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featuring

THE EIGHT 2015 FINALISTS

PLUS:

VISUALIZE IT to Achieve It Take Charge & STOP BULLYING


The holidays...a time for family, friends, hugs and guiding teeth into beautiful alignment. in Holiday Cheer.

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(704) 892-3300


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.

STA F F

.

PUBLISHER

Dana Nieters

dana@lakenormanwoman.com

volume ix, number vII

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EDITOR

December WRAPPING IT UP

Amy Hallman

amy@lakenormanwoman.com

OPERATIONS SUPPORT & CONTRIBUTING WRITER Leslie Ogle

leslie@lakenormanwoman.com

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Stephanie Sullivan

stephanie@lakenormanwoman.com

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Sandy Comer

sandy@lakenormanwoman.com

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Juli Simmons

ads@lakenormanwoman.com

ART DIRECTOR Chelsea Bren

chelsea@lakenormanwoman.com

D EC E M B E R CO N T RI BU TO RS :

Jan Brittain; Judith M. Daly; Phillip Ngo; Karen Patterson

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Lake Norman Woman reserves the right to deny any advertisement or listing that does not meet Lake Norman Woman standards. Submissions are welcome but unsolicited materials are not guaranteed to be returned. Lake Norman Woman assumes no responsibility for information, products, services or statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. An advertised special printed in this publication is subject to change without notice. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.

{FROM

TH E

publisher}

When I was growing up, my world was filled with female heroes: Margaret Thatcher, Billie Jean King, Oprah Winfrey, Mother Teresa, Sandra Day O’Connor, Geraldine Ferraro, Sally Ride, Jane Goodall, and Wilma Rudolph. To me, these women represented the possibility—the expectation, even—that my own future as a woman in this country would be just as bright. They gave me hope that I could be everything they were: strong, passionate, successful, principled, good. They didn’t expect success to come easily—they worked hard for every gain, and they held themselves accountable for every setback. I know they weren’t flawless; we’re all only human, after all. But imperfections and all, I can’t help contrast these women with many of the celebrities our society hails as heroes today. I follow who receives the most likes on Facebook and has the most followers on Twitter, and I keep up with who makes headlines. I glance at the faces gracing the covers of our magazines and starring on the big screen. And while there are many worthy celebrities, there are even more who have been raised to icon status that puzzle me. Think Miley Cyrus. Last year, Time Magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people. Compare Miley’s accomplishments as a very skillful, naked, wrecking-ball rider to those of Margaret Thatcher, who was one of Time’s most important people of the 20th century, or of Oprah Winfrey, who was named to Time’s list of most influential people six times—and you just might scratch your head in bewilderment, too. Girls need heroes—heroes that inspire them to do the right thing, accomplish great deeds, face their fears, and help those in need. They need lasting heroes, who show it’s possible to rise above the frustrations and failures of everyday life, who demonstrate

that adversity is an opportunity for growth. But in my search of modern day heroes, all I find are twerking Miley Cyruses and scantily clad Kim Kardashians—while staying power, personal responsibility, and integrity seem to be lost arts. Quite frankly, these searches can leave me wondering if true heroes even exist at all anymore. The good news, for me, is that this doubt never lasts very long. In fact, nearly every day in doing this job, humanity’s goodness pretty much smacks me right upside my head. What being the publisher of this magazine has taught me is that when I lose my faith in the goodness of people it’s because I’ve been looking in the wrong places. And while Hollywood producers might reject most of their stories as “ordinary” and their efforts might not make CNN’s headlines, there are multitudes of kind-hearted, dedicated, and courageous women right here in Lake Norman. All I had to do was ask you to help us find them…and you responded by sending us the stories of seemingly ordinary women who are everything that much of what the national headlines are not: authentic, gutsy, determined, resilient, strong, tenacious, and committed. All of their stories shouted out loud and clear that heroism is alive and well; you just have to know where to look. In this issue, we honor eight of those women. All of their stories are different, but there’s one central message you can take away: we all have a hero abiding within us. We all hold a magnificent gift, a gift that starts right within our own heart. The choice of what to do with that gift is, of course, our own. What if we use it, like our 2015 Women of Will, to make the modern day hero a little easier to find?

. PUBLISHER

-dana

C O N TAC T DA N A V I A E- M A I L AT DA N A @ L A K E N O R M A N WO M A N. C O M

DANA NIETERS


Joyous holiday wishes to you and your family …

from your good neighbor. May all your wishes come true this wondrous season. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.® CALL ME TODAY.

David R Traugott, Agent 108 Gateway Blvd, Suite 102 Mooresville, NC 28117 Bus: 704-696-8355 www.davidtraugott.com

1101450.1

State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL


Contents

46

BRING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH THE KEYS TO YOUR NEW HOME

DECEMBER 2015

12

28 38

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WO M E N O N TH E M OV E

| DECEMBER 2015

40

THE VOICES OF OUR WOMEN OF WILL FINALISTS: What Is Your Favorite Holiday Tradition?

22

WOW FINALIST: Brenda Robinson

24

WOW FINALIST: Teri Hutchens

26

WOW FINALIST: Dr. Kathleen Russo

28

WOW FINALIST: Hedvika Miller

29

WOW FINALIST: Patsy Wilson

30

WOW FINALIST: Jane Bolton

32

WOW FINALIST: Lisa Mayhew-Jones

34

WOW FINALIST: Sandy Tabor-Gray

36

She Said

HEDVIKA MILLER

in every issue

Women Of Will

5 T HI N GS TO D O I N D E C E M B E R


30

JANE BOLTON

14

22

BRENDA ROBINSON

{

O N THE C OVER:

42

18

46

Family

Surviving The Children’s First Holidays After The Divorce Take Charge And Stop Bullying

Health

Is Your Food Blocking Your Medications?

Home

Bring In The New Year With The Keys To Your New Home

WOMEN OF WILL FINALISTS, SANDY TABOR-GRAY & PATSY WILSON

PH OTO G R A PH Y BY:

CHELSEA BREN Special Thanks To Our Photo-shoot Location, Rumor Mill Market, located at 217 Depot St., Davidson, NC

16

Self

Pray It, See It, Feel It, Believe It!

44

Beauty Shouldn’t Hurt

48

MIND BODY SPIRIT: Why We Celebrate Christmas

DECEMBER 2015 |

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The voices of our Women Of Will finalists...

What is your favorite holiday tradition? “My most cherished holiday tradition is relatively new. I treasure coordinating and leading the Angels of ‘97 Candlelight Memorial Service in early December. While I cannot buy gifts for my daughter, Laura, I can give her the gift of remembrance during this special time. It brings bereaved parents together to remember and honor our children. We come together to share memories and fellowship.”

JANE BOLTON

“Relaxing, not running around, setting my hair on fire, is always a good plan during the holidays. Early in my life in North Carolina, I discovered Asheville. One of the most wonderful things I can do is visit my friends there. It’s a delight to spend the holidays with them and with my dad.”

BRENDA ROBINSON

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“On Christmas Eve, I have my children to bring over all my ‘grands’ to open their gift from me. We eat, make goodies and, of course, open that gift they have been eyeing under the tree for several weeks. I can’t be with them all on Christmas morning so this is my way of having a little Christmas morning Joy. Priceless!” LISA MAYHEW-JONES

“After the Thanksgiving meal, our family sits around the kitchen table for family time. We play games, reminisce, and laugh! One tradition is drawing a secret name for Christmas gifts. To help the shopper, each family member makes a suggested shopping list. This is a fun activity because we make our shopping lists together by going through the Black Friday advertisements. Good times!”

TERI HUTCHENS

“On one of the last few days before Christmas, we select and decorate our Christmas tree. The fresh smell of winter enters and kicks off our real celebration. Each ornament hung is a reminder of family and friends: mementos, photos of family moments, handcrafted beauties by children over the years, symbols of special events. It’s a sweet memory tree!” PATSY WILSON

“Each year, I give my children an ornament that’s significant to their year. As I place each ornament on the tree, I reflect on that time or place where we traveled,

HEDVIKA MILLER

remembering all the blessings that we’ve experienced as a family. After losing Michael, these memories are even more meaningful; it’s what I have left to share with his children.” SANDY TABOR-GRAY

“I was a baton twirler from ages 5 to 18. My marching band, the Huntington Thunderers, marched in the Macy’s Day Parade on Thanksgiving day every year. We would bus from Long Island to New York City for the parade. I remember it being cold and wet most years, but still it was great fun for me, my sisters, and my fellow performers.”  DR. KATHLEEN RUSSO

“Since my childhood I’ve loved Christmas. That was the time we all got together in Bozkov, the little village in the mountains in the northern Czech Republic with my grandmother, Ludmila. There was no better day than Christmas Eve! For dinner, we had potato salad, schnitzel, and fish—carp! After dinner, we opened gifts from Jesus under Christmas tree.”


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family

SURVIVING

the Children’s First Holidays

AFTER THE DIVORCE BY: JUDITH M. DALY

Many years of experience as both a family law attorney and as a divorced mother with two small children prompts me to share thoughts on how to help children through the holidays. PUT YOUR CHILDREN FIRST.

Be more generous and compromising during the holidays, making sure the children’s needs are met. Sometimes this means you make sacrifices for their sake. If you have to give up your own wants and needs, don’t tell the children what you have done. Children need a mother, not a martyr. Do what is best for them. MAKE YOUR BEST EFFORT TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE OTHER PARENT.

Newly minted child custody papers will still leave questions unanswered. Communication with the other parent is necessary to address issues, such as gift giving, swapping out days to allow the children to see a relative visiting from out of state, or informing the other parent of the holiday school performance. AVOID CONFLICT IN FRONT OF THE CHILDREN.

Perhaps you started off the year successfully co-parenting, but the stress that accompanies the holidays has made that resolve

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disappear. Children need both parents in their lives, and they do not need the parents arguing. Such behavior only adds to your children’s feelings of confusion, split loyalty, depression, and anxiety. Your problems with the other parent are not the children’s problem. Compromise. MAKE NEW TRADITIONS.

There is no need to toss out all the old ones, but do make room for new traditions for you and your children. Enlist the children’s participation at a soup kitchen to serve food or by simply taking food from your own pantry to the local food pantry. Plan an evening with party punch, hor d’oeuvres (think mini pigs-in-a-blanket!), and a newly released movie rental. Consider baking cookies (slice and bake is OK!) to take to the elderly retired couple down the street. LOWER YOUR EXPECTATIONS, AND BE KIND TO YOURSELF.

Your job as a divorced mother requires more energy through the holidays, so now is not the time to try to retain status quo in all areas. Your life has now irrevocably changed, for better or for worse; and it will never be the same. Pay attention to what is really important, what is driving

your actions, and see what you can do to ease off yourself. MIND YOUR HEALTH.

What mother hasn’t been told, “Take care of yourself first, or you won’t be able to take care of anyone else”? This is especially true during the holidays when temperatures drop, when lack of sunlight can trigger depression and overeating, when finances are stretched, and when your psyche is bombarded with expectations from childhood or from media advertising. Get plenty of sleep, eat healthy food, and limit alcohol consumption to help your body deal with the stress of the holidays. SEEK COUNSELING.

If the grief of divorce is still fresh, find a professional counselor to help you move forward with peace, happiness, and joy in your new life.

Judith M. Daly is a North Carolina State Bar Certified Family Law Specialist. For more information, contact her at Daly Family Law Firm at 704.878.2365.


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self

Pray It, See It, Feel It,

Believe It!

S U P E R S TA R S D O I T ; elite athletes do it; the superrich do it—we’re talking about visualization. Whether it’s a job, a relationship, money, or just being happier in life, you can manifest your dreams into reality.

The originator of the Chicken Soup for the Soul® series, Jack Canfield has taught millions his formula for success and personal fulfillment. He says that visualization of your goals and desires starts a chain reaction within you. You will subconsciously become motivated and begin working on your goals. You will recognize the necessary resources; and by the law of attraction, you will draw people, resources, and circumstances necessary to achieve your dreams.

A POPULAR VISUALIZATION TOOL IS THE CREATION OF A VISION BOARD. HERE’S HOW YOU CAN GET STARTED: Be hands-on and creative!

Post a collage of words, pictures, affirmations, and quotes, so you can see them daily. Use a bulletin board or magnetic/ dry-erase board to add and remove items easily. NOTE: Creating this on electronic devices is not recommended. Be specific.

If you want a new car, post the exact model, year, and color on your vision board. Want to travel? Post images of your dream destinations.

me acting services rendered

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Avoid clutter.

Try not to crowd your vision board. You don’t want to attract chaos in your life, so keep it organized. Be strategic.

Sometimes clarity and simplicity will keep you focused on what’s important. Use only positive words and images that make you smile. Consider more than one board.

You could have one for your personal life and one for your professional life.

Consult it every day.

Look at your vision board throughout the day but especially right before bed. This is a very powerful time for the mind to visualize and absorb. Visualize!

See yourself already doing the things you wish to achieve. Before he was famous, Jim Carrey wrote himself a check for $10 million for “acting services rendered,” postdated it for Thanksgiving 1995, and carried it in his wallet always. Years later, Carrey signed a

contract for Dumb & Dumber for $10 million. The date? Thanksgiving 1995! Create a gratitude board.

Listing all the things for which you are grateful keeps your mind in pursuit of those things. Remember the law of attraction! Take notes.

Write down the date you created your dream board, and create a new one each year. The universe replies speedily, and you may be surprised at just how quickly your dreams become reality.

For more information on visualization and positive affirmation, visit the American Psychological Association at www.apa.org. For more ideas on creating a vision board, go to www.makeavisionboard.com.


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health

DRUG: ACE inhibitors, such as enalapril (Vasotec), captopril (Capoten), and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) USE:

Is Your Food

BLOCKING

Your Medications? to know certain foods affect your prescription or over-the-counter medications. While alcohol is an understood nono for many medications, there are many other seemingly innocuous (even healthy!) foods that can cause unusual side effects when mixed with certain prescriptions. Some can even prevent the meds from working altogether!

YO U M AY B E S U R P R I S E D

Consumer Reports cautions against taking multivitamins with iron without your doctor’s consent; and it warns that herbs, found in many places we regularly shop, especially St. John’s wort, is not just a bad idea—it’s dangerous and can lead to death! It is important to read all pharmaceutical inserts and consult your physician regarding the details of your diet. Also, consider these common medications and food interactions:

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To lower blood pressure or treat heart failure FOODS TO AVOID:

Foods high in potassium, such as bananas, oranges, and green leafy vegetables INTERACTION:

These drugs can increase the amount of potassium in the body; too much potassium can cause irregular heartbeats and heart palpitations. DRUG: Blood thinners, such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel bisulfate (Plavix), and aspirin USE:

To lessen the chance of blood clots FOODS TO AVOID:

Foods high in vitamin K, such as spinach, kale, broccoli, green tea INTERACTION:

Vitamin K is essential for forming blood clots, so these foods reduce the effectiveness of blood thinners. DRUG: Statins, such as atorvastatin (Lipitor) and lovastatin (Mevacor) USE:

To lower cholesterol FOODS TO AVOID:

Grapefruit, grapefruit juice, tangelos, Seville oranges, and other citrus fruits INTERACTION:

Chemicals in these fruits block the enzymes necessary to break down statins, resulting in higher levels of the drug in your body. Side effects increase, particularly muscle problems.

DRUG: Tetracycline antibiotics (Ala-Tet, Panmycin, Sumycin) USE:

To treat infections, acne, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and others FOODS TO AVOID:

Milk, yogurt, cheese, other calcium-rich foods or supplements INTERACTION:

Dairy products make it harder for your body to absorb the medicine. DRUG: Levothyroxine (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid) USE:

To treat thyroid conditions FOODS TO AVOID:

Walnuts, soybean flour, cottonseed meal, strawberries, peanuts, other highfiber foods INTERACTION:

These foods block the absorption of thyroid medication. DRUG: Metronidazole (Flagyl) and linezolid (Zyvox) USE:

To treat bacterial infections FOODS TO AVOID:

Foods that contain the amino acid tyramine, commonly found in pickled, fermented, or smoked foods, such as processed cheeses, anchovies, and salami. It is also found in avocados, bananas, chocolate, and alcohol. INTERACTION:

Too much of this amino acid combined with the medication causes blood pressure spikes.

For more information on food and supplement interactions with medications, visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at www.fda.gov. | DECEMBER 2015


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THE

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F I NA L I S T S

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WE ARE PROUD TO PRESENT OUR 2015 WOMEN OF WILL

The eight finalists are women from diverse backgrounds, educational experiences, professions, and regions, with varied skill sets, personalities, and interests. Yet, as you read their stories, certain characteristics are clearly commonalities: Resilience. Determination. Grittiness. Courage. Strength. Commitment. They are not celebrities or women familiar with the limelight. They are women who took a look at the world and realized the opportunity to improve the lives of others. They are women who refused to let fear set boundaries on their dreams. They are women who disallowed obstacles to stand in their way. They are, without a doubt, Women of Will. Gold Sponsors:

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The Women of Will finalists were selected by a panel of influential women who live and work in the Lake Norman community: Jennifer Marion Mills, Randy Marion Automotive; Dana Nieters, Lake Norman Woman Magazine; Jan Brittain, last year’s Woman of Will winner; Lisa Qualls, BB&T Mortgage Loan Officer & Mooresville Town Commissioner; and Danielle Ratliffe, Executive Women of Lake Norman Vice President.


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2015 FINALIST

W H E N Brenda Robinson gives a motivational speech, she knows

about surpassing dreams. In 1980, Brenda became the first black woman in the United States Navy to get her Wings as a Naval Aviator. In March, Brenda will be inducted into the Pioneer Hall of Fame by International Women in Aviation. At 11 years old, Brenda earned her first flight, from Philadelphia to Chicago, when her father promised she could fly to visit family. “Imagine having 10 cups of coffee and a bag of candy—that’s how I felt,” Brenda recalls. “I was jumping out of my skin, though I knew to sit still, ladylike. My nose stayed pressed to the window. I took a bazillion pictures of clouds.” Already, Brenda believed that flight attendant was the only aviation career for a girl. A high school career-exploration program led Brenda to discover a love for air traffic control. At Dowling College, Brenda was one of 5 women in its renowned aeronautics program. She is the school’s first black woman to graduate in aeronautics. In her first semester, she began flying lessons. “My parents okay’ed the concept and cost. Had they said, ‘Nope, not happening,’ I wouldn’t have given it another thought,” Brenda admits. Still, flying was expensive. “When I ran out of money, I’d stop flying. Sometimes it was months before I’d go back. My parents worked overtime to raise the next $5,000.” Her graduation plans hadn’t included the military. “But a classmate came to my dorm, saying the Dean of Aeronautics had sent for me. So, I shut the door, stomped around, and went to the military briefing! “They found me. The Navy’s ‘opportunity of a lifetime’ included flight school after basic training for ‘the first black woman,’” Brenda says. “At the time, even black men experienced discrimination in military aviation. So the push was on; I provided the opportunity for recruiters to check two boxes: female and minority.” Brenda was one of 10 women. “The women were overqualified; we needed a science degree and flight background (My private pilot’s license was more than ‘flight background.’),” she says. “The men simply had to graduate college.

Brenda robinson BY: AMY HALLMAN

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“Although I knew I could be the first black woman to do this, I couldn’t think about it too long. I avoided thinking about those that said I shouldn’t bother applying and those against women, or minority, aviators.” Her successful 20-year Navy career includes flying bomb disposal teams and passenger transport missions from Guam to the Pacific Micronesia Islands, Philippines, and Japan; landing on aircraft carriers; being check airman and flight instructor; flying admirals, congressmen, generals, the Chief of Naval Operations, and the assistant secretary who would go on to be the Secretary of the Navy under President George H. W. Bush. She flew in both Gulf Wars, regularly into Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Egypt, and Europe. After the military, Brenda flew with distinction the 727s, 757s, and 767s for American Airlines. After 17 years, Brenda retired to spend with her widowed father, a World War II veteran. For now, one of many projects is finishing her book, The Very First Raven. “Raven” was Brenda’s aircraft carrier call sign. Today, her historic achievement is well received. “Now, women don’t have to hide behind the I’m-sorry-to-haveencroached-on-your-space attitude. I’m proud to see this.”


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2015 FINALIST

Teri hutchens BY: LESLIE OGLE

S H E K N O W S E A C H student by name. She knows their

strengths, their weaknesses, and their personalities. She knows their struggles as well as their interests—Teri Hutchens, principal of The Collaborative College for Technology and Leadership (CCTL) in Statesville, knows each of the school’s 222 students. Born and raised in Statesville, Teri started her career as a math teacher, then high school principal; then Teri briefly left education to earn a law degree from UNC-Chapel Hill. After practicing law for two years, she realized her heart is in education. “I went back as a classroom teacher—to re-establish my credibility within education and the school system,” Teri says. “It was important to reassure staff that I could not only lead a school, but I could be a teacher. A principal should be an instructional leader, someone who can reach students, someone capable of leading.” “She has unique leadership skills,” colleague JoAnn Deal notes. “Teri serves as each student’s mentor, advisor, disciplinarian, and counselor. Every grading period and interim report, she personally meets with each student who’s underperforming to develop a plan and monitors them regularly. As a result, we’ve reached new levels of student success.” Though Teri has had obstacles, she refuses to be defined by them. Focusing on versatility, kindness, and honesty, Teri navigates life with a positive and grateful attitude. In her desk drawer at school, she has a file folder labeled “Happy,” which includes items such as a thank-you note from a former student, and an encouraging card from a supervisor telling her the profound

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difference she’s making. “‘Failures’ aren’t really failures, but opportunities for growth,” she says. “If I’m having a bad day, I open that folder and count my blessings.” Teri’s internal drive propels her. Also, she credits her parents’ influence. “Neither of my parents went to college—or even changed jobs throughout their employment, but they encouraged and supported me through my higher education and career changes,” she shares. “My parents taught me I could do whatever I set my mind to; and I try to give that to my students. “As a school, we’re here to maximize student potential. It’s our job to get to know our students, to meet them where they are academically, and to personalize their school experience. At times, we are a student’s counselor, parent, social worker, encourager, planner and, of course, teacher. Each student has unique abilities and needs; and we try to increase their abilities and to meet all their needs,” Teri says. “Sometimes for our students, school is the place where they feel safe, supported, and capable. Some students have home lives that are chaotic, stressful, and out of their control. While their parents want the best for them, sometimes they aren’t able to provide it; and I have a deep desire to help those students find comfort and success and reach their potential. In a small school with a high-quality staff and smaller classes, we can achieve exceptional student growth. They grow in a variety of ways—emotionally, intellectually, socially, academically, as future leaders, and productive citizens. I am privileged to work with so many amazing people!”


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2015 FINALIST

DR.

Kathleen russo BY: LESLIE OGLE

W H E T H E R I T ’ S in medicine or marathons, Dr. Kathleen Russo,

board-certified physician at Carolina HealthSpan Institute in Huntersville, does not rest on her laurels. Though she didn’t take up the sport until she was 47 years old, today Dr. Russo is an avid runner, logging about 50 miles a week and has completed the last eight Boston Marathons, as well as marathons in Chicago, New York, Germany, and Athens, Greece, among others! Dr. Russo earned her medical degree from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and completed her residency at the University of Florida in Gainesville. She completed a Fellowship in Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona under Dr. Andrew Weil; and she received training in bio-identical hormone replacement under Dr. Ronald Brown, founder of Carolina HealthSpan Institute. In 2002, Dr. Russo traveled to Zambia, Africa, to teach medical officers at the local hospital. Treating everything from dysentery to malaria, she was astonished by the large presence of HIV in the population. She discovered that at least 50 percent of child-bearing age women were HIV positive. “There was no treatment, no testing, and no discussion about this devastating health issue,” Dr. Russo says. “In fact, 1 in 5 children were dying from HIV before age 5 in this particular village.” Dr. Russo decided then to develop a plan and to return to Africa the following year to implement it. Her focus became “The Prevention of HIV Transmission from Mother to Baby” project. “I developed a protocol for voluntary counseling and treatment and wrote handbooks for the hospital staff,” she explains. “I did fundraising, and we bought HIV testing kits and medications. The following year, I went back to Zambia to train the medical staff in this program.” In 2004, Dr. Russo visited again, but was surprised to find all the testing kits and medications still on the shelves! “I’d thought the hard part was done, but unfortunately, I hadn’t considered the cultural aspects of the tribe nor the stigma of the disease,” she admits. “People were afraid to even talk about HIV, much less get tested or treated, for fear of exile. Over the next few years, we redesigned the program and, ultimately, the Zambian Health Ministry took over the successful system.” Dr. Russo turned her focus to domestic philanthropic pursuits. In 2005, as its medical director and examining physician, she worked with the organization Prevent Child Abuse Rowan to open the Terrie Hess House, a Child Advocacy Center, to treat child victims of physical and sexual abuse in Rowan County. The center provides free medical treatment, and psychological and legal support for the children and non-offending family members. The organization bestows an annual “Friend of a Child Award” in Dr. Russo’s name. After 17 years of practicing pediatric medicine, Dr. Russo says, “I feel that I served my purpose and was ready to grow and broaden my knowledge foundation. I chose bio-identical hormone replacement medicine because I am so passionate about it. Truly, it can be life changing for men and women with hormone imbalances.” She says she still enjoys helping others live the healthiest lives possible. “There is so much energy in this community,” she shares. “The people are health conscious and take an active role in their health care; I love being part of that!”

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2015 FINALIST BORN IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC,

Hedvika Miller, owner of the Ludmila European Music and Art Academy in Cornelius, has overcome immeasurable odds to achieve the American dream. Growing up 20 miles from the German border, both Hedvika’s parents were musicians—her mother was a music teacher, her father, a professional piano player. After their divorce, young Hedvika found comfort and guidance in her grandmother, Ludmila Kosova. “I named my school after my grandmother because she was such a large influence in my life,” Hedvika smiles. “She was born in 1898 in a small village in the northern Czech Republic. As a child, I spent a lot of time in her small house in the mountain village of Bozkov. A very intelligent woman, she graduated with a nursing degree and delivered many of the babies in the surrounding villages.” Hedvika recalls that every night, even though it was illegal, her grandmother would listen to the radio broadcast, “Voice of America,” and share the stories she had heard with Hedvika. “She would tell me about skyscrapers, freedom, and great people, like President Kennedy,” she says. “My grandmother died when I was 18 and, although she never got an opportunity to visit America or see the fall of communism in the Czech Republic, it was her stories and dreams about America that inspired me to come to the United States.”

Hedvika miller BY: LESLIE OGLE

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In 1998, Hedvika was a successful music and dance teacher—and also a journalist. She even had an opportunity to work in the press secretary’s office under Václav Havel, the former president of Czechoslovakia, but she did not speak English. After a divorce, she decided that with only one suitcase and just $300, she would come to America to learn the language. She would discover much more. Hedvika settled in Florida where she found a job in housekeeping. She worked tirelessly to make enough money to send for her daughter, Klara, who was still with her ex-husband in the Czech Republic. In June 1999, Hedvika had a car and an apartment, and she had started teaching piano; and she was finally able to bring her daughter to the United States. Also, she could more aggressively pursue her dream of opening her own music school. And if that weren’t enough great news, Hedvika also met and married her husband, Mike. Her newly formed family moved to North Carolina. In addition to teaching more than 40 hours a week, Hedvika also worked in journalism as an international reporter for the BBC and the newspaper Právo, both in Prague. She produced documentaries from the Amazon, Haiti, and Guatemala during summer breaks. After years of hard work and long hours, Hedvika finally felt it was time to open her school. “I started my little two-room studio in Cornelius in June 2007,” she says. “I even hired another teacher for help. Today, we have more than 200 students and 17 teachers providing music, dance, theatre, and art for the entire Lake Norman area. I am forever grateful to America for all the opportunities.”


Patsywilson

2015 FINALIST

BY: AMY HALLMAN

PAT S Y W I LS O N , executive director

of Solace for the Children and vice president of Solace Afghan, has always advocated for children. With 30 years in education, Patsy retired as gifted coordinator from Iredell-Statesville Schools in 2006.

In 1996, Patsy and husband Richard began their journey to help children worldwide— hosting children affected by the Chernobyl nuclear-power-plant explosion. Thinking they could do more, Patsy and nine others formed Lake Norman Children’s Relief (LNCR) to address the medical, dental, and optical needs of international children. After Belarus’ political changes denied children rights to receive international medical treatment, prayerfully, Patsy considered their next aim. Then, Richard had a dream. “In it, he was told, ‘Children are being killed in Afghanistan and Iraq. It’s time to begin the healing,’” Patsy says. “With nothing but faith in a God that finds nothing impossible, we began contacting orphanages and hospitals again—successfully.” Despite the discouragement of political and cultural challenges, Patsy would say, “If God wants this, the doors to Afghanistan will open.” As Americans, it was important to keep a low profile; Solace relied on Afghan volunteers to manage necessary governmental paperwork (In 2012, Solace became a certified AFG NGO.).  In 2007, LNCR brought its first seven Afghan children into the United States.  Realizing the need of hundreds of children, LNCR took another leap of faith: going national. “We changed our name to be universal,” she says. “‘Solace for the Children’ spoke our intent: to give children the chance for a healthy and loving life they could draw upon back home. “The Solace network includes more than 2,000 U.S. volunteers and hundreds more in Afghanistan. To date, we’ve brought

more than 150 children into the U.S.” Patsy’s goal is clear: to establish a Solace community in all 50 states, to build peace at the grassroots level. She continues to consider ways to reach out to more children, including Syrian and Iraqi. Solace is breaking down barriers of mistrust and misunderstanding among Afghan families. For Patsy, hope is Solace’s most important effort. In its selection process, groups are comprised of various ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Many of these children wouldn’t be allowed to interact back home. Families begin to relate as fellow citizens— and understand that we share more similarities than differences. The medical treatment is the “foot in the door,” allowing for systemic change worldwide. “In 2009, we met Fahima. As an infant, her home was hit by a rocket. The next day, an uncle found this miracle girl alive! Known to her family as ‘Snow Baby,’ with her body-covering bandages, Fahima came to us to repair scar-damaged mobility,” Patsy shares. “Today, through the Solace Peace House Academy in Kabul, Fahima is active in community service—last winter, we distributed 15,000 sets of winter clothing in five provinces. In 2016, she will begin college.” Upon returning home, each child is offered traditional education. Provided with the necessary supplies, they attend partner schools or Solace Peace House Academy. They can benefit from more than 50 American University of Afghanistan volunteers. Solace offers Afghans—and Americans—a way to look beyond themselves. “It’s been a long process— four years before we received our first recommendation from a Solace alumni family,” Patsy says. “Now, most of our children are recommended. They’ve watched us work and have seen that we honor their trust.”

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2015 FINALIST

Jane bolton BY: DANA NIETERS

J A N E B O LTO N is on a journey—a journey that no parent can ever be prepared to take.

Hers began on April 7, 1995, when her daughter, Laura, and Laura’s best friend, Mandi, were in an automobile accident on Kerns Road in Huntersville. Neither survived. “You lose your heart and soul when you bury a child,” Jane says. “I muddled through those first months not knowing how I was going to survive. From the very beginning, Laura always made me a stronger person. She was my best friend and kept me grounded.” As the holidays approached, Jane felt trapped in an emotional wilderness of shock, sadness, exhaustion, and anger and realized she needed help. She attended meetings of Compassionate Friends, and in doing so, gave herself a tremendous gift: hope. “Being with other parents who were surviving without their children gave me hope that I, too, could survive,” she remembers. Unfortunately, Laura’s and Mandi’s families were not the only ones from the North Mecklenburg High School Class of 1997 to experience this heartache. Between its 10th- and 12th-grade years, the Class of ‘97 lost five classmates to car accidents or illness. Determined to make something good come from these tragedies, a dear friend of Jane’s, Charles Guignard, had a vision: He would cook spaghetti, and people would come! And in doing so, they would raise money through “The Angels of ’97” (Sherry Harkey, Mandi’s mom, came up with the name.) to provide scholarships for North Mecklenburg area seniors. That first year, they raised more than $5,000. “Sherry and I loved doing this for our girls and the other children,” Jane says, of the organization’s continued success. “So we ‘informed’

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Charles that we weren’t stopping. Little did we know the plans God had for us!” Twenty years later, The Angels of ‘97 has raised more than $600,000! While the organization has helped 198 students achieve their college aspirations, it is Jane who feels blessed: “I didn’t get to send Laura to college,” she explains. ”But I believe that a part of Laura goes with each of our recipients. I believe that she is in their hearts and will help them realize their goals and dreams.” And Jane didn’t stop at helping students with scholarships. She never forgot how important Compassionate Friends was to her healing process; and with the encouragement of a committee member, she formed The

Angels of ‘97 support group. This faith-based group isn’t headed by grief counselors; it is simply a way for bereaved parents to find compassion and understanding by sharing stories and memories, laughter and tears. “Reaching out to bereaved parents is the best gift I can give them,” Jane says. “Laura would want me to help others. She would have done that if the tables had been turned.” Jane admits that her own journey is not over, that losing a child puts parents on a lifelong quest for healing. And she admits that there are many dark days for bereaved parents in which they feel they will not survive. But Jane is determined they will not walk their journey alone; they will have a friend— and hope—to accompany them.


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2015 FINALIST

L isa

MAYHEW-

jones BY: AMY HALLMAN

“ M Y G R A N D PA R E N T S ’ H O M E once stood where the

Cornelius Community Garden sits,” Lisa Mayhew-Jones, co-chair of the Smithville Community Coalition (SCC), says. “The home of my great-grandmother, who picked cotton in what’s now the park, still stands, and a slew of relatives live here.” Smithville, which includes more than 100 people and 90 homes, is located along both sides of Catawba Avenue, on the east side of Statesville Road. Our Towns Habitat restored park basketball goals, and rehabilitated or constructed 10 houses in Smithville. In fact, Habitat’s work prompted its interest in the overall revitalization project. In 2011, Lisa attended this discussion. “During the meeting, I spoke up because some residents were balking. I said this meeting wasn’t about anyone else’s perception, but to learn what Smithville wants,” Lisa says. “They voted to start a coalition.” Lisa was selected to chair, with Ron Potts and Sammie Knox. The committee formed a 501(c)3 nonprofit. “It’s important our residents have a say in what happens to our neighborhood,” Lisa says. “We want to create and train for local jobs, develop education and employment support programs, revitalize homes, and secure infrastructure improvements. We don’t want decisions made for us.” The coalition, now a model for similar initiatives in Huntersville and Mooresville, works with individual local leaders. Despite initial reservations by some residents and some officials, Lisa says the relationship is solid. After one presentation request for $500 for the community garden, the Town gave them $5000! “People say they see passion ooze out of me,” Lisa laughs. “I think it just flows to others, who volunteer and fill needs.” She has introduced a jazz festival; annual beautification events; an after-school tutoring program; a community choir; and preschool and camp scholarships. The Kiwanis Club of Lake Norman offered to partner and build a Smithville Park splash park. “We had to help,” Lisa says. “With no public lake access, what better way gives Cornelius children summer fun? We raised $3,000, and pledged additional funds. These partnerships can bring together the diverse Cornelius neighborhoods as one.” A key aim is to celebrate the heritage of this historically significant neighborhood. Smithville Park is located on the former Smith Plantation. In 1908, Smith provided land to former slaves for homeownership. “Smithville” was not incorporated into Cornelius until 1968. “We are a people of great pride and faith,” Lisa says. “Our forefathers and mothers worked hard for this land. Their legacy must live on.” Lisa believes in personal empowerment. She rallies support for the sick and those in crisis. However, when Lisa’s employment closed, things were difficult. “The Bible says, ‘You reap what you sow’ (Galatians 6:7), so I guess I’d been sowing something I didn’t even know,” she smiles, crediting people she met through the coalition. “I could reap good harvest with others’ help. It wasn’t what I’d done but what God put in their hearts to do.” With a large family (two children, five stepchildren, and 11 grandchildren!), Lisa is a natural leader. With the coalition, she leads residents to empower themselves into an energetic, positive force. “My community made me who I am today; I won’t see it go away,” Lisa says. “I’m a child of God, and my passion for my community will not let me do anything else.”

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2015 FINALIST

Sandy tabor-

GRAY

TO S AY T H AT Sandy Tabor-Gray is a giver may be the understatement of the century. She is a national branch coordinator for Solace for the Children, an organization that provides medical assistance, education, and leadership development for children in war-torn countries. Also, Sandy mentors drug-addicted youth. As a teen, Sandy struggled through her own addictions; and in 2013, she lost her son to an overdose. But instead of giving in to grief, Sandy directed her energy and inexhaustible, positive attitude toward helping others.

Sandy graduated from the University of Ohio with a degree in early childhood education. She and Jim, who have now been married more than 25 years, landed in Mooresville in 1997, after living in four cities in seven years. They have three children of their own: Michael, who would have been 24 this year; Christopher, 21; and Mary, 20. Sandy is also honored to be “Mom” to the many Solace children they have hosted. She commemorates them through photos

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BY: LESLIE OGLE

on her dining room wall. She recently traveled to Afghanistan, experiencing firsthand the importance of their services. “We interviewed children and families once they returned home. Saroosh was part of our Lake Norman branch, so I’d spent a lot of time with him. When Saroosh came into the Kabul office and saw me, he ran to hug me, almost lifting me off my feet,” Sandy recalls. “His ear-to-ear smile brought tears to my eyes. Once we started talking, with an interpreter between us, his father said, ‘When my son came in and hugged you, I thought, I’ve never hugged my son that way. Not because I don’t love him, but because in Afghanistan we don’t hug like that. My son has learned to show love for those he cares about.’ Now when his parents leave the house, Saroosh always hugs them and says he loves them, and he shows his younger siblings affection, too. While Saroosh is grateful for his medical care, it’s apparent that the personal change made the lasting impact.” Solace is not only making a difference in children’s lives, but

in the lives of their families, and in their communities. “In 2010, we hosted 9-year-old Ajeebullah, nicknamed ‘Scrappy’ by an American Army Captain,” Sandy shares. “Scrappy, who lived in a refugee tent camp with his mother and siblings, started coming onto the Army base for English lessons with 50 to 75 other boys, who filed in and sat in rows on the hard desert ground, eager to get a piece of education. Once here, Scrappy immediately was a leader who stood up for others with an infectious, positive attitude; he ended up teaching us about gratitude and what’s important in life. Scrappy is now completing 8th grade and is in the top 3 of his class!” Sandy says she did not know how to live with a broken heart after the death of her son, but she remembered her purpose. “I knew I could either allow my sorrow to take over, or I could reestablish my faith in God, and know He is with me. My heart is in service work, and being the hands and feet of Jesus.”


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She said

Famous Women of Will offer their words of wisdom.

LIZA MINNELLI:

Reality is something you rise above. LOUISA MAY ALCOTT:

I am not afraid of storms for I am learning how to sail my ship.

MARGARET THATCHER:

You may have to fight a battle more than once to win it. HELEN KELLER:

One can never consent to creep when one feels compelled to soar.

J.K. ROWLING:

We do not need magic to change the world. We carry all the power we need inside ourselves already. COCO CHANEL:

If you’re sad, add more lipstick, and attack.

I was always looking outside myself for strength and confidence but it comes from within. It is there all the time.

ANNA FREUD:

If I make a fool of myself, who cares? I’m not frightened by anyone’s perception of me.

ANGELINA JOLIE:

LUCILLE BALL:

I would rather regret the things that I have done than the things that I have not.

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If you can’t go straight ahead, you go around the corner.

CHER:

The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you’ve got to put up with the rain. DOLLY PARTON:

To me, fearless is not the absence of fear. To me, fearless is living in spite of those things that scare you to death. TAYLOR SWIFT:


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I N

T H E

C A R D S

women O N

T H E

M O V E

Artist ROSA MURILLO’S work is displayed in the Levine Museum of the New South’s new exhibit “NUEVOlution: Latinos and the New South.” She creates paintings, drawings, and jewelry, displayed and for sale at the Mint Museum and Levine Museum. She’s painted window murals for the Sanctuary of Davidson. Rosa created Found Art Tuesday, incorporating community interaction with art. CATHERINE BAILEY is a licensed real estate broker and Realtor® with Debi Gallo & Associates, affiliated with Southern Homes of the Carolinas. Catherine is a buyer specialist, listing agent, and an accredited staging professional with several years experience. She earned a business administration degree and began her career as a federal investigator with the National Labor Relations Board. KAREN L. DORTSCHY joins Suzanne Meyer as co-host of WSIC 100.7 FM/1400 AM/ TV 21.2’s “Around the Lake” show, live every Thursday, from 8 to 9 a.m. A resident of Lake Norman since 2003, she is also a professional pet portrait artist and owner of Haute Dauge Portraits. DR. REBECCA R. HALL

relocated her chiropractic practice, Health By Design, PLLC, to Mooresville. With 19 years in health care, Dr. Hall is a certified medical examiner for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, a certified health coach, and a clinical hypnotist, specializing in long-term health goals. She is also Mayo Clinic-certified as a tobacco treatment specialist. GWYNN LINDLER owner of LKN Fit Life, LLC, has earned the Level 1, BioMechanics Method Corrective Exercise Specialist designation.
Gwynn holds American Council on Exercise certifications as a medical exercise specialist and personal trainer. Training clients in their homes, Gwynn is a member of the Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce and Executive Women of Lake Norman.

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W O M E N

O N

T H E

ONLY A FEW SEATS LEFT!

M O V E

Board-certified in family medicine,

P lease J oin

TARA L. FRANKHOUSER, DO,

joins Piedmont HealthCare. Her practice focus includes chronic disease management, wellness and preventive health care, complete gynecological care, pediatric and adolescent health, senior care, dermatology care, health screenings, and immunizations. In addition, Dr. Frankhouser has training in osteopathic manipulative treatment. Dr. Frankhouser is accepting new patients of all ages. Lake Norman High School art teacher BRETTE WEBB opened Fired on Broad, a pottery studio in Mooresville. The experienced potter opened the studio for local artists as well as those interested in taking lessons, attending workshops, or having a place to work within the art of pottery.

LAKE NORMAN WOMAN MAGAZINE

for the 3rd annual

Awards & Luncheon

JENNIFER PIPPIN, with Pippin

Home Designs, and Bill Goff, with Blackfoot Landscape, recently won the American Residential Design Awards (ARDA) Grand Award for “Outdoor Living Projects,” at the American Institute of Building Design annual conference in Rhode Island. MOORESVILLE AREA CYCLISTS (MAC)

donated a check for $5,000 to The Ada Jenkins Center in Davidson. The organization, at Ingersoll Rand, in its first poker ride, had more than 270 participants. Pictured: Melisa Mohn, MAC ride planning committee member; Ben Baker, vice president of MAC; Kevin Elder, organization president; Jane Cacchione, with The Ada Jenkins Center; Hillary Halstead, MAC treasurer and ride coordinator; and Bill McDonnell, organization secretary.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2015 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

CHARLES MACK CITIZEN CENTER 215 N. MAIN STREET | MOORESVILLE

TICKETS ON SALE NOW For more information and to purchase tickets: www.lakenormanwoman.com

Look for coverage o f event in ou r January issue.

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSOR

PORTION OF PROCEEDS BENEFIT

DECEMBER 2015 |

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calendar 5 THINGS AN LKN

1

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OMAN SHOULD DO IN DECEMBER

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THURSDAY-SATURDAY, DEC 3-5:

CHRISTMAS IN DAVIDSON 6-9 p.m. 216 S. Main St., Davidson

THURS.-SUN., DEC . 3-20:

4

Pictured L to R: Kristen Lineberger, Susan Boaz,

THE DAVIDSON Kelly Dowless and Debra Allebach COMMUNITY PLAYERS PRESENTS: CHRISTMAS BELLES 307 Armour St., Davidson Tickets: Adult: $20; senior (65+): $18; student (< 21): $12 Written by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope, and Jamie Wooten, this seasonal play celebrates the ugly Christmas sweater! This southern comedy works around three sisters, their family secrets, sibling rivalry, and a raucous Christmas pageant just in time for Christmas Eve!

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8TH ANNUAL COMMUNITY NATIVITY FESTIVAL 10 a.m.- 8:30 p.m. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 7036 McIlwaine Rd., Huntersville All are welcome to attend this free, family-friendly community event. There is something for everyone, including more than 400 Nativities from around the world, a stable with Nativity costumes, children’s crafts, and nightly musical performances from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Come get in the spirit and be entertained! Enjoy trolley rides and shop among the vendors set up on the Green, along the streets, and in local businesses. Mrs. Claus will be conducting story time. Of course, you can make some time for Santa, too!

3

THURSDAY-SATURDAY, DEC . 3-5:

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8:

THE ESSENTIAL WINTER MEDICINE CABINET 5-7 p.m. 275 N. Hwy. 16, Denver This free event, sponsored by Cooking For Life and SouthEast Chiropractic, will have live, hands-on demonstrations, tastings, samples, and gifts of herbs, essential oils, food, and drinks.

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11 & 12:

WALK THROUGH BETHLEHEM Fri.: 6-9 p.m.; Sat.: 2-9 p.m. Camp Wesley, 3090 Deal Rd., Mooresville All are invited to this free, lively, interactive, biblical-era drama and marketplace. Guests register for the census (and tour group). Guides lead the way through Bethlehem, and groups experience the very first Christmas. Along the way they meet the tax collector, merchants, and shepherds in the field—and discover Baby Jesus in the manger!

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family TAKE

GE CHARN D A

W H E N H E R daughter started

coming home from school quiet instead of her usual excited self, Martha worried. After probing, Sara finally mentioned some “teasing” at school and online. However, it was not a simple case of joking around on the playground. Her child was being bullied. Bullying is repeated and intentional behaviors, meaning to bother another person, by physical contact, words, or even subtle actions, whether in person, online, or another medium. By equipping children with the proper solution, you can wrap up bullying. Here’s how:

BE SURE.

Children may not realize they are being bullied, but rather think it’s just teasing. Experts agree

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that teasing never involves race, religion, physical appearance, or personal characteristics. Also, intent is important—bullying intends to upset the target.

need to go away now, and mind your own business.” Then, they should walk away, avoid further engagement, and report to an adult what happened.

PAY ATTENTION.

DEAL WITH CYBERBULLIES.

Notice your child’s moods and behaviors—an outgoing child is suddenly sullen or withdrawn; missing toys, supplies, or money are “explained” away; children suddenly don’t want to participate at school or ride the bus; or eating and sleeping habits change. Encourage your child to talk about her school day and ask questions on everything from lunch to locker rooms. TALK, WALK, AND TELL.

The American Psychological Association recommends teaching your child to first talk to the bully (if they aren’t in direct danger). Say, “You don’t scare me,” or “You

Teach your child to “unfriend” anyone who sends inappropriate messages, photos, or links. Monitor your child’s electronic devices through filters such as Net Nanny Mobile (www.netnanny. com), Phone Sherriff (www. phonesherriff.com), or Covenant Eyes (www.covenanteyes.com). These filters allow you to block websites and remotely review your child’s apps and texts. BEWARE OF EMOTIONAL BULLIES.

The APA explains that social bullying is just as harmful as the physical type. Girls tend to bully by excluding

others or spreading rumors. Be sure your child knows that being intentionally left out is bullying. PREPARE AT HOME.

Practice ways your child can respond to bullies. Teach her creative, even humorous, ways to confront the bully. Quick, clever, and kind retorts can diffuse the situation, giving her more time to distract, disregard, and move away. FIND QUALITY.

As the expression goes, “If you play with pigs, you’re bound to get muddy!” Explain that hanging out or befriending bullies makes her a bully, too, as does remaining silent and not telling the appropriate authorities. For more information on bullying, visit www.thebullyproject.com or the American Psychological Association at www.apa.org.


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self

Once considered a luxury; now, having your nails done is an expectation. When you visit a new, or convenient, salon, are you well attended, or do you feel like the technician’s next meal ticket? Even as a regular customer, you should feel pampered.

BEAUTY SHOULDN’T

HURT

Are the chairs clean? The older, whirlpool chairs have lots of unseen plumbing. Residual water in the pipes (for days, perhaps), gives mildew or bacteria time to grow. To clean the newer, electromagnetic chair and all its components, not just the bowl, the technicians should break it down. The solvent should be hospital grade, not a familiar household cleaner. Watch the technician drop Pedisoak tablets or granules into the bowl. Learn which solvents and

solutions are used. To maximize space, most salons buy bulk products and distribute into smaller—unlabeled—containers. Use salons that house their products openly to ensure quality.

BY: PHILLIP NGO

W H E N I T C O M E S TO beauty routines, women are like the post office: a little snow or bad weather isn’t going to stop them from getting to their beauty appointments! Today’s women are busy, but they’re also spontaneous and fun— and meticulous about their appearance. While we celebrate that attitude, there are some things to consider when selecting a nail salon.

You can’t return a service. Compare a

$3-5 savings to potential medical costs for an infection (or worse). Remember, an infection won’t show for about two days; and when you complain, they’ll (rightly) say you looked fine when you left.

Spot gimmicks.

If you’re offered several glasses of wine, it’s probably a distraction. Will you love your nails tomorrow?

Does the salon sell more than nail polishes? They may be pushing goods, more than services, to make ends meet.

Examine the sterilizer machine. It should be

running constantly. This antibacterial vault takes 10-15 minutes to work. Technicians shouldn’t be rushing, like it’s a microwave oven. A clean utensil does not have to be wiped.

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While it’s a bargain, pure acetone soaks all your nails’ moisture. Your nail

bed is comprised of layers, which acetone breaks apart, and your nails will never grow. If your nails look white and ashy when unwrapped, that’s pure acetone. Bowl soaking will also dry your skin.

If you have an ingrown nail or excess

whitish skin beside your nail, don’t chop it. Butchering your nail and cutting away skin cause long-term health issues.

Each technician’s license should be displayed. If you

seek waxing services, locate an esthetician or cosmetology license. If there’s only one license but several technicians do the waxing, beware. Many employees work only on commission. If it’s their turn in the rotation, their choice is: “Get in the back of the line,” or “Go for it.”

Latex gloves are more cost effective. While you may not be allergic to latex, continual use of latex products can lead to an allergy. Law requires a vent system for fumes at each station in salons with acrylic nails (Older salons were grandfathered.). The smell shouldn’t be overwhelming. If the technicians don’t care about their own health, why do you think they’re concerned about yours?

Phillip Ngo, a biology and chemistry graduate of UNC Charlotte, is the owner of Pure Lux Spa at 7260 Hwy. 73, Ste. 108, in Denver. Phillip recently expanded his growing, singular business, rather than franchise it, in order to maintain quality control. To make an appointment, call 704.827.7788.


Many people with significant symptoms do not have visible varicose or spider veins. If you are experiencing symptoms such as heaviness, aching, swelling, throbbing, itching or even restless legs or leg wounds that won’t heal, you could have a vein problem.

Drs. Steve Folstad and Todd Hansen 206 Joe Knox Ave., Suite H in Mooresville, NC 28117

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©2015 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. (BRP). All rights reserved. ®, ™ and the BRP logo are trademarks of BRP or its affiliates. ◊ SAVE UP TO $2,500 on select models: Eligible units are new and unused 2015 and prior Can-Am ATVs and Can-Am side-by-side vehicles. The buyer of an eligible 2015 model will receive up to $2,500 rebate. Rebate amount depends on the model purchased. While quantities last. For safety and training information, see your dealer or call the ATV Safety Institute at 1-800-887-2887. Always ride safely and responsibly.

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BY: KAREN PATTERSON

make some families happier than being able to step into a new home and begin celebrating all future Christmas holidays. With a little planning, and some guidance from a knowledgeable mortgage professional, you can make that new-home purchase a reality.

BU

N OT H I N G W O U L D

First and foremost, understand the difference between a pre-qualification and a pre-approval. A pre-qualification is based on the verbal information that you have provided to your mortgage professional. A pre-approval is a little more involved: You have provided your income, assets, and other documents. Your credit report has been pulled, and an underwriter has reviewed your information. Take the extra step and get pre-approved, not just pre-qualified, before you ever think about looking at new homes. The worst thing that you can do to yourself is to start shopping, fall in love with a new home, and then be told that you cannot afford it. There are many loan programs available, and by providing as much information as you possibly can, your mortgage professional can better guide you to the right mortgage loan product that works best for you. Karen Patterson, NMLS: 504481, is a senior mortgage consultant and branch manager at Movement Mortgage, LLC, at 19901 W. Catawba Ave., Ste. 104, Cornelius. For more information, please call Karen at the office at 980.263.2340, or at her cell at 704.239.2187; or fax her at 704.837.8643. Also, visit her online at www.movement.com/karen.patterson.

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YER’S GUIDE

Before you begin house shopping—and throughout the mortgage process—make sure you adhere strictly to the recommendations listed below:

DO: Continue to make timely payments on all your existing accounts. Your credit is monitored throughout the mortgage process. Keep all existing accounts open. Closing accounts on your credit report can cause you to lose the good payment history that you have acquired by having that account open. Provide documentation for any non-payroll deposits. Typically, a letter explaining for what and from where the deposit came and supporting documentation is required.

Respond quickly to requests for any additional documentation, as time is of the essence. Buy only what you can comfortably afford. Better Homes & Gardens writer Burton Hillis once said: “A house is money, but your life is time; happiness comes when you can tell the difference.”

DON’T: x Open any new accounts or allow anyone else to make inquires on your credit report. No furniture shopping—and no matter what—do not buy a new car. x Consolidate your debt to one or two cards. You do not want to max out or overcharge your existing credit cards. It is better to have multiple accounts with lower balances. x Quit your job or change jobs just prior to or during the loan process. This could cause you to jeopardize your mortgage loan approval. Your employment will be verified on the day of closing. x Make any cash deposits to your bank accounts. Cash deposits cannot be used for available funds. x Overextend yourself. You may qualify for that new house by holding down two jobs, forgoing vacations, and living on a tighter budget, but your quality of life may suffer. You are committing to how you will spend a great deal of your time.

NC-I-156187 | Movement Mortgage, LLC is an Equal Housing Lender. NMLS ID# 39179 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org) | 877.314.1499. Movement Mortgage, LLC is licensed by NC # L-142670. Interest rates and products are subject to change without notice and may or may not be available at the time of loan commitment or lock-in. Borrowers must qualify at closing for all benefits. “Movement Mortgage” is a registered trademark of the Movement Mortgage, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company. 841 Seahawk Cir., Virginia Beach, VA 23452.


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better me

better you

better world

Mind Body Spirit The mind, body, and spirit are intimately connected. Because unhealthy thoughts and emotions can create a vicious cycle that leads to unhealthy physical patterns, we can choose a victorious path that includes a positive, healing, uplifting spiral. By mixing the ingredients of attitude and action, we can change the flavor of our own lives. Learn to nurture your body and soul to lead a more balanced life.

Why We Celebrate Christmas BY: JAN BRITTAIN

YEARS AGO, I encountered a question during this season that has shaped my understanding of Christmas ever since: “Whose birthday is it anyway?” If we want to have a truly spiritual experience during this season of celebration, that’s a question we need to ask, answer, and remember. Birthdays are great fun. Gifts, decorations, special food, parties, cards. What’s not to like? But how would we feel if on our birthdays, other people got the gifts and cards? How would we feel if people decorated, prepared special food, and planned festive gatherings—without including us? None of that makes any sense. And yet, that’s exactly what many of us do every single Christmas. We just leave Jesus out, which is a real shame. After all, it is his birthday.

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Many people will find themselves waking up on December 26, weary and worn with lots of bills to pay and weight to lose. But it doesn’t have to be that way. You see, Christmas was really just the beginning. We only celebrate the cradle because of the cross. We can enjoy all the wonderful things about this season and still keep the Birthday Boy at the center of it all. Here’s how:

§ Use a Nativity scene as a central decoration in your home. Display it where everyone who visits will see it. You could place it where it’s seen as people enter or leave your home, or perhaps on a mantel in the family room. § During December, sing the first verse of a Christmas Carol as grace for your meals. Choices include: Away in a Manger; Hark, the Herald Angels Sing; Silent Night; O Come All Ye Faithful. Pick one, and keep singing it until the whole family knows the words by heart. § During this season most of us spend lots of money on gifts for people we love. Consider spending the same amount (or at least a sizable amount) for those in need. That’s the closest we can get to actually giving Jesus a birthday present. After all, Jesus said if we do something for them, it is the

same as doing something for him. Matthew 25:40 Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me. § Choose Christmas cards that actually convey the real reason for the season. Make sure your notes on those cards do the same: May the Christ Child be born again in your life and in your home. § Take your family to seasonal events that actually focus on the one whose birthday we celebrate. Many local churches offer special opportunities to turn our eyes back to the child born in Bethlehem. § And finally, make this decision: Every holiday decoration I see—no matter how secular or gaudy—will be, for me, a welcome reminder of that sweet savior’s birth.

Those who keep the Birthday Boy at the very center of their celebrations will, at the end of this season, be well on their way to celebrating the even greater things to come. Oh Come let us adore him, Christ the Lord.

Pastor Jan Brittain is the senior pastor at Williamson’s Chapel United Methodist Church at 575 Brawley School Rd., in Mooresville. She is also the 2014 Lake Norman Woman Magazine’s Women of Will Grand Finalist. For service times or more information about Williamson’s Chapel UMC, visit www.willchapumc.org. | DECEMBER 2015

©Andybor | Dreamstime.com


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Available

Available

Sisters Cove - Mooresville

Sisters Cove - Mooresville

New construction - The Olivia 3 BRS/2.5 Baths - 2585 sq. ft.

MLS # 3078084

New construction - The Caroline 3 BRS/2.5 Baths - 4059 sq. ft.

$747,900

MLS # 3092737

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$939,900

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Sisters Cove - Mooresville

Sisters Cove - Mooresville

New Construction - Waterfront. Full Brick 4BRS/4.5 Baths - 2 Master Suites - 5181 sq. ft.

New Construction - Waterfront. Shingle style home 5BRS/4.5Baths - Breathtaking views - 4702 sq. ft.

$1,139,000

$1,222,000

Available

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Falls Cove - Troutman

The last 5 remaining Developer owned home sites. Sites #31, #32, #43, #44, and #61. $40,000 each

The Sanctuary - Charlotte

The last 3 remaining Developer owned home sites in this stunning community. Sites #137, #147, and #150. $64,000 to $70,000

Available

Northview Harbour - Sherrills Ford Developer owned lot with inc. boatslip. Borders common open space. MLS # 3042247

$49,900


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Lake Norman Woman Magazine December 2015  

Lake Norman Woman Magazine December 2015

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