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FALL / WINTER 2019 / 20 HIGHSNOBIETY – FROM TEENAGE BLOGGING TO I­NTERNATIONAL MEDIA GREATNESS / BECK TO BECK, THE SUCCESS DUO WHO LITERALLY WORK ­BACK2BACK / TAKING A TRASH LEAP TO MAKE THE (­ FASHION)WORLD A BETTER PLACE DO LOOK BACK! ON A DECADE OF STREET AND ­U RBAN WEAR WITH THE SEEKERS

Berlin Fashion Week Magazine #27


SCHNELLE FRISCHE WENIGER BÜGELN

Für alle, die Fashion lieben: Mit kraftvollem Dampf entfernt ProSteam® Knitterfalten, beseitigt Gerüche und schont Fasern und Farben. #auffrischenistangesagt

aeg.de/prosteam


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WELCOME

Berlin Fashion Week sets standards when it comes to ­fashion trends. Its many trade show formats, runway shows, and various events have become a magnet for the international fashion scene. This is where people gather to examine the latest trends and collections of both established brands and emerging Berlin labels.

MESSAGE from the Governing Mayor of Berlin Michael Müller

Fashion unites creativity and business, and it’s long since ­become a significant economic factor in Berlin. With e­ xciting new creations, innovative concepts, and up-to-the-minute trends, the latest edition of Berlin Fashion Week will wow visitors and give Berlin’s importance as a fashion industry location another boost. Imaginative, adventurous, and expressive – that’s how Berlin’s fashion labels are presenting themselves. And that puts them right in step with Berlin Fashion Week. Welcome to Berlin Fashion Week in January 2019!

© Senatskanzlei/Lena Giovanazzi

Imprint PUBLISHER

CONTRIBUTORS

COVER

ADVERTISING

PREMIUM EXHIBITIONS GMBH

Lena Brombacher | Mareike Brünig

Highsnobiety & Team

Advertising Director | Marco Gröning

Luckenwalder Strasse 4–6 | 10963 Berlin

Chris Danforth | Renko Heuer | Kate Lewin

Photographer: Maxime Ballesteros

Junior Advertising Manager | Hauke Krüger

+49 (0)30 62 90 850

Björn Lüdtke | Kay Alexander Plonka

maximeballesteros.com

Anita Tillmann | Jörg Arntz | Simon Kimble

Frédéric Schwilden | Quyn Tran

berlinfashionweek.com

Wagemann Medien GmbH

TR ANSL ATION

Sonnenstaub – Büro für Gestaltung

Leuschnerdamm 31 | 10999 Berlin

Francesca Gatenby | Nivene Raafat

und Illustration

+49 (0)30 62 73 52 30

Sonja Marterner | Peter Großöhme

info@wagemann-medien.de

CIT Y GUIDE

Greifswalder Strasse 29 | 10405 Berlin

wagemann-medien.de

Lena Brombacher

+49 (0)30 55 57 79 29 0

EDITORIAL Editor-in-Chief | Christine Zeine

PRINTING ART DIRECTION

magazine@berlinfashionweek.com

sonnenstaub.com


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RADAR

Robotic Kitchen – the future of cooking The British company Moley Robotics has developed a ‘Robochef’, together with a design kitchen and recipe database, that takes over the paring, cooking and cleaning while we snuggle up on the sofa and relax. All we have to do is to place the ingredients within its reach and choose a recipe. These were pre-cooked for the ­robot by Head Chef Tim ­Anderson. ­Using the integrated 3D ­ camera you can even ‘teach’ this industrious kitchen helper to cook your own recipes, since the programming is done on the basis of g ­ esture recognition. Grandma’s roast coming up then. The MK1 digital housemate will soon be available for pre-purchase. Th ­ ermomix is so last season. At Spyce restaurant in Boston they ­already use artificial intelligence in the kitchen. The Robotic ­ Kitchen installed there whips up 150 healthy dishes an hour in its seven woks, creating bowls of rice, ­c urries, p ­ asta or salad to order. The idea was developed by four engineering students who wanted to offer nutritious food at a fair price.

moley.com | spyce.com

RADAR Fashion trucks – stores on wheels After food trucks fashion trucks are the next big thing. Because: in conjunction with physical retail spaces and online shopping, mobile pop-up boutiques offer benefits that are especially exciting for brand appearances and the events sector. The trucks are particularly effective at festivals and trade shows, or used as a pop-up store right on the doorstep. In Frankfurt, Daniela Bode regularly parks up at markets in her pink Truck-à-Porter. The interior houses a proper mini boutique, including clothing rails and display areas for jewellery and accessories. The love of fashion and the dream of the ultimate road trip were what inspired this mobile business concept. The trend originated in the USA of course. Le Fashion Truck founder Stacey Jischke-Steffe perfected the business and now offers webinars on the subject of ‘­Starting a Fashion Truck’.

truckaporter.com | lefashiontruck.com


RADAR

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Transport technology – driverless buses

The women of the Bauhaus school – 45 stories

It sounds like something from the future, but it's already a reality. Around the world intensive research is being conducted on the relevant technology, and an increasing number of pilot projects are being launched – yet we never thought we would see them so soon: driverless buses. Trial runs began for the first time in Berlin in 2018. At the ­Charité and Virchow hospital campuses in Berlin, electric buses drive around at speeds of 12 km/h and offer space for 11 to 15 passengers. At the moment, monitoring personnel, who can intervene in the event of an ­emergency, are still on board, but from spring 2019, they will operate fully autonomously. Brave New World!

If we were to tell the story of Bauhaus we would search in vain for ­female icons in the historical reports. Patrick Rössler and Elizabeth Otto have dedicated a book to these women. ‘Frauen am Bauhaus’ (‘Women in Bauhaus’) presents 45 stories about the artistic background and works of the female proponents of Bauhaus, and shows how Bauhaus attracted women from all over the world – including artists, designers and architects. We read about well-known greats such as Gunta Stölzl, Ise Gropius and Anni Albers, but ­ also biographies of female representatives of ­Bauhaus who up to now have only been familiar to those with expert knowledge of the subject. The book offers the most extensive and up-todate overview to date of the women who helped shape this school of thought and take it out into the world. Publication: 20 March 2019

bvg.de

Coffee recycling – made in Germany In Europe alone 8 million kilograms of coffee grounds are thrown in the bin every day. While he was studying in Italy it occurred to Julian Lechner – who comes from Berlin – that these coffee grounds ought to be used for something. No sooner said than done. After plenty of experimenting he succeeded in creating a strong material out of coffee grounds, beechwood fibres, starch, cellulose and organic polymers. The resulting product was attractive, lightweight and even dishwasher-proof mugs and takeaway cups that smelled of coffee even when unused. The coffee grounds used come from caterers in Berlin. The attractively designed coffee containers are 100% made in Germany.

knesebeck.de

BerlKönig – digital ride-sharing service

kaffeeform.com

Who’s that whizzing along so late through the night and the wind ... BerlKönig of course! The on-demand shuttle is a ride-sharing concept from BVG and ViaVan, a joint venture between Daimler and Via. Intelligent algorithms enable journeys to be bundled together for passengers travelling to similar destinations on the eastern ­S-Bahn circuit. This makes travelling easier on the wallet (the base price is EUR 1.50 per kilometre) and the environment as well. Incidentally, using the innovative travel service is also exciting, because who knows whom you’ll bump into during Fashion Week on the back seat of the comfortable Mercedes-Benz! So, download the ­BerlKönig app and cruise through Berlin in great company. Receive a EUR 10 credit bonus to put towards your first ride with BerlKönig by using the exclusive Fashion Week code. Fashion Week code: Fashionkoenig (valid until 20.01.2019)

berlinkoenig.de


NOT YOUR

FASHION


ORDINARY by FRÉDÉRIC SCHWILDEN

Photos by MAXIME BALLESTEROS

SNOBS


D

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COVER STORY

DAVID

FISCHER Founder & CEO

While studying, David Fischer blogged about sneakers. This evolved into Highsnobiety, one of the most read and fastest growing street culture and lifestyle platforms in the world with 150 employees around the globe. A conversation about family, stage fear and the big dream of David Fischer

sense that it was about David Fischer. It was never about what David was wearing, what he was having for lunch. I just hacked blog technology to start a magazine. So when the magazine came out in 2010 my parents just said, oh, it’s a magazine.

You started Highsnobiety in 2005. Who were you at that time?

Where did you just come from?

A business student in Zurich.

I had this super exciting weekly sales call with our American team.

Why were you interested in business studies?

How did it go? Talking about the next projects with my partnership managers, what’s their progress with our partner brands. What deals have we fixed so far? What keeps us from closing other deals? What might be possible pain points? You know, somehow, I am the only one with the full picture.

Do you find it hard to let go? I do. Although during the last five years I have let go. And so I realized things seem to work out just fine without me.

Please explain Highsnobiety to my 92-year old grandmother. It was even hard explaining it to my parents. It all changed in 2010 when we launched our first print magazine. Before, we were a blog. I mean, not really a blog in the

I wasn’t – I just didn’t know what to study when I finished international school in Geneva. I mean, actually I wanted to do something creative and I was interested in fashion. But it just turned out to be business studies.

You said in another interview, at some point you realized that you weren’t Karl Lagerfeld. Would you have become a designer if you had had the skills to do it? I didn’t think I was lacking the skills but I just did not consider it. My parents would probably have been surprised by this, for sure.

What kind of people are your parents? My dad spent almost his whole life at Procter & Gamble. And the last three years at Kellog’s. He was a traditional manager. My mum


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COVER STORY

“ I don't want to be the guy chasing the hype”

Did fashion mean social affiliation for you?

But you definitely have an urge to speak up.

Quite the opposite – I was the only one walking around like that. I wanted to be different. And it was never about showing off or others needing to know what I wear. I needed to know.  

Absolutely.

What did you need to know? That I was wearing the right pieces. Cool pieces. I needed to know that the guy designing this was interesting and cool and that he or she stands for something. That’s still important to me today. For example, I love how at The Elder Statesman the designer Greg Chait creates luxury without anyone noticing that it’s luxury.

How do you buy clothes?

came from a family of entrepreneurs. Therefore she liked the security that my father’s job provided and wanted the same for me and my brother: go to business school, work in marketing for Procter & Gamble – deal done. So I ended up with business studies because I thought that’s how you can combine creativity and security. But in the end I was neither interested in the academics nor was it fun.

Did you still learn something from it? Maybe without realizing it. But I didn’t take specific steps or especially plan to start a business like Highsnobiety because of what I learned at college.  

So it just happened? That’s how it happened.

You were interested in fashion from a very young age. It has always been important to me what I wear. In school, I was the guy who was three steps ahead of everyone else when it came to fashion.

What did you wear at that time? At 13 I was wearing Stone Island jackets and Nike Airforce 1.

I’ve got a strange tick. If my wife goes shopping, she would change instantly the moment she bought the piece. I am not like that. I buy something and have to leave it in the closet for a couple of weeks before I actually wear it the first time.

Highsnobiety started with content, with texts, images – your thoughts. But with your success with your readers you also started selling this success to large companies. How does that work when you don’t like going on stage? Selling means going on stage, doesn’t it? I’m constantly challenging myself to get out of my comfort zone, to overcome my shyness. I am sitting in client meetings or I have to present and perform, I get invited to panel talks. And mostly I come out of all of these quite well, even though I am nervous as hell before and I really don’t enjoy it.

Then you’re actually doing … … something wrong? Yeah, maybe you’re right. But I’d love to be really good at it.  

Why?

You are more comfortable thinking about the result than being in the moment itself?

I don’t want to be the guy who, you know, this is going to sound so stupid.

Yes, a hundred percent. In the end I love all of it. Just not so much on stage.

You don't want to be the guy chasing the hype?

What do you love?

Yep, that’s it. I’ve always been that way. As long as I can remember.

You know it’s a contradiction that you create hype through your work but don’t want to be the one who wears it? Of course. It happens that I love the exact same sneakers as the kids. But I wear them six months afterwards. Wearing the hot shit seems too obvious to me. Wh ­ enever I buy something that’s been super hyped I always end up thinking, it’s just not me at all.  

Your own style is more quiet. I’m actually a shy person. I’m not someone who needs to be on stage. That is reflected in what I wear. I really don’t want to attract too much attention.

I love to be the first one to show something to other people. I love the hunt and the curiosity – from our team, from me. Every day I take a hundred screenshots on Instagram. I’d love to spend three hours a day just browsing through Instagram. I love getting visual inspiration and inspiring others. I love planning a big story and watching how it hits.

Like with Vetements, when you found out that no one buys their stuff anymore. How many people read that? We have between eight and nine million visitors a month to our website. The article on ­Vetements was read 1.5 million times. That made the editorial team in New York aware of the responsibility they have. When the whole


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Los Angeles on Monday, Seattle on Tuesday, Portland on Wednesday and then back to Berlin.  

Do you fly business class? Economy.

That is inhuman. Sometimes I get an upgrade, but it’s pretty rare. And that’s the point when you realize how much fun flying can be.

What does Highsnobiety stand for? It’s about history. Where do we come from? The mix of music, skating, art, culture, fashion. This makes us who we are. We’ve gone luxury, too, but it’s not where we started from. ­Highsnobiety is not just about product inspiration, I want to be the market authority.  

You want to be the one saying this is cool and here is why? Exactly. And I want to be the one who tells the market something is cool because it’s inspired by Raf Simons 1998, which in fact reflects this and so on.

Do you believe in hierarchy? People have to take responsibility and that is most important to me. Once a company reaches a certain size you need a hierarchy. At Highsnobiety anyone can say anything but in the end I am the one making the decision.

What’s the lowest salary you pay? I think around 24,000 euros.

How did you decide how much you pay yourself?

industry comes to you saying that you made a point – you hit bullseye – of course that is great but it also means we have to have our shit in order because literally every­body reads it.

You’re wearing a ring on your finger. Are you married? Yes, that’s right, and I’ve got two kids, two and four.

And how do you manage that? My wife isn’t working at the moment. But it’s hard. Somehow, she needs to just accept that, I’m afraid. The biggest issue is the travelling of course. I don’t mind travelling. But my family can’t come with me, which is sad. On Monday I’ll be in Herzogenaurach, Germany, at Adidas, then in New York from Tuesday to Friday, in

That’s always really been dictated by what my family and I needed for a comfortable life. In fact, my salary stayed the same from 2010 until 2016. Then I realized we needed management structures. We needed more people than just me to take responsibility. Now there are more than five people making more money at H ­ ighsnobiety than me. That's how times change.


Everyone grows a beard and has really short hair.  

What’s more important – genius or hard work? On average, hard work probably wins. Ideally, you have both. But it won’t work if you don’t put the effort in.  

Is the streetwear-isation of designer brands cultural appropriation? Absolutely. And our next book is going to be about cultural appropriation.  

Why do progressive white people want to be black? I am not sure white people want to be black, but we are certainly for the first time at a point where fashion and hip hop collide and truly become inclusive to one another and that is fantastic. It’s a more honest conversation than before and not a one-way street anymore.

And not only in the sense of inviting famous black artists to parties, but really meaning to open up?

What does a comfortable life mean? There is a certain standard, like having an apartment of a certain size for example. When we came to Berlin we moved into a 120 square metre apartment. That was my idea of a comfortable life.

Do you drink expensive wines? Not really. But I don’t like having to think if I can afford going out for dinner two or four times a week.

Your favourite restaurants? I love the pizza at Due Forni or like to go to Grill Royal.  I like good food but it doesn’t have to be posh.   

In your opinion, is there a perfect shoe? I love white sneakers. White leather trainers. I like the Stan Smith, the Air Force 1, the Common Project Achilles; I like

the 70s Chuck Taylor, the New Balance 990. They are all timeless.

How many of your original principles do you have to give up to be successful? Certain principles you definitely want to stick to, no matter what, yet overall I believe that a truly successful business manages to adapt itself to changing times. You need to remain open-minded, see new opportunities, also allow yourself to test things out and make mistakes, all while staying true to those defining principles of your brand.

Why aren’t men interested in haircuts anymore? But haircuts will come back. As a man of today there are not really any borders. In Asia they have so much more courage when it comes to hairstyle. But for here you are right. It’s so uniform.

Of course hip hop has always had a penchant for luxury fashion. In the past luxury houses did not really take that seriously, or actually did not even like that association. That has completely changed and they now fully embrace it.

Who changed it? Virgil Abloh, who’s Artistic Director at Louis Vuitton, Kendrick Lamar, who’s won a Pulitzer Prize, and the fact that Palace clothing is now being worn at Wimbledon on centre court.  

What is your next goal? I’ve always had an obsession with brands. And now we're creating our own brand. Not only the magazine, not just print or digital. Now we’re in retail and we’re going to be a fashion brand in the next two years. That’s my dream.

highsnobiety.com


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COVER STORY

A ADLI KLEIN CREATIVE DIRECTOR BRAND

Born 14 November 1981 in Melbourne, Australia As a child Klein wanted to be an illustrator

into a very poor family in Kosovo. His mum died when he was very young and left behind five boys along with his dad. In his early teens my dad was singled out and forced to pull out of school in order to help support the family. He was always tough on me in terms of performing well in school and was generally a very resentful person. When I was young I excelled in music and played clarinet for many years. I had the honour of playing in the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in Sydney in 2000. Right before the Games, he randomly called me and said: I love you. I waited 19 years to hear that. This moment really changed our relationship. I was one of the first in my extended family not to marry a Muslim. This moment was the most important in my life – when my dad let go.

H

What do you do at Highsnobiety?

HENDRIK

I look after the visualisation and identity of the brand. The core of any brand is the logo of course, but from there, my job is to find ways to expand and strengthen the visual presence of the brand, ensure that our visual communication/creative (i.e. imagery, graphics) is accessible and, ultimately, that it best represents who we are as a brand.

What’s the world’s best logo? Besides the one from Highsnobiety, you mean? In the fashion brand world, definitely Loewe’s logo. It reveals so much care and craftsmanship within its characters. I also think visually it is very representative of the brand.

Which company does need a new logo? Marni. Not from an aesthetic perspective, but more because I have always felt it is not very representative of who they are as a brand.

The most heartbreaking moment in your life? Was the first time my Dad told me he loved me. My dad was born

JUERGENS BRAND MANAGER

towards outside influences, they are still very proud of their culture. They celebrate their local acts.

When did you find yourself? It was the summer of 2013. I was in my mid-twenties and in my third semester of international management. So I dropped out of college. And I realized, I failed as a student because it wasn't meant for me.  So at the same time I succeeded as a ­professional. I became Sales Manager for Bread & Butter. And I was happy. And I just knew that's me.  

What are you getting for your next tattoo?

Born on 5 July 1987 As a child Juergens wanted to be a jet pilot

Fourteen years ago, I went to a tattoo parlour. It was going to be a skull. Thankfully, I decided against it. I haven’t had a tattoo so far and I’m still happy about that.

What do you do at Highsnobiety? If you could only ever wear one As a Brand Manager I look after outfit what would it be? product collaborations, proprietary product launches, event marketing and partnerships with other creative companies. The last big project was our print magazine launch activation in Japan in October.  

Low-cut Doc Martens in black, dark blue Dickies trousers, a Gildan crewneck in grey and a charcoal grey Carhartt jacket.

What’s your hidden talent? I’m a passionate karaoke singer, though I can't sing at all.

What’s different in Japan? Everything needs to be Japaneseminded to work there. You can't just pull off a collaboration with a German brand. Even though the Japanese are very open

Is there good food in Berlin? Berlin food? For me that means street food. One of my favourite places to go is Ya-Hala-Chicken on Pankstraße.


COVER STORY

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COVER STORY

H HERBERT HOFMANN CREATIVE DIRECTOR COMMERCE

Born on 29 January 1984 in Zams, Austria As a child Hofmann wanted to dress like a businessman

What do you do at Highsnobiety? I like to present brands in a way that they aren’t presented usually – taking a luxury brand to the streets and incorporating a streetwear brand into the world of high-fashion editorial. Bringing luxury labels on a approachable level and elevating streetwear to a higher level is my mission. I select the brands and products we work with for our store and work on the creative direction.  

Why do we wear outdoor clothing now for that matter? As someone who’s studied ­Geography and grew up in Tirol, I obviously think that’s spot on. I grew up with brands like The North Face, Patagonia and Salomon. They make warm clothing in very good quality. A brand like Patagonia manufactures its products sustainably, repairing and upcycling rather than chucking them out. Besides Prada, Patagonia is one of the brands I genuinely love.  

Can Berlin be taken at all seriously as a fashion metropolis? Sure, Berlin is still stylish and unique, driven by the mix of

brands and styles ranging from vintage to the new season’s fashion. And most Berliners don’t really care – that’s how the best outfits and combinations appear.

Where is the best bed in the city? My bed at home. I have an enormous bed, two metres wide from a Swedish bed manufacturer. It’s a life-changer. I spend a lot of time in bed, even when it comes to work.

What should I eat? Go to Hamy in Hasenheide. It’s a Vietnamese place where you can get the best-tasting Tofu Curry. And the absolute upside is, they haven't raised prices since I arrived in Berlin … years ago. Just an honest, down-to-earth place with great food.

What’s the last artwork you bought? A work by Michael Johansson, a Swedish artist; a mixer that was taken apart and then put together in a frame and sprayed – it looks like a huge Playmobil toy which still has to be assembled.


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trend for the next season is. And all that put in a digestible and understandable way.

Describe your style.

J JAN QUAMMIE STYLE DIRECTOR

I dress in themes. I wake up and ask myself who do I want to be today. I always had a thing for cowboy boots, I like Scotland and kilts, I play with that. I play with the fact that I went to a Catholic school. I’m really into anti-uniforms.

What will we wear in 2030? The fashion industry is going back to workwear. People will realise what the fashion tricks are: charging more because there’s a label on it. So people will say “fuck it” and go to a shop that sells work clothing to buy nearly the same pieces for much less.  

Is it OK to wear glasses without a prescription? I used to do that. I think it’s OK. But when you do you should be careful, because it damages your eyes more than it actually helps. It puts your eyes out of focus.

What is your favourite colour? Born 8 April 1985 in New York City, United States As a child Quammie wanted to be a fashion designer

I don’t have one. I do have a least favourite colour and that’s brown. I don’t feel comfortable in it.

What do you do at Highsnobiety?

Which is the worst-dressed German city?

Let our readers know what they should be buying and what the

I mean, there are quite a few. But Bamberg and Augsburg stand out.


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M MAX BERGER MANAGING DIRECTOR COMMERCE

Born 28 November 1983 in Gießen As a child he wanted to be an entrepreneur What do you do at Highsnobiety? I help make sure we become a relevant e-commerce site. Taking people from discovering the products to making a purchase. The challenge, though, is to ensure we keep the balance between credibility and monetisation.  

Are you planning to buy art in 2019? I don’t go to galleries and buy art; I make it myself. My walls are plastered with Polaroid photo collections that I find at flea markets.

Your best skateboard trick? Never really got the hang of it. Although I’m a pretty ace snowboarder. I could do a kick flip, though.

How do you spend your weekends when you need ‘me-time’? My weekends are all about my wife and our two kids. I wouldn’t want it any other way. I don’t like to stand still. I always have to be doing something, constantly improving things.

Which brand really means a lot to you? Levi’s. And its continuity, especially with denims. As for shoes, it’s Converse for me – low or high-top. The pieces come round again and again and never go away.


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COVER STORY

S

What have you learned from Andy Warhol? Copy and paste.

What’s key for a good lipstick? It needs to last! Preferably Red, and by Mac.

Where do you feel most at home in Berlin?

SASKIA

In the cafés around Neukölln, especially at Two Planets.

LINZ

How did your style evolve over the years?

VP CLIENT SERVICES

I started out with a posh style, then I tried more of an indie look. Today, I’m more of a tomboy, and feel very comfortable in my own skin.

Born on 3 June 1988 in Cologne As a child Linz wanted to be a journalist What do you do at Highsnobiety? I head up our in-house ‘branded content’ studio. We develop content for our partners that is spread across all our channels. For example, in a campaign for Diadora, we told the story of how, in the 70s and 80s, Italian sportswear set out to conquer the English stadia. My work involves leading people, creating the space they need to work creatively, effectively and happily.  

What new thing have you learned recently? I've been reminded of the importance of empathy, which I draw from a conversation I’ve just had with a colleague.

Which music can you always dance to? Techno!

Generally speaking, do you believe that it's possible to find love in Berlin? Yes!


DAMUR

CONTEMPORARY FASHION 20 FASHION


ESSENTIEL ANTWERP PREMIUM

KARL KANI SEEK

LALA BERLIN V.COMMUNICATION

JAN 'N JUNE NEONYT

NORWEGIAN RAIN PRESS FACTORY

LITICHEVSKAYA PROJEKTGALERIE

PREMIUM

CAPPELLETTI


SAVE THE DUCK PREMIUM

MOU PREMIUM

DRYKORN PREMIUM

MAISON HEROINE PREMIUM

ISABEL VOLLRATH MBFW | KADEWE

C.P. COMPANY FAKE PR

IPHORIA PREMIUM


ALPHATAURI PREMIUM

FASHION

23


ZUCCA PREMIUM

24 FASHION


JACK WOLFSKIN TECH LAB PREMIUM

RUSSELL ATHLETIC SEEK

SAMSØE SAMSØE PREMIUM

ELISA BARRETO PREMIUM

KNOWLEDGE KERN COMMUNICATION

RICH & ROYAL PREMIUM

PREMIUM

SUPERGA


SILK RELATIONS

MARSHALL HEADPHONES

ELLESSE SEEK

DUNO PREMIUM

ILSE JACOBSEN PREMIUM

MANILA GRACE PREMIUM

BAKERY SVPPLY SEEK

SEEK

SANDQVIST


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by CHRIS DANFORTH

HOW STREET CULTURE INFILTRATES HIGH FASHION


CU LTU R E

10 years ago I was 18 years old. Instagram didn’t ­exist yet, which is crazy to think about. I wore LRG or Crooks & Castles t-shirts, ­G-Shock watches, Alife Everybody High s­ neakers, and New Era 59Fifty fitted caps. I don’t actually know my fitted size anymore. I read every single new post about Japanese brands and Medicom Be@rbricks on H ighsnobiety and ­ ­ Hypebeast, every single day, pretty much without exception. That education was always a hunt, and I learned something new every time I browsed through ­K armaloop. I only skipped one single day of high school, and it was to go to a N.E.R.D. meet-and-greet so I could get a photo with Pharrell. I was actually never into Supreme, but my parents bought me tickets to New York for my high school ­graduation present, and I will never forget visiting the Bape store and seeing that conveyor belt of Bapestas. There was a sense all these things were connected somehow or part of the same ecosystem, but nobody called it streetwear. I’ve always had a problem with the phrase streetwear, and it’s a lazy description that doesn’t get to the core of anything, but it’s still the best phrase we have to describe this whole mix of graphic t-shirts, hip-hop, skateboarding, graffiti and DIY attitudes. Whatever you want to call it, inclusion in streetwear culture was earned through participation, and capital ‘F’ fashion inclusion is based on how much money you have, and at that point in 2008, the two had no connection with another. But over the past 10 years, a new conversation has eventually developed thanks to new values and codes born from streetwear that infiltrated the world of haute couture. Luxury brands survive on being exclusive and aspirational. I saved pay cheques from my first job to eventually buy a Gucci wallet, but once I could even afford it, I felt bad about setting foot in the store because everyone knew I didn’t belong there. Everyone can relate to the feeling of coveting a luxury item, including streetwear brands and designers. Two to three years before Supreme opened in SoHo in 1994, Dapper Dan was north in ­Harlem re-constructing and re-tailoring Gucci and Louis Vuitton products into one-of-a-kind pieces for musicians, adding new context and redefining the idea of luxury.

Edson Sabajo from Patta visiting SEEK in February 2017

In that era, Stüssy ripped off Chanel. SSUR and Freshjive put out too many possibly litigious parody graphics to count. And the best example to understand this whole shift –

29 ­upreme put out their own parody Louis S ­Vuitton graphic in 2000, only receiving a ceaseand-desist from Louis Vuitton, to then run box logos down the Louis Vuitton runway 17 years later. Continuing with t-shirt graphics, certain irreverent and subversive brands levelled their own shots at the luxury world via subtle logo flips – SSUR's Comme des Fuckdown graphic from 2012, Crooks & Castles’ Versace-inspired Medusa head, the list goes on. In a commercial sense, Marc Jacobs’ and ­L ouis Vuitton’s graffiti-sprayed handbags with ­Stephen Sprouse, and later Louis Vuitton partnerships with Takashi Murakami, were both early ­examples of the tables turning, in terms of a ­fashion brand deriving inspiration from street subculture, and the flow of ideas essentially reversing. Riccardo Tisci’s appointment to Givenchy continued fashion’s increasing in­ terest in streetwear cultures, with his shark and ­ Rottweiler shirts, and his Nike sneaker collaboration. Not long after, Gucci unveiled its Gucci Ghost campaign, heavily featuring graffiti graphics and street art-inspired imagery. Now, names from the world of streetwear are being cherry-picked by high fashion brands, from Tisci at Givenchy and now Burberry, to Kim Jones at Dior, Demna Gvasalia at ­Balenciaga, and Virgil Abloh at Louis Vuitton. Ralph Lauren and Palace were the latest to bridge that gap between two formerly distinct and separate ideas, which have now merged in many ways. Many high fashion brands have endeavoured to align themselves with streetwear values, and to create their own sneaker designs to stay on course with this market shift. As a result, the luxury today is paradoxically not as aligned with traditional luxury i.e. elitist consumption of expensive items. Knowledge and authenticity are more important than ever, as consumers believe that what they’re wearing and how they wear it represents a cultural point-of-view rather than just a black-andwhite status symbol or purchased inclusion like an expensive watch. There is a surplus of products but less of an understanding of the reasons these products exist, or why Dior is making a shoe that looks like a Converse Chuck Taylor. Sure, anyone can buy that Dior Chuck Taylor for the right amount of money, but understanding why it exists is not a luxury you can purchase. Brands in the luxury space now must leverage cultural cache and survive in today’s digital era, but not everyone can adapt.


30 For the entirety of the four-plus years I’ve lived in Berlin SEEK has been a pillar of the Berlin Fashion Week circuit. For me, the event has first and foremost been a place to interact with friends and to keep up-to-speed with some of my favourite brands. Maren from SEEK explained to me “What started out as a few selected brands in a separate area within PREMIUM, staged as a common ground for a special breed of brands that strongly focus on values like heritage, storytelling, authenticity, quality and sustainable market growth, has, over the last ten years, evolved into a biannual get-together of industry leaders and influencers.”

10 YEARS OF THE HIGHLIG

SEEK has always been an occasion to catch up with faces that you haven’t seen since last season, and participate in the Berlin conversation – occasionally enjoying the Spree-side area while sipping a cold drink. It brings many people from all parts of the industry under one roof, which is perhaps the best thing about SEEK. With that, as well as SEEK’s 10th birthday celebrations, it seemed only natural to reach out to members of the SEEK community – the nucleus of the event – to paint a picture of why the event is worth attending.

Whether you’re catching up on the latest military-inspired luggage from Japanese brand Porter, new stationery goods from go-to G ­ erman brand Kaweco and Field Notes, contemporary sneakers from Veja, or sportswear from Kappa, any visitor would find it impossible to do a lap without being drawn into several booths to take a closer look. But when the doors close at Arena Berlin and work hours are over the festivities are just beginning. Those who have travelled from far and wide might take a moment of respite before the after-hours and after-after-hours events take over the schedule, from Spree-side swim sessions to BBQ grilling, to bowling matches and packed club events at Prince Charles or Chalet next door. Ben Birkl from Alpha Industries said it best when noting “It's like a big family reunion every season. We hosted a badass BBQ on the

Marie-Luise Patzelt, Damien Winpenny, Maren Wiebus, Marie Sandmann, Alina Hahn Escobar Rooftop back in 2017 together with Patta, 24 Kilates, SEEK & Asics – this get-together was such good times! The Spanish boys from 24 Kilates took care of the Sangria supply, while the food was in Patta's hands, so there was incredibly good jerk chicken with noodles available.” Marie-Luise from SEEK also reminds us of the time Skateboard P visited Berlin for SEEK one summer: “One major highlight for us was when we celebrated together with Billionaire Boys Club one summer. Pharrell was a regular guest in our office; he had his fair share of naps and chilled in the Kühlhaus back yard.” It’s no secret that the backdrop for SEEK – Berlin – is widely recognised as one of the nightlife capitals of Europe, if not the entire world. It’s a haven for creative and personal freedom, and it’s also the home of many underground and sub-cultures, all of which have an impact on the fashion ecosystem.

Converse’s Berlin Incubate Manager, Basti Dicket, expands by saying “For me it's mostly the people from other countries I look forward to meeting, people I can’t see all the time. The international crowd is pretty sworn in and every­one is happy to catch up.” Speaking about the scariest event over the last ten years, Marie tells us “it was the moment when the electricity went down in Kühlhaus – followed by Maren having a nervous breakdown. We had to evacuate the whole building, which back then had no windows, so it went pitch black inside. Afterwards, we ended up having the best time, hanging out in the back yard, going for drinks, discussing fashion and life in general, and sharing some really good laughs.” But what does the SEEK team think about reaching the 10-year landmark, especially in an industry that is constantly in flux in terms of digital trends and consumer habits. ­Marie-Luise tells us “We’re most proud of being a meeting

© Jan Kapitaen

Reference Studios’ own Giang Vo told us "SEEK was one of the first trade shows to show another perspective of streetwear aesthetic from an area outside of US-based streetwear labels. SEEK was always interesting to me because of brands such as Our Legacy, ­LibertineLibertine, Soulland and others. Brands with more of a Scandinavian vibe.”


31

SEEK: HTS

SEEK (MILE)STONES 2009

2016

First edition of SEEK takes place in a dedicated space within PREMIUM

SEEK crosses the pond bringing ‘THE OFF’ a joint event with Highsnobiety from Berlin to New York. Amongst others, Playboi Carti, Venus X and Dillon Cooper celebrate at the Villain in Brooklyn.

2012 SEEK moves into Kühlhaus right next to PREMIUM

2013

2017

SEEK presents 80 brands on four floors. Highlight: Pharrell Williams celebrates his label Billionaire Boys Club in the courtyard.

First pop-up store at Torstrasse SEEK sells ‘all white’ products by e.g. Alpha Industries, Brosbi, Edwin, Ellesse, H2O, Jason Markk, Kangol, Native Youth and Ucon Acrobatics first SEEK fan scarf – a legendary piece up to this day.

2014 Happy 5th birthday SEEK SEEK celebrates its 5th birthday over wine, schnapps and pasta. In collaboration with British Address Magazine, SEEK hosts a panel talk with Ana Finel Honigman (Fashion journalist and critic for The New York Times, Vogue, Dazed & Confused), Herbert Hofmann (back then Voo Store, now Highsnobiety), Mary Scherpe (Stil in Berlin) and Mirna Funk (Journalist and founder of Digital Agency Cream).

© Juergen Schabes

place and also some sort of playground for the fashion industry and the culture around it. ­Berlin is our home. This makes us the perfect hosts, as we want to show everyone the best time and every side of the city we love.” Looking forward to the next 10 years, Maren speaks of one very simple ambition. “We want to do more! There's so much more to SEEK than fashion and trade. I see SEEK continuing to build on the cultural conversation. Being inclusive yet confident. Being ahead with regards to relevant topics such as conscious consumption. Being a trustworthy filter gathering good brands and people to work with. Enabling our partners to share and get to the heart of what their brand and product is about. Entertaining. Inspiring and being inspired.” Happy Birthday SEEK! Words by Chris Danforth

SEEKexhibitions.com

2018 Trade Union is born SEEK presents the Trade Union – a collective of various agencies and brands creating an efficient order space. The summer edition sees SEEK implementing a central theme to emphasise Berlin as a Destination for lifestyle, culture, partying and fashion.

2015

JANUARY 2019

SEEK moves to Arena Berlin with 200 brands, launches its Magazine No. 1. SEEK stickers pave the floors of Arena and the streets of Berlin. The modified sayings and song texts such as “SEEK me baby one more time”, “Biggie, Biggie, Biggie, can’t you SEEK?”, “SEEK you later alligator” remain catchy until this day.

10th anniversary of SEEK For this occasion specials, exclusives and daily surprises take place during the three show days. SEEK develops and reinforces the concept of the Trade Union with a relocation to the foyer at Arena Berlin.

The masterminds behind SEEK’s concept in 2011: Maren Wiebus & Oliver Saunders (Our Legacy)


32

032c Pool Party @ SEEK’s Badeschiff / Mumi Haiati (Reference Studios) / Jul 2017

THE SEEKERS

SEEK’s Having A Ball / Montgomery Juchems (Wunschnath Agency), Patrik Ström (Sandqvist) Jan 2017

032c Pool Party @ SEEK’s Badeschiff / Bill Kaulitz / Jul 2017

SEEK Party / Hakan Temür (Brandpool), Crispin Spindler (Agentur Olly Dees) / Jul 2017

© Jennifer Fey

© Kyra Sophie Wilhelmseder

Oliver Saunders (Our Legacy) in front of Kühlhaus / 2011

SEEK / David Fischer, Philip Gaedicke, friend, Jessica Weiß (Journelles) / Jan 2013

© Kyra Sophie Wilhelmseder

SEEK / Pharrell Williams / Jul 2013

SEEK / Yasin Müjdeci (Voo Store) / Jan 2013 Patta x 24 Kilates x Asics BBQ / Guillaume Schmidt (Patta) / Jul 2017

SEEK / Laust Frederiksen / Jan 2013


© Jan Kapitän

SEEK’s Sneaker Spot BBQ @ Badeschiff / Rin & Yung Hurn / Jul 2016

© Carolin Saage

Dinner @ Crackers / Daniel Benz (Asphaltgold) / Jan 2018

Patta x 24Kilates x Asics BBQ / Ben Birkl (Alpha Industries) / Jul 2017

© Renato Silva

Party @ Katerblau / Hikmet Sugoer, Nanette Lovelace, Philip G. Lovelace (BAM)

SEEK / Ricky Powell / Jan 2017

SEEK / Erik Andreasen (Fuku Agency) / Jul 2013

032c Pool Party @ SEEK’s Badeschiff / Marc Göhring (032c), Adriano Sack (Welt) / Jul 2017

SEEK’s Having A Ball / Team Patta – 24 Kilates – SEEK / Jan 2017

© Maxime Ballesteros

SEEK / Jan Joswig, Herbert Hofmann / Jan 2013


© About You


35

INTERVIEW

DOUBLE TROUBLE STYLES BETTER by MAREIKE BRÜNIG

The opening of the Beck to Beck pop-up store during Fashion Week Berlin in July 2018 and its launch as a fashion brand attracted large crowds. The police were also there: “Mr Beck, we’re really pleased that you’re opening a store in the area where we operate! There are just too many people on the pavement, though – shall we give you some red and white barrier tape to guide those people standing on the street?” – “No, that doesn’t look good!” Successfully launching a new brand requires precisely this attitude – this is the starting shot for Beck to Beck’s career as a fashion brand. We met Uli and Michi Beck together with their business partner, Hendrik ­Schimmel, at their showroom in central Berlin to discuss the right attitude.

That was a highly successful beginning for the Beck to Beck brand. What are your feelings about it? MICHI: You could say that! The response from the media and the order requests were amazing. We consciously didn't produce pieces in bulk, but really only upon request.

How emotional was this for you? Would you compare it to stage fright before going on stage? Are the two things comparable? MICHI: Really, it’s more exciting, because of course it’s actually a whole new business. It’s just the three of us: Hendrik, Uli and I – plus an agent whom we work with, but otherwise we take care of everything. It’s like a small-scale family business where everything arrives without a filter and we learn something new every day. So it can’t be compared to bringing out a new album or being on tour, it’s a different thing altogether.

Why are you setting up a fashion brand now of all times? ULI: The launch was planned for October of last year for broadcasting the last season of The Voice. Michi was already wearing the Blinded sweatshirt. The complete collection hadn’t yet been finalised, however, so we were looking for an alternative. It would have been stupid to do it right in the middle of it, so that’s why we wanted to start immediately at the next Berlin Fashion Week in July 2018. MICHI: All things considered, it was a longer process before we came to a decision in any case: the idea was born in 2016. I was wearing a Kings of Indigo sweatshirt at The Voice that the viewers absolutely loved. The idea of setting up his own brand was something that Uli had been thinking about for a long time though.


36

INTERVIEW

ULI: We have our graphic designer, ­Stephen Paris, who interprets the ideas for us and creates the whole artwork; and our agent, Aviva, who gets involved in the production side of things. Otherwise, though, we take charge of everything.

Sophisticated streetwear – to what extent does hip-hop feature – what's the idea behind your collections? MICHI: For us, the content is just as important as the design and the fact that it reflects our roots. With the Fantas we were the first to wear German streetwear labels, which was ultimately due to the style that I created for us as a brand. This idea of ‘sophistication’ appeared for the first time: grown-up, minimalist, pared-back. ULI: It’s about paying attention to welldesigned styles and good materials. MICHI: Exactly! Everything took its course as regards content: inspired by The Voice’s blind auditions, in our first collection we initially came across the concept of Blind and then ­Blinded. This concept also works well in fashion because it can be taken both positively and negatively – being dazzled by beauty, but also being Blinded by hype around a trend, for instance. With the design we saw that the concept was

also implemented visually, in that the word Blinded was applied using Braille dots. The idea of ‘ambiguity’ is continued in the second collection, ­Limited: positive in the sense of a finite limit that generates desire; yet a finite limit can also be interpreted in a negative sense of course. This time, the optical element in the design is that the term ‘­Limited’ is never fully visible.

Who influences whom then? Who is the influencer in your team? ULI: It depends. We all always inspire each other. Stephen Paris is also part of the team of course: he’s very creative and brings his ideas to the table. Everyone mucks in. MICHI: Just back to back. Like playing records!

Like in a state of flow … MICHI: Yes, we spend a lot of time together – although we never have much time. Yet we manage to make the little time we have with each other into quality time together. Whether it’s at home on the sofa in the evening, or eating supper together … that’s the good life for you!

You have already told us a bit about your second collection, Limited. Is the focus of this collection still on shirts, hoodies, etc.? MICHI: We are trying to branch out more into stitching, repeated prints, etc. We are very keen to take the next step and not simply make exactly the same things that we made in the last collection, just with a different twist – we genuinely want to go through a process of true evolution.

What are your wish-list stores? Where would you love to hang your collection in Germany and around the world? MICHI: Recently we finally managed to get our own online shop – ­­becktobeckshop.com – off the ground, which we have done very well I’d say. Otherwise we’re really happy with our set-up and we’re pleased that stores such as About You, ­Egoist, ­Ludwig Beck, Jades, Abseits and Thomas i-Punkt have come on board. There were also a few other stores that wanted to combine the order with an autograph session, which we declined. The stores currently in place are the right ones in this respect; namely those that believe in the label.

And how about you personally? Do you tend to buy online or shop in-store? ULI: I don’t buy online that often really, because I always prefer to try things on first. I mostly only order online if I can’t get it anywhere else, or if I want a very specific item. MICHI: For me it’s a bit like being a pop star, I have to admit. When I’m abroad I love going shopping and I go a lot. When I’m here, though, it’s not as r elaxed because you frequently feel ­ you’re being watched. I’m often recognised in G ­ ermany …

What do you like most about what’s hot right now? Especially as regards the fashion here in Berlin? ULI: I think it’s great that there are no no-gos. There’s nothing you can't wear. And I like the fact that people are all so open. You never get looked at strangely. No-one stands and points at you. MICHI: Being a city of fashion means Berlin is a hub for all experiences and anything goes! I believe the city is seen as an experimental playground – and this is also Berlin’s forte. It’s not as ‘established’ as Paris or Milan – it’s completely different … that’s exactly what makes it exciting!

Which hot-spots can you recommend? MICHI: I’d love to be able to give you the lowdown on something new, but … ULI: … at the end of the day, you still go to those places you know and trust. MICHI: … to the Grill, to Borchardt, etc.. ULI: … Soho House, Volkspark Friedrichshain – which is just outside our back door. MICHI: To be honest, it’s more important for us that we manage to make time for our friends, and having kids doesn’t exactly make it any easier of course. So we’re by no means the hot-spot spotters any more. Hot-spot number one is on our balcony at home. (laughs) ULI: That’s just how it is: whenever we have a bit of leisure time we travel loads. We make the most of holidays spending time with our friends. Apart from that we work a lot, or party in the street – with or without barrier tape.

beck-to-beck.com

© About You

With your unisex designs do you really make everything yourself, from A right the way through to Z?


www.richandroyal.de


BRANDS BRANDS BRANDS

032C APPAREL fashion for the 90ies club kids Jörg Koch, founder and Chief E ­ ditor of 032c magazine, sees his sphere of influence more as a platform for a broad spectrum of creative approaches than a “piece of printed matter”. The ­company's headquarters in the brutaliststyle church of St. Agnes in Kreuzberg – in close proximity to the legendary König Galerie – are, as it were, fruitful ground for art, culture and fashion. What began with items of merchandise like t-shirts and caps has now become an established part of the company. Koch’s wife, Maria, founder and Creative ­ Director of 032c Apparel, has worked for Jil Sander and Marios Schwab, as well as for Kanye West and Yeezy in the capacity of Special Consultant. In the past year two premières were celebrated under her command: in January the brand was invited by Pitti Uomo to F ­ lorence, where the company was introducing its début menswear collection via an atmospheric performance held at the Medici Riccardi palace. The launch of the first ready-to-wear range for women followed in London in November. The ‘Cosmic ­Workshop’ collection is aligned with the rave and club culture of the 90s. “It’s clothing for the intrepid, the curious and the dreamer looking for a place to belong and to be free out on the street and under the stars, in clubs and in basement venues, in communal experience and in secret solitude,” M ­ aria Koch explains. Delicate and sheer materials – plissé, ­printed tulle – are contradicted by ­ protective reinforcements: puffered binding, ­ architectural details in satin and moiré, and metallic sequins that act as flexible, ­glimmering armour. The presentation of the womens­wear range attracted frenetic praise in the media. The sought-after pieces will be available to purchase in-store from June – in 20 hand-picked stores around the world, such as Selfridges and Browns in L ­ ondon, KM20 in Moscow, The ­Galleria in Seoul, and in 032c’s own in-house retail space in Berlin, directly underneath the studio.

032c.com


39

FASHION

GANT 70 years of American sportswear

Today, Gant stands for high-class American sportswear with a European touch. The brand’s story began in 1949 in New Haven, Connecticut, when Ukrainian Bernard Gantmacher dedicated himself to manufacturing shirts. His passion for quality and design led him to create elegant sportswear and leisure clothing in addition to perfecting the men’s shirts he designed. In 2019 this international company will celebrate its 70th anniversary. For Fall/Winter 2019/20, Gant has crafted a timeless yet modern collection that articulates what has been continually conceived, felt, implemented, discarded and celebrated afresh over the 70 years of the company’s history. The collection is all about the brand’s birthplace, the East Coast of America. Lightweight rugby shirts and wax jackets showcase the brand’s maritime style infused with summerhouse flair. Even the ‘back to work’ clothing range radiates l­ate-summer cool, with jackets and blazers teamed with patterned knits. Cosy knitwear keeps you warm when it gets too cold for comfort ­outside; and for special occasions Gant offers a range of dinner jackets, elegant dresses, glamorous tops and flowing skirts. The colour palette ranges from bright and bold to cosily warm tones over the course of the season.

gant.com

UNITED FASHION supporting and boosting fashion designers across Europe European fashion is in demand all over the world and represents a strong factor for the economy. The UNITED FASHION EU project was created to strengthen European designers’ ability to compete. The three-year exchange programme pools the fashion expertise of seven EU Member States. Eight organisations, MAD Brussels (BE), Flanders DC (BE), ModaLisboa (PT), ­ Baltic Fashion Federation (LV), Maisons de Mode (FR), Fashion Weekend Skopje (MK), Fashion Council Germany (DE) and Not Just a Label (UK), supported by the EU’s Creative Europe Programme, support European fashion designers regarding their business skills, without ignoring creativity.

Näz © Sanda Vuckovic

As part of Berlin Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2019/20, ten selected labels will be showcasing their collections at the PREMIUM trade show. On top of this, the designers will be taking part in various seminars and events, including at the #FASHIONTECH BERLIN conference. The selected labels are as follows: Cesar Casier (Belgium), Conni ­K aminski (Germany/Belgium), Dioralop (Croatia), Giuseppe Virgone (Belgium), ­Goncalo Peixoto (Portugal), INCH2 (Latvia), NÄZ (Portugal), One Wolf (­L atvia), ­Oscar The Collection (Belgium), Urban Circus (France).

united-fashion.eu

NÄZ


40

FASHION

AIGNER the statement leather collection When Hungarian-born Etienne Aigner achieved his first successes as a bag designer at the Parisian haute couture shows in the 1930s, none guessed he would be laying the foundations for a luxury brand with a long tradition. Even today the brand stands for craftsmanship, the highest quality and timeless design. Over the years the label has evolved into a stylish luxury brand – so the title of the Fall / Winter 2019 collection is perfect: ‘Enlightenment’. The collection was inspired by the Age of Enlightenment and is all about transformation, knowledge, freedom and happiness. Clean, cool shapes are contrasted with elaborate designs, decoration and finishes. Eye-catchers include tartan checks; the romantic emblem of the pansy, which appears in embroidery and print; the horse’s head and the screw stud, which Aigner already uses.

aignermunich.com

SERGIO TACCHINI tradition meets innovation The iconic, Italian sportswear brand elevates activewear to a lifestyle: its Fall/Winter 2019 collection goes head over heels for detail and c­elebrates the classics. Divided into Blue and Green segments, the designs cater for all the requirements of contemporary streetwear. Blue presents a wide range of basics created from jersey and brushed cotton, triacetate and poly diamond through to velvet, teddy-fleece, nylon and cord, and ­branded with logos, taping or all-over prints. Green, also known as the

Archivio Line, makes a statement: classics like the Young Line Polo (McEnroe) are as essential here as the Ascot and Dakar track tops, or the Daska polo shirt. For the first time there are also original styles from the 90s. On top of this there are lots of exciting collaborations, including Band of Outsiders, Stampd, Chinatown Market, Rolex and Adam Lister.

sergiotacchini.com


FASHION

41

Milanese brand DSG#Disgusto originated as an outsider project with a clear message: rebellion against the existing fashion world, though always with a wry smile. The D is therefore turned on its belly, becoming the iconic Smile logo. The brand has gained street cred with ­m illennials thanks to its bright colours and unapologetic messages, and is targeting its appeal for authenticity and uniqueness at this new generation, which, in DSG#Disgusto’s opinion, is just imitating and copying without questioning things. The 2019/20 Fall/Winter collection is titled ‘Monkey See Monkey Do’ (a pidgin saying from the 1920s & the title of a song by Eminem) and is ­inspired by the hip-hop and rap scenes of the late 80s and ­early 90s, which turned the prevailing f­ashion norm on its head. DSG#Disgusto presents unusual ­ fabrics and colours, patches, rhinestones, eco-friendly furs with ­incorporated logos, as well as camouflage and the face of a mandrill.

dsgdisgusto.com

DSG#DISGUSTO fashion rebellion

OUR LEGACY reduce to the max The new, gallery-style store in Berlin – built in collaboration with architectural firm Arrhov Frick – reflects the Swedish brand’s design concept to the letter: raw, clean, timeless. The feeling of emptiness almost swallows you up, creating space in the mind. Jockum Hallin, Cristopher Nying and Richardos Klarén are three friends and carry out their business from Stockholm. As well as the conceptual, experimental strategy and the brand’s androgynous clothing designs, the unusual materials also stand out time and again. The unisex feel of the menswear designs have gone down so well with women that, as of Spring/Summer 2019, the brand will be offering a womenswear collection too, including classic pieces. These can be effortlessly combined with pieces from the menswear collection. Alongside flagship stores in Stockholm, London and Berlin the brand is also present in 200 multi-brand stores around the world.

ourlegacy.se


42

FASHION

NORDEN vegan outerwear made from repurposed waste Canada is known for strong outerwear brands. To compete with them takes something very special. As seen with the ­Norden brand, which was set up by Michael Eliesen and Mayer Vafi. N ­ orden ­foregoes all animal-derived materials; instead, the jackets are manufactured from yarn made from recycled plastic bottles. The first collection was launched with six d ­ esigns for women and six for men. The jackets are perfect for protection from wind and bad weather and contain between 25 and 99 plastic bottles. The founders’ vision: “Everyone making better c­hoices to reduce waste for a cleaner planet”. Norden is targeting M ­ illennials and Gen Z – and all those who live a vegan lifestyle and want to dress ethically and sustainably.

nordenproject.com

PHILOMENA ZANETTI In an era of short-lived trends Julia Philomena Leifert is making a stand for eco-luxury with her label, Philomena Zanetti, set up in 2014. She uses only the finest materials for her clothing range, teamed with timeless design and high-quality workmanship. For her Fall/Winter 2019 collection the designer took inspiration from the legendary Teddy Girls. The feminine equivalent of the Teds, they campaigned for greater equality and better access to higher education in post-war England. The look: elegant and rebelliously androgynous. Philomena Zanetti presents traditional, tailor-made, double-breasted blazers paired with high-waisted trousers made from the finest suit materials, together with coats of pure cashmere. For the first time, this season the designer is working with materials that are a result of overproduction and surplus to requirements.

philomena-official.com

Philomena Zanetti © Anna Daki

a new definition of luxury


43

CHEVIGNON fab forty-something Kids of the Nineties will still remember the coveted Chevignon jackets with the flying duck on the back. Chevignon is now celebrating its 40th anniversary through its Fall/Winter 2019 collection. This is presented with a balancing act between past and future: the typography of the ‘Chevignon Paris’ anniver­ sary logo comes from the archives, from 1993 if we’re going to be specific, and marks the brand’s move to a more streetwise identity. The focus for the future, however, is on ­technology. In keeping with urban Parisian style we therefore have a windbreaker and a transparent down jacket that proudly shows off its in­terior and the technical expertise behind the design. The collection also presents pieces that are unmistakeably N ­ ineties, including bleached teddy jackets, parkas and ­cowboy styles. We can’t wait. Happy Birthday!

chevignon.com

NICCE soft sport & hard work The London ‘melting pot’, with its culture, lifestyle, emerging music scene and its street style, acts as an exuberant source of inspiration for indie brand Nicce (pronounced nee’chee). You won’t find seasonal hype influencing the brand’s designs. Instead, the timeless, clean-cut designs make a statement with their unusual colours and technical details. The motto of the 2019/20 Fall/Winter collection is “It’s time to stand up and be seen on the street – and trust us, you will be seen”. The collection presents an ­eclectic mix of sportswear and hard-wearing workwear, with reflective ­details and a

camouflage pattern that was developed in-house, which promises anything but camouflage. For the first time materials like knitted fabrics, velour and fleece have also found their way into the collection. Stone grey, loganberry, deep navy and white are punctuated by flashes of safety yellow and cobalt blue. Silhouettes begin to open up with the introduction of oversized fits. Think council workers meet the Gilet Jaunes.

nicceclothing.com


#LISTEN! #LISTEN! #LEARN! #LEARN! #EXPERIENCE! #EXPERIENCE! #BUSINESS!# #BUSINESS!# by BJÖRN LÜDTKE


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The issue of whether the fashion sector is a pioneer in matters of digitalisation or w ­ hether it is lagging behind is a hotly ­debated one. There are many established companies that went through a process of digital transformation early on, and thus many successful business models today that only became possible thanks to digitalisation. By contrast, others, especially brands that counted on their legacy, have fallen behind because of it. No matter whether we have our own digital transformation ahead of us, or we're in the middle of it, or think that we might have already gone through it: none of us can afford to stand still. #FASHIONTECH BERLIN takes place twice a year during Berlin Fashion Week. At the conference fashion bumps up against not just the tech industry but also the startup community. The topics for discussion include digital transformation, innovations,

MICHAEL STRACKE

#FASHIONTECH BERLIN © Nils Krüger/offenblende.de

Chief Business Development Officer #FASHIONTECH BERLIN

change management and disruptive technologies. “We have invited the leading experts in the community to give keynote speeches and take part in panel discussions on the main stage, but also to network within peer groups in the masterclasses, the exhibition area — which in January 2019 will be three times as big as in July 2018 — and the networking areas,” says ­Michael Stracke, Chief Business D ­ evelopment Officer at #FASHIONTECH BERLIN. “We want to communicate a new spirit and promote the desire to experiment. On one hand we want to provide those who have already gone through the transformation process with fresh inspiration by means of our best cases. On the other hand, we want to give those who still have transformation on their agenda the tools and motivation to

venture to take the first step.” The inspiration should not only come from the fashion industry, since the impetus for innovations can also be initiated by completely different disciplines. The core issue at January’s #­FASHIONTECH BERLIN will be “How to transform your ­organisation”, since this change doesn’t just mean implementing digital technologies within the business. The key is to promote and implement change at every single step of the value chain. Above all, it is the people within a business who are responsible for making this happen. The focus of the conference lies on four aspects of the digital transformation: Leadership & Culture, ­Innovation & Technology, Customer Journey and Future of Work.

LEADERSHIP & CULTURE It’s only at first glance that the digital transformation appears to be exclusively about new technologies. They play an important role, of course. Yet they are worthless if the corresponding culture is not already firmly in place within the business. In the digital era it’s primarily a question of speed. Today, it is possible to become the market leader faster than ever before. By implication, that also means that companies can fall behind the competition much faster too. Only those who can innovate rapidly and continually will achieve success with their customers and users, who are more demanding than ever. Innovations come about when the company has no fear of failure. Silicon Valley exemplifies this mindset. Those who learn from their mistakes will improve the next time — in line with the motto “Failure is one step on the journey to success”.

SEBASTIAN KLAUKE Chief Digital Officer OTTO GROUP


The Otto Group is a perfect example of this: the Otto catalogue was stopped after a publication run of decades and start-up culture was brought in-house with About You and the collaboration with the venture capital firm Project A. Ultimately, the Otto Group continually disrupts its own business model — before anyone else does it for them. ­Sebastian Klauke is Chief Digital Officer at the Otto Group. His example clearly shows where the digital culture of a company must be anchored, namely at management level, from where it can permeate through to all other areas. Klauke says “There are lots of unhappy CDOs who ought to take their business digital but don’t have the budget or the clout. It doesn’t work. That kind of role is like being a jester — it can be fun, but doesn’t lead to much and seldom ends well. In short, a Chief Digital Officer needs to contribute responsibly to making existing, functioning business models sustainable for the future; and, at the same time, drive forward innovation and new business models. I therefore believe that a successful CDO also needs to be strongly anchored within the operational business.”

INNOVATION & TECHNOLOGY Traditional development methods, where a product or service is polished and perfected in the design studio under lock and key, are a thing of the past. While all this is taking place, nowadays a competitor will have already launched their innovation onto the market far sooner. We’re not only talking about the development of new collections, but of investigating the digital potential of the whole value chain. It’s all about modern, digital marketing and innovative sales channels: apps, networking events, experience and connected retail are the buzzwords here. Agile methods, where solutions are continually improved by means of an iterative process, are in demand. At the heart of everything are the wishes and needs of the customers and users — and their feedback. For over 40 years Gary Wassner has been responsible for the financing of some of the most successful US fashion brands like Michael Kors and Marc Jacobs, and he ­ knows the market better than almost anyone else. He says “Know your consumer. Speak to your consumers. Address the needs and desires of your consumers.” It is no longer the company or the brands but rather customers who define what they want to consume when, where and how.

TECH

This makes communicating with users easier today than ever before and it can be done qualitatively, e.g. through a conversation on social media, but above all quantitatively through analysing data, whether from online or from the physical store. Today, customers and users expect not only a personalised approach; platforms where, with the help of AI, the offer can be tailored to each user based on their individual preferences are particularly effective — see About You. The trend towards customisation is also continuing to grow. The customer is becoming the co-creation partner ad infinitum and the community is practically designing collections for itself, e.g. as seen with hype label A Way To Mars.

ANA ANDJELIC Chief Brand Officer REBECCA MINKOFF

CUSTOMER JOURNEY “If the 20th century was the age of the corporation, the 21st century is that of the consumer,” says Ana Andjelic, Chief Brand Officer at Rebecca Minkoff. The textile ­

r­ etail industry, whether physical or digital, has long been competing with other leisure time activities such as eating out or Netflix. Time is a scarce commodity nowadays and

#FASHIONTECH BERLIN © Nils Krüger/offenblende.de

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anyone investing it wants to see a return on their investment. The retail trade is moving away from pure point of sale and consumers expect an experience, so, despite the ubiquitous trend towards digitalisation, physical meeting places where members of a community can meet up and talk face-to-face are becoming increasingly important. For retail and brands it is crucial to keep the fount of inspiration flowing, to give customers a reason to visit them again. Connected retail therefore not only means that users can continue the customer journey offline that they began online — and vice-versa. Markus Fuchshofen is M ­ anaging Director at Bonprix: “If the traditional strengths of stationary retail outlets are closely interwoven with technology — ideally so that the join is barely visible — it can lead to an exhilarating shopping and brand experience for the customer.” In the ­future, nobody will need to queue in-store in order to pay. Sizes and colours that are no longer

MARKUS FUCHSHOFEN Managing Director BONPRIX

in stock at the store will be ordered for home delivery via virtual sales counters, and apps will accompany customers through the store like digital assistants.

Connected retail also means that retailers profit from data about their customers, which they can analyse to show what customers are currently interested in. The retailer can then align the content and experience to match. “Linking stationary and online channels, e.g. via the customer’s smartphone, also opens up new opportunities for retail to gain better insights into the needs of their own customers. If, for instance, it’s possible to buy via an app as well as in-store and online, the data can be used, among other things, to personalise the offers and recommended products more effectively, and to optimise the shopping experience across all channels,” explains Fuchshofen. In the first quarter of 2019 the theory will be put into practice, as Bonprix will be opening a new style of store concept in Hamburg as a pilot project under the motto of “fashion connect”.

FUTURE OF WORK The digital transformation will also result in changes to the demands of the whole of the professional world. The employee profile will be new at all levels. Rather than the perfect CV the required attribute will be the courage to try out new things, make mistakes but also learn from them to improve quickly. Flat hierarchies are needed to shorten feedback loops and to be able to act quicker and in a more agile way: connected working in cross-functional teams instead of drawn-out meetings. “The digital world needs a connected mindset that no longer thinks competitively but allows collaborations, even across departments,” says Professor Weinberg, Director of the HPI School of Design Thinking in Potsdam. This requires not only a mental rethink, but

PROFESSOR ULRICH WEINBERG Director of the HPI SCHOOL OF DESIGN THINKING


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coding workshop occasionally. “You don’t need to understand every single aspect of the technology; you just need to know what’s possible,” says Michael Stracke, Chief ­Business Development Officer #­ FASHIONTECH BERLIN. Sofia ­Wingren is CEO of Hyper Island, a digital Business School that originated in Sweden and has already gained the

SOFIA WINGREN CEO HYPER ISLAND

Brand new jobs and apprenticeships need to be created. MediaMarktSaturn is leading the charge: with a new apprenticeship as ‘eCommerce Manager’, offered by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry since 2018. The requirements for recruiting are also new. The fashion industry is constantly evolving into a tech industry and, as such, increasingly requires so-called MINT jobs (Mathematics, IT, Natural Sciences and Technology). Graduates in these disciplines often move straight to a start-up or tech company after graduating, where the salaries tend to be more lucrative. This gives rise to new challenges for employer marketing, job portals and personnel consultants. How can the fashion industry be made more attractive — e.g. for developers? Reza Moussavian is Senior Vice President Digital & Innovation (HR) at Telekom. He says that, when it comes to employee qualifications, it’s all about the mix: “I essentially see two areas of competence here: 1. technologies and 2. culture — let’s call them hard and soft skills ... I am not a fan — at all — of concentrating purely on the

soft skills and only considering mindset. Naturally it’s important, however there must be a combination of tech and cultural skills. Conversely, it’s not enough either to ‘only’ have a command of technologies.”

moniker of “The Digital Harvard”. She says “Training and learning processes have evolved hugely. Antiquated, textbook-heavy, learn-byrote methods have now developed into something that reflects the demands of modern leadership. Learning is collaborative and progressive; less theorising, more doing.” This new view needs to be anchored at leadership level, along with a digital mindset: “A workforce must be constantly learning, unlearning, and relearning. This will not happen unless it comes from the top down.” fashiontech.berlin

#FASHIONTECH BERLIN 15 January 2019, 10AM–6PM KRAFTWERK Köpenicker Strasse 70 | 10179 Berlin

REZA MOUSSAVIAN Senior Vice President DIGITAL & INNOVATION (HR) TELEKOM

Continuing Professional Development also needs to work differently, so it can for instance make sense to place managers in a

Access to conference / stage: 240.00 Euro (+ 19% VAT) Access to exhibition, masterclasses and networking areas: free of charge for PREMIUM GROUP badge holders Media & press: free entry following pre-registration and verification

#FASHIONTECH BERLIN © Nils Krüger/offenblende.de

also brand new workplaces, moving away from individual offices to open structures that promote interdisciplinary communication.


15 JANUARY 2019

THE TECH CONFERENCE FOR THE FASHION INDUSTRY

HOW TO TRANSFORM YOUR ORGANISATION

GET YOUR TICKET NOW! KRAFTWERK BERLIN WWW.FASHIONTECH.BERLIN


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INVEST. INNOVATE. SUSTAIN. by QUYNH TRAN The phrase “Please think about the environment before printing this e-mail” appears in many people's e-mail signatures. A seemingly trivial detail – but, as is so eloquently said: the devil is in the detail. According WWF, almost every second industrially felled tree is processed into paper. Hence, it has already been the done thing in many offices to save paper for years. And paper is just the beginning. With the growing awareness of sustainable corporate governance and the increasingly ­u rgent global issues, the focus has shifted to no longer concentrate exclusively on the sustainable origin and manufacture of products. Increasingly, business processes around the product that are not always immediately apparent are becoming part of the game; it’s about the ecological assessment and social balance, and the effect on people and the environment – from aspects like usage, logistics and communication through to disposal. Deutsche Post is using the new eco-friendly StreetScooters while out and about in more and more delivery areas

This year, for example, Starbucks addressed several aspects of its corporate governance. The coffee chain has had a ‘Green Team’ since 1994 and advocated on traditional

e­ nvironmental issues such as reducing rubbish and energy efficiency for years. The sustainability agenda also includes ethical production and fair pay rates, as well as environmental damage minimization for suppliers, and collaboration with civil society and employees. In the next few years the company is set to employ war veterans in order to integrate them into society again. It also works with Arizona State University on ­ online courses in sustainability management. At the Global Climate Action Summit in S ­ eptember 2018, a six-point plan was announced to make 10,000 of the 28,000 branches ­greener by 2025. This not only entails waste and ­energy management, but also the design of good air and lighting for a better atmosphere. “To put it simply: we want to serve ­sus­tainable coffee sustainably,” e­ xplains CEO and ­President Kevin Johnson in this context. This is not just a moral but also a practical and profitable decision: the ­investment in the ­infrastructure could, according to the company’s own ­research, save USD 50 million in ­operating costs, which in turn is to be redirected to s­ ocial projects. Starbucks is keen to share all this: like an open-source network, other companies are welcome to a ­ ccess the ­results and seek out assistance.


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Proactive commitment is worth it – for ­people and the environment – as DHL, the subsidiary of the Deutsche Post, has shown. Back in 2007, DHL actively commissioned a study on CO2 emissions because there was no suitable survey available for the l­ogistics industry at the time. The target was thereupon set to reduce emissions by 30 per cent by 2020 – something that is made possible primarily by emissions-free delivery. After attempts to find a suitable electronic vehicle produced by major car manufacturers failed, in 2014 DHL bought the start-up StreetScooter to develop its own electric delivery van. Today, 5,000 of such e-vans are in use; in the long term, the original fleet of vehicles will be completely replaced by electric models. In addition to this, cargo bikes are used for the final miles. What was originally meant for only own use is now sought after by other companies, and will soon be available to purchase. An unanticipated ­ result that might open new business areas but has – most importantly – a strong effect on the environment.

This is not only a long-term investment into society but also into the staff that goes far beyond the corporate practice. “It’s more important than ever to take a stand for a better tomorrow. Social impact has always been at the core of our mission and the starting point for everything we do at

Toms. Besides shoes and sight restorations, we have also always been committed to provide safe water for communities. Our commitment hasn’t changed, but the world we live in has – that’s why we’re looking forward to new urging projects to invest in in the future,” said Amy Smith, Chief Giving Officer at Toms. With Toms as a leading example, ­company’s increasingly invest into creating a better working environment for their employees, e.g. through measures like flexible work hours, health programmes, educational trainings and programmes and professional and long-term prospects. These are some of the reasons why tech companies in ­Silicon Valley have topped the hit lists for years as the most popular employers for the most talented individuals.

Toms’ Founder Blake Mycoskie on a giving trip to Argentina giving shoes to people in need

Social enterprises like Toms, on the other hand, convince with a social agenda: Since the founding of the shoe brand, every sold pair of shoes equals a pair given to people in need, and every pair of sunglasses pays for a sight restoration. But it’s not just this charitable aspects that make the brand a popular employer: While flexible working hours and paid parental leave are common practice at conscious companies, Toms gives employees the opportunity to go on giving trips in o ­ rder to let them experience, understand and practise the c­ ompany’s culture and its DNA.

Above all this, acting sustainably also means minimising long-term business risks and optimising performance potential. It starts with the origin and supply of resources in production; how the product is distributed, marketed, communicated; how the people involved are treated. But it goes much further: acting sustainably is ­u ltimately a holistic concept that includes every single decision taken within the company – even the most trivial. starbucks.com dpdhl.com toms.com

One of Starbuck’s eco-conscious stores is the Reclamation Drive-Thru which is made entirely of reclaimed shipping containers


15–18 JANUARY 2019

#berlinfashionweek www.fashion-week-berlin.com


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CLI N Y C RE

by KAY ALEXANDER PLONKA


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Hand on heart: who would have thought, when 16 year old Boyan Slat from the Netherlands proclaimed his intention eight years ago to fish out all the plastic waste floating around in the world's oceans, that by 2018 his not-for-profit project would have developed to such an extent that he would actually be able to start with ‘The Ocean Cleanup’ in the ­Pacific?

Active marine conservation: Marine Biologist Ocean Ramsey and Underwater Photographer Juan Oliphant have dedicated themselves to the conservation of white sharks in Hawaii and are supported in this endeavour by North Sails

Of course, there is as yet no solution to avoiding even more dangerous microplastic pollution caused by fragments of rubber tyres, cosmetics, detergents and particles of synthetic textile fibres, but Rudi Dutschke says: “Revolution is not a quick action where something happens and then everything’s different.” If, though, soon even prosthetic legs for the poorest of the poor can be manufactured cost-effectively from plastic waste using 3D printing processes, an idea that is the brainchild of Nuremberg ­researcher Prof. Christian Zagel, then it would be laughable if the fashion industry didn’t find a means and a way to do its part in making the world a little better. Many brands from A for Armed

Angels to Nudie Jeans and ­Wunderwerk, all the way through to Philomena ­Zanetti are already doing things differently. They all rely on fair production, sustainably produced materials and high-profile educational work. The Jeckybeng label, for example, which produces its PFC-free outdoor jackets from water-repellent organic cotton and offers a lifelong repair service in Poland and Germany. The makers support the marine creature conservation organisation Sea Shepherd in its fight for endangered porpoises in the Baltic Sea. “We want our collaboration to be a model of best practice. We want to be engaged and make a difference,” says Dominik Fuss from Jeckybeng. Through the collaboration with Sea Shepherd, EUR 100 from the sale of each jacket, which amounts to at least a quarter of the sale price, flows directly into the campaign to protect the cetaceans. What seems to be merely tilting at windmills instantly appears in another light when brands like Adidas announce that they are aiming to use only ­recycled


Planet, an initiative for the avoidance of singleuse plastic packaging. We donate one per cent of our global revenues to the British Ocean Family ­Foundation, which combats the expansion of marine pollution,” explains Willem Wijnen, CCO of North Sails. The list of those who are changing their views is growing by the day. For the first time at PREMIUM, the Portuguese brand Lemon ­Jelly will be presenting three styles of rubber Chelsea boot made from 100% recycled waste, including the soles. So if we all help, even just a little, to get environmental issues under control again then we have already achieved something. And you can always start straightaway. Have fun, you’ll see how good it feels.

jeckybeng.com northsails.com adidas.com/us/parley veja-store.com polimoda.com lemonjelly.com

Trashwalk: Clean up with bloggers and influencers in Sardinia organised by North Sails plastic in their products from 2024. The sports equipment giant has been working with marine conservation organisation Parley for the Oceans since 2015. The result: 41% of Adidas’s Spring / Summer 2019 collection will be made from recycled plastic. Sneaker brand Veja from Paris, which is no longer that small a brand, has been using mesh inserts made from recycled plastic bottles since its inception over 10 years ago. In this example, having the courage to consistently manufacture in a responsible way has now paid off. Even the newest member of the British Royal Family, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, was recently photographed wearing V-10s by Veja and has given the French brand – which produces its shoes in Brazil fairly and sustainably and which employs a Parisian sheltered workshop for the picking and packing processes – a further hefty boost. Promoting awareness campaigns and educational programmes is more effective, cheaper and much less time-consuming than the arduous task of fishing the (micro-)plastic waste out of the world’s oceans again. North Sails is therefore leading the way by example with its ‘Free The Sea’ capsule collection that is manufactured from Recover Blue, a material blend of recycled

cotton and PET plastic bottles. The brand’s ambassador is the Italian marine bio­logist Mariasole Bianco from the World ­ Commission on Protected Areas. She carries out educational work on the topic of ocean waste, going into schools and appearing on TV, and organises lots of high-profile beach clean-up campaigns. “True to our motto, ‘Go Beyond’, we will increasingly be manufacturing our products out of sustainable materials, taking a step-by-step approach. Furthermore, we are also supporting A Plastic

“I advise my students to design significant, long-lasting clothing – the vintage pieces for the next generation so to speak – and not tomorrow’s fast ­fashion rubbish.” Danilo Venturi, Director Polimoda Florence

Jeckybeng x Sea Shepard


01/15-17/2019 Kraftwerk Berlin


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Javier Goyeneche, Founder & Director Ecoalf

FISHERMEN’S FRIEND Together with Spanish fishermen, founder of Ecoalf Javier Goyeneche started to free the sea from plastic waste, which he then used to create parkas, jackets, sneakers and bags. Over the course of PREMIUM Ecoalf will be present in the courtyard area of STATION-Berlin, directing a clear message to visitors by means of an interactive art installation by Juan Garaizabal: we must reduce our ecological footprint ASAP – because there is no plan[et] B! In the interview Javier Goyeneche talks about what he still has planned to make the planet a little better.

© Ecoalf

by KAY ALEXANDER PLONKA


BUSINESS

Some years ago you started to collect trash from the Mediterranean Sea together with one fisherman. Now 3,000 fishermen have collected over 280 tonnes of trash from the ocean since the beginning of this project. Why does this work so well? The fishermen had to put up with the rubbish in their nets every day. They are all proud to do their bit and help tackle the problem. All we did was to provide the tools in the form of containers and logistics so that the rubbish that is brought into the boats doesn’t get thrown back into the ocean. This project raises awareness and consciousness of the environment and brings people together who share the same concern – protecting the oceans. The project has now been implemented in Asia as well, what's the status over there? We developed a three-year programme for the government of Thailand to help them replicate Upcycling the Oceans across four islands: Phuket, Samui, Ko Tao and Samed. We also work with the fishermen there, as well as scuba divers and beach volunteers. The first year we focused on education and developed a waste management system. Now we are concentrating on using eco-friendly technology to transform the waste into yarn, and we have used it to produce our first swimwear collection.

For the Ecoalf collection, as well as recycled wool you also use cotton, coffee grounds and algae. Which materials will be added to the list in future? For spring we are introducing Cupro and Hemp. Cupro is a natural product from the seed of the cotton plant that is generally thrown away; we are turning it into cool, feminine pieces. For autumn we are working with Piñatex, a textile made from pineapple leaf fibres – produced naturally and in an environmentally friendly way. Piñatex is produced using cruelty-free methods and has a high level of social responsibility. All our collections will be manufactured without the use of feathers until 2020. For Fall / Winter 2019 we have already significantly increased the vegan-friendly, synthetic fillings.

ecoalf.com Read the full interview at berlinfashionweek.com

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100 COMING YEARS IS FULL MORE CIRC  © Anna Daki

by RENKO HEUER


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OF LESS   LE Enjoying the views while strolling around Hufeisensiedlung


In love with the colours in the bedroom at Taut’s Home

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© Anna Daki

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Near the River Spree: a closer look at ‘Das Bauhaus’

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s Berlin is gearing up to celebrate 100 years of Bauhaus in 2019, we asked Danish architect and ­designer Sigurd Larsen to join us for a leisurely stroll around town, a long Spaziergang to some of the most iconic buildings and sites from the city’s ‘Golden Twenties’. Between various trips down memory lane and quick glimpses at future projects we were excited to learn about his vision, his ‘inner feminist,’ and the importance of kitsch. That moment when Sigurd Larsen isn’t even aware of that other anniversary: “Oh, right, that’s also this year: 10 years since I came to Berlin. It’s true.” Indeed, it’s been a decade since Larsen (*1981) arrived in the German capital, and, even though he didn’t expect to stay this long, he’s obviously left his mark on various hotspots around town: perhaps you’ve already enjoyed a coffee on one of his furniture designs, or you might have even stayed inside his award-winning hotel room concept … “I wanted to stay as long as it’s fun … and it’s still fun,” he continues, as we leave his stylishyet-unpretentious studio, tucked away b ­ etween Spätis and bike rentals in central Kreuzberg, heading south. “Honestly, I didn’t expect to be able to make a living out here for that long. Initially, I didn’t even bring my own furniture: it was in storage in Copenhagen for another 1.5 years,” he adds. “Generally, there’s a lot more optimism now compared to 10 years ago. People have started to believe that Berlin can be a stable success for a longer time.” Raised near the ocean just outside of Aarhus, Larsen has been interested in design for as long as he can remember. Once he completed his initial degree, he took off to work in ­Rotterdam (MVRDV), followed by a stint in NYC (OMA / Rem Koolhaas) and more handson experience in Copenhagen (COBE), where he also earned his Master’s degree at The ­Royal Academy of Fine Arts before packing his bags and falling in love with Berlin. Not r­ eally satisfied with the lakes around here, he’s been missing the ocean ever since.

Beautiful dark light Although the German Hauptstadt has seen massive changes in recent years, arriving at Tautes Heim, Taut’s Home, “a rentable ­museum with 1920s splendour in an original Bruno Taut house,” feels like entering a pre-WWII setting. Everything is 100% original, 100% Bauhaus, the colours, the materials, the details. Time seems to stand still here.

It’s surprisingly sunny as we approach the iconic house that sits on the northern tip of a larger compound. Classic German preChristmas window decoration meets clear-cut modernist architecture in the quiet neighborhood. Once we’re past the fruit trees and enter the building it’s the light – or rather: the relative lack of light – that changes everything for Sigurd Larsen. “Beautiful dark light,” he says more than once, as his sneakers carry him from the Blue Room (including a writer’s desk and treetop views) to its stunning green and yellow counterparts. Super down-to-earth, Larsen uses the more intimate ‘Du’ when talking to the welcoming property owner – in fact, his English is full of German terms (a language he wanted to

learn early on, “simply to be able to read the news and talk to older people as well”). At one point during our tour he discovers two tomes on ‘proper housewifery’ – entitled ‘Das Reich der Hausfrau’. “Wow, my inner feminist feels offended by this,” he chuckles, before marveling about the impeccable two-tone curtains that match the room’s award-winning design. “The entire colour palette is fantastic,” he continues, “I think they chose the colours based on the corners of the world. I really like such strong colours inside a house – because it turns the entire place into a kind of cave.” Although he’s primarily known for working with the original colours of any given material (wood is obviously a favourite), he has recently employed more Bauhaus-inspired col-


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CU LTU R E Heading back to the city, he links the Bauhaus movement to his earliest influence: Danish ­design. “It is essentially at the root of Danish design.” Indeed, even the fact that his studio, launched in 2010, works both in architecture and furniture design can be traced back to the ideas of Walter Gropius’ Bauhaus movement. “The overall idea that the person who designs a building and the one designing furniture is the same person – that’s a Bauhaus thought, and it’s also a very Danish thought. Danish architects have always been working with furniture as well.” With his recent design chair project for German DIY store chain Hornbach, a stunning piece called Werkstück 001, he even returned to the democratic  design-for-everyone approach that was also crucial for his predecessors. “Yes, many of the pieces that later became expensive design classics were originally intended for the masses: mass-produced, not expensive. And I think that’s a beautiful concept.”

“If you care about the eco footprint of a building, then it’s important for a house to last a long time. In that sense it’s a slow business. We don’t have two Fashion Weeks a year, you know?”

ours for a school building in western Germany. “I’ve always been very inspired by the colour palette of Bauhaus. These de-saturated colours are incredibly pleasant, and they work so well with daylight.” As we walk over to the impressively curved Hufeisensiedlung, another modernist land­ mark that’s only two blocks away from Taut’s Home, and one of six Berlin Modernism ­Housing Estates that were awarded UNESCO World Heritage status in 2008, Larsen continues to reflect on the Bauhaus tradition. What is it that makes this art school, which only existed from 1919 to 1933, so special? “It’s ­ what comes right after industrialism, and it feels like a natural extension of that: they had all the methods, the logic of industrialisation – and they married that to the colour aesthetics and the form language from the arts,” says Larsen, who also enjoys working as a professor twice a week. “It’s two very contemporary things coming together.”

“If you care about the eco footprint of a building, then it’s important for a house to last a long time. In that sense it’s a slow business. We don’t have two Fashion Weeks a year, you know?” As we head back to his office, the daylight slowly fading, making room for the glittering decorations of the Christmas season, it’s quite surprising to learn that he isn’t even appalled by the excessive décor: “Well, if you can let out all the energy for kitsch in December, then you still have 11 good months a year … so maybe it’s all good,” he wonders, laughing. “These past few years, we actually had a big Christmas tree in our house. Even architects sometimes need to go kitsch. We try to represent something ­really cool in everyday life, but sometimes we just have to go crazy.”

sigurdlarsen.com

© Anna Daki

Avidly studying ‘Das Reich der Hausfrau’ (‘The Empire of the Housewife’) in the ­kitchen at Taut’s Home

Currently rethinking what a house can be in a more southern climate – it’s his first project in Greece, and the first house that he’ll be able to enjoy himself after completion, albeit “only for three weeks each year if I’m lucky”, Larsen shares some fascinating asides (e.g. about European vs. Japanese understandings of privacy) while we’re en route to Das Bauhaus near Alexanderplatz and Museumsinsel. It’s another building created in the ‘International Style,’ and just recently renovated. Unlike his previous projects including affordable  sustainable houses such as The Light House and The Green House, his future summerhouse is “actually going to be somewhat Bauhaus-inspired,” he says, looking at the huge white building, “but that’s because you’re only allowed to make white cubes in that area.”


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CU LTU R E

PAHR

The legacy of the 20th century’s most influential art school doesn’t just fade away – ­especially not in Berlin. Here, the ­Bauhaus influence still lingers large, including when you’re eating. Characterised by minimalist and modern architectural feats, the movement’s definitive design style is evident in many of Berlin’s industrially presented restaurants – spaces where the school’s original refusal of ornamentation is paired with playful investigations into colour and geometrics. The most important rule to remember though, is that “form follows function” and, while the beauty of restaurants such as Pahr – located in Wedding’s stunning Lobe Block – may wow, it’s secondary to

the food coming out of the kitchen. Pahr’s co-founder, Jessica-Joyce Sidon, explains how “when we got offered the space it was pretty simple to finalize the concept. Like Lobe Block, we wanted to create a space where people can meet and have a great time. Good food and drinks are just as important as the surroundings you’re in.” Pahr’s pared-back interiors give way to a menu that is similarly pure, served alongside a natural wine list and homemade infusions at the bar. Continuing Lobe Block’s “rough is enough” motto is NaNum in Kreuzberg. A part-café, part-design space, where traditional ­Korean dishes such as bibimbap are served in ceramics handmade by the owner, Jinok Kim. Traces of her craft, including pinch marks and prints, are evident in the

t­ ableware’s ­reduced forms and rough exteriors, and all designed to serve the kitchen’s offerings as a vessel. It takes a lot of thought to create this sort of minimalism that’s also welcoming. This is a concept that Cell in ­Charlottenburg also openly experiments with, championing brutal aesthetics with open, geometric ironworks surrounding each of the restaurant’s tables. The illusion created is a series of cells within cells but the unique design offers diners direct views into the kitchen where Russian-born chef, Evgeny Vikentiev, conveys local ingredients from a new perspective. “Our menu definitely follows function, it’s a journey,” Evgeny says. “One element from the previous course will be present in the next. Everything is connected.”


by KATE LEWIN

NANUM

If you’d prefer to see the Bauhaus legacy in a more original form, then a visit to Wilmersdorf’s Erich Hamann Bittere Schokoladen should be top of your list. The chocolatier is housed in a 1928 factory complex built by the founding father of Bauhaus, Johannes Itten, who conceived both the shop and its interior design. Tradition and modernity are visible side-by-side and the shop’s famous chequered chocolate boxes with blue ribbons are still iconic today. The beauty of the Bauhaus manifesto colours everything, tuck in to Berlin’s brutalist bites!

pahr.berlin nanumberlin.com cell.restaurant hamann-schokolade.de ERICH HAMANN BITTERE SCHOKOLADEN


68

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INTERIOR

74

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WILD HEART FREE SOUL

HOTEL ULTRA

Mitte

Kilims are woven poems of

HOTEL ULTRA’s guests

typehype.com

nomad women. They tell about

are selected products from

mother goddess, love and long-

international designers and

ing. Their bright colours and

brands that ‘check in’ to 36

AMODO

TYPE HYPE

Linienstrasse 150

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 9–13

Mitte amodoberlin.com

JOHANENLIES NEW ADDRESS

URBAN INDUSTRIAL

archaic symbols create a warm

different ‘rooms’, where they

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and blissful atmosphere in every

wait for you to check them

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home. WILD HEART FREE

out. ­Although each guest has

johanenlies.com

urban-industrial.de

SOUL specializes in ­Turkish

their own (design) language,

kilims rugs and cushions from

here they happily inhabit

the 60s and 70s. Owner Beyza

the same space, whether it’s

BRUTTO GUSTO

COROTO NEW ADDRESS

Özler frequently travels through

a ­paperclip next to a floor

Torstrasse 175

Strausberger Platz 8

Turkey to select her handmade

lamp or a vase sharing a

Mitte

Mitte

vintage textiles with passion and

spot with an armchair. From

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coroto.de

great care. Her ‘Kilim Temple’

aesthetic designs to ­minimalist

is a colourful oasis in the midst

­elements, every budget and

of the city.

taste is catered for here.

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HAY

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76

LE LABO

DIPTYQUE POP-UP-STORE NEW

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BECYCLE

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Discover HOLMES PLACE’s

BECYCLE is Berlin's answer

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to Flywheel: the 45-minute

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spinning classes are set to

ent ­locations in Berlin. Stop by

thumping hip-hop, house

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and pure pop beats. Barre,

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Grand Hyatt

Platz after a long day and r­ elax

Hiit and yoga classes help

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in the luxurious spa area, or

­strengthen and elongate the

hautundsein.de

Tiergarten | hyatt.com

head to one of our other five

muscles needed for cycling.

Berlin clubs where you can

The cosy lounge invites

work up a sweat on state-of-

­Wi-Fi-seeking freelancers

HELY'S LAB

COWSHED SPA

the-art cardio machines, at

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Soho House

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rigs or weight training. Why

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 100 Y 100 years of Bauhaus

Niederkirchnerstrasse 7

Neue Nationalgalerie. Kulturforum. Berlin-Tiergarten, Potsdamer Straße 50. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin / Maximilian Meisse

ART

78


79

KÖNIG GALERIE

CWC GALLERY

Agnieszka Polska – The Demon’s Brain, 2018 © Agnieszka Polska, Courtesy ŽAK | BRANICKA, Berlin and OVERDUIN & CO., LA; Andy Warhol © Ron Galella, Andy Warhol at the CFDA Awards Dinner, New York City, 1985; Saul Leiter – Untitled © copyright Saul Leiter Foundation, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Alexandrinenstrasse 118–121

HAMBURGER BAHNHOF

HELMUT NEWTON FOUNDATION For the first time in its history,

St. Agnes | Kreuzberg

The exhibition ‘Andy Warhol:

koeniggalerie.com

Fantastic!’ presents more than

In the multichannel video

80 portraits of Andy Warhol.

installation ‘The Demon’s Brain’

the HELMUT NEWTON

They provide us with a rare

­Agnieszka Polska grapples with

­FOUNDATION is staging an ex-

SEVEN STAR GALLERY

perspective on the personality of

the ethical question of how

hibition dedicated exclusively to

Gormannstrasse 7

the co-founder of Pop Art and

individuals can assume social re-

nude photography. ‘Saul Leitner.

Mitte

one of the most eminent artists

sponsibility amid the overwhelm-

David Lynch. Helmut Newton.’

7starberlin.com

in history. Special emphasis is

ing demands of the present

not only features shots taken by

placed on the synergy that arose

moment. The work is based on

the master of the nude, Helmut

from the cooperation between

a collection of fifteenth-­century

Newton, but also the works of

GALERIE FÜR MODERNE FOTOGRAFIE

Andy Warhol and well-known

letters addressed to Mikołaj

photographer Saul Leitner, who

photographers. Furthermore,

Serafin, the custodian of

worked for international fashion

Schröderstrasse 13 | Mitte

the Factory, founded in the early

­Poland’s salt mines. Polska tells

magazines in the 60s and 70s,

galeriefuermodernefotografie.com

1960s by Andy Warhol, occupies

the fictional story of a young

and director David Lynch, whose

a prominent space in the exhibi-

messenger tasked with deliver-

well lit, close-up images of naked

tion.

ing these letters on horseback.

bodies conjure up landscapes.

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Mitte

Mitte

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smb.museum

smb.museum

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C/O BERLIN

BLAIN | SOUTHERN

Kulmer Strasse 17

Linienstrasse 23

Hardenbergstrasse 22–24

Potsdamer Strasse 77–87

Schöneberg

Mitte

Amerika Haus | Charlottenburg

Mercator Höfe | Tiergarten

noahklink.com

dittrich-schlechtriem.com

co-berlin.org

blainsouthern.com

THE FEUERLE COLLECTION

SAMMLUNG BOROS

CAMERA WORK

GALERIE ISABELLA BORTOLOZZI

Hallesches Ufer 70

Reinhardtstrasse 20

Kantstrasse 149

Schöneberger Ufer 61

Kreuzberg

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Tiergarten

thefeuerlecollection.org

sammlung-boros.de

camerawork.de

bortolozzi.com

ROBERT GRUNENBERG BERLIN


ARAI

LAYLA BY MEIR ADONI NEW

Japanese

Israeli

Straßburger Strasse 60

Hallesche Strasse 10

Prenzlauer Berg

Kreuzberg

araiberlin.com

layla-restaurant.com

PAULINSKI PALME

KANTINI / BIKINI BERLIN

International

International | Food Court

Richardstrasse 76

Budapester Strasse 38–50

Neukölln

Charlottenburg

paulinskipalme.de

bikiniberlin.de

UNGEHEUER

ERNST

International

International

Emser Strasse 23

Gerichtstrasse 54

Neukölln

Wedding

ungeheuer-neukoelln.de

ernstberlin.de

CELL NEW

KUCHI

International

Japanese

Uhlandstrasse 172

Gipsstrasse 3

Charlottenburg

Mitte

cell.restaurant

kuchi.de

PAULY SAAL

MA'LOA NEW

International

Hawaiian

Auguststrasse 11–13

Zimmerstrasse 68

Mitte

Mitte

paulysaal.com

maloa.com

Layla by Meir Adoni © David Sonntag

EATING

80


81

FRIEDEL RICHTER

SAGE RESTAURANT

TO THE BONE

MADE IN CHINA NEW

International

International

Italian

Chinese

Mitte

Located in an old brick build-

Inspired by the regional

Dive into the world of steam-

friedelrichter.de

ing in Kreuzberg that has been

cuisines of Northern Italy, TO

ing bast baskets and discover

turned into an artistic, urban

THE BONE offers a contem-

the traditional Chinese dim

space, SAGE R ­ estaurant opens

porary take on the traditional

sum culture at MADE IN

LE PETIT ROYAL

its doors at 6pm. You can enjoy

dishes from that region. Bone

CHINA. Guests can watch the

French

great cocktails, creative cuisine

marrow with oxtail confit or

fascinating food preparation

Grolmannstrasse 59

with a changing menu of meat,

rabbit liver pâté with plum

live and embark on a culi-

Charlottenburg

fish and v­ egetarian dishes and a

chutney are examples of the

nary journey while enjoying

lepetitroyal.de

diligently compiled wine menu.

dishes on offer next to chang-

the venues Chinese Design

On warm summer days the

ing seasonal dishes and sig-

atmosphere from the 80s. The

SAGE Beach is the perfect place

nature steaks from special-

southern Chinese-Cantonese

Torstrasse 199

TORBAR

NEW

for a sundowner in a special at-

ised Italian meat suppliers.

cuisine offers an impressive

International

mosphere directly on the Spree;

Specially developed cocktails

selection of over 30 different

Torstrasse 183

and during the cold winter our

and negroni variations are

dim sums, Shanghai sumpling

Mitte

fireplace in the SAGE Restau-

served into the night during

soup, chilli wantans, various

torbarberlin.eatbu.com

rant invites you to celebrate

and after dinner service.

types of dumplings, as well as home-made dandan noodles

with your friends while smoking cigars.

KIN DEE

Torstrasse 96

and Peking Zhajiang noodles.

Mitte tothebone.bonita.berlin

Schönhauser Allee 10–11

Thai

Köpenicker Strasse 18–20

Lützowstrasse 81

Kreuzberg

Prenzlauer Berg

Tiergarten

sage-restaurant.de

madeinchinaberlin.weebly.com

kindeeberlin.com

GRILL ROYAL

BEUSTER BAR

CHUPENGA

THE KLUB KITCHEN

International

International

Mexican

Asian

Friedrichstrasse 105b

Weserstrasse 32

Mühlenstrasse 13

Mulackstrasse 15

Mitte

Neukölln

Friedrichshain

Mitte

grillroyal.com

beusterbar.com

chupenga.de

theklubkitchen.com


82

International

TO BEEF OR NOT TO BEEF

SUPERFOODS & ORGANIC LIQUIDS

BRASSERIE COLETTE TIM RAUE

Behrenstrasse 55

Italian

Juice Bar | Restaurant

French

As part of its mission to

SUPERFOODS & ORGANIC

BRASSERIE COLETTE TIM

­promote authentic Italian

LIQUIDS ‘Modern’, ‘vegan’,

RAUE is located at 5–7 ­Passauer

food and meat culture, TO

‘gluten-free’- these are the buzz­

Strasse, directly opposite

PAHR NEW

BEEF OR NOT TO BEEF

words behind the superfood

KaDeWe, and is open both at

International

works closely with Italian star

stores opened by Julia Puestow

lunchtime (Mon–Sun, 12–3pm)

Böttgerstrasse 16 | Lobe Block

butcher Dario Cecchini and

and Julian Liebich, which boast

and in the e ­ vening (Mon–Sun,

Wedding

other suppliers to provide

timeless, youthful design. The

6–11pm). The menu offers clas-

pahr.berlin

speciality meats of the highest

­entrepreneurs pick up on themes

sical French brasserie cuisine

standards. The menu ranges

of ‘organic’ and ‘sustainable’,

featuring all Tim Raue’s typical

from signature steaks like the

but express these in a modern

gastronomic hallmarks with re-

RICHARD

Bistecca alla Fiorentina to

way. They appeal to a young,

gard to aroma and presentation.

International

fresh and light and vegetarian

urban audience who are keen to

The interior is characterised

Köpenicker Strasse 174

seasonal dishes. Over 100 wines

integrate fresh healthy eating

by classical brasserie elements

Kreuzberg

– as well as a seasonal drinks

into their routine. Superfoods’

paired with contemporary

restaurant-richard.de

menu – are on offer to comple-

stores are located at Schlüter-

design.

ment the menu.

strasse, Berlin-Charlottenburg,

COOKIES CREAM

Mitte cookiescream.com

AL CONTADINO SOTTO LE STELLE

Akazienstrasse 3

Italian

tobeefornottobeef.bonita.berlin

­Weinbergsweg and Friedrich-

Passauer Strasse 5–7

strasse in Berlin-Mitte.

Schöneberg brasseriecolette.de

Schöneberg Weinbergsweg 23

Auguststrasse 36 | Mitte

Mitte

alcontadino.eu

superfoodsberlin.com

MINE RESTAURANT

STICKS'N'SUSHI

PANTRY

CHIGAGO WILLIAMS BBQ

Italian

Japanese

International

American

Meinekestrasse 19

Potsdamer Strasse 85

Friedrichstrasse 120

Hannoversche Strasse 2

Charlottenburg

Tiergarten

Mitte

Mitte

minerestaurant.de

sticksnsushi.berlin

pantry-berlin.com

chicagowilliamsbbq.de


83 SALE E TABACCHI Italian Rudi-Dutschke-Strasse 24 Kreuzberg sale-e-tabacchi.de

KATZ ORANGE International Bergstrasse 22 Mitte katzorange.com

GAZZO PIZZA NEW Italian Hobrechtstrasse 57 Neukölln gazzopizza.com

NOBELHART & SCHMUTZIG International Friedrichstrasse 218 Kreuzberg nobelhartundschmutzig.com

FACTORY GIRL

L.A. POKE

THE FLYING MONKEY

LA BONNE FRANQUETTE

International | Deli

Hawaiian

Chinese

French

Auguststrasse 29

Alte Schönhauser Strasse 44

Mitte

Mitte

‘Dim Sum’ = ‘to touch the

‘Manger à la bonne fran-

factorygirl.net

lapokebowls.com

heart’. Taste the finest selec-

quette’ stands for good food

tion of Asian tapas & hand-

without the fuss, in a relaxed

crafted dumplings. The small

atmosphere. The kitchen offers

PRISM NEW

LA MIFA

dishes are perfect for sharing,

mostly traditional dishes from

European & Levantine

International

guests can sample plenty of

the south-west … with classics

Fritschestrasse 48

Storkower Strasse 123

what’s on offer – sharing is

like mussels or ‘steak frites’,

Charlottenburg

Prenzlauer Berg

caring, right? Colourful neon

beef tartare and all sorts of

prismberlin.de

lamifa.de

lights illuminate the black

recipes using duck. The wines

interior, creating an electric,

come from various regions

vibrant atmosphere. With

of France – most of them

DISTRICT MÔT

PAPPA E CICCIA

exquisite drinks and cocktails,

directly. The concept is simple:

Vietnamese

Italian

this is the ideal setting for a

a small selection of freshly pre-

Rosenthaler Strasse 62

Schwedter Strasse 18

night out to remember. The

pared products and good qual-

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

famous ‘Mauerpark’ is within

ity wines. It makes you want to

districtmot.com

pappaeciccia.de

walking distance. Let the

stay just a little bit longer.

lights Dim Sum. Chausseestrasse 110

1000 GRAD

SHISHI NEW

Kastanienallee 15

Mitte

Asian

Mediterranean

Prenzlauer Berg

labonnefranquette.de

Kurfürstendamm 90

Ritterstrasse 12–14

flyingmonkeyberlin.de

Charlottenburg

Kreuzberg

facebook.com/Eintausendgrad/

shishiberlin.de

893 RYOTEI

BENEDICT

KUMAMI

HEIMLICHTREU

Japanese

International | Breakfast

Japanese

International

Kantstrasse 135

Uhlandstrasse 49

Kietzer Strasse 3

Anklamer Strasse 38

Charlottenburg

Charlottenburg

Köpenick

Mitte

893ryotei.de

benedict-breakfast.de

kumamiberlin.com

heimlichtreu.de


84

TISK

GRACE

AKEMI

DAE MON

Traditional Berlin Cuisine

Asian & European

Asian

Open minded cuisine

Neukölln

The cosmopolitan charm of the

AKEMI’s creators have set out

DAE MON, a restaurant charac-

tisk-speisekneipe.de

interior in the style of a New

to deliver delicious, healthy

terised by open-minded cuisine

York townhouse is as captivat-

Asian dishes that delight both

and modern flair, has been situ-

ing as the cuisine, which takes

the body and the soul. Diners

ated between Monbijoupark and

BORCHARDT

its influences from Asian and

can embark on a culinary

the Hackescher Markt S-Bahn

International

European flavours. With a

voyage across the Far East,

station since October 2014. It

Französische Strasse 47

focus on top quality, inter-

particularly by sampling the

started out back then as con-

Mitte

pretations of Wagyu beef and

Chinese, Japanese and Viet-

temporary Korean cuisine; two

borchardt-restaurant.de

Maine lobster have established

namese tapas, which showcase

years ago however the concept

themselves as GRACE classics.

the finest cuisine from each

changed: the restaurant now

The high standard of cuisine

country. Some of the most

offers open-minded cuisine that

NITHAN THAI

is continued in the wine menu,

popular delicacies include

takes its influences from fasci-

Thai

carefully selected by the som-

crispy shrimps with avocado

nating and satisfying combina-

Chausseestrasse 5

melier, which sparkles with

tartare, seaweed salad with

tions from European cuisine

Mitte

rare vintages from across the

sesame oil and marinated

as well as Japanese and Korean

nithanthai.de

world.

pork with honey glaze.

sources. Head Chef Raphael

Kurfürstendamm 25

Rykestrasse 39

menu four times a year, always

TOMMI'S BURGER JOINT

Charlottenburg

Prenzlauer Berg

rising to new culinary heights.

American

grace-berlin.com

facebook.com/akemiberlin

Neckarstrasse 12

Schünemann presents a new

Kurfürstendamm 212

Monbijouplatz 11

Charlottenburg

Mitte

burgerjoint.de

dae-mon.com

THE BIRD BBQ

THE TREE

KOCHU KARU

NANUM

American

Chinese

Korean

Korean

Oderberger Strasse 61

Brunnenstrasse 167

Eberswalder Strasse 35

Lindenstrasse 90

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

Kreuzberg

thebirdbbq.com

fb.me/thetree.berlin

kochukaru.de

nanumberlin.com


85

WORK HARD PLAY HARD

SEEK 10 YEARS OF

15–17 JANUARY 2019 ARENA BERLIN WWW.SEEKEXHIBITIONS.COM

FOLLOW US!


86

NAUTA Nikkei Cuisine Kastanienallee 49 Mitte nautaberlin.com

SETS International | Deli Schlüterstrasse 36 Charlottenburg sets.de

DATA KITCHEN International Rosenthaler Strasse 38 Mitte facebook.com/datakitchenberlin

HOUSE OF SMALL WONDER

NOTO

SPINDLER

LE POPULAIRE NEW

International

Italian | American

International

International

Johannisstrasse 20

Torstrasse 173

Mitte

Mitte

A converted industrial build-

Cuisine meets Art. Enjoy

houseofsmallwonder.de

noto-berlin.com

ing along Kreuzberg’s canal

modern fusion cuisine with a

is home to SPINDLER, a

local and seasonal twist in an

gourmet experience in ­Berlin’s

old Prussian Palais. Please

MOGG

NIGHT KITCHEN BERLIN

most legendary district serv-

your tastebuds with delicious

American | Deli

International

ing up modern European

breakfast, poké bowls, an

Auguststrasse 11 – 13

Oranienburger Strasse 32

cuisine with a French touch.

assorted selection of the best

Mitte

Heckmann-Höfe | Mitte

The seasonal menu is prepared

German cheeses by cheese con-

moggmogg.com

nightkitchenberlin.com

using market-fresh products,

noisseur Fritz Blomeyer and a

with ingredients sourced

range of ­delightful cakes. Ve-

as locally as possible. You’ll

gan ­options are also provided.

QUA PHE

CASSAMBALIS

find the best dry-aged steaks,

Don´t miss the excellent wine

Vietnamese

Greek

wild-caught fish and creative

list or the contemporary art

Max-Beer-Strasse 37

Grolmannstrasse 35

dishes for vegetarians. Enjoy a

exhibition space and concept

Mitte

Charlottenburg

wonderfully relaxed, bohemian

store.

facebook.com/atquaphe

cassambalis.de

atmosphere! Unter den Linden 5 Paul-Lincke-Ufer 42 | 43

Mitte

RYONG

SHISO BURGER

Kreuzberg

koflerkompanie.com/restau-

Vietnamese

Asian Burger

spindler-berlin.de

rants/lepopulaire

Torstrasse 59

Auguststrasse 29c

Mitte

Mitte

ryong.de

shisoburger.de

GÄRTNEREI

ROY & PRIS

LOKAL

EINSUNTERNULL

International

Chinese

International

German | Fine Dining

Torstrasse 179

Weinbergsweg 8a

Linienstrasse 160

Hannoversche Strasse 1

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

gaertnerei-berlin.com

royandpris.com

lokal-berlin.blogspot.com

einsunternull.com


BESUCHE UNS AUF DER H7-K 03

„FASHION CHANGES, BUT STYLE ENDURES.“ Coco Chanel


DRINKING

88

BAR MILANO

FREUNDSCHAFT NEW

Brunnenstrasse 11

Mittelstrasse 1

Mitte

Mitte

barmilanoberlin.com

fb.me/bar.Freundschaft

KATER BLAU

KLUNKERKRANICH

Holzmarktstrasse 25

Karl-Marx-Strasse 66

Friedrichshain

Neukölln

katerblau.de

klunkerkranich.de

TIER

BAR TAUSEND

Weserstrasse 42

Schiffbauerdamm 11

Neukölln

Mitte

tier.bar

tausendberlin.com

PARIS BAR

DRAYTON BAR

Kantstrasse 152

Behrenstrasse 55

Charlottenburg

Mitte

parisbar.net

draytonberlin.com

GRETCHEN

THE BARN NEW

Obentrautstrasse 19–21

Weinhaus Hut | Alte Potsdamer

Kreuzberg

Strasse 5 | Tiergarten

gretchen-club.de

thebarn.de

CRACKERS

TIGER BAR

Friedrichstrasse 158

Potsdamer Strasse 91

Mitte

Tiergarten

crackersberlin.com

oh-panama.com/de/tiger_bar


89

SHARLIE CHEEN

PRINZIPAL

BRICKS

Torstrasse 1 | Prenzlauer Berg

Since its opening, the ­SHARLIE

PRINZIPAL is fundamental.

Situated beneath the

sohohouseberlin.com

CHEEN bar on Rosenthaler

Fundamentally unpredict-

luxurious Hilton Hotel at

Platz has been a real crowd mag-

able, fundamentally amorous

­Gendarmenmarkt, this club

net. The international cli­entele

and fundamentally different to

certainly feels right at home

PALSTA NEW

are bowled over by the quality

everything you’ve seen before

in Berlin, a city bursting

Oderstrasse 52

drinks on offer. Clean lines with

in bars and clubs. Dive in –

with contrast. Opened in

Neukölln

extravagant elements, such as

into a breathtaking, electri-

November 2015, the venue

fb.me/palstawinebar

a ceiling construction found

fying and fairytale world.

was designed and realised by

nowhere else in the world and a

Tue–Sat 20.00–open end,

the world-famous architects

back bar that beautifully frames

T­h u & Sat: Burlesque Show

at studio karhard. A purist,

SOHO HOUSE BERLIN Private Members Club

MELODY NELSON

250 spirits, complete the venue’s

Novalisstrasse 2

interior look. The ­Berliner

Oranienstrasse 178

design details in a progres-

Mitte

Klebebande art collective has

Kreuzberg

sive yet casual atmosphere.

melodynelson.de

even embellished the walls with a

prinzipal-kreuzberg.com

urban feel meets industrial

permanent tape mapping instal-

Mohrenstrasse 30

lation that is unique in Berlin.

Mitte

VICTORIA BAR

bricks-berlin.club

Potsdamer Strasse 102

Brunnenstrasse 196

Tiergarten

Mitte

victoriabar.de

sharliecheenbar.berlin

HOLZMARKT

BON BON

HOUSE OF WEEKEND

PAULY SAAL BAR

Holzmarktstrasse 25

Torstrasse 133

Alexanderstrasse 7

Auguststrasse 11–13

Friedrichshain

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

holzmarkt.com

bonbonbar.de

houseofweekend.berlin

paulysaal.com

BAR 3

TWINPIGS

TRAUMA

MONKEY BAR

Weydingerstrasse 20

Boddinstrasse 57a

Heidestrasse 50

Budapester Strasse 40

Mitte

Neukölln

Tiergarten

Charlottenburg

fb.me/twinpigsbar

traumabarundkino.de

monkeybarberlin.de


90

BRAVO BAR Torstrasse 230 Mitte fb.me/bravobar

GQ BAR Patrick Hellmann Schlosshotel Brahmsstrasse 10 | Zehlendorf gqbar.de

MR. SUSAN NEW Krausnickstrasse 1 Mitte fb.me/hellomrsusan

FAHIMI BAR Skalitzer Strasse 133 Kreuzberg fahimibar.de

SOLAR

NO FIRE NO GLORY

Neukölln

SOLAR has been Berlin's

NO FIRE NO GLORY: special-

ae-neukoelln.de

­viewing platform for creatives

ity coffee and the best breakfast

and visionaries since 2005.

in Prenzlauer Berg. Our cof-

The menu presents outstand-

fee has to be mature, hand-

VELVET

Ä

Ganghoferstrasse 1

Weserstrasse 40

Neukölln velvet-bar-berlin.de

PRINCE CHARLES

BAR SAINT JEAN

ing classics and fresh crea-

harvested and directly traded.

Prinzenstrasse 85f

Steinstrasse 21

tions with regional ingredients

It is roasted in small drum

Kreuzberg

Mitte

from mostly organic sources.

roasters by micro-­r oasters.

princecharlesberlin.com

barsaintjean.com

SOLAR offers enjoyment for

In our cappuccino we use

all the senses. An insider's tip:

Demeter organic milk from

awaiting you just one flight up

the eco-village of Brodowin;

KIM BAR

OHM

the spiral staircase, on the 17th

all cakes are home-made; and

Brunnenstrasse 10

Köpenicker Strasse 70

floor, is the Sky Lounge with

we offer brunch with avo-toast,

Mitte

Kreuzberg

its spectacular 270° view. Art

eggs Benedict and pancakes

kim-bar.com

ohmberlin.com

and design spread across three

until 4pm.

floors – from Berlin's only DJ elevator through to urban art.

Rykestrasse 45

SAPHIRE BAR

GEIST IM GLAS

Bötzowstrasse 108

Lenaustrasse 27

Stresemannstrasse 76

Prenzlauer Berg

Neukölln

Kreuzberg

saphirebar.de

fb.me/geistimglas

solarberlin.com

60 HERTZ

BASALT

SALON ZUR WILDEN RENATE

WÜRGEENGEL

Waldemarstrasse 11

Utrechter Strasse 38

Alt Stralau 70

Dresdener Strasse 122

Kreuzberg

Wedding

Friedrichshain

Kreuzberg

60hz.berlin

fb.me/pg/basaltberlin

renate.cc

wuergeengel.de

REINGOLD

BAR ZENTRAL

SORSI E MORSI

THE GRAND

Novalisstrasse 11

Lotte-Lenya-Bogen 551

Marienburger Strasse 10

Hirtenstrasse 4

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

reingold.de

barzentral.de

sorsiemorsi.de

the-grand-berlin.com

Prenzlauer Berg nofirenoglory.de


SPORTSWEAR

®

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SLEEPING

92

MICHELBERGER HOTEL

LULU GULDSMEDEN

Warschauer Strasse 39–40

Potsdamer Strasse 67

Friedrichshain

Tiergarten

michelbergerhotel.com

guldsmedenhotels.com

HOTEL THE YARD

THE WEINMEISTER

Alexandrinenstrasse 125

Weinmeisterstrasse 2

Kreuzberg

Mitte

hotel-theyard.berlin

the-weinmeister.com

SIR SAVIGNY

MAX BROWN KU'DAMM

Kantstrasse 144

Uhlandstrasse 49

Charlottenburg

Wilmersdorf

sirhotels.com

maxbrownhotels.com

LUX 11

HOTEL ZOO

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 9–13

Kurfürstendamm 25

Mitte

Charlottenburg

lux-eleven.com

hotelzoo.de

CROWNE PLAZA BERLIN Hallesche Strasse 10

TITANIC GENDARMENMARKT BERLIN

Mitte

Französische Strasse 30 | Mitte

ihg.com

titanic.com.tr

SOHO HOUSE BERLIN

25HOURS HOTEL BIKINI BERLIN

Torstrasse 1

Budapester Strasse 40

Prenzlauer Berg

Charlottenburg

sohohouseberlin.com

25hours-hotels.com


Freitag passiert’s. Intensive Reportagen, anspruchsvolle Fotostrecken, ßberraschende Essays und Kolumnen: Das SZ-Magazin hat eine Wirkung, der sich niemand entziehen kann. Am 22. Februar 2019 erscheint das MODE-Special des SZ-Magazins.

Weitere Informationen und Mediadaten unter: sz-media.de/sz-magazin.


94

CATALONIA

TAUTES HEIM

Köpenicker Strasse 80–82

GRIMM’S HOTEL AT POTSDAMER PLATZ

ORANIA.BERLIN

Mitte

Situated in Bruno Taut’s

cataloniaberlinmitte.com

­‘Hufeisensiedlung’ (built in

Located in the heart of the park

ORANIA.BERLIN, Berlin’s first restaurant & bar with 41

1925–30), TAUT’S HOME is

at Gleisdreieck is the elegant

homely rooms. Directly located

suitable for up to four guests.

and urban 3-star Superior

in edgy Kreuzberg, the restau-

HOTEL BRISTOL BERLIN

All furnishings are either

GRIMM’S HOTEL, only 5 min-

rant has a cosy fireplace and

Kurfürstendamm 27

hand-picked originals or

utes’ walk from ­PREMIUM.

open kitchen. With it’s famous

Charlottenburg

made to measure from vintage

Individually designed, fairytale-

signature dish ‚Xberg Peking

bristolberlin.com

1930s models. This is probably

like motifs form a unique

Duck‘, the restaurant stands

the closest you can get to the

symbiosis with modern design.

out in Berlin’s gastronomic

spirit of emergent Modernism

Fairytale dreams come true

scene. The interior design of

SO/ BERLIN DAS STUE

in Berlin. The accommodation

here, thanks to the 110 rooms,

the boutique hotel, restaurant

Drakestrasse 1

offers all the modern amenities

including six imperial suites; an

& bar reflects local craftsman-

Tiergarten

with the character of a museum.

exclusive fitness area and sauna

ship as well as casual elegance.

das-stue.com

TAUT’S HOME is design history

with roof terrace; as well as the

The perfect spot to jump into

brought to life: it’s like going

in-house restaurant with direct

Berlin Fashion Week!

back in time!

access to the park.

tautes-heim.de

Flottwellstrasse 45

Kreuzberg

Schöneberg

Kreuzberg

orania.berlin

ellington-hotel.com

grimms-hotel.de

ELLINGTON HOTEL BERLIN Nürnberger Strasse 50–55

Oranienstrasse 40

GORKI APARTMENTS

HOTEL AM STEINPLATZ

PROVOCATEUR

HOTEL PENSION FUNK

Weinbergsweg 25

Steinplatz 4

Brandenburgische Strasse 21

Fasanenstrasse 69

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Charlottenburg

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hotelsteinplatz.com

provocateur-hotel.com

hotel-pensionfunk.de

HENRI

HOTEL AMANO

HAMPTON BY HILTON

HOTEL ROSSI

Meinekestrasse 9

Auguststrasse 43

Otto-Braun-Strasse 69

Lehrter Strasse 66

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Mitte

Tiergarten

henri-hotels.com

amanogroup.de

hiltonhotels.de

hotel-rossi.de


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Seven decades Seven icons Der Heavy Rugger ist längst vom klassischen Rugbyshirt in die KÜnigsklasse moderner amerikanischer Sportswear aufgestiegen.

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BERLIN FASHION WEEK MAGAZINE #27  

Twice a year, the BERLIN FASHION WEEK MAGAZINE guides all the international visitors of Berlin Fashion Week through one of the most desired...

BERLIN FASHION WEEK MAGAZINE #27  

Twice a year, the BERLIN FASHION WEEK MAGAZINE guides all the international visitors of Berlin Fashion Week through one of the most desired...

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