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SPRING / SUMMER 2018   REFERENCE STUDIOS – MUMI HAIATI & HIS BERLIN TRIBE D E S I G N E R F O R T O M O R R O W AW A R D – S T E L L A M C C A R T N E Y D O E S I T A G A I N H I G H S N O B I E T Y C E O D AV I D F I S C H E R TA L K S S T R E E T W E A R / A T R I B U T E T O GIANNI VE RSACE  / BE RLIN FOOD E XPE RIE NCE – THE WORLD IN A BOWL

Berlin Fashion Week Magazine #24


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WELCOME

Message from the Governing Mayor of Berlin Michael Müller

Fashion Week is one of Berlin’s trademarks as a fashion capital. Exciting new collections and the latest trends are presented here, while Berlin time and again proves to be the consummate meeting place for buyers, industry professionals, journalists and fashion ­lovers from all over the world. The latest industry developments are scrutinised here by a knowledgeable international audience. Years ago, almost no one would have predicted that Fashion Week would someday be a major platform for the fashion world. Since its

inception, however, Fashion Week has evolved to become a compelling showcase for designers from around the globe and for both young and established labels. In that sense, the fashion industry offers more proof of the pervasive spirit of entrepreneurship that spurs our city’s economic development. On that note, welcome to Berlin Fashion Week! I would like to wish all of our visitors an exciting time along the runway, as well as memorable encounters at all of the shows and while exploring our vibrant city.

© Senatskanzlei/Martin Becker

Imprint PUBLISHER

CONTRIBUTORS

COVER

ADVERTISING

Anita Tillmann | Dr. Florian Bachelin

Chris Danforth | Violet Kiani

Photographer: Maxime Ballesteros

Advertising Director | Marco Gröning

Jörg Arntz

Tina Molin | Till Schröder

www.maximeballesteros.com

Junior Advertising Manager | Hauke Krüger

Janine Dudenhöffer | Katrice Dustin

Berlin Tribe: Mumi Haiati & Friends

PREMIUM E XHIBITIONS GMBH

Berit Großwendt – Room 26

Luckenwalder Strasse 4–6 | 10963 Berlin

Barbara Stummer – Room 26

+49 (0)30 62 90 850

PRINTING ART DIRECTION

Wagemann Medien GmbH

Sonnenstaub – Büro für Gestaltung

Leuschnerdamm 31 | 10999 Berlin

magazine@berlinfashionweek.com

TR ANSL ATION

und Illustration

+49 (0)30 62 73 52 30

www.berlinfashionweek.com

Nivene Raafat

Sonja Marterner | Peter Großöhme

info@wagemann-medien.de

Greifswalder Strasse 29 | 10405 Berlin

www.wagemann-medien.de

EDITORIAL

CIT Y GUIDE

+49 (0)30 55 57 79 29 0

Editor-in-Chief | Christine Zeine

Lena Brombacher

hallo@sonnenstaub.com

Managing Editor | Lena Brombacher

www.sonnenstaub.com


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ECONOMY

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P O W E R O

F

M A N Y


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ECONOMY

Berlin: just a place full of penniless creatives, right? Hype envy – there’s plenty going around. Reality tells a different story. For some time now, profitable ­fashion brands have also been a common sight along the Spree. A glance at the figures confirms the enormous economic surge of an intrinsically global industry. ­Fashion generates over € 2 trillion worldwide. If fashion were its own country, it would have the seventh-largest economy in the world with annual growth rates of five percent. That’s according to recent calculations released by industry insiders The Business of Fashion and McKinsey. In Germany, fashion produces over € 31 billion in revenue, € 4.2 billion of which is generated by 2,500 Berlin-based companies employing 24,000 people. It ranks first among the country’s cities. German brands may not be setting the catwalks ablaze just yet – but they do dominate entire market segments. ­ ­ Adidas, Hugo Boss, C&A, Escada, Jil Sander and s.Oliver are titans of the medium price bracket. In 2015 Adidas managed to generate as much turnover on its own as Chanel, Prada and Dior combined. Each year Berlin Fashion Week attracts over 200,000 guests, who, in turn, bring more than € 120 million into the city each season. Most recently, exhibitors have generated income totalling over € 73 million, pushing Berlin up to No.  3 on the 2016 global ranking of fashion trade shows (ahead of Paris and Milan). At PREMIUM GROUP shows alone, which feature over 1,800 brands, 70 percent of exhibitors come from outside Germany, which helps explain why ­Berlin regularly pops up in top 10 lists of the world’s most popular fashion cities.

© Jay Wennington

Admittedly, things are different in ­Berlin than in London, New York and Tokyo. Here wages are lower; consumers are a little more frugal with their money in this metropolis of individualists. Berlin takes a more experimental,

relaxed approach – more conventional brands flourish elsewhere. Fresh ideas are therefore vital. Berlin presides over the country’s highest concentration of fashion schools, with ten institutes producing 300 graduates every year, and the highest density of ateliers, with well over 1,600 studios. Then there’s the Fashion Council Germany, who bring together expertise and talent from across the land. A digital catalyst, Berlin is constantly pushing the full gamut of fashion tech, with blogger conferences, co-working incubators and start-ups like The Factory and re:publica. Its core concepts, such as upcycling, wearables and smart recycling, will find fertile ground here. And Zalando is building a multi-million-euro headquarters in Berlin – its second. The city is buzzing in countless niche areas. And herein lies its strength: the power of many. Politicians have sussed it out. Brigitte Zypries will be the first Federal Minister for Economic Affairs and Energy to visit Berlin Fashion Week. In the last decade, Berlin has invested € 10 million in the city’s fashion industry. Paris plans to top its sector up to the tune of € 57 million by 2020. In this age of the World Wide Web and social media, fashion is global – and available 24/7. A good idea is now worth twice or thrice as much. To use Berlin’s eternal motto: Da kiekste, wa! (Or ‘Not too bad, huh?’ to those new to the local lingo.)

Brigitte Zypries, Federal Minister for Economic ­A ffairs and Energy, will open the PREMIUM trade show at the start of Berlin Fashion Week. The event will take place in two ­stages. After being given a presentation by the Fashion Council ­G ermany on various steps in place to promote fresh talent, the minister will be given a guided tour of the PREMIUM show led by the management team.

4 July 2017, 11:00–11:45 Fashion Council Germany reception by invitation only

4 July 2017, 11:45–12:30 PREMIUM guided tour through the exhibition halls / by invitation only


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RADAR

Ooho! – water you can eat London start-up Skipping Rocks Lab has created edible packaging for liquids. The Ooho! water bubble is inspired by molecular cuisine. A technique known as ‘spherification’ is used to shape water into a sphere. Brown algae extract and calcium chloride form a gel-like structure that acts as a stretchy membrane. A second membrane is used as hygienic packaging. Remove it and the remaining sphere is 100 % edible. You can either pop it in your mouth or carefully bite into it and drink the liquid inside. The non-edible membrane will biodegrade after four to six weeks.

R ADAR Spectacles – cameraequipped sunglasses

Snap’s camera sunglasses are one of America’s most sought-after gadgets. Instead of just keeping track of your filming exploits via your smartphone screen, you can now watch and record what’s happening directly in front of you simply by touching a button on your shades. The integrated camera films the event from the wearer’s perspective with a 115-degree wideangle lens and a microphone. To avoid any data protection issues, the sunglasses feature in-built LED lights that flash while the ten se­ cond film is being recorded. www.spectacles.com

Grohe Sense – the intelligent water sensor If your washing machine suddenly springs a leak, a few drips needn’t mean a full-on flood thanks to Grohe’s latest smart home innovation. Grohe Sense is an intelligent water sensor that detects leaks in your home. As soon as the sensor comes into contact with water, Grohe Sense emits a beeping sound and a flashing red light, and also sends an alert to your smartphone via the ­Grohe Ondus app. www.grohe.de

Rei Kawakubo/ Comme des Garçons – Art of the In-Between A new fashion publication is selling fast – one that is being lauded as a real collector’s item. The book in question is the catalogue accompanying the Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons exhibition ‘Art of the In-Between’ currently on show in New York. It features around 140 of Kawakubo’s womenswear creations for Comme des Garçons, ranging from the early 1980s to her latest collection. The exhibition is running until 4 September and is a must for anyone in New York. If you can't manage to see it in person, at least be sure to get the book! You can order it online. www.metmuseum.org

Rei Kawakubo below © Paolo Roversi, Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art / above © Craig McDean, Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

www.skippingrockslab.com


SERIE 9000 | WASCHMASCHINEN MIT SOFTWATER-TECHNOLOGIE

DER BESCHÜTZER DES KLEINEN SCHWARZEN Farben, so kräftig wie am ersten Tag. Als erste Waschmaschinen überhaupt enthärten die Geräte der Serie 9000 von AEG das Wasser, bevor es in die Trommel gelangt. Jedes Kleidungsstück wird so schonend und gründlich gereinigt – selbst bei niedrigen Temperaturen. Das Resultat: Form und Qualität bleiben bestehen und Farben behalten auch nach vielen Wäschen ihre Intensität. Erfahren Sie mehr auf www.aeg.de/softwater


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THE BER


RLIN TRIBE


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COVER STORY

ULTR A CONTEM POR ARY Text by KATRICE DUSTIN Photos by MAXIME BALLESTEROS

Reference Studios, the former Bureau Haiati, is leading the way to a new era of cross-platform public relations, with an international network of clients, friends and collaborators from every corner of the globe. Representing carefully-selected labels and companies such as Ottolinger, Grindr, Faith Connexion and Slam Jam, the Berlin-based communications agency is at the centre of counter-culture, aiming to bridge the gap between the traditional and the conceptual, all while keeping the people that surround them at the heart of everything they do. Here, we meet the team at Reference Studios along with their tribe of visionaries, to find out what makes them tick and why they’re proud to call this place home.


MUMI HAIATI Founder Reference Studios

Mumi Haiati has become an instantly recognisable face within the international fashion community. After a decade spent climbing the industry ladder in New York, London, Paris and Barcelona, he seized the opportunity to create an international communications platform based in Berlin, and thus in 2014 Bureau Haiati (now Reference Studios) was born. With an ultra-contemporary touch that is devoid of ‘PR clichés’ and more reminiscent of curation, this Persian-born, Düsseldorf-bred maverick has successfully paved the way for a forwardthinking approach to fashion public relations that feels, ultimately, at one with the zeitgeist. How did you get started in PR? Back in the day, I started out interning at Totem. At that time, they handled PR for some of my favourite designers, like Raf Simons and Walter Van Beirendonck.

Have you always wanted to work in fashion? I’ve always had a strong affinity for fashion, but at first I actually wanted to become an actor. I got accepted by an elite acting school and moved to the UK. When I moved to London, I started hanging out with all sorts of inspiring people and realised that my place was in fashion.

Why did you start your agency in Berlin, as opposed to somewhere like Paris or London? I felt a need to create a platform with an international voice based here in Berlin. It’s a city of free spirits that offers people a generous amount of space to grow. In our unpredictable world, I think this is much needed. Berlin is also the creative hub of Europe these days, which is why we believe it's so relevant. There’s so much more to come from this city – this is only the beginning.

Why the name change from Bureau Haiati to Reference Studios? Reference Studios is the new chapter of Bureau Haiati. Since we’ve now established a truly international reach, it’s time for us to branch out into different ­ avenues

and set the tone for a new stage of creative exchange and expression. We have a very exciting cultural project on the horizon. Keep an eye on us and you’ll find out very soon!

What makes the people you are surrounded by so special? Each of these individuals is beautifully unique in their own right, with a powerful point of view on the world. I am very proud of how our ‘tribe’ challenges the status quo and gracefully breaks racial, gender and social norms. One common thread connects us: our collective values of honest self expression and non-conformity, as well as our respect & appreciation for each other.

Where are some of your favourite places in Berlin? I love Kantstrasse in Charlottenburg, where our office and showroom is located. It’s so culturally diverse – Russians, Persians, Chinese, Germans … And my absolute favourite is Paris Bar. I also love Kreuzberg, it's still the spirit of Berlin to me.

Who are some of your inspirations? My mum and dad, Elsa Klensch from CNN Style and Aaliyah, of course!

What is the best advice you’ve ever been given? I’m a ‘give advice’, not a ‘take advice’ kinda gal.

@mumihaiati @bureauhaiati


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COVER STORY

MARC GOEHRING Stylist & Fashion Editor 032c Magazine

Hailing from Bavaria, Marc Goehring is a stylist, editor and consultant with a distinct, directional and irreverent approach to aestheticism – blending the ideals of traditional, luxury fashion with the attitude and exuberance of the social media age. It’s this unique vision that Marc continues to implement in his work as a stylist, and as Fashion Editor for 032c Magazine.

What is your favourite piece of clothing? Right now, an amazing pink vintage Hawaiian shirt that my boyfriend, Mumi [Haiati], got for me in Ibiza (#shoutout best husband).

What’s the best way to spend a day off in Berlin? On the boat with friends, iced tea & cigarettes.

Current favourite song? Not my current, but my all-time favourite: Rammstein – Roter Sand.

@marcgoehring


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COVER STORY

MARCO HALBINGER Reference Studios

Munich-born Marco Halbinger moved to Berlin two years ago after founding his own clothing label, Naviiv, and working for Mercedes-Benz, as well as high-fashion concept store Pool in Munich. These days he runs the showroom at Reference Studios and uses his myriad of professional experiences to interact with the international fashion pack.

NADIA KANAAN

Reference Studios

What’s the best thing about what you do? Communicating with people and creating and implementing concepts. And of course, the fashion!

What do you love about Berlin? Coming to Berlin was the best decision of my life. It’s so multifaceted and free. I love waking up here every day.

What is your daily uniform? I like it comfortable and a bit messy. Jogging pants, sneakers and oversized everything. I also love Prada. Just please, no avant-garde!

Nadia Kanaan considers herself a facilitator; connecting people with opportunities, projects and each other. Having lived on three different continents, the Jordanian-born former New Yorker has worked in PR for Adidas alongside gigs writing and coding, until making the move to Berlin to join Reference Studios upon its conception. What is the best thing about working in fashion? The friendships I’ve made are everything! And when all the stars are aligned, it doesn’t even feel like work anymore.

Tell us about the different cities you’ve lived in? I was born in Jordan and grew up in Saudi Arabia, which a lot of people are equally fascinated and confused by. It’s cool though, I can tell people I ride camels and they believe it. I went to college in Montreal – a super-creative city similar to Berlin. Then I did the corporate world in New York, which taught me how to deal with all kinds of situations.

What are your style inspirations? 1990s/2000s, dystopian films, Gwen Stefani and my husband Khaled [Elsayed]!

What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given? Love life and it'll love you back.

Best thing about living in Berlin? Endless nature!

@lem0nadia

What song best describes your life right now? Kodak Black feat. Future – Conscience

Best advice you've ever been given? Nothing comes from nothing.

@marco_halbinger


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COVER STORY

SIMON KAISER

Trade Berlin – Reference Studios Armed with wisdom beyond his years, the 22-year-old DJ, producer and all-round wunderkind behind Trade at OHM is making his foray into the fashion world. After visiting his older brother in Berlin at age 15, Simon Kaiser made the bold move from his hometown of Freiburg and has since made it his mission to create fun, safe and inclusive spaces while introducing diverse talent to the city’s nightlife scene. What is Trade? Trade is my bi-monthly party at OHM Berlin that started in September 2015. It's about introducing new artists and different styles of music – not just house and techno.

KATRICE DUSTIN

You’ve recently started working with Reference Studios – what is the most exciting thing about navigating the crosssection between music and fashion? With Reference Studios, I do event coordination and a little PR. The intersection is exciting because the ­fashion industry has started catching up with the music that people are listening to right now.

Reference Studios

What is the best thing about living in Berlin? I still feel like I can redefine myself whenever I want.

Who are you most excited by in the music world right now? Bill Kouligas, who runs the label PAN. He’s done countless amazing projects.

Favourite summer jam? Merca Luv – Merca Bae

@simonxkaiser @tradeberlin

Joining the Reference Studios team in 2017, this 26-year-old writer by trade is now navigating the world of fashion PR. After forming her roots in the Canadian prairies surrounded by mountains, Katrice Dustin spent the last few years working as a fashion journalist, flitting between London and Vancouver. Nowadays, she calls Berlin her home and has no plans to change that. What do you love most about what you do? Constantly learning, meeting inspiring people and making magic happen. I feel really lucky!

How did you get into fashion? I moved to London at 21, where I spent three years working in fashion and writing freelance. Then I decided I wanted to start writing more creatively, but I still wanted to be part of that world. Now I think I’ve finally found the perfect balance.

Best thing about living in Berlin? Pink sunsets, amazing friends and delicious food every­ where!

Favourite book? ‘Venus in Furs’ by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch.

What are your style inspirations? Bond girls, Fassbinder films, my mother and Prada everything.

Summer plans? Working hard, having fun, and finishing my book!

Words to live by? Don’t let nobody steal your magic.

@katriceduh


COVER STORY

LARISSA HOFMANN Model

Five years ago, Bavarian-born model Larissa Hofmann was studying art in Berlin before getting scouted and moving to Paris. Since then, the 25-year-old has lived in and travelled to countless cities around the globe, including Sydney, ­London and New York. Fast-forward to 2017 and, between taking part in shoots for international fashion magazines such as 032c, Vogue and Elle, Larissa can be found at her East London home, enjoying her garden and following her passions through countless art and photography projects. What is the best thing about your job? The people I've met during my travels. I’ve also learned a lot, and really come to know myself.

Can you tell us a bit about what you do outside of modelling? I took a break from modelling last October. After four years of non-stop work without a day off I needed to find balance and make time to do things I want. Since then I’ve taken pictures for AnOther Magazine, worked on a project for Dover Street Market x The National Portrait Gallery, and had a show in Los Angeles with my drawings.

Where are your favourite places you’ve travelled to so far? Iceland, La Digue (Seychelles), Koufonisia (Greece), Berlin, Jamaica and the South of France.

How do you spend your days off? When not working I’m at the park, playing tennis or reading in the sun.

What is your favourite thing about coming to Berlin? MY FRIENDS. MUSIC. FREEDOM.

@larryhofmann

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JAN QUAMMIE Fashion Director InStyle Germany

As Fashion Director at Instyle Germany, Munich-based Jan Quammie believes that fashion is a form of art. After working as Senior Buyer for Net-a-Porter in Shanghai, and as Senior Fashion Stylist at MyTheresa.com, this New York-born editor can be found sporting envy-inducing ensembles at fashion week events around the globe, with a playful, colourful style that directly reflects her magnetic personality and enthusiasm for life.

What are your style inspirations? I'm inspired by anything that feels effortless, not trendy.

Best places in the world to shop? Vintage Stores, Dover Street Market and Voo Store in Berlin.

What’s the best way to spend a night off? A nice dinner with loved ones, perhaps a cocktail at my favourite bar, then in bed before midnight.

What’s your favourite thing about coming to Berlin? I like that Berlin seems to be its own little world that just so happens to be in Germany. There's a lot of inspiration here – it feels endless and always feels like home.

What’s your favourite summer song? Frank Ocean – American Wedding

@jan.quammie


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COVER STORY

JEN GILPIN

Designer – DSTM Jen Gilpin is the Canadian designer behind luxury lingerie and swimwear brand DSTM (Don’t Shoot The Messenger). With its signature use of luxurious yet eco-friendly fabrics the label has become a well-known name in Berlin’s fashion landscape. When she’s not in her studio (conveniently located behind her shop on Tortrasse) Jen can be found travelling to never-before-seen places and escaping into her imagination for inspiration. Where did you grow up? I was born and raised in Edmonton, Canada to a family of scientists.

How did DSTM come about? After I moved to Berlin in 2008, I made the decision to start a label. I’ve always loved lingerie and so DSTM was born in 2010.

JOHANNES CHRISTIAN SCHÖN

Bocci – Omer Arbel Office

How did you get started in fashion design? At a young age my grandmother introduced me to crafts while my mother taught me how to sew. From then on I’ve never stopped making things.

What is your favourite thing about your job? I love making people happy. It’s a great feeling when someone feels amazing and loves themselves in the clothing I make.

What inspires you the most? Inspiration is everywhere, in everything.

@dstm_

Hailing from Bielefeld, north-west Germany, Johannes Christian Schön has spent the past decade traversing through various positions in the art and design worlds, including working with Victoria Miro in London, KW Institute, Esther Schipper, Maurizio Cattelan and Massimiliano Gioni. He now oversees communications at both the Omer Arbel Office and Canadian luxury design company, Bocci, where he continues to build bridges connecting the world with the international design community. What is the best thing about your job? So many things. Recent projects, like Omer’s installation at London’s Barbican Centre, or our Bocci x Neue­ House NY collaboration, both gave me the chance to build relationships with inspiring people across the world.

What does your average day look like? My workdays are spontaneous and eventful. I generally avoid routine – it’s the best way to stay curious! Days off consist of trying to catch up on my book pile and walking my Dachshund, Brutus.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Berlin? There are many versions of Berlin that I am interested in. It’s the different pockets of people who shape and define the city.

Favourite restaurant in Berlin? Vietnamese Brasserie Madame Ngo for lunch and ­Paris Bar for conversation.

If you moved from Berlin, where else would you like to live? New York! It has an energy and vibrancy that makes it like nowhere else in the world.

@johannesschoen


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COVER STORY

CHRISTA BÖSCH AND COSIMA GADIENT Designers – Ottolinger

Christa Bösch and Cosima Gadient have seen their label, Ottolinger, grow tremendously in the last few years. After showing at fashion week events in New York and Paris, the Swiss design duo have made a name for themselves as creators of aesthetic taste, both in their adopted home of Berlin and within the international fashion community. Through their use of innovative tailoring, deconstructionist techniques and integration of unexpected materials, Christa and Cosima aim to create a world of their own, one that speaks to the current state of fashion with a sharp, yet nonchalant sense of humour.

KHALED ELSAYED

Where did you grow up? Basel and Stein in Switzerland [respectively].

What does your average day look like? Usually, we’ll get up at 7, start work at 9 and leave work at 7. But, in reality, every day is different. That’s what we like about what we do!

DJ

What’s the best thing about living in Berlin? There is always something going on but you can still maintain a healthy work routine. Also, Berlin just offers a lot of space – literally and figuratively.

Favourite city in the world? We’ve never been there, but lately we find ourselves dreaming about Seoul. The unseen always seems tempting.

What inspires you the most? Just walking around the city.

@ottolinger1000

After years of music-making and DJing in his native B ­ rooklyn, NYC, Khaled Elsayed – aka Abu Ashley – has settled in B ­ erlin, and finds himself striking a balance between engineering school, dreaming about synthesizers and hosting his monthly show, ‘YALLA!’, on Berlin Community Radio. How did you get started in music? I got sick of iPod parties in college so I learned how to DJ.

How does Berlin compare to somewhere like New York? Berlin is pretty similar to 90s Brooklyn – just instead of a large Black and Latino community it’s got the Arab and Turkish community.

Why did you come to Berlin? Because NYC is dead.

What does your average day look like? I spend my days at the Technical University of Berlin attempting to solve the world’s problems.

What’s something new you have learned being in Berlin? I learned German!

What’s your favourite thing to do on a day off? Hang out with my wife, Nadia [Kanaan], and gossip.

@abu_ashley


COVER STORY

LYRA

Musician Performance Artist

Before moving to Berlin in 2013, musician and performance artist Lyra spent four years studying classical music in upstate New York. These days she can be found performing around Europe, writing new songs, and programming events for Berlinbased creative music software company Ableton. For her, Berlin is the perfect balance between a big city and a small town – offering space to grow but still keeping up with a pace that feels exciting. What do you love most about what you do? Everything I do is connected to my creative passions and sense of community. I feel really lucky to have my life – I don’t take it for granted!

Who are your favourite artists working now? I adore Elysia Crampton – she is such a powerful voice. And Kendrick Lamar's latest album is amazing. In visual art, I think my friend Donna Huanca is doing monumental, beautiful work.

What is the best thing about Berlin? In Berlin, I gained access to self-expression that I never expected to find in my 20s. This ability to redefine who you can be and what society can be is just incredible.

Where do you go to gain creative inspiration? My home has always been a sanctuary for discovery. I also enjoy spending time at parks and forests around the city.

What is your current favourite song? Migos — Kelly Price.

@lyra____

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COVER STORY

CELIA SOLF

Creative Consultant The Store @ Soho House Berlin Celia Solf has lived in countless cities around the world, including New York, Montreal, Cape Town and Paris. With a dynamic background in art, styling and buying, Celia now heads up creative consulting at The Store, Soho House Berlin. How did you start working for The Store? I landed in Berlin in 2008, where I worked for a gallery, then managed some stores and brands. I started to consult in 2014 when the owner of the Vinyl Factory, who also owns the Soho House building in Berlin, contacted me to support their new project, The Store.

ROBERT GRUNENBERG Art Historian

What does your average day look like? Working, looking at art, seeing my great friends and laughing in order to stay happy & healthy.

What is the best thing about what you do? I’m always surrounded by creative people in fashion, design, art, music and more. It’s never boring – I’m thankful for that!

Where is your favourite place to escape to for a weekend? The countryside, I love nature. I also love Tbilisi and the Georgian mountains around the city.

Favourite piece of artwork? So many. The latest I bought are three artworks from a series of 171 from ‘Rituale Des Verschwindens’ (‘Rituals Of Disappearing’) which have been on show in the entrance hall in Berghain since 2004.

Best thing about living in Berlin? When I first came to Berlin I wasn’t sure how long I would stay, but now I love it so much. A lot has happened since then! One day I’d love to write about it all.

@celiasolf

With an impressive CV that counts many lucrative roles in the art world, including with MoMA PS1 in New York and as Art Editor for acclaimed publications L’Officiel and Numéro, Frankfurt-born art historian Robert Grunenberg has made his home in Berlin. Throughout his career, this published author, former model and all-round polymath has worked with the likes of Jeff Koons, Juergen Teller and Hans Ulrich Obrist and has published projects for 032c and SSENSE. While travelling the globe and revelling in the power of knowledge, Robert remains grounded and believes that the true spirit of Berlin can still be found on the dance floor. Who is your favourite artist these days? I’m currently trying to see as much artwork as possible by Belgian artist Marcel Broodthaers. He was a true poet, yet he shows a strongly conceptualised way of thinking.

What makes Berlin a great place to be? Berlin is the only metropolis in Europe that feels like a utopia. It attracts people who still believe in changing the world, but most people don’t know how to, so everyone experiments and that’s when magic happens. Berlin is for dreamers.

What do you love most about what you do? I like to meet people. Listening to other people and watching other people’s artwork has a transformative power. If you meet people from whom you can learn something, never let them go!

Best place to escape to? Frankfurt, my hometown.

Best advice? Listen to Tocotronics love song, ‘Rebel Boy’.

What’s next? I’m working on an exhibition about palm trees in contemporary art and a long term art project that will begin in 2018. Be surprised.  

@robert_grunenberg


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COVER STORY

LAWRENCE LEE DJ

MAXIME BALLESTEROS Photographer

Maxime Ballesteros’s photography style has become instantly recognisable – and for good reason. After arriving in Berlin in 2007 with a handful of items in the back of his car, the French photographer has been successfully blurring the line between the honestly candid and the undeniably sexy ever since, all the while evoking an incomparable sense of sophistication within the people and places he captures. What made you want to become a photographer? I never wanted to become a photographer, or realised it. I was taking photos all the time but I didn’t know I could make a living from it. Then one day a friend paid me 20 Euros to take a few images for an article she was writing for a fashion site, and that was it.

What does your average day look like? Shooting, selecting images, emailing, biking, travelling, trying to comb my hair straight.

Best part of your job? Meeting people through the lens and in real life.

Best thing about living in Berlin?

DJ and producer Lawrence Lee started out by learning the ropes from New York’s DJ crowd, soaking up as much as he could before graduating by spinning hip hop and techno in the city’s underground clubs. It was when he met his best friend, Khaled Elsayed, that the duo began throwing parties together. After relocating to Berlin this January, Lawrence continues to make the music people want to hear, in bet­ ween days off gardening, wandering his neighbourhood for endless inspiration, and browsing for hard-to-find records at Hardwax. Where did you live before Berlin? I grew up in the New Jersey suburbs. At 18 I moved to the Bronx for school, then later to Manhattan where I lived uptown, downtown, all around.

What’s the best thing about living here? A lot of things – but most of all the freedom that people allow themselves and others.

What was your best party experience in Berlin so far? I think being at Homopatik on one of my first trips to Berlin stands out as something important.

Most New York spot in Berlin? Old dingy bar in Prenzlauer – 8mm.

Favourite summer jam? Young Hearts Run Free – Candi Staton

@lawrenceleeofc

Berlin attracts a lot of really interesting people. Everybody comes with their own unique energy and background. People are allowed to show themselves as they are, if they are ready to do so.

Who is your favourite photographer? William Klein.

Words to live by? Don't treat others in a way you wouldn’t like to be treated. Even though I’m an atheist.

@maximeballesteros


22

For years, there has been plenty of talk of how Berlin’s Wedding district is, alongside hip Neukölln, the city’s next trendy hotspot. Now aptm, a 230 m 2 loft located at No. 18 Lindower Strasse and due to open in September, looks set to help bring the prophecy to life. “Because ‘traditional’ retail is passé, the global customer requires a unique environment and a trusted custodian to show them the lesser seen,” Glass explains. The concept is that anything that can be moved can either be purchased or experienced. Glass, European Membership Director at Soho House Berlin, came up with the idea of creating a live-in location that can be a venue for meetings, parties or film shoots, as well as

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a place to eat and sleep, after more and more guests started asking, "Where is this from?" or "Where can I buy it?" Hailing from America, Glass has a healthy wanderlust and shares his time between ­ Berlin, ­Amsterdam, Istanbul, Barcelona and Mumbai. It thus seemed obvious to create a place to bring all these experiences and inspiration together. Glass’s carefully compiled range is also regularly updated. aptm will once again prove that, by creating a perfectly conceived physical store, it is possible to preserve real-life retail experiences in the face of the continued rise of online shopping. Touch, feel, smell, taste – there is no computer screen in existence that can convey the full sensory experience. Not yet, at least. And until that day comes, we should celebrate unique shopping experiences and look forward to discovering this melting pot of cultures that is ideally suited to a city such as Berlin.

www.aptm.berlin

by JANINE DUDENHÖFFER

© Jochen Arndt, www.jochenarndt.com

“Imagine: a friend, well travelled and with superb taste, gives you the keys to their wellappointed place and says, ‘Make yourself at home!’” That’s Chris Glass’s philosophy for his new concept apartment aptm. Imagine this friend opening their door to the public, inviting them to come and buy everything within or to be inspired; to meet interesting people and have fun. That’s what we call the perfect retail experience.

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Bocci 79

Omer Arbel turns light into delight

A new species has landed in Berlin. Its new home is a vacant building constructed in 1896. Light beings from a faraway galaxy known as Vancouver have reclaimed the site’s cathedral-esque staircase and several floors of abandoned rooms. Upon entering this ­futuristic world, visitors will be overwhelmed by the poetry of the space and the creatures they encounter. They come in peace and bring you light – and they possess an otherworldly ­beauty.

incarnation’s name still stand proud above the entrance today – well, at least in part. That’s because five of the original ­letters have been ­ removed and rearranged a few centi­ metres higher. They now read ‘BOCCI’. It is an act laden with symbolism. A lone ‘T’ from ‘Charlottenburg’ has been transformed into an ‘I’, demonstrating that something new can be created by modifying something old; removing these letters does not render the words illegible.

At No. 79 Kantstrasse in Berlin’s Charlotten­ burg district, Vancouver-­ based Canadian ­design brand Bocci has transformed a disused 2,200  m 2 historic courthouse into a stun­ ning studio-meets-showroom. Until 1933, the 44-room building was home to the crimi­ nal division of the Charlottenburg district court, complete with a detention block in the courtyard for prisoners awaiting trial. Under the Nazi regime, it was both the State Insti­ tute for Food, Pharmaceutical and ­Forensic Chemistry and a Gestapo prison before ­fi nally becoming Charlottenburg’s land registry ­office. Metallic letters spelling out the latter

Since the local authorities moved out in 2010, the old building has stood empty. The prison block sometimes served as a location for film productions: a few scenes from ‘The Reader’ starring Kate Winslet were filmed here. Bocci founder and Creative Director Omer Arbel happened upon the building by chance, h ­ aving rented out a space next door. Back then, his landlord was planning to convert the cells in the courtyard into a boutique hotel and was trying to find a tenant for the front building. A trained architect, Arbel was instantly bowled over. “We had to make a decision about it very quickly, and it’s a strange story, but we fell in love with it ob­

© Bocci

by LENA BROMBACHER


25 viously, immediately. It is way more space than we could ever need or require. It’s so big, such a huge building. And that became attractive because shockingly, in Berlin, there are these buildings just sitting here. Which is actually a story that is impossible anywhere else right now.” Since being converted, the building can now be seen in a whole new light – quite literally. Light installations featuring Bocci's unique combina­ tion of glass, porcelain and metal, the result of a decade's worth of creative endeavour, run along the whole building. Arbel’s designs for Bocci are showcased together with his sculpted pieces and architectural designs, thus presenting the whole gamut of his creative work. Although many of Arbel’s works have already featured in contem­ porary galleries, and this space certainly gives the impression of an art exhibition, here the pieces’ consecutive numbers – for example, No. 57.0, a horizontal system of pendants compris­ ing glass and metal – don’t correspond to their position. The common thread running through all these artefacts is the artist’s fascination with the intrinsic mechanical, physical and chemical qualities of materials, as well as his philosophy on how we experience space. “I always believe that we need visual, auditory or tactile cues from parts of a space that we can’t occupy with our bodies in order to truly perceive it,” the Creative Director explains. For Arbel, the Berlin branch of Bocci 79 is an archive, a studio, a laboratory, a production site and a gateway to a new world. It is where he tests new techniques and technologies for future artefacts and a place where the public are invited to experience first-hand how new ideas are brought to life in his ­i n-house work­ shop. It’s more about offering a ‘behind-thescenes’ glimpse than boosting sales figures: here the guiding principle is the creative process itself, as well as the search for inspira­ tion. “Our building in Berlin is much older than our city here! So there’s just a ­complexity of what that means culturally. To be able to toggle back and forth between a new and old world environment is amazing. They’re such different cities, they’re so, so different. Ber­ lin is so open, and there's a kind of ‘fuck you’ ­attitude, but a friendly ‘fuck you’ attitude. And there is a greater appreciation for the arts on a mass cultural level, which I find amazingly receptive to our work.” The coming years will see Bocci 79 become even more refined, just like a cabinet of c­ uriosities. Its first new installation will be unveiled in No­ vember.

www.bocci.ca/79


MISSION STREET WEAR JOIN THE GANG

Anita Tillmann, PREMIUM GROUP Managing Partner, interviews the CEO and publisher of Highsnobiety, David Fischer


27

INTERVIEW

Anita Tillmann: How do you define streetwear? David Fischer: Streetwear is so multifaceted. That’s why it’s so hard to sum it up in just a few words. But I myself define it as a development in the field of fashion that has emerged from subcul­t ures within the worlds of music, skateboarding, art, etc.

What does wearing streetwear mean to you? Wearing streetwear has been the norm for me for as long as I can remember. It doesn’t really carry any special meaning. The appreciation that I have had for fashion for several years has now become mainstream, but I don’t really consider it a big deal.

Has the essence of streetwear changed? When you think back to what you were wearing in the 90s and look at yourself now, do you see a difference? Ultimately, things always move in cycles. What I wore in the 90s is now making a comeback. First, it was iconic sportswear brands such as Fila, Kappa and ­D iadora, and now we’re seeing a resurgence in some workwear styles, e.g. from Dickies and others. Is it exactly the same as it was in the 90s? No. But today’s emerging fashion scene is mainly based on reinterpretations of past styles. It’s the mix of several different looks that makes it unique and exciting: the breaking down of barriers that once existed but have today disappeared.

Some talk of the rise of the fifth streetwear wave. Others say, “Don’t call it a comeback.” (Aria Hughes, WWD.) What role does streetwear currently play?

sibilities, which give the scene a whole new level of excitement.

What are brands such as Supreme and Vetements doing right? They generate interest in an item as well as a sense of community for their fans. When you buy these brands, you feel like you are part of the Supreme or the Vetements community, which makes you feel incredibly strong.

How do established brands such as Adidas or Nike serve the mass market whilst still continuously managing to create hype in niche areas, i.e. without damaging their image as being ‘cool’? They segment the market and supply various markets with different products. They know exactly which stores will reach which communities and which designer collaborations provide access to key groups. For companies like Nike and Adidas, this is nothing new, but for the fashion world in general, this idea has only gained purchase relatively recently.

Who are your streetwear superheroes?

“I COULDN’T IMAGINE THE FASHION INDUSTRY WITHOUT STREETWEAR.”

Streetwear is omnipresent. Streetwear staples such as hoodies, graphic T-shirts and sneakers feature regularly in every high fashion collection. I certainly wouldn’t refer to it as a trend; I couldn’t imagine the fashion industry without streetwear.

As global platforms for inspiration, how have the internet and social media – particularly Instagram – changed streetwear and street culture? Is it still possible to be ‘underground’ in this day and age? Of course, nowadays trends proliferate at an extremely fast pace. There are practically no local trends or subcultures anymore, and when there are, they don’t last long. It’s perhaps a bit of a shame as before it was exciting to discover these movements in various countries and cities. But at the same time, we are now able to constantly find new inspiration from around the world and we also have universal access to everything. This opens up brand new opportunities and pos-

James Jebbia, Hiroshi Fujiwara, Nigo and Shawn Stussy have paved the way for today’s market. It may seem as though everything came about very quickly, but ­Su­preme and Bape began way back in the early 90s. Highsnobiety has been celebrating streetwear for the last 12 years and the market has only recently grown to a significant size. It didn’t happen overnight!

What do you think will be the next big thing in streetwear?

I’m a firm believer in open source and modular fashion. In future, I think the end-consumer will be able to have more influence on products than they do today; be able to tailor them the way they want but within parameters set by the brand and other partners. The new consumer wants something of their own; something similar to what their friends are wearing, but that offers something unique.

How much will streetwear retail change in the future? What should buyers expect? As a consumer, I like to be constantly surprised and confronted with new things. That is why I am also a big fan of the ‘drop’ model used by brands like Supreme, as well as some Japanese names. Releasing products weekly, instead of just once or twice during a season, allows retailers to be in permanent dialogue with consumers. Online sales are completely dominating, which is why retailers’ communication strategies are also so important. They have to make sure they set themselves apart from the competition on social media. If you’re a buyer, you need to find specific themes to use to create an element of surprise.

www.highsnobiety.com


FASHION

THE HUNT IS OVER by CHRIS DANFORTH

STREETWEAR IN TIMES OF SOCIAL MEDIA


FASHION

As much as the world of streetwear and sneakers has been enveloped in what we consider mainstream tastes, one big aspect of the culture today has been stripped away: the hunt. Years before social media, sneakerheads lived, breathed and grew thanks to their own special form of community. Information was not as readily available as today, and no single term was used to describe the early mix of graffiti, skateboarding and music subcultures that were the foundation for what we now somewhat lazily describe as ‘streetwear’. First movers scanned through the latest Air Jordans in mail-order catalogues and relied on word-of-mouth to find out about new drops. These were the initial taste­ makers, who prided themselves on an ­individual style that was bred in the streets. Over the years, brands couldn’t help but take notice of these dedicated consumers, and social media has accelerated the growth of this formerly niche interest. Products and experiences were once reserved for a small circle of people ‘in the know’, but as the years have gone on, the scarce availability of select sneakers, apparel and limited items has made them covetable for outsiders looking in. As a result, the circle has grown. While some labels have increased production to keep up with global demand, others have remained staunchly aware of their roots, refusing to ‘sell out’ by growing too quickly. If The Hundreds, LRG, Alife and similar brands of the era brought forward the first s alvo of streetwear, a second wave is being ­ led in 2017 by newcomers like Brain Dead, ­M idnight S ­ tudios, Noah and others, who are uniting different ideologies that come from graphic design, punk rock and even nautical cues under one cohesive umbrella that is drawn from diverse references. These brands are sprouting from the already established idea of what streetwear is and how it has developed into a major buzzword for younger consumers over the past two or three decades. Other labels like Anti Social Social Club, Nasa­ seasons and Cactus Plant Flea Market have utilised social media – particularly Instagram – to its fullest by way of strong product placement and high-level celebrity co-signs, rapidly

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gaining popularity in ways that streetwear brands haven’t typically in the past. All in all, the importance of social media for any footwear, clothing or accessory brand these days cannot be overlooked, but communities on apps like Instagram and Twitter also foster a tribe mentality where true individuality is less important than dressing the part by wearing the biggest streetwear signifiers like Supreme and Palace Skateboards. For smaller entities, a social media presence gets the ball rolling, while direct-to-consumer e-commerce maximises profits and enhances the feeling of exclusivity for consumers. Generally speaking, brands that take risks, challenge conventions and champion new aesthetics stand a better chance of lasting in the market than a label that jumps on existing trends and bows to the status quo. Longstanding brands like Adidas, Nike and Vans have always had their own place within the landscape, but are also engaging streetwear culture through limited drops and targeted collaborations with other brands and retailers, therefore continually pushing forward and securing their respective places within the general fashion ecosystem. These limited products also lend clout to mainline releases, so while Adidas Originals Yeezy Boosts may release in only several thousand pairs, the appeal and demand for Adidas trickles down to general drops like the Gazelle or Superstar. Brands also cultivate higher interest with premium divisions like Adidas Consortium, NikeLab and Vans Vault, which deliver exclusive releases and collaborations under a different banner. Today, consumers are inundated with choices and information, and it only takes a thumb scroll to discover a dozen new brands being promoted by Instagram influencers. The hunt is over and, in turn, the competition is more serious than ever.


#BEAUTIFUL #DIVERSITY #TRENDSHOW

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OTTOLINGER COUTURE GOES CHAOS


PORTRAIT

by BARBARA STUMMER / ROOM 26

Skirts with frayed seams, suits with holes burnt into the fabric and asymmetric dresses that make you wonder whether Edward got his scissorhands on them: up-and-coming Berlin label Ottolinger eschews standard patterns and usual looks. Its blend of streetstyle, punk and couture is not only mixing things up on the city’s fashion scene – it’s also causing a stir globally.

© Reto Schmidt, Styling: Marc Goehring

Ottolinger’s two designers, Christa Bösch and Cosima Gadient, have a clear objective in mind: to reinterpret couture by realising designs with exquisite materials handcrafted to perfection. The result? A vexingly modern look that fundamentally challenges the perception of beauty. Both hailing from Switzerland, the pair met while studying fashion in Basel where they realised that they shared not just a love for the avant-garde, but also a similar sense of humour. ‘Ottolinger’ was written on the doorbell of the apartment next door to their first design studio and soon went from a running joke to their joint moniker. When it comes to their creations, the two designers also find inspiration in equally unusual places; random impressions, unique experiences or fascinating works of art – it all shapes their collective work. Whether it’s roughly sewn trousers, cut-up mesh dresses or deconstructed tops, their designs are wild, bursting with friction and confident coolness. It’s little surprise that the duo are already being lauded for their debut collection. When Christa Bösch and Cosima Gadient were showcased as promising newcomers at the 2016 VFiles shows in New York, they not only caught the eye of influential fashion platform MADE but of rapper Kanye West, who immediately hired the designers for his Yeezy label’s womenswear line. Their star firmly in the ascendency, the pair now split their time between Berlin and Los Angeles whilst working on several collections simultaneously: the dream start to any career.

www.ottolinger.com

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FASHION + TECH

by TILL SCHRÖDER

TH E NEXT LE V E L Listen! Learn! Experience!


© Offenblende

Fashion and technology have always existed in symbiosis. Ever since he took hold of a needle and thread, man has relied on technology for his garments. But today fashion goes much further, with the frenzied adoption of external innovations. True to fashion’s age-old tradition of breaking new ground, the leap from weaving looms to smart textiles seems almost tiny. Digital is taking over from analogue across every level, and at increasing speed. Now a product can often go from prototype to market ready in a matter of weeks. Modern-day nail varnish was a by-product of the car industry, LEDs were accidentally discovered by radio researchers and Velcro® was the result of an engineer taking his dog on long walks in the woods.

But that was only the start. Textile fibres made from orange peel or fashion made from recycled plastic waste from the world’s oceans are what’s next. The trends currently taking shape in fashion collections appear to transcend pure aesthetics. Even now, there are doctors at some first-aid posts working with connected vests that allow them to treat and communicate simultaneously. This new passion for inventing is also opening up undreamt-of possibilities for very different fields, such as health monitoring that uses textiles or smart work clothes that reduce risk. Nike’s first model to feature sensor-controlled, self-tying laces is set to be rolled out soon. Google is producing conductive fabric for connected


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The step change in material development, to which this new sector has dedicated plenty of time and energy, has most notably been accompanied by wearables, together with new sales technologies, i.e. the ‘smart retail’ experience, such as apps that use facial recognition and the linking up of online and offline logistics using RFID. Artificial reality is now used to assist ­ ­ buyers, along with interactive price tags and ­music systems that independently change tracks depending on the weather and number of customers. Webcams are used to adapt sales assistant numbers to the volume of customer traffic. Sales parameter data are analysed – the previously unknown is ­b eing discovered. The potential is there but it is still at a very early stage. However, progress is rapid and promising.

The PREMIUM GROUP’s #FASHIONTECH conference explores the latest developments. In keeping with its ‘Listen, Learn, Ex­perience’ motto, it will feature keynote speakers, such as David Fischer (Highsnobiety), Sharmadean Reid (Wah ­ Nails), Antje Hundhausen (Deutsche Telekom), ­Hywel Davies (Central Saint Martins) and Niclas Rohrwacher (CEO and founder of Berlin start-up campus Factory Berlin) who will share their views on the digital future of the fashion industry. Cloudy Zakrocki and Nora Beckershaus (Refinery29 ­Germany), Jonas Thaysen (Facebook) and Dr. Marc Schumacher (Liganova The Brand Retail C ­ ompany), along with presentations by Zalando, Sleek ­Magazine and Messe Frankfurt, complete the programme. The #exhibition features wearable labels such as Jasna Rok and ElektroCouture, who will be showcasing trailblazing collections. A mix of keynote speeches, exhibitions, start-up pitches and masterclasses take visitors on a journey from the micro to the macro of fashion’s digital transformation – one that is no longer driven by questions of ‘if’, but ‘how’. Questions that designers and businesses are approaching with tremendous zeal – and their passion has found the perfect platform in the shape of #FASHIONTECH, now into its sixth edition.

www.fashiontech.berlin

#FASHIONTECH BERLIN CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION 5 July 2017 10 am–6 pm KÜHLHAUS Luckenwalder Strasse 3 Kreuzberg Free access with your PREMIUM GROUP badge – no pre-registration needed!

© Offenblende

jackets in cooperation with Levi’s. Karl L ­ agerfeld is experimenting with 3D-printed footwear. Amy Winters is working with holographic leather that reacts to sound, whilst Anouk Wipprecht is creating sensory clothes that process physical and emotional stimuli. We’ve become familiar with smartphone-charging solar cells on bags and garments. Clothing is evolving into an interactive user interface; an aesthetic, multi-sensory experience; an intelligent appendage. The digital world’s next step will see individuality taken to a whole other level.


THE CONFERENCE ON THE FUTURE OF FASHION 5 JULY, 2017 – KÜHLHAUS STATION-BERLIN

PRESENTED BY OLE TILLMANN

10: 30

ANITA TILLMANN (MANAGING PARTNER, PREMIUM GROUP) OLE TILLMANN (FOUNDER & CEO, PEAK CREATIVE LEADERSHIP) WELCOME

10:45

SHARMADEAN REID (FOUNDER, WAH NAILS) curated by LESSONS FROM LONDON‘S HOT TEST INDIE BRAND ON HOW TO BE „DIGITAL FIRST“

11:10

HYWEL DAVIES (PROGRAMME DIRECTOR FASHION, CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS) MEL ANIE ASHLEY (COMMUNICATIONS FASHION, CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS) curated by HOW THE WORLD‘S LEADING FASHION SCHOOL IS DEALING WITH DIGITAL

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DR. MARC SCHUMACHER (MANAGING DIRECTOR, LIGANOVA THE BRANDRETAIL COMPANY) FROM POS (POINT OF SALE) TO POEX (POINT OF EXPERIENCE) – A NEW RETAIL PARADIGM

12:00

ANNE MUHLETHALER (CONSULTANT FOR CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN GROUP, AVM CONSULTING) curated by SOCIAL CHANNELS & CHATBOTS SERVICE REINVENTED

12:15

ANTJE HUNDHAUSEN (VICE PRESIDENT BRAND EXPERIENCE, DEUTSCHE TELEKOM) CHRISTIAN BRACHT (CEO & PUBLISHER, SLEEK MAGAZINE) PROF. DR. PAUL LUKOWICZ (GERMAN RESEARCH CENTER FOR ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE) DR. TORSTEN WINGENTER (SENIOR DIRECTOR DIGITAL INNOVATIONS, LUFTHANSA) AI MEETS FASHION - INTRODUCING TELEKOM FASHION FUSION CHALLENGE @LUFTHANSA FLYING LAB

12:40

THIMO SCHWENZFEIER (DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATION TEXTILES & TEXTILE TECHNOLOGIES, TEXPERTISE NETWORK MESSE FRANKFURT) EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SMART FABRICS

13: 00

LUNCH BREAK

14: 00

DAVID FISCHER (FOUNDER, HIGHSNOBIETY) AN EXPERT GUIDE TO STORYTELLING IN A DIGITAL AGE

14: 25

CLOUDY ZAKROCKI (EDITOR IN CHIEF, REFINERY29 GERMANY) NORA BECKERSHAUS (DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS AND MARKETING, REFINERY29 GERMANY) ANITA TILLMANN (MANAGING PARTNER, PREMIUM GROUP) INTERVIEW: HOW THIS US LEADER IN FASHION CONTENT CRACKED THE GERMAN MARKET

14: 40

JONAS THAYSEN (LEAD CREATIVE STRATEGIST, CREATIVE SHOP CENTRAL EUROPE, FACEBOOK) HOW TO DRIVE BUSINESS IMPACT ON FACEBOOK: THE MOBILE MAKEOVER

14: 55

VICTORIA POOLE (MARKETING DIRECTOR, THE MILL) IMMERSION & EMOTION IN FASHION

15:15

JEROME COCHET (MANAGING DIRECTOR, ZAL ANDO MEDIA SOLUTIONS) HOW TO CONNECT BRANDS TO CONSUMERS

15: 30

COFFEE BREAK

16:00

YAEL KOCHMAN (CEO, FASH&TECH) DISRUPTIVE FASHIONTECH TRENDS IN RETAIL AND ISRAELI STARTUPS AT THE CENTER OF THE REVOLUTION

16:15

LIHI PINTO FRYMAN (CMO & CO-FOUNDER, SYTE - VISUAL CONCEPTION) WHY THIS FASHION SEARCH ENGINE HAS FINALLY GOT IT RIGHT

16:25

JULIUS HENNE (CO-FOUNDER, MMOODDEELL) LUDWIG HENNE (CO-FOUNDER, MMOODDEELL) THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION IN MODEL BOOKING: HOW THIS STARTUP IS CHANGING THE TALENT INDUSTRY

16:35

AYHAN YURUK (FOUNDER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR, SHOWROOMING - DIGITAL MEETS PHYSICAL) HOW TO MAKE SHOWROOMING WORK FOR YOU - A GUIDE TO CREATING CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

16:45

NICL AS ROHRWACHER (CRO & FOUNDER, FACTORY BERLIN) BERLIN, THE STARTUP MAGNET: WILL THE CITY BECOME THE SILICON VALLEY OF EUROPE?

17:00

ANITA TILLMANN (MANAGING PARTNER, PREMIUM GROUP) OLE TILLMANN (FOUNDER & CEO, PEAK CREATIVE LEADERSHIP) CLOSING REMARKS


Transformers. Connected, autonomous, shared, electric. The new mobility is now as intelligent as it is fashion forward. Transforming couture presented by M.I.A and Tommy Genesis. #mbcollective #switchtoEQ

@MBFW


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HOMAGE TO GIANNI VERSACE

by BERIT GROSSWENDT / ROOM 26


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INTERVIEW

Brazilian artist Alexandre Stefani has tracked down and collected over 500 garments, items of jewellery and accessories from all over the world belonging to the collections of legendary designer Gianni Versace. Now he is presenting some of his most spectacular and precious rarities during SHOW&ORDER AT KRAFTWERK BERLIN.

You have been collecting Gianni Versace fashion for over 25 years. How did it all start? I first heard of Gianni Versace at the end of the 80s when I was an exchange student in France. For me as a Brazilian, it was a whole new world, especially as back then I was certainly not in a position to afford any of his creations. I bought my first piece in 1992. After that, I only wanted to wear Versace. But as I could never afford it, I began to keep my eyes peeled for less costly vintage pieces. It was the start of a love affair.

“ I BOUGHT MY FIRST PIECE IN 1992. AFTER THAT, I ONLY WANTED TO WEAR VERSACE.” Alexandre Stefani

ALEXANDRE STEFANI

What fascinates you most about Gianni Versace? I admire the hedonism of his collections; the joy, the delight with which he approaches things. He didn’t care about beauty and elegance. He preferred to play with shapes, colours and materials, such as leather, silk, latex and metal. He broke down barriers and brought opposites together. The best example is his legendary bondage collection that dates from 1992 and was inspired by the S&M scene. Here Versace experimented with a range of couture techniques.

Why are you presenting your collection now and why in Berlin? I actually only collect these items for myself. But I wanted to mark the 20th anniversary of Versace’s death by presenting my collection’s most dazzling pieces to the public. I think far too little is known about his talent, his fashion and the man himself, and most fans only remember his bestsellers. As an avant-garde city, Berlin is quite simply the perfect place to have this conversation.

Where did you manage to find your rare vintage items? In places all over the world, such as Russia, Japan, Germany and Italy. Many items come from clients or collectors from the USA or from people who used to be Versace’s close friends and colleagues. Pieces change hands online, which is my usual hunting ground. I have a look every day. Some items have also been donated.

HOMAGE TO GIANNI VERSACE

Which pieces are your favourites? A dress made completely out of metal from 1983 – it’s breathtakingly beautiful. And a pearl-embroidered vest: the most luxurious item from the menswear collection. It took 25 years until I was finally able to get my hands on it.

Where do you keep your treasure trove? In wardrobes that are arranged by theme: silk blouses, leather articles, items of historical importance and so on. I keep pieces that I wear ­myself in my own personal wardrobe. Everything is regularly aired and checked.

© Robert Przybysz

What can today’s young designers learn from Gianni Versace? That there will always be demand for the unusual. Designers should pay close attention to quality in every respect, right down to the smallest detail. And, above all else, designing should be fun.

EXHIBITION 4–6 July 2017 10 am–7 pm OPENING RECEPTION with the collector Alexandre Stefani 4 July 2017 / 4 pm by invitation only SHOW&ORDER AT KRAFTWERK BERLIN top floor Köpenicker Strasse 70 Mitte


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SUPPORT

MENTORING MADE IN GERMANY

William Fan

by LENA BROMBACHER

The creation of an institution such as the Fashion Council Germany (FCG) was undoubtedly long overdue. Its aim is to improve the image of German fashion design in the worlds of business, politics and culture, with a particular focus on encouraging the next generation – the future ambassadors of German fashion. What’s special about the FCG’s prizes for emerging designers are not the awards themselves. Whilst accolades do help boost the recipient’s reputation, they are no guarantee for success. An effective approach involves providing consistent, longterm support for young designers delivered by mentors working in the industry. As such, chosen designers are not left to fend for themselves on a highly competitive fashion market once the applause dies down, but guided, advised and coached by some of the industry’s biggest hitters. As fashion has not only cultural worth but, above all, commercial value, the aim is to ensure brands are ready to take on international competitors. Only those creators who can offer not just great designs but business acumen and effective use of marketing tools stand a chance of gaining a foothold on the global market. The FCG has been a vocal proponent of all these issues and has come up with a range of development programmes to put them into action. Much has happened in the two years since its inception. Two designers – Marina Hoermanseder and Nobieh Talai – have received support in cooperation with the Berlin Senate Department for Economics and Technology, and this year will see the launch of two new development programmes with a total of six labels being taken under the FCG’s wing. “The Fashion Council Germany initiative has enabled us to give a voice to our efforts to nurture Germany’s fashion scene: a voice that is loud enough to be heard beyond our own borders. In many ways, measures to promote fashion in Germany, Berlin and within the Fashion Council Germany itself are still in their infancy, but over the past two years we have managed to achieve a great deal in the worlds of business and politics as well as in society,” explains a spokesperson for the FCG.

Sebastian Kaiser

Anna Heinrichs


SUPPORT

Julia Leifert

Tim Labenda

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Fellowship Programme in cooperation with H&M Last summer, designers working in womenswear, menswear and accessories were invited to apply for the newly created ‘Fellowship Programme by Fashion C ­ ouncil Germany and H&M’. Ten finalists presented their labels to a jury of eleven leading figures from the industry who evaluated the creative and commercial potential of the up-and-coming designers based on business plans, lookbooks and runway photos. The winners were announced in January of this year. Originally, the plan was to award the prize to three designers, but the accolade was ultimately given to four: Sebastian Kaiser / Boulezar, Anna Heinrichs / Horror Vacui, Tim L ­ abenda and William Fan. Each of them can look forward to a two-year development programme that includes a total of 50 days of close cooperation spread over the course of the scheme. These protégés will receive support from the FCG's exclusive network and members of the mentoring jury. Experts from global powerhouse H&M will also be on hand to share theoretical and practical expertise on how to build and expand their brands.

Portrait Tim Labenda © Markus Jahns

Mentoring Programme for sustainable fashion

Karen Jessen

The FCG’s latest project, which is taking place in cooperation with the Berlin Senate Department for Economics, Energy and Public Enterprises and Messe Frankfurt (organisers of the Greenshowroom and the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin), focuses on sustainability. Berlin has responded to the increasingly loud calls for more sustainability in fashion like no other major European city and stands out as a pioneer in the field. “Together with our partners, we want to use our Mentoring Programme to give greater emphasis to the issues of sustain­ able production and the circular economy, as well as to expand Berlin’s base of sustainably producing start-ups. Specific coaching will be offered with the aim of helping companies to successfully position themselves on the market,” ex­plains Ramona Pop, Senator for Economics, Energy and Public Enterprises. In addition to a six-month mentoring scheme and workshops, Messe Frankfurt is also offering the two winners, Karen Jessen / Benu Berlin and Julia Leifert / Philomena Zanetti, a platform at the Greenshowroom. All the FCG’s selected mentees will be showcased during Berlin Fashion Week at a special booth as part of the PREMIUM trade show.

www.fashion-council-germany.org


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INTERVIEW

OOPS! …

She does it again Stella McCartney back as patron of the ‘Designer for Tomorrow’ award by CHRISTINE ZEINE

This year will once again see Stella McCartney take on the role of patron for ‘Designer for Tomorrow’, a fashion talent award organised by Peek & Cloppenburg and Fashion ID that honours up-and-coming fashion talents. McCartney’s focus on sustainability makes her a crucial role model for aspiring designers.

I feel much honoured to be asked again, especially as it’s their 10th time anniversary. To me, it is very exciting to be someone that’s in a position to speak to new designers and to give them some kind of advice and to also ask them questions … see how the next generation of creative people are coming about in the industry, to see if they are going to be the next people to take centre stage – it’s exciting. I think it’s challenging today. There are more people on the planet, there is more competition; it’s harder to find your voice and to have an individual spirit, so I think there are many challenges that face the next generation today. I think financially it is very hard to have any kind of place in any kind of industry, so you have to be mindful of what you really want to do and really follow your dreams, but, at the same time, be realistic and just get your foot in the door and do everything you can in an industry you love.

To err is human. We learn from our mistakes. What has been your best lesson thus far? Which mistakes should up-and-coming fashion talents allow themselves to make? My best lesson has always been when I haven’t been true to my­ self; when I have tried to be something that I’m not and it hasn’t come naturally to me. I’ve always found it more of a struggle, whether it’s been noticed or not, but it’s something that I’ve re­ ally given up on as I’ve gotten older and I’ve gotten more com­ fortable and confident in my own skin and in my place in fash­ ion and in life. I find I make fewer compromises, and therefore I hopefully make fewer mistakes, but, you know, the biggest mistake is trying to pretend you are something you are not … people talk to me a lot about sustainability and about my place in that, and I can’t pretend to be perfect. I think the biggest mistake I could potentially make is to try and act like I’m doing everything completely perfectly or with the cleanest of con­ science. And I’m not … I’m in tune with a lot of things in my business that are conventional but I try my best. Today more than half of our brand’s products are sustainable.

What role does sustainability play today? Essentially, sustainability is everything. And without it we have nothing. You know, it’s really the fashion industry that’s being left behind in this conversation. Everyone else is present in the room, everyone is coming to the table with something to say and every other industry has to take this into account. And even if they don’t care, they have to be accountable because the customer requires it of them and the customer now has to re­ quire it of the fashion industry. The industry is literally getting away with murder.

How important are smart textiles and wearables in your collection? It really depends where I’m working. I think wearables are per­ haps something that is not quite at a place where we are ready to work with it yet. But I think that will come into our collabo­ ration with someone like Adidas, for example, but we are really open to everything. Technology is a massive part of our house, and we work with it on a daily basis. And also just being innova­ tors: it is something we are excited to be in fashion, to look at textiles in a way where they are more mindful, more responsi­ ble … and less harmful to the planet, so we do that in every way, every day.

What role do social media play for you and your brand? Social media is a big part of the house of Stella McCartney. We are a young fashion brand and we embrace different platforms. We aren’t afraid to talk to many people in many different ways, so social media actually serves us really well. We also love collaborat­ ing, so it’s a wonderful place for us to play and have fun. It allows us to work in ways that perhaps give a different tone of voice to our brand. So, for us, social media is something we find exciting. We see it as something with potential rather than something that’s scary. We understand it and have an agility that means we are able to use the best of what social media has to offer.

www.designer-for-tomorrow.com

© Courtesy of Stella McCartney

This is your second time assuming the role of patron for the ‘Designer for Tomorrow’ award. What was your motivation?


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CONTEMPORARY


VIVETTA Prag Agency

Viu X Saskia Diez © Vitali Gelwich

VIU X SASKIA DIEZ SEEK

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Benu Berlin © Suzanna Holtgrave

FEMME MAISON Vogue Salon

BENU BERLIN Der Berliner Mode Salon & Greenshowroom & PREMIUM

FRISUR SEEK

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WILLIAM FAN PREMIUM & Der Berliner Mode Salon


ESSENTIEL ANTWERP PREMIUM


EDDA GIMNES Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin

CECILIE COPENHAGEN PREMIUM

ROBERTA EINER PREMIUM Young Designer

EJING ZHANG PREMIUM Young Designer

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NATHINI VAN DER MEER Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Berlin

GESINE FÖRSTERLING Der Berliner Mode Salon

HERMIONE FLYNN Der Berliner Mode Salon

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When Gembalies hosts a private showroom, even international guests come calling. In just four years, designer Frauke Gembalies and business partner Ekatharina Iliadis have managed to win over an illustrious circle of modern women that includes ­ gallery owners, artists and entrepreneurs, such as Oda Jaune, Paloma Varga Weisz, Nina Höke, Karen Boros and Claudia Hornemann. When asked about the secret to her success, ­designer Frauke Gembalies replies, “We continuously whisk our customers away to another world”. Whilst inspiration for her last collection came from Morocco – with pieces featuring elaborate embroidery – the Autumn/Winter ­ Collection 2017/18 is all about checks. “We started out with a photo of Jean Cocteau taken by Irving Penn,” says Gembalies. Hence the collection featuring patterns ranging from glen-checks to tartan on soft winter fabrics, such as cashmere, alpaca and wool. “We always follow our intuition,” explains Gembalies as she describes her unusual approach. The designer is no naïve greenhorn; this is a ­woman with years of experience in the fashion industry. After a post as Creative Consultant at Akris, she took over the creative reins at Rena Lange before working as a freelance international consultant. Eventually her friends convinced her to launch her own label as well. “It was never my dream,” Frauke Gembalies admits. But it was impossible to ignore the constant and enthusiastic praise garnered by her own designs.

left © SM Morrison, 2016 / right © Sunny Ringle, 2017

She shares her time between Berlin and Paris, where Gembalies’ luxury prêt-à-porter atelier is ­located. When it comes to her label, the fashion ­expert trusts her instincts. Pieces are exclusively sold in private showrooms organised twice a year in Berlin, Hamburg, Munich (initially at ­Christian Liaigre), Düsseldorf, London and Zurich, each lasting just one or two days. “Our customers are very well informed. They know what they’re after; they compile their looks, order and leave happy,” explains Gembalies. “Nobody says, ‘I need to check with my husband first.’” Gembalies’ fans also trust her style choices. One of her iconic pieces is a coat without buttons. “No one has ever asked how they’re supposed to do it up,” says Gembalies. In fact, her customers seem to love her designs. “They live in them,” she explains, adding that many customers receive compliments on their unique garments when they wear them out. Several have even thanked Gembalies personally in an email or sent “photos of themselves at the ­Biennale in Venice”, Gembalies says with a smile. It’s little wonder then that Gembalies continues to go from strength to strength. The first Brussels showroom is planned for January 2018.

www.gembalies.com

by TINA MOLIN


Basking in the glow THE TRIUMPH OF BEAUTY by LENA BROMBACHER


BEAUTY

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Th e to r H e m e is the B a m a by Q ke up mak to o e u p lo f th e

Embryolisse cream: even Net-à-Porter sells it. Or the Bioderma Sensibio micellar water. ­Nobody seems to wash their face with tap water any more. Thanks to thousands of blog posts and videos, you can now find these products in nearly every bathroom cabinet worldwide.

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The most hyped beauty brand right now is definitely the eponymous makeup and cosmetics universe of Charlotte Tilbury, queen of the glow. With years of experience as a celebrity makeup artist and BFFs like Kate Moss, she’s on the inside track. Every product is a money spinner, be it the Filmstar Bronze & Glow or Charlotte’s Magic Cream. Not a day goes by without the beauty blogosphere and vlogosphere raving about her products.

ne

B w en G wa orh y Pe of p a m h e r fu a m e r fum s c r i n g e at in by pow – th ed a re d d e o .e e r f o K a b rm u uk i .

© Byredo

Beauty is not a trend; beauty has become a global lifestyle staple that stands on an equal footing with fashion. More and more sales and press agencies who used to deal with fashion are complementing their portfolios with cosmetic brands as demand for beauty items is growing faster than ever before. If you are still hesitant, you may be the last one to jump on the bandwagon. These days it’s rare to find a fashion blog that doesn’t feature lavishly ­a rranged beauty still lifes, a YouTube channel without makeup tutorials galore, an I­ nstagram #ootd (outfit of the day) that doesn’t mention the lipstick brand and colour, or a concept store without exclusive niche perfumes and scented candles. Life is full of beauty. And full of bloggers and vloggers, who provide us with beauty news and exciting products every day anew. A click on the affiliate link brings us directly to the next online shop where we blissfully place the object of our desires into our shopping cart. Never before has there been such an i mmense offer of beauty products, and each ­ day new brands arrive on the scene – vegan, organic, cruelty-free, infused with moonlight or special crystals, yadda, yadda, yadda. And, of course, there is #trending. Take French pharmacy products that seem to feature in almost every beauty blog. One example is the

The dernier cri in the beauty world looks like a miniature breast implant, but is used to apply makeup: the SiliSponge from Singapore. If you search for this item on YouTube, you will get around 63,500 results. Wow. The power of social media! It’s a fierce competitor to the famous beautyblender (for those who don’t know, it’s a makeup sponge). Of course, similar products have followed, like the Heme Baby Q applicator from Taiwan. And then there is K beauty (with a capital K, like Korea). Korean women are known for their strict skincare routine, which seems to be a national obsession. The funny packaging makes you forget the Ch

arl

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ilb u wo r y l i p sti r th w. c ch a rl t h e h ks a r ot t ed yp et i e efi lbu ! nit ely r y. co m

gross ingredients, like snail slime or snake poison, and the variety of masks they offer is huge. Perfume-wise, the last decade saw a boom in niche perfumery. The three most talked about brands from the niche market on social media are Byredo, Le Labo and Escentric Molecules. Their scents have become cult ­perfumes. For years, the whole fashion world – every fashion store and showroom – smelled of Molecule 01 by ­Escentric Molecules of Berlin-based perfumer Geza Schön. Then suddenly the streets of New York and LA began to


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um e w w S a n t yo u w. al 3 sme lel ab 3 by l l eve of r L ag e L a r y w h ran ere b c e o. is s .c om

smell of Le Labo’s Santal 33, a divisive unisex sandalwood scent. Simultaneously, every blogger and vlogger was talking about Gipsy Water and Rose of No Man’s Land by Byredo. This year, Escentric Molecules launched ­Molecule 04 and Escentric 04 – two new scents based on sandalwood. Maybe one of them – or both – will become the new holy grail, who knows. The competition never rests. Hi-tech beauty solutions are a logical consequence of the digital revolution. An app a day keeps the ennui away, right? “Technology is transforming consumers’ daily beauty routines,

Th e yo M a t c d a u r fa h C o ta c pe to ­c e an app rso sc re a d u a s n t w w a lise e a m es th ns e w.g d ­f a et m o u n tc h i n atc d a t i o g , h .c n. o

and smart devices have huge potential to impact how we care for our hair and skin,” says Guive Balooch, Global Vice President of L’Oréal’s Research and Innovation T ­ echnology Incubator. Recently the world’s first-ever smart hairbrush premiered: the Kérastase Hair Coach. A microphone listens to the sound of the user’s hair being brushed to identify patterns, providing insights into manageability, frizziness, dryness, split ends and breakage (to name just one function of this smart beauty tool). Data is sent to a mobile app via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. The app detects hair damage, gives the consumers feedback on brushing habits or offers product recommendations. The

Samsung S-Skin gadget uses a microneedle patch with a portable device that analyses the skin. This patch penetrates the skin to deliver skincare pro­ducts, while the device can measure the skin’s hydration, redness and melanin levels to provide customised care using an LED light. The HiMirror is an innovative skin analysis engine that recognises and identifies problem areas and suggests solutions. “Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who is the fairest one of all?” Afterwards you can apply makeup exclusively blended for your skin tone by MatchCo. The app works with a six-step scanning process to calculate your perfect match. The future is now!

BEAUTY HUBS PREMIUM – THE CUBES / STATION-Berlin / Luckenwalder Strasse 4–6 / Kreuzberg SHOW&ORDER AT KRAFTWERK BERLIN – TOP FLOOR / Köpenicker Strasse 70 / Mitte BEAUTY EVENTS

Ké ra the s t a s firs e’s H t w w sma air C r w. lor t h a i o a c h r ea l .c b r u s i s om h .

15 LOOKS BEAUTIFUL DIVERSITY IN THE ­S POTLIGHT by Refinery29, Schwarzkopf and Inselberg Models 4 July 2017 11 am, 1 pm, 3 pm

BEAUTY HACK by SLEEK Conference on how social media is changing the beauty industry 4 July 2017 3  pm–5  pm

GET YOUR STYLEMAKE-OVER AT  CREATIVE CARAVAN by INSTINKTE open to public 6 July 2017 12  pm–4 pm

SHOW&ORDER AT KRAFTWERK BERLIN Köpenicker Strasse 70 / Mitte


Freitag passiert’s. Intensive Reportagen, anspruchsvolle Fotostrecken, ßberraschende Essays und Kolumnen: Das SZ-Magazin hat eine Wirkung, der sich niemand entziehen kann. Jeden Freitag in der Sßddeutschen Zeitung.

Mediadaten und weitere Informationen unter: sz-media.de/szmagazin


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© Charlotte Tilbury

T O    C H A R L O T T E    T I L B U R Y

B E A U T Y    Q U E S T I O N S

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BEAUTY

Charlotte Tilbury has been fascinated by the power of makeup since the age of 13 when she first discovered mascara. As a makeup artist, she works with some of the most important people in today’s fashion and beauty industry. In 2013 she launched her eponymous makeup and skincare brand. The awardwinning line took the world by storm. As did C ­ harlotte. In her makeup tutorials, she presents different looks – from Golden Goddess to Rock Chick – for all types of women.  How important are social media for your brand? It’s an incredibly powerful tool in engaging your consumer in a deeper relationship than is possible in store and for connecting people from every generation and from all parts of the globe. I love the fact that I can have a direct dialogue with my consumers and can reach millions of people instantly! I see my social media channels as my own magic media platforms. Facebook is my TV channel (with 430k followers); YouTube is my tutorial diary (with 452k followers and 30m views); Instagram is like having my own glossy publication and billboard (with 1.4 million followers); Twitter is like a news board (152k followers) and Snapchat is like sharing news and ideas with friends.

What do you think the future of the beauty industry will look like? If only I had a crystal ball – I would love that! Both science and technology are so instrumental when it comes to revolutionising the beauty industry. Technology plays a magic role in ­e verything we do – it’s at the forefront of my makeup revolution. I have built technology into the fabric of my brand DNA – it’s the advantage of being a brand that has grown up in a fully digital age, not an older, legacy brand that’s now having to adapt to the digital revolution!

What is your opinion on hi-tech beauty gadgets? I’ve incorporated hi-tech gadgets into all of my beauty boudoirs to bring my products to life in a truly innovative and groundbreaking way! When launching my new fragrance Scent of a Dream, we used Virtual Reality to create a revolutionary experience. It was all about using new technology to create a totally immersive film that transported you to another world – a magical, multi-sensory universe starring Kate Moss. The whole ­experience enabled you to visualise the invisible – to actually smell and understand the perfume with your eyes! I’m so ­passionate about disrupting the beauty world with industry tech firsts; for my latest project, I created a Magic Mirror for all my beauty wonderlands. We refined codes using ground-breaking technology so we could literally paint makeup onto people’s ­faces in a hyper-realistic way. It magically morphs any of my 10 iconic looks onto your face – it’s makeup made easy!

www.charlottetilbury.com

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1 | ‘Berlin Showertower’ made with love and the finest natural ingredients. www.dearsoap.com 2 | Handmade scented candle from the Alphabet Collection by Mario Lombardo. www.atelier-oblique.com

3 | ‘Holundersirup’ shower gel from the ‘Tradition’ series  by Frank Leder. www.frank-leder.com

A irlines x Bernhard Wilhelm nail polish collab, colour: ‘COR – pajas blancas cordoba’. www.usluairlines.com ­ material, containing natural softeners. www.biobrush-berlin.com ­

6 | Organic deodorant made of natural oils. www.fine-deodorant.com

Line brush No. 10, 100 % vegan. www.jacks-beautydepartment.com

4 | Uslu

5 | Toothbrush made of biodegradable raw 7 | Jacks ­Beauty

8 | Merme follows the one-ingredient philosophy. Natural oils for face, body and hair.

www.mermeberlin.com 9 | ‘Tagarot’ lipstick in ‘Pink Blossom’ with organic avocado oil and babassu butter. www.undgretel.com 10 | 'Unter den Linden' smells like Berlin in summer when the lime trees are in full bloom. www.aprilaromatics.com 11 | The smell of fashion: the perfumes of Verdúu reflect the designer's vision.­ www.verduu.com 12 | Organic hand cream with Brazil nut, oat and honey. www.delilou.com


#berlinfashionweek www.fashion-week-berlin.com

4–7 JULY 4–7 2017 JULY 2017


4 – 6 JULY

5 JULY 2017 BERLIN


THE FASHION AUTHORITY www.premiumgroup.berlin

2017 BERLIN

5 – 7 AUG 2017 MUNICH


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Kin Dee

Pioneering projects such as the futuristic Good Bank prove that when it comes to health food, the city isn’t lagging behind but confidently leading the way. Here the principle of vertical farming is applied, with salad greens sown and grown in special cultivation chambers on show in the restaurant before being picked and served. No pesticides, no genetic engineering, no haulage. Whatever can’t be grown in the restaurant itself is purchased locally, depending on seasonal availability. Another health food trend emerging in the capital is the Hawaiian poké bowl. Dishes served in generously sized bowls have been in fashion since we were introduced to ramen soups and Korea’s bibimbap. 2017 will welcome bowls that feature diced raw fish combined with vegetables, rice, nuts and lots more –­

TASTY BERLIN THE WORLD IN A BOWL ma'loa

by VIOLET KIANI

Kin Dee © Robert Rieger, Freunde von Freunden

Berlin’s culinary scene is bubbling away like a soup on a blazing hob. We can certainly hold our own against some of the world’s finest gastronomic hubs, such as London, Tel Aviv and LA. And anyone visiting Berlin during Fashion Week should definitely set aside some time away from checking stores and the city’s famous nightlife to discover at least a handful of its outstanding new restaurants. Go out Very Hungry Caterpillar-style and sample a little of everything on offer, only this story won’t end in belly ache: it’s all just so healthy!


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Good Bank

all gluten-free and packed with protein and nutrients. You can sample poké bowls at ma’loa in Berlin Mitte.

Miss Violet's Supperclub © Jan Brockhaus

The city’s undisputed kings of gastronomy are currently taking their cues from Asia: the team behind Boris Radczun and Stephan Landwehr, who have already made their mark on the scene with Grill Royal, Le P ­ etit R ­ oyal, Pauly Saal, Dottír and Einstein U ­ nter den L ­ inden, are now serving up contemporary Thai food with a local twist at the ­recently opened Kin Dee. Following Ryong on ­Torstrasse, Huy Thong has just opened his second Vietnamese restaurant, Con Tho in Kreuzberg, and The Duc Ngo, owner of the Kuchi restaurants, is taking Asian cuisine to the next level with two new openings: Ryōtei 893 and Golden P ­ hoenix at Berlin’s Provocateur ­hotel, offering Japanese-Peruvian delicacies that are practically tailormade for ­Instagram. Other restaurant owners have started a countertrend by returning to local cuisine and regional specialities. At PeterPaul, guests can enjoy a modern, tapas-style take on Königsberger meatballs and beef roulade, whilst Nobelhart & Schmutzig has garnered a Michelin star and a golden reputation on Berlin’s culinary scene with its ‘brutally l­ ocal’ mantra. There are also food nerds, such as soft ice cream maker Paul Möhring, who produce simple recipes inspired by their grandparents’ generation. Legendary restaurateur Heinz ‘Cookie’ Gindullis prefers to look to the f uture, offering Berliners their first ­ ­ d igital restaurant in the shape of Data Kitchen, where guests order digitally and retrieve their dishes from glass boxes.

Berlin makes it easy for food pioneers to bring their ideas to life, which is why our culinary scene has so much to offer. My own story is the perfect example. Two years ago, I started Miss Violet’s Supperclub, a dinner event where I would cook my favourite Middle ­Eastern ­dishes, each time at a different location. The event has now become something of an i­nstitution and has even been hosted at Hotel A ­ dlon Kempinski. Each time guests take their seats around the long dining table and begin to take in the aroma of the large steaming dishes, I am filled with a huge sense of gratitude for Berlin: here everyone gets a chance.

Miss Violet’s Supperclub


SHOPPING

78

THE STORE Soho House Berlin

THE CORNER BERLIN EAST | MEN | WEST

Torstrasse 1 | Mitte

Französische Strasse 40 &

www.thestore-berlin.com

Markgrafenstrasse 45 | Mitte Wielandstrasse 29 | Charlottenburg www.thecornerberlin.de

SUPERCONSCIOUS Weinbergsweg 22 Mitte www.superconscious.de

STUDIO183

APRIL FIRST

Brunnenstrasse 183

Auguststrasse 77

Mitte

Mitte

www.studio183.co

www.aprilfirst.de

IC! BERLIN NEW!

A.P.C.

Münzstrasse 5

Mulackstrasse 35 &

Mitte

Fasanenstrasse 22 | Mitte &

www.ic-berlin.de

Charlottenburg | www.apc.fr

ACNE STUDIOS

NANDI STORE NEW!

Weinmeisterstrasse 2 & Potsdamer

Dunckerstrasse 11

Strasse 87 | Mitte & Tiergarten

Prenzlauer Berg

www.acnestudios.com

www.nandistore.com

JOHANENLIES NEW!

ADIDAS ORIGINALS

Mulackstrasse 32

Münzstrasse 13–15

Mitte

Mitte

www.johanenlies.com

www.adidas.de


79 DARKLANDS

FIRMAMENT

MICHAEL SONTAG

Heidestrasse 46–52

Linienstrasse 40

Muskauer Strasse 41

Tiergarten

Mitte

Kreuzberg

www.darklandsberlin.com

www.firmamentberlin.com

www.michaelsontag.com

ANDREAS MURKUDIS 77 & 81

HANNES ROETHER

VERONICA POHLE

Potsdamer Strasse 77 & 81

Brunnenstrasse 6–7 &

Kurfürstendamm 64

Tiergarten

Torstrasse 109 | Mitte

Charlottenburg

www.andreasmurkudis.com

www.hannesroether.de

www.veronicapohle.de

COMME DES GARÇONS – BLACK SHOP & POCKET SHOP

NUTSANDWOODS NEW!

MIENTUS

Ackerstrasse 19

Wilmersdorfer Strasse 73

Linienstrasse 115 | Mitte

Mitte

Charlottenburg

www.comme-des-garcons.com

www.nutsandwoods.de

www.mientus.com

HALLESCHES HAUS

HOTEL ULTRA

ÉCOLE BOUTIQUE

Tempelhofer Ufer 1

Torstrasse 155

Torstrasse 3

Kreuzberg

Mitte

Mitte

www.hallescheshaus.com

www.hotelultra.de

www.ecole-boutique.com

GALERIES LAFAYETTE

KADEWE

MYKITA

Friedrichstrasse 23

Tauentzienstrasse 21–24

Budapester Strasse 38–50

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Charlottenburg

www.galerieslafayette.de

www.kadewe.de

www.mykita.com

HAPPY SHOP

KAUF DICH GLÜCKLICH

APARTMENT BERLIN

Torstrasse 67

Rosenthaler Strasse 17

Memhardstrasse 8

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Acclaimed jewellery designer

www.happyshop-berlin.com

www.kaufdichgluecklich-shop.de

www.apartmentberlin.de

Sabrina Dehoff has just

DEHOFF STUDIO NEW!

opened her latest store, DEHOFF STUDIO, on the

BIKINI BERLIN

KICKZ

NO 74

popular Auguststrasse in

Budapester Strasse 38–50

Torstrasse 86

Torstrasse 74

Mitte. DEHOFF STUDIO

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Mitte

presents her new concept of

www.bikiniberlin.de

www.kickz.com

www.no74-berlin.com

limited and one-of-a-kind pieces, starting with a line of beautiful, unique and

SOLEBOX

KONK

CIVILIST

colourful silk dresses show-

Nürnberger Strasse 14

Kleine Hamburger Strasse 15

Brunnenstrasse 13

cased next to the Sabrina

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Mitte

Dehoff jewellery brand and

www.solebox.com

www.konk-berlin.de

www.civilistberlin.com

its latest collection titled ‘Citadine’.

SOTO

LALA BERLIN

ORLANDO

Auguststrasse 26a

Torstrasse 72

Alte Schönhauser Strasse 3

Münzstrasse 2

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

www.sabrinadehoff.com

www.sotostore.com

www.lalaberlin.de

www.orlando-berlin.de

VOO STORE

NIKE

PAPIER TIGRE

OUKAN

Oranienstrasse 24

Hackescher Markt 2–3

Mulackstrasse 32

Kronenstrasse 71

Kreuzberg

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

www.vooberlin.com

www.nike.com

www.papiertigre.fr

www.oukan71.com

GARMENTS VINTAGE

LUIBAN

HAY BERLIN

OVERKILL

Linienstrasse 204–205

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 28

Auguststrasse 77–78

Köpenicker Strasse 195a

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Kreuzberg

www.garments-vintage.de

www.shop.luiban.com

www.hayberlin.de

www.overkillshop.com


80 TEMPORARY SHOWROOM

A7

Kastanienallee 36a

Almstadtstrasse 7

Mitte

Mitte

www.temporaryshowroom.com

www.a7berlin.de

WOOD WOOD & WOOD WOOD ANNEX

ATELIER OBLIQUE

Münzstrasse 18 Mitte

Rochstrasse 4 & 3 | Mitte

Mitte

www.converse.de

www.woodwood.com

www.atelier-oblique.com

DO YOU README?!

KUBORAUM

PAULA IMMICH

Auguststrasse 28

Köpenicker Strasse 96

Nürnberger Strasse 17

Mitte

Mitte

Charlottenburg

www.doyoureadme.de

www.kuboraum.com

www.paulaimmich.de

PARKHAUS BERLIN

GRETCHEN NEW!

FÊTE DE LA BOUTIQUE

Schröderstrasse 13

Kurfürstendamm 216

Mulackstrasse 11

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Mitte

www.parkhausberlin.de

www.mygretchen.com

www.fetedelaboutique.com

RIANNA + NINA

HORIZN STUDIOS

AMODO

Torstrasse 62

Alte Schönhauser Strasse 33/34

Linienstrasse 150

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

www.riannaandnina.com

www.horizn-studios.com

www.amodoberlin.com

SCHWARZHOGERZEIL

BURG & SCHILD

BOLIA NEW!

Torstrasse 173

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 3

Fasanenstrasse 31a

Mitte

Berlin

Charlottenburg

www.schwarzhogerzeil.de

www.burgundschild.com

www.bolia.com/de

CONVERSE STORE

Mulackstrasse 20

REBECCA CONCEPT STORE There is a very special boutique on the popular Alte Schönhauser Strasse in pulsating

SNEAKERSNSTUFF

0039 ITALY

VANS ZOOPER STORE

Berlin Mitte. At REBECCA

Schönhauser Allee 6|7

Schlüterstrasse 51

Bikini Berlin

CONCEPT STORE, women

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Budapester Strasse 46

can dive into a luxurious

www.sneakersnstuff.com

www.0039italy.com

Charlottenburg | www.vans.de

dressing room with a handpicked selection of fashion and accessories. The enchanting

CITY JEANS BY HANS

ODEEH

DSTM

furnishings and playful details

Meinekestrasse 25

Potsdamer Strasse 81a | Haus J

Torstrasse 161

take visitors on a trip into the

Charlottenburg

Tiergarten

Mitte

exciting world of young

www.hans-berlin.com

www.odeeh.com

www.dstm.co

couture.

DOPO DOMANI

DAS NEUE SCHWARZ

AUGUSTKINDER

Mitte

Kantstrasse 148

Mulackstrasse 38

Hufelandstrasse 10

www.rebecca-berlin.de

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

www.dopo-domani.de

www.dasneueschwarz.de

www.augustkinder.com

SUPER CONCEPT SPACE

BLESS BERLIN

FIONA BENNETT

STICKABUSH/STAB

Budapester Strasse 50

Oderberger Strasse 60

Potsdamer Strasse 81–83

Gipsstrasse 23

Charlottenburg

Prenzlauer Berg

Tiergarten

Mitte

www.super-space.de

www.bless-service.de

www.fionabennett.de

www.stickabush.com

TASCHEN STORE BERLIN

FRAGMENT

MAISONNOÉE

Schlüterstrasse 39

Almstadtstrasse 5

Potsdamer Strasse 91

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Tiergarten

www.taschen.com

www.fragment.berlin

www.maisonnoee.com

FOR INFORMATION ON ALL OTHER SHOPPING SPOTS, SEE WWW.BERLINFASHION WEEK.COM

Alte Schönhauser Strasse 41


DYSIGN 5 -7 SEPT 2017 I N T E R N AT I O N A L FA B R I C T R A D E FA I R

FA B RI C S | AD D I T I O NALS | B LUEZONE | KEY H O US E | DES IG N STUDIOS | AS IA SALON M U N I C H FA B R I C S TA R T. C O M | # M U N I C H FA B R I C S TA R T


WELLBEING

82

NEW!

GENTLEMEN'S CIRCLE

JO MALONE

Grooming

Perfumes & Cosmetics

Charlottenstrasse 35

Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41

Mitte

Mitte

www.gentlemens-circle.com

www.jomalone.com

TREAT COLLECTION BEAUTY LOFT NEW!

VABALI SPA

Beauty Salon

Seydlitzstrasse 6

Schönhauser Allee 55 | Prenzlauer

Moabit

Berg | www.treatcollection.com

www.vabali.de

BELLE REBELLE

LOS ANGELES COLD PRESS

Perfumes & Cosmetics

Juice Bar

Bleibtreustrasse 42

Friedrichstrasse 70

Charlottenburg

Mitte

www.bellerebelle.de

www.lacoldpress.com

FINE & DANDY LITTLE SISTER NEW!

WHEADON

Coiffeur

Steinstrasse 17

Ackerstrasse 156 | Mitte

Mitte

www.fineanddandy.de

www.wheadon.de

COWSHED SPA

DIPTYQUE

Beauty Salon & Wellness

Perfumes & Interior Scents

Soho House Berlin

Kurfürstendamm 193–194

Torstrasse 1 | Mitte

Charlottenburg

www.sohohouseberlin.com

www.diptyqueparis.eu

Wellness

Beauty Concept Store


83 AESOP Cosmetics Alte Schönhauser Strasse 48 & Forster Strasse 47 | Mitte & ­Kreuzberg | www.aesop.com

SPIRIT YOGA MITTE Acitivity Rosenthaler Strasse 37 Mitte www.spirityoga.de

MAC NEW! Makeup & Cosmetics Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41 Mitte www.maccosmetics.de

LIQUID GARDEN Juice Bar Stargarder Strasse 72 Prenzlauer Berg www.liquidgarden.berlin

SCHWIMMHALLE HOTEL ODERBERGER

UDO WALZ COIFFEUR

BECYCLE

Perfumes & Interior Scents Alte Schönhauser Strasse 26

Activity | Oderberger Strasse 57

Udo Walz’s latest attraction is

BECYCLE is Berlin’s answer

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

located right in the middle of

to Flywheel: the 45-minute

www.lelabofragrances.com

www.hotel-oderberger.berlin

Berlin’s famous Kurfürsten­

spin­n ing classes are set to

damm. In June 2016 he opened

thumping hip-hop, house

his most recent salon where he

and pure pop beats, and

LE LABO

AVEDA EXPERIENCE CENTER NEW!

DODO'S BLOW DRY BAR

is also showcasing his new

feature a pulsating light

Coiffeur

fashion line ‘Liebstesstück’.

design. BARRE, H.I.I.T. and

Hair Care & Cosmetics

Rosenthaler Strasse 66

Open from Monday to Satur-

yoga classes help strengthen

Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41 | Mitte

Mitte

day, walk-in appointments are

and elongate the muscles

www.aveda.com

www.dominic-keller.de

usually available from Monday

needed for cycling. The cosy

to Wednesday and bookings

lounge invites Wi-Fi-seeking

can be made anytime on-

freelancers and athletes to

MDC COSMETIC

BEARDY BOYS

line. Enjoy healthy food and

linger and kick back, to con-

Perfumes & Cosmetics

Grooming

drink out on the terrace of the

sciously refuel their batte­

Knaackstrasse 26

Gethsemanestrasse 1

Udo Walz Bistro Q32 as you

ries, and grab an organic

Prenzlauer Berg

Prenzlauer Berg

take in stunning views of

snack or smoothie from the

www.mdc-cosmetic.de

www.beardy-boys.de

Kurfürsten­damm.

adjacent My Goodness café.

Kurfürstendamm 32

Brunnenstrasse 24

HAUT & SEIN

BREATHE COSMETICS

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Beauty Salon

Perfumes & Cosmetics

www.udo-walz.de

www.becycle.de

Mulackstrasse 32

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 28

Mitte

Mitte

www.hautundsein.de

www.breathe-cosmetics.com

JIVAMUKTI YOGA

SHAN RAHIMKHAN

SHIJIN SPA

Activity

Coiffeur

Wellness

Brunnenstrasse 29

Markgrafenstrasse 36

Sonntagstrasse 25

Mitte

Mitte

Friedrichshain

www.jivamuktiberlin.de

www.shanrahimkhan.com

www.shijin-spa.de

FOR INFORMATION ON ALL OTHER BEAUTY SPOTS, SEE WWW.BERLINFASHION WEEK.COM


NITHAN THAI

NEW

CON THO

NEW

Thai

Vietnamese | Vegan

Chausseestrasse 5

Hasenheide 16

Mitte

Kreuzberg

www.nithanthai.de

www.fb.me/conthoberlin

NENI BERLIN

KANTINE KOHLMANN

International

German

Budapester Strasse 40

Skalitzer Strasse 64

Charlottenburg

Kreuzberg

www.25hours-hotel.com

www.kantine-kohlmann.de

THE STORE KITCHEN

MINE RESTAURANT

Soho House Berlin

Italian

International

Meinekestrasse 10

Torstrasse 1 | Mitte

Charlottenburg

www.thestores.com

www.minerestaurant.de

PETERPAUL

NEW

NEW

A NEVER ENDING LOVE STORY

German

International

Torstrasse 99

Breakfast & Brunch

Mitte

Bleibtreustrasse 5

www.peterpaul.berlin

Charlottenburg

CHICAGO WILLIAMS BBQ

RICHWATER & MITCHELL

American

British

Hannoversche Strasse 2

Wiclefstrasse 30

Mitte

Tiergarten

www.chicagowilliamsbbq.de

www.richwatermitchell.de

NEW

Kin Dee © Robert Rieger, Freunde von Freunden

EATING

84


85

3 MINUTES SUR MER

SUCRE ET SEL

SAGE RESTAURANT

AKEMI

French

French

International

Asian Fusion

Mitte

Traditional French kitchen

SAGE Restaurant is located

AKEMI’s creators have set

www.3minutessurmer.de

served in cosy, trendy atmos-

in an old brick building in

out to deliver delicious,

phere. Since 2012 the family

Kreuzberg that was turned

healthy Asian dishes that

run business is located in the

into an artistic, urban

delight both the body and

AL CONTADINO SOTTO LE STELLE

‘a la mode’ area of Berlin. You

restaurant with creative

the soul. Diners can embark

can have breakfast, lunch,

cuisine and a colourful mix

on a culinary voyage across

Italian

dinner, private parties, special

of guests. Open every day

the Far East, particularly by

Auguststrasse 36 | Mitte

events and typical specials like

from 6 pm, you can choose

sampling the Chinese,

www.alcontadino.eu

french duck, filet mignon,

from a constantly updated

Japanese and Vietnamese

plateau de ­fromage, crêpes and

menu of meat, fish and

tapas, which showcase the

homemade desserts. Come to

vegetarian dishes from all

finest cuisine from each

taste Paris!

over the world. During

country. Some of the most

summer we also serve drinks

popular delicacies include

Torstrasse 167

BEUSTER BAR International Weserstrasse 32

Torstrasse 132

at our beautiful SAGE

crispy shrimps with avocado

Neukölln

Mitte

BEACH next to the Restau-

tartar, seaweed salad with

www.beusterbar.com

www.sucreetsel.de

rant on the banks of the river

sesame oil and marinated

Spree.

pork with honey glaze.

PANAMA

KATERSCHMAUS

Köpenicker Strasse 18–20

Rykestrasse 39

International

International

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

Potsdamer Strasse 91

Holzmarktstrasse 25

www.sage-restaurant.de

www.akemi-berlin.

Tiergarten

Friedrichshain

www.oh-panama.com

www.katerschmaus.de

BORCHARDT

MA'LOA

International Französische Strasse 47

NEW

squarespace.com

NEW!

PAULY SAAL

KIN DEE

Hawaiian | Poké Bowls

International

Thai

Oranienburger Strasse 7

Auguststrasse 11–13

Lützowstrasse 81

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Tiergarten

www.borchardt-restaurant.de

www.fb.me/maloapoke

www.paulysaal.com

www.kindeeberlin.com


86

GRILL ROYAL

THE FLYING MONKEY

International

Asian | Dim Sum Bar

TO BEEF OR NOT TO BEEF

ULA Japanese

Italian

Friedrichstrasse 105b Mitte

‘Dim Sum’ = ‘to touch the

www.grillroyal.com

heart’. Taste the finest

One of the world’s best

Japanese restaurant, the

selection of Asian-style tapas

butchers, Dario Cecchini,

owners sought to build a space

HOUSE OF SMALL WONDER

& homemade dumplings.

provides TO BEEF OR NOT

that was set apart from the

The small dishes are perfect

TO BEEF with hand-picked

hustle and bustle of the city

American | Japanese

for sharing and mean guests

speciality meats, which

and deliberately far from the

Johannisstrasse 20

can sample plenty of what’s

they then prepare to the

main roads: ‘ula’ is, after all,

Mitte

on offer – sharing is caring,

highest standards. From an

the Japanese word for hidden.

www.houseofsmallwonder.de

right? Offering exquisite

original bistecca di panzanese

That is how the team was able

drinks and cocktails, this is

to a starter menu featuring

to create an exclusive and

the ideal setting for a night

exceptional classics, some of

intimate atmosphere and build

GOLDEN PHOENIX

NEW

In creating this modern

out to remember. It also

them with a contemporary

a small piece of Japan in

Chinese

features an elegant modern

twist, along with primi piatti

Berlin. On the menu, you will

Brandenburgische Strasse 21

interior and is located within

and exquisite meatless dishes

find a range of Japanese fusion

Wilmersdorf

walking distance of the

– here you will find the very

dishes that are typical

www.provocateur-hotel.com

famous ‘Mauerpark’. Let the

best that Italian cuisine has to

examples of the country’s

lights Dim Sum.

offer.

cuisine and made fresh in the

MOGG

Kastanienallee 15

Akazienstrasse 3

cooking staff, who conjure up

American | Deli

Prenzlauer Berg

Schöneberg

the finest regional dishes.

Auguststrasse 11–13

www.flyingmonkeyberlin.com

www.tobeefornottobeef.berlin

kitchen by the all-Japanese

Mitte

Anklamer Strasse 8

www.moggmogg.com

Mitte www.ula-berlin.de

KATZ ORANGE

KUCHI

LE PETIT ROYAL

MADAME NGO

International

Japanese

French

Vietnamese | French

Bergstrasse 22

Gipsstrasse 3

Grolmannstrasse 59

Kantstrasse 30

Mitte

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Charlottenburg

www.katzorange.com

www.kuchi.de

www.lepetitroyal.de

www.madame-ngo.de


87 MRS ROBINSON'S

NEW!

RICHARD

GRACE

Asian

International

Asian & European

Pappelallee 29

Köpenicker Strasse 174

Kurfürstendamm 25

Prenzlauer Berg

Kreuzberg

Charlottenburg

www.mrsrobinsons.de

www.restaurant-richard.de

www.grace-berlin.com

GROSZ

COOKIES CREAM

STICKS'N'SUSHI

International

International | Vegetarian

Japanese

Kurfürstendamm 193|194

Behrenstrasse 55

Potsdamer Strasse 85

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Schöneberg

www.grosz-berlin.de

www.cookiescream.com

www.sticksnsushi.berlin

SHISO BURGER

TOMMI'S BURGER JOINT

893 RYOTEI

Asian | Burger

American | Burger

Japanese

Auguststrasse 29c

Kurfürstendamm 212

Kantstrasse 135

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Charlottenburg

www.shisoburger.de

www.burgerjoint.de

www.893ryotei.de

NOBELHART & SCHMUTZIG

PAUL MÖHRING

International

German | Soft Ice Cream

International

Friedrich­strasse 218

Oranienburger Strasse 84

Monbijouplatz 11

Kreuzberg

Mitte

Mitte

www.nobelhartundschmutzig.com

www.paulmoehring.de

www.dae-mon.com

NEW!

NEW!

DAE MON

THE BUTCHER

67 SIXTYSEVEN

MÄDCHENITALIENER

International | Deli

American | Burger

Asian

Italia

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 5

Kantstrasse 144

Rosenthaler Strasse 67

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Shopping stimulates the

www.good-bank.de

www.the-butcher.com

www.fb.me/sixtysevenberlin

appetite, especially when the

GOOD BANK

narrow lane of Mulackstrasse

PAPPA E CICCIA

NIHOMBASHI

Italian | Organic

NEW

becomes filled with the delight-

LA LUCHA

ful aroma of rosemary and

Japanese

Mexican

balsamic vinegar. Located at no.

Schwedter Strasse 18

Weinbergsweg 4

Paul-Lincke-Ufer 39–41

12 Alte Schönhauser Strasse,

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

Kreuzberg

www.pappaeciccia.de

www.nihombashi.de

www.laluchaberlin.com

MÄDCHENITALIENER is a

staple of Berlin Mitte’s fashion district. Its much-celebrated fig

BREWDOG

NEW

pasta has featured on the menu

BOSCO

UMAMI

of this charming restaurant

American

Italian

Asian

since 2001, but you'll be temp-

Ackerstrasse 29

Wrangelstrasse 42

Knaackstrasse 16

ted to stay and savour its other

Mitte

Kreuzberg

Prenzlauer Berg

pasta and antipasti creations, as

www.brewdog.com

www.boscoberlin.com

www.umami-restaurant.de

well as sample the impressive wine list. For reservations, call

Mädchenitaliener © Marcus Krauß

+49 (0)30 40 04 17 87.

THE KLUB KITCHEN

SHIORI

BEETS & ROOTS

Asian

Japanese

International

Alte Schönhauser Strasse 12

Mulackstrasse 15

Max-Beer-Strasse 13

Grosse Hamburger Strasse 38

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

www.fb.me/maedchenitaliener

www.theklubkitchen.com

www.shioriberlin.com

www.beetsandroots.de

THE BIRD EXPRESS

INDIA CLUB

RAWTASTIC

ROY & PRIS

American | Burger

Indian

International

Chinese

Kleine Präsidentenstrasse 3

Behrenstrasse 72

Danziger Strasse 16

Weinbergsweg 8a

Mitte

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

www.thebirdexpress.com

www.india-club-berlin.com

www.rawtastic.de

www.royandpris.de

NEW


88 DATA KITCHEN International Rosenthaler Strasse 38 Mitte www.datakitchen.berlin

SALE E TABACCHI Italian Rudi-Dutschke-Strasse 24 Kreuzberg www.sale-e-tabacchi.de

BAR GRACIA

NEW!

Spanish Göhrener Strasse 5 Prenzlauer Berg www.bargracia.de

CECCONI'S Italian Torstrasse 1 Mitte www.cecconisberlin.com

NEW

USHIDO

CHAN

SPINDLER

SEASIDE

Japanese

Thai Cuisine

International

International | Fish & Seafood

Prenzlauer Berg

CHAN’s tropical bamboo

A converted industrial

Mitte

www.ushido-bbq.com

garden is the place to mingle

building directly on Kreuz-

www.seaside-fish.com

with a chilled-out, laid-back

berg’s Landwehr Canal is

Lychener Strasse 18

Mohrenstrasse 17

crowd in the summer. Take a

home to SPINDLER, the

DALUMA

peek into the open kitchen to

restaurant created by

LOKAL

International

see Thai chefs creating the

restaurateur Frank Spindler

International

Weinbergsweg 3

most delectable, market-style

and designer Karolina Preis.

Linienstrasse 160

Mitte

dishes that are always totally

An illustrious mix of Berlin’s

Mitte

www.daluma.de

fresh and flavourful. The

bohemians have made this

www.lokal-berlin.blogspot.com

cuisine is so delicious that

their rendezvous spot,

CHAN’s interior and garden

enjoying the creative gourmet

RYONG

are often full, so it’s always a

cuisine of Basque chef Nicolas

CALIGARI

Vietnamese

good idea to book ahead.

Gemin. The menu features

Italian

Torstrasse 59

Relaxed, delicious and highly

everything from catch-of-the-

Kienitzer Strasse 110

Mitte

recommended!

day fish and dry-aged beef to

Neukölln

vegetarian dishes that make

www.caligariberlin.de

www.ryong.de

CEVICHERIA

Paul-Lincke-Ufer 42

the most of regional and

Kreuzberg

seasonal produce.

QUA PHE

www.chan-berlin.com

Peruvian

Paul-Lincke-Ufer 43

Vietnamese

Dresdener Strasse 120

Kreuzberg

Max-Beer-Strasse 37

Kreuzberg

www.spindler-berlin.com

Mitte

www.cevicheria-berlin.com

www.fb.me/atquaphe

NEW

THE BOWL

BENEDICT

GÄRTNEREI

International

International | Breakfast

International

Warschauer Strasse 33

Uhlandstrasse 49

Torstrasse 179

Friedrichshain

Charlottenburg

Mitte

www.thebowl-berlin.com

www.benedict-breakfast.de

www.gaertnerei-berlin.com

Healthy Food

FOR INFORMATION ON ALL OTHER EATING SPOTS, SEE WWW.BERLINFASHION WEEK.COM


4 - 6 J U LY 2017 F U N K H AU S B E R L I N


DRINKING

90

NEW!

MIKKELLER BAR NEW!

PROVOCATEUR BAR

Torstrasse 102

Brandenburgische Strasse 21

Mitte

Wilmersdorf

www.mikkeller.dk

www.provocateur-hotel.com

Ä

GIN & TONIC BAR

Weserstrasse 40

Große Präsidentenstrasse 6–7

Neukölln

Mitte

www.ae-neukoelln.de

www.amanogroup.de

AUNT BENNY

BAR TAUSEND

Oderstrasse 7

Schiffbauerdamm 11

Friedrichshain

Mitte

www.auntbenny.com

www.tausendberlin.com

BADESCHIFF

THE COVEN BAR

Eichenstrasse 4

Kleine Präsidentenstrasse 3

Kreuzberg

Mitte

www.arena.berlin

www.thecovenberlin.com

BAR 3

BAR SAINT JEAN

Weydingerstrasse 20

Steinstrasse 21

Mitte

Mitte www.barsaintjean.com

BAR FAHIMI

ELSE

Skalitzer Strasse 133

An den Treptowers 10

Kreuzberg

Friedrichshain

www.fahimibar.de

www.else.tv


91 BAR MILANO Brunnenstrasse 11 Mitte www.bar-milano.de

TIGER BAR Potsdamer Strasse 91 Tiergarten www.oh-panama.com

BAR ZENTRAL Lotte-Lenya-Bogen 551 Charlottenburg www.barzentral.de

SALON ZUR WILDEN RENATE Alt Stralau 70 Friedrichshain www.renate.cc

BASALT Utrechter Strasse 38 Wedding www.fb.me/basaltberlin

SHARLIE CHEEN

AVENUE

Kreuzberg

The SHARLIE CHEEN bar is

From a restaurant serving

www.farb-fernseher.de

a real crowd magnet. Its

Russian speciality dishes to one

international clientele are

of the capital’s hottest clubs:

bowled over by the quality

here you'll find fifty years of

JAMBOREE NEW!

FARBFERNSEHER

Grand Hyatt Berlin

Skalitzer Strasse 114

Marlene-Dietrich-Platz 2 | Mitte berlin.grand.hyatt.com

BON BON

GRETCHEN

drinks on offer. Clean lines

­Berlin history in one building.

Torstrasse 133

Obentrautstrasse 19–21

with extravagant elements,

At the turn of the century,

Mitte

Kreuzberg

such as a ceiling construction

Berlin’s emerging party scene

www.bonbonbar.de

www.gretchen-club.de

found nowhere else in the world

rediscovered the premises,

and a back bar that beautifully

setting the course for this

frames 250 spirits, complete

unique location to be repur-

CLUB DER VISIONÄRE

HAFEN

the venue’s interior look. The

posed for contemporary use.

Am Flutgraben

Motzstrasse 19

Berliner Klebebande art

With its mix of simple el-

Alt-Treptow

Schöneberg

collective has even embellished

egance and timeless design

www.clubdervisionaere.com

www.hafen-berlin.de

the walls with a permanent

elements, AVENUE is now

tape mapping installation

considered one of Berlin’s

that is unique in Berlin.

top clubs.

THE GRAND

HOLZMARKT

Hirtenstrasse 4

Holzmarktstrasse 25

Brunnenstrasse 196

Karl-Marx-Allee 34

Mitte

Friedrichshain

Mitte

Mitte

www.the-grand-berlin.com

www.holzmarkt.com

www.sharliecheenbar.berlin

www.avenue-berlin.com

CRACKERS

8MM BAR

HOUSE OF WEEKEND

ANITA BERBER

Friedrichstrasse 158

Schönhauser Allee 177b

Alexanderstrasse 7

Pankstrasse 17

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

Wedding

www.crackersberlin.com

www.8mmbar.de

www.houseofweekend.berlin

DRAYTON BAR

BUCK & BRECK

PRINCE CHARLES

JOHN MUIR

Behrenstrasse 55

Brunnenstrasse 177

Prinzenstrasse 85f

Skalitzer Strasse 51

Mitte

Mitte

Kreuzberg

Kreuzberg

www.draytonberlin.com

www.buckandbreck.com

www.princecharlesberlin.com

www.johnmuirberlin.com


92

TIER Weserstrasse 42 Neukölln www.tier.bar

KATER BLAU Holzmarktstrasse 25 Friedrichshain www.katerblau.de

KIM BAR Brunnenstrasse 10 Mitte www.kim-bar.com

KING SIZE Friedrichstrasse 112b Mitte

KLUNKERKRANICH

MELODY NELSON

Karl-Marx-Strasse 66

Novalisstrasse 2

Neukölln

Mitte

www.klunkerkranich.de

BRICKS

SOLAR

In November 2015 a club was

SOLAR is Berlin's viewing

opened beneath the luxurious

platform for creatives and

Hilton Hotel at the historical

visionaries. The menu presents

Gendarmenmarkt. A pretty

outstanding classics and fresh

SOHO HOUSE BERLIN

MONKEY BAR

normal occurrence for a city

creations with regional

Torstrasse 1

Budapester Strasse 40

with as many contrasts as

ingredients from mostly

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Berlin. Its name? BRICKS.

organic sources. SOLAR

www.sohohouseberlin.com

www.25hours-hotels.com

­Designed and realised by

offers enjoyment for all the

internationally renowned

senses – an insider's tip. Await-

architects ‘studio karhard’,

ing you just one flight up the

MAXIM

DEAN

here a puristic urban setting

spiral staircase, on the 17th

Gormannstrasse 25

Rosenthaler Strasse 9

meets industrial design details in

floor, is the Sky Lounge with a

Mitte

Mitte

a progressive yet casual atmos-

spectacular 270° view. Art and

www.vins-cochonneries.com

www.amanogroup.de

phere. This is where Berlin’s

design spread across three

history comes face to face with its

floors – from Berlin's only DJ

zeitgeist.

elevator through to video

CHALET

NEUE ODESSA BAR

Vor dem Schlesischen Tor 3

Torstrasse 89

Mohrenstrasse 30

Kreuzberg

Mitte

Mitte

Stresemannstrasse 76

www.chalet-berlin.de

www.neueodessabar.de

www.bricks-berlin.club

Kreuzberg

installations and urban art.

www.solarberlin.com

PAULY SAAL BAR

PARIS BAR

CAFE AM NEUEN SEE

TWINPIGS

Auguststrasse 11–13

Kantstrasse 152

Lichtensteinallee 2

Boddinstrasse 57a

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Tiergarten

Neukölln

www.paulysaal.com

www.parisbar.net

www.cafeamneuensee.de

www.fb.me/twinpigsbar

HAUBENTAUCHER

RUM TRADER

APARTMENT

Revaler Strasse 99

Fasanenstrasse 40

Heidestrasse 62

Friedrichshain

Wilmersdorf

Tiergarten

FOR INFORMATION ON ALL OTHER DRINKING SPOTS, SEE WWW.BERLINFASHION WEEK.COM

www.haubentaucher.berlin Open Air

www.amanogroup.de


SLEEPING

93

THE YARD

NEW

SIR SAVIGNY HOTEL

Alexandrinenstrasse 125

Kantstrasse 144

Kreuzberg

Charlottenburg

www.the-yard.de

www.sirsavignyhotel.com

I31 HOTEL

GORKI APARTMENTS

Invalidenstrasse 31

Weinbergsweg 25

Mitte

Mitte

www.hotel-i31.de

www.gorkiapartments.com

MOTEL ONE UPPER WEST

NEW

PROVOCATEUR

Kantstrasse 163–165

Brandenburgische Strasse 21

Charlottenburg

Wilmersdorf

www.motel-one.com

www.provocateur-hotel.com

MARITIM HOTEL BERLIN

SOHO HOUSE BERLIN

Stauffenbergstrasse 26

Torstrasse 1

Tiergarten

Mitte

www.maritim.de

www.sohohouseberlin.com

MANI

ADELE DESIGNHOTEL

Torstrasse 136

Greifswalder Strasse 227

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

www.amanogroup.de

www.adele-berlin.de

MAX BROWN

DAS STUE

Uhlandstrasse 49

Drakestrasse 1

Charlottenburg

Tiergarten

www.maxbrownhotels.com

www.das-stue.com


94

ELLINGTON HOTEL BERLIN

HOTEL ZOO BERLIN

Nürnberger Strasse 50–55

NOVUM SELECT HOTEL BERLIN THE WALL

HOTEL ODERBERGER

Schöneberg

Opened in 1911, HOTEL ZOO

www.ellington-hotel.com

with its prestigious location

The NOVUM SELECT HOTEL

HOTEL ODERBERGER is a boutique hotel created within

directly on West Berlin’s

BERLIN THE WALL, is located

an impressive historic bath­

Kurfürsten­d amm quickly

on one of the most famous city

house built in 1902 and

HONIGMOND GARDEN HOTEL

established itself as the VIP

squares in all of Europe. 170

located in the vibrant district

Invalidenstrasse 122

Hotel of the Berlin Movie

modern and generously fur-

of Prenzlauer Berg. The hotel

Mitte

Festival in the 1920s to the

nished rooms and apartments

features 70 elegant and unique

www.honigmond.de

1950s. These days guests can

in 4-star category await guests.

rooms, a cosy fireplace bar and

choose to party or relax in

With its unique mix of creativ-

an excellent restaurant

surrounding designed by Dayna

ity, culture and business, an

serving up mainly modern

HILTON BERLIN

Lee (Powerstrip Studios NYC).

overnight stay in this new

German cuisine. At its heart is

Mohrenstrasse 30

130 bedrooms and 14 suites with

NOVUM Hotel in Berlin’s

an impressive swimming pool:

Mitte

high ceilings, original brick

historic center becomes a

an incredible cathedral-like

www.hilton.de/berlin

walls, custom made furniture

special experience.

space that can also be used as

and luxurious fabrics mirror

a gorgeous setting for parties,

HOTEL ZOO’S illustrious past.

GARDEN LIVING

photo shoots and conferences. Zimmerstrasse 88

Invalidenstrasse 101

Kurfürstendamm 25

Mitte

Oderberger Strasse 57

Mitte

Charlottenburg

www.novum-hotels.de

Prenzlauer Berg

www.gardenliving.de

www.hotelzoo.de

ANDEL'S BY VIENNA HOUSE

HOTEL INTERCONTINENTAL

HOTEL ADLON KEMPINSKI

HOTEL DE ROME

Landsberger Allee 106

Budapester Strasse 2

Unter den Linden 77

Behrenstrasse 37

Friedrichshain

Tiergarten

Mitte

Mitte

www.viennahouse.com

www.ihg.com

www.kempinski.com

www.roccofortehotels.com

HOTEL BERLIN BERLIN

THE RITZ-CARLTON

TITANIC CHAUSSEE BERLIN

Lützowplatz 17

Potsdamer Platz 3

Chausseestrasse 30

Mitte

Tiergarten

Mitte

www.hotel-berlin.de

www.ritzcarlton.com

www.titanic.com

FOR INFORMATION ON ALL OTHER SLEEPING SPOTS, SEE WWW.BERLINFASHION WEEK.COM

www.hotel-oderberger.berlin


P H O T O G R A P H Y C R E AT I V E

C A R AVA N

PREMIUM EXHIBITION

SEEK

SHOW & ORDER

JULY

JULY

JULY


Just a little suggestion, should your arm get tired Wonderful to wander bikini Berlin

BIKINI BERLIN CONCEPT SHOPPING MALL Budapester Straße 42–50 10787 Berlin www.bikiniberlin.de

Berlin Fashion Week Magazine #24  
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