greater risk; although implants can be problematic for mammogram efficacy.

MYTH: Milk or dairy increases your risk.

© Katarzyna Bialasiewicz | Dreamstime.com

FACT: Several myths persist

MYTH:Breast cancer always

about the correlation between dairy intake and the increased risk of breast cancer, but years of research indicate no link.

shows itself in the form of a lump.

FACT: Swelling, skin irritation, and

inverted or dimpling nipples can indicate cause for concern as well.

MYTH:Finding a lump means breast cancer.

FACT: Only a small

© Tyler Olson | Dreamstime.com

MYTH:You don't need regular

percentage of breast lumps turn out to be cancer. But if you discover a persistent lump in your breast or notice any changes in breast tissue, you should schedule a doctor’s visit immediately.

mammograms if you lead a healthy lifestyle.

FACT: While exercise and diet can reduce your risk for

breast cancer, scientists do not fully understand all the causes and environmental factors, making mammograms especially important and necessary.

MYTH: Certain deodorants and

wire bras can cause breast cancer.

FACT: These rumors have circulated for years, and research has debunked them more than once; there is no scientific evidence to support either.

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For more information on breast cancer awareness facts, visit www.nationalbreastcancer.org.


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REDUCE YOUR RISK! D E T E C T I N G

B R E A S T

C A N C E R

E A R L Y

By: Dr. Lindsey Mashburn

© Starast | Dreamstime.com

Mammograms: Yearly or Not?

Why are self-exams so important? According to a recent article in the Journal of Women’s Health, Health, “Women often detected breast cancers themselves, either by self-examination (25%) or by accident (18%).” I often hear patients say, “I don’t do my breast exams because they are so lumpy I wouldn’t know if anything was wrong.” Most women have some lumpiness. The key is getting to know your normal lumps, so if something new pops up you recognize it. Also if you do your exam monthly and you get to know your normal lumps, then you can feel reassured each time when there aren’t changes. Breasts are normally lumpier around periods, so that is not a good time to do the exam. Doing the exam in the shower with a soapy hand can make it easier to feel lumps.

Medical guidelines for various screening tests have been changing over the years. This has led to confusion about mammograms. Based on data from the Journal of the American Medical Association, Association 10 deaths would be prevented for every 10,000 women who had yearly mammograms for 10 years. In that same time, 940 women would have a biopsy that was normal. Looking at these numbers and the demographics of Lake Norman, this translates to around 40 lives saved in 10 years in our area with yearly mammograms. In those 10 years, about 4,000 people would have a biopsy that was normal. This article cited considers these normal biopsies a “possible harm of screening” and has led some people to suggest that you may not need yearly mammograms. Many others consider this a worthwhile trade-off to save lives.

What can every woman do to reduce their risk? EXERCISE.

Regular moderate to vigorous exercise has been shown in multiple studies to reduce the risk of a breast cancer diagnosis. Exercise also reduces the risk of breast cancer recurrence in breast cancer survivors. DON’T SMOKE.

Smoking increases the risk of many cancers, and breast cancer is one of those.

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MAINTAIN A NORMAL BMI (BODY MASS INDEX).

Breast cancer risk is lowest in women with a BMI below 25. As BMI increases above 25, so does the risk of breast cancer. LIMIT ALCOHOL.

Even one drink a day can increase the risk of breast cancer, and studies suggest that the risk increases with higher levels of alcohol consumption.

KNOW YOUR FAMILY HISTORY.

Additional screening tests or preventative treatments may be indicated based on your family history. Knowing your family history allows a doctor to best determine your risk and develop a screening and prevention plan. If your lifetime risk is over 20%, you qualify for not only a mammogram each year, but also an MRI (usually insurance

covers it). If you have an abnormal gene that may increase your risk of breast cancer as high as 87%, then you may choose to have preventative surgery to reduce your risk (again, insurance will most likely cover this).

Dr. Lindsey Mashburn is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. A Cornelius native, Dr. Mashburn is a practicing physician at South Lake Women’s Healthcare, 19453 West Catawba Ave., Suite A, in Cornelius. You may reach them at 704.896.9912 or visit www.southlakewomens.com.


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Understandably, Danielle fell apart when she first received her diagnosis. Fighting disbelief and shock, she kept asking herself, “How can I possibly have cancer?” She even chastised herself for bothering to eat a healthy diet, exercise every day, and stay in overall good health when she got sick anyway. “Honestly, I was angry that I had bothered,” she admits.

(above) Danielle with Dr. Konefal. (left) Danielle and the staff at SERO.

LIFE CAN CHANGE

in the blink

of an eye

Danielle Sweet felt in January of this year when her radiologist informed her that she had breast cancer. “I went from living my daily life to fighting for my life,” she recalls. T H AT ’ S C E RTA I N LY H O W

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But then Danielle looked to the example of her mother’s own battle with pancreatic cancer, and she found inspiration. “Sadly, she passed away in 2014,” says Danielle. “But with her positive attitude and unwavering courage, she taught me a valuable lesson on facing adversity. I realized I had the power to fight this disease and decided to win this battle as quickly as possible.” Tests indicated that Danielle had stage II invasive ductal carcinoma. In February she endured a lumpectomy and a lymph node biopsy and then, because the margin of tissue was not cancer free, a re-excision in March. Following surgery, Danielle developed axillary web syndrome, a painful condition that can restrict arm movement. Thankfully, an occupational therapist was able to resolve the situation. To lower the chance of the cancer returning, Danielle also underwent four weeks of radiation treatment at the Lake Norman Radiation Oncology Center, staffed by Southeast Radiation Oncology Group (SERO). From her first session, everyone at SERO made it clear that she was not only a part, but the most important member, of her healthcare team. “Even though it was intimidating,” Danielle says, “they answered my questions, addressed my concerns, and made me as comfortable as possible.” The SERO team was just as considerate of her family’s experience, giving her son Cameron a tour of the treatment room when he expressed concern about the radiation process. And after daily visits with the therapists plus weekly progress updates with Dr. Konefal, Danielle gained friendships as well. “I actually miss our chats!” she asserts. Knowing that SERO was providing her with the best care available, Danielle was able to focus on enjoying life during her treatment. Determined that her routine stay as normal as possible, she kept up with tasks and chores, even when she didn’t always feel like it. Husband Shawn, Cameron, and her youngest son, Brandon, were there supporting her throughout the process. “My family is hysterical!” she says with a grin. “We love to make each other laugh. Whenever I started feeling sorry for myself, I would get a silly text and be reminded that life goes on.” Danielle encourages anyone battling cancer to surround themselves with positive people, too. “Find a support group and trust them to help you,” she advises. “At first I felt like I had been inducted into a club that I didn’t want to belong to. Later, though, I questioned how I ever lived without a sisterhood that shares struggles, successes, and lots of advice.” By: Dana Nieters | Photography By: Chelsea Bren


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living it

one day at a time

priorities change, schedules are disrupted, and proper lifestyles take on new urgency. The Susan G. Komen website recognizes that “in the first year after a cancer diagnosis and during the active phase of treatment, it is common to feel depressed and anxious. After all, side effects related to treatment can worsen your quality of life.” With everything seemingly turned upside down, here are some tips and thoughts on keeping things on track during this difficult time: O N C E YO U A R E D I A G N O S E D W I T H B R E A S T C A N C E R ,

ASK FOR HELP

KEEP ORGANIZED

STAY HEALTHY & ACTIVE

MAINTAIN COMMUNICATIONS

With or without insurance, the costs associated with treatment are exorbitant. You may not be prepared for things like childcare, expensive nutritional foods, travel expenses, or other unexpected costs. From your pharmacy to daycare, know that assistance is available. The United Way or the American Cancer Society can direct you to the appropriate assistance programs.

With all the specialists and doctors on your team, there is an array of folks getting your records, but be sure you keep an organized file for yourself and others, such as your family, your trainer, or your nutritionist for example. Apps such as Track My Medical Records and iBlueButton help you organize, track, and share all your medical files (both are available for free at your app store).

Before, during, and after treatment, an active and healthy lifestyle is paramount, albeit different with each stage. Some people find that they have an aversion to certain foods posttreatment; others aren’t up to their previous exercise regimen. Talk to nutritionists and other health experts so you can create a plan that’s right for you.

Having open and honest conversations with your family, friends, and work colleagues behooves everyone. People may be confused about how to act or what to expect. Remember, you are the key when it comes to handling all the issues surrounding your situation, so be clear, concise, and cooperative and others will follow suit.

For more information on day-to-day matters regarding breast cancer, visit www.breastcancer.org or www.komen.org.

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RECOMMENDED FOLLOW-UP CARE & SURVIVORSHIP

what now?

I’m finished receiving treatment for my breast cancer…

You have finished treatment for breast cancer. While this can be a very exciting time, many patients are left with lingering questions, side effects, and anxiety about what is supposed to come next. Additionally, questions arise such as: “How do I know if my cancer comes back?” or “Do I need a mammogram?” In order to address these concerns, routine follow-up care and survivorship are vital.

C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S !

Survivorship means living with, through, and beyond cancer from diagnosis on ... it is important to have a survivorship meeting or visit at some point after completing any treatment to discuss any concerns or lingering side effects. At your survivorship visit, your healthcare provider may provide you with a survivorship care plan, which is a document that outlines your original diagnosis, treatment received, recommended follow-up, and management of ongoing side effects. This document can then be sent to other healthcare providers to update them on the care you have received and will receive in the future from your medical oncologist. Also during this visit, your provider will offer suggestions for management of any side effects or concerns and may make appropriate outside referrals for assistance. Lastly, it is important for physicians to monitor their patients for long-term side effects of treatment—such as sexual dysfunction, premature ovarian failure, infertility in younger patients, cognitive dysfunction, psychosocial stress, cardiac dysfunction, and lymphedema to name a few. When in doubt, it never hurts to contact your medical oncology team!

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By: Allison Knox

For most types of breast cancer, patients should have a careful history and physical examination to be performed by their physician every 3 to 6 months for 3 years, then every 6 to 12 months for years 4 and 5, and then annually afterwards. Annual mammography is recommended to the preserved and contralateral breast. For example, if you had a mastectomy performed on one side, you should still have mammograms on the other side yearly. Data supports monthly selfbreast examinations, but does not support routine bone scans, chest x-rays, liver ultrasound, or CT scans unless the patient has new symptoms that may be suggestive of recurrence. Always inform your physician or healthcare provider of any concerning symptoms that are new and getting worse. Symptoms such as back pain, headaches, vision changes, abdominal pain or bloating, and breast lumps or changes could signify a potential problem. If a woman is taking Tamoxifen for hormone receptor positive breast cancer, a yearly pelvic examination by a gynecologist is recommended. There is no evidence for endometrial cancer screening on a regular basis. For patients taking an aromatase inhibitor, an initial bone density scan is recommended because worsening of osteoporosis is a potential risk. Results will determine recommended follow-up or intervention afterwards. Allison Knox is a physician assistant with Southern Oncology Specialists with locations in Huntersville (704.947.5005), Denver (704.659-7830), and Charlotte (704.945.6843). Visit their website at www.SouthernOncologyNC.com.


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POTENTIAL

OVERUSE

OF

Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy By: Dr. Carolina Fasola

WOMEN DIAGNOSED WITH

early stage breast cancer have several treatment options to choose from, all with excellent outcomes, and coming to a decision can be daunting. Breast conserving surgery (commonly referred to as a lumpectomy) combined with radiotherapy constitutes breast conservation therapy and is often the recommended treatment option for women with early stage breast cancer. The alternative surgical option of mastectomy (removal of the entire breast tissue) can sometimes obviate the need for radiation. There is no survival difference between breast conservation therapy and mastectomy in women with early stage breast cancer. Therefore, the decision of whether to undergo a mastectomy in a woman who is a candidate for breast conservation therapy is a personal one—where concerns with body image or need for follow-up testing may influence this decision. A desire to minimize the risk of a second breast cancer in the opposite breast can lead women to pursue mastectomy of the unaffected, healthy (contralateral) breast as a precaution, called contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), also known as a double mastectomy. The rate of CPM is increasing among women with early stage breast cancer without an inherited risk of breast cancer. However, the choice to undergo a CPM in women without an inherited risk of breast cancer is controversial.

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While CPM is strongly recommended for women who have increased risk for a contralateral breast cancer, such as those with a BRCA1 or 2 genetic mutation who may have an increased risk >10–25% in developing a second cancer in the opposite breast, the risk among women without an inherited risk of breast cancer is far lower at 3–5% within 10 years of diagnosis. Additionally, CPM has no survival benefit in this subgroup of women. Moreover, CPM has higher surgical complication rates, including risks of wound healing or infection, longer

Avoid potential

overtreatment at the expense of increased

complications.

hospital stays, longer recovery periods, possible need for multiple operations, and long-term risks of chronic pain or body image concerns. These surgical complications may delay the start of recommended chemotherapy and/ or radiation regimens, which is problematic as the main driver in breast cancer survival is the potential for spread of the known breast cancer to distant organs rather than from the development of a second breast cancer in the opposite breast.

In light of these drawbacks, CPM in women without increased risk for contralateral breast cancer has been discouraged by several medical organizations and societies to avoid potential overtreatment at the expense of increased complications. In women with early stage breast cancer without an inherited risk of breast cancer, the decision of whether or not to pursue a mastectomy of the opposite breast should involve discussion of potential benefits and risks with a physician. Ultimately, this shared decision making should empower women to help make these difficult decisions regarding cancer treatment and prevention. If CPM is pursued, it is often recommended to do so only after all cancer treatment is complete to avoid any delays in necessary treatment.

Dr. Carolina Fasola is a board-certified radiation oncologist working for Southeast Radiation Oncology Group (SERO) in Charlotte. She completed her residency training in radiation oncology at Stanford University in 2015 and has enjoyed working for SERO ever since. Southeast Radiation Oncology Group, located at 200 Queens Road, Suite 400, in Charlotte, can be reached by calling 704.333.7376.


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APPROACHING BREAST CANCER WITH

Care & Compassion Car C

By: Antionette G. Kerr Photography By: Chelsea Bren

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THE TEAM AT SOUTHERN ONCOLOGY SPECIALISTS IS TAKING THE FIGHT AGAINST BREAST CANCER PERSONALLY.

“Breast cancer has affected my life on a personal level,” offers nurse practitioner Shelby Jones,” because my step-mother was diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in 2013. Her treatment was multimodal, as it included surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and anti-hormone therapy. Her determination and resilience through her treatment was remarkable. She was a fighter!” Fortunately, she is now five years cancer free, and Shelby and her family plan to honor Breast Cancer Awareness Month by participating in the 2018 Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure 5K in Charlotte. About 1 in 8 U.S. women (roughly 12.4 percent) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2018, an estimated 266,120 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 63,960 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer. “Studies show that early screening and detection save lives. This cannot be underscored enough,”

Shelby emphasizes. “Mammograms are typically the diagnostic test of choice for most women; however, your provider may recommend other screening tools such as ultrasonography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of your breasts. Talk to your provider for more information about the next steps in scheduling your breast cancer screening exam.” This is precisely why Dr. Swetha Gujja works diligently to provide education. “Awareness through education is the only way to cope with these problems, which makes this month important to me,” she explains. “My advice to women is to please get their mammograms on time and seek medical attention for any unusual symptoms. I plan to honor this month by distributing flyers with the commonly-asked questions and answers regarding breast cancer.” Physician assistant Allison Knox stresses the importance of early detection and screening as well. “Get screened,” she urges. “Make sure to get your mammograms annually. Being

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preventative is the key to early detection. Additionally, if you ever notice any abnormal lumps or bumps in your breasts, always follow up with your physician to make sure they are aware.” In addition to encouraging screening, those at Southern Oncology Specialists are also caring for survivors. “I plan to honor and acknowledge each woman in our office currently battling breast cancer,” Allison says. “I hope to focus on the role of survivorship that includes helping women redefine their normal lives after diagnosis and treatment,” she concludes. With a strong commitment to helping with the quality of life of survivors, October presents a special opportunity for raising awareness at Southern Oncology Specialists. According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, on average, every two minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer with over 3.3 million breast cancer survivors alive in the United States today. And, ladies, be aware your husbands, sons, brothers, and fathers are not immune when it comes to breast cancer. While “only” 1 in 833 men risk getting breast cancer in his lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society, make sure your boys know what to look for when it comes to this ugly disease. Throughout the years, Dr. Gujja has learned a number of valuable lessons from her patients. “Don’t let anyone make you believe that the field of oncology is depressing,” she insists. “It is more gratifying than you might think! The best part is making a difference in our patients’ lives.”

(L TO R) ALLISON KNOX, SHELBY JONES, & DR. SWETHA GUJJA

Having faced cancer with a few of her family members, Dr. Gujja personally understands the physical, mental, and emotional battle. She says her biggest lesson is understanding that “we all need to be grateful for what we have and appreciate the little comforts of life. On an ideal day, I would like to be able to deliver only good news to all my patients, treat all their illnesses, and make them feel better … then go home and have a good time with my family,” she smiles.

her biggest lesson

IS UNDERSTANDING THAT “WE ALL NEED TO BE GRATEFUL FOR WHAT WE HAVE AND APPRECIATE THE LITTLE COMFORTS OF LIFE.

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“Breast Cancer Awareness Month is important to me personally because I see women every single day who are living with and through the diagnosis of breast cancer,” Allison adds. “Each patient quickly becomes family, and we want to make sure they are treated with the care and compassion they deserve.”


Seasonal allergies can take some of the fun out of just being a kid. If your child suffers from allergies year after year, it’s tempting to try over-the-counter remedies that may help ease symptoms, but can leave your child groggy or drowsy. Our board-certified allergists can test to discover exactly what your child is allergic to, create a customized treatment plan that in time can lessen the severity of her symptoms, and, in many cases, cure her allergies altogether! Call 704.372.7900 to schedule an appointment at our Lake Norman, Huntersville and Mooresville locations.

breathe » live » thrive | www.carolinaasthma.com

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women on the

move

KELLEY IRELAND, broker-in-

charge/owner of Village Real Estate Group, recently received the 2018 Five Star Real Estate Agent Award. Voted on by the public and her peers, this is Kelley’s ninth year to get this distinction.

Denver resident LINDSEY SCAROLA recently published a children’s book titled, My Perfect Dog. A first-time author, Lindsey wrote the book in honor of her beloved 9-year-old yellow Labrador, Ben, who passed away suddenly from cancer.

Truliant Federal Credit Union recently added DENISE C. WILLIAMS to their management team. Denise was one of only three to be named MFC Manager in the Southern Region, and she will manage the Cornelius location. Denise is a cofounder of the Executive Women of Lake Norman and is also actively involved in the Cornelius Chamber of Commerce and the Cornelius Cultural Art Group. ELLA ARCENEAUX, high

school senior at Hough High School, and her leadership team have designed pink Homecoming shirts for October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month with proceeds going to the Susan G. Komen foundation. This is the second year the Hough High School Leadership Team has designed and sold the shirts for breast cancer awareness, with last year’s shirts selling out before the big game.

CONNECT Whether you are a woman on the move, looking WITH US! for events, new businesses in the area, or are willing to contribute your opinion, follow us by visiting www.facebook.com/lakenormanwoman or e-mail leslie@lakenormanwoman.com.

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Hopewell Presbyterian Church invites you to join us:

Help us create a new worship experience…See you at The Well! For more information visit hopewellpresbyterian.com or call our office: (704) 875-2291 10500 Beatties Ford Rd

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calendar

5 THINGS AN LKN

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OMAN SHOULD DO IN OCTOBER

Saturdays & Sundays, through Nov. 18

1 Saturdays & Sundays, through Nov. 4

THE AMAZING MAIZE MAZE Opens 10am Rural Hill Farm 4431 Neck Rd., Huntersville

Get lost in this giant sevenacre corn maze with over two miles of interconnecting paths. You can also take a hayride around the farm, explore the historic site, have a picnic, or hike the trails.

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2

25TH ANNUAL CAROLINA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL 10am to 5:30pm 16445 Poplar Tent Rd., Huntersville

This 16th-century European-style art and entertainment festival combines outdoor theater, circus entertainment, arts and crafts marketplace, a jousting tournament, a feast fit for royalty, and much more.

Thursday, Oct. 4

LAKE NORMAN WOMAN’S PARTY IN PINK

18TH ANNUAL ALL AMERICAN DOG SHOW

6-8pm On the Carolina Grace Luxury Yacht

Help us honor Breast Cancer Awareness Month in a cruise around Lake Norman that includes food and beverages, contests, a raffle, and live music.

5

FridaySunday, Oct. 19 through 21:

4

Saturday, Oct. 6

3-6pm Robbins Park 17738 West Catawba Ave., Cornelius

In addition to fun contests, visitors are able to enjoy vendor tents, concessions, a K-9 demonstration, the Shelter Strut Parade, and children’s activities.

CAROLINA BALLOON FESTIVAL Hours vary Statesville Regional Airport 26 Hangar Dr., Statesville

Morning and late afternoon balloon launches, plus live music, tethered balloon rides, an artisan village, Kids Zone, a wine & craft beer garden, great festival foods, and more!


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Scene

WITH

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Vicky Turner, Innovative Tub Solutions, and Stacy Anderson, Wells Fargo, at a recent Executive Women of Lake Norman meeting

BE SCENE LAKE NORMAN WOMAN is getting out and about each month, looking for great events and the fabulous and exciting Lake Norman people who are making them happen! So next time you’re at a chamber event, a new business in the area, or just out having fun, look for Lake Norman Woman and our camera. Who knows, you just might find yourself in next month’s

LKNW’s Dana with Dr. Eva Imperial of Iredell Primary Care for Women at Dr. Imperial’s “Women & Wine” event in August

Shawn Cooper of the Tutor Doctor with LKNW’s Jessica Jones

“SCENE WITH LAKE NORMAN WOMAN!”

View more

Scene photos

on our Facebook page at: Lake Norman Woman

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Kris Kane, Bank of the Ozarks; Annie Lewis, Annie Lewis Event Planning; and Caroline Bosi, South Lake Women’s Healthcare, at a meeting of the Executive Women of Lake Norman

LKNW’s Stephanie with Kelly O’Donnell of Beautycounter at Mainstream Boutique in Mooresville


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8

things

}

8 INTERESTING MILESTONES, EVENTS, SCOOPS, TRIFLES, OR JUST COOL STUFF.

BERRIES GREEN TEA

PEAS

eight

GARLIC

FOODS

that help

ямБght

CANCER SALMON

SPINACH BROCCOLI

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TOMATOES


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melissa

HARTWICK

LKNW RECOGNIZES A WOMAN DOING EXCEPTIONAL WORK IN THE LAKE N O R M A N C O M M U N I T Y, A L E A D E R W H O I S PAV I N G T H E WAY T O C H A N G I N G O U R AT T I T U D E S A N D I N S P I R I N G C O N F I D E N C E I N T H E F U T U R E .

on

GETTING STARTED IN BUSINESS: My daughter Becky has special

needs and was having a horrible time sleeping. I would spend hours trying to soothe her to sleep. My career at the time was designing and sewing custom bridal gowns, so when my daughter’s doctor recommended a weighted blanket, it was an easy transition. The added bonus is that cotton is so colorful and fun to work with – much more than bridal satin!

on

BEING PROUD AND HAVING JOY: I spent several years as an

adult living and working in Nicaragua running a children’s home for a nonprofit organization. While I was there, I met my daughter! I adopted her at 8 years old, and now she’s almost 14. I am proudest of my daughter and our relationship. It has been the greatest joy of my life to watch her grow stronger and healthier over the time I have been her mom. Every step forward is a major cause to celebrate, and we are very good at celebrating the little victories!

on

MANAGING BUSINESS AND FAMILY: It is definitely hard to be a

single mom and run a business. Some of my favorite times are when I’m working at my sewing machine and Becky sits down at her little sewing machine to make doll clothes. I enjoy being able to work while spending time with her too. The most important thing for me is to stop what I’m doing and listen to her when she wants to talk or needs my attention. She is my top priority and I never want her to doubt that. I often work late at night when she is asleep to get my more-detailed work done.

on TACKLING OBSTACLES:

Melissa Hartwick Lifetime Sensory Solutions OWNER & DESIGNER

By: Michelle Love | Photography By: Toni Lovejoy

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I have a genetic condition called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, which causes me significant chronic pain. Over the years, I’ve had to learn what my body is capable of doing and modify my own expectations. It is hard to have big dreams and realize that your body just isn’t capable of fulfilling them, but I am learning how to modify my dreams so I can still realize them. Instead of doing a 10-mile backpacking trip, I may do a one- to two-mile trip, then set up camp to enjoy the scenery for the rest of the day. Using knee and ankle braces as needed helps me to stay more active than I could be otherwise. Melissa Hartwick is the owner of Lifetime Sensory Solutions in Charlotte, maker of weighted blankets sized to fit your needs. For more information, please visit her website www.lifetimesensory.com.


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IN THE

kitchen

Zesty Dill Cucumber Salad INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sugar 4 to 5 cups sliced cucumbers, peeled or sliced 3 cups grape tomatoes, halved 1 cup red onion, finely chopped 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh dill, finely chopped Salt and pepper to taste TO PREPARE

In large bowl, mix the vinegar, olive oil, and sugar. Add the cucumbers, tomatoes, onion, and dill, then season with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for one hour to blend flavors. Toss before serving. HINT Add black

olives for a little more color, more variety, and extra flavor. Serve over a bed of lettuce with feta cheese for a light meal!

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for side dishes? Try this cucumber salad. It’s easy to make, healthy to eat, and very refreshing to accompany any main dish.

RUNNING OUT OF IDEAS


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DANA NIETERS reviews Fear, Faith, and a Fistful of Chocolate: Wit and Wisdom for Sidestepping Life’s Worries by Deborah Coty

a book

LOOK I F T H E R E I S O N E T H I N G T H AT

I am absolutely certain of, it’s that uncertainty is an unavoidable part of life. Unfortunately, though, the human brain is wired to overreact to uncertainty—it’s an innate response that worked for our cave-dwelling predecessors eons ago when extreme caution and fear regarding the unknown helped ensure their survival. Today, it mostly just creates unnecessary hand wringing and nail biting. Anxiety and fear are not laughing matters. However, if you want to find a way to laugh—even when looking some of life’s scariest moments right in the face—then read this book by inspirational humorist Deborah Coty. With a keen blend of humor and wisdom, Debora shares stories from her own life, biblical encouragement and scriptures, and a

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lot of deep belly laughs as she provides practical advice on how to overcome fear with both faith and chocolate. Deborah, in a style that makes readers feel as if they’re having coffee and a great conversation with a really funny girlfriend, breaks down the top fears women face today into ten chapters: the loss of a loved one, debilitating illness, failure, growing old, the unknown, loneliness, dependency on others, rejection, specific critters such as snakes and spiders, and being judged unfairly. She doesn’t title the individual chapters with those fitting yet “ho-hum” descriptions, though. Instead, headings such as “Vultures Circling My Head” and “Do They Make Prune Smoothies?” have readers smiling before they even leave the table of contents. The sections at the end of each chapter called

“More Pluck, Less Chicken” ask thoughtprovoking questions that will have readers taking practical steps away from constantly ruffled feathers and toward a calmer, quieter inner dialogue. Though the chocolate and the laughter are important, the central tenet of Deborah’s message is faith. Don’t worry, you will laugh out loud…a lot. But, above all, her scripturally sound insights will inspire a spiritual growth that will lead you to serenity, peace, and conquered fears.


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Is Yo Y ur Sadness DEPRESSION? October is an awareness month for many issues, and depression screening is among those. The American Psychological Association (APA) states that nearly 18.8 million American adults experience depression each year, and women are twice as likely as men to develop major depression. We can all relate to feelings of sadness and bad moods, but how do you know if it’s depression or just the blues?

According to the APA, if you experience five or more of the following every day for two weeks or longer (and the symptoms interfere with your daily activities), you may have major, or clinical, depression— Sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism, worthlessness, or helplessness Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping

Difficulty concentrating, remembering, and making decisions Decreased energy/fatigue Appetite and/or weight changes Thoughts of death or suicide Restlessness/irritability

If you or someone you know suffers from depression, contact a licensed mental health care provider. With appropriate psychotherapy and proper medications, even the most severe forms of depression can be successfully treated.

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For more information on depression, visit the American Psychological Association at www.apa.org or the National Institute of Mental Health at www.nimh.nih.gov.


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clean WORK

KEEPING A

ENVIRONMENT

A C C O R D I N G TO T H E C E N T E R S F O R D I S E A S E

“the exact timing and duration of flu seasons can vary, but influenza activity often begins to increase in October.” From computers and phones to shared kitchens, the workplace is a breeding ground for bacteria, and sickness can spread throughout an office in as little as a few hours. One study conducted at the University of Arizona in Tucson found that “within four hours, more than 50 percent of surfaces and employees were contaminated with the virus” after one person came to work sick. Here are some musts for keeping healthy at your office— CONTROL AND PREVENTION,

TOO MANY COOKS IN THE Harmful microorganisms thrive on refrigerators, microwaves, and faucet handles as well as on water fountain and vending machine buttons/knobs. Dish cloths and sponges in the kitchen are particularly germy, so wash often in dishwasher or scald with hot water after every use.

kitchen

wash

YOUR HANDS THOROUGHLY & REGULARLY. It cannot be emphasized enough that washing hands is the single best way to keep germs at bay … for at least 20 seconds in hot, soapy water.

do

clean tidy

= HEALTHY & PRODUCTIVE. Desks, phones, keyboards, etc. are major culprits for germs. And, as a recent study revealed, for those who ate at their desks, their work areas showed higher levels of bacterial contamination.

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gesundheit

When you sneeze or cough, cover your nose and mouth with the crook of your elbow, not your hand(s). As a general rule, avoid touching your hands to your face.

SANITIZERS WORK. Ask management to provide disinfecting wipes and hand sanitizer in all common areas such as bathrooms and kitchens. While these products do not take the place of a good handwashing, they do kill and prevent the spreading of germs.

For more information on keeping healthy in the workplace, visit www.Webmd.com.


CUSTOMIZED- BUYER PROFILE BUSINESS VALUATION

MAXIMIZE

T H E VA LU E O F YO U R

BUSINESS

“Joe Vagnone did an excellent job brokering our business. We were extremely impressed with his diligence and tireless efforts to move the process to closing.” - Kim Clark, Seller

704-577-8030

www.jvagnone.com

" T H E R E A L D E A L - F O R - S M A L L B U S I N E S S” Considering selling your small business? Contact Joe at joe@jvagnone.com

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{ H E R E she

IS}

AN LKN WOMAN WHO PERSONIFIES WHAT MAKES LAKE NORMAN WOMEN SO GREAT

kimberly B AU M A N N In one word, how would you describe your passion? Children! My mother passed it

on to me. She’s a real kid-magnet. My whole life I watched as kids lit up when she was around. In my late teens, I realized I had been blessed with this gift as well. One day at the grocery store, a young girl around 4 years old was watching me, smiling and waving, and asked her mom if she could come talk to me – and so it began.

What turn in your life afforded you the most self-reflection? For nearly 20 years I

had built my practice in Wisconsin, and then my husband found a job here in North Carolina. I didn’t want to leave my patients so he moved first to be sure he liked it. He loved it, so a year later I followed. It was hard, and for the first year after moving here I focused on our house projects. Something was missing in my life, but I was hesitant to start over with a new group and new patients—enter Lakeshore Pediatric Center. They have made me feel right at home … I am back to doing what I love and I am so grateful!

H O M E TO W N :

M U K W O N A G O, W I S C O N S I N

LAKE NORMAN HOME: HIDDENITE

HOUSEHOLD:

H U S B A N D S T E V E ; DA U G H T E R GABRIELLA (21) AND SON Z A C H A RY ( 1 8 )

How do you like to spend your time away from work? When I’m not at work or

not cooking in the original, tiny kitchen of our 80-year-old farmhouse, I am gutting and renovating the other areas of our home. Steve found the house while I was still in Wisconsin. It needed a lot of work, but the view is incredible! Once I got the measurements, I started designing the renovation work. I’m not an architect, but I learned how to draw construction plans and was approved as the general contractor. I also write a blog chronicling the adventure on simplysassafras.com.

At the end of the day, what makes it all worthwhile? I always knew I wanted to do

something with children, and as a pediatric nurse practitioner, I have the awesome challenge and responsibility to do just that. The kids are the best part of my work. Imagine a job where a cute little toddler climbs up into your lap just to sit there; or a child runs into your office and gives you a great big hug because they forgot before you left the room; or a newborn baby grabs your finger; or a shy toddler finally makes eye contact … it is the most rewarding feeling and I love it!

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i am an LKNw oman because…

“The Lake Norman area has so much to offer with great shopping, cultural events, and amazing restaurants – I am so excited to call it my new home.” Kimberly Baumann, PNP-C, is a pediatric nurse practitioner with Lakeshore Pediatric Center in Denver.They are located at 635 N Hwy 16 and can be reached at 704.489.8401 or via their website at www.lakeshorepediatric.com.

By: Michelle Love | Photography By: Lisa Crates


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memorable moments

ADVICE ON WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP:

“Give your time and the gift of listening…Just being there emotionally any way you can.” Barb Scheffer, October 2016

Featured in October 2014, Jill Burgess was a member of Team USA, which won the ICF 2014 Dragon Boat World Championships in Poland. Jill Burgess, October 2014

“When you’re moved in unexpected directions, try not to concentrate on the patchwork of threads and mismatched patterns. Step back and see the bigger perspective, the beautiful quilt of your life.” Donna Ballas, October 2014

I AM

A WARRIOR!

DON’T BE SORRY— IT’S THE BEST THING THAT EVER HAPPENED TO ME. That’s what Maggie Fisher tells folks who say they’re sorry to hear that she had breast cancer. Maggie Fisher, October 2015

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ON STAYING POSITIVE:

“As a pastor friend of mine says, ‘I don’t plan on pitching a tent and camping out in it.’ It is a temporary situation, a bump in the road. I plan for the future.” Kathy Wheeler, October 2017


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MIND body spirit { { By mixing the ingredients of attitude and action, we can change the flavor of our own lives. Learn to nur ture your body and soul to lead a more balanced life.

Anyone who has faced life-shattering experiences knows how easily that foundation of trust can crumble. Fear slowly makes its way to the front, or grips the wheel immediately, but I learned that when we allow fear to drive the car, we are spinning our wheels.

trust POWERFUL force IS A

My main question was how? How do we keep fear out of the driver’s seat? One fearful thought brings a truckload more. The fear of losing my mom was unbearable, so I became an avoider. I thank God for my dad, whose strength I envied. Knowing the right words to say, he stood by my mom’s side and never lost faith to see her through. My mom, dealing with the diagnosis, had unwavering faith in her doctors and trusted everything would be ok.

How do people have unshakeable faith in the unseen future? It took being a parent and staring into the trusting eyes of a 3-year-old to learn the real power of faith. The large growth on my son’s shoulder helped me find my way back to faith. It had to be removed and S I X T E E N Y E A R S A G O my phone surgery was the only option. I rang with unexpected news … news decided to believe in the impossible that takes you from feeling ordinary … that the lump would simply to devastated in the blink of an eye. fall off. After all, 3-year-olds are I only remember two things: “Your operating from their subconscious, mom has breast cancer,” and the long, so they trust what you tell them. heart-stopping silence that followed. That’s why they believe in Santa Claus. Fast forward to just days before surgery, and imagine our surprise when we awoke one morning to something truly remarkable—the growth had disappeared without a trace! My son did not have any doubts when I had told

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him it would fall off. It was a miracle which proved that trust is the most powerful force. Unlike a 3-year-old, adults no longer operate within their subconscious. Belief takes more effort; however, it can be accomplished. Belief and trust are separate strings wrapped into a bundle of appreciation. The easiest way to draw upon this faith is to start with one strand of gratitude. Take 15 minutes a day to focus your thoughts with something simple that is easy to appreciate. It could be as simple as appreciating the feeling of sun on your skin. The key is to be general in thought until you feel a shift deep inside. Move your thoughts to more specific feelings of gratitude. You’ll feel it if you are on the right track. Focused, appreciative thoughts will help you find trust. These steps, even when life is at its worst, creates a ripple effect. Like throwing a stone into the water—one ripple starts and then more flow outward into the water. The key is to be conscious and consistent in throwing these stones. We hold the power within us. The universe has your back, and we are capable of things greater than our mind can comprehend. It all begins with appreciation which is simply love. Kari McCormick resides in Huntersville and is a former educator. She is owner of Bella K, a company that designs custom Gameday, Resort, Bandana, and Wedding flip flops. She is also the founder of “Selfie Style” girl’s empowerment workshops. For more information on their products and/or workshops, visit www.bellakstyle.com.

©Andybor | Dreamstime.com

B E T T E R M E … B E T T E R YO U … B E T T E R W O R L D


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Lake Norman Woman Magazine - October 2018  

Lake Norman Woman Magazine - October 2018

Lake Norman Woman Magazine - October 2018  

Lake Norman Woman Magazine - October 2018

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