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21st IAKS Congress 2009

Congress papers


21st International IAKS Congress Cologne, 28th to 30th October 2009 Congress Papers


21st IAKS Congress International Congress for the Design, Construction, Modernization and Management of Sports and Leisure Facilities Cologne, 28th to 30th October 2009

Congress organizer IAKS - International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 3 50933 Köln Germany

Patrons Chevalier Dr. Jacques Rogge, President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Sir Philip Craven, President of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) Hein Verbruggen, President of Sportaccord Dr. Wolfgang Schäuble, Federal Minister of the Interior of the Federal Republic of Germany

Cooperation partner International Association of Sport and Leisure Infrastructure Management (IASLIM)

Congress languages English – German – Spanish – Russian

IAKS Congress venue Congress Centre East of Koelnmesse Deutz-Mülheimer Strasse Eastern Halls entrance 50679 Köln-Deutz Germany


Wednesday, 28.10.2009, 2:30 to 5:00 p.m., Offenbachsaal Accessible sports and leisure facilities Chairman: Apostolos Rigas, IPC Head of Paralympic Games Strategic Projects, Greece Universal accessible design for sport: Examples from Beijing 2008 and Vancouver 2010 Ian McKay, Principal, PBK Architects, Canada London 2012: Transport concept and Games mobility Mark Todd, London Organizing Committee of the Olympic Games, United Kingdom Adapted ski resort or ski resort Sylvia Mestre Alexander, IPC Chairperson Alpine Skiing Spain Design concept for an accessible Paralympic tourism, sports and leisure centre Wolfgang Tenhagen, President of RBSV Schleswig-Holstein, Germany John Teunissen, ConeGroup, The Netherlands

Thursday, 29.10.2009, 9:00 to 11:00 a.m., Offenbachsaal Basic provision of sports infrastructure: School sport, sport for all, leisure and trend sports Chairman: Prof. Dr. Giselher Tiegel, Germany Masterplan for physical education and school sports facilities in Spain Jesús del Barrio Diez, Senior Sports consultant, Spain Santiago Ibañez Ruiz, Senior Sports consultant, Spain Development of sports facilities for exercise and fitness Dr. François Vigneau, Consultant architect at the Ministry of Health, Youth and Sport, France Exercise in the modern school: The sports hall of the future Peter-Axel Müller, Graduate sports instructor at the Comenius Grammar School in Dusseldorf, Germany Water adventure installations as urban playgrounds Ulrike Rechler, Dipl.-Ing., Architect, Germany


Thursday, 29.10.2009, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Offenbachsaal Innovative sports and leisure infrastructure in urban development Chairman: Prof. Dr. Heiner Haass, Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Anhalt, Germany Activity inspiring sports architecture: Integrating sports in urban developments Poul Broberg, Secretary to the management at the Danish National Olympic Committee and Sports Confederation, Denmark Innovative concepts for sports and exercise areas in Swiss local districts Martin Strupler-Grötzinger, Architect, sports and PE instructor, Managing Director of Strupler Sport Consulting, Switzerland Harbour pools from Scandinavia to Shanghai: Creating urban activity areas Kai-Uwe Bergmann, Director International Business Development, BIG Bjarke Ingels Group, Denmark

Thursday, 29.10.2009, 3:00 to 5:30 p.m., Offenbachsaal Developing Nations Forum Chairman and introduction: Prof. Carlos Vera Guardia, Architect, California, USA Sustainability and legacy of sports facilities: The day after Fernando Telles, Engineer, Brazil Sports management education and training Nancy C. Gonzalez de Sanoja, Venezuela 30 years of the development of sport and sports facilities in Spain Juan Andrés Hernando López, Architect, Spain Sports for Urban Development (Youth-Led Initiatives for improved livelihoods) Kenneth Kamenchu, United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), Kenya


Friday, 30.10.2009, 9:00 to 11:00 a.m., Offenbachsaal Sports facility sustainability: Ecological, economic and social aspects Chairman: Dr. Julius de Heer, Director, de Heer Consulting, Switzerland Sustainability targets of the IOC Gilbert Felli, Olympic Games Executive Director, International Olympic Committee, Switzerland Planning instruments and evaluation methods for sustainable sports facility construction Natalie Eßig, Dipl.-Ing., Architect, Institute of Building Physics at the Technical University of Munich, Fraunhofer Institute of Building Physics, Germany Low-energy and zero-energy sports halls Christian Lanzinger, Executive Board Member of kplan AG, Germany Cornelia Jacobsen, Hausladen Engineering, Germany Modular structures for major sports events Bernd Helmstadt, Managing Director of NÜSSLI (Germany) GmbH, Switzerland

Friday, 30.10.2009, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Offenbachsaal Stadiums and arenas: Best practices for financing, construction and operation Chairman: Conrad Boychuk, Senior Director of Recreation + Venue Development, CEI Architecture, Executive Board Member of the IAKS, Canada Social and economic sustainability as a basis for successful sports facilities Alessandro Zoppini, Architect, Studio Zoppini Associati, Italy Singapore Sports Hub: Innovative financing and procurement Robin Thompson, Director of pmpLEGACY, London, United Kingdom 12 years of operation of the Max Schmeling Sports Hall in Berlin: Trends in use and costs Prof. Jörg Joppien, Architect, Technical University of Dresden, Germany Integration of stadium projects in real estate development Guido Krüger, Beiten Burkhardt law firm, Germany Stephan Rechten, Beiten Burkhardt law firm, Germany


Friday, 30.10.2009, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Offenbachsaal Staging sports events: Stadiums of the future Chairman: Ian McKenzie, Director of UIA Sports and Leisure Programme, United Kingdom European standards for the design and construction of stadiums Saverio Mandetta, Chairman of CEN-TC 315 Spectator Facilities, Italy Gian-Luca Salerio, Secretary of Chairman of CEN-TC 315 Spectator Facilities Italy The "Accessible Stadium" project in the first Spanish football division PhD Juan Luis Paramio Salcines, Universidad Autónoma Madrid, Spain Sustainable stadiums: Icons of the emotions and economics Dr. Stefan Nixdorf, Architect, agn Niederberghaus & Partner, Germany Stadium concepts for the FIFA Football World Cup 2014 in Brazil PhD Carlos de la Corte, Technical Consultant to the Organizing Committee of FIFA Football World Cup 2014 in Brazil, Brazil

Friday, 30.10.2009, 9:15 to 11:15 a.m., Conference Room 5 Sport and leisure infrastructure education and training programme Special event organised by the IAKS and IASLIM in English only Chairman: PhD René Kural, Architect, Director of Centre for Sports and Architecture at Royal School of Architecture, Denmark International school of sports and leisure infrastructure management Jože Jenšterle, Secretary General of IASLIM, Slovenia SAPCA’s educational programme for the sports facility industry in the UK Christopher Trickey, Chief Executive, SAPCA, United Kingdom "Sports facility management (IST)" distance learning course Michael Wrulich, IST-Sports facility management, Germany


Accessible sports and leisure facilities Chairman Apostolos Rigas IPC Head of Paralympic Games Strategic Projects, Greece

Apostolos Rigas has studied Adapted Physical Activity in the University of Athens and holds a Masters Degree in Sports Management from the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). After a successful career as a coach for athletes with a disability in the national level, he worked as the Athlete Classification Manager at Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games and as the Manager for Paralympic Games Planning at Athens 2004 Paralympic Games. After Athens 2004, Apostolos has been a consultant for the IPC in the area of Paralympic Games Management. Today, he is the Head of Paralympic Games Strategic Projects for the IPC, responsible for managing the development of Paralympic Games organization requirements and guidelines, transfer of knowledge, and IPC’s internal policies and procedures for Games-time operations. In addition he is in charge of special projects such as Paralympic Games evaluation, Paralympic Games impact & legacy, accessibility etc. In 2006 the Hellenic Society of Sports Management in its annual conference declared Apostolos Rigas as the “Sport Manager of the Year 2006”.


Universal accessible design for sport: Examples from Beijing 2008 and Vancouver 2010 Ian McKay Principal, PBK Architects, Canada

Ian McKay is an architect specializing in sports and recreation design as well as designing for the disabled. He is a principal at PBK Architects Inc. based in Vancouver, BC. During his career he has conducted research on a wide variety of disabled sports in North America and worked with disabled advocates on a number of projects. Ian attended the Beijing Paralympics and was involved in the design of 2 facilities for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. He was also involved in designing the first arena in North America to incorporate permanent clear dasher panels and bench areas to accommodate sledge hockey with minimal set up time.


Universal Accessible Design for Sports: Examples from Beijing 2008 and Vancouver 2010 Presenter: Ian McKay The number of disabled athletes is growing at both the recreational/community and competitive/international levels. Disabled codes usually only address the minimum standards for disabled persons in general and not necessarily the needs of a disabled athlete. Recreational/sport facility designers must go well beyond the minimum standards to design a facility that serves the disabled athlete well. Canadian and American building codes have been improved over the years and design solutions that include the disabled are also improving. Building codes describe requirements for universal accessibility but usually only anticipate a small number of disabled in the building at one time and do not address sport specific issues. The Rules of Play for various disabled sports usually focus on the field of play and dressing rooms but there are a number of areas in sports/leisure buildings that are not covered and can affect the success of events. This presentation will highlight some recent Canadian code improvements and areas that ought to be covered in codes/rules of play. The Beijing Paralympics were the first games legally required to conduct disabled sport events in the same facilities as the Olympic Games. Mr. McKay toured these venues during events to gain first-hand knowledge of their accessible features. Vancouver and Whistler have designed and constructed a number of indoor & outdoor facilities/venues for the Vancouver 2010 Paralympic Games and they are readying their cities to receive these athletes and a large number of disabled spectators. The presentation will show events/facilities from Beijing & Vancouver and focus on the design issues for both competitive and community based athletes as well as the design issues within the community to receive the large influx of disabled at one time. This presentation will be an architect’s perspective on what design information still needs to be developed and available so that designers can respond successfully to the issues of disabled athletes. These issues may be of interest to all communities who wish to attract the growing number of disabled sport competitions at national and international levels as well as improve barrier free access for local competitors/spectators.


London 2012: Transport concept and Games mobility Mark Todd London Organizing Committee of the Olympic Games, United Kingdom

Mark Todd is a 45 year old disabled person with over 20 years experience working as an Access Advisor and TV broadcaster. Having played a key role in the disability movement he became the first Access Officer at Manchester City Council before moving into a career in television presenting programmes addressing disability issues. In 1992 he moved back to Manchester to oversee the access programme which became a key success story of the major regeneration of this post industrial city. This important contribution to the regeneration of the City was recognised in 1995 when he received The Mancunian of the Year Award from civic leaders. In 2001 he created “access all areas�, his own access advice consultancy and became the Access Advisor to the 2002 Commonwealth Games. He is currently an advisor to the International Paralympic Committee and also a the London 2012 Olympics.


Attitude over age

Black and Minority Ethnic people

Sexual Orientation

Faith

Gender

Disabled people

Six strands of diversity:

Diversity and Inclusion

Accessibility Manager

Mark Todd

Meeting the Challenge

London 2012

Forum

D&I Sponsors

D&I at LOCOG

WF, PR, SD

areas

All functional

D&I team

Diversity Board

Groups

D&I Working

Action Team

Diversity

Diversity & Inclusion is about creating Everyone’s 2012


Venues – outside London area

VENUES

• Maximum value for money.

• A legacy of accessible facilities and social regeneration for the benefit of disabled people.

• The same level of service in London and around the UK.

• Access provided to all back of house.

• Accessible services for all client groups.

• High quality access to all venues.

What LOCOG needs to deliver

Venues – London area


• Cross strand

• Cover operational solutions

• For all client groups

• Applied in all scenarios

• A living document to be added to and amended

• Standards appropriate for a Games

• High quality access standard

The LOAF

How to lessen risk and meet the challenge?

A range of risks, differing challenges

• Established locations with changed use

• Established venues

• Temporary venues

Access all areas, inc executive boxes, changing rooms, VIP areas

Provision for faith groups Family friendly facilities

Sports presentation for visually impaired people Induction loops for hearing impaired people Easy access seats for ambulant disabled people

Wheelchair spaces to be 1% of all seats for sale Companion seats and Family seats Well located, elevated positions with a good view Wheelchair spaces 1200mm above the seat in front Plentiful accessible toilets Blue Badge parking

Venues for Everyone

• Applicable to all Functional Areas

• Consistent access across all venues

new thinking

previous Games

IPC Technical Manual

existing standards

• In-house document:

• Simple, clear direction

• A virtual lever arch file

A variety of venues, with temporary overlay

• Permanent, purpose built venues

LOCOG Overlay Access File (LOAF)

Accessible Venues


Atkins

Access Consultants

Design Team

Populous

LOCOG

Project Manager

LOCOG’s in-house accessibility service to flag issues

LOCOG’s in-house Design Team for all overlays

Ensure the venue is designed and planned to host the Games

Assess loading times of Paralympic buses for service level plans

Select buses on the basis of ease of conversion

Re-use Olympic fleet during the Paralympic Games

Ensure wheelchair users can travel with non-wheelchair users

Provide flexible seating arrangements

Avoid using minibuses with single tail-lifts

Equalities Customer Care training for all drivers

Games Family Transport Planning and Procurement

To ensure provision is equitable, usable, cost efficient but most importantly enhances the Games’ experience.

To provide advice, prioritise issues and resolve problems

Resolution

Access Manager

Designing in Accessibility

swivel seats

hand-brake extensions

hand controls

Provide vehicles with adaptations:

Recruit volunteer drivers with a disability

vehicles

automotive sponsorship category cannot provide compliant

Use alternative accessible MPV vehicles or minibuses, if the

Games Family Transport Planning and Procurement

GAMES FAMILY TRANSPORT


Games Network of Accessible Transport (GNAT)

Develop new ideas for Games time

Provide accurate information

Invest in transport infrastructure

Identify the gaps

Assess transport close to venues

Maximise accessible provision

Forecast the demand

Promotes an inclusive approach

Focus improvements in one Document

Accessible Transport

Older people

First time visitors

Children

Parents with infants

Disabled people of all impairments

A more accessible transport system for:-

Accessible and Inclusive Public Transport

Accessible Transport Strategy

SPECTATOR TRANSPORT


• Disabled and Deaf people across the UK working with us

• All partners working together to maximise existing resources

• IPC expectations met and integrated into Olympic experience

• Emulating and exceeding experience of previous Games

• Inclusive end-to-end customer experience for the Games

What we want to deliver

Assistance to seat service

Electric buggy transport

Escort service

Free loan of power chairs

Free loan of wheelchairs

GamesMobility Service:

Accessible Transport

Visitor experience - Coordinating an inclusive experience for tourism and accessible related events

Accommodation - Hotel benchmarking scheme

Information, communication, technology - Everyone’s Games, everyone’s message, everyone’s information

Transport - In discussion with TfL and train operators to move from inclusive aspiration to accessible reality

Arrivals and departures - Working with BA to create an exemplary welcome for everybody to the UK

Current Projects

EXTERNAL PARTNERSHIPS


• Significant progress to date

• Aiming high

• Well developed strategies for success

• Identified opportunities

• Identified risks

To Summarise

The official Emblem of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Ltd is protected by copyright. © London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Ltd 2007. All rights reserved.

Thank you


Adapted ski resort or ski resort Sylvia Mestre Alexander Spain

Sylvia Mestre Alexander has made her master in sport nutrition at the Fundación Universitaria Iberoamericana, realised advanced trainings like Management Education at the World Academy of Sports, AISTS Sports Management Seminar for Woman and MIMS on Sport Management at the Cruyff International Academics. After having worked for Prince, S.L and Salomon, S.A. in the marketing sector, she lead her own Ski Camp for five years. Today she works as Technical Director Alpine Skiing for the F.E.D.C – Spanish Federation for the Blind. Apart from that she is manager of the Association Play and Train. From 2002 to 2006 she has been member of the IPC Sports Technical Committee and is now Chairperson of this Committee.


Adapted ski resort or ski resort Presenter: Sylvia Mestre Alexander Overall, as generally defined, disabled people represent a significant proportion of the world's population, and part of the above mentioned proportion practice sport. Accessibility is just as important as the ski lift is for a ski resort. Accessibility is a clear indicator of the “quality� of the ski resort. Accessibility is a characteristic of urbanism design, the buildings, and the transports. Accessibility allows the maximum personal autonomy. Good accessibility is one that exists but goes unnoticed by most users. Accessibility ensures an equal opportunity for all people, including therefore people with a disability. Accessibility can be easily improved without major renovations.


Design concept for an accessible Paralympic tourism, sports and leisure centre Wolfgang Tenhagen President of RBSV Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

Wolfgang Tenhagen is the president of Schleswig-Holstein Federation for Rehabilitation and

Disabled Sports (Germany). Since 1974 he has been a member of the board of managing directors of the Schleswig-Holstein Federation for Rehabilitation and Disabled Sports of which he became chairman in 1994. Furthermore he is vice president of the German Paralympic Committee and supervisory board chairman of a building society in Schleswig-Holstein.


Design concept for an accessible Paralympic tourism, sports and leisure centre Presenter: Wolfgang Tenhagen

Conclusions on market trends On the basis of everything that has been said and analysed in the preceding paragraphs, the following conclusions can be drawn (no order of preference): 1. In Germany there are 89,000 sports clubs in operation with roughly 24 million members. In Schleswig-Holstein there are 2,692 clubs with a total of 885,256 members. 2. The regional, national and international disabled sports and Paralympic organizations have indicated that there is explicit demand for a Paralympic Centre which should provide not only barrier-free overnight accommodation but also tourist leisure opportunities. 3. Rehabilitations- und Behinderten-Sportverband Schleswig-Holstein e.V. (SchleswigHolstein Rehabilitation and Disabled Sports Association), Deutsche Behindertensportverband e.V. (German Disabled Sports Association), the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), international sports federations (ISFs) and Bundesverband der Volkssolidarit채t (Federal Social Welfare Association) have stated that they will make use of the barrier-free sports and tourism facilities being realized in connection with the Kappeln Project. 4. The market territory on which the Paralympic part of the Kappeln Project is concentrating consists of the regional (northern German), national (German) and international Paralympic (sports) market (IPC and its 160 member countries). 5. The Kappeln Project can play an important part as a (pre-)Paralympic training, competition and/or congress centre and has the potential for recognition as a (national and possibly international) Paralympic aquatic sports centre. 6. Preliminary studies have shown that there is interest in the Kappeln Project among sports organizations in Schleswig-Holstein and the immediate vicinity of SchleswigHolstein. 7. The primary market territory, suitable particularly for short holidays, has a total population of 7.8 million. The market territory as a whole (suitable for long holidays) has a population of about 24.2 million (including Denmark). 8. 30 per cent of the population in the market territory are 25 to 45 years old and 26 per cent 45 to 65. The percentage of older people will grow considerably in the market territory in the coming decades. 9. The primary and secondary market territory has a total disabled population of 625,000, with a total of about 2 million in the tertiary market territory. Roughly 67 per cent of this group are people with a physical disability.


10. The primary and secondary market territory is host to 0.2 million disabled holidaymakers, of whom 0.4 million take short holiday trips (1.45 million holiday days per year). The tertiary market territory is host to 1.05 million disabled holidaymakers, of whom 0.56 million take long holidays in their own country (7.83 million holiday days per year). 11. The total market territory is host to 1.25 million disabled holidaymakers, who take 9.28 million days of holiday per year. 12. People with disabilities mainly make use of the off-peak season. Very popular are the months of May, September and October. 13. Barrier-free tourism still has untapped customer potential in the German tourism sector. Roughly 40 per cent of people with a disability do not go on holiday because there are no suitable offers. Over 48 per cent of people expressed their wish to travel frequently if more barrier-free facilities were available. 14. Barrier-free tourism is of interest not only for people with disabilities, since 30 to 35 per cent of the overall (German) population benefit from barrier-free tourism. In the primary and secondary market territory, these are over 2.7 million people with a further roughly 8.5 million people in the tertiary territory. 15. It has been shown that disabled flats are the key to the choice of travel destination. And not only the travel destination itself, but also the periphery (arrival and departure, leisure opportunities such as excursions) should be barrier-free. 16. In the investigation of this issue, it has been shown that there are three main obstacles that prevent the existing supply (activities, travel destination) from satisfying demand (people with disabilities). These are psychological barriers, inadequate communication and poor coordination and organization. 17. Barrier-free travel opportunities in Schleswig-Holstein and the immediate area are limited. 18. Trends in tourist leisure Germany-wide are stable. 19. All Germans spend a relatively large amount of holidays in their own country. Schleswig-Holstein ranks as the third most popular holiday region in their country. 20. Health/spa and wellness trips come third and fourth and together make up a third (33 per cent) of the desired forms of travel. 21. In the primary and secondary market territory there are 2.93 million holidaymakers. These people take a total of 5.06 million long holidays and spend 18.21 million days of holiday in their own country. In the tertiary market territory there are 18.02 million holidaymakers. These people take a total of 7.48 million holidays and 82.23 million holiday trips in their own countries, which amount to 82.23 million days of holiday. 22. The number of holiday parks in Germany is much lower than in the Netherlands. In the market territory, there is much less competition than on the Dutch market.


23. In the immediate vicinity (10 km) there is one park concentrating mainly on rehabilitation. There is also a holiday park 70 km away with comprehensive facilities. 24. In the North Sea region and on the island of R端gen, the number of holiday parks is higher compared to Schleswig-Holstein. Schleswig-Holstein is more popular as an inland holiday region than the North Sea region and the island of R端gen. 25. Various Dutch companies are planning to create holiday parks in the north of Germany. 26. The IPC and DBS have indicated that the opportunities provided by a Paralympic Academy with overnight accommodation (hotel and hotel apartments) and sports and leisure opportunities are explicitly desired and considered necessary. 27. There is mention of sufficient market potential for a barrier-free Paralympic and tourist centre.


Design concept for an accessible Paralympic tourism, sports and leisure centre John Teunissen ConeGroup, The Netherlands

John Teunissen is a developer and manager for sport and leisure facilities in Germany, Netherlands and some other european countries. In addition he gives advice in term of sport and leisure facilities to some communities in the Netherlands an also in Germany. Since 27 years he is working with national and international organisations for disabled sports. Since 10 years he is a member of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC). Since 2006 he is the chairman of the International Wheelchair Amputee Sport Federation (IWAS) and therefore responsible for the international electronic wheelchair-hockey. Due to his expericences he developed a project named “Kappeln-Ellenberg�.


•Betreibung (ConeVerwaltung GmbH)

•Integrale Entwicklung (ConeEntwicklung Gmbh)

Tätig in 2 Bereichen des Sports und der Freizeit

Unternehmensprofil ConeGroup

John Teunissen

Barrierefreie Sport- und Freizeitanlagen

Anzahl der Mitarbeiter

Anzahl der Fazilitäten

Anzahl der Betriebe

Entwicklungsprojekte

Kennzahlen ConeGroup

Gebiet des Sports und der Freizeit.

275

33

10

7

und Verwaltung von Einrichtungen auf dem

Spezialisiert auf die Entwicklung, Realisierung


Zahl 7 4 4 1 3 1 3 10 33

Projekt: Marum (Live-Style Centre Marum)

Einrichtungen Schwimmbäder Freibäder Sporthalle (inkl. Eventhalle) Judoraum Fitness- und Sauna Squash (3 Bahnen) Tagung/Kulturzentren (inkl. Theater) Gastronomie Gesamt

Übersicht Einrichtungen

Projekt: Insell Schiermonnikoog

Projekt: Prerow (Sole-Thermal/Wellness/Hotel)


(Schleswig-Holstein)

Tourismuszentrum Kappeln

Projekt (barrierefreies) Sport- und

Projekt: Schrattenberg (Ă–)/Valtice (Tj)

Kappeln in Schleswig-Holstein

Beispiele von Cone Betrieben


Marktgebiet

----- = Grenze Reisedauer < 2 Stunden ----- = Grenze Reisedauer < 3 Stunden ----- = Grenze Reisedauer < 5 Stunden

Das (barrierefreie) S&T Zentrum ist ein breit getragene Entwicklung

 Stadt Kappeln und das Land SH unterstützen das Projekt  Grundstucksankauf und Fördermitteln sind gesichert

 wir entwickelten ein Nachnutzungskonzept  es beinhaltet die Realisierung eines (barrierefreien) S&T Zentrums

 Bundeswehr beschloss Militärstüzpunkte zu schliessen  MWS Kappeln (27 ha) wurde bis 2003 genutzt

Hintergrund des Projekts

Wir sehen für das S&T Zentrum die gute Möglichkeit, eine hervorragende Position sowohl im (barrierefreien) Sportmarkt, als im Tourismus- und Freizeitmarkt zu erwerben

Aussichten

Faszilitäten

(barrierefreie)

Vorhandene


Altersgliederung

Wirtschaft

Trends Sozial-Kulturell

1. ein (paralympisches) Sportsegment 2. ein Tourismussegment

Technologie

Marktkategorien (barrierefreies) S&T Zentrum

Marktpositionierung

Zielsetzung ZielsetzungVermarktung Vermarktung - -Arrangementangebot Arrangementangebot - -Gruppenangebote Gruppenangebote - -kundenorientierte kundenorientierte Vorgehensweise Vorgehensweise

Sportsegment

(barrierefreies)

- Sportanlagen - Tagungs-/Kongress-Räume - Entertainmentfaszilitäten - Hotelappartements

Vermietung

- 220 Hotelappartments - Hotel (max. 40 Zimmer) - 4 – 20 Pers. Appartments - 75% davon barrierefrei

Vermietung

Tourismus

(barrierefreier)

- Familen (mit Kindern) - Familienaussflüge - (Freundes-)Gruppen - Einzelpersonen

Akquisition/Zielgruppe

Sportsegment

Zielsetzung ZielsetzungVermarktung Vermarktung -Arrangement -Arrangement(Gruppen) (Gruppen) - -Tagungen Tagungen(mehrtägige) (mehrtägige) -(Sport) Veranstaltungen -(Sport) Veranstaltungen übrige übrigeMöglichkeiten Möglichkeiten

- Sportverbände/-vereine - RBSV-SH/DBS/IPC - Organisationen/verbände - Markteting

Akquisition/Zielgruppe

Sportsegment

- Erlebnis-Schwimmbad - Wellness/Fitnes/Health - Wassersport/Tennis/Sport - Erlebnisplätze/3D-Kino usw.

Produkten

- Schwimmbecken (25 m) - Sporthalle, Outdoor-Tennis - Wassersport-/leichtathletikanlage usw.

Produkte


Hauptzielsetzungen

George Bernard Shaw

Ich träume von Dingen, die es noch nie gegeben hat und frage: Warum nicht?

Manche Menschen sehen die Dinge, wie sie sind, und fragen: Warum?

 Übernachtungszahl beträgt 177.532 p.a (64% Auslastung)  Gesammtinvestition € 35 Mio. (ohne MwSt)  Zugesagte Förderung € 8.8 Mio. (ohne MwSt)

 mit der Stadt Kappeln werden Vereinbarungen getroffen  das Land muß die Fördermitteln zur Verfügung stellen

 das Zentrum wird Eigentum einer Investitionsgesellschaft  die Sport-/Freizeitanlagen werden von Cone betreiben  der Betrieb der Hotelappartments wird verpachtet

Wirtschaftliche Hauptzielsetzungen


Basic provision of sports infrastructure: School sport, sport for all, leisure and trend sports Chairman Prof. Dr. Giselher Tiegel Germany

In the year 1965 Giselher Tiegel began his first study at the German Sports University in Cologne and completed his degree as a diplom sports instructor. Additionally he studied at the same time anglistics at the University of Cologne. Afterwards in 1968 he studied for a second time at the Birmingham University as a DAAD-foundationer. Since 1971 he was working as a lecturer at the DSHS Cologne. In 1976 he became professor at Duisburg University and in 1992 at D端sseldorf University. In year 2008 he retired from his active career.


Masterplan for physical education and school sports facilities in Spain Jesús del Barrio Diez Senior Sports consultant, Spain

Jesús del Barrio Díez is working in the National Sport Council in Madrid as senior consultant. He is a degreed architect and has been working as a freelancer and in cooperation with engineers in several projects. He became vice-director of sports infrastructures in the National Sports Council in order to implement the education plan. Since then he has developed this educational plan in the regions of Murcia and Extremadura. Additionally Jesús del Barrio Díez coordinates about 14.000 m² of swimming pool and gymnasium area in the CAR in Madrid, and he is also the coordinator of the Spanish working committee for the European Committee of Standardisation CEN 315. He is actively cooperating with Latin American countries and speaker in conferences organised by the IAKS Section Latin America and Caribbean, the Andalusian Sports Institute, the Council of Castilla y León and Extremadura.


Masterplan for physical education and school sports facilities in Spain Santiago Ibañez Ruiz Senior Sports consultant, Spain

th

Santiago Ibañez Ruiz is coordinator of the 4 National Survey of sports facilities in Spain in the CSD and coordinator of the poll of the sportive habits of the Spanish population. He has studied Chemistry in the University of Oviedo in Spain and collected afterwards eleven years of working experiences as teacher and director of the didactical seminar in the MEC. In 1988 he became coordinator of the education programme in the CSD (MEC) and as well of nd rd the 2 and 3 National Survey of sports facilities in Spain. He is author of various articles and conferences and has already been speaker in numerous seminars about sports infrastructure in Spain, France, Bolivia and Guatemala as well as speaker in professional trainings at the Universities of Extremadura, Madrid and Córdoba.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES.

AND

SCHOOL

SPORTS

Speech to be made by Mr. Santiago IBÁÑEZ RUIZ and Jesús del BARRIO DÍEZ, from the Spanish High Council for Sport, at the 21st IAKS Congress, which is scheduled to take place in Cologne, Germany, from 28th to 30th October 2009 In 1988, the Ministry of Education and Science (present-day Ministry of Education) and the High Council for Sport (at the time an autonomous body seconded to the Ministry of Culture) launched a Plan, the full name of which was the Plan for the Extension of Physical Education and School Sport in Non-University Teaching Centres. It was commonly referred to as the School Plan, because of its direct relation to the location of the facilities. This important project allowed to equip many public Primary and Secondary schools (at the time called EGB, BUP and FP centres) with the necessary resources for them to teach curricular Physical Education and contribute towards creating the habit of practising sport, thus increasing the quality of teaching in general and of public teaching in particular.

AIMS Four main aims were pursued: 1. To meet the need for sporting facilities in public schools where they were lacking or clearly insufficient. In this regard, agreements were entered into by the various Autonomous Communities and Cities to which competencies on educational matters had not been transferred, on the one hand, and the High Council for Sport, on the other. Of the total of 19 Autonomous Communities and Cities in Spain, the following signed the agreement: Asturias, Cantabria, La Rioja, Navarre, Castile and Leon, Aragon, the Balearic Islands, Extremadura, Madrid, Castile La Mancha, Ceuta, Melilla and Murcia. Agreements were also entered into with the City Corporations of Zaragoza and Palma de Mallorca. In total, 15 agreements were signed. 2. To build dual-use facilities. This means that while the facilities are preferably for use by schoolchildren, they are also used by the general public in the surrounding area. All of the facilities are dualuse since the Plan was launched and they are co-funded by the local corporations. Generally speaking, for municipal corporations, the Plan represented an excellent opportunity to meet a double demand: that of the schools and that of the population. With a financial contribution that is almost always lower than 40% of the total cost of the work, the local governments undertook to guarantee that the facilities would never be infra-used, in line with the philosophy of the Plan. The facilities are of various sizes depending on the number of pupils for which they have to cater, ranging from an open-air court measuring 22x44 with two dressingrooms to pavilions measuring 27x45 m with four dressing-rooms. Sometimes in schools in which there were not many pupils, large facilities are built at the request of the municipalities, which fund the extra part in full. 3. To provide the specialised teachers that are necessary for both Primary and


Secondary Education. This specialisation was achieved by holding various courses taught by the various Physical Education departments in the universities. The courses were taught to Primary teachers and the duration was 500 hours. 4. To provide sports materials to the schools associated to the sporting facilities that are built. With a view to attaining the minimum necessary equipment and thereby make the practice of Physical Education more feasible, the Ministry of Education and Culture completed the movable or perishable sports equipment existing in the schools.

RESULTS The results to be highlighted are as follows: 1. Investment The investment made by all of the administrations is summarised in the following table: In millions of â&#x201A;Ź

%

Total

539.88

100

CSD (High Council for Sport)

239.16

44.3

Autonomous Community governments

150.63

27.9

Local corporations

150.09

27.8

This great financial effort was made possible because of the participation of various Administrations: the State administration, through the High Council for Sport (CSD); the Autonomous Community and local administrations, among which the role of the Local Corporations is notable, although in some cases provincial or island councils also took part. The CSD (High Council for Sport) is the institution that provided the most funding to the School Plan, covering 44.3% of the total investment made. After the CSD (High Council for Sport), the contributions made by the Autonomous Community governments and Local Corporations stand at a similar level: 27.9 and 27.8%. Average expenditure in euros per inhabitant Total

30

The ratio of euros invested per inhabitant, 30, allows to establish a comparison between different territories, whereas in some it was 70 and in others, 20 euros. 2. Facilities built CSD (High Council for Sport)

A.C.

TOTAL

Plan Total

641

834

1.475

%

43.46

56.54

100

The almost 540 million euros invested by the School Plan means that each


facility cost on average 366,000 euros. The Plan was highly profitable because it catered for almost 1,600 schools. Average schools using scheduled facilities Autonomous Communities Melilla Ceuta Murcia Extremadura Castile La Mancha La Rioja Balearic Islands Cantabria Aragon Madrid Asturias Castile Leon Navarre

0.00

0.20

0.40

0.60

0.80

1.00

1.20

1.40

1.60

1.80

The scheduled facilities can cater for more than one school, which means that the impact of the Plan on the educational system as whole is increased. Navarre and Castile & Leon are the regions where better use of the scheduled facilities is made, as they cover approximately 50% more schools. The roofed facility with dressing-rooms was built in 72.7% of cases and the unroofed facility represents 27.3% of the total facilities built. Therefore, the majority of the investment effort in the School Plan was made in the roofed facilities.


Types of new facilities that are most represented in the School Plan as a whole (%)

Roofed pavilion Roofed multi-sport court with dressing-rooms 22x 44 Dressing-rooms Roofed pavilion

15 x 27

Roofed pavilion

27 x 45

Roofed pavilion

19 x 32

Roofed multi-sports court 22 x 44 Roofed pavilion

22 x 44 with stands

Roofed pavilion

10 x 24

Roofed pavilion

22 x 44

Multi-sports court 22 x 44 0.00

2.00

4.00

6.00

8.00

10.00

12.00

14.00

16.00

18.00

The School Plan was especially relevant in rural areas, where 37.4% of the facilities that were built were located. Moreover, semi-urban areas accounted for a further third of the facilities (33.1%), leaving municipalities with over 50 thousand residents with the lowest percentage representation (29.5%). These figures mean that the logic of the institutional action in this case was inversely related to the population distribution, with rebalancing effects benefiting the most disadvantaged areas, which often see how the bulk of public investments go towards meeting the needs of the urban population. Urban % facilities

Total

29.5

Semi-urban % pop.

55.2

% facilities

33.1

Rural

% pop.

25.7

% facilities

% pop.

37.4

3. Mixed Commissions The Mixed Commissions are paritary meetings whose formation is formalised at the time of signing of the Agreement between the Ministry of Education and Culture and the Autonomous Communities for carrying out the School Plan. Despite the difficulties encountered and from the perspective of institutional analysis, roll-out of the Plan constituted good practice in aspects like coordination between the various players involved (fundamentally between different levels in the Administration and between areas in the various regional Administrations), the leveraging of the financial, material and human resources provided by various Administrations and the innovation, creativity and flexibility that are necessary in order to deal with exceptions and conflicts, as well as, in general, the goodwill of the majority of the Administrations that were committed to the Plan. 4. Schools

19.1


Beneficiary schools, according to educational levels (%) IES (Secondary) schools

Others 1%

21%

Public schools 78%

Just over three-quarters of the schools that benefited from the School Plan are Primary Education schools (78.2%), while Secondary Education Institutions (IES) account for 20.7%. This pattern is repeated in all regions. 5. Pupils In relative terms, the facilities that were built benefited a significant portion of the pupils in the affected Autonomous Communities, almost reaching half of them (49.8%), i.e., over 700,000. 6. Teachers hired Another aspect of interest to the School Plan was to provide public schools with teachers specialising in the subject of Physical Education. Until the year 1992, after which there are no figures in this regard, 6,011 had been hired. These figures are considerably higher than the initial expectations of the School Plan, with 70% more contracts than the figure that was considered a priori, which is very significant if we bear in mind that the available data are dated from the year 1992. 7. Use of sports facilities in schools. There is no doubt that the activities to which the schools give priority in the use of proprietary facilities are those of a sporting nature. School sporting and extracurricular non-sporting activities are more implemented in schools located in urban residential areas. As regards the average number of hours per week invested in each of these activities, it may be seen that the majority are dedicated to curricular Physical Education activities (on average 26 hours), followed by non-school sporting


activities (almost 13 hours on average). These figures are followed at a distance by those for school sport (8 hours), extracurricular non-sporting activities (slightly more than 5 hours) and non-sporting school activities (over 4 hours). a) Curricular physical education activities Considerable progress has been recorded in the use of proprietary facilities for curricular Physical Education activities, compared to the situation recorded in the study on this issue carried out in the year 2000 (11 percent that did not use them, compared to over 1 percent in 2005). The figures on the use that is made of the facilities for curricular Physical Education activities are very similar. However, it should be pointed out that as regards the number of hours dedicated to this activity, that almost 80% of Infant and Primary Education Centres (CEIP) and Grouped Rural Centres (CRA) dedicate less than 25 hours, while over 77% of IES (Secondary Schools) are over 25 hours per week. The number of teachers does not appear to be a problem for carrying out the curricular activities: almost 90 percent of centres consider that the number of teachers is sufficient. b) School sport Implementation of school sport is considerable in the centres: 63.1 percent of centres included in the survey use their facility for these activities. In cases in which the facilities are not used for school sport activities, the fundamental reasons provided are most of all that nobody proposed that they should be practised. As regards the organisation of this type of activity, the local corporation is still the player with the most important role. A greater effort needs to be made to ensure that these school sporting activities are accompanied by the formation of some kind of school sporting association. This only happens in 17.2% of cases, with a slightly higher percentage in the case of the IES (secondary schools). c) Non-school sporting activities Over half of the centres surveyed carry out non-school sporting activities in their facilities. It is the local corporation that is mostly responsible for these activities, either on an exclusive basis or along with local associations. AVERAGE OR PREDOMINANT VALUE IN SAMPLE AS A WHOLE Use for curricular P.E. activities

98.1%

Use for school sport

63.12%

Use for non-school sporting activities

61.1%

Use for school non-sporting activities

27.8%

Use for extracurricular non-sporting activities

26.9%

8. Use of municipal sports facilities


As we have commented previously, the distance between the schools and the municipal facilities constitutes one of the main factors for explaining lack of use. As provided in the Plan, this distance should not be more than 150 metres.

Use of facilities

municipal

Distance between the municipal facility and the school

AVERAGE OR PREDOMINANT VALUE IN THE SAMPLE AS A WHOLE

TYPE OF SCHOOL WITH HIGHEST VALUES

61.6%

IES (Secondary School)

(- 150 metres) 47.5%

Negligible differences

9. Agreements on use and management The Agreements on Use and Management create the Local Commissions on Use and Management, which are in charge of regulating the functioning of the facilities and dealing with the managerial and maintenance problems that occur in the day-today running. In the process of implementation of the Plan, as we shall see later on, mostly due to the failure to constitute or to the limited continuity of this structure for social participation, various problems have arisen about the use that is made of the facilities. The most common were related to overlapping of the schedules for school and non-school use, insufficient surveillance, maintenance and cleanliness at facilities and the unilateral management by the Local Corporation of the cession and/or dynamisation of the facility outside school hours. The Commissions on Use and Management were designed as the operational tool that would develop one of the main aspirations of the School Plan, such as the community use of the sports facilities built under the auspices of this ambitious project. 10. Assessment of the School Plan. However, it seems evident that those that are familiar with the Plan consider it to be quite positive in general terms. The most favourable opinions are those of the CEIP and the CRA, centres located in vulnerable neighbourhoods and the communities of Navarre and La Rioja - which, as you may remember, have registered good results in many of the issues that we have analysed and demonstrate the highest level of knowledge of the Plan. The School Plan seems to have had a very different impact depending on the type of area in which the school is located, judging by the opinions of interviewees. Thus, for example, as regards the facilities, the School Plan was more effective in urban residential surroundings. On the other hand, the usefulness of the Plan in addressing the needs for sporting materials is particularly evident in neighbourhoods that are vulnerable or that have problems of social marginalisation. In the rural setting, the efficiency of the Plan has basically helped to improve staffing levels. Infant and primary education schools are overall more satisfied with the usefulness and efficiency of the School Plan, which is logical if we remember that they are precisely the ones that are its main beneficiaries, to the detriment to the IES (Secondary Schools). In the light of the global assessment, it may be said that eight (8) points have been


achieved to a satisfactory level, while two (2), i.e. the agreements on the use and management and the facilities located at a distance of over 150 m are less satisfactory. In the former case, as they have not been deployed in some of the centres, some of the problems between the various user sectors have not been dealt with and in the latter case, because they are not used for Physical Education.

ARCHITECTONIC SOLUTION FOR THE SCHOOL PLAN. The architectonic response to the needs of the Plan was agreed upon by the education secretariat, in the case of gymnasiums only for schoolchildren and the CSD sport secretariat in the case of facilities with the possibility of school and non-school use for regulated indoor sports. The final solution by the Ministry of Education has allowed for polyvalent facilities for dual use, by schools and for non-school sport. 1. First architectonic developments. The initial design of the school gymnasium, school facility to the neighbourhood facility, started with a module defined by the size of the dressing-room. School gymnasiums M-1 and M-2 are obtained on the basis of two dressing-rooms and by increasing the room size. The M-3 gymnasium is obtained with two identical dressing-rooms, a storeroom, a machines room and a distributing hall. M-3 A court measuring 15x27. M-3 B court measuring 19x32. M-3 C court measuring 22x44. In the case of B and C, there is the possibility of fixed stands, called M-3 Bg and M3 Cg. There are four team dressing-rooms, dressing-rooms for referees, a first-aid room, a gymnasium, a store-room, a machines room and a hall with restrooms for spectators. M-4 and M-4-G are obtained, with moveable or fixed stands respectively. There are also multi-sports courts and separate dressing-rooms for these courts, as well as roofs for multi-sports courts. 2. Prefabricated concrete projects. The first interventions were with projects of the prefabricated concrete type. The idea was to roll out a massive plan with an industrialised system. The reality was that the manufacturing deadlines and the distance between the sites where the work was being done led to major delays in deployment and did not reduce costs. In some cases, they were changed to more traditional systems of metallic structures and brickwork. 3. Standard projects by the High Council for Sport (CSD). The standard projects carried out subsequently by the Architecture Area in the CSD (High Council for Sport) with external engineering were aimed at creating buildings that would be functionally correct as regards accesses, dressing-room layout, facility design with no dangerous elements, good surfaces for the practice of sport, adequate natural and non-glare lighting. Ventilation in the dressing-rooms and facility would


have to be correct, with natural resources and mechanical ventilation. There would also be anti-vandalism solutions in the layout and as regards the benches in the dressing-rooms, hooks, showers, toilets, etc. The aim was to obtain buildings that would be easy to maintain and cost-effective to run. The aesthetic result depended on adaptation by the project management, but always with the limitations of a highly utilitarian architecture. The construction system was traditional with a metallic structure in the buildings up to M-3 and concrete pillars and steel trusses in the M-4. The enclosure was with brickwork, the most generalised system in Spain. Its design was updated three times, incorporating improvements in facilities for use by the disabled. Improvements in facility ventilation and acoustic conditioning. This project was made available to Local Corporations requesting it as a functional guide and with materials that are suitable for facilities to be used by schools and for non-school use. They are still valid for subsidies that promote the construction of polyvalent school buildings. 4. Standard projects in collaboration with Ensidesa. In a collaboration project carried out on a joint basis with the technical department of ENSIDESA blast furnaces, projects were carried out with metallic structures and enclosures with a concrete base and insulated metal panels. The structural solutions were interesting. The maintenance and durability of the enclosure were more difficult. 5. Special projects. When the development of the Plan allowed for a more prolonged process, orders were placed with a very extensive group of architects. In this case, the projects were based on diagrams or functional ideas provided in a design guide and were of a more personal nature, in response to peculiarities of the surroundings or the particular architectonic schools. The aesthetic and functional results were tailored to meet needs. On the basis of the programme defined by the Local Corporation Plan, it could finance extensions to the programme, include fixed stands or a fronton wall in the facility, etc. Some designs had functional and maintenance defects. Others exceeded the budgetary limits that had been allocated to these works. The timeframes for deployment are extended by solutions that are not well-defined. These are some of the disadvantages that were reported. In other cases, they involved the integration of existing dressing-rooms or classrooms, combining with the natural tree elements on school yards, making the most of the scarce metres available to create very good solutions. 6. Functionality of buildings constructed. The buildings that demonstrated the worst results for use are the free-standing dressing-rooms for multi-sport courts. Their free-standing location without continuous use and supervision means that they are very vulnerable to vandalism. The result is that in a very short time they are in a very poor state of repair. The sporting functionality of the multi-sport court that is roofed but not closed is


very poor. We do not have an area that is protected from the wind, sideways, sand, etc. This means that an adequate surface for sport cannot be installed. With a little more money, it could be closed and then we would have a venue that would be protected from the elements. The type of pavilion that is extendable by modules, for example a facility measuring 15x27 that is to be transformed into a facility measuring 45x27, turned out to be very negative. The experience of extending a pavilion of these characteristics turned out to be very expensive. The ground surface is destroyed, while the damage caused and the fact that sporting activities have to be halted mean that this type of planning is not recommended. Buildings cannot be cut like pieces of cake. The best way to construct a building in stages is to finance the investment and do it in a single stage. If this is not possible, it is better to build the structure and the full enclosure and then improve the finishings, such as the ground surface for the practice of sport, or doing the dressing-rooms separately, etc. In the case of school facilities and neighbourhood facilities, the use of which is shared with residents, conservation is better than if they were exclusively for the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s benefit, as well as the fact that better use is made of them. Their use for municipal leagues means that the local corporations keep them in good condition. It must be said that the worst conserved building is one that is not used. In this case, no money is allocated for its maintenance. The worst case that I have seen is that of a facility for use exclusively by schoolchildren, which was destroyed by the latter and subsequently abandoned by the local corporation to the onslaught of leaks and damp. Regular inspection in the years following construction allows us to assess the result of the design and the materials that are used. This is how we have seen the problems with the light fittings, the carpentry that is damaged by damp, the worktops in restrooms that suffer deterioration or which have been incorrectly fixed in place.

CONTINUITY OF THE SCHOOL PLAN EXPERIENCE. The Autonomous Communities in Spain have competencies in the area of sport and education. This work, which meets the need to optimise public investments, is being and will go on to be continued in communities that are sensitive to these approaches. The small municipalities are the ones that are most in need of addressing their school sport and other sporting facilities with multi-purpose buildings. The Urban Plan should define the integration of sporting and school areas in order to facilitate the use of sporting facilities by pupils during school-hours. To promote the regular practice of sport and associative movements is a means for integrating citizens. It was a worthwhile experience and others will continue this work or reinvent it in the future.


1,564,093.77 1,633,553.79

768,654.83

853,038.56

1,073,602.82

SCHOOL FACILITYM-3bg

SCHOOL FACILITYM-3c

SCHOOL FACILITYM-3cg

MULTI-SPORTS COURTM-4 1,517,247.62

MULTI-SPORTS COURTM- 1,592,309.33 4g

868,301.69

778,671.84

644,721.17

1,583,234.79

1,511,600.18

1,069,414.80

849,313.19

766,356.74

633,045.08

428,456.42

321,758.02

T: 30 t/m2

1,674,888.77

1,585,275.22

1,173,363.27

877,879.82

796,031.47

660,881.38

443,415.77

330,950.75

EARTHQUAKE (T: 20 t/m2)

1,616,195.94

1,539,765.31

1,090,129.29

866,475.77

781,226.00

648,591.23

441,767.75

331,731.26

GAS-OIL

1,607,354.55

1,530,962.50

1,082,096.91

858,312.23

772,780.64

640,246.54

433,240.54

323,574.12

NATURAL GAS

HEATING ON COURT

22,313.13

22,313.13

14,010.26

13,782.25

13,782,25

13,785.25

13,785.25

13,447.75

SOLAR ENERGY INCREMENT

12

12

11

9

8

8

6

6

TIMEFRAME FOR DEPLOYMENT( months)

The “Solar Energy Increment” refers to the installation of solar collectors on the dressing-room roof and an accumulator tank for hot water.

No.: 22

No.: 22

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PRICE REVIEW(For mula)

11

Madrid 13th July 2009

The “Heating on court” estimate includes foundations for plots with resistance 20 T/m2, hot water in showers and gas-oil or natural gas heating in the dressing-rooms and on the court.

The “Earthquake” estimate includes a structure that is earthquake-resistant, foundations for plots with resistance 20 T/m2, hot water in showers and gas-oil heating only in dressing-rooms

The “T: 30 T/m2” estimate includes foundations for plots with resistance 30 T/m2, hot water in showers and gas-oil heating only in dressing-rooms.

The “T: 10 T/m2” estimate includes foundations for plots with resistance 10 T/m2, hot water in showers and gas-oil heating only in dressing-rooms.

The “No variations” estimate includes foundations for plots with resistance 20 T/m2, hot water in showers and gas-oil heating only in dressing-rooms.

In each Sports Module:

1,094,350.93

633,045.08

SCHOOL FACILITYM-3b

436,140.43

431,214.77

SCHOOL FACILITYM-3a

324,482.32

322,096.60

T: 10 t/m2

GYMNASIUMM-2

NO VARIATIONS (T: 20 t/m2)

STANDARD SPORTS CONTRACT ESTIMATE in euros (€)(including 16% V.A.T.) MODULES BY THE C.S.D.( High Council for Sport)(2002)


Development of sports facilities for exercise and fitness Dr. François Vigneau Consultant architect at the Ministry of Health, Youth and Sport, France

Dr. François Vigneau graduated at the Ecole d’Architecture of Toulouse/France in 1988 with his diploma in architecture (DPLG). In 2006, he achieved his doctor title for geography and urban planning at the University of Toulouse with his thesis “Sports centres and urban planning”. He took up his main profession as consultant architect in 1991 working at the Sports Facilites Bureau of the Ministry of Health, Youth and Sport in Paris/France. Since 1998 he is associate professor at the Institut Universitaire Professionnalisé of the Université d’Evry-Val d’Essonne/France. Since December 2008 he acts as Deputy Secretary General of the French Athletic Federation. Dr. François Vigneau wrote numerous publications and papers about topics such as facilities for athletic training, women and sport, sustainable facility management and the environmental quality of sports facilities. Being an active player of rugby and basketball as well as being an athlete, he also gained experience as physical trainer and deputy manager of Basketball teams in the 1980es.


DEVELOPING SPORTS FACILITIES FOR SPORT AND HEALTH or DEVELOPING SPORTS FACILITIES FOR EXERCISE AND FITNESS Presenter: VIGNEAU François Emmanuel From facilities for sports to facilities for sportsmen. For a long time, sports facilities have been identified in a single question: what sports do we practice there? Thus football grounds, sports halls, swimming pools… are constructed. This design was adapted to the Sixties when mainly teens and young adult male, through clubs and competitions, practiced the “sport for the masses”. But since the last third of the twentieth century, sportsmen are more diverse: more young people, adults and senior citizens, women . . . Their practices are also more diverse, not only in terms of sports but also in terms of motivations. So the competition is no longer the only goal. The objectives of the sportsmen are now as : relaxation, contact with nature, extreme thrills and above all, form, well-being and health. The traditional facilities are not suitable for these new targets of practice and saying “who can the more can the less” is wrong. In France, since the early Sixties, the ministry of sports, often drawing in foreign experiences, proposed new types of sports facilities for relaxation, (base of leisure and outdoor sports, leisure pools, multisports playgrounds) and health (fitness track). In the automobile field, a car is no longer choose according to their brand and speed. Manufacturers have developed ranges according to the principal use of vehicles: urban, family, long distances, utility, sports, mountain… In the same way, sports should be defined by their function according to the objectives: show, performance, form, pleasure, extreme thrills, contact with the nature… Thus it should be logical to move from facilities for sports to facilities for sportsmen. Facilities for sport and health. Generally the notion of sport-health is associated with sports that appeal mainly to aerobic processes, developing cardio-vascular activity with light intensity and little traumatic for the tendons, joints and muscles: jogging, walking, cycling, swimming, fitness… Spaces that allow the practice of these activities are mostly traditional sports facilities (swimming pools, fitness rooms…), or well known for many years, particularly in Germany (bicycle). In contrast, the running and the Nordic walking are practiced on different types of spaces that are not always suitable (stadium, urban park, sidewalks of streets…). To promote these activities in the mid seventies, the French ministry of sports has driven the fitness track. However, a functional analysis shows that the design of these facilities is now obsolete.


We therefore will present proposals for suitable spaces for sports activities in health and athletic character aiming to host the widest part of the population. The areas of athletic training and preparation. A challenge: The goal is to provide access to a practice promoting health, wellness and form through running, walking and active physical culture for the greater number of individuals: women as men, young and old, sedentary to elite athletes. One method: We have to identify the different types of potential sportsmen and their current practices, but also to take into account the latest methods of physical preparation. Proposals: From the analysis of practices and methods of training, we can deduce the following types of spaces: - Loops tracks for the cardio-respiratory development in various lengths (from 500 to 5000 meters), of varied topography (flat to hilly) and suitable ground (sand and chips for the runners, tamped track for walkers) with starting (and finish) lines very close to each other. - Fitness apparatus for strength training, not throughout the track, but grouped in one site at the start and the finish lines of all the loops track, forming a gym full air. This allows athletes to switch exercices involving different muscle groups, the educators to monitor and provide advice to all users and coaches to work in a group with a class or a team, managers to monitor and maintain apparatus easily. - Straight lines for the technical work of the stride and the development of neuromuscular qualities. These lines must have different lengths (25 to 250 meters), different slopes (flat to work on running technique, descending to be “overspeed”, climbing to develop the power), different coating (synthetic elastomer for work speed, flexible materials to the technical training). Possible evolutions: One or more of the following may supplement areas of athletic training and preparation: - To increase the potentials users: additional loops tracks to host cyclists and/or skaters, space sheltered from wind and rain to attract practitioners and Tai-chi-chuan, landing zones for jumps at the ends of the line in synthetic elastomeric coating for physical and sports education and training in these disciplines; - To increase the duration of use: electric light and light cover of the gym outdoors, even in the straight line with synthetic elastomeric coating, in order to train in the evening and despite the weather; - To develop the efficiency of the facility: “channel” of cold water to facilitate recovery after the race trainings.


Conclusion The areas of athletic training and preparation therefore promote the practices of sport and health. They can accommodate on a single site a very large proportion of the population, both sexes, all ages and all levels. These facilities go beyond the sole interest of the federal sports. They are intended to provide sports facilities to local interest. Franรงois VIGNEAU Architect, Ph D in geography and planning, Member of the IAKS, Member of the UIA sport and leisure program, Architect at the sports facilities office of the French ministry of Health and Sports, Deputy general secretary of the French Athletics Federation.


Exercise in the modern school: The sports hall of the future Peter-Axel Müller Graduate sports instructor at the Comenius Grammar School in Dusseldorf, Germany

From 1965 to 1979 Peter-Axel Müller was an ice hockey player in the German Bundesliga in Duesseldorf, Duisburg and Iserlohn. Being coach of the the second division German Bundesliga ice hockey team from 1979 to 1984, he trained in Bremerhaven, Essen, and Duisburg. In 1984 he acquired the ultimate coaching licence from the I.I.H.F. (International Ice Hockey Federation). He studied at the German Sports University in Cologne where he obtained his degree as a diplom sports instructor in 1976. Since 1981 he works as Graduate sports instructor at the Comenius Grammar School in Dusseldorf. In 1979, he established an institute for movement training in Dusseldorf with the main focus on stress-testing for managers and executives. Peter-Axel Müller is advisor and developer of marketing solutions for multifunctional large scale sport facilities. In 2003, he started developing his project „Exercise in the modern school” to promote the innovative chances in school sports. Main elements of his solution are the “Overall motoric circle” (2004) , “Modern Triple Sports Hall”, the “Triple Endurance Test” and the “Pupil Personal Coach”. Peter-Axel Müller acts as chairperson of the 2008 founded association "Moderne Schulfitness Düsseldorf e.V." for fund raising and gaining scientific research support for the solution of his project.


Seite 3 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ When I thought about "Modern School Fitness" four years ago, I was aware that this expression cannot refer only to physical fitness but also includes the mental as well as health development of children and teens. ƒ In this context „modern“ means close to technical innovation. Only if we are one step in advance in our educational and learning concepts we will be able to meet the challenges of the global competition. ƒ As is known for a harmonious physical and mental development, training and nutrition are basics for well-being. ƒ Due to social problems and information overkill students oftentimes suffer from tired' tiredness, overstretching and resignation. ƒ To involve our students' in an effective and motivating learn management we need to create new ways and modern offers. Therefore obviously the learn-timemanagement is the third module of the concept.

– BACKGROUND –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Cologne, 5th July, 2009

Diplom-Sportlehrer at Comenius-Gymnasium Düsseldorf Project leader of "Moderne Schulfitness" Chairman of the Club Schulfitness Düsseldorf e.V.

Contact

Summary

Seite 2 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

– BACKGROUND –

oftentimes cancelled due to teachers‘ conferences, etc.

ƒ Sports lessons are usually taught in the late afternoon and therefore

(reduction to 2 hours/week).

ƒ Physical education has only a low significance in secondary schools

ƒ The children‘s ability to concentratively work over a longer period is decreasing constantly. ƒ Bad physical endurance leads to rapid fatigue. ƒ Often school is attended only passively.

complain permanent backache.

ƒ 33% of the vocational students and 12% of grammar school students

half since 1980.

ƒ The number of children with at least 30% overweight has increased by

coordinate their movements.

ƒ More and more children lose the ability to control their body and to

system, every third has a bad posture, every second has weak muscles, every fifth has overweight.

ƒ Already 40% of the 12-year-olds have problems with their cardiovascular

Seite 4 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Lack of physical education

Lack of concentration

Lack of fitness

– PROBLEMS –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Individual Training Programmes

and IT-supported training rooms and connected infrastructure

by Peter-Axel Müller

Triple Fitness Test

School and mass sports with multi-medial

Approach

Grammar School, Multimedia and Fitness Equipment

Objectives

Background

The Sports Hall of the Future:

"Modern School Fitness"

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


Contact

Seite 5 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Training

Youth Current Status

Teacher

Nutrition

INDEX VALUE

Nutrition check Nutrition advice Nutrition behaviours Nutrition plan Nutrition type home /( school

ACTUAL (weakly VALUE update)

Seite 7 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Status Self Control (Students)

Dialogue

INDEX VALUE

(Copyright P.A.Müller)

Sports Clubs

Parents

Best Practices within the global competition

Lerning behav. When? Where? How ?

INDEX VALUE

Permanent learn control: regular reminder via PC/Handy

Learning behaviours When? Where? How ?

ACTUAL (weakly update) VALUE

Lern-Time-Management

School Central Server - PC - Handy

Caféteria automatical counter / prepaid chipcard control

Consulting EDV/Software (Medocheck)

Fitness School state-of-the art fitness equipment chipcard control

(Teacher)

INDEX VALUE

Trainings plan Training at school Training at home

ACTUAL VALUE Personal-Coach

Student

Fitness Triple Test Fitness grade

ACTUAL (weakly VALUE update)

– OBJECTIVES –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Summary

Individual Training Programmes

Triple Fitness Test

Approach

Grammar School, Multimedia and Fitness Equipment

Objectives

Background

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Integrated and personal support of each student by personal coaching, standardised testing methods and individual training and nutrition concepts. Learning atmosphere according to today's youth requirements (state-of-the-art standards in trainings equiment, mulitmedia techniques). Create a new community feeling where everybody is involved. High potential of personal identification with the school and the sports community center.

ƒ

ƒ

ƒ ƒ

Summary Contact ■

Seite 8 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Individual Training Programmes ■ ■

Triple Fitness Test ■

Grammar School, Multimedia and Fitness Equipment

Approach ■

Objectives

Background ■

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Seite 6 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Physical and mental fitness for all

Advanced sport offerings for all members of the local community: students, parents, teachers, sports clubs, police, fire fighters etc.

ƒ

Basic provision of sports infrastructure for all

– OBJECTIVES –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


Seite 11 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

– TRIPLE SPORTS HALLS –

ƒ Mobile laptop for video analysis, slow motion and evaluation

ƒ Control system for optimal individual training by auto tracking camera

Dance Choreography Area

ƒ With personal chip cards for individual set-up.

ƒ 5 cross-trainers

ƒ 5 bikes

ƒ 5 treatmills

Endurance Area

Seite 12 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ Personal chip cards for maximum power, minimum power, repetition and individual machine set up.

ƒ 15 power training stations for all kind of muscles

Strength Training Area

– TRIPLE FITNESS GYM –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Seite 10 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Seite 9 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

– GRAMMAR SCHOOL, MULTIMEDIA AND FITNESS EQUIPMENT –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

– GRAMMAR SCHOOL, MULTIMEDIA AND FITNESS EQUIPMENT –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


Seite 15 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

More motivation - More fun

Overall improved information flow

Well-feeling with the whole community

Example: Teachers' and parents' conversation while training at the same time in the gym.

Seite 16 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ Costs about 20.000 EUR per unit

¾ Time needed for building-up and storing back: 1,5 minutes

¾ Place needed in the store room approx. 4 sqm

¾ Place needed for one unit (in action) approx. 60 sqm

ƒ Foldaway, space saving, fast and easy:

ƒ A whole class (36 students) can train simultaneously

ƒ The „Vollmotorik-Circle“ trains all motor functions and the fitness with body spider, mini-trampolines, and bicycle ergometers

– THE FULL-MOTORIC-CIRCLE – Multifunctional sports equipment provides a variety of activities and a well-balanced training.

– TRIPLE SPORTS HALLS –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Seite 14 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

for game analysis of the competitors and the own team.

Camera tracking of single movements and special areas possible

Example: Automatic video tracking of single players possible to demonstrate i.e. lack of coverage or fouls.

High Identification Potential for All User Groups.

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Seite 13 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

The trainer can give instructions by headphone in all areas

Visual cross-linking possible on plasma and video screens

Simultaneous supervision

Example: One half of the club members is playing team sports i.e. Volleyball in the basement, the other half is training in the three rooms of the gym area.

– TRIPLE SPORTS HALLS – Video Tracking for Defensive and Offensive Movements.

Effective Club Training Possibilities.

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

– TRIPLE SPORTS HALLS –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


- Jump-up Strength -

- Endurance 6 minute run 12 minute cooper-test

Seite 19 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Test period: 45 bis 90 minutes. Test grading weighted to age and gender.

- Push-up Strength -

– TRIPLE FITNESS TEST (from P.A. Müller) –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Seite 17 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

You will find the video (length: 5 mins.) on my homepage: www.peter-axel-mueller.de

The worlwide most modern mobile fitness-system.

– THE FULL-MOTORIC-CIRCLE –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Contact

Seite 18 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Average Grade

Comparable with Grade D

Comparable with Grade D

Comparable with Grade C

Seite 20 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Final Grade

EDV Print

– TRIPLE FITNESS TEST (from P.A. Müller) –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Summary

Individual Training Programmes

■ ■

Triple Fitness Test

Approach

Gymnasium, Multimedia and Fitness Equipment

Objectives

Background

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


Contact

Seite 21 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Seite 23 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ In the IT department he will be responsible for the sectors of nutrition, physical fitness and life situation: ƒ The physical training test (three-step-test) together with the eating habits determine the actual data ƒ The IT teacher discusses the six-months-training schedule with the student (Posibilities at school and at home) ƒ The training targets are defined ƒ The student is advised – possibly in cooperation with his parents ƒ Social impact is taken into account

ƒ We can test and influence fitness and nutrition as well as the time management of the learning process ƒ If all components are matched well we will gain a maximum of harmonious growth, health and efficiency of learning ƒ Thus the PT teacher will become a consultant concerning living and learning matters in the sense of a Personal Coach

Modern School Fitness: Chances and Possibilities in Practice

– INDIVIDUAL TRAINING PROGRAMMES –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Summary

Individual Training Programmes

Triple Fitness Test

Approach

Gymnasium, Multimedia and Fitness Equipment

Objectives

Background

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Federal States / Federal Gov.

on s ulti

ƒ stress parents, teachers, friends ƒ learning habits ƒ learning circumstances

10 to 12: always together with the parents (organisational measures) 12 to 14: if desired, together with the parents (conflict potential) over 14: without parents (self-responsibility)

ƒ eating habits: - when, what, why - actual/to be/analysis ƒ Individual habits - possible alternatives

(time management of the learning process)

Social environment

ng

Seite 24 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

•Consulting (depending on the students‘ age):

ƒ kind of training (physical strength, staying power, agility) ƒ choosing the right kind of sports ƒ interests of sports clubs ƒ training courts near the place of living

Nutrition / eating habits

Consulting

Scheduling the physical fitness / consulting* - semiannually C

Physical fitness

st Te

– INDIVIDUAL TRAINING PROGRAMMES – Personal Coach (Teacher)

ICW (SAP) Internet platform

Seite 22 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

medo.check Document

School

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Teacher

medo.check® EDV-Assistent Performance Check up – Individual Consulting – Standardized Grading

– INDIVIDUAL TRAINING PROGRAMMES –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


Contact

Seite 25 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ Long-term cost savings amounting 4 to billions of Euros

Health Insurances

Seite 27 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ Attractive sports hall, also for use of sports clubs and other schools ƒ Advantage of location; positioning 4 as “innovative city of sports” ƒ Positive impulse for school- and education policy

Towns and Municpalities

Cooperating Companies

ƒ Deeper comprehension of the physical development of their children ƒ Better understanding of optimal movement stimulation ƒ Fitter, healthier and more motivated children

Parents

ƒ Showcase with options of international expansion ƒ Positive image building through engagement for children, health, and sports ƒ Generation of data for science, research, and development

ƒ Attractive sports offering for students, parents, teachers, sports clubs, … ƒ Above-the-average expertise in sports and interdisciplinary lessons; potential for differentiation ƒ Better human resource management for sports teachers

Schools

Students 1

ƒ Improved fitness, better health, better self-evaluation in physical performance ƒ Less susceptibility for backache and false posture ƒ Better performance and concentration, less fatigue ƒ Violence prevention by canalising aggressions

The society benefits from an improvement of the student‘ performance and an adequate fitness system.

– BENEFITS –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Summary

Individual Training Programmes

Triple Fitness Test

Approach

Gymnasium, Multimedia and Fitness Equipment

Objectives

Background

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Society

ƒ Projection screens for public relations.

ƒ Communikation via UMTS

a community sport center for all local groups a competence center for sport education and testing systems the future benchmark for physical and mental education

¾ ¾ ¾

Seite 28 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ Düsseldorf will become one of the leading cities in Germany in the development and support of professional and popular sports in school.

ƒ The EU needs to find standards for school sports to maintain the development in order to preserve the health of young people for the future.

a pilot school for fitness and healthiness

¾

ƒ The Comenius-Gymnasium will become

– VISION –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Seite 26 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ Analysis and projection of sports performance

ƒ Instructional images

ƒ Animation

Science ƒ Scientific institutes will get data for evaluation and analysis of new developments in spots education.

Public

ƒ Analysis of games, tournaments (volleyball, tennis, soccer, handball, hockey): detailled anaylysis of the running routes with two cameras allowing split-images on the screen.

Events / Sports Clubs

ƒ Repetition of single video parts.

ƒ Communikation via UMTS

ƒ Live presentation in other school facilities

ƒ Cross-teaching

ƒ Cross-linking with other academics

School / Network

Benefits of Multimedia Use

ƒ Projection of all training data

ƒ Technical and methodical projextion

ƒ Projection of different phases

ƒ Wide screen projection, slow motion, tracking system

Videoanalysis

School

– GRAMMAR SCHOOL, MULTIMEDIA AND FITNESS EQUIPMENT –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


+49 (0) 211.672784 +49 (0) 178.2347355 peter-mueller@ish.de

Seite 31 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Fon Mobil E-Mail

Peter-Axel Müller Vautierstrasse 88 D-40235 Düsseldorf

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

Seite 29 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

ƒ Including new media such as mobiles und PDA (Personal-Digital-Assistant) ■

Contact

Seite 30 | "Modern School Fitness" by Peter-Axel Müller, 21st International IAKS Congress, 28.- 30.10.2009, Cologne

Individual Training Programmes

Triple Fitness Test

Summary

¾ Connecting subjects such as Biology and PT by means of video transmission

¾ Network: school managers -administration - students - teachers

Gymnasium, Multimedia and Fitness Equipment

Approach

■ ■

Objectives

Background

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.

¾ Video analysis on huge screens

¾ employment of videos in the training studios

ƒ Multi-medial extension:

ƒ Construction of a new cafeteria with automatical counter (chipcard access, pre-paid)

Longterm objectives:

– OBJECTIVES –

Modern School Fitness. The Sports Hall of the Future.


Water adventure installations as urban playgrounds Ulrike Rechler Dipl.-Ing., Architect, Germany

Ulrike Rechler was born in 1963 in Germany. She holds a master degree in Public Administration / Urban Design and is working as a free-lance architect and sculptor.


Aquatic adventure areas as urban “playgrounds” Presenter: Rechler Ulrike We love water! Throughout the world, people of all ages from all manner of social and cultural backgrounds have been fascinated by water. Water in public spaces - Europe In public spaces in Europe, we come across predominantly 3 types of water use so far ‐ in public swimming pools for sport and leisure ‐  as wells and fountain areas ‐  as aquatic play activities in the form of “playwork” in playgrounds Inspiration from North America In North America over the last 15 years, they have gone beyond this, in many respects, and established successful obstacle-free aquatic experiences of a kind that is still relatively unknown in Europe –  splash pads –  public urban beaches (urbeaches) and their newest development - spraypoints The new concepts Splash pads and public urbeaches/ spraypoints refer to water adventure areas with a depth of water of 0.00. Splash pads combine the amenities of pool and dry play areas to form a totally new interactive leisure concept. Spraypoints are urban oases with a mix of sculptured elements and fountains that are accessible for playing in. They are open to everyone, interactive, for play and enjoyment and they provide a space for different movement dynamics. The aquatic experiences on offer have been developed and oriented according to the needs of different user groups. The right design concept, the correct layout of the individual features of the area and its finely tuned interplay make up the whole, which is considerably greater than the sum of all its parts.


Splash pads A family leisure spot

An ambitious splash pad design concept appeals to people from 0 to XX years old. It offers everyone the chance to move freely and independently in the area according to his or her interests and abilities and to experience the fun of water alone or together with others. Here everyone can find something. ... small children have their first independent experiences with water as an element. ...pre-school children play together in small groups and test themselves in joint actions. ..older children engage in wild water games with and against each other. ...parents can sit back,relax and enjoy their free time. ...people with special needs move freely and as part of the whole hustle and bustle. ...teenagers can find a place just for themselves here. ...older people are attracted and enthralled by the lively delights. ... The potential This type of aquatic adventure area offers obstacle-free water fun. They can be perfectly integrated into the landscape surrounding swimming pools and at the same time, open up possibilities for wet leisure activities completely without a swimming pool and without constant supervision. All types of sport and leisure facilities, green areas, parks and play and adventure oriented grounds can be equipped and upgraded with splash pad aquatic adventure areas. As no supervision is necessary in these spaces, a very flexible and diverse range of operating concepts can be considered when offering individual sport and leisure activities.. New user groups can be catered for. Opening hours and seasonal offers can be extended.


The stream of visitors and length of stay can be mapped out. Public urbeaches –Spraypoints Art – fountains – playing field – adventure world– identification point – meeting place – cool oasis in the urban landscape

These special, new types of public urbeach areas go far beyond the usual fountain landscapes. 3D elements, light, water and users’ activity make up constantly changing scenarios in the public space. Here you can get wet or stay dry, watch or take part yourself in the wild hustle and bustle, experience quiet moments of meditative silence or let yourself be infected by the spontaneous expression of joie de vivre. Water as an object of sympathy and longing unites people from all social and cultural backgrounds. Spraypoints are designed as an overall concept for use in public spaces. The obstaclefree playgrounds offer diverse elements for different user groups. Design, play and


enjoyment value, as well as water flow are optimised for the low-maintenance operation. With splash pads or public urbeaches/ spraypoints, places for experiencing water can be designed that are open to all people in a completely natural way.


Innovative sports and leisure infrastructure in urban development Chairman Prof. Dr. Heiner Haass Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Anhalt, Germany

Prof. Dr. Heiner Haass was born in 1955 in Bonn, Germany. He studied architecture and urbanism at the university of Hanover. In 1983 he completed his degree as a diplom engineer. Since 1988 he worked in Hanover as an architect with the main focus on urban

development for leisure and tourism. He was also lecturer at the Universities of Göttingen, Hanover and Bernburg. In 1994 he became professor for landscape architecture in Bernburg. Since 1994 he is an associate member at the ICOMIA`s Marina committee and since 2009 member of PIANC-WG 134 „Operational and Planning Guidelines for Superyacht Facilities”.


Activity inspiring sports architecture: Integrating sports in urban developments Poul Broberg Secretary to the management at the Danish National Olympic Committee and Sports Confederation, Denmark

Poul Broberg studied political science and completed his degree as a master of science. He is secretary to the management at the Danish National Olympic Committee and Sports Confederation. As secretary to the management he advises the NOC president and CEO in current affairs in national and international sports policy. Futhermore he is responsible for the preparation of recommendations, cases and information to the NOC board. Among other duties he takes care of the NOCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s connections and collaborations with the IOC. Additionally he is in charge of the preparation and accomplishment of the biannual meeting with the NOCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s member organisations. Poul Broberg is a guest teacher at the Institute of Sport at Copenhagen University, where he teaches national and international sports policy at a master level. In addition he was consultant in the National Olympic Committee and Sports Confederation of Denmark. His responsibilities were concentrated around developing, formulating and implementing the NOCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s political strategy in the Danish municipalities.


- Social, physical, mental barriers for physical activity among people living in the cities - Room for sport in the cities is about more than indoor areanas and stadiums â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just look at which sports people are doing today - Wider understanding of how a sports facility can be understand. Sport facilities in the city is about city spaces, city buildings and activity areas.

Introduction to the development of cities

21st IAKS Conference â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29th of October 2009

Activating Architecture and City Planning

- Brief introduction to the development of cities - The NOC of Denmarks motive for working with architecture and city planning - Introducing new principels for architecture and city planning, which can create more physical activity - The good examples

Agenda


4. Making the city spaces the most used and largest sports facility in the country

3. Influence on the political agenda, when it comes to the future of the design of our cites

- two different set of levels on the concrete and on the strategic level

- developped 56 planning icons, which are all representing a recommendation when it comes to city planning and the opgrading of the public spaces

- developped concrete methods and tools to secure places for sport in public spaces

1. Member recruitment â&#x20AC;&#x201C; more Danes must be physical active

2. The declined interest from the youth in becommming involved in the world of sport as active and volunteers

Introducing new planning principels when it comes to make sport a natural part of the development and the future planning of the cities

Why is architecture and city planning interesting for the NOC of Denmark?

- Sport can take place in building, which are designed for other purposes - New sports are developed right in the middle of the city â&#x20AC;&#x201C; parkour, skateboard, rollerskating - Sport in the city is about 24 / 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and is accessible when ever you want to be physical active - Sport must be possible right outside the front door - Sport is able to use empty areas in city, which are of no interest to other

Sport in the cities must integrated in new contexts


2. In every development plan the authorities must state how they will make room for sport and physical activity.

1. Sport and physical activity will be an integrated part of all future city planning on state and municipality level

Our ultimate ambition

ƒ Adaption of tracks, courses or pitches to the limits of the city ƒ Multi use ƒ Graphic marks ƒ Diversified covering

Concrete planning icons

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Public places Parks The ”blue” space Connections Surplus areas Parking lot Former industrial areas Roof tops Housing areas Business areas Schools

The spaces we are looking at

ƒ Scattered activities in bigger areas ƒ Demand of 10 % activity in planning and design ƒ Reserve special areas with potential for sport and activity ƒ City spaces with in 800 meters

Strategic Planning Icons


A city sports park – vision created by the NOC of Danmark and the school of architecture

Examples

The blue space – floating club houses – vision by the NOC of Denmark and Force 4

Public Places – Playground de Salvio, New York City


Surplus areas – sport beneath the bridge – Amsterdam - Holland

Former industrial areas – industry transformed into park – Landschaftspark, Duisburg Ruhr

Connections - vision created by the NOC of Danmark and the school of architecture

Parking lot – multifunctional parking lot – Ringe - Denmark


Business Areas – In-Fill - vision created by the NOC of Danmark and the school of architecture

Roof tops – The roof top as a football field – Tokyo - Japan

Schools – Trekronerskolen – Roskilde - Denmark

Housing areas – Sports Court – Guangzhou - China


+ 45512655

pbr@dif.dk

Poul Broberg

Secretary to the Management

NOC Denmark

Thank you for your attention


Innovative concepts for sports and exercise areas in Swiss local districts Martin Strupler-Grötzinger Architect, sports and PE instructor, Managing Director of Strupler Sport Consulting, Switzerland

Martin Strupler-Grötzinger completed his studies at the University of Bern and with a diploma as sports and physical education instructor. Afterwards he studied at the ETH Zürich and completed his degree as a diplom architect. After having worked as a teacher and in the regional sports administration, he is now the managing director of Strupler Sport Consulting in Switzerland active in the range of sports and stadium constructions. Since 1981 he is also teaching as a university lecturer at the institute for sport science at the University of Bern.


IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

3

1. Basics – why does a local authority draw up a strategy for sports and exercise areas? 2. Content and structure of strategies for sports and exercise areas 3. What’s new and innovative about our strategies for sports and exercise areas?

Contents

IAKS Congress 2009 Martin Strupler-Grötzinger

in Swiss local districts

for sports and exercise areas

Innovative strategies

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Basics

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Development of exercise areas

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

(sports facility planning)

2

4

Sports development

Development of society

Land use planning

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Sport mobilizes

Sport inspires


Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

… the basic precondition for increasing the proportion of physically active people in the population.

Sports facilities and exercise areas are…

IAKS Sports and exercise space

The economic importance of sport: • 80,300 employees (full-time equivalent) in sport as a whole – more, for instance, than the clock or chemical industries • 1.8% of GDP – more, for instance, than agriculture and forestry This breaks down into 27% for sports tourism 23% for sports infrastructure (in- and outdoors) 12% each for clubs/associations and the sports trade

Sports infrastructure – focus of sports funding

9

7

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Î Adapt exercise opportunities and infrastructure Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Their own sports needs Much control over their free time Growing health awareness A history of exercise

IAKS Sports and exercise space

– – – –

• Increasing number of physically fit people in the 3rd phase of life with:

• Decline in recruitment potential for in most cases youth-oriented clubs and for competitive sport

Demographics and consequences for sport

IAKS Sports and exercise space

8

10

Î Increase exercise opportunities in everyday life

• 37% of the Swiss population practise sport rarely or not at all – almost 2 million people. • Lack of exercise generates direct treatment costs of CHF 2.7 billion annually. • Encouraging 1% of couch potatoes to take regular physical exercise would cut health costs by CHF 20 million. • About 20% of youths are overweight. • The Playstation is replacing play in the home environment.

Social trend: Lack of exercise


Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Advantages: Î Synergies Î Efficient use of resources Î Long-term planning (of land and resources)

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Reconstruction of Olympia, a place of worship, 2nd century BC

Standardized sports facilities for organized sport and school games

Sports facility planning – history

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Integration in local-authority exercise area and sports facility strategies (KoBeSaK) – or GESAK With interdisciplinary cooperation from all policy departments responsible for sport and exercise: Education, health, leisure, society and community, industry, environment, transport, regional planning

Possible solutions

13

11

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Sports funding

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Traffic planning

Exercise space in the settlement area

Regional planning, settlement development

Health policy

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Networked thought and action

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Exercise area and sports facility strategies for • Sport in the urban planning project for Chenggong New Town in China Î population 6 million • Municipality of Bern (restricted to ice & water) Î 130,000 • Municipality of Thun Î 45,000 • Municipality of Zug Î 23,000 • Baar local authority Î 20,000 • Municipality of Aarau Î 18,000 • Worb local authority Î 10,000 • Aarberg local authority Î 3,000 • Dotzigen local authority Î 1,500

Our projects of the last 5 years

14

12


Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

… playgrounds and public parks and gardens

Areas for exercise and sport comprise …

IAKS Sports and exercise space

homes planned and designed for exercise

… first and foremost:

Areas for exercise and sport comprise …

17

15

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

IAKS Sports and exercise space

… roads and paths

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Areas for exercise and sport comprise …

IAKS Sports and exercise space

… the immediate home environment and courtyards

Areas for exercise and sport comprise …

18

16


Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Summarized: • Playgrounds and public parks and gardens • Roads and paths • Immediate home environment (forecourts, courtyards, car parks) • Grounds of school complexes • Existing standardized sports facilities for organized sport ...and the areas connecting them

Exercise areas in settlement areas

IAKS Sports and exercise space

21

19

… of course:

… grounds of school complexes

[H] Water sports facilities in open waters

[D] Ice sports facilities, roller sports facilities, shooting ranges, tennis facilities and other standardized facilities

22

[G] Walking and hiking paths, running courses, keep-fit courses, bridleways (for separate horse-riding facilities, see D)

[C] Swimming facilities

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

[F] Cycle paths, biking and inline skating routes (for separate roller sports facilities, see D)

[B] Outdoor areas at schools (including school yards), grassed sports and athletics facilities

IAKS Sports and exercise space

[E] Exercise-friendly settlement space, e.g. with traffic-restricted zones (children’s) playgrounds, exercise and sports opportunities in public parks and gardens, (for school yards, see B), close-to-home recreation areas [A] Gyms and sports halls

20

Exercise and recreation space in the wider sense

Breakdown

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Sports facilities in the narrower sense

IAKS Sports and exercise space

standardized facilities for organized sport

Areas for exercise and sport comprise …

Areas for exercise and sport comprise …


Action Timetable Finance

Check Corrections

Implementation

Efficiency review

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Specified in client’s brief Regional coordination

Analysis of existing facilities Analysis of demand Summary of demand for action

Basic analysis

Formulated goal

Survey of existing facilities Survey of demand

Basic surveys

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

1. Involvement of the various user groups: Schools with teaching staff and caretakers / clubs / population Î cooperative planning 2. Implementation of the findings of the Switzerland-wide sports survey 2008 3. Holistic approach 4. Inclusion of muscle-power mobility or slow motor traffic 5. Integration of close-to-home recreation/excursion destinations within the region

Overview of novel and innovative features

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Strategy

Basics

Structure

25

23

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

24

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

26

Cooperative planning: Cooperation with schools (school managers, teaching staff, caretakers), clubs and the interested public (Standard) procedure: • Public information event • Survey (questionnaire also on the local-authority website) • Monitoring group • Final public event

1. Involvement of the various user groups

IAKS Sports and exercise space

• Picture(s) • Plan of location • Description of facility, e.g. with details of floor surface; facility dimensions; ancillary facilities; structural state; existing and planned investments; lighting, sound system; mobile and fixed apparatus/equipment • Capacity and utilization • Access / parking space / public transport / cycle parks • Food & drink / accommodation • Reservations office • User survey: Summary of feedback on the facility concerned

Project documents based on breakdown


Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

• Inclusion of exercise in everyday mobility (travelling to work, to shops, during leisure time) • Travelling to sport or exercise locations • Safe and marked walking, hiking and cycle paths • Signposting of suitable inline skating routes • If required: Sports mobility strategy

4. Inclusion of muscle-power mobility

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Examples: • About 50% of active people practise sport outside clubs • Top of the list is the “Helvetic Triathlon”, i.e. hiking/walking, on-/off-road cycling, swimming)

Omission of blanket survey of population Implementation of the findings of the Switzerland-wide sports survey 2008 Î www.sportobs.ch

2. Generally valid findings

29

27

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Structures and providers

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

• Regional approach • Lake and river banks: Paths, grassed play areas, bathing opportunities, slipways for boats, surfboards etc. • Adding rest areas with exercise opportunities to network of hiking paths • Viewing points

5. Integration of recreation/excursion destinations

IAKS Sports and exercise space

ORGANIZATION

Non-profit/commercial

PRIVATE

INFRASTRUCTURE

PUBLIC SECTOR

EXERCISE OPPORTUNITIES

3. Holistic approach

30

28


Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Improve rate of utilization of available halls. ƒ Introduce central management ƒ Establish new closing times for the sports halls ƒ Organize the delegation of responsibility for sports hall use

4

IAKS Sports and exercise space

. Consult with the surrounding districts to examine the possibility of cooperation and supplementary finance for the ice rink, swimming pools (covered and outdoors), large sports halls and cycle paths. Clarify finance for a temporary roof over the 50 m pool (air hall) with national and canton government

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

3

IAKS Sports and exercise space

www.struplersport.ch

Thank you very much for listening.

33

31

Example of Worb – summary

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

In the course of the building permission proceedings, influence should be brought to bear for the creation of larger, interconnected exercise areas and their design. Parent pressure groups for the improvement and upgrading of existing exercise areas should be supported with experts and finance.

8

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Prepare a modernization and design strategy for the Rüfenacht school grounds so that they meet the requirements for school lessons (athletics, ball games) as well as for active children’s leisure time. The strategy must be coordinated with the redesign of the Sperlisacher playground in the immediate proximity.

Carry out the “Sportlich zum Sport” project.

6 7

Develop a local-authority mission statement.

5

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Build an artificial turf pitch or an extra standardized natural turf pitch. Choose one of the alternatives: ƒ Alternative 1: Extending Niederhaus to include a second natural turf pitch for exclusive use in the winter season ƒ Alternative 2: Extending Worbboden to include an extra natural turf pitch north of the existing facility ƒ Alternative 3: Artificial turf surface on the main pitch in Worbboden If alternative 1 or 2 is chosen, the ancillary facilities planned in Niederhaus for 2007 must be urgently supplemented with showers.

2

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Situation in the “turf pitches” sector: ƒ Encourage greater use of the various existing small turf pitches, some of them situated a short distance outside the village ƒ Check the soil structure of all turf pitches used by schools and clubs and improve if necessary ƒ More intensive pitch maintenance

1

Short-term measures for the next 2 years

34

32


The planning and realization of cycle paths and bridleways must be accorded high priority.

11

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Modernization of the Wyden gymnasium

17

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Plan a new games hall if cooperation between districts or the development of the Hofmatt sports centre fail to yield solutions.

16

Long-term measures for the next 5-15 years

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

In the densely built-up area, encounter zones should be planned and realized that accord equal status to foot, cycle and motor traffic (“dead slow” zone).

10

IAKS Sports and exercise space

The future use of the grounds of the decentralized schools must be ensured as close-to-home exercise areas.

9

37

35

IAKS Sports and exercise space

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Martin Strupler, Strupler Sport Consulting, Bern, Switzerland

Initiate the “Local exercise and sports network” (LBS) project.

15 IAKS Sports and exercise space

Organize joint use of sports equipment for schools and clubs.

Creating a public changing room suitable for all-year use in Hofmatt and signage for running, cycling and inline skating routes of different length. Publicity with introductory and participatory courses.

13

14

Upgrading and extension/replacement of facilities in Hofmatt to create a regional sports centre with the inclusion of all parts of the facilities and the three interrelated dimensions of infrastructure, organization and activities offered. Measures belonging to the latter two dimensions that do not require any major structural alterations are to be implemented in the short term (e.g. all-year use of the pool site).

12

Medium-term measures for the next 3-5 years

38

36


Harbour pools from Scandinavia to Shanghai: Creating urban activity areas Kai-Uwe Bergmann Director International Business Development, BIG Bjarke Ingels Group, Denmark

Kai-Uwe Bergmann graduated his study as a MA of Architecture with honors at the University of California in Los Angeles, USA. In addition he studied architecture at the University of Virginia, USA, and completed it as a BA of Science in Architecture. Kai-Uwe Bergmann LEED AP, RIBA, MAA, AIA has 9 years of experience as a project leader. He brings his expertise in business development and in project management to proposals around the globe, including work in Scandinavia, the Middle East and Asia. Additionally he is a leader in developing BIGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence in Central Asia, where his current ongoing project includes The Baku Villas along the Caspian Sea. Kai-Uwe Bergmann was previously a project architect with C.F. Møller Architects in Copenhagen where he was a member of three award wining competitions. Furthermore, he filled the same role at the Austrian office of Baumschlager & Eberle where he was involved on their work for the UN AIDS Research Administration Building in Geneva and a residence in Diepoldsau, Switzerland. Additionally Kai-Uwe Bergmann has spent the past eleven years studying glass art and creating his own cast glass pieces.


Developing Nations Forum Chairman and introduction Prof. Carlos Vera Guardia Architect, California, USA

Prof. Carlos Vera Guardia studied architecture in Chile and in Venezuela. Additionally he received the Doctor of Philosophy in England. Since 1995 he is a executive board member of IAKS, and since 2007 international member of the American Leisure Academy (ALA). Furthermore he is also a board member of the International Sports for All Federation (FISpT) und a council member of the Latin American of Free Time and Recreation (ALATIR). He gained a lot of experience in architecture due to the Pre-Project in the year 1996 in collaboration with the International Centre of Sports Sciences of Lara State in Venezuela and the Pre-Project in collaboaration with the High Performance Centre of Anzoรกtegui State in Venezuela. From 1965 until his retirement in 1997 he was teaching architecture as a tenured full time professor of the Faculty of Architecture of the University of Zulia. In 2002 he was awarded as a member of the American Leisure Academy (ALA) and in 2007 as a member of Honor of the UIA Sports and Leisure Programme.


Sustainability and legacy of sports facilities: The day after Fernando Telles Engineer, Brazil

Fernando Telles is a civil engineer and physical education teacher, he is also a planning specialist in recreation and sports facilities. He is working as a consultant in planning sports and recreation infrastructure in NUTAU/USP and Architectural and Urban Technology Research Nucleous of the University of São Paulo. He is the Director of CBDA – Brazilian Confederation of Aquatic Sports – in Rio de Janeiro and co-author of the Atlas of Sports in Brazil and Legacy of Sports Megaevents: Rio de Janeiro Future Olympic City, Sports Facilities Planning and Development and Legacy of Sustainable Sports Mega-events: the Importance of Sports Facilities. Additionally he is author of the website “www.planesporte.com.br” aiming at disseminating the most up-to-date knowledge about concepts, practices and policies adopted wordwide for planning sports and leisure facilities.


Legacy and Sustainability – “The Day After” Presenter: Fernando Telles Concepts applicable to developing countries focusing on the legacy of international sport megaevents and the social post-use of the sport facilities. The first part of the presentation seeks to explain and update the general concept of legacy, initiating with an approach to major types of megaevents focusing on what a host city should expect as a positive legacy, i.e. an immediate local, national and international visibility impact, including sport and culture motivation and, most important, change and transition through urban regeneration. As an example, we mention the sucessful bid of London 2012, presenting an Olympic vision that means not only a “sport celebration but also a regeneration force...” (Hansard, House of Commons, 2005). Concerning the required infrastructure for the megaevent we mention the Primary Structure – sport & leisure – in fact, sports facilities are the prevailing ones; the secondary structure – housing & recreation - including training facilities -, and the Tertiary Structure – work & traffic – often as part of the city Urban Master Plan, with most of its developments anticipated for the sake of the megaevent. (H. Preuss, Impact of Olympics, 2006) As for urban regeneration, we will present “hard” and “soft” legacy concepts and the meaning of Legacy Momentum (G. Poynter, I. MacRury, LERI / UEL, London, 2006). The final part of the presentation focuses on the importance of planning the legacy, aiming at anticipating the post-use of sports facilities not only for high performance athletes but also to be adequate for educational and community use after the event, therefore preventing the risk of creating “white elephants”. Once the project facility has been approved, a project Planning Committee may be established to accumulate and organize all information pertinent to the project and to make facility design decisions as they arise. The program specialists should define what sports, recreation and physical activities are intended for the facility. An other important issue is the physical and management maintenance of the facility to keep it economically sustainable. In this concern a practical rule states that the annual facility maintenance operation cost goes beyond 10% of the investment demanded for its construction (R. Bonnenfant - F. Vigneau, Le Moniteur, 1993). Certainly, there are means of obtaining financial resources as through admission tickets or rental of facility spaces, for example. Nevertheless we are aware of the difficulties involved, especially in developing countries as far as it is necessary sometimes to conciliate economics with legitimate social demands. Finally, we present a diagram of the Project Planning Committee (T.H. SawyerIndiana State University, 2002) and its multidisciplinary contributions as well as a 1993 survey made in Germany referring to a high level of participation of the


population in sports (W.Weber-Head of Group, 1993). However, it should be taken into account that those percentages may be much smaller in developing countries. In a “study case” approach we comment about consequences of insufficient legacy planning for post-use of major sport facilities constructed for the Pan American Games in Rio de Janeiro (2007). Today there is a positive move from government sport authorities to find an adequate solution to minimize the problem. (Seminário Internacional de Legados de Megaeventos Esportivos – Rio de janeiro – May, 2008). The post-event use of sport facilities is an important guide to the success of the megaevent and, in all cases, legacy needs to be built into initial conception, design and delivery of those facilities.


OLYMPIC GAMES

WORLD SOCCER CUP

PAN AMERICAN GAMES

CENTRAL AMERICAN AND CARIBEAN GAMES

AFRICAN GAMES

ASIAN GAMES

WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES

WORLD SPORTS CHAMPIONSHIPS

OTHERS

MEGAEVENTS

DEVELOPING NATIONS FORUM

XXI IAKS CONGRESS

• Environmental legacies – ecological

• Social legacies – new houses

• Economic legacies – investments / new employees

Oct 2009

Fernando Telles

A F T E R

LEGACIES

D A Y

• Sports legacies – new facilities

T H E

SUSTAINABILITY AND LEGACY OF S P O R T S F A C I L I T I E S


Primary Structure

Secondary Structure

Tertiary Structure

1.

2.

3.

University of Mainz - Ger

Holger Preuss

Work & Traffic

Housing & Recreation

Sport & Leisure

Urban Development

Impacts of Megaevents on Urban Structure

• Tangible and intangible

• Changing and transition

• Enhancement of city cultural life

• International and local visibility

Megaevent Impacts •

• • • •

Stadium Indoor arena Velodrome Special Facilities such as Swimming Pool, Shooting Range, Rowing Course, Equestrian facilities

Primary Structure - sport & leisure -

Source: Hansard, House of Commons debates ‘London 2012 Olympic Bid’, 6 July 2005

London’s bid was built on a special Olympic vision. That vision of an Olympic Games that would not only be a celebration of sport but a force for regeneration. The games will transform one of the poorest and most deprived areas of London. They will create thousands of jobs and homes. They will offer new opportunities for business in the immediate area and troughough London... One of the things that made the bid successfull is the way in which it reaches out to all young people in two important respects: it will encourage many more to get fit and to be involved in sport and, whatever their physical prowess, to offer their services as volunteers for the Olympic cause.

London 2012


• Status / National Pride

• Legacy Planning / Sustainable Legacy

• National / International Tourism

Legacy momentum

Infrastructure Spaces reorientation Increase of comfort New types of land usage Economic Activities

• General Concept

“soft” legacy

• • • • •

“Hard” Legacy

Urban Regeneration

• Enthusiasm / Reputation

• Confidence

• Parklands

• Training Facilities

• Midia and Press Centre

• Athlete Village & Midia Village

- Housing & Recreation –

Secondary Structure


Fernando Telles Planesporte São Paulo, Brazil

“ S po r ts f ac i l i ti e s a r e s u s t ai n a bl e w h e n b oth material and financial resources were secured for their operation & maintenance and projects were conceived to minimize impacts on the surrounding environment”

Sustainability 2

• Sustainability: Programs / Maintenance

• Elite Sports & Community Recreation

Post-use of sports facilities

Legacy Planning

3% Orientados para atividades esportivas de competição

3%

34%

Ativos no sentindo mais amplo

34%

70%

Proporção da População Envolvida na Atividade Esportiva

Atletas de alto nível

3%

Participation in Sport: Aproximately 70% of the Population Participate Actively in Sport

President, Green & Gold Inc. Otawa, Canada

David Chernushenko

“Sport facilities are sustainable when it meets the needs of today’s sport community while contributing to the improvement of future sports opportunities for all and the integrity of the natural environment on which it depends”

Sustainability 1


PROJECT

FACILITY CONSULTANTS

PLANNING COMMITTEE

USERS •Students •Community

PROGRAM SPECIALISTS

ADMINISTRATORS

PAN AMERICAN VILLAGE

ARCHITECTS

SPECIALISTS •Financial •Acoustical •Energy •Managerial •Other

ENGINEERS •Structural •Mechanics •Electrical •Civil

Localização das instalações

PAN 2007 – RIO DE JANEIRO


• FERNANDO TELLES • fernando@planesporte.com.br • www.planesporte.com.br

Thank you Gracias Obrigado

OLYMPIC STADIUM JOAO HAVELANGE

AQUATIC PARK MARIA LENK


Sports management education and training Nancy C. Gonzalez de Sanoja Venezuela

Nancy C. Gonzalez de Sanoja is not only sports instructor, but also made her master in sports sciences. She is Vice Head Teacher at the Iberoamerican University of Sports in Venezuela and has been professor at the Universidad Pedag贸gica Experimental Libertador for seventeen years. Apart from her professional work she assumed several offices like the presidency of IASLIM Venezuela, of the organising committee of an international association, of the watersports association of Lara or as coordinator for FUNDELA. Nancy C. Gonzalez de Sanoja is actively standing for the sports development in Latin America as she is board member of MERCOSUR in Latin America. She has been a member of the Consejo Asesor de Ciencias Aplicadas of the National Sports Institute in Caracas, member of the th organisational committee for the 4 Latin American Congress of ISCHPER-SD and for the Panamerican Junior Waterpolo Championships.


THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSIDAD IBEROAMERICANA DEL DEPORTE IN THE MANAGER TRAINING IN SPORT FACILITIES Presenter: Nancy González de Sanoja The refoundation of the new Bolivarian Republic of

Venezuela, which

started with the election of Hugo Chávez Frías as president on December 1999, as st well as the process of implantation of Socialism in the 21 Century oepning a new

space for nationality in Venezuela as human and collective feeling. That is the reason why the Universidad Iberoamericana del Deporte was created, after a long feasibility process, under decree number 4.244, January 30th 2006, as an experimental institution of higher education which has among the objectives “the role of a leading function in sports” as well as “the source, systematization and socialization of new knowledge in the sport, scientific, humanistic, technological and artistic field”. In the double dimension: educative and geopolitical as it is expressed in the name, the university also includes, among the purposes, the leading of “the revitalization, in historical perspective, of the Caribbean and Iberoamerican integration thought as the main cornerstone for cooperation”. The university mission states “the opening to new experiences in the fields of training, research and social projection at pre and post grades in the scientific, technological and cultural field associated with physical activities, sports and related areas”. And the vision is to become “leader in training human talent in a whole, humanistic and long-lasting way with vocation toward physical activity, sports and related areas. The training programs which are now being developed at the university are: Physical Activity and Health, Sport training and Managing in Sport Technology. Managing in Sport Technology lasts nine semesters, divided into an initial period lasting one semester, whose main objective is to ensure the student`s success during the learning experiences; plus four periods constituted by the integration of axes, subjects and learning project developed during four years. Each period has two semesters and it is clearly stated that students will be able to acquire certain abilities previously established. The given degree is “licenciado”.


The career Managing in Sport Technology has four training central elements or axis: one transdisciplinary axis which implies knowledge directly involved with own and related areas to the speciality as well as problems currently faced in technology applied to sports. This curriculum approach enables students to face reality directly. This central element allows the connection between different disciplines related with the knowledge areas as a whole, overcoming the traditional rigidity. Regarding these aspects, the curriculum includes courses such as Security and Equipments of Sport Facilities; Building Spaces and Rough Sport Equipment; Foundations of Design Applied to Sports Field; Usage, Maintenance and Hygiene of Spaces and Sport Equipment, Design and Construction of Sportive Infrastructure, among others. The transversal axis is constituted by learning which helps the comprehensive training and emphasizes values and qualification of individual and familiar sensibility. The main components go beyond professional issues since they focus on the participation of a sustainable development. The main point of the integrative axis lies in the participation of students in developing socio productive projects regarding needs previously identified in communities, which will be bringing tangible results and benefits to the environment. Finally, through the expansion axis, our institution grants access, qualifies and gives credits to some competences, experiences as well as individual achievements of the most outstanding participants of the program. As described, Managing in Sport Technology is based in some principles currently necessary dealing with third and fourth levels of education, such as: multi, inter- and transdisciplinarity, transversality, integrality and knowledge applicability. These parameters are achieved through close links between humanistic and scientific knowledge taught, the easiness of students to move according to new tendencies of municipalization, the modality of faced and semi faced studies controlled through interactive learning units and participative strategies, represented by the projects learning methodology, conceived, planned


and oriented to face social demands in order to contribute with endogenous development. Being sure of graduating a professional well trained and knowing the own geographical reality, as well as the new tendencies developed in this specialty in other institutions and sport organizations in the world, the Universidad Iberoamericana del

Deporte has organized themed events where foreign expert

have participated. Moreover, this university has also participated in other events out of borders, such as: Foro Internacional de Gesti贸n de Infraestructura Deportiva y Recreativa, el Seminario Internacional de Administraci贸n de Infraestructura Deportiva y Recreativa y la Conferencia Continental de la Asociaci贸n Internacional de Administraci贸n de Infraestructura Deportiva y Recreativa. These meetings have made possible the interchange of experiences, the approach and solution of concrete problems and the opening to innovation to be up-to-date with knowledge advance. Moreover, the participation in such events have permitted the university to get in touch with professionals and experts invited to interact with students through courses, workshops, and other extracurricular activities. Also, they have offered the opportunity to subscribe conventions with the International Association of Sport and Leisure Infrastructure Management (IASLIM). All this is related with the purpose of the program Managing in Sport Technology which is oriented to strengthen a professional with updated knowledge on the area of speciality. The intention is to enable the graduated to be creative and innovative and the entrepreneur to be adapted to turbulent changes of the century. His training is strongly based in humanistic principles allowing graduating respond effectively to demands and expectations of local, national and international communities. He is also trained in the management of administrative methods and procedures to play roles of physical, sport and leisure activity managers aimed to make decision related with the design and application of policies, strategies and programs dealing with the managing of sport organizations in order to develop management processes in economical and financial aspects as well as the dealing with human talent.


Finally, the student leaves the university with enough attitudes to play specific roles such as the active participation to think of projects, designing and plans to build sport facilities; look after the appropriate usage, maintenance and preservation of sport infrastructure; undertake activities for promoting, marketing, controlling and establishing standards to select sport and leisure equipment . Moreover, the graduated will be able to initiate his own management process. The graduate`s profile provides basic and general skills as follows: optimal written and oral performance, ability to interact effectively in all settings. Therefore, the graduated will evaluate research as a key factor to update and improve knowledge and acquired abilities at university. Moreover, he will work on innovation to handle with information and communication technologies and faciliate the searching, processing, application and interchange of knowledge. Given the condition of technological and scientific dependence of our country, the graduate could make decisions on those sports and technical issues which are profitable and the usage depending of the sociopolitical viability. The graduate´s range of activity in Managing in Sport Technology can be with public and private companies, where they can be employed, especially in clubs, associations, regional and national sport institutions, government departments, non government organizations (NGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s), federations, centers for initiation on sports, sport facilities and enterprises related to sports, physical activity and leisure. We are sure that the professionals on Managing in Sport Technology at the Universidad Iberoamericana del Deporte will help to improve greatly the quality of services offered both in private and public companies, since their mission is addressed to manage sport facilities for the practicing of sports, physical activities and leisure. As sport manager, ready to make appropriate selections and problem solving the graduated will work with approaches, tools, and methods for decision making adapted to local, national and international reality. They will also work in teams allowing them to delegate responsibilities inside and outside institutions, through the strengthening of self managing networks of sport for all.


The new sport manager from our university will adopt emerging values applied in world organizations such as World Health Organization and the UNESCO promoting outlines on sport for everyone as well as the need to have more spaces to involve the majority of people to practice sports in order to preserve health and improve life quality. Thus, the current tendency of humanization of facilities and sport equipment justifies gyms, fields, courts, and some other sport equipment.

The new manager will acknowledge sport as a

human activity; a mean of social sensibility feeding ideals, fantasies and expectations strengthening human condition. For these reasons, he will emphasize the citizen`s expectations adapting these spaces to real needs, accessibility, comfort, security and also to people with a disability. Furthermore, we promote for social justice, equality, brotherhood, tolerance and diversity. Moreover, there is no space to individual interest contrary to real value of sport. Likewise, the manger will promote environment preservation and the right use of resources for the sustainability of life on earth. Thus, he will ensure the appropriate usage of renewable and non renewable natural resources to avoid pollution when building and using sport facilities. Knowing and assuming the world economical crisis, the new manager will technically regulate financial investment regarding the construction of sport facilities through recycling and innovation related with material and sport structures prevailing diversity, multifunctional and sustainability. This way, assuming his role of entrepreneur, he will get further benefits of infrastructure through promotion to develop other activities and events, whose resources will be used to maintain it. In summary, the Universidad Iberoamericana del Deporte, located in Venezuela, will give this country and other Caribbean and Latin American nations a university graduate managing sport facilities designed for practicing of physical, sport and leisure activities, applying technical and scientific criteria, such as adaptation of infrastructure to specific requirements depending of the discipline, adjustment to current international regulations; respect to the right of all human being to practice the needed or preferred sport or physical activity in a right way, and appropriate and comfortable places to aim people to practice sports ;


innovation and creativity in some situations. All this will be the result of permanent studies and research as well as the self-confidence of our own capacities to make the world a better place to live and enjoy.


30 years of the development of sport and sports facilities in Spain Juan Andr茅s Hernando L贸pez Architect, Spain


30 years of sport facilities and sport development in Spain Presenter: Juan Andres Hernando López The view that I will try to give about the last 30 years of sport and sports facilities in Spain will be that of a person who has experienced this process from within as user and from without as an urban architect specializing in sports facilities. Both points of view have helped me to understand, observe, enjoy and, on occasion, to be a part of this period, acting in different fields ranging from the practice of sport to the planning, design and management of sports facilities. This work has been possible with HERNANDO & SAUQUÉ Architects, which came into being at the beginning of the Seventies when we first got in contact with handball sport and, from there, we founded the firm and developed all our activities through to the present day in that area. Times were different at the end of the Sixties and beginning of the Seventies. It was the end of a political cycle when “official sport” was directly and almost exclusively associated with the sportsman and, in consequence, sports facilities (with the exception of summer swimming pools) were conceived and designed for competition and access was almost exclusively for athletes belonging to various local clubs. Most competition facilities were State-owned. The other, privately owned facilities, generally owned by the wealthy upper middle class who had their own patrimony. They managed them open n expression of culture and sport and without competition as the preferential aim. Some of these sport halls and multifunctional clubs, with many different “activity areas” (between 10 and 20), have survived the passage of time well, while some of them are already over 100 years old and still enjoy very good patrimonial, associative, cultural and sports health.


It is possible to consider them as “milestones” that could serve as points of reference for the past and for projects of the future where we encounter a society in need of social-sporting and cultural models where personal contacts are favoured in a world oriented especially towards technology, communication and the sport itself. Nevertheless, times change and sports facilities have had to be adapted to a more competitive society than the one that facilitated their creation and survival down the years. All those that engage in this benefit from new inspiration for social and sporting life with better prospects for the future. The areas in need of overhaul and modernization are principally sports infrastructure, which is obsolete and in need of adaptation to new trends; and sports management which has to achieve viability in a more competitive world that has elevated it from the almost amateur to professional status in their evolution. This is a difficult approach and not always too successful, but indispensable in view of the times in which we live. With the beginning of democracy in Spain, according to the Secretary of State for Sport, Mr. D. Jaime Lissavetzky, in the prologue of CENID 2005 … “The practice of physical exercise and sport has acquired in Spain, just as in the majority of present-day societies, a social relevance and pioneering role of the first order. Thus, creating universal access to sport has been elevated to a civil right whose realization plays an increasingly important role in the government action of the public powers and institutions.” The Sports Act 10/1990 of 17th October, laying the foundations of the development of sport, structures the sector and allocates responsibilities in the structure of sport for its development in society as a whole, some for the various (public) administrations and some for the private sector. The structure of the State since the Spanish Constitution of 1978 gives an important boost to the development of sport, declaring it to be "a right for all Spanish people" and paved the way for the development of the administrative decentralization of the 17 autonomous communities which make up Spain today.


This moment was a good opportunity for the creation of structures that would permit existing activities to be given local management. Decentralization gave them competences to a greater or lesser degree according to the administrative area for diverse government sectors. Sport is the sector that has enjoyed largely decentralized development with a high level of management of the "competences and qualified resources" that each of them develops on the basis of its own Autonomous Community Sports Act, in addition to the 1990 Act, with the following general tasks: •

The promotion, construction and management of sports facilities.

The guardianship and coordination of the sports federations of the territorial autonomous area.

The coordination, promotion and guardianship of the sport associations.

Legal authority for sports policy in the autonomous area.

Sports subsidies.

Physical education in schools.

The training of technical personnel and sports instructors.

Management of training centres for degree courses in the sciences of physical exercise and sport.

As a consequence, decentralization extends to the local government units, and particularly the municipalities, which are the main promoters and managers of public sports services. Its contribution has been the main driving force behind our ability to show our current reality, a quality range of sports, without architectural barriers, close to home and available to all who want to incorporate sport into their culture of physical exercise and/or sport for the benefit of their wellbeing. In Spain today, the percentage of public sports providers is still higher than the remaining private providers. During people´s leisure time sport for all, education and welfare have been the true driving force behind the sports process over the past 30 years. As an example, in Catalunya (population 7,000,000 in 900 municipalities) 60% (7,420 II.DD.) of the sports facilities are public and the


remaining 40% (5,058 II.DD.) belong to private sports providers (commercial and non-profit). The facilities profile has changed very much with the passage of time, incorporating conventional sports areas, new uses and new spaces for unconventional physical activities (not tied to national standards). Every day, it is becoming more and more necessary to convert new sports infrastructure into efficient rational and “functional containers” that are easy to adapt to new technologies and new trends in sport, with lower modification costs and less impact on the environment. The cities are also undergoing these transformations and urbanism is an important intervention factor in the development and design of new community spaces. As a consequence, management of citizens’ active, free time is directly related to the design of the immediate public space in which many of the necessary activities for the consolidation of the social fabric of the district, village or town take place. The answer to all this has to be found by multidisciplinary teams of sociologists, social engineers, architects, engineers and educators. These define the strategic lines by which those individuals responsible for giving form and substance to urban space and its buildings so that we can be successful with the trends of the moment and the location. We still plan sports facilities without a definitive strategic sports plan, and it is really easy to make a lot of mistakes due to the fact that we move in areas that are not well defined. We act if we were the sports specialists, when in fact we are merely technical experts, the architects who convert into reality the ideas of the promoter, be he public or private. Cities like Vitoria/Gasteiz have developed a few facility prototypes, highly evolved “civic centres” in their provision of public services which go much further than the suggestion “Lövenich” in Cologne did for us, also in the Seventies with its “integrated basic unit”. Their example is challenging but extremely pragmatic and


attractive, from the technical and social point of view, and optimizes the invested public resources while also improving the management of the patrimony and quality services. These facilities achieve a high degree of effectiveness (delivering social and cultural sports activities to 75% of the population) and indisputable levels of efficiency, which is currently the most important criterion.


Sports for Urban Development Youth-Led Initiatives for improved livelihoods Kenneth Thuranira Kamenchu Sports and Youth Expert, United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), Kenya

Kenneth Kamenchu is a highly motivated individual and an eager learner with the ability to blend into most work oriented environments easily, also a team player with a creative flair and an eye for detail. As an experienced consultant on children/youth and sports issues, he widely traveled having worked with international non governmental organizations for the last 15 years. From 1999 to 2007 Kenneth Kamenchu worked as project officer for “Hope Sudan International”, as programme manager for “Global Urban Volunteers” and as youth and sports specialist for Youth, Sport and Environment Unit. (CYSE). Since 2007 he is working for the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN HABITAT). He coordinated the International Youth Day 2007 and is responsible for the sports and youth issues for UN Habitat. Kenneth is responsible for contacting international partners for fundraising projects for the Youth and Sports activities.


Sports for Urban Development (Youth-Led Initiatives for improved livelihoods) Presenter: Kenneth Kamenchu Introduction We are living in a world where young people constitute the majority of the urban population in rapidly urbanizing countries. An effective response to improve the living conditions of the urban poor and slum dwellers must be dealt with together with the challenges facing them. It is prudent therefore to involve the youth in development policies as a way of dealing with those challenges. Research conducted by UN-HABITAT, the UN Agency for Cities and other Human Settlements showed that the year 2007 would be the year when half the global human population would be living in towns and cities. This was two years ago and this means that now we are no longer predominantly rural. One in every three city residents find themselves living in inadequate housing with no or few basic services such as electricity, clean water and sanitation, Currently, slums are now home to 1 billion people around the world. The latest research shows that Sub-Saharan Africa today still has the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest proportion of its city dwellers living in slums. They constitute 62 percent of Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban populations. That compares to 43 percent in South Asia, 37 percent in East Asia, 28 percent in South East Asia, 27 percent in Latin America and the Caribbean, and 15 percent in North Africa. It is no surprise that urbanization indeed poses a great challenge to us. The worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young people, now numbering more than 1.3 billion, must be seen as a vanguard for development as well as key agents of positive social change in the urbanizing world. Globally, this accounts to roughly 40 percent of the global population. Indeed, young people are on the frontline of growing urban poverty, child trafficking, sexual exploitation, high unemployment and the growing phenomenon of street children. This is why UN-HABITAT recognizes the importance of working with young people and empowering them. Youth Empowerment The Secretary General of the United Nations, Mr. Ban Ki-Moon himself contributed funding to our new Moonbeam Youth Training Centre in Nairobi, Kenya. It is why we have also established six pilot youth resource centres in cities in East Africa, and six other cities in countries recovering from conflict. The Opportunities Fund for Urban Youth-Led Development is another programme that was established to support innovative youth-led urban development projects used to sustain the livelihood of youth and those living around them. Youth studies have become an important and growing sub-field within the social sciences and the applied fields, including planning. In addition to the publication of the specialized Journal of Youth Studies, there are also trendy interdisciplinary


research topics such as youth civic engagement, youth planning, and demographic studies analyzing Generation X and Generation Y, among others. This trend supports the growing interest in youth-led development. Youth and Sports Participation in youth sports has steadily been on the rise for the past twenty years (Joe Waters, 2004). Millions of children across the country take part in one or more sports throughout the year. Sport is used to mobilize and prepare young people for active participation in urban life and to promote poverty alleviation. UN-HABITAT and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) signed an MOU in Lausanne, Switzerland on February 5 2009 aimed at promoting youth empowerment through sport by targeting mainly vulnerable and disadvantaged communities world-wide. The landmark pact was signed by Mrs. Anna Tibaijuka, UN-HABITAT Executive Director, and the IOC President, Mr. Jacques Rogge, at the IOC Headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland. Both sides agreed that they would encourage advocacy and field-level activities will be driven in close cooperation between the UN-HABITAT’s offices and the 205 National Olympic Committees. “The IOC is working closely with a number of UN agencies. Through this collaboration, the IOC and UN Habitat will focus on the urban poor: millions of people, particularly children in the slums, for whom sport can bring escapism and hope”, said IOC President Jacques Rogge after the meeting. For a start, common projects will be implemented in the following three fields: - Youth empowerment through sport It is commonly understood that sport and physical activity contribute towards good physical health, specifically for the development of youth. It is also well acknowledged that the benefits of sport extend beyond physical health to include psychosocial health and general well being. It has been demonstrated that sport provides high self-esteem, the ability to cope, positive mood, enhanced motivation, better concentration and good judgement; all essential life skills (Burnett, 2001, Reid, Dyck, McKay, & Frisby, 1999). In Burnett’s relevant study conducted in South Africa she found that a ‘sport-for-all’ philosophy translated into opportunities for increased participation, leadership and upward mobility (Burnett, 2001). Research also indicates that sports involvement facilitates the attainment of important life skills and attitudes in children that can generalize beyond sports to other important areas of their lives (Siegel, 2006). Through sport youth are not only becoming physically and mentally healthy, they are also learning essential life skills to be transferred beyond sport. Further research indicates a correlation between participation in sport and personal empowerment: Personal empowerment results when feelings of powerlessness are reduced through the acquisition of skills and self-perceptions that encourage individuals to become causal agents in daily events. The development of qualities such as positive self-esteem, perceived competence, self-efficacy, and an internal locus of


control facilitate empowerment at the personal level. (Blinde & Taub, 1999 p. 182) It stands to reason that with increased psychological health and empowered consciousnesses, young people are better poised to make good decisions regarding their lives. It is this connection that has driven the concept of development through sport. The universality of sport posits games and physical activities as a language capable of cutting across barriers of race, language, gender, ability and culture. However critics argue that sport can also propagate negative developments, including exclusion, social inequalities and injury. Like any tool, success is dependent on how it is delivered. The belief that sport has the potential for more positive than negative is endorsed by the support of governments and civil society across the world. Following the Salt Lake City Olympics in February 2002, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan proclaimed: Sport can play a role in improving the lives of individuals, not only individuals, I might add, but whole communities. I am convinced that the time is right to build on that understanding, to encourage governments, development agencies and communities to think how sport can be included more systematically in the plans to help children, particularly those living in the midst of poverty, disease and conflict (United Nations, 2005). Subsequently the United Nations created an Inter-Agency Task Force on Sport for Development and Peace; the Task Force was constituted in November 2002. In 2005 the UN declared the International Year of Sport and Physical Education, encouraging member nations to use sport as a tool to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. The ability to participate in sport and physical activity has also been argued to be a basic human right based on the connection to positive youth development (Kidd & Donnelly, 2000). - Community-based sport activation in secondary towns, and - Slum dwellers' activation through sport. This will indeed empower youth and improve their livelihood through sports. Encouraging young people to participate in sports activities will help meet UN targets set by the Millennium Development Goals. The new partnership builds on the important ongoing work of other specialized UN agencies that have already teamed up with the IOC to place sport on their development agendas. Reaching out to young people in slums â&#x20AC;&#x153;We must not forget that over 50 per cent of slum populations are made up of young people and there is no better way to give direction and motivation than encouraging them to participate in sportsâ&#x20AC;? added Mrs Anna Tibaijuka.


To guarantee the successful implementation of this new cooperation agreement, a follow-up committee will be established. It will meet annually to further define, develop, and maintain a programme of common interest. Models of successful development through sports programs include these international examples: Sport-in-a-Box The SBOX project inspires young Canadians to use the power of sport to engage with their communities in global issues that affect us all. A legacy of the 2005 UN International Year of Sport and Physical Education (IYSPE), SBOX embodies the spirit of international cooperation that the UN fosters, empowering youth to take local action to address global challenges. An innovative, creative and fun project that uses sport to promote public awareness of relevant issues, SBOX emphasizes the importance of a life-long engagement in sport, physical activity and the appreciation of social-cultural diversity. The project operates in 20 communities across Canada. Through a series of 8 unique workshops, children ages 9-12 learn about the Millennium Development Goals through games and physical activities. Upon the completion of the workshops children are asked to create a box filled with items that reflect the lessons learned through the project (e.g. art, music, poetry, photography, artifacts). Communities are then twinned and youth have the opportunity to exchange the boxes between communities, introducing local knowledge exchange and building relationships. Olympafrica Youth Ambassador Programme (OYAP) OYAP is a volunteer programme in Lesotho whose mandate is to have youth empower youth through sport. The goal is to train young people to initiate their own empowerment projects, thereby transferring the power into their hands. The programme has two main functions: (1) to train youth to organize sport activities for other youth, and (2) to use these activities as a platform for peer education on relevant social issues. These goals serve to teach youth identified life-skills (e.g. teamwork, leadership, commitment), and also use sport as a tool for education on important topics such as HIV/AIDS and drug and alcohol abuse. Currently the programme hosts over 200 youth ambassadors across all ten districts of Lesotho. All of the ambassadors complete a training course that tackles relevant social issues such as: HIV/AIDS, drug and alcohol abuse, sexual and reproductive health, and family issues. Additionally the training addresses relevant management topics such as: volunteerism, leadership, project planning, fundraising, social styles, peer mentoring, the Lesotho National Olympic Committee, sport in Lesotho, associations and resources, development through sport, life skills, and the Special Olympics. Following the training ambassadors initiate projects relevant to their interests and the perceived needs of youth in Lesotho.


Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) MYSA is a self-help youth programme linking sports with environmental cleanups, AIDS prevention, leadership training and other community service activities involving approximately twenty thousand young people. MYSA promotes human rights and citizenship. The implementation of projects is based on respect for others and social responsibility. The participatory management style used is transparent, promotes democratic principles and nurtures accountability. Through youth driven leadership initiatives, young persons in MYSA contribute positively to the wellbeing of their community. They earn points for their performance in different sports and community activities. Each year the best young leaders by age and gender in the 16 zones in the slums then receive MYSA Leadership Awards, which also consist of educational bursaries/scholarships, worth Ksh 10,000, which are paid directly to their schools in support of school fees. In 2004, 400 young MYSA leaders received awards. Right To Play Right To Play is an international humanitarian organization that uses sport and play programs to improve health, develop life skills, and foster peace for children and communities in some of the most disadvantaged areas of the world. Working in both the humanitarian and development context, Right To Play trains local community leaders as Coaches to deliver its programs in countries affected by war, poverty, and disease in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and South America. Currently, Right To Play works in 23 countries: Azerbaijan, Benin, Botswana, Burundi, China, Ethiopia, Ghana, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Mali, Mozambique, Pakistan, Peru, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, the United Arab Emirates and Zambia. Education through Sports Sports and physical education provide the foundations necessary for the development and well-being of younger people in society and the educational system. Critics argue that sport can also propagate negative developments, including exclusion, social inequalities and injury. Like any tool, success is dependent on how it is delivered. The belief that sport has the potential for more positive than negative is endorsed by the support of governments and civil society across the world. While sports is gaining an importance in society and social development, it is also considered a social and cultural phenomenon that goes beyond sports facilities, stadiums and other areas where it is practiced. The spectacular development of sports through the media and its popularity, able to attract massive numbers of fans with diversified interests, lead inevitably to greater consideration of its educational role, to convey messages and contribute to the communication of ideas. International sporting events such as the Olympics and the FIFA World Cup provide opportunities for nation building and inspiration. Celebrated athletes can provide positive role models to young people by demonstrating the success achieved through hard work and determination.


During the 20th General Conference in 1978, UNESCO adopted its International Charter and through this it promotes physical education and sports. Physical education and sports do indeed contribute to developing â&#x20AC;&#x153;genericâ&#x20AC;? skills, the cognitive and physical potential of a child, and provide the foundations necessary for complete development and well-being. Civic foundations: another educational aspect, equally important as physical and mental well-being, is related to the inherent values that sports transmit: Respect for rules Rejection of cheating, meaning to seek victory at any price Respect of the winner for the loser, as well as the loserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acceptance that the winner is the best at the moment (Winning/Losing with grace) Goal setting Teamwork Leadership These civic and democratic foundations forge the values for living together in diversity and respecting differences. Sports stir up passion and is an athletic encounter allowing us to surpass ourselves and do our best in peak condition. Sports participation in an urban life According to reports provided by both American Sports Data and the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, competitive and recreational sports are a significant industry in the U.S., driving close to 40 million participation days of activity annually. Approximately 74 percent of the 48 million youth between the ages of six and 17 have participated in sports, and 26 million youth indicate that they are actively involved in at least one organized sports activity. . From a revenue perspective, youth sports are a $4 billion industry that has annual double-digit growth. The past decade of exponential growth in youth sports programming has been fueled by three primary market conditions. First, as sports participation among youth increases, so does the demand from parents for their children to excel in those sports. 35% of people aged under-30 partakes in some form of fitness and running according to the UK report of May 2001. Key findings in a survey done in America found that: Across the US, 69% of girls and 75% of boys currently play organized and team sports. Where gender gaps in athletic participation appear, they are related to economic disparities, race and ethnicity, and family characteristics.


Whereas similar rates of sports participation between girls and boys exist in suburban communities, urban and rural girls are less involved than their male peers In urban communities, 59% of third through fifth grade girls are involved with sports, compared to 80% of boys. Globalization and Sports During the 20th century, sports took on an increasingly international flavor; aside from the world championships for individual sports, like soccer's World Cup, large-scale international meets, such as the Pan-American games and the Commonwealth games, were inaugurated. Sports have correspondingly become increasingly politicized, as shown in the boycott of the 1980 Moscow games by Western nations and the retaliatory boycott of the 1984 Los Angeles games by Soviet-bloc nations, an exchange brought on by Soviet actions in Afghanistan. 1995 Rugby World Cup provided a seminal moment for nation building in South Africa. In a newly post-apartheid state, Nelson Mandela stepped out onto the field wearing a South African jersey to embrace Francois Pienaar, the white Captain of the Sprinbok after they won the championship. A powerful demonstration of the ability of sport to unite against racial division. Politics directly related with economic issues, influence the course of action one country might choose against another and affect sports as they are a vital part of a nation's role in the global scene. Individual countries during the recent past have boycotted sport events or used them for propaganda reasons and thus, imposed their political views affecting the global scene. Due to the worlds' interest in sport, the power to influence the public becomes a huge issue and has been the reason for many â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;country-battles' in the recent past. At the same time, the commercialism that accompanied spectator sports gradually engulfed both amateur and professional sports. By the late 20th century, the televising of athletic events had made sports big business. On the other hand, expanding public concern with personal physical health led to mass participation, not necessarily competitive, in sports like running, hiking, cycling, martial arts, and gymnastics. Athletic activity by women expanded, especially after political action in the 1960s and 1970s opened doors to many forms of competition and an increased share of public funding for sports. Economic integration and free trade have and surely will, continue to affect the sports and fitness industry in the future. Countries use sports either to impose their economic power over others, or to elevate their current role. Due to sport's great costs, counties' governments engage themselves in promoting and supporting these economic needs by authorizing special public monetary programs or by seeking private financing. Corporate sponsorships are today a reality, as companies spend about $6 billion annually sponsoring activities ranging from the Olympic Games to the World Cup. The popularity of sponsored events is due to several reasons. They enhance the reputation and image of the sponsor, they provide a focal point for marketing efforts and sales campaigns, and they generate publicity and media coverage. More cost-effective than


advertising, sponsorships include prestige and at times target a worldwide audience. Broadcasting rights, ticket sales, merchandising, and sponsorships, are the main reasons of sport's unique role in a country's strategy. Living today in the information age, with amazing revolutions in technology and communication, sport experts believe that sport is greatly influenced by the actions of individual nations, as well as by the international trends that influence the world economy. Moreover, being a spectacle, sport athletes have become professionals that through them their country's culture is promoted and their achievements contribute to the country's fame. Thus, the sport and fitness industries, as part of our Global Society, have become lately an issue of great concern. Studies worldwide provide valuable information about the political, geographical, economic, cultural, social, aesthetic and historical aspects of sports and it is firmly believed that they will continue ‘shaping' one another in the years to come. Sports and Peace Sport is an international language. Its ability to cross cultures enables sportrelated programmes to bridge social and ethnic divides. As a result, sport can be a powerful tool to promote peace, both symbolically on the global level and very practically within communities. The power of sport can be used as a tool for preventing conflict as well as an element for building sustainable peace. When applied effectively, sports programmes promote social integration and foster tolerance. These core values are the same as those necessary for lasting peace. In post- conflict environments in particular, this can work to reduce tensions and generate dialogue. Realizing the potential of sport as a tool for Development and peace Sport is far more than a luxury or a form of entertainment. Access to and participation in sport is a human right and essential for individuals of all ages to lead healthy and fulfilling lives. Sport—from play and physical activity to organized competitive sport—has an important role in all societies. Sport is critical to a child’s development. It teaches core values such as cooperation and respect. It improves health and reduces the likelihood of disease. It is a significant economic force providing employment and contributing to local development. And it brings individuals and communities together, bridging cultural or ethnic divides. Sport offers a cost-effective tool to meet many development and peace challenges, and help achieve the MDGs. The potential links between sport and peace are also powerful. From international events to the grass roots, sport brings people together in a way that can cross boundaries and break down barriers, making the playing field a simple and often apolitical site for initiating contact between antagonistic groups. Consequently, sport can be an ideal forum for resuming social dialogue and bridging divides, highlighting the similarities between people and breaking down prejudice.


The popularity of sport and its convening power further contribute to sport being a powerful voice for communicating messages of peace and a site for symbolic public acts on the global and local levels. Sport is an effective element in community-based initiatives that aim to create sustainable peace. The skills and values learned through sport are many of the same skills and values taught in peace education to resolve and prevent conflict and create conditions conducive to peace, from the interpersonal to the international well crafted sports activities teach respect, honesty, communication, cooperation, empathy, and how and why to adhere to rules. Sport is a powerful way to communicate these values, especially to young people, in a way that is fun and participatory. For refugees, displaced persons, orphans and former child soldiers, sport offers a sense of normality providing structure in destabilizing environments, and serves as a means to channel energies positively. Sport in pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals Sport directly contributes to the pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals. It is an innovative and effective tool to assist existing efforts to achieve specific targets such as those concerning education, gender equality, HIV/AIDS and the reduction of major diseases. More broadly, well-designed sports programmes are also a cost-effective way to contribute significantly to health, education, development and peace and a powerful medium through which to mobilize societies as well as communicate key messages. As one of the richest and most developed aspects of civil society, and as a powerful international network of private sector actors and organizations, sport opens new avenues for creative partnerships through which to achieve the Untied Nations development goals. The Habitat Agenda stipulates how youth should be involved in human settlements development with specific focus on the development of participatory approaches in which young people can voice their views and demands in decision-making processes. To actualize the mainstreaming of youth in urban development, UN-HABITATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic vision has been refined to focus on strategic partnerships with youth with the intention of leveraging resources and coordinating international programme activities which work towards similar goals of enhanced youth engagement. Sports forms part and parcel of these approaches that can be used to engage the youth in urban development directly and indirectly. Through sports, youth speak the same language, experience life through different perspectives and develop a healthier perspective on life. Sports, evidently plays a major role in lowering the vulnerability of young people to factors such as stress, depression, crime and social delinquency. Sport also addresses urban issues such as unemployment, poor public health, environmental problems, and gender inequity. Simultaneously, training, education and entrepreneurship can be promoted through sport. Sports have a strategic place in the Habitat-Youth paradigm. It is one activity that directly links youth and urban planning and development. This aspect is in keeping with the UN-HABITAT Youth Strategyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus on leadership programs developed to catalyze further engagement of youth. Thank you.


3

United Nations agency for the built environment focusing on inclusive, greener, safer cities

Lead agency on shelter cluster for post disaster reconstruction

Lead agency for MDG 7 target on improving living conditions of slum dwellers

Position in development arena

Mr. Kenneth Kamenchu, Sports and Youth Expert, United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)

IAKS Congress for the Design, Construction, Modernization and Management of Sports and Leisure Facilities Cologne, Germany – October 2009

Sports for Urban Development (Youth-Led Initiatives for improved livelihoods)

4

2

URBAN 37%

1970

RURAL 63%

URBAN 47%

2000

RURAL 53%

URBAN 60%

2030

RURAL 40%

An urban era – the need for UNHABITAT

Adequate shelter for all

Sustainable urban development

UN-HABITAT’s mission and vision


5

5%

2%

Developed Countries

40%

42%

11%

Developing Countries

10%

17%

22%

35%

16%

Decline (-0% )

Slow (0-1% )

Moderate (1-2% )

Rapid growth (2-4% )

Accelerated growth (+4% )

• • • • •

One stop Youth Resource Centres The Tegla Loroupe Peace Run International Olympic Committee Partnership UN- HABITAT’s Youth Advisory Board Youth Opportunities Fund

Key Insights from the Case Studies

In the North, almost half of the cities are declining In the South, more than half of cities are growing very fast Developing world cities growing 10 times faster

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Urban growth by region

6

Recommendations

Pockets of poverty Exclusion and marginalization Environmental degradation Decay

General wealth Enhance social Development Provide employment Incubators of innovation and creativity

• Municipalities to give priority to open spaces for recreation and sports • Governments to create larger budgets for sports facilties and youth empowerment • Focus on related, ‘doable’ behaviors that are defined, measured and offer relative advantage over status quo • Attract key influencers and early adopters – allow them to model behaviors for target audiences • Stage implementation to ensure scalability, longevity, flexibility for urban livelihoods

Design Imperatives:

• • • •

• • • •

Cities – opportunities and challenges


• Merci and thank you for your attention

• Questions

• Involve leading athletes, artists to invite target audiences to participate in urban youth-led development • Allow individuals, organizations to choose area of interest • Create link between sport, healthy living, clean environment • Establish signature icon that identifies ‘I’m in!’- participatory process • Enable community and organization projects, campaigns • Use social networking site to allow participants to report their achievements and engage with others • Aggregate and report progress to create momentum – people see how they are making a difference • Celebrate success

Concept Under Development

Assist us answer this question as the solution is right here!!!!!

Not just to raise awareness of sports facilities issues…. But move beyond awareness and concern to change behaviour and inspire action towards improved environmental responsibility and sustainable living choices How?

We are seated here today with the answer and its through this forum that we have to chart this way for this!!

• UN HABITAT’s Youth Programme and the Resource Centres • Sports Strategy • Youth Empowerment Programme • Youth as Agents of Peace • Partnerships • The Challenge to UN HABITAT How do we effectively reach the young people in sports activities? How do we engage the young people in meaning dialogue? How do we prepare our youth for sports leadership positions? How do we prepare our youth for challenges ahead of them in this demanding Era?

UN HABITAT and SPORTS


Sports facility sustainability: Ecological, economic and social aspects Chairman Dr. Julius de Heer Director, de Heer Consulting, Switzerland

Julius de Heer, a Dutch national, graduated as a Civil Engineer at the Swiss Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne and followed a post-graduate study in human ecology and environmental impact assessment at the University of Geneva. J. de Heer obtained his PhD at the EPFL in environmental sciences. He co-founded in 1988 ECOSCAN SA, one of the first Swiss companies specialised in environmental consulting services. In 2005, he founded his own company J. de Heer Consulting, House of International Sport in Lausanne, specialised in sustainable sport development. Julius de Heer has a large experience in all technical aspects of Olympic summer and winter bids and works as an IOC expert. He is a pioneer in sustainable sport development, applying new sustainable strategies to sport events and sport facilities. Many environmental methodologies were applied for the first time to sports events, like Sion 2002's green book, Sion 2006's strategic environmental assessment and environmental management system, Paris 2012's Agenda 21, "zero-emission concepts" for Paris 2012, Rugby 2007 World Cup France, Tokyo 2016. Julius de Heer is also active in the eco-design of sport facilities like the venue selection for Olympic bids (Sion 2002 and 2006, Almaty 2014, Sochi 2014), design and overlay of outdoor venues Asian Winter Games 2011 in Almaty, Geneva football stadium, Avenches equestrian competition centre, and environmental audits for existing stadiums Paris 2012. He gives a two-week course during the Master of Urban Studies at the University of Lausanne.


Sustainability targets of the IOC Gilbert Felli Olympic Games Executive Director, International Olympic Committee, Switzerland

Gilbert Felli joined the IOC in 1990 as Director of the IOC Department of Sports, Olympic Games Coordination and Relations with International Federations. In March 2003, Gilbert Felli was appointed Olympic Games Executive Director. He was a member of the Evaluation Commissions for the Olympic Games from 2002 to 2014. Furthermore, he has been a member of the Olympic Games Coordination Commissions since the Albertville Olympic Games and is currently Executive Director of the Vancouver, London and Sochi Coordination Commissions, the Singapore and Innsbruck Youth Olympic Games Coordination Commissions as well as the Evaluation Commission for the 2016 Olympic Summer Games. As the Olympic Games Executive Director, he is responsible for the running, coordination and follow-up of all Olympic Games activities, from the candidature phase to the actual holding of the Olympic Games. On many occasions, he has also been in a honorary position as President of the organising or technical committees for competitions such as world and continental championships in skiing, tennis, figure skating, curling, archery, gymnastics, basketball, volleyball and athletics. He has a personal experience of sports competitions as an official of a Swiss ski team and as a coach for ski and ice-hockey teams. Gilbert Felli also participated in a ski professional circuit in the USA for several years and played ice-hockey with a Swiss club. Mr Felli has a diploma in architecture, and worked several years in construction business in Switzerland before switching to the sports world.


Planning instruments and evaluation methods for sustainable sports facility construction Natalie Eßig Dipl.-Ing., Architect, Institute of Building Physics at the Technical University of Munich, Fraunhofer Institute of Building Physics, Germany

After her architectural studies at the Technische Universität Darmstadt (Germany) and at the Politecnico di Torino (Italy), Natalie Eßig worked as an architect in the field of energy-efficiency and sustainable architecture. In 2004 she returned to academia as a lecturer and began her dissertation about “Sustainability of Olympic Buildings – Assessment Methods for the Sustainable Performance of Olympic Venues” at the Technische Universität Darmstadt and at the University of Technology, Sydney (Australia). In March 2008 she started her career at the Institute of Building Physics at the Technische Universität München and at the Fraunhofer Institut for Building Physics (IBP). She is an expert in the field of sustainable building performance (assessment and certification). She is involved in the development of the German Certificate for Sustainable Buildings (scientific advice) and is coordinating the transfer of knowledge between the Fraunhofer-Institute of Building Physics, the German Sustainable Building Council (DGNB) and the Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs. Further fields of her activities are research in national and international assessment and certifications methods (LEED, BREEAM), energy efficiency of buildings, life cycle assessment and sport facilities.


“Planning Instruments and Assessment Methods for Sustainable Sport Facilities” Presenter: Natalie Essig 1. Introduction Buildings, which have been built in consideration of sustainable criteria, have many advantages compared to conventional buildings. Life-cycle costs are one of the most important factors, higher property values as well as an improved image. Further effects are reduced risks, positive influences on physical health of the users and a reduction of negative influences on the surrounding infrastructure and environment [1] - these aspects also applies to sports facilities! To plan, build, assess and certify the sustainable performance of sport facilities, standardized planning instruments are necessary. These tools should contain a high level of detail and be as clear as possible and easy to understand for the user. Therefore the following abstract will give an overview about international planning instruments, which could be used to promote sustainable sport facilities.

2. Planning Instruments for Sustainable Sport Facilities At an international level, a great variety of complex planning and assessment tools are presently available for sustainable architecture. The assessment methods were especially developed for the building industry and ranging from office and industrial to residential buildings - but in the field of sustainable sports facilities there is still a great lack of transfer of knowledge! Within the scope of sustainable sport facilities, however, appropriate tools need to be developed. These planning instruments for sport venues must include concrete, precisely formulated protection goals and leading indicators and enable the planning team to recognize impacts and interrelations existing between social, economic, and ecologic dimensions and to adequately treat these in the process of planning and building, respectively. At the national and the international level a great number of tools and aids designed to facilitate the assessment of the building sustainability are now available. The following list gives a survey of available tools and aids, which can be used to assess buildings [2]: •

Product declarations (EPD): building products and auxiliary building materials (e.g. environmental product declarations)

Building components: functional units after installation

Tendering aids: ecologically oriented technical specifications

Energy performance certificates: Describing and assessing the energy efficiency of buildings


â&#x20AC;˘

Checklists and guidelines: Specification of objectives, principles and overall concepts (e.g. Guideline for Sustainable Building, issued by German Fed. Min. of Transport, Building, and Urban Affairs BMVBS)

â&#x20AC;˘

Tools for holistic planning and assessment: life-cylce assessment methods (LCA), tool for life-cycle costs (LCC)

â&#x20AC;˘

Building performance labels and certificates: building assessment

3. Assessment and Certification Systems for Sustainable Buildings An important progress regarding sustainability assessment is based on the development of building labels and building certificates.

Fig. 1. Labels and certificates for the assessment of the sustainability of buildings These labels permit the comprehensive assessment of the quality of building and planning. In the early work phases of a building project they provide planners and builders with an assessment of the project, which may enable them to improve a building's sustainability performance already in the design phase. On the international level a great multitude of very different assessment methods is currently represented. The British BREEAM label (the pioneer from the 90s) and the American LEED method have been internationally established. Due to its perfected marketing concept, this method has already been adapted for assessment by several countries, for instance LEED Canada, LEED India, LEED Emirates etc. (see figure 1).


Fig. 2. Comparison of the contents of BREEAM, LEED and DGNB In general, the assessment methods can be assigned to two categories, distinguishing assessment typologies of the first and second generation. The assessment methods of the first generation include those tools which were the first systems to be developed in the 1990s, attributing priority to evaluating the "green" or environmental and energy-efficient building performance criteria (like BREEAM, LEED or CASBEE), i.e. featuring the Greenbuilding approach. Second-generation assessment methods, like DGNB, include those tools which do not only consider environmental building criteria but the overall performance of the entire construction, namely also economic, socio-cultural and technical aspects or aspects related to site and process quality (Sustainable-building approach) (see figure 2).

4. Olympic Venues and Assessment Methods Existing assessment methods, like LEED, BREEAM or DGNB are however predominantly designed for the assessment of the planning, construction and the management of office, residential and industrial buildings. In the field of sports facilities such tools havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been yet established in the international building sector. If we want to know, how such assessment methods are working for sport facilities, we have to look on Olympic Games. To implement a sustainable planning process for Olympic Games, the IOC demands in its Candidature Procedure and Questionnaire that an environmental impact assessment for all


Olympic venues must be carried out already in the candidature phase [3]: “Carry out initial environmental impact assessments for all venues, competition venues, IBC and MPC, Olympic Village(s) and interconnecting Olympic infrastructure”. This environmental impact assessment is particularly aimed at the ecological assessment of the quality of Olympic structures and has not yet been included in the overall analyses of Olympic events (like the IOC's 'Olympic Games Global Impact Study - OGGI') or in assessments of Olympic Games presented by Greenpeace (Olympic Games Sydney 2000), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) (Olympic Games Athens 2004) or by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) (Olympic Games Beijing 2008). Yet this demand is answered by further and future host cities by employing different assessment methods. The foundation was laid on the occasion of the Olympic Games 2000 in Sydney, when benchmarks were developed for the assessment of the ecological impacts of the competition venues. The national Australian assessment methods Green Star (Green Building Council Australia – GBCA) and NABERS (National Australian Built Environment Rating System, Australian Government) were developed on this basis [4] (see figure 3). The Organising Committees of the Olympic Winter Games of Vancouver 2010 (VANOC) and the London Summer Games of 2012 are certifying their new and existing competition venues and non-competition facilities by applying existing national assessment schemes “to building and operating Games facilities that would ensure a minimal environmental footprint“[5]. Vancouver, for instance, uses the north-American system LEED Canada (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) to assess its Olympic sports facilities. For the London Games of 2012 a special label for Olympic sports facilities will be designed within the national sustainability method BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) to assure the ecological implementation of Olympic venues. Especially for the Olympic venues of the Beijing 2008 Games, the Chinese Ministry of Construction (MoC) and the Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST) developed the Green Olympic Building Assessment System (GOBAS). In the Olympic Winter Games of Turin 2006, the Turin media village was assessed by means of GBTool. When the city of Paris submitted its application for the Olympic Games of 2012 the design of the Olympic indoor swimming pool was certified with the French tool HQE (La Haute Qualité Environnementale) already in the preparatory stages [6]. Also for the candidature for the Olympic Winter Games 2018 the Munich Candidature Committee will assess all the Olympic venues with the Gold Standard of the German Certificate for Sustainable Buildings (DGNB).


Fig. 3. Olympic Venues and Assessment Methods Primarily through the Olympic events energy-efficient construction methods of sport venues and formulations for the assessment of sustainable sports facilities are becoming more and more accepted on an international level. Finally we can say: The basis for sustainable sport facilities is just given, but the existing criteria catalogues has to be adopted on the sport venues! Furthermore assessment methods for the sustainable performance of sports facilities has to mind more than ecological, economic and socio-cultural points, sport criteria must be included as well (see Figure 4). Besides the classical three pillars model (ecological, economic, and socio-cultural aspects), there are a lot of other criteria for the assessment of sport venues that have to be considered for certification. Sport aspects means here the functional and site quality of venues, i.e. inclusion of functional, barrier free and architectonic qualities as well as criteria for site selection and sport infrastructure.


Fig. 4. Aspects of Assessment Methods for Sustainable Sport Facilities

References [1] Braune, A. 2007: Short study. Potenziale des Nachhaltigen Bauens in Deutschland: Analyse der internationalen Strukturen; p. 4; from http://www.gesbc.org/fileadmin/downloads/potenziale_nachhaltiges_bauen_in_deutschland.p df; April 23, 2008 [2] Hegger, M. et al. 2006: Energie Atlas, Nachhaltige Architektur; p. 191 [3] International Olympic Committee 2006: Candidature Acceptance Procedure and Questionnaire for the XXII. Olympic Winter Games 2014; p.138; from http://multimedia.olympic.org/pdf/en_report_945.pdf; January 3, 2008 [4] Wood, P. 2007: Green Building, Do not leave it to goodwill and collabaration at all; p. 5; from http://www.minterellison.com/public/resources/file/ebcd8600c52b166/GreenBuildings.pdf; July 31, 2008 [5] Vancouver2010 (2007). Championing Environmental Legacies; from http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/OrganizingCommittee/MediaCentre/FeatureStories/2007/ 04/18/45436_0704180905-273; June 11, 2007 [6] Gontier, P. (2005). L’architecture comme composante d’un écosystème urbain: exemple d’une piscine olympique écologique; from http://sdmed2005.conferences.gr/index.php?id=2669; April 23, 2008


Low-energy and zero-energy sports halls Christian Lanzinger Executive Board Member of kplan AG, Germany

Christian Lanzinger was born in 1968 in Germany. From 1990 to 1996 he studied business administration at the University of Regensburg. Afterwards from 1997 to 1999 he worked as a developer. In 1999 he assumed the leadership of factoring and project development at the kplan AG, a corporation for project development and complete planning in Germany. Since 2005 he is a member of the executive board of kplan AG.


Low-energy and zero-energy sports halls

Cornelia Jacobsen Hausladen Engineering, Germany

Cornelia Jacobsen was born in 1970 in Munich. She studied engineering with the main focus on physical technics at the University of Munich. From 1995 to 2002 she was working as a scientific officer at the research center in energy economics in Munich. Since 2000 she is working at Hausladen Engineering in Germany. First she was acting as a project director, afterwards she was the main leader in the range of engineering and since 2009 she ist a member of the executive board of Hausladen Engineering. Among other duties, she is responsible for the development of buildings and engineering.


10%

50%

(50% aller öffentl. Projekte)

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard Unternehmensstruktur

50%

Bäder, Schule, Sport, Freizeit

90%

Industrie u. Gewerbe

kdata

PPP KonzeptEntwicklung Ausschreibung u. Vergabe

Öffentl. Hand u. Parakommunale Einrichtungen

Öffentl. Sicherheit u. Ordnung; Feuerwachen, Bau- / Betriebshöfe

kplan®AG

Suisse Projets

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

(4 Pilotprojekte)

Nachhaltiger PassivhausStandard

Leanergie®

Dipl.-Ing. Cornelia Jacobsen Dipl.-Kfm. Christian Lanzinger

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

3

1

Birkenweg 10 35708 Haiger Tel: 02773/910120 Fax:02773/910125

Niederlassung

kplan AG Haiger

Leanergie®/ energieeffiziente Bauweise

Public Private Partnership – Konzepte

Finanzierungsberatung

Ausschreibungen

Wettbewerbe und Studien

Architektur

Technische Planung

Tragwerksplanung

Projektsteuerung

Projektdurchführung

Projektentwicklung / Consulting

Forschung und Entwicklung

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard Leistungen

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen Daten und Fakten im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Eiserfelderstr. 316 57080 Siegen Tel: 0271/35929-0 Fax: 0271/35929-15

Bahnhofstr. 13 93326 Abensberg Tel. 09443 / 921-100 Fax: 09443 / 921-180

Siegen

Niederlassung

kplan AG

Zentraler Geschäftssitz

kplan AG Abensberg

- Hochwertige IT-Infrastruktur, Glasfaservernetzung

- Bauvolumen in 2008 ca. 200 Mio. EURO

- Umsatz ca. 5 Mio. EURO

und technische Konsortien

- 55 Mitarbeiter im Bereich Architektur, Projektentwicklung

Dipl.-Kfm. Christian Lanzinger, Architektin Simone Mattedi

- Vorstände:

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

4

2


Sporthallen Daten und Fakten im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

- Umsatz ca. 3 Mio. EURO pro Jahr

und CAD Konstrukteure

- 36 Ingenieure, Physiker, Architekten, Techniker

Dipl.-Ing. (FH) Martin Kirschner

Dipl.-Ing. (FH) Cornelia Jacobsen,

- Erweiterte Geschäftsführung:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerhard Hausladen, Josef Bauer

- Geschäftsführer:

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Feldkirchener Str. 7a 85551 Heimstetten Tel: 089/991525-0 Fax: 089/991525-99

Haustechnik Bauphysik Energietechnik

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Erfahrung aus über 40 Sporthallenprojekten

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

7

5

Fachoberschule/ Berufsoberschule Erding mit extrem niedrigen Primärenergieverbrauch

Nachhaltigkeitszertifizierung

Wettbewerbe und Studien

Energieversorgungskonzepte

Thermische Bauphysik

Strömungssimulation

Thermische Simulation

Gebäudeaerodynamik

Fassade

Energiekonzepte

Haustechnische Anlagen

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard Leistungen

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Leanergie®

Gefördert von der Deutschen Stiftung Umwelt

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

8

6


Vermeidung unkontrollierter Fensterlüftung mit hohem Energieverbrauch

Optimale Aufenthaltsqualität

11

Reduktion des Kunstlichteinsatzes (Stromverbrauch)

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Nutzung von alternativer Energie (Erdwärme, Erdkühle, Solarenergie, etc.)

% - 80 %

Reduktion Schadstoffemissionen (Heizung, Strom, etc.) im Betrieb um ca. 60

um ca. 80 %

Reduktion Energiebedarf (Wärme, Strom und Betriebskosten)

9

Zielsetzungen …aus energetischer Sicht

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Beispiel Sporthalle Neuburg bei Coburg

3.

Nichtmonetäre Aspekte Fazit / Ausblick

6. 7.

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

keine späteren Nachrüstkosten, falls sich gesetzliche Vorgaben ändern zukunftsorientiertes Konzept, mehr Planungssicherheit bei Kosten

12

Reduktion der Feinstaubbelastung •

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

nachhaltiger Umgang mit Ressourcen •

10

Vermeidung von Schall (von außen und innen)

Schaffung von „Lebensräumen“ •

leichte Bedienbarkeit der technischen Anlagen •

optimale Behaglichkeit und hoher Komfort

hohe Tageslichtnutzung / Reduktion des Kunstlichteinsatzes

Einsatz ökologischer Baustoffe – Senkung der Schadstoffbelastung

gute Luftqualität in d. Räumen

Zielsetzungen …für die Nutzer – aus der Sicht der Nutzer

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard Themenschwerpunkte

Beispiel Sporthalle Straubing

Niedrigenergiestandard

Definition Passivhaus-/

- Wirtschaftlichkeit

- Bauliche und technische Aspekte

- Vorgehensweise

5.

4.

Zielsetzungen aus Nutzersicht

2.

- Das Projekt

Zielsetzungen aus energetischer Sicht

1.

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH


Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Projektbeispiel Sporthalle Neustadt bei Coburg

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Projektbeispiel Sporthalle Neustadt bei Coburg

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

15

13

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Prüfung der Möglichkeiten der Primärenergieoptimierung

Schritt 2

Prüfung, inwieweit beim Neubau der Sporthalle unter den gegebenen Randbedingungen mit vertretbarem Aufwand der Passivhausstandard erzielbar ist

Schritt 1:

Eignungstest zu Projektbeginn

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Projektbeispiel Sporthalle Neustadt bei Coburg

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

16

14


Dämmung Außenwände/ Dach mit ca. 14 / 17 cm Wärmedämmung

Lüftungsanlage mit WRG nur in Teilbereichen (Duschen, Umkleiden)

Spez. HWB ca. 64,9 kWh/(m² a)

Sporthallen Variante 2: Maßnahmen im Niedrigenergieim Einzelnen oder Passivhausstandard

Konventionelle Wärmeschutzverglasung

„EnEV 2009 ohne flächendeckende mechanische Lüftung“:

Variante 2: Maßnahmen im Einzelnen

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Gesamte Primärenergieoptimierung des Gebäudes

Variante 3:

„EnEV-Standard 2009“; mechanische Lüftung mit WRG nur in Teilbereichen

Variante 2 (EnEV):

Sehr hoher Dämmstandard; flächendeckende mechanische Lüftung mit hocheffizienter Wärmerückgewinnung

Variante 1 (Versuch Passivhaus):

Variantenvergleich:

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

19

17

Das Erreichen des Passivhausstandards möglich. Spez. Heizwärmebedarf ca. 13,8 kWh/(m² a)

• •

Primärenergie-/CO2-Bilanz der Haustechnik Lebenszyklusanalyse (LEGEP)

• •

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Passivhausprojektierungspaket (PHPP)

Tageslichtsimulation (=> hohe Tageslichtautonomie)

• •

Thermisch-dynamische Simulationsrechnung

Durchgeführte Simulationsberechnungen

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Dämmung Außenwände/ Dach mit ca. 35/ 40 cm Wärmedämmung Lüftungsanlage mit Wärmerückgewinnung; Eta (Wirkungsgrad) ca. 80%

Passivhausfenster mit Dreifachverglasung

Versuch zur Erreichung des Passivhaus-Standards:

Variante 1: Maßnahmen im Einzelnen

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

20

18


Neubau

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Stromverbrauch

Vergleich ENEV 2009 zu Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard Leanergie®

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

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21

wirtschaftlich darstellbar

Zusätzliche Primärenergieoptimierung kurzfristig kaum

Vergleich ENEV 2009 zu Passivhausstandard

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Lüftungsanlage

Vergleich mit „EnEV“-Variante (2009) mit, bzw. ohne

darstellbar?

Der Passivhausstandard kann erreicht werden. Ist der dieser hohe energetische Standard wirtschaftlich

Wirtschaftliche Einschätzung

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

24

22


Vergleich ENEV 2009 zu Passivhausstandard (ohne Berücksichtigung Kosten Lüftungsanlage)

Gebäude, die das gesetzlich geforderte

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Anforderungsniveau (EnEV) unterschreiten

Begriff gesetzlich nicht eindeutig festgelegt

Definition Niedrigenergiehaus

Drucktestkennwert n50 ≤ 0,6 h-1

und Strom ≤ 120 kWh/m²EBFa

Primärenergiebedarf für Heizung, Warmwasser

Heizwärmebedarf ≤ 15 kWh/m²EBFa

Definition Passivhaus

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im NiedrigenergieWirtschaftliche Einschätzung oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

27

25

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Projektbeispiel Sporthalle Straubing

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Mehrinvestitionskosten Passivhausstandard: ca. 60.000 €

Vergleich ENEV 2009 zu Passivhausstandard (ohne Berücksichtigung Kosten Lüftungsanlage)

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

28

26


Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Bruttovolumen: 13.920 m3

Nettogrundfläche: 2.740 m2

Haustechnik-/ Energiekonzept: Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Architekt: Löhle & Neubauer Architekten, Augsburg

Bauherr: Stadt Straubing

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

31

29

Lageplan

Schnitt

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Grundriss Erdgeschoss / Grundriss Untergeschoss

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

32

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o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

Sportbodenheizung

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

AB

WRG

FO

AU

Lüftungszentrale

33

35

Heizungs- und Lüftungskonzept Turnhalle

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

o

ZU

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

2

4

7

12

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Tageslichtsimulation

Tageslichtquotient [%]

1

Solaranlage

Lüftungsgerät

36

34

Platzbedarf Pelletslager, Haustechnik im Untergeschoss

Pelletskessel

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Pelletslager

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH


Ausrichtung

Baulicher Wärmeschutz

Sonnenschutz

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Quelle Bilder: Fachverband Tageslicht und Rauchschutz e.V., www.fvlr.de

Lichtverteilung

Oberlichter

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

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Sporthallen im NiedrigenergieNichtmonetäre Vorteile oder Passivhausstandard

⇒ zukunftsorientiertes Konzept, mehr Planungssicherheit bei Kosten

⇒ keine späteren Nachrüstkosten, falls sich gesetzliche Vorgaben ändern

⇒ nachhaltiger Umgang mit Ressourcen

⇒ Vermeidung von Schall (von außen und innen)

⇒ optimale Behaglichkeit und hoher Komfort

⇒ bessere Luftqualität

Energieverbrauch

⇒ Vermeidung von unkontrollierter Fensterlüftung mit hohem

⇒ Reduktion der Schadstoffemission um ca. 60 – 80 % (CO2:ca. 17 t/a)

Energiemarkt

=> Reduktion des Energiebedarfs und somit weniger Abhängigkeit vom

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Montage und eingebaute Solardach-Membran

Turnhalle Neuburg

Turnhalle Burgweinting / Regensburg

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

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38


Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

⇒ Bessere Zukunftssicherheit durch Passivhausstandard

⇒ Nichtmonetäre Vorteile berücksichtigen

aber: auf qualitative Vergleichbarkeit achten!

⇒ Wirtschaftlichkeit derzeit nur langfristig darstellbar

⇒ Passivhausstandard bei Sporthallen möglich

Fazit:

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

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42

Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit

Dipl.-Ing. Cornelia Jacobsen Dipl.-Kfm. Christian Lanzinger

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH

Sporthallen im Niedrigenergie- oder Passivhausstandard

Ingenieurbüro Hausladen GmbH


Modular structures for major sports events Bernd Helmstadt Managing Director of NÜSSLI (Germany) GmbH, Germany

Bernd Helmstadt is degreed civil engineer, visited a management seminar on corporate management at the University of St. Gallen and trained as toolmaker. In 1990 he started his professional career with NÜSSLI as project manager, two years later he became Managing Director for Germany and since 1998 he is also Managing Director for Austria. Between 1998 and 2005 he has been Business Unit Manager Stages/Grandstands for the entire NÜSSLI Group and since 2005 he is Business Unit Manager Stages/Grandstands for Germany and Austria as well as Member of the extended NÜSSLI Group Management. During his career he has lead numerous projects for and with NÜSSLI like 3 sports venues with 25,000 seats in Sydney in 2000, mobile tennis arena with 12,000 seats for the Tennis Masters in Madrid, 12 sports venues with 47,000 seats for Athens in 2004, 3 sports venues for Turin in 2006, adidas world of footbal in Berlin in 2006 or the Stadium Extension of Ernst Happel Stadium for the UEFA EURO 2008 in Vienna.


Stadiums and arenas: Best practices for financing, construction and operation Chairman Conrad Boychuk Senior Director of Recreation + Venue Development, CEI Architecture, Executive Board Member of the IAKS, Canada

Conrad Boychuk is a Senior Director with CEI Architecture in Vancouver, Canada. His responsibilities include overall design responsibility for the office, as well as the specific marketing of recreation and sports project. Conrad sits on the Executive Board of both the International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities (IAKS) and the Canadian Parks and Recreation Association (CPRA). He is a frequent author and presenter at international sports and recreation conferences and was one of the jurors for the 2009 IOC/IAKS Awards for Exemplary Sports Facilities. Conrad Boychuk has spent over 35 years as a design architect. He works closely with communities to develop the most appropriate and relevant design for recreation and leisure and spectator facilitie. His working relationship with business planning groups gives him a unique insight into the financial sustainability of recreation and spectator projects. His projects focus on maximizing overall community and life-style benefits in a manner that is operationally and fiscally responsible and socially sustainable.


Social and economic sustainability as a basis for successful sports facilities Alessandro Zoppini Architect, Studio Zoppini Associati, Italy

Alessandro Zoppini collected working experiences with ARUP Associates, Renzo Piano Building and is now working for more than 14 years for the Studio Zoppini Associati in Milan. He assumed visiting professorships at faculty of architecture at the Politecnico in Milan, at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and has been visiting critic and lecturer at The University of Michigan, the University of Washington, the Architectural Association in London and the Kingston University. Alessandro Zoppini already worked for some excellent references, like Torino 2006 Winter Olympics speed skating Oval, Sotchi 2014 Olympic Bid Oval and arena, Le Mans stadium competition or London 2012 Aquatic centre competition.


Social and Economical Sustainability Presenter: Alessandro Zoppini For many years, those involved in the design and construction of buildings tended to see sustainability in terms of the environment and the use of the earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources. It is now clear that this definition is too narrow and that sustainable development, like all aspects of our society, require a balance of social and economic as well as environmental issues. I will explore how social, economical and environmental issues may influence the design of Sports buildings by analyzing relevant cases in our practice experience.

Social Sustainability Sports Facilities design nowadays must imply the long-term legacy and, in consequence, these proposals consider the legacy mode rather than the Specific event mode to be the dominant design condition. The design of any venue must responds to the social issues as follows: The Project's Vision â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a Sport Venue is a key player in an urban Context as a launch pad for future sustainable development but the project's success will depend on its social sustainability. The design itself will play an important role in this process and team's experience in understanding and reinforcing the flexibility of organisation through design will be crucial. People - During the process of developing a shared vision for the project, the characteristics of the project team will be important - its chemistry, experience, its ability to relate to others, its leadership, its morale and so on. This level of achievement would not have been possible without complete integration between the design team, the Client's own team and the construction team. The individuals and firms that form this proposal are all committed to teamwork of this kind and are knowledgeable about the processes required at the highest level of sustainable performance. Perception and Image - Whilst there may be a misplaced view that an iconic building will drive regeneration, there is absolutely no doubt that a Large or Small Sports Venues must be viewed as a delightful and welcoming building - one that draws spectators, competitors and users in all their guises and makes tham want to return. There are many different groups who will use the building at any one time and it must accommodate their disparate requirements with ease. Balancing transparency and enclosure, in both social and environmental senses, will attract and hold people. Consultation and collaboration - The ability to consult openly with different groups that may have contrasting interests in a project should be one of the designers strengths. This inevitably includes staff


of the Client organisation and planning officers, but also neighbouring occupiers and members of the public. Access – It is essential to place the main point of access significantly closer to the major peoplegenerators such as stations and bus-stops than any other possible location and is intended to create a perception of easy access for all. Transparency – Venues must apperars legible and easy to understand. Privacy - Although the interior of the a Sport Venue can as an impressive, single volume it should also be designed to allow separate groups to use each area in private. This may be particularly relevant to local ethnic groups who might otherwise be deterred from using the building. Leisure – A sport Facility must also become leisure to become a secure recreational area for local people, The building would become the venue for a lively day out, rather than a one or two-hour visit. Security - The layout of the building and its external spaces should provide a self-contained, easy-tosupervise environment whereby security is unobtrusive and natural. Procurement - it should be normal working method to adopt socially responsible procurement methods that recognise issues, such as local labour or third-world exploitation, by the Envest assessment method.

Economic Sustainability As with social sustainability, the legacy mode is the crucial design consideration. Rigorous Design Process – The design team of a Sport Venue should have a thorough understanding of building economics and construction costs, underpinned by considerable experience in the commercial sector. The team should also be familiar with the demands of funding organisations. Throughout the process, options should be analysed for their economic as well as physical contribution to the project. The key to this process will be the design team's ability to enable innovative and imaginative solutions to emerge from tightly co-ordinated and hard-edged briefing and costing studies. Defining the Brief – A Sport Venue will change and evolve over time, , and close liaison with the Client and future operators will help clarify their common needs to optimise the functional, typological and management criteria. The role of leisure in society has changed in the last few decades and it is therefore important to develop proposals which are sufficiently flexible to cater for the unexperienced.


Low Life-Cycle Costs - Energy is only one constituent of a building's running costs but it goes without saying that energy consumption should be minimised for economic reasons as well as for the environmental benefits. Other important costs include maintenance and routine refurbishments of key assemblies, where initial design decisions based on proper cost-benefit analysis can have significant influence. Flexibility in use can result in maximum return for cost Procurement Experience - The team's track record of reliable delivery is the direct consequence of an orderly design process, combined with an in-depth understanding of contractors and their commercial policies. Size - To ensure that a building is affordable, those elements that are only required for specifics events should be constructed as simply and as cheaply as possible. Quality - By focussing expenditure on the long-term elements, a higher, more durable quality can be achieved in the legacy building. Simple construction - Ease of construction and maintenance support long-term economic performance. Although the overall shape of the building are often dramatic, the structure and finishes should be relatively simple, making it cheaper in terms of both initial outlay and ongoing maintenance than would otherwise be the case. Ease of maintenance - Apart from the building fabric, maintenance should be simple by virtue of, for example, locating light fittings in walkways within the roof structure, so that costly temporary works can be avoided. Adaptability - In common with many other building-types, it seems highly likely that the internal functions of a Sport Venue may change over time. The clear-span structure and the lack of internal obstructions allow a high degree of future adaptability, should it prove necessary to alter the building in line with changing patterns of use over the lifetime of the building. Value - The design team's specialist Sport expertise and its knowledge helps to create Venues to be of interest to a wide range of operators. The overall commercial value of a sSport Venue is likely to be greater with this approach than if it is restricted to design a simple Sport facility, especially if the initial operator is changed at some point in the future. The intention is for the a Sport Venue to become a lively, popular and successful facility with long-term job opportunities for local people. Increasing the Centreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social value will help to full fill this objective.


Singapore Sports Hub: Innovative financing and procurement Robin Thompson Director of pmpLEGACY, London, United Kingdom

Robin Thompson is a director of pmpLEGACY and a specialist in financial planning and procurement. A qualified accountant, he has worked in the sports and leisure sector for over 20 years and during this period has contributed to the feasibility, financial planning and procurement of several flagship venues including: Beijing Olympic Stadium, Singapore Sports Hub, Kensington Oval Barbados (2007 Cricket World Cup) and venues in the London Olympic Park for 2012, including the Olympic Stadium. He is a leading expert on public private partnership finance for major event venues and advices clients worldwide on the business planning, procurement and operation of facilities, including aquatic centres, arenas and stadiums.


− The Result

− Approach

− The Objectives

− Some History

Robin Thompson

4th June 2009

An interim presentation of findings

Trophy development

30 Oct 2009

Innovative Financing and Procurement

Singapore Sports Hub

The need for investment

Before and after …


− 55,000 seat National Stadium plus retractable roof; − 6,000 seat indoor Aquatic Centre − 3,000 seat multi-purpose arena − 41,000 sq m of commercial space − Water Sports Centre − The existing 11,000-capacity Singapore Indoor Stadium − Supporting leisure and commercial developments

Including …

− Create a sporting culture − Promote sports technology − Build sports excellence and promote sports institute − Be event centric – host major events − Enhance lifestyle and tourism − Encourage recreation and sports − Create retail experience

Singapore Sports Council - Objectives

• 25 year agreement • Design, Build, Finance and Operate • Consortium lead development

− Procurement

• Sports Hub • PPP Approach

− Feasibility Study

Singapore Sports Hub - Process

A Unique Sports, Entertainment & Lifestyle Hub


− − − − − −

Develop the strategy Manage the outcomes Elite sport management Promotion of Events Reinvestment Facilitate commercial relationships − Own the asset

Singapore Sports Council

Working together … − − − − − − −

Guaranteed Events Event and Activity Plan Reinvestment of Revenues Facility Management Event Management Commercial Partners New events

Consortium

• New events, programmes • A vibrant hub of activity • 24/7/352 Operation

− Creating a vision

• Programming and Events - critical • Design and facilities - supporting

− A long term partner

Singapore Sports Hub - Approach

Bouygues/Dragages Arup Global Spectrum World Sports Group Dalkia HSBC

The result ….

• • • • • •

− Singapore Sports Hub Consortium

The Partner


− Total throughput nearly 3 million − 24/7/52 operation

− Total throughput less than 750,000

− Event focused – no non event day use

+44 (0) 7887 546489

robinthompson@pmpgenesis.com

Robin Thompson

pmpgenesis

− Mix of events, community, elite and mass participation /involvement

To … − In excess of 350 event days

From … − Less than 150 event days

And …

Where Sports, Entertainment & Lifestyle Meet


12 years of operation of the Max Schmeling Sports Hall in Berlin: Trends in use and costs Prof. Jörg Joppien Architect, Technical University of Dresden, Germany

Prof. Jörg Joppien was born in 1958 in Germany and is degreed architect. With his architecture office Joppien-Dietz-Architekten, he first built a kiosk and clubhouse in Frankfurt in 1989. This first project has been followed by the Max Schmeling Hall in Berlin. In 1996 he founded his own architecture office “jörg joppien architekten in Berlin. Since 1999 he is working as professor at the Technical University Dresden and as dean preparing Bachelor / Master in ACI working group. Jörg Joppien is a member of the UIA Sports & Leisure working group for IAKS, chairman of the working group 50-60-70 BDA Berlin; Member of the BKA Bundesarchitektenkammer Germany for ACE and UIA Education and has been jury member for the IOC/IAKS Award and IPC/IAKS Distinction in 2007 and 2009. In cooperation with the IAKS he took part in preparing the national application of Düsseldorf and Leipzig for the Olympic Games 2012.


Prof. Jörg Joppien   Berlin, Dresden, Kopenhagen  TUD, BDA, dwb, BAK, IAKS, UIA S&L, CIA 

12 years MAX SCHMELING HALLE

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1

energy at arena: more than 1.200 kW energy at ceiling: more than 300 kW

mean load under the roof: 120 t Stromversorgung Decke: über 300 kW

TECHNICAL FACTS Stromversorgung Arena: über 1.200 kW

parking lots: 36 busses, trucks and media trucks: at least 20

parking lot for handycapped: at least 6

EXTERIOR FACILITIES

offices for production: 12 exhibition area: 2.200 m²

changing room for artists: 7

changing room for groups: 16

event room: ca. 54 m²

restaurant Albatros: ca. 78–143 m²

VIP-Lounge: ca. 412 m²

2. conference room: ca. 49 m²

1. conference room : ca. 126–147 m²

print and media: ca. 20 m²

dancing hall: ca. 400 m²

ballet: ca. 190 m²

hall with columns: 2.684 m²

4

sportshall C (threetimes divisible): 1.242 m²

sportshall A and B (sixtimes divisible): 2.475 m²

OTHER EQUIPPMENT

interior hight : 16,5 m, exterior hight: 18 m squaremeters sportsfield with inserted tribunes : 1.972 m² squaremeters sportsfield with driven out tribunes: 925 m² gross volume: 339.547 m³ gross floor area: 48.800 m² squaremeters of northern fasade: 2 180 m long and 14 m high

MEASURES OF THE ARENA

places for wheelchairs: at least 16 toilets for Handicapped: 8 around the main arena, 7 at the other sportshalls

catering boxes: 20

chairs on the sportsfield: 4.040

chairs: 7.491

ca. 11.900 Personen

with stage in the middle and no chairs:

CAPACITY OF THE ARENA

opening summer 1997. building cost 105 Mio. EUR. time of building 4 years architects Jörg Joppien, Albert Dietz und Anett Maud-Joppien cause of establishment: application for olympic games 2000 for boxing

IN GENERAL

Deckenbelastbarkeit: 120 t

TECHNISCHE FAKTEN

Behindertenparkplätze: mindestens 6 PKW-Stellplätze: 36 Stellplätze für Busse, LKW und Medienfahrzeuge: ca. 20

AUSSENANLAGEN

Halle A und B (sechsfach teilbar): 2.475 m² Halle C (dreifach teilbar): 1.242 m² Säulenhalle: 2.684 m² Ballettraum: ca. 190 m² Tanzsaal: ca. 400 m² Print- und Medienraum: ca. 20 m² Pressekonferenzraum: ca. 126–147 m² Konferenzraum: ca. 49 m² VIP-Lounge: ca. 412 m² Restaurant Albatros: ca. 78–143 m² zzgl. Veranstaltungsraum: ca. 54 m² Gruppenumkleiden: 16 Künstlerumkleiden: 7 Produktionsbüros: 12 Ausstellungsfläche: 2.200 m²

SONSTIGE AUSSTATTUNG

DATES AND FACTS II

Lichte Höhe des Innenraumes: 16,5 m, Höhe: 18 m Fläche bei eingeschobenen Teleskoptribünen: 1.972 m² Fläche bei ausgefahrenen Teleskoptribünen: 925 m² Bruttorauminhalt: 339.547 m³ Bruttogeschossfläche: 48.800 m² Fläche der nördlichen Glasfassade: 180 m Länge, 14 m Höhe Grundstücksfläche: 38.560 m²

GRÖSSE DER ARENA

ca. 11.900 Personen Festinstallierte Sitzplätze: 7.491 Plätze im Innenraum: 4.040 Imbiss-Stände in den Umläufen: 20 Rollstuhlplätze: mindestens 16 Behindertengerechte WCs: 8 in der Haupthalle, 7 in den Nebenbereichen

Kapazität mit Mittelbühne, unbestuhlt:

KAPAZITÄTEN DER ARENA

Die Eröffnung war im Sommer 1997. Die Baukosten lagen bei 105 Mio. EUR. Die Bauzeit betrug vier Jahre. Das Architektentrio Jörg Joppien, Albert Dietz und Annette Maud-Joppien entwarf und baute die Halle. Anlass der Errichtung: Berliner Bewerbung um die Olympischen Spiele 2000 für Boxen

ALLGEMEINES

DATES AND FACTS I


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PHASE

1993/4

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8

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ƒBig events require one-way-streets for taxes and busses at Falkplatz

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ƒ600 up to 1000 parking lots with 20 barrierfree ones would be suitable. This suggestion is not realistic within a short period of time.

ƒLack of parking space means lack of signs within the city Signage must be improved at least for for deliveries, bikers and pedestrians

ƒCompetitive disadvantage: lack of parking space: After 12 years of use residents and visitors do not question any more the lack of parking space as in the beginning

ƒLocation is basis for the good use of the federal competence centre “dance” as well as of the sport halls run by the schools and the clubs providing capacities for the entire district of Prenzlauer Berg to be reached at short distance on foot

ƒLocation within the city guarantees good accessibility. ƒMSH is well connected to public transportation.

1. How do you judge the general urban position and the accessibility of the MSH in the city after 12 years of use?

S-BAHN: 700 m

U-BAHN: 700 m

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15

COMPETITION MODELL 1992....IT SHOWES NOT ONLY THE BOXING BUT ALSO THE JUDO HALL FOR OLYMPIC APPLICATION BERLIN 2000 ....A PEFECT PLACE NOW FOR AN ADDITIONAL PARKING GARAGE

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PARKPLÄTZE

Parking spaces for approx. 100 VIP 6 barrier free 36 representatives 3-20 delivery

16

ƒThe Gegenbauer Location Management & Services GmbH being associated to the Velomax Berlin Hallenbetriebs GmbH runs two more halls: the Rhein-Sieg-Halle in Siegburg (3,000 spectators) and the Rittal Arena Wetzlar (6,000 spectators)

ƒ When participation in the tender managing processes have been optimized with regard to a more efficient manpower disposition. Outsorcing of duties to the Gegenbauer Facility Management GmbH (affiliated company) offers the highest possible flexibility to any changes with regard to the density of the events

ƒIn 2007, the Velomax Berlin Hallenbetriebs GmbH won a europe wide tender by the Land Berlin to manage the MSH and the Velodrom

2. How did the management of the hall by Velomax develop? Any optimizing processes?

14


• For the future, the already mentioned conference areas, VIP loges and parking areas would improve the marketing measures. • Additional space for the waste press as well as the waste removal logistic shall be created.

ƒIn comparison to other halls the MSH offers large storing areas (e.g. pillar hall), connected areas at disposition (e.g. connected halls, dance hall, ballet hall) as well as vast cloak rooms

ƒ Architecture provides dense atmosphere inspite of large visitor capacity as well as intimacy for sport and entertaining events

ƒ optimum of view from all seats; visitors are close to the staging

Dancing

19

17

Restaurant

Technics

VIP

20

18

• Intelligent entrance management system might reduce manpower for bigger events.

• In the respective time storage areas were changed into restrooms and catering areas. The VIP section got air conditioning and a service area. 20 catering boxes were installed at the Arena circuit. The west wing got a cafeteria with kitchen. The Arena got a complete light dimming device and an additional decentralized sound system as well secondary bearing structure for the stage

ƒ MSH offers large space

From today’s point of view conference rooms with the respective technical equipment, a VIP area connected to the premium seating area as well as loges would be preferable.

4. What did you change in terms of floor plan and functionality within the last 12 years? What would you like to change in the future?

3. Which particular advantages for comparable halls turned out while operating the MSH


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23

ƒ Besides classic ball sport events or other sports like gymnastics or boxing, there are rock or pop events (Madonna, Bob Dylan, Grönemeyer) taking place as well as congresses, political conventions and gala entertainment.

ƒ Both the end of marketing restrictions and the 20 matches of the Handball Bundesliga Clug Füchse Berlin as well as the matches by the Volleyball Bundesliga Club SCC Berlin will compensa this.

ƒ Basketball Club ALBA Berlin has moved 35 home matches and 35 training sessions per year to the O2 world Arena. To realize these dates approx. 210 days had to be prereserved due to the late edition of the playing schedule.

ƒThe new Restaurant zum Mauerpark will be operated by a new tenant soon. The double sauna facility is used by the Basketball Association Berlin.

ƒ The sport halls and the competence centre dance is frequented daily from 7 am to 10 pm. The three triple use sport halls are used not only by the schools located in the disctrict Prenzlauer Berg but also intensivly by clubs. Long waiting lists for new users are due to the already complete use.

5. How did the utilization of the arena, the sport halls, the compentence center dance and th additional use develop since 1997?

Technics

WRESTLING

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22


GRÜNDACH ERDBERÜHRTE BAUTEILE

27

25

Positive measurements are from the architectural kind. Concrete walls being storing mass for the night conditioning and the climate in general, the earth labyrinths being air pre conditioner and the arrangement of 70% of the outer covering under the earth are playing a great part.

6. Which planned ecological measurements turned out to have a positive effect?

GRÜNDACH

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B

L

DAYLIGHT

31

29

32

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DELIVERY AIR – OUTGOING AIR

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Together with the Berliner Energie Agentur a photovoltaic device is actually planned on the large hall roof. This investment could not be effectuated in 1997. The new modules manage meanwhile a much larger use

• The hall suffers from post olympic monetary restrictions in particular in the technical field. An intelligent new automation and drives technology misses as well as the third northern façade. The pumps of the reed clarification plant are operated by so called solar suns being victims of regular destruction. The heating power plant is oversized because other users had been calculated.

7. Which originally planned ecological measures have not been realized yet and what kind of additional measures do you plan?

DELIVERY AIR

36

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sommer

Text winter

39

2°C BEFORE CONDITIONED AIR THROUGH LABYRINTH OF EARTH TUBES

37

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• Electricity costs are declining again but due to the increasement in additional costs in general the Velomax Hallenbetriebs GmbH has to research for intelligent solutions for price reduction.

• The EEG contributions (legislation to renewable energy) put charge on the electricity costs for approx. 1,5 ct/KWh

• Additional costs increased continously over the last 12 years.

8. Could you evaluate the development of additional costs (heating, water, electricity)?

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44

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mail@joerg‐joppien.de www.joerg‐joppien.de

jja‐ jörg joppien architekten Prof. Jörg Joppien BDA dwb Flemingstr. 10; 10557 Berlin Tel.  0049 30‐20 45 06 90 Fax  0049 30‐20 45 06 92

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Integration of stadium projects in real estate development Guido Krüger Beiten Burkhardt law firm, Germany

Guido Krüger was born in 1959 in Hanover, Germany. He studied law, business administration and political science at the universities of Kiel and Genf. In 1990 he established a law firm named “Krüger Putz von Döllen” in Berlin, Dusseldorf, Hamburg, Hanover and Cologne. In addition he became a partner of Taylor Wessing due to the fusion of the establishment in Dusseldorf and the law firm of Taylor Wessing. Since 2003 he is responsible for the Corporate M&A department of Beiten Burkhardt law firm and he serves as managing director Beiten Burkhardt. Among other duties he is responsible to give legal advice to banks, organizations, municipalities and other corporations. He published a lawyer-guide with the main focus on tax reform of corporations and other publications.


Integration of stadium projects in real estate development Stephan Rechten Beiten Burkhardt law firm, Germany

Stephan Rechten is a Salary Partner of BEITEN BURKHARDT. He counsels clients in public procurement law and public law issues and litigation both for public and private entities. Stephan Rechten was responsible for public procurement, PPP and security & defense-related topics at the Federation of German Industries for more than seven years and joined BEITEN BURKHARDT in 2007. He is co-author of two benchmark public procurement commentaries and a regular speaker at conferences on German, European and International public procurement issues.


Particularities of implementing stadium projects

Guido Krüger Stephan Rechten

Cologne, October 30th, 2009

21st IAKS Congress

Legal framework for private financing of stadium projects

Integration of stadium projects to real estate development

competition and procurement law, company law, tax law, …)

ƒ Coordination of a multitude of legal challenges (planning law, public building law,

ƒ Coordination of a multitude of services (planning, financing, construction, operation)

companies performing the work, users [associations, visitors, service providers], financing banks)

ƒ Coordination of multitude of involved actors (contracting authorities, politicians,

The construction or modification of municipal stadiums places a multitude of demands on public authorities

Particularities of implementing stadium projects

4. Competition law framework

3. Planning law framework

2. Financing concept

1. Particularities of implementing stadium projects

Overview

Seite 4

Seite 2


„BOT-model“

performance of a variety of coordinated activities (e.g. planning, building, financing and operation) for a fixed price (mostly in monthly instalments over a longer period)

Distinguish „concession model“ performance of many coordinated activities without compensation by the contracting authority as licenser (start-up financing at the most) against transfer of a long-term licence to the performer of the work (concessionaire)

There are two basic procedures for a PPP solution

Particularities of implementing stadium projects

ƒ (where required) early involvement of technical and / or legal advisers

ƒ probing and developing of an alternative procedure („Plan B“)

Seite 7

private financing of public projects as an integral part of a holistic approach (in various forms) to profit from benefits / synergies of a long-term transfer to private entities

Financing concept

Common goal: optimisation of risk distribution and creation of a win-win situation

private financing of public projects (in various forms) as “stand-alone” solution / approach

“British approach” PFI solution (Private Finance Initiative):

“continental European approach” PPP solution (Public Private Partnership):

Distinguish

ƒ early strategic planning and conceptual design

ƒ timely involvement of relevant actors

Forms of private financing of large-scale public projects

Particularities of implementing stadium projects

Successfully meeting such challenges requires

Particularities of implementing stadium projects

Seite 5

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ƒ Advisable for projects from 15 Mio. EUR in monetary requirements.

ƒ But typically at higher costs of financing compared to municical forfaiting

ƒ Advisable for projects from 15 Mio. EUR in monetary requirements.

ƒ Basic problems: 8 Complex and costly setup of the financing concept 8 Possible conflict of interests between the various financiers

ƒ Thereby the project risk is isolated to the project vehicle and whose money lenders ƒ Thereby no municipal risks of malperformances

Financing Concept

• Capital market

• Credit market

• Bank credits

Private financing

ƒ Freedom of scope concerning: 9 Dept/ Equity ratio 9 Number of investors 9 Repayment periods 9 Possible involvement of public sponsorship

Seite 11

Municipal forfaiting

Private project financing:

Licencee

Outside creditors

PPP FINANCING

ƒ The licensee arranges a fully private financing for the project vehicle ƒ Possible financial resources: 9 Loans 9 Bonds 9 Investment fonds 9 Equity Investors

Building company

PROJECT VEHICLE

PPP-contract

Awarding authority

Forms of financing:

Financing Concept

Private project financing:

Financing Concept

Investors/ Sponsors

Stakeholder:

Financing Concept

Seite 9

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Seite 10


9 Thereby the project vehicle cashes in on the solvency of the municipal 9 Easy setup of financing concept 9 Long term period of fixed interest

The Municipality acts as beneficiary (Borrower) of a municipal loan In exchange it waves any current and prospective interest or loan objections The project vehicle is the loan payee The Municipal pays licence fees to the project vehicle

answer the questions of location and access to transportation

ƒ Therefore, the regional planning issues must first be assessed at federal or state level to

may be described as planning „from the periphery inwards“

ƒ To solve conflicts, the applicable regional planning law follows a procedural system that

all interests and needs affected (operators, users, neighbours, environment, etc.)

ƒ The construction of stadiums creates sources of conflict and requires careful weighing of

Planning law framework

ƒ Advisable for rather small projects up to 10 – 15 Mio. EUR in monetary requirements.

ƒ The forfaiting can be tied to certain milestones, or to the whole PPP-lifecycle. ƒ Dependend hazards: 8 Municipal takes the according financial risk regarding the project 8 Additional financial risks regarding malperfomances

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Municipal bound financing (called as Non-recourse forfaiting of instalments):

Financing Concept

Seite 15

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planning documents prepared by the contracting authority

ƒ The ability of the project to be approved is eventually analysed on the basis of the detailed

• weighing of interests and needs affected • requirement of environmental audit to be considered in the weighing process • urban development contracts possible / distribution of costs

for the approvability of the project under planning law by preparing a zoning map or a master plan (parking bays, secured site development, etc.)

ƒ Once a suitable location has been found, the municipality must provide the prerequisites

Planning law framework

Planning law framework

Seite 16


law normally applies. Exception provided for under German law (Section 99 subs. 3 and 6 of the German Act Against Restraints of Competition) may violate European law (cf. case C-451/08 pending at the ECJ).

ƒ Sale of properties subject to requirements regarding urban planning: procurement

works, deliveries and services, procurement law applies. Exception under Section 100 subs. 2 lit. m) of the German Act Against Restraints of Competition: transactions that serve the procurement of money or capital for the contracting party.

ƒ Where the performances of private entities include the procurement of construction

requires a selection from among various private bidders in accordance with existing competition law.

ƒ The integration of private sector services in the performance of public contracts as a rule

Competition law framework

review) and with regard to the issued building permission (action for avoidance)

ƒ Court proceedings may be instituted both with regard to the development plan (judicial

• connection to the public transport network • connection to the road network • …

mandatory planning procedures (e. g. plan approval procedure)

ƒ Possibly at the same time, other aspects of the project should be dealt with in the relevant

Planning law framework

Seite 19

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Plan

Finance

PPP – typical scope of services

Competition law framework

Competition law framework

Build

Operate

Transfer/ Commercialise

Seite 20


preparation and design

Stage 2:

Stage 3: call for tenders and award of contract

Stage 4: implementation and contract controlling

Stage 5: transfer / commercialisation

considerable leeway of judgement. It also must take a competitive approach to their selection.

ƒ When deciding on an involvement of experts, the awarding public authority has

prepared following the guidelines and criteria given by the expert or adviser

• The contracting party can adopt as its own the solution worked out and

go beyond the limits of mere assistance“

• „The involvement of an expert or an adviser of the awarding authority must not

ƒ Decisions on the award must be taken by the awarding authorities themselves

there must be a concrete advantage in terms of competition law, hence a simply „apparent“ restraint on competition is not sufficient

no „automatic“ exclusion (ECJ, 3 March 2005, C-34/03)

launch of the award procedure, the awarding party has to ensure that competition will not be distorted by the participation of such tenderer.

ƒ Where a tenderer has advised or otherwise assisted the awarding party before the

Involvement of „project designers“

Involvement of advisers

documentation of the procedure and essential decisions

timely and comprehensive information of the unsuccessful competitors

award-decision on the basis of transparent and project-adequate parameters

observation of equal treatment and non-discrimination in negotiations

setting of adequate deadlines for the preparation and processing of tenders

functions where necessary)

Competition law framework

Seite 23

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

ƒ examination of the suitability of applicants for the specific project ƒ as specific a description as possible of the contract to be awarded (describe

negotiated procedure or competitive dialogue)

ƒ selection of a suitable and at the same time legally safe procedure (for PPP normally

PPP basics under procurement law:

Competition law framework

Competition law framework

selection of the private partner

ƒ In addition, the procurement regulations contain detailed provisions regarding the

EC Treaty, especially transparency, equal treatment and non-discrimination

ƒ There is no special PPP system under Community law ƒ Every single transfer of a task to a private entity must observe the principles of the

Stage 1: assessment of demand and identification of actions

PPP „Particularities“ in terms of procurement law

Competition law framework

Seite 21

Seite 24

Seite 22


Stephan Rechten attorney-at-law

BEITEN BURKHARDT Rechtsanwaltsgesellschaft mbH Kurfürstenstraße 72-74 10787 Berlin

Tel.: ++49 30 26 471 – 219 Fax: ++49 30 26 471 – 123

Stephan.Rechten@bblaw.com

Guido Krüger attorney-at-law

BEITEN BURKHARDT Rechtsanwaltsgesellschaft mbH Uerdinger Straße 40474 Düsseldorf

Tel.: ++49 211 518 989 – 181 Fax: ++49 211 581 989 – 29

Guido.Krueger@bblaw.com

Thank you for your patience!


Staging sports events: Stadiums of the future Chairman Ian McKenzie Director of UIA Sports and Leisure Programme, United Kingdom

Ian McKenzie is Director of the International Union of Architects Work Group on Sport and Leisure. He is an architect and Head of Facilities Development at the British Amateur Swimming Association. Ian McKenzie has responsibility for directing and developing the ASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work on the planning, design, economics and management of swimming pools. Ian McKenzie is also the Venues Infrastructure Advisor to Glasgow 2014 Ltd., the Organising Company for Commonwealth Games to be held in Glasgow in 2014. In addition, he is vice chair of the Venues Sub-group for Glasgow 2014. Ian McKenzie was a member of the Bid Team, which was successful in securing the 2014 Commonwealth Games for Glasgow. His specific role within the 2014 Bid Team was venues development. He is a member of the Royal Institute of British Architects Sport Forum. Prior to taking up his post with the ASA in July 2009, Ian McKenzie was Head of Facilities Development at Sportscotland, where he worked for 23 years.


European standards for the design and construction of stadiums Saverio Mandetta Chairman of CEN-TC 315 Spectator Facilities, Italy

Saverio Mandetta studied at the University of Rome and graduated his study as a civil engineer in the year 1972. He is president of the European Committee of standardization CENT TC 315 “Spectator facilities” and a member of FIFA/UEFA Working Group for the prototype football stadium. In addition he is the president of the board committee of U.N.I. on Sports Grounds and the head of CONI department for security and environment on sport facilities (Olympic Italian Committee). Saverio Mandetta published the “Technical Recommendations and Requirements for the Construction or Modernisation of Football Stadia” which is compiled by FIFA and UEFA, Furthermore an article about criteria for spectator viewing area. Since 1990 he was responsible for the coordination of the project of the 12 Stadiums for the Football World Cup Italia ’90 and also for the project of the Stadium of Ciudad de La Plata in Argentina. In addition he was in charge of consulting and coordination of a stadium project in Seoul, Korea. Since 1999 Saverio Mandetta is responsible for updating the executive project and specialist consulting of the works in progress of the Stadium of Tunis. He serves on the advisory of the master plan and works on the preliminary and executive project. In addition he is responsible for the supervision of works of construction of the Stadium of Donetsk, Ukraine. Furthermore he acts as an advisor for the achievement of the UEFA 5 star accreditation 50.000 spectators.


European standards for the design and construction of stadiums Gian-Luca Salerio Secretary of CEN-TC 315 Spectator Facilities, Italy

Gian-Luca Salerio studied electro-technics and electrical engineering from 1984 to1988. He worked as technical manager for an Italian Manufacturers' Association of electro-technic and electronic products from 1989 until 1995. Afterwards he became technical officer for medical and sports standards in the Italian Standards Organization, UNI, from 1995 till 1998. Since 1998 Gian-Luca Salerio is Secretary of CEN European Technical Committee TC 315 "Spectator facilities" and since 1999 Secretary of CEN European Technical Committe TC 333 "Cycles". In addition, he is UNI Member of "European Advisory Board for Healthcare Standards" in CEN and UNI Member of European and International Sports Committees of CEN and ISO. At the moment Gian-Luca is the Head of UNI Standardization Department "Health, food material and consumer goods".


Technical Specifications for the design and manufacture of products meeting the essential requirements

Harmonized Standards

Essential Requirements

Directives

Council Resolution of 7 may 1985

New Approach

System: EN Standards

The European Voluntary

3

1

Laws Decrees

13200 ISSUED STANDARDS

EN

VOLUNTARY

RATIFICA

ORGANO COMPETENTE

pr/EN

CEN/TR

Technical Report New Project

Environmental performance evaluation

Guidelines

UNI EN ISO 14031 SETTEMBRE 2000

Presidente dell’UNI, delibera del 6 settembre 2000

Commissione "Ambiente"

© UNI - Milano 2000 Riproduzione vietata. Tutti i diritti sono riservati. Nessuna parte del presente documento può essere riprodotta o diffusa con un mezzo qualsiasi, fotocopie, microfilm o altro, senza il consenso scritto dell’UNI.

RICONFERMA

RATIFICA

ORGANO COMPETENTE

RELAZIONI INTERNAZIONALI

Nº di riferimento UNI EN ISO 14031:2000

Riproduzione vietata. Tutti i diritti sono riservati. Nessuna parte del presente documento può essere riprodotta o diffusa con un mezzo qualsiasi, fotocopie, microfilm o altro, senza il consenso scritto dell’UNI.

4

2

ISO

Gr. 10

Ente Nazionale Italiano di Unificazione Via Battistotti Sassi, 11B 20133 Milano, Italia

Pagina I di IV

Commissione "Ambiente" = EN ISO 14031:1999 (= ISO 14031:1999) presente è la 2000 versione ufficiale in lingua italiana della norma Presidente dell’UNI, La delibera del 6norma settembre europea EN ISO 14031 (edizione novembre 1999).

RELAZIONI NAZIONALI

zione o della registrazione e nemmeno per definire qualsiasi altro requisito = EN ISO 14031:1999 (= ISO 14031:1999) sistemiindilingua gestione ambientale. La presente norma di è conformità la versionedei ufficiale italiana della norma europea EN ISO 14031 (edizione novembre 1999).

SOMMARIO di conformità

CLASSIFICAZIONE zazione eICS alla

DESCRITTORI La norma

Ambiente, gestione, gestione fornisce una guida perprotezione progettareambientale, e utilizzare la valutazione della ambientale, prestazioneinambientale prestazione ambientale un’organizzazione. È applicabile a qualsiasi organizzazione, senza riguardo alla tipologia, alle dimensioni, alla localiz13.020.10 complessità. La norma non stabilisce livelli di prestazione ambientale. Essa non è finalizzata ad essere utilizzata come norma prescrittiva ai fini della certificazione o della registrazione e nemmeno per definire qualsiasi altro requisito La norma fornisce una guida per progettare e utilizzare la valutazione della dei sistemi di gestione ambientale. prestazione ambientale in un’organizzazione. È applicabile a qualsiasi organizzazione, senza riguardo alla tipologia, alle dimensioni, alla localizzazione e alla complessità. La norma non stabilisce livelli di prestazione ambientale. Essa non è finalizzata ad essere utilizzata come norma prescrittiva ai fini della certifica-

13.020.10

Ambiente, protezione ambientale,management gestione, gestione ambientale, prestaEnvironmental zione ambientale

Guidelines

Environmental performance evaluation Linee guida

della prestazione ambientale

Gestione ambientale

Valutazione della prestazione ambientale

Gestione ambientale Linee guida

Environmental NOR M A I T A L I Amanagement N A Valutazione

Gr. 10UNI Nº di riferimento UNI EN ©ISO UNI14031:2000 - Milano 2000

UNI Ente Nazionale Italiano di Unificazione Via Battistotti Sassi, 11B 20133 Milano, Italia

RICONFERMA

1 – Layout criteria for spectator viewing area 2 – Layout criteria of services area (CEN/TR) 3 – Separating elements 4 – Seats – product characteristics 5 – Telescopic stands 6 – Demountable (temporary) stands 7 – Entry, exit elements and routes( pr/EN) 8 – Safety management (pr/EN) 9 – Layout criteria for viewing area for spectators with special needs (prCEN/TR)

es Mandat

Directives Regulations

LEGAL

RELAZIONI INTERNAZIONALI

RELAZIONI NAZIONALI

SOMMARIO

CLASSIFICAZIONE ICS

DESCRITTORI

NORMA ITALIANA

NORMA EUROPEA

LEGAL/VOLUNTARY SYSTEM UNI EN ISO 14031 SETTEMBRE 2000

Pagina I di IV

NORMA EUROPEA


L

VISIBILITY

13200-1

LOCAL OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

LAYOUT CRITERIA OF SERVICES AREA

CEN TECHNICAL REPORT 13200 - 2

L

EN

7

13200-3

Separating Elements – Test Methods

EN

DOORS, CORRIDOR, PASSAGES AND LIFT

LAYOUT CRITERIA OF SERVICES AREA

CEN TECHNICAL REPORT 13200 - 2

6


13200-4

ENTRY ED EXIT ELEMENTS AND ROUTES

Pr EN 13200 - 7

Seats – Test Methods

EN

11

Safety management

• Identification of pathways of local public, the disabled spectators, visitors, athletes and media and emergency public safety and mobility to and from the stadium before, during and after the event providing routes and parking facilities for separate rival groups of supporters and, where possible, for various areas of the stadium

• overall health plan that takes into account the routes of emergency and the hospital activated structure, in operation and in emergency.

ƒ Implementation and integration of services to citizens in urban public transport function of the emerging mobility needs of the audience of the sport.

Contents of territorial plan

Phase 1 - Territorial Plan (care of the property manager)

Pr EN 13200 - 8

Example of demountable stands, stairs and separating elements

TELESCOPIC AND DEMOUNTABLE (Temporary) STANDS

EN 13200 5-6

12

10


• Control rooms of power and alarms;

• Visual and audio communications;

• Fire Safety Plan

• Plan for medical and first aid;

• Steward’s organigram and manual pocket relationships with the Police, Medical, Fire Brigade

• Managing communications to the public (audio and video)

• Management of CCTV;

15

• Team center of safety and security supervisors for the event and emergency (composition, tasks, activities, regular briefings and emergency);

Contents of the operating plan

Safety management

manager)

Pr EN 13200 - 8

Phase 4 - Operating plan (care of the event

relative capacity

ƒ The configuration of each sector with

ƒ Public’s ways and services staff ••

ƒ Exit’s system

ƒ Tickets Check point

ƒ Canalization of spectators in each big sector

ƒ Mobility in external area

Content of sport facilities plan

13

Safety management

Phase 2 - Sport Facilities Plan (care of the property manager)

Pr EN 13200 - 8

Pr EN 13200 - 8 manager)

Safety management

Safety management

• Actors involved; • Action to be taken; • Exercises; • Procedures for action by parties responsible for emergency management.

For each risk analysis:

• Suspension of the event for reasons of public security; • Acts of terrorism or which may lead to panic; • Electrical accidents; • Fires, explosions, explosions, releases; • structural failure and eventual collapse ; • Faults to technological service; • Natural disasters (earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, etc..). • Incidents of supporters.

List of possible risks for spectators and structures:

Contents of Emergencies Management Plan

Phase 5 Emergencies Management Plan (care of the event manager)

Pr EN 13200 - 8

• fire prevention and control plan

• medical plan and first aid devices, in exercise or in emergency

•plan for maintaining the ordinary security and safety level during the event

• plan for the maintenance of ordinary security conditions (monitoring, maintenance and the operating conditions)

Contents of the ordinary management plan

Phase 3 Ordinary Management Plan (care of the sport facility

16

14


Pr CEN/TR 13200 – 9

EN 12234 EN 13865 EN 12235

Standards on mobile equipment

NUMBER OF WHEELCHAIR SPACES

Layout criteria for viewing area for spectators with special needs

19

• EN 12233 • EN 12231 • EN 12232

Standards on natural turf

EN 1969 EN 13745 EN 12616 EN 14952 EN 13746

Area)

20

18

Standards on sport surfaces (Activity


• EN 12229 • EN 13672 • EN 13817 • EN 13744

Standards on artificial turf

21

• • • • •

Football Handball Hockey Basketball Volleyball

EN 748 EN 749 EN 750 EN 1270 EN 1271

Standards on fixed equipments for:

22


The "Accessible Stadium" project in the first Spanish football division PhD Juan Luis Paramio Salcines Universidad Autónoma Madrid, Spain

Juan Luis Paramio Salcines is senior lecturer of sports management and leisure studies at the Department of Physical Education and Sports Sciences of the Faculty of Teacher Training and Education. He studied sport management at the University of Complutense and the Spanish Olympic Committee. He reveived a PhD in sports management at the University of Loughborough. Additionally he received the bachelor degree on physical education and sports science at the National Institute of Physical Education in Madrid. He gained a lot of academic experiences not only due to his work as a lecturer in sports management at the University of Madrid, also due to his visiting lecturer at the University of Physical Education and Sports Science Department and some other universities like that. Actually he worked also on some research projects. In the year 2007 he was the project leader of the project named “Economic Impact Analysis of the World Rally Championship 2007: The case of the RACC Catalunya”, futhermore he was also the project leader of the research project named “Hacia la Accesibilidad Universal y Diseño para todos en Recintos Deportivos: El caso de los estadios de fútbol de 1ª División en España”. In addition he published several articles in journals and books.


Coliseum Alfonso Pérez Vicente Calderón

Nou Camp

Teresa Rivero

Santiago Bernabeu

El Madrigal

September 24

Octuber 4

Octuber 19

Octuber 24

November 19

Real Madrid vs. Athletic de Bilbao Villarreal vs. Almería

Barcelona vs. Atlético de Madrid Rayo Vallecano vs. Castellón

Atlético de Madrid vs. Sevilla

Getafe vs. Atlético de Madrid

Real Murcia vs. Las Palmas

Match

Research Group UAM October 2009

Nueva Condomina

September 20

September 28

Stadium

Date of Visit

Methodological Issues. Fieldwork

Juan Luis Paramio, Phil Downs, Eduardo Beotas, Gustavo Muñoz and Carlos Campos

XXI Internacional Congress of IAKS, Cologne, Germany 28th to 30th October 2009

“Accesible Stadium” in the First Spanish Football Division

Research Group Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain October 2009

Fundamental Issues 1. Means of communication between disabled fans and clubs 2. Number and Profile of disabled fans on the stadia visited 3. Main demands from disabled fans 4. Club Policy with their own disabled fans and away disabled fans 5. Parking spaces for disabled fans 6. Stewards for disabled fans and their level of training 7. Gates for disabled fans in each stadium 8. Number of seats, position on the stands and visibility of the pitch 9. Level of Accesibility to other areas and services of the stadium 10. I Strategic Plan to Improve the Accesibility at Spanish Division Stadiums (2009-2014)

Research Group UAM October 2009

1. What were the needs and requirements of different types of disabled fans when attending matches prior to, during and after the match in Spanish stadia? 2. How do First Division Spanish clubs deal with accessibility in their stadia? 3. What were the accesibility standards and services in those stadia selected?

Research Questions


Research Group UAM October 2009

The majority does not offer any significant information neither for their own disabled fans nor for away disabled fans (being from national or international teams)

None of the First and Second Spanish Division clubs fullfil the minimum requirements on accesibility on their web pages

Research Group UAM October 2009

1. Communication of clubs with disabled fans

Research Group UAM October 2009

• Insertar varias páginas de clubes españoles que muestren las dificultades de uso y de la misma forma algunas de las páginas de clubes extranjeros que aparecen a continuación

Research Group UAM October 2009

• Public and private transport means with their locations and stops • Number of parking slots reserved for disabled fans and their localition and distance to the stadium • How to contact the clubs and person responsible for this service • Stadium Guide • Virtual tour of the stadium with the location of seats for disabled fans and services outside and inside the ground • Ticketing policy for disabled fans and their companions for match days • Accesible tours to the stadium on non-match days

Main aspects on the web sites of clubs


Research Group UAM October 2009

2. Number and Profile of Disabled fans on Spanish stadiums

Research Group UAM October 2009

Research Group UAM October 2009

Most of them go on their own, without being part of any disabled association of the club Although there are two disabled fans associations in clubs like Rayo Vallecano (2 Division) and Villarreal (Asociaci贸n Colectivo de Integraci贸n al Minusv谩lido de Villareal (ACUDIM)

Demand There were around 30 and 40 disabled fans (men and women) on wheelchairs plus their companions (relatives and friends) that attend matches regulary

Research Group UAM October 2009


Research Group UAM October 2009

70 disabled fans, including their companions attend regulary matches at the Bernabeu Stadium 50 disabled fans attend regularly matches at Nueva Condomina stadium (2 Division team)

â&#x20AC;˘ On the other hand,

Research Group UAM October 2009

Villarreal Stadium, and Disabled Association

Research Group UAM October 2009

Research Group UAM October 2009

Great variety on the supply of seats for disabled fans Quite poor on stadiums of main clubs like FC Barcelona offers only 24 seats for wheelchairs fans in their Nou Camp stadium (12 in the north stand and 12 in the south stand) with a 98.000 capacity and around 163.000 members con 24 plazas para seguidores en silla de ruedas AtlĂŠtico de Madrid SAD (only 40 seats, 30 for their own disabled fans and 10 for away fans) Getafe SAD does not offer any seats for disabled fans at all in their Coliseum


Research Group UAM October 2009

Outside, Real  Murcia  offers  some  parking  spaces  for  disabled fans

Only Real Murcia SAD has 9 parking spaces in the interior  of  the  Nueva  Condomina.  Those  parking  spaces  are  for  members of the club 

Clubs like  Real  Madrid,  Atletico  Madrid,  Villarreal,  Getafe  or  Barcelona  do  not  have  any  reserved  parking area for disabled fans outside their stadia

Research Group UAM October 2009

Vicente Calderon. Disabled fans location at pitch level

Research Group UAM October 2009

Parking outside the Bernabeu Stadium 

Research Group UAM October 2009

4. Parking spaces for disabled fans in stadia


Research Group UAM October 2009

Research Group UAM October 2009

• In the majority of stadia, there are one or two gates for disabled fans, but not all of them are accesible • Probably the best practice was found at the Bernabeu Stadium where they offer an accesible gate

Case of Bernabeu Stadium

Gates for disabled fans at Stadia

Research Group UAM October 2009

Ticketing Prices for disabled fans and their companions (Season 2008-09)

Research Group UAM October 2009

Gate for disabled fans at Camp Nou Stadium


Research Group UAM October 2009

Camp Nou reserved seats for disabled fans

Research Group UAM October 2009

7. Number of Seats for disabled fans and their companions in Spanish Stadia

Research Group UAM October 2009

Research Group UAM October 2009


2010

2011

2012

Phase 3 Removal of Physical and Building Barriers inside Stadiums (October 2010-October 2013) 6 Actions De alto impactoResearch Group UAM October 2009 and with great economic impact

Phase 2 Removal of Physical and Building Barriers outside Stadiums (October 2009-October2011) More complex and more expensive

Phase 1 General Awareness (April 2009-July 2010) 8 Actions Simples and low cost

2009

April

Phase 4

2014

(October 2013-October 2014) Accesibility Audit for Stadiums

2013

October

I Strategic Plan to Improve the Accesibility at Spanish Football Stadiums (2009-2014)

Research Group UAM October 2009

8. None of  the  stadia  visited  offer  any  accesible  provision  for  other  complementary  services and activities like tours and museum  visits

Research Group UAM October 2009

E‐mail: juanluis.paramio@uam.es

Universidad Autónoma, Madrid, Cantoblanco, E‐ 28049; Spain. 

Dr. Juan Luis Paramio Senior Lecturer at Sports Management

For further information:

Grupo Investigación 1 Junio 2009

8. Leaving the Stadia


Sustainable stadiums: Icons of the emotions and economics Dr. Stefan Nixdorf Architect, agn Niederberghaus & Partner, Germany

Dr. Stefan Nixdorf has a degree in architecture since 1996 and received his doctor´s degree ten years later. For his academical efforts and his work he already received several awards and architectural prizes. In 1996 he started working for gmp architects in Hamburg and changed to gmp in Aachen in 1999, where he contributed at the planning and completion of the Rhein-Energie-Stadium in Cologne. During his work in Aachen, he has been scientific assistant at the University of Aachen and even one semester at the “Academie van Bouwkunst” in Maastricht/ Netherlands. Since spring 2007 he is working for the agn-group in Ibbenbüren and as part of the project management he is responsible for the venue of sports and events. He is author of several articles and books regarding the construction of sports facilities and already participated successfully in numerous architectural competitions.


www.agn.de

‚Production‘

… is a dramatic manifestation of a structure or its events in the midst of spectators within the circle of the stadium, or on the media’s screens.

Opening ceremony Rhein-Neckar-Arena, Sinsheim

… in marketing, ‘performance characteristic’, it describes the feature with which an offer clearly sets itself apart from the competition, and can be achieved through the dimensions of price, time and quality.

Green Building – Institut für Geographie WWU Münster

Definition

… a scientific method used to define and describe images with respect to content and symbolism.

‚Iconography‘

‚U.S.P.‘

Tivoli Alemannia Aachen | Millerntor-Stadion St. Pauli | Rhein-Neckar-Stadion 1899 Hoffenheim | Nordtribüne VfL Osnabrück

architects | engineers | generalplaner

Dr.-Ing. Stefan Nixdorf (Architect)

21. International IAKS Congress 2009 | 30.10.2009

Iconography between Emotion and Economics

Sustainability in Stadium Construction -


levels of denotation in sustainability

functional sustainability

economic sustainability

ecological sustainability

Definition the Brundtlandkomission 1987

„… is a development that guarantees that the needs of today’s generation are met without influencing the ability of future generations to meet their own needs…”

‚Sustainability‘

emotional sustainability

sustainability is characterised by three points

Die Säulen der Nachhaltigkeit

has a social aspect, an economic aspect and an eco-political aspect.

Sustainability


sports venues …

Kolosseum, Rom

…are not only venue for sport events.

icons as visiting cards of a city

sports venues …

… are locations for common experience between people.

[Quote from “Italienische Reise“ J.W. Goethe, Munich 1962, Vol.1, p.33]

The simplicity of the oval is perceived in the most pleasurable way, and every head serves to measure, how prodigious the whole. Now, when one see it vacant one has no measure; one cannot know whether great or small.”

He prepares such a crater with his art, as simple as at all possible, so that this ornament the people itself thus become. Should the people see itself collectively, it must be amazed, otherwise accustomed to seeing meander ing and confusion…the people would see itself united in one noble body,…as one figure of single spirit enlivened.

„Then such an amphitheatre was made to impress: to present the people as well as itself at their best. This common need to satisfy is the task of the architect.


… and sports venues are put in scene.

sport is staged …

agn

… are a setting for emotion.

sports venues …

… have a community responsibility.

… a common experience.

Olympiastadion Berlin 2006, gmp - Architekten

sports venues …


King Fahd Stadion, Saudi-Arabien, Schlaich Bergermann + Partner

… the construction that is appropriate for the material involved.

Commerzbank Arena Frankfurt 2006, gmp - Architekten

… the fascination for the technical

Watercube Peking 2008, PTW architects

… the transformation of an idea.

Tennis-Stadion Qi Zhong 2005

… the imagery of technology


Allianz-Arena München 2005, Herzog & de Meuron

… identification through light.

Olympiastadion Peking 2008, Herzog & de Meuron

… the staging with light

Allianz-Arena München 2005, Herzog & de Meuron

… identification through light.

Allianz-Arena München 2005, Herzog & de Meuron

… identification through light.


RheinEnergieStadion Köln 2004, gmp - Architekten

… significant landmark.

Sportpark Köln 2006, agn Niederberghaus & Partner

… composition of the road.

Olympiastadion Montreal 1968, Frei Otto

… the iconography of structure.

EM-Stadion Braga 2004, Souto de Mora

… staging of landscape.


Olympiapark München 1972, Behnisch & Partner

Montreal 60er,Frei Otto

… the transformation of landscape.

(Prof. Volkwin Marg)

„Things should be designed so simple, that they withstand in content and time….., because manifestness is a categorical imperative.“

Sicherheit im Volksparkstadion (Hamburg) in den 30er Jahren

concerning costs and deadlines

safety, functionality, iconography

assumptions of planning


Definition of Green Goal at time of World Championchip 2006

On mobility: Reduction of greenhouse gasses by 20% by increasing public transport use to a minimum of 50%.

On electricity: Reduction of current stadium energy consumption by 20%.

On wastage: Reduction of waste stadia and their surroundings by 20%.

On water: Reduction of current stadium water usage by 20%.

55 Bewertungssysteme international (Studie der TU Darmstadt 2008)

Sustainability Charta EURO 2008

To realize environmentally compatible stadia To implement climate friendly and energy efficient measures To enforce the public transport To avoid waste To support economy and job situation To set incentives for tourism Investments are effective beyond EURO 2008 To support regional, biological and fairtrade products To make fanwork bring nations together Stadia have to be barrier-free/unobstructed as standard To accentuate juvenile culture and soccer culture To be exemplary in prevention and protection of young people

They are geared to the dimensions environment, economy, social/cultural life:

Austria and Swizerland aim to set a trend through sustainable organisation of the 2008 European Championships.

Sustainability Charta UEFA EURO 2008TM

zertification

EMAS registration

environmental expert

environmental statement

documentation

corrective and preventive measures

management system

environmental program

environmental audit

since 04 / 2009 as Version EMAS 3

EMAS - Eco-Management and Audit Scheme


office profile and headquarters

levels of denotation in the sports field

sports and event centres health care industrial/ commercial buildings public buildings educational facilities restoration/preservation of monuments energy und technical Infrastructure

Business segment

With more than 250 employes, 7 headquarters and a Europe-wide network of partners, the agn group is one of the biggest general planners in Germany

agn was founded in 1952 as an architecture office. Today it´s a general planner company with broad activities.

an

economical and an environmental signification.

Sport has a social,

www.agn.de

Stadium philosophy

Simplicity – sustainability – manifestness are a categorical imperative for us.

Beeing orientiated at the feasible we work in interdisciplinarian teams.

We give these emotions a home.

They are figureheads of a city with a high amount of public interest. Their atmosphere enthuses and touches the spectators. The people don‘t only come to see a game, but also to enjoy the common social event.

„Stadia are our passion.“

Tivoli Alemannia Aachen | Millerntor-Stadion St. Pauli | Rhein-Neckar-Stadion 1899 Hoffenheim | Nordtribüne VfL Osnabrück

architects | engineers | generalplaner


Green Building – Institute of geography WWU Münster

sustainability in the planning process

/ Economical quality

/ Ecological quality

Soziokulturelle

Sociocultural and functional quality

/

Qualität

und funktionale

Tivoli Alemannia Aachen | Millerntor-Stadion St. Pauli | Rhein-Neckar-Stadion 1899 Hoffenheim | Nordtribüne VfL Osnabrück

www.agn.de

Renaissance of the master builder

Generalplanning –

six categories of quality in DGNB-certification

S t a n d o r t q u a l i t ä t / Quality of site

P r o z e s s q u a l i t ä t / Quality of proccess

Q u a l i t ä t / Technical quality

Qualität

Qualität

Technische

Ökonomische

Ökologische


Rhein-Neckar-Stadion, Sinsheim

TIVOLI Alemannia Aachen

Rekonstruktion des Millerntor-Stadions / Reconstruction of the Millerntor stadium

Rhein-Neckar-Arena, Sinsheim


Lounge, Innenarchitektur a.s.h Kรถln / Lounge, interior design a.s.h. Cologne

TIVOLI Alemannia Aachen

TIVOLI Alemannia Aachen


Vier Trib端nen, ein Spielfeld, Mainz 05 Four grandstands, one playing field, Mainz 05

B端roprofil


Thank you for your attention!

Vielen Dank f端r Ihre Aufmerksamkeit!


Stadium concepts for the FIFA Football World Cup 2014 in Brazil PhD Carlos de la Corte Technical Consultant to the Organizing Committee of FIFA Football World Cup 2014 in Brazil, Brazil

Carlos de la Corte graduated in architecture and urbanism in 1994 at the University of São Paulo (USP). The graduation final work has received a honor prize in “Opera Prima” competition with an Olympic Stadium and a Sport Complex proposal for São Paulo. In 1995 he became member of the IAKS – International Sports Facilities Association – and currently is IAKS representant in Brazil and member of Latin America and the Caribbean Section. Carlos de la Corte published articles in various architecture magazines (SB-IAKS), Téchne (Brazil) and AU (Brazil) regarding sports architecture issues and die presentations on Congresses. In 1999 he started working for Bovis Lend Lease in Brazil, a leading multinational integrated real estate services company, acting from field superintendant manager up to operations manager and finally country manager, taking over the company command in Brazil in 2004, when he lead a 50 people team (architects and engineers) in various contracts. In 2002 he acted as a consultant to the Brazilian sports ministry, developing a cost efficient model-design of sports facilities for communities, allowing modular parts phased construction. In 2007 Carlos de la Corte was invited by Federal Government to join and talk in a public audience regarding stadium safety in Deputy Chamber in Brasilia. He received his PhD title in 2008 with the detailed study of Brazilian Football Stadia, assessing its facilities and creating a ranking model for management, comfort and safety comparing them with success European experiences and international bibliography In 2009, has joined the LOC (Local Organizing Committee) for the FIFA World Cup 2014 to be the technical consultant for the stadium design and interface with FIFA departments.


ƒ Creates a evaluation stadium model, with enphasys in: ƒ Comfort ƒ Spectator accessibility ƒ Safety

elaborated based on international regulations and specific bibliographic recommendations, complemented with interviews with the stadium managers and extensive field research.

ƒ The objective was accomplished through the application of a questionnaire

international standards and the comfort and safety demanded from the public.

ƒ It searches their evaluation based on the football new economic trends, the

four of the largest stadiums in Brazil (Pacaembu, Morumbi, Mineirão and Maracanã).

ƒ PhD research at University of São Paulo, taking 4 years duration ƒ The current study aims to do a technical, functional and management analysis of

Abstract

Köln, - October 2009

Carlos de La Corte (carlos.corte@arenaestadios.com.br)

“Brazilian stadiums: a technical, functional and economic performance analysis. The challenges for the 2014 World Cup“

21st International IAKS Congress

Press and authorities facilities and services

Referees and players facilities and services

Spectators facilities and services

Safety / Circulation

Spectators comfort

Current capacity

Field

Access and location

Specific technical aspects COMFORT AND SAFETY

STADIUM ASSESSMENT

21%-40% Bad

0%-20%

Regular

41%-60%

Good

61%-80%

Assessment qualification

Quality assess for attending or not – Performance evaluation

Very bad

Critical and description analysis

Architecture - materials

Site Plan

Financial details

Management

History of building

Register

General Data

The Assessment

Excellent

81%-100%

The Research

Cleaning, neighborhood and environmental impact

Telephone system

Elevators

HVAC

Gas system

Hydraulic, drainage and rain water systems

Lightning Protection system

Electrical Installation

Pitch Lighting

Sound system

CCTV (Safety)

Electronic display

Grass, drainage, irrigations

INFRA-STRUCTURE


Maracanã Stadium Public (Rio de Janeiro)

Morumbi Stadium Private – (São Paulo)

•What to do: demolish or refurbish them?

•The building pathologies need to be urgently repaired, after 30-40 years of use with no maintenance

•Most brazilian stadiums suffer from financial management problems (lack of an economic model for stadiums)

•Most brazilian stadium suffer from lack of maintenance, comfort, access, safety and profitability

•The subject demands urgent study (age of buildings, new trends, 2014 WC, management dificulties)

•Lack of specialization in the country

•Lack of national norms or standards for stadium design, management or assessment

The brazilian stadiums reality – Problems

Mineirão Stadium Public (Belo Horizonte)

Pacaembu Stadium Municipal (São Paulo)

Stadiums assessed

REGULAR

BAD BAD

Spectators comfort Safety / Circulation

4 5

0%

20%

40%

60%

PACAEMBU

35%

MINEIRÃO

42%

51%

MARACANÃ TOTAL -TECHNICAL ANAYLIS

MORUMBI

46%

STADIUM COMPARATIVE

REGULAR

BAD

80%

REGULAR

BAD TOTAL

BAD REGULAR

BAD BAD

Spectators facilities and services Referees and players facilities and services Press and authorities facilities and services

6 7 8

BAD

BAD

BAD

REGULAR

REGULAR

Field of play Current spectator capacity (way of calculation)

2

VERY BAD

1 3

VERY BAD

PACAEMBU

Description Access and location

Items

MORUMBI

EVALUATION STADIUMS COMPARISON – TECHNICAL DATA

Thecnical data conclusions

REGULAR

BAD

REGULAR

BAD

GOOD

VERY BAD

VERY BAD

REGULAR

REGULAR

MINEIRÃO

AVERAGE

43%

•PHILIPS, FIFA. Guide to the artificial lighting of football pitches: Dijon: Press´ Citron, 2002.

REGULAR

GOOD

REGULAR

BAD

GOOD

BAD

BAD

GOOD

REGULAR

MARACANÃ

•JOHN, Geraint, SHEARD, Rod. Stadia: A design and development guide. London: Architectural Press, 3rd edition, 2000.

REGULAR

REGULAR

BAD

BAD

REGULAR

BAD

BAD

REGULAR

BAD

AVERAGE

•CEN – Comité Européen de Normalisation. European Standard: Spectator Facilities- final draft – prEN 13200. Brussels: CEN, 2003.

•THE STATIONERY OFFICE. Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds. London: The Stationery Office, 1997.

•FIFA. Estadios de Futbol: Recomendationes técnicas y requisitos. Zürich: FIFA, 1995.

The referred bibliography

% of approved items


MA AVERAGE

PA MO

MI

Access and location

PA MO MI

MA AVERAGE

Field of play

MA AVERAGE

MI

MO

PA

calculation)

MI

MO

PA

PA

Evaluated Items

Safety / Circulation

MI MA AVERAGE

0.00%

10.00%

20.00%

30.00%

40.00%

50.00%

60.00%

70.00%

80.00%

90.00%

21%-40%

Bad

Regular

41%-60%

6.15%

MINEIRÃO

16.85%

77.00%

PA

MARACANÃ

MI

MA AVERAGE

PA

MO facilities and services

Press and authorities

PA

IDEAL (up to 90m) ADEQUATE (90-190m) NOT ADEQUATE (>190m)

Excellent

81%-100%

facilities and services

Referees and players

MO MI MA AVERAGE

21.28%

62.81%

Good

61%-80%

15.91%

QUALITY OF VISIBILITY

0.10%

MORUMBI

20.99%

4.42%

PACAEMBU

38.02%

57.56%

78.91%

and services

Spectators facilities

Assessment qualification

0%-20%

Spectators comfort

MA AVERAGE

Very bad

capacity (way of

Current spectator

MO

% of approved items

Example of quality of visibility evaluation

STADIUMS PA - Pacaembu MO – Morumbi MI – Mineirão MA – Maracanã

KEY

0%

20%

40%

60% MO MI MA AVERAGE TOTAL

0.00%

10.00%

20.00%

30.00%

40.00%

50.00%

60.00%

70.00%

80.00%

60.25%

16.75%

Steps hight

31.00%

22.00%

Dist. Bars and vomitories

20.00%

Dist. Access gates and turnstiles

48.50%

Barries hights

Type of fence betw. Sections

Exit capacity

Exit time

Entry Capacity Corrridors width

58.75%

60.00%

Stairs width

Handicapped Number of number of seats obstructed rows

Brazilian stadiums are not in acoordance with international standards of FIFA and also with otter bibliographic references. At the moment, they are not capable to hold international events without great structural and use reforms;

Dist. Seats and exits

71.50%

2. Brazilian stadiums are not prepared to hold the public with the comfort and safety demanded from the new economc trends of football.

1.

28.25%

Free Space betw. Number of seats Dist. Seats and Seats between stairs WCs

33.00%

Conclusion

Seats dimension

70.00%

AVERAGE OF ATTENDANCE PERCENTAGE OF THE 4 STADIUMS PER ITEM ASSESSED

62.00%

AVERAGE OF ATTENDANCE PERCENTAGE OF THE 4 STADIUMS PER ITEM ASSESSED 65.75%

Stadium compataive - TECHNICAL ANALYSIS

53.00%

80%

PA MO MI MA AVERAGE

Example of non attendance of int’l norms or recommendations (average between 4 stadiums assessed)

43.75%

Thecnical data conclusions

59.25%


Stadiums in Brazil

South

0,0%

Southeast

Center-West

Northeast

Northeast

5,0%

10,0%

6,5%

15,0%

41,9%

58,1%

20,0%

30,0%

Private

Public

25,0%

%s over total

12,9%

12,9%

25,8%

35,0%

40,0%

45,0%

41,9%

Number of stadiums in Brazil with 35.000 capacity or above per region, in %

Brazilian Stadium Management system (over 35.000) cap.

Regions of Brazil

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

35

1940

Before

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

2

50-59

70-79

Year of inauguration

60-69

3

80-89

7

90-99

1

after 2000

1

40-49

12 50-59

60-69

22

70-79

41

Year of inauguration

38

80-89

35

90-99

60

after 2000

82

Total

Northeast

Northeast

Center-West

Southeast

South

Total

Oceania

Asia

Latin America and USA (exclude Brazil) Africa

Europe

Brazil

Number of stadiums in the world (35.000 capacity or above) per region, in %

1940

40-49

1

4

12

Stadiums in Brazil (year of inauguraion) per region and decade (35.000 cap. and over)

Before

Stadiums in Brazil x World

Football income • In the world: U$ 250 billion • In Brazil : U$ 3,2 billion (less than 2% of al world) • The average income of a brazilian club is around U$25milion • CBF annual income is around U$ 40 million

Some Numbers • Population: 180 million • 27 State Federations • Aprox. 500 professional clubes, around 90 games per year each; • 300 mil direct jobs; • 30 million participants (formal and non formal); • 580 mil participants in 13.000 clubs • 1640 stadiums (Brazil has 5557 cities)

Number of stadiums

Brazilian reality

Regions

Brazi, the country of football

Number of stadiums


50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Number of stadiums

0

5

10

15

20

25

1

Regions

Africa

14

America (except Brazil)

Brazil

Public Average

38.888

34.363

28.838

18.473

12.401

Country

Germany

England

Spain

Italy

Brazil

Public – Average (Leagues)

Asia

4

Regions

Africa

0

Year

2006

2006-2007

2006-2007

2006-2007

2006-2007

0

Oceania

0

Oceania

CBF

FIFA

UEFA

Entity

TOTAL

20

TOTAL

44

42

776

987

Income U$million

Entities Income

Asia

1

Demolished or non active stadiums

America (except Brazil)

0

Europe

19

Europe

4

0

Brazil

21

Stadium Projects (remodeled or in construction) 2007 to 2011

Public Average and Entities Income (Brazil x World)

Number of stadiums

2005

2006

2006

Year

31,5%

17%

23%

Income Representation (2006)

Direito de TV Commercial, Publicidade Mkt e Transferência Broadcasting Players Patrocínio de Jogadores negotiation

29%

Built more than 30 years Reinforced concrete structure No spectator roof No individual seats 2 to 3 tribunes With athletic track

Type of Buildings • • • • • •

8%

Biheterias Ticketing

26,8%

41,7%

Representação de Receitas (2006)

Faturam ento (em U$m ilhões) Income (U$m)

416,3

Representação de Receitas (2006)

Football Clubs Income (2006) 4352,1

12%

Social No profite sports Outras Other income Amador receitas / social

11%

ClubesBrazilian Brasileiros Clubs

10 biggest 10 maiores EuropaEurope

10 biggest Brazil

10 maiores do Brasil

10 biggest Europe

10 maiores da Europa

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Building typology

0,0%

5,0%

10,0%

15,0%

20,0%

25,0%

30,0%

35,0%

40,0%

45,0%

0,0

500,0

1000,0

1500,0

2000,0

2500,0

3000,0

3500,0

4000,0

4500,0

5000,0

Clubs Income (Brazil x World)

%s

Stadium projects (Brazil x World)

%s


1

2

3

4

5

Year

6

Financial Result

7

8

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Building typology

-1000000

-500000

0

500000

1000000

1500000

2000000

2500000

3000000

3500000

4000000

9

Brazilian Stadiums Reality– Typical financial situation

Value(U$)

10

Year Income Expense Result

• • • •

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Maintenance

Bad maintenance Structural problems Lack of funds Lack of professional managers

Management and Maintenance

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Building typology


Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Bad visibility-Behaviour

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Blind spots (visibility)

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Behaviour

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Bad visibility-Behaviour


PACAEMBU

40,260

24,758

37,733

PACAEMBU

40,260

63,219 48,251

MINEIRAO

75,783

37,353

MORUMBI

72,039 53,537

MINEIRAO

75,783

56,307

56,308

MARACANA

87,142

MARACANA

87,142

Homologated capacity X Final capacity discounting blind and out of stair seats

MORUMBI

72,039

Homologated capacity X Final capacity discounting blind seats

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Vandalism

0

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

70,000

80,000

90,000

100,000

0

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

70,000

80,000

90,000

100,000

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Example of capacity reduction

Final capacity discounting blind and out of stair width seats

Homologated capacity

Final capacity discounting blind seats

Homologated capacity

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Safety (Violence)

Brazilian Stadiums Reality – Vandalism


Recent stadium costs parameters in Brazil • Stadium João Havelange-new U$ 4.074,00 per seat • Maracanã-Refurbishment U$1.217,00 per seat

CBF estimates to spend around U$1,1Billion in stadium refurbishments 9 remodeling / 2 new ones

Te cost of a stadium is directly linked • Capacity • Structural changes • Level of finishing • Equipments • Roads, access, site cost • New facilities (press, changing rooms, TV)

Stadium Costs

Challenges - (Costs)

Brasil

Colônia

João Havelange

Inglaterra Grécia Inglaterra

China

Olimpico Beijing #

Olímpico Londres #

Inglaterra

Emirates Stadium

Olímpico Atenas*

Inglaterra

Novo Wembley

Alemanha França

África do Sul

Greenpoint

Stanley Park Liverpool#

Alemanha

LTU ArenaDüsseldorf

Stade de France

Inglaterra

City of Manchester

Munique

Espanha

Valencia Nou Mestalla#

África do Sul

Alemanha

Amsterdam Arena

Alemanha

Holanda

Leipzig

Alemanha

Alemanha

Juventus Arena

Frankfurt

Itália

Estádio do Dragão

Durban Stadium-Kings Park

Portugal

Estádio da Luz

Gelsenkirchen

Portugal

Hamburgo

Ucrânia

Alemanha

Soccer City*

Stadion Shakhtar#

África do Sul

Hannover*

África do Sul

Alemanha

Nuremberg*

Nelson Mandela Stadium*

Alemanha

Amakhosi Stadium

Croácia

África do Sul

Ellis Park*

Alemanha

África do Sul

Kaiserslautern*

Berlin

Alemanha

Stuttgart*

Maksimir Zagreb #

Alemanha

Maracanã*

País Alemanha Brasil

Dortmund*

Estádio

The 2014 WC

80.000

71.030

90.000

80.000

60.000

70.000

80.000

66.016

70.000

51.500

48.000

75.000

48.132

70.000

53.804

50.000

49.500

76.176

51.500

45.000

46.120

52.000

44.199

76.176

50.400

65.039

51.055

94.000

44.652

41.926

55.000

70.000

41.170

54.267

87.142

66.981

Capacidade

$ 1.011.840.000,00

$ 730.000.000,00

$ 907.800.000,00

$ 730.000.000,00

$ 536.520.000,00

$ 550.800.000,00

$ 573.870.000,00

$ 403.260.000,00

$ 422.633.000,00

$ 307.380.000,00

$ 275.400.000,00

$ 423.000.000,00

$ 265.080.000,00

$ 371.280.000,00

$ 269.310.000,00

$ 250.000.000,00

$ 221.730.000,00

$ 341.220.000,00

$ 211.500.000,00

$ 183.333.333,33

$ 167.790.000,00

$ 179.070.000,00

$ 127.746.000,00

$ 211.500.000,00

$ 138.180.000,00

$ 176.250.000,00

$ 136.770.000,00

$ 221.000.000,00

$ 90.240.000,00

$ 78.960.000,00

$ 103.000.000,00

$ 118.000.000,00

$ 68.103.000,00

$ 72.615.000,00

$ 106.111.111,11

$ 64.155.000,00

Custo Total (em U$)

$ 12.648,00

$ 10.277,35

$ 10.086,67

$ 9.125,00

$ 8.942,00

$ 7.868,57

$ 7.173,38

$ 6.108,52

$ 6.037,61

$ 5.968,54

$ 5.737,50

$ 5.640,00

$ 5.507,35

$ 5.304,00

$ 5.005,39

$ 5.000,00

$ 4.479,39

$ 4.479,36

$ 4.106,80

$ 4.074,07

$ 3.638,12

$ 3.443,65

$ 2.890,25

$ 2.776,47

$ 2.741,67

$ 2.709,91

$ 2.678,88

$ 2.351,06

$ 2.020,96

$ 1.883,32

$ 1.872,73

$ 1.685,71

$ 1.654,19

$ 1.338,11

$ 1.217,68

$ 957,81

Custo por Assento (em U$)

The Host Cities (12)

Chalenges • How adopt existing stadiums for new trends? • How to atract private investors for new stadium management? • How turn existing structures feasible for new football trends? • How to take advantadge of events, as WC to attack these issues? Brazil problems • Lack of public funding • Football clubs in financial dificulties • Lack of reliabiity of investors (guarantees, contrcats) • Fans changing behaviour • Low purchasing power of fans, country poverty

The challenge for Brazil


Maracanã-Rio de Janeiro 83.142

Morumbi-Sao Paulo 64.039

Arena Maracatu-Recife 47.000

Vivaldão-Manaus 43.000

Castelão-Fortaleza 60.000

Estádio das Dunas-Natal 43.000

The Stadiums

Arena da Baixada -Curitiba 42.000

Beira Rio-Porto Alegre 60.000

The Stadiums

Risk....

• • • •

• •

Nova Fonte Nova-Salvador 50.000

Mané Garrincha-Brasília 72.000

It is feasible to adopt stadiums to FIFA requirements FIFA = media, tv, parking, VIP seats, players and referees In one way or other, will be done

White elephants in some years...

Participation of all social partners and not only CBF All projects should present a business plan /economic study (who will manage, who will fund, which club will play, who will design) Specialized and independant technical consultants should join Mixed investments (not only public) Join some club interests with private investors Take the chance and built a national norm for stadium design (COMFORT and SAFETY) Apply these standards to the proposed projects and not only FIFA regulations

What should be done....

• • •

Regulaments

Is it possible? How?

Arena Cuiabá-Cuiabá 40.300

Mineirão-Belo Horizonte 72.783

The Stadiums


Private Companies Investors

Clubs

Government/Public Power

Common interest

Hoe does government can help? • Provide the Area • Help getting investments in public banks with long term and low interest rates • Infra-structure investment • Public funds • Guarantee to Investors • Participation, demanding social return ou even economic from clubs or private partners

The players

Possible Model

Köln - October 2009

END OF PRESENTATION

21st International IAKS Congress


Sport and leisure infrastructure education and training programme Chairman PhD René Kural Architect, Director of Centre for Sports and Architecture at Royal School of Architecture, Denmark

PhD René Kural is Director of Centre for Sports and Architecture and Associate Professor at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture. He is author of the books Architecture of the Information Society, 2000, Sports and Cultural Buildings of the Future – Between Vision and Reality, 2000, Playing Fields - alternative Places for Sports, Culture and Leisure, 1999, Traces of New Cityscapes,1997 (red.), and Dynamics and Principles of the Shaping of the World City,1993. He is also author at The Great Danish Encyclopaedia, Denmark’s National Encyclopaedia, and has contributed with numerous number of articles and feature articles about new architecture and modern city planning for Danish and international magazines, anthologies and news papers. René Kural has been Visiting Scholar at Columbia University, New York, and at Tokyo Institute of Technology for several years, and has been invited as lecturer to Asia and most countries in Europe. René Kural is among other appointed the Danish member of Union Internationale des Architectes (UIA), Sports and Leisure Group, member of the Think Tank of Sports in the municipality of Copenhagen, appointed as external examiner at the University of Copenhagen, and reviewer for Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. Rene Kural functions as adviser for Danish and foreign municipalities and architects offices among others resulting in three 1. prizes in architectural competitions for the last 1½ years.


International school of sports and leisure infrastructure management Jože Jenšterle Secretary General of IASLIM, Slovenia

Jože Jenšterle is Secretary General of the IASLIM - International Association of Sport and Leisure Infrastructure Management, Director of the Sport Center Association of Slovenia and member of the Sport Infrastructure Committee of Slovenian Olympic Committee. He is economist and has special knowledge and professional experiences in project management and consulting, especially in the fields of education, marketing, sustainable development, social management, program development, tourism, investments, infrastructure for sport and leisure. He worked as Project Adviser for European Union PHARE programs and has Certificate of Business Management issued by JICA, Japan Government Agency in Tokyo. He had continuing professional development and training in the certified programs at the University of Florida in Gainesville, USA, University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada, The Australia Clinic in Perth, Australia, Danish College of Pharmacy Practice in Hillerød, Denmark, Babson College International Colloquium, Wellesley, USA and CEGOS European Community PHARE programs for the managers. For the past fifteen years he was a lecturer at universities and business schools and guest speaker at many international conferences and congresses of professional associations in Spain, Germany, Italy, Slovenia, Denmark, Australia, USA, Canada, Venezuela and Ecuador. In 2009 he will conduct two major projects: International School of Sport and Leisure Infrastructure Management and Standards and regulations of planning, building, managing, maintaining and usage sport and leisure infrastructure.


Interests in the sport, leisure and infrastructure

Interested parties in sport, leisure and infrastructure

Environment and sport, leisure and infrastructure


Changes in sport, leisure and infrastructure

Program encompasses four fields of education: sustainable development, "social" management, infrastructure and programs.

Interdisciplinary educational program for jobs and professions, which are specific to managing sport, leisure and infrastructure, includes knowledge and business skills in planning, construction, management and maintenance of sport and leisure infrastructure and programs.

Fields of education

General information about the program

Future trends in sport, leisure and infrastructure


3. Post-graduate university studies (2 study years) 336 hours of lectures (672 pedagogical hours of study activities)

2. Under-graduate university studies (3 study years) 672 hours of lectures (1.344 pedagogical hours of study activities)

1. Certified professional training courses (2 study years) 336 hours of lectures (672 pedagogical hours of study activities)

Programs will have the same basic structure. Different forms will differ in content and size:

Universities, business schools and other educational institutions, will decide on form of the program. Schools will include program in their curriculums as certificated professional training courses, under-graduate or post-graduate university studies. Schools will define content and size of different forms of the program.

Forms of program

Study programs

Fields of education

•senior manager of sport and leisure programs, •senior manager of sport and leisure infrastructure, •senior adviser for sport and leisure infrastructure.

Students in post-graduate programs at Universities and business schools, can acquire VII level of education and professional title:

•graduate manager of sport and leisure programs, •graduate manager of sport and leisure infrastructure.

Students in under-graduate programs at Universities and business schools, can acquire VII level of education and professional title:

•licenced manager of sport and leisure programs, •licenced manager of sport and leisure infrastructure.

Students in certified professional training courses at Universities, business schools and specialised educational institutions, can acquire professional title:

Study programs

Program is devided in two semesters, four educational fields, eight modules and 76 subjects. 1.Sustainable development and infrastructure 1. Sustainable development • Sustainable development • Infrastructure planning 2. Infrastructure • Operations and maintenance • Communal and technological systems 2.Management and programs 1. Programs • Programs • Marketing 2. Management • Management • Business functions

Program structure

General information about the program


Fourth educational field is "Programs". It includes two modules and 19 subjects. In certified professional training courses and post-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 80 hours of lectures (240 pedagogical hours of study activities). In under-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 160 hours of lectures (480 pedagogical hours of study activities). Students prepare one research project and attend study visit. Educational field includes programs and marketing.

Subject 11105 Social changes and future development of sport and leisure infrastructure

in

sport,

leisure Subject 11109 The future of leisure, sport and infrastructure

partnership

Subject 11108 Public-private infrastructure

Subject 11103 Impact of infrastructure on the environment Subject 11104 Climate changes and future development of sport and leisure infrastructure

Subject 11107 Public interests in sport and infrastructure and

Subject 11106 Olympic movement and sustainable development of sport Subject 11102 Sustainable development

Subject 11101 Sport philosophy and ethics

Semester 1: Sustainable development and infrastructure Field of education 11: Sustainable development Module 111: Sustainable development

Program modules

Curriculum

Curriculum

Third educational field is "Management". It includes two modules and 17 subjects. In certified professional training courses and post-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 80 hours of lectures (240 pedagogical hours of study activities). In under-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 160 hours of lectures (480 pedagogical hours of study activities). Students prepare one research project and attend study visit. Educational field includes management and business functions.

Second educational field is "Infrastructure". It includes two modules and 23 subjects. In certified professional training courses and post-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 96 hours of lectures (288 pedagogical hours of study activities). In under-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 192 hours of lectures (576 pedagogical hours of study activities). Students prepare one research project and attend study visit. Educational field includes infrastructure operation and maintenance and communal and technological systems.

Second semester is "Management and Programs." It includes two educational fields, four modules and 36 subjects. In certified professional training courses and post-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 160 hours of lectures (480 pedagogical hours of study activities). In under-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 320 hours of lectures (960 pedagogical hours of study activities). Students prepare two research projects and attend two study visits.

First educational field is "Sustainable development". It includes two modules and 17 subjects. In certified professional training courses and post-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 80 hours of lectures (240 pedagogical hours of study activities). In under-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 160 hours of lectures (480 pedagogical hours of study activities). Students prepare one research project and attend study visit. Educational field includes sustainable development and infrastructure planning.

Educational program encompasses four fields of education, which represents basic structure of the program.

Program has two semesters.

First semester is "Sustainable development and infrastructure." It includes two educational fields, four modules and 40 subjects. In certified professional training courses and postgraduate university studies, the program encompassess 176 hours of lectures (528 pedagogical hours of study activities). In under-graduate university studies, the program encompassess 352 hours of lectures (1.056 pedagogical hours of study activities). Students prepare two research projects and attend two study visits.

Fields of education

Curriculum

Semesters

Curriculum


Subject 11207 Reconstruction of sport facilities

Subject 11208 Future trends in the infrastructure planning

Subject 11202 Urban planning of the sport centers

Subject 11203 Architectural design of sport facilities

Semester 2: Programs and management Field of education 21: Programs Module 211: Programs Subject 21101 Programs and services

Subject 12207 Hazardous substances and material management

Subject 12208 Waste management

Subject 12209 Cleaning services

Subject 12210 Communication systems

Subject 12211 Lightning and acoustic technologies

Subject 12212 Safety systems

Subject 12201 Communal and traffic systems

Subject 12202 Water supply systems

Subject 12203 Energy supply systems

Subject 12204 Natural air treatment systems

Subject 12205 Heating systems and indoor air treatment technologies

Subject 12206 Water treatment technologies

Subject 21106 Events

Subject 21105 Tourist programs

Subject 21104 Fitness in wellness programs

Subject 21103 Profesional sport

Subject 21102 Sport for all

Program modules

Semester 1: Sustainable development and infrastructure Field of education 12: Infrastructure Module 122: Communal and technological systems

Subject 12106 Ice rings

Subject 12105 Athletic and football stadiums

Subject 12104 Swimming pools

Subject 12103 Arenas

Program modules

Curriculum

Subject 11205 National, regional and local networks of sport and leisure centers

Subject 11204 Standards and regulations of planning and building of sport and leisure infrastructure

Subject 12101 Sport and leisure infrastructure

Subject 11206 Sustainable development of sport centers and facilities

Subject 11201 Regional planning of the sport centers

Subject 12111 Sport playgrounds for children

Subject 12110 School sport facilities

Subject 12109 Other sport facilities

Subject 12108 Golf courses

Subject 12107 Ski slopes and ropeways

Subject 21110 Accommodations, services

catering,

VIP,

Subject 21109 Programs for children and youth

Subject 21108 School sport education

Subject 21107 Special programs

Curriculum

and

Semester 1: Sustainable development and infrastructure Field of education 12: Infrastructure Module 121: Operations and maintenance

Subject 12102 Standards and regulations of management maintenance of sport and leisure infrastructure

Program modules

Semester 1: Sustainable development and infrastructure Field of education 11: Sustainable development Module 112: Infrastructure planning

Curriculum

Program modules

Curriculum

medical

and

other


Subject 21207 Brands and integrated communications

Subject 21208 Marketing and ÂťLive TVÂŤ

Subject 21209 Event management

Subject 21202 Satisfying buyers' and users' needs

Subject 21203 Market research

Subject 21204 Marketing strategies

Subject 22208 Human resource management and team building

Subject 22203 Purchasing management

Subject 22205 Profit and nonprofit management

Subject 22209 Health and safety management

Subject 22207 Risk management, business planning and control

Subject 22202 Business plan

Subject 22204 Sales management

Subject 22206 Financing of infrastructure

Subject 22201 Business economics

Semester 2: Programs and management Field of education 22: Management Module 222: Business functions

Program modules

Curriculum

Subject 211101 Fundamentals of management

Subject 21206 Psihology of market communication

Subject t 21201 Tourism, leisure and sport market

Subject 21205 Marketing program

Semester 2: Programs and management Field of education 21: Management Module 211: Management

Semester 2: Programs and management Field of education 21: Programs Module 212: Marketing

Conclusion

Subject 21108 Crisis management

Subject 21107 Change management

Subject 21106 Organizational culture

Subject 21105 Project management

Curriculum

International School of Sport and Leisure Infrastructure Management is new comprehensive interdisciplinary educational program. It will be supplemented by Universities, business schools and specialized educational institutions and incorporate in their curriculums. Schools will offer the program as certified professional training programs, under-graduate or post-graduate university studies. The needs for such education and professional training are big.

Subject 21104 Organizational structures and proceses

Subject 21103 Development strategy

Subject 21102 Comprehensive strategic analysis

Program modules

Program modules

Curriculum


SAPCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s educational programme for the sports facility industry in the UK Christopher Trickey Chief Executive, SAPCA, United Kingdom


Mission statement: “As the recognised UK trade association, SAPCA fosters excellence, professionalism and continuous improvement throughout the sports and play construction industry, in order to provide the high quality facilities necessary for the success of British sport.” SAPCA works in close cooperation with sports councils, sports governing bodies, funding agencies, sports organisations, academia and others.

SAPCA’s role

Christopher Trickey Chief Executive, SAPCA

SAPCA’s Educational Programme for the Sports Facility Industry in the UK

3

1

The recognised trade organisation for the UK’s sports and play facility construction industry. Formed by the industry in 1997. Non-profit-seeking: funded by the industry. 220 corporate members – specialists in sport and play facilities. Contractors, manufacturers and suppliers, consultants and test laboratories, sports bodies. Admin team of 5, based in Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire, UK.

• • • • •

• ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾

Surfacing Contractors Group Ancillary Contractors Group Manufacturers & Suppliers Group Professional Services Group Affiliate Members

Includes separate Divisions for: Tennis Courts Synthetic Pitches Natural Sportsturf Athletics Tracks Play Surfaces Multi-Sports

Principal Contractors Group

SAPCA’s structure

• • •

About SAPCA

4

2


• • • • • •

• • •

Designed for site operatives. Recognise and reward competency in key skills. Vocational – workplace assessment; portfolios of evidence, but no written examinations. Delivered by South Birmingham College. Qualified Assessors and External Verifiers. Awarded by Edexcel; nationally recognised. “Train to Gain” funding from government. Flexible delivery – no fixed timescales Targetted training courses to support candidates with underpinning knowledge.

National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs)

Four key areas of activity: • Industry Regulation • Technical Standards & Guidance • Research • Educational Programme

Raising Standards

7

5

Partnership with South Birmingham College, adopted as SAPCA’s National Training Centre. Other partners include Loughborough University Business School, SkillsActive & Edexcel. New NVQs in Sports and Play Installation: ¾ Level 2 (Launched October 2008) ¾ Level 3 (Launch due 2010) SAPCA Certificate: Management & Leadership Training Courses The Sports and Play Foundation

Plus three Units from • Block A: Installation • Block B: Maintenance

Three Mandatory Units: • Conform to efficient work practices • Use and maintain equipment and machines • Conform to general workplace safety

NVQ Level 2

• • •

Educational Programme

8

6


Mandatory Management Units: • Manage your own resources and professional development • Provide leadership in your area of responsibility • Allocate and monitor the progress and quality of work in your area of responsibility • Ensure Health and Safety requirements are met in your area of responsibility

NVQ Level 3

11

9

Block A: Installation • Prepare sites for the construction of sports/play surfaces and equipment • Provide ground and substructure conditions for sports/play surfaces and equipment • Provide foundations, substructures and edge details for sports/play surfaces and equipment • Prepare for and install base layers for sports/play surfaces • Complete sports/play surface work for handover

NVQ Level 2 Assemble and install purpose made equipment and components for sports/play Complete sports/play surface work for handover Check and maintain sports/play surfaces and equipment

Optional Technical Units • Install and maintain artificial grass surfaces for sport • Install and maintain polymeric surfaces for sport and play • Install and maintain acrylic surfaces for sport • Install and maintain macadam surfaces and coatings for sport and play • Install and maintain natural grass surfaces for sport • Install and maintain equipment for sport and play

NVQ Level 3

• •

Block B: Maintenance

NVQ Level 2

12

10


13

Educational charity for the UK’s sports and play facility construction industry. Role – to develop qualifications and training for the sports and play industry and the wider marketplace. Registered as a Company Limited by Guarantee in July 2009 – applied for Charitable Status. Membership open by invitation to “stakeholder” organisations within the sports and play sectors. Promote collaboration in the provision of education and technical guidance. Fundraising to support educational activities.

The Sports and Play Foundation

www.sapca.org.uk 14


"Sports facility management (IST)" distance learning course Michael Wrulich IST-Sports facility management, Germany

Michael Wrulich was born in 1982 in Idar-Oberstein. He studied business administration with the main focus on management of sports at the university of Koblenz/ Rhein Ahr Campus Remagen. From 2003 to 2005 he was a member of the German junior football league for the team of 1. FC Kaiserslautern e. V. From 2005 to 2006 he was the executive director of SpoRAC e. V. In 2006 he was working as a volunteer manager at the FIFA WM 2006 organising committee in Kaiserslautern, Germany. Since 2007 he is working at the IST-Sports distance learning college in Germany in the range of marketing and sales with the main focus on sports and management.


Michael Wrulich

IST-Studieninstitut

Personality & Soft Skills

Tourism & Hospitality

Michael Wrulich

Sport & Management

IST-Studieninstitut

IST-Studieninstitut

that moves!

Education,

Spa & Health

Fitness

that moves

Education,

that moves

Education,

30.10.2009

30.10.2009

Michael Wrulich

IST-Studieninstitut

Michael Wrulich

Close cooperation with different partners

ISO 9001 & PAS 1037 accredited

All programs are accredited

Flexibility due to distance leraning

IST-Studieninstitut

IST-Studieninstitut

More than 3.500 current students

that moves

Education,

Today: about 50 employees and more than 180 freelancer

2003: Launch of the modern training center in D端sseldorf

Relocation to D端sseldorf in 1995

Founded in 1989 by Dr. Hans E. Ulrich in M端nster

IST-Studieninstitut

that moves

Education,

30.10.2009

30.10.2009


Michael Wrulich

IST-certificate/diploma

Chamber of Industry and Commerce

university of applied science

y y y y

12 13 14 15 16

Marketing

Basic Law

Sports Facility Conception

Sports Facility Financing

Sports Facility Operations

4

5

6

7

8

Marketing for Sports Facilities

January April July October

that moves

Education,

Michael Wrulich

Environmental compatibility

Special Sports Facilities

Concepts for Spa Facilities

Technical basics

Ticketing in practice (workshop)

Ticketing

Management Concepts for Sports Facilities (workshop)

IST-Studieninstitut

11

Project Management

3

30.10.2009

10

Business Administration II

2

Michael Wrulich

9

IST-Studieninstitut

Michael Wrulich

specialization stadium management

Start

that moves

Education,

y 14 study units y 2 workshops

16 months

Sports Facility Management

IST-Studieninstitut

Business Administration I

that moves

Education,

30.10.2009

basic business studies

Sports Facility Management (IST)

Sports Facility Management

1

Sports Facility Management

IST-Studieninstitut

Climb up the IST- carrer ladder

Sport & Management

that moves

Education,

30.10.2009

30.10.2009


IST-Studieninstitut

Internet: www.ist.de

E-Mail: sport@ist.de

Michael Wrulich

Hotline: 0800 / 478 0800 + 49 (0) 211 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 66 68 - 0

Contact

that moves

Education,

30.10.2009 IST-Studieninstitut

Michael Wrulich

Thank you for your attention!

that moves

Education,

30.10.2009


www.iaks.info

IAKS Kongress Handout 2009  

IAKS, IPC, IOC, Kongress

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