Page 1

{DWffiBIAi.

14

The 'Miracle Man' of Mount Royal By J. J. de路Lara

N the flat-topped crest of Cote-des-Neiges, which itself stands like a watchful bodyguard of the great Mount Royal, a squatwalled, graystone church looks down UPOIl the long, ",;nding and intricately split streets that form the island c<; Montreal. The church is what is known in the United States as a basement <:hurch-the solid understructure erected by devout and optimistic parishioners who know that with patience and persistent generosity a noble edifice wiII rise upon the nu.c!eus house of God. Ten years ago this, broad crypt had not been made; a simple wooden hut, its rear wall the native rock of Cote-des-Neiges, was all that stood upon the barren face of the hill. Now. the stone crypt is the object of thousands of pilgrims at every season of the year; to it there come by every ~nail stacks of letters from all parts of the Province of Quebec and from many unexpected and 'remote places of the world-and the letters are all addressed to one man. Seventy-six years old, short and spare of stature, with the thin, ill-shaven face and tousled thatch of one who cares naught for personal appearance, but this unpromising aspect of ill-groomedness, with shiny-seamed soutane and too-wide Roman eollar relieved by dancing gray eyes and a strangely childish smile--Frere Andre, known to Canadian vital statistics as' Andre ' Bessette of SaintCesaire, Quebec, is the man who has made the l'rypt of St. Joseph on Cote-des-Neiges. Onlv when he had reached the biblical ,limit of seventy years did Frere Andre commence to achieve the quiet fame that no'w brings tens of thousands of Canadians to see him every year. In 1870 he entered the congregation of the Holy Cross at Montreal. He was a simple lay brother. In all these Catholic religious congregations the vows of poverty, obedience and chastity are taken, and humility is always connoted; but nobody is more humble in station than the lay brethren. They do the manual work. the. less skilled work of the congregations:

O

FRERE

ANDRE became porter a.t the seminary of the Holy Cross, which stands at the footof Cotedes-Neiges. For decades he went the round of his 'simple duties, opening and closing doors, attending to callers, polishing and dusting and doing ' all maIlller of hewing' of wood and drawing of water. His superiors saw nothing remarkable in the little Fren('h Canadian brother, excepting, perhaps, that feast days made little difference to Frere Andre's diet and holidays simply meant that the brother from Saint-Cesaire took longer walks and made longer meditations. Some would chide him for the long periods he .spent on his knees. Then, after a time, they observed that he did not frequent the general chapel. Instead, with the aid of another brother-the carpen-

FRERE

ANDRE is the last niizn in the world who would acknowledge the title" Miracle Man'" But i1Ul8much as it describes a man devoted to the .supernatural, not necessarily performing the supernatural, the phrase fits the humble lay brother whose home is high up on breeze-swept Cote-des-Neiges. Knights of ColumbuS, 10,000 strong, made a pilgrimage to the Crypt of St. Joseph, Mount Royal, this year. The picture shows part of this inspiring spectaclea tribute to an humble soul modeling his life alter the Patron Saint of Canada

He found that Frere Andre was a simple, happy lay brother, who did not even lead worshipers in their worship-being a lay brother; but who urged upon all worshipers to pay special homage to St. Joseph who, by the way, is ,the patron saint of Canada. The Archbishop a'Sked the questions that an Archbishop is entitled to ask, for a request had been made for the Archbishop to grant the privilege of the tabernacle (repository of the Host) to the oratory. The Archbishop drove back to his palace, and Frere Andre returned to his altar of St. Joseph to pray for the intercession of the saint in behalf of the innumerable persons who had written to him or come to beg him for aid. But here is what Archbishop Bruchesi himself has pronounced regarding the general ' character of Frere Andre's oratory and crypt: "Shall I say that miracles are wrought in this shrine of St. Joseph'? If I denied that such was the case, the ex-votive offerings in yonder pyramids would belie my words. I need make no investigation, 1 am convinced extraordinary occurrences have taken place; corporal cures, perhaps, although it; is quite easy to suffer illusion in such cases, and spiritual cures still greater have been wrought here. Sinners have come here. have prayed, and after prayer confessed their iniquities and gone away at peace with God."

tel' of the institution-Frere Andre had erected a rude, wooden church-hardly anything better than a night-watchman's hut--on Cote-des-Neiges. There he worshiped, having placed in the hut a little statue of St. Joseph to which had been attributed miraculous powers by the brothers who had received it from the first brothers of the Holy Cross to c.ome to Canada from France. In 1892 Brother AND the Archbishop'S special commission, comAlderic and Pere Geoffrion, the superior of the .tl. prising three priests of other parts of the seminary, had planted a medal of St. Joseph under diocese, declared in its report: " As to the a tall pine beside the spot where Frere Andre's miracles the faithful affirm they. have seen wrought little chapel had been built. before their eyes, the commission withholds passing Minims--or novices of the order-attracted by judgment, before such time as each has been Frere Andre's quietly devout demeanor, visited the thoroughly examined and before the most reliable little crypt. When their parents came to the semcertificates are presented, as, for instance, at ina ry they took them to the, crypt. Gradually, no-, Lourdes." body , knows the exact time--but quite gradually Which shows that the Church does not readily visitors commenced to attribute beneficial incidents accept stories of miracles. i A bishop is decidedly in their lives to their visits to the crypt. The circle of , from Missouri when reports reach him of such visitors enlarged and Frere Andre put rude, benches occurrences in his 路 diocese. The harm that might into his hut. Unexpected cures of minor ailments, be wrought by a spurious miracle worker would then of serious infirmities, were reported by visitors far outweigh the good a genuine miracle ,shrine . to the crypt; sudden acquisition of material goods, may do. and sudden avoidance of impending misfortune were But you will find evidence in the crypt of St. also attributed to the miraculous character of the .Joseph at Cote-des-Neiges. There are trusses and erypt and the little man who tended it. erutches piled there as at Lourdes-not as numerous as at Lourdes-but testifying t o similar miraculou,: HESE reports finally l"eached the ears of Archcures; and the certificates of phYsicians are not bishop Bruchesi of Montreal. His Grace was ' wanting-reputable physicians wh~ in some case;: frankly skeptical--or at least in a frame of mind have no Christian faith to prejudice them in favor where he would not permit an institution claiming of the crypt; and, as a matter of fa ct, the Christian miraculous properties to exist in his diocese without physician's eagerness to indorse miracle shrines is in conducting a rigid examination of its claims. He inverse ratio to his devotion as a Christian. paid a personal visit to Frere Andre and the crypt. Daily at the shrine, crowds will visit it to pay Perhaps the Archbishop feared that some mesmeric honor to St. Joseph and to plead with little Frere power had been exerted on the hundreds of those Andre to intercede for them. This humble brother who had visited the crypt and professed miraculous is the first to laugh at the appellation "Miracle benefits in virtue of their visitation. Man." (Continued on page 26)

T


WwmalX

26

Labor and the Law KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS

Continued 'rom poge 15

work. He testified before Peele's commission that he employed no children under ten years of age, and that the total hours worked were under twelve, inc1udinlt one and a quarter hours for meals. Children had previously worked fourteen hours in his factory, but the number of hours had been ' reduced gradually. 'He 'said to the Commission that he believed such a limitation of hours would result in an improvement in the health of th~ operatives, both young and old, and a very considerable improvement ill t1le instruction of the rising ~eneration, together with a very conSlderable diminution in the poor rates of the country. He reported further a freat improvement "in the genera b:ealth and spirits" of the people employed by him which, had resulted from the chang-es already introduced, and stated that he did not think it necessary for ('hildren to be employed under ten years of age in any regular work. He thought children from ten to twelve should be employed as "half-timers" only. He referred to the increased . t rength, ~Ictjvity, and impl'ov d sph'it! of th " individual worker.; resultin!! frolll a shorter working day. H said: 'A ia'J:ge.r quantity may be produced by a Jrreater attention of t he hand' while the machinery is at work, in preventing breakage. . . . from the ~'l'eater desire of the individuals to perform their duty conscientiously, from the great wish to make lIP for any supposed or probable loss that the proprietors might sustain in consequence of giving this amelioration to their work people."

The Reform Movement HE fust landmark in factory legislation came in 1833, in the wake of T the Reform movement of 1832, and

after the organization of Ute workers of England was no longel' deemed a conspiracy, in other words, aftel' the legalization of trade union!;. This act introduced an external authority-the itinerant justices, with sl,'lccined poweJ'S to enforce the laws existing and provided by the Act itself, a blending of judicial and executive power in regard to the execution of the provisions of the Act. Night work was prohibited to all under eighteen years between the hours of 8 :30 p. m. and 5 :30 a. m. in specified weaving industries. No person under eighteen s hould be permitted to work 1ll00'e than twelve hours a day, or sixty-nine hours; a week. No child under nine was to be employed at all except in the silk mills, no, child under eleven was to be employed until some time after the first year following the passage of the Act, under twelve the second year, and under thirteen the third year. They were not to work more than forty-eight hours a week or nine hours in one day. ' All these provisions relate to children. The history of the struggle of organized labor for a reduction of the hours of labor is bound up in the history of the modern labor movement. It has received the sympathy and support of the humanitarian leaders in every industrial country, England, France, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States, who recognized that a normal working day is essential to an educated democracy. The panacea for our industrial and economic ills must be sought elsewhere -in the principle of moral responsibility of employer and employee for the common welfare. The "Miracle Man" of Mount Royal Continued from poge 14

"It is St, Joseph who does these things." he teaches : "I am like you, simply a suppliant," But the response to suppliance hinges to no small exten t, even in reason let alone in faith. on the merits of thE> supplicant. Frere Andre Is unqueRtionably a man of sai ntly life, Many clever and astute persons have expected to lind him a learned. shrewd man, proba.bly sincere. but unquestionably business-

DEATH NUMBERS 15256-15341 NUJll~er

Associate Members, 542,472 '

OFFICIAL ASSESSMENT No. 427, October 1, 1921 or Insurance Members, 218,206 Total Membership, 760,678

To Grand Knights and Suboidinate Councils of the Knights of Columbus and all Members of said Order: S,.c)TUERS : Your in8urance a$6eSSm ent. lIS provided by the General ~ J:.II:WS o( the Order, is due thl$ date nnd payable wllhln thirty days under lIenalt")' Imposed by said laws, Members must make paymont to th Financial SeCI'ctaT)' of (hel r res pectivo Counclls. Counclls must m ako payment to UJ" Supreme Secretary lIS provided by said Jaws, Tn compliance with the Death BClIof\t Law of the Order. yo u are hereby noUfied of the (ollov,'lng d eaths roporled since last AssllSSmenl:

Name

15256 15257 15258 15259 15260 15261 15262 '15263 15264 15265 11)266 15267 15268 15269 .I 5270 15271 15272 J ;;273 15274 l5275 L5276 15277 15278 1527$l 15280 15281 16282 15283 1E;284 1;;285 15286 15287 16288 15289 15290 15291 15292 15293 15294 15295 15296 15297 15298 15299 15300 15301 15302 1G303 15304 15305 15306 15307 15308 15309 15310 15311 15312 15313 15314 15315 15316 15317 15318 15319 15320 15321 15322 15323 15324 15325 15326 15327 15328 15329 15330 15331 15332 15333 15334 15335 15336 15337 15338 15339 ·15341

Location of Council

Jomel; S. Kissan 65 Ptllrlck P . ~'Ol( . , . , 39 03nl ..1 J. SUm " lln . . 47 O:uliei .1 . Ryon ..•. 39 John 1. .." ""Ins .• ..• 35 Johu P. Murph)! ..• 55 !iiimon O·Horn ...• • 66 Artbu~ H. Ollffy . • , 25 .Ios ph P. GraOy ... 21 .Iohn ,I. COli roy .•. . 45 'rbos.•1. 'Laughlln 60 Wm. 11. Kl'o~g.. r , . 27 Audrcw P. 'K0lI10P .. H4 Atrr ll .f . Danahy .. 43 \". .1. Adar:neltz ..•. 54 .Iohn P . .Rorh~ .• • , 56 .101111 J . Andrew" . . G2 Elugenl' .r. ~,"hub~rl 56 John .1. Ga.r> . • •. 64 .r rome J . Kalll ca.1 :.w Thom"$; E. K well. . 54 :;lJJJ1u~1 0. f'arrICt· . . 65 ,los, A. Urzykowl;Ikl 21 M. f'. )II;Oullo ugh .. 43 Danl I W. Mnher .• 56 William '1'. l-iollaJld. 58 ~1f 'Im -I SOli! h. .... G8 ,Inrnes D . K~'rin 8 .•. 53 fl . M. ""o/1unl r .• • :n C. I" . Crow l!!)' , .rl'... 26 eha", ShcpR~rd .. . 41 Chari.". .1. .~lc 'Ilb .62 Hugh Newma.n .... 41 1'ldward Dobson. ... 66 () 0, '. DouglJerly.. 63 F.:dwal'd J. MclCenny 55 "(llilam 'rhie[ ... .• 46 Jos, ~'1, Shannll.h!fn. 21 Patrlc.kL. QII,i gley. 63 Oil. D . CoppInger. 30 Philip In(ques ... .• 28 IImu:11 .r. Skoyles. 36 Paul J. Uauok . . .. 21 Pntl'lck J . D'o wllng. 43 J~obn Fl. Dc\' loc ... 51 0, O'Bri en, Jr . . . ,. 22 J"rnnclsco Tc.rl'31.ns. 46 Thomas G. I:Ilnklo. , 28 John F. Uoey, •. .• 46 'Eug n' A , Giraud • • 62 Ollo Burlz r .••• • • 44 U"bcrl I., J>!sy.... 43 N. \I'. Trng:reS$er .. 50 J e r mlnh Ii. Sulllvo,n 60 Daniel P. Conway .. 47 J:r.mCiS E, .Burton. .. 56 Peter A. McKennn .• 65 William :S. OwC!ns •. 47 John L. O·Drion ... 42 Cburlcs E, Byrnes. 53 Jns. p, Gi lmartin . . 21 Denllis McCullOUGh. 70 David J. Walsh . •.. 24 Michael J. Kiely .•• 61 01l0. J. Bralldehol't. 37 Frank .T. FieldS .... 18 . Thomas Golden, .• • 47 Jobn J. "'Isber . ..• 44 Johu C. Bn rQCcidcr. 31 John F. CUrry . ... 59 John }'. Conway ..• 26 Fred P. 'Roder .• . . 31 Frank J. "f.flllc..... . 25 J ohn J. Pumphr y. 39 Jomes C. Rarrigan. 40 .John A. Stark . . • , 28 Willlnm A. ~runsell. 46 Jnnl('S L. Brerlnon. , 47 E . W . Eschlimnnn. '£0 WlIlh,Ol n\llln •••• 45 .Tohn O· oOlle U. ... 2\ D, F. CarpCll\er .•. 42 .T,oscph W., 1IlI11s... 29 Cornclius Quillian .. 68 Jllm E . l\l<:Cnwllly 60

.. 2[;

1399 683 541 2061 420 184 1114 184 471 241 264 16:1.6 79 1418 361 344,

244 244 105 491 1260 74 121 304 126 12 236 1278 1663 632 16 121 88 362 236 492 609 404 2130 1343 217 1017 517 306 1780 121 1434 101 405 593 800 75 280 762 852 243 2238 126 1 240 631 98 780 917 400 2053 65 888 531 704 981 585 1056 1687 510 21 '.372

ChalCllugay. N. 1. .' •• Los Angeles, Cal .. • • •.. Ba~re, VL. ••••• •••• •• Mo nessa, Pa. •.. • .. .. D ""CT1 ' Colo, ., .••.... Fa ll Rlv r. Ma..'>ll. • • ••• Hornell. N. Y. " " ' " 6orry, Pa. .. ........ . PlJilu,d Iph la. Pa. • . • •. SlloknlHI, "-8ljb. . •• . .•• 'I' rrp Saute, [nd, ••••• SaYrov1 1l '. N. ,r. .. ... . Man~a Id. :.lass. . .... . 'BllrtOJO. N. Y....•• •• . 'rhebodaux. [.n. • • •• ••• Butrllio. 1". Y. Porl ,Ter,'is. N. Y. • •.. ew York . N . Y • . • •.• PIIISb\lrg, Pa. , .. . •. , . ftalam1l1iOo. 1'<1Icb, , •••• Nat! k. Mass, " • • , •. •• Falley FRrm. ({y. • •• • • Chicago. II1. " ' ... , " Philadelphia. J'a, . , . . . Chicago, Ill. '., . .. .. , Chicago, 111. .., .•.• • , Malden. Mass. .." " ., PIIlsburgh. PII . • , •• , • • Gr$nd ll'ork~, N. I), . • • • ·ombrld · . Ma.'\.~. , .. .• 6righl.On, Ma..".. . , ••• •• Poughk•. psle. N. Y •••• Brooklyn. N. Y • • •••. • • Ne '" Brltaill. 'onn, ..•. I?hlladplplli;J. PR. ., .•. Chicago, III. .,." ,. , . Idaho Falls, Idaho .,., . Chicago. III. .... ', .. . Bridgeport. Conn. ." , . Brighton, Mass, •. • . ,' . Worcester, Mass, ', ." . ~N'ew York, N. Y . • .• ,. P1l1lndelph'ia, Pn , .. ", TltusvUle. Pa, ." .. . " Jackson, Mich, • ... ,'. Al leboro. Mass. • .. , .• , On lexico, Cal. " . , ... " Mt, Carmel, Ill, .... , . New York, N, Y . . . ". Austin, Tex, •. ,,','" ChIcago, 111. " ' " , . , . New York, N, y, . " , . Ambridge, P a, "."" Brighton, Mass. " " ' " ChIcago, Ill. .• . , .. ..• Portland, Me. .,' . ... . . AtlanLfc City, N, ./ .•.. Saginaw, Mlch, ....•.• St. Louis" Mo, .••. .••. Somerville. Mass . •.. ,. Scrnnton. Pa . . . .•..• .. LexIngton. Ky. • •• .••. Ohlcago. 111 . . . . . . . . , .. HornelJ. N. Y. • • •. , .• O~tovlLle. Ohio ......• BrooklYIl. N. 'Yo ,. , .". New 1'I:wca, Conn, " " Patersen. N. J. , .... . , Savannah, Ga• . . . ..•. , lloston. ~tasS", •. . ...• •. Carroll. l own •. ..•.••• BrattleborQ, \fl••••. . , . 01UDlbu8, Ohio ' . .. , .. Grand Pall 9. N wnIL .• N w Havco, Conll . •. " . Qttumwll, 10wo. ... • • " MadIson. Wis. . . . . ... . Charlestown. S, C, .", St, LouIs, Mo, .", , ~, , , 1!rooklyn, N. Y. .""" u elnwnro. Ohio .""" Chicago. IlL . " " , ... D ubuque, Iowa .",." , Westerly, R. I. .... " . Pittston, Pa, " " ,.".

Cause of Death

IDate of Death Sept, May June June May June June July June May June Apr, Apr. Apr. Ma,y Apr. May ;rune May' June .June June June .Tune .June .June ,lune Apr, .Iune .Iune ,Tune .Iune June June July June ,June July July July July July .July Ju[y July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July July Ju[y July July July May June June June June June July July July July July Mar. Mar. July June

Initiated

7, 1920 Chron. neph!'. ruJd myocard,ltls . July 21.1804 6,1921 Sclerosis ot 8pl"uJ cord . . . . • Aug. H. 191 14,1921 PuJmonary tuberculosis •• , . . Oot. 7.1918 15,1921 Pu[mOlln.ry tuborcu.l0als , , , ., Oer.. 11. 1820 25,1921 Pneumonia .. , . . . • . . , . .. ,. 0cL 2. 19117 19,1921 hronie Ill'pbrlll~ •.. • . . . , . . ov, 22.1897 25,1921 Typbohl F vljr . ..... .•..•.. OQL. T. 1897 1,1921 Accldenlal injur lCli . , . . • . . . AuS, 1,.1916 6,1917 Sat' ·OO)!I. "r 11\' l' ••• , , • •• • ••• Dec. 21.1911 28.1921 Tltrom 1)0$1. •••••••••••• • ••• l~ b . 20. 191 (I 19.1921 Sep"i~ of Il" rol[d gland •.•••. Apr. 2~.190:{ 10. 1921 Pulmonary I ub r<,\ulo."16 • • • • • 1)61'. 1. 191\} 27. 1921 I.obar pUOlumon IlL .•. •...•. . Mar. 5. J 62 12, 1921 .\ l)'oc:al'dilfl' •• • • •• . • • . . ..... SCpl . H , 189S 5,1921 Ac ut aPPClidi 'iUs ..•..••... Apr. :11. 1,91,:: 28, 1921 Cur"bral he morrhag(· , . . . • . :';epl. I, 130fl ~Pa~re~i~ , • • • • • , . . . . • • • • • M,ay 19. 1904 19.1921 H)',,,,rlrophl' ot prostl1t \' , .. . .Ian. !!G• .;I,89 6, 1921 31. 1921 J>ndo"".rdl\i~ and eel'. " ."orr . . Nov. 1 1. ;f89'; Gun~hOI woulld . . . . . • ••••• :;ep! , . .192 10,1921 Pl'rniclous anmmja . . . . . .• ' Mol'. J =l. 1808 11, 1.921 PUhUO!HU'Y lube rculo.ls .. • . , ,rUnl' G. 19011 13, 1921, 17,1921 StllJl i [1I('uinK. and 01 It II< !t\ din S ill., 211. l!l19 Inte~llooJ obslructlon . . • . .. I) \,. 1\. J9tO 17,1921 Ae id elllallnjuriPR •••• •• ••.• Iulr I t). l891; 20. 1921 Cerl!hrn.1 hillIlorrhl<St . , .. .•• .Iun" 27. t 97 17, 1921 anCt!l" or MOSL. I1n~ 1.I1,,<ld,·r. On . S. I 9:1 24, 1921 Irrhosis of liver .. , , , , • . . .• Jlln ' J O. Inn L 19. 1921 A~cidclllal drowning . . • . . , • •1un I S. U'll 0 25, t92t ['ulmonnr)' tub\'rCIII sit, . . • • • .1011 . 2~ , 191!; 22, 1921 'or 0l:!rnJ hCJllo:rh3/':1l •. • , •. • .Iuly :H . 1 01 21.1921 ,\rtorlO ~clerOHIl< . ....•.••.. • •Inn. 2\\.1903 29 . 1921 l.ymphAllc lultnemia .•. ... •• •run · :{. J912 26,1921 Apoplexy .. ,. ... ... . .. . .... Mill'. 1.], 88 29.1921 A rl!'rio sclerosis •.•.• .•. ".. ,rune 13. 1897 2,1921 Cc,r b ral hemor~hagc .. , . .. . Mn.r. ". 1912 29,1921 Ulcer oC duod~num •.... . .. • No \·. 26. 1916 27, '1921 3,1921 GuPShOl wound •. •• ....... . Ir"b. 20. 1920 Endocardi tis • .. .•••... ....• Mar, 2 .1901 2,1921 A~(! iden l llllnjllrlc5 .. . . . . . • Mill'. 21. 1911 4,1921 AooldentAI [njurles ••.. •• , • .Juno ~. 1921 7,1921 Dillbetcs melUlu8 , •.• , .. , ... Jun' 5; 1914 6,1921 Heart disease ........... •.• .Iuly 31, 1919 11, 1921 Diptb@rla ahd typhoId ft:w<lr •• Feb. 26 ,19)7 9,1921 Chronic nephritis. , .• •. ' •• Mar. H. 1912 8,1921 Aooldent:U drowning • . • . . . . Mar, 20.1.1)17 9,1921 Accidental Injuries ••.. • .•. • Ma~' 9.1920 10, 1921 Ch ronlc endocarditis • , • . . , . De". 13. 1916 10, 1921 Pulmonary tnbcrculosls . • . .. rotay 24., 1901 8,1921 Pulmonary tuberculosis. . . ,. May 21. 1905 9,1921 11, 1921 M nlnglliS . ••... .... ...•• ,. Feb, 27, 1920 Ccrebrn.1 hemorrhage. . . . .. , Apr. 30, 191.2 12, 1921 Acut gnslro-cnterlt!s •. , ... , Apr. 11.1915 16, 1921 Pul.mollllry tub'rculosls • • . . •• Mar. 31 • .l 95 19, 1921 ~lIlmonory abscess .. ....... ott. ll,l9U 18, 1921 G rcbrai hcmorrhnge . • • • • .• Feb. 9. 1896 19. 1921 Cerebral hcmorrhoso . .•..•• Mol'. 21. 1901 18, 1921 Lighl'Dlng stroke ., .. ,.. . . .. Apr. G.1919 6.1921 18, 1921 Th ermic rever •. , . ••. , .. . . ,. May 22, 1900 Chronic endocardltis . .... ,.. Nov, 1lI. U)OO 20, 1921 Dh' er tleulltls o( intem.lne ••. . ,\1:or. 3.1919 21, 1921 Atrophic sclerosis o C liver .. . Apr . .l,(J , 1905 15, 1921 Pu.1mooary tuberculosis. . . .. .Jan, 1'i.191G 20. 1921 Ce r brill bem. nnd dlab lel;., .July lS.1897 24, 1921 Appendicitis . , . , .•..... ,. . I~pr. 20, 1921 24, 1921 Accld6lltAl drowning , , . . . . , Opl. 23.1920 22, 1921 Oancer . •. .•.. , .••.•.• • •. . Feb, 1 .1 .1896 29, 1921 Mala r ia .•. •• . • . ... .• .. •. . , Mar . .1'8. 1901 27,1921 Septic meningitis. . . . . . . • . .• )far. 9, 1913 23, 1921 Cerebral hemorrhage, . • • .•• .Ia'll. 25, 1904 29, 1921 H o mloldo by gunshot .. . , . .• June 8, 1918 21,1921 AecJdental dro,,"'Il108 . . . . . , ., .Tull' 21 . 19U 14,1921 AccldontAl drownln~ .• , • .. • Aflr. 10.1914 19.1921 Pernlc.1ous anaemia ... , •• ,.. Dec. 2.1913 15,1921 Pulmonary tubcrcu lO$in .•••. Apr, 7.1 912 7,1921 Epilepsy . •. . • . . ... ... ' . ... i"oV. 9 .1913 11,1921 AppendJc.ltls •.••••. . •. .• •. , Aug. 26, 1900 18, 1921 Dlobcteo ...••. •. ... •... ... Oct. 26. 1902 24, 1921 Endoc!'rdlUs . ..... ... . , . . .. Kov. to, 1901 28, 1921 Chl'ollle myocnrdltls ... , . . • .•Iun c 2·1. 1 02 31. 1921 Ptomaine polson ... . .. ..•. ' .Ion . 10.1920 30,1921 , . . . , .. . .. , .. " .. , .. " .. Kov. 7,1895 22. 1919 Gunshot wound ..•. ,' ... ',' Feb. 2, 1913 14, 192t 14, 192,1;{ Cirrhosis of liver " " " " " Aug. 12, 1885 18, 192:10 Cerebral bemorrbage .... ,', Nov. 3, 1910

Amount Paid Order $480,03 30,94 199,86 93.45 121,70 315,28 615,53 88.il6 18,90 125.20 393,69 13.~0

12,;32 220 ,95 1.20.86 174,3'; 207 ,69 313.14 558,30 7,20 291 ,74 501,51 16,56 110,01 3 63,80 a52.62 103.48 242,38 18,00 41.58 192,42 892,80 92,98 714,87 505.91 151.92 56,57 22,00 420,81 90,83 4,15 67.81 21.58 50 ,U 120.69 36.40 19.58 52,61 211 ,29 329 ,39 19,26 97,85 84,86 541.96 89,88 388.45 54~.90

29.98 152.23 251.34 20.16 538.80 54.02 421.80 4.65 7.70 259,03 204,65 79.37 355,90 66,98 92,32 59,80 76.92 88,65 66 ,96 207.02 205.80 160,39 193,79 13,68 257,58 71,87 900.42 683,19

, ·Carrled $2,000.00 !A,inount carried by deceased members. $87,459,66 !'<ew Haven , Conn" October '1..' 1921. (Sl'gned) WJI{, J, McGINLEY, Supreme Secretary, "When Notice ot. Assessment is glvelV by the Supreme' ~ Secretary, throUgh an official paper, as hereinbefore provided, no further notice need be given. by the Financial Sepretary." , Amendment to the ',Laws and Rules of the Supreme Council, June, 1903, THIS IS THE ONL~ OFFICiJAL' NOTICE OF , ASSESSMENT TO MEMBERS - I

fJI- The members of tM Kniglt.ts of

Co~mbit.s Il!lmed i'n the mortuary table above left They appret;iated the true principles of Columbianism. Is your family provided for? The K. of C. insurance system is second to none in safety stability, 8011ndness-ma:xim~m 'protection 'a t minimum cost.

some provision for their families. •

.p

like. Not a CMl III any form is exacted or llccept,Cd by Pr"r\! Andre froin those seeklog Ills olJicel;.us port r o[ ,the', crypt of St. ,I oseph. He Is 8wOrl\ to ~ a vow' Qf poverty; he Is an' nsecllc "'ho has worn the saine habit and the same dusty clerical hat for fifteen years, He has about him a heavenly b"mt.r and serenity and the' simple. gushing childishness of those who walk with God, I think the person he most resembles is Marshal Foeh-the two men have the same translu-

,

<:en grill' or nye. and Ure ~am e ' ncr!l'Y o f all" ell lid molion. From the pOJ)llt In r;lI1 erYlIl you will b en r, e very dll),. a ' ptieSl . C11d 0111 I.tll' inte nllons Or· lhe young 3lld . id-th Iii'rls SU killS fa1thful sIYains Ilod 11 artslck YOUlhs appealing ror as!!. "1~01' u. l1'rson who Is Lhr-aton'd wllh dCu.th by cancer." UI pricsl IJllon~'!! . "Or II t roubled ,,;fo for th .. cOI1 "(!rf!ion or " husband of Intempernl bablu;." "or a nh.r· ahou t wllo IB 11(:31' brUl",.ul1tC)·," ctc.. ct.

And through the long hours of the night Frere Andre is on his knees before the statue of hIs beloved St. Joseph, praying for these things. Some day this cburch on the mountainside, SUccessor to the little wooden oratory of Frere Andre. will be the glorious basilica of St. Joseph. and the little miracle man of Mount Royal will probably be enshrined as the saint whieh every soul in Quebec believes him to be,

Profile for Columbia Magazine

'Miracle Man'  

The 'Miracle Man' of Mount Royal by J. J. de Lara

'Miracle Man'  

The 'Miracle Man' of Mount Royal by J. J. de Lara