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SPRING/SUMMER 2019 KÖNIG GALERIE — WHERE BETTER RAVE ABOUT ART? WHY RIHANNA, VIRGIL ABLOH, JEREMY SCOTT AND MAISON MARGIELA LOVE CROSSPOLLUTION / DESIGNER AND EXPAT LUTZ HÜLLE ABOUT RECONNECTING WITH HIS GERMAN “HEIMAT” / WHY GENERATION Z IS FORCING A LEAP IN COMPANY CULTURE

Berlin Fashion Week Magazine #26


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WELCOME

Welcome to the summer edition of the 2018 Berlin F ­ ashion Week!

MESSAGE

from the Governing Mayor of Berlin Michael Müller

Berlin Fashion Week is a flagship event that underlines the city’s status as a fashion capital. This summer marks its 26th anniversary, and with its numerous trade fair formats, fashion events and runway shows, Berlin Fashion Week continues to offer plenty of glitz and glamour, inform visitors about exciting new trends and collections, and bring buyers, industry professionals, members of the media, and fashion lovers from all over the globe to our capital. As usual, the programme is packed with unmissable highlights. And while Berlin-based labels still feature heavily, a large number of renowned international brands also appear alongside our traditional portfolio. Fashion means creativity, art, and inspiration. But the fashion industry also plays a key role in our local economy. A prime example is the successful #FASHIONTECH conference, an increasingly high-profile event for professionals from around the world that further cements Berlin’s role as a fashion hub. With so much to look forward to, I hope you enjoy an exciting Berlin Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2019!

© Senatskanzlei/Lena Giovanazzi

Imprint PUBLISHER

CONTRIBUTORS

COVER

ADVERTISING

PREMIUM EXHIBITIONS GMBH

Frédéric Schwilden | Chris Danforth

König Galerie & Artists

Advertising Director | Marco Gröning

Luckenwalder Strasse 4–6 | 10963 Berlin

Kate Lewin | Lena Brombacher

Photographer: Maxime Ballesteros

Junior Advertising Manager | Hauke Krüger

+49 (0)30 62 90 850

Björn Lüdtke | Western Bonime

www.maximeballesteros.com

Anita Tillmann | Jörg Arntz | Simon Kimble

Renko Heuer | Quyn Tran

www.berlinfashionweek.com

Wagemann Medien GmbH

TR ANSL ATION

Sonnenstaub – Büro für Gestaltung

Leuschnerdamm 31 | 10999 Berlin

Francesca Gatenby | Nivene Raafat

und Illustration

+49 (0)30 62 73 52 30

Sonja Marterner | Peter Großöhme

info@wagemann-medien.de

CIT Y GUIDE

Greifswalder Strasse 29 | 10405 Berlin

www.wagemann-medien.de

Lena Brombacher

+49 (0)30 55 57 79 29 0

EDITORIAL Editor-in-Chief | Christine Zeine

PRINTING ART DIRECTION

magazine@berlinfashionweek.com

www.sonnenstaub.com


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RADAR

Coscoon – natural beauty DIY box

LimeBike – smart mobility from California with love There are lots of places in Berlin that offer rental bikes. Recently, though, it’s impossible to help noticing the lime green bikes all over town that go that extra mile – the e-Bikes from LimeBike, a sustainable transport solution for people who want to minimise their CO2 footprint. Those wanting to use the electrically powered two-wheelers need a smartphone and the LimeBike app; then there are three steps to follow: search for a bike via GPS, scan the QR code and, once finished riding, park it in any authorised place and lock the rear lock to conclude the rental. For half an hour’s ride you’ll need to cough up EUR 5.50 in total. The fun factor and comfort make the price worth it. No more reaching your destination drenched in sweat – a winning formula, especially during Fashion Week. Those who prefer to take the sporty option can, of course, rent a “normal” bike from LimeBike, which costs just EUR 1 per half hour.

Many women secretly dream of blending their own skincare product or lip balm. The young Berlin natural cosmetics label Coscoon has anticipated this desire and created DIY boxes that consumers can use to produce their own natural-based cosmetics. Pure skincare free from mineral oils, silicons and parabens. No animal testing or gene technology! There is no arduous sourcing of raw ingredients required: everything you need is included within the box as per the recipe, including a glass beaker or similar laboratory tools as well as crucibles or lipstick tubes. It’s like an experimenting kit for women. Big like!

coscoon.com

limebike.com

RADAR

Brave new world – teamLab creates huge digital only art museum The fact that the digital only art museum has opened at the artificially created island of Odaiba in the Bay of Tokyo is appropriately in line with the overall idea behind the concept. The Mori building Digital Art Museum teamLab B orderless exhibition space shows an ­ installation of artworks that together reveal a fascinating, borderless world of art. The enchantment of light, colours and shapes results from the interaction of the freely moving objects in the room, which not only interact with each other but also with the observers to produce a magic that cannot be captured purely in words. The digital representation of nature is breathtakingly beautiful and, at the same time, resembles a fairytale. The 10,000 m 2 of floor area holds 520 computers and 470 projectors that generate this visual image of the future, enveloping and winning over visitors within seconds.

borderless.teamlab.art


RADAR

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The rebirth of cool – the smart fridge Family Hub 2.0 by Samsung The Samsung Family Hub 2.0 is every techie’s dream come to life. On one of the fridge doors there is a control centre – a 21.5 inch touchscreen with full HD resolution that displays the available apps in tile format. Samsung also uses its proprietary voice control. The apps for shopping lists, notices, weather forecasts, etc. can be controlled by voice instruction via the “Advanced Voice Technology”. If you’re at the supermarket and are unsure what’s hiding at the back of the fridge, simply press a button to see a picture of the inside of your fridge thanks to the integrated camera. Must-have 2.0!

samsung.com

It’s only pixel deep – the world’s first computer-generated influencer

Nowadays we leave the house saying “bye Alexa” and “hi Mercedes”. The new A-class is the first model of Mercedes-Benz to be fitted with the innovative MBUX multimedia system – the ­Mercedes-Benz User Experience. The unique feature of this system is its ability to learn, thanks to artificial intelligence. With the new, revolutionary voice control many features can easily be controlled by voice, from the navigation system to the air con or the radio. Settings can be personalised by setting up a personal profile using a smartphone, for example. The car therefore “knows” instantly what to do when you get in. Enjoy the ride!

May we introduce: Miquela Sousa, aka Lil Miquela. Model and singer, sweet 19, half Brazilian, half Spanish, based in California. She wears Prada, Supreme and Co.; takes selfies with her friends and has just got a tattoo. 1.2m followers on her Instagram page. Virtual insanity! Because: Lil Miquela is not even real but a pure figment of the imagination, a fictitious character enjoying the lifestyle of an Instagram It-Girl. In 2017 Miquela even published her first single, “Not Mine”, on Spotify. LA-based tech start-up Brud, which specialises in artificial intelligence and robotics, is behind the story. They want to use the popular fictional character to sharpen users’ awareness and demonstrate how “unreal” the Instagram world is. And that it’s ultimately all just about fame, since this is a valuable commodity when it comes to marketing.

mercedes.com

@lilmiquela

The new A-class – artificial intelligence goes streetwise


Marginalia or genius?


Text by FRÉDÉRIC SCHWILDEN

Photos by MAXIME BALLESTEROS


I was already quite drunk and at a Backstreet Boys concert when I pressed “order” on my mobile phone. That was in summer 2013. I bought a jumper designed by artist Martin Eder while I was listening to “Quit Playing Games (with My Heart)”. It was a limited edition run of 100. The jumper was black and had a cat on the front with blood flowing from its eyes. On the left and right, on the sleeves, naked women were flying through space. I was happier then than I’ve been for a long time. Since then my view is that there’s nothing better than art that you can wear. An artist produces originals, one-off pieces that originate from genius, i.e. from the depths of their mind. Fashion also works with genius: that of the

designers. Fashion, though, manufactures in series – in collections where a t-shirt, jacket or dress exists in thousands of manifestations of itself. When Demna Gvasalia presented a t-shirt bearing the logo of the logistics company DHL in her clothing collection it was the snooty fashion lovers who were the most shocked. Art historians naturally thought instantly of Duchamp and of readymades entering the fashion sector, even if it had taken a whole 99 years to do so. Marcel Duchamp came up with the concept of the “readymade”. He would take a preexisting object, present it in a different setting and declare it a work of art. Duchamp took a urinal, for instance, placed it on a

pedestal and called it “Fountain”. Demna Gvasalia took the DHL shirt, placed it in a showroom and called it fashion. Duchamp and Gvasalia have both produced work seen as “anti”. Anti-art; anti-fashion. Duchamp is subsequently considered to be one of the most important artists of the modern era, whose understanding of art radically altered our present day. Time will decide whether Gvasalia is seen as a marginal note or the genius of the century. What is indisputable, though, is that art and fashion are now lavishing each other with mutual admiration, and this is a good thing. Since 1995 Fondazione Prada has exhibited and supported artists like Thomas ­Demand, Louise

Bourgeois and John Baldessari. Seven years ago, Anselm Reyle designed bags, footwear and sunglasses for Dior. Last year there was a Jeff Koons collection at Louis Vuitton. This year, streetwear label Supreme has brought out t-shirts, jumpers and skateboards featuring prints by the American photographer Nan Goldin. In Berlin art and fashion already go hand in hand. The artist Denis Loesch amalgamates jumpers with brand logos into his sweater range. His fictitious brands are now called “Versucci”, “Sander Cruz” and “Comme des Vuittons”. König Galerie, the hottest gallery in the entire world, now even has its own lifestyle range called “König Souvenir”. They want to be part of the process,

through the products that they design in tandem with the artists and creatives. There are “Guilt” hats by Monica Bonvicini that recall Trump’s “Make America great again” baseball cap, while hand towels featuring a motif taken from a homoerotic work by Norbert Bisky are a reaction to earlier homophobic attacks in Berlin. Currently in the planning phase are new products with the Ignaz collective, which produces sweaters with knitted kippahs on, in answer to the call of the Jewish community: “Berlin wears a kippah”. There are leggings by Claudia Comte, t-shirts printed with works by Andreas Mühe and Anselm Reyle and, in collaboration with Lala Berlin, even a head-to-toe outfit featuring a

ART AND FASHION ARE MORE CLOSELY INTERTWINED THAN EVER BEFORE. BERLIN SHOWS HOW BENEFICIAL THIS IS – FOR EVERYONE.

work by Corinne Wasmuht. There are shortly plans to bring out a phone accessory together with Sucuk & Bratwurst from Frankfurt. No coincidence: right next to König Galerie is probably the most hip fashion and culture magazine anywhere in the world – 032c. On top of this, for some years now the fashion bloggers at Dandy Diary have been throwing parties at König Galerie where collectors, clubbers, models and fashion influencers meet to rave about art. Want to know what it’s all about? Don't sit there asking questions, just come and celebrate fashion, art and life.


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COVER STORY


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COVER STORY König Galerie inside St. Agnes – a former church in Kreuzberg – is Berlin's hippest art space, but also the head office of a magazine and a fashion label. We spoke with members of the König Galerie team, including power couple Johann and Lena König, as well as art director Louisa Hölker, about influencers, fashion and art.

Do you have a fixed daily routine? LOUISA: Not really. At the moment I’m getting lots of stuff ready for Art Basel, plus projects with Anselm Reyle and Andreas Mühe. LENA: I get up at five, then I play with the kids. Right now, their favourite game in the morning is pretending the bed frame is a boat and the rug is the water all around it. Then I drop the kids at the nursery and tell myself to take a lunch break later, which of course doesn’t happen. I then pick the kids up again at half three. In between all that I’m at the gallery’s office. JOHANN: My day is like that too. I also get up at five. Then I go for a half hour jog … LENA: … that’s not true … JOHANN: … then I row for half an hour, then I swim half an … LENA: … and then he wakes up at some point. JOHANN: So actually, I don’t really have any fixed daily routine.

JOHANN KÖNIG, LENA KÖNIG AND LOUISA HÖLKER

Nothing regular? JOHANN: Although when it comes to food, I follow the “8 to 16” diet. I first eat around midday, then have an evening meal. And then nothing for 16 hours.

What’s the aim? JOHANN: Losing weight.

How much? JOHANN: No specific amount. We don’t have any scales.

You were looking for a creative director for your gallery. How many applicants did you have? LENA: 25 at least. But we actually realised that we don’t need one. We just did everything ourselves; the merchandise, the fashion, the magazine. There are lots of upsides to doing it yourself. Our artists are our creative directors.

As a gallery, how did you come by the idea to not just sell art, but lifestyle items too? JOHANN: I saw editions as no longer contemporary. People aren’t as interested and, at the end of the day, it’s cheap art. But there really are loads of younger visitors.

They also want to be part of it. It was clear we needed to create affordable merchandise so people could display their passion for art. It also had something to do with 032c.

What’s it like working with the artists on the merchandise? JOHANN: It happens automatically. Katharina Grosse, for example, knew immediately what her t-shirt should look like. And Monica Bonvicini had the idea about jewellery. LOUISA: First we wanted to have a gold chain with the Istanbul-Biennale logo on, with “Guilt” on it. But Monica said no, she didn't want any gold chain; she’d much rather have a cap. She thought of “Guilt” as a contrast to Trump's “Make America Great Again”. Then it was knocked out within a week. LENA: The leggings for Claudia’s exhibition are just her style of course. She wears leggings with cowboy boots, and that’s why there are leggings printed with motifs taken from her work.

What is the difference between art and fashion? JOHANN: Fashion is practical. LENA: It can be worn, so it’s usable, in contrast to art. It’s identity-forming. Art, on the other hand, can fulfil social functions but doesn't get worn out.

Why do influencers now post from your parties? JOHANN: I started inviting them years ago. I found their range interesting. LENA: There were also a few who posted Instagram stories. They would put "Great show, go see it," but they were never actually there. I think the influencer hype will blow over.

You are influencers yourselves though. Johann, you once said in an interview that you only wear things that people send you. JOHANN: Yeah sure, trainers, stereo systems, dietary supplements, tinned sausages. But seriously though, the end game is about art. And the way we operate, that includes the parties, the magazine, fashion, influencers – people who originally didn't have much to do with art, if they come to love it then we’re hitting the nail on the head. The only thing we want is more art in the world.

koeniggalerie.com koenigsouvenir.com

THE ONLY THING WE WANT IS MORE ART IN THE WORLD


12 For Germans, beauty is an insult. For artist Anselm Reyle, beauty is brimming with possibilities. His most expensive item of clothing is a pair of jeans.

COVER STORY Were you born an artist or did you have to become one?

What was the most irrational thing that you've bought?

Are you even happier since owning a boat?

My mother is an artist too, so maybe I really was born one, but I didn’t want to be an artist at all. I grew up among artists and I just found their attitude and berets awful.

A Swarovski toaster. I liked the concept but hadn’t seen it first and, when I bought it, it was so ugly that I felt compelled to throw it away immediately.

Yeah, I guess so, I just don't get to go on it enough.

How much money is too little, how much is just right and how much is obscenely over-the-top? So far, I’ve always been able to think something reasonable to do with my money. So I never really had too much.

Does happiness prevail in your life? Yes.

What do you wear for work? Work clothes, t-shirts, shorts in summer. And trainers.

Does criticism make you happy? It was criticism that first made me understand what I'm doing. How I approach decorative things. And that this is an essential part of my work.

Do you think that the Germans’ fear of decorative art can be traced back to the Nazis? There’s nothing more decorative than totalitarian systems? Honestly, I’ve never thought about it. It could definitely be the case though, a fear of something being over-present. It’s more the case in Germany than in America or Asia. The Germans say that when something is decorative it has no depth. The fact it can have both and that this can address in-depth content is something they don’t understand.

What’s the most expensive item of clothing you’ve ever bought for yourself? Probably a pair of Levi’s jeans. I’ve had a few Dior things given to me as gifts, but I’ve never bought anything like that myself.

CRITICISM MADE ME UNDERSTAND WHAT I’M DOING

ANSELM REYLE


M E D M G

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COVER STORY Andreas Mühe’s photos are a largescale play on the power – toughness – of the naked male body, and the beauty of nature. Sometimes, though, he is the one that feels almost helpless.

It’s pretty common for everyone to think that they can take photos nowadays isn't it?

What did you learn about yourself when you photographed yourself naked at the Baltic Sea?

Luckily, they can’t.

I have photographed so many naked men. It started with Obersalzberg, then I photographed Rammstein naked in America. At some point I thought I should try it with myself as subject.

What is good photography? Good photography reveals something and affects you. It can make you feel anything from delight to disgust.

Do you get to know people when you photograph them? No, of course not, that’s superficial baloney. In my pictures you’ll see more about me and my vision of and take on the world than you will about the subjects I photograph.

There are moments in the landscape of course that strip you bare. You can also sit there and howl. You are genuinely shaken by nature. Positively and negatively. Maybe this is also an expression of helplessness.

Have you photographed more naked men than naked women?

What did you learn about Helmut Kohl when you photographed him?

I find the male body somehow more interesting as a sculpture. The male body has a toughness, for starters, that I find attractive. Maybe men are also simpler to take naked portraits of. Maybe I’m also more anxious in front of naked women. Ultimately, every naked man is also my naked self.

Everyone gets softer when they get older.

andreasmuehe.com

EVERY NAKED MAN

What did you see in Erich Honecker’s hunting lodge when you photographed it? People have retreated to some interesting places. In principle, Obersalzberg is of course also an assignment. One person is based in Obersalzberg and another has a little hunting shack in the forest in SchorfheideChorin.

ANDREAS MÜHE

IN MY PHOTOGRAPHS IS ALSO MY NAKED SELF


14 The “Sucuk und Bratwurst” design collective is thought to be the coolest creative agency in Germany. They use models with prosthetic limbs to model their sneakers and declare rappers dead.

COVER STORY Is our world really getting more beautiful by the day? ALESSANDRO: Absolutely. Every day is the most beautiful. We are out and about every day with more beautiful people.

The philosopher Byung-Chul Han said “Smoothness characterises our present moment.” Do you think that Instagram and Apple products create a kind of tyranny of almost frictionless surfaces? DAVID: The world really is getting smoother. On the other hand, though, then it’s easier to stand out.

SCIENCE IS FOR SCIENTISTS

ALESSANDRO BELLIERO, LUKAS OLGAC, DENIS OLGAC AND DAVID GÖNNER

How did Adidas react to the idea of presenting trainers on a model with prosthetic legs? ALESSANDRO: Not so well. LUKAS: They didn't want to use the pictures. ALESSANDRO: We also put a male model in a high-tech skirt. They didn’t like that either. DENIS: In the future, everything is a bit fused anyway. Our idea was that everything will blur together. ALESSANDRO: Male, female, not an issue any more. LUKAS: They hit the brakes on us. Now we are team Nike.

Is knowledge obstructive for good design? DAVID: You shouldn’t think things to death. ALESSANDRO: Science is for scientists, we always say. DAVID: We just do design.

What does it say about Germany's coolest design agency that it’s named after a sausage – meat stuffed in a casing made from animal intestines? LUKAS: Thanks for saying we’re so cool. The name is that because it stays in your memory. ALESSANDRO: And in your stomach. sucukundbratwurst.de


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COVER STORY Artist Claudia Comte shapes sensual sculptures out of wood, using a chainsaw. We spoke about old television, splinters in the face and the miracle of life.

Is it a privilege to be Swiss-born? Absolutely. I just came back from the Midwest. Travelling and seeing the world really made me think about how lucky I am to be European and of course Swiss.

And this Swiss-ness, what does it do to you? There was nature and something quite intimate about it. There were 300 people in the village I grew up in; there were more cows than people. That does something to you.

Why do smooth surfaces of wood interest you so much? That grew slowly in me. Eleven years ago, when I started working with a chainsaw, the challenge was to use the chainsaw as my only tool. I started to polish the works and I became quite obsessed with it. I wanted them to be perfectly polished. So I polished more and more. Now I feel that the surfaces are perfect. I trained my eyes and I see the differences between my early works and now. Looking at older works of mine is like watching old television.

Nowadays the resolution is bigger. The pictures are sharper. The colours are brighter.

Do you feel afraid or empowered when using the chainsaw? You can't use a tool properly if you are afraid. I just feel great while working with the saw. I go in the woods, there’s no better surrounding for me than the trees. Of course, sometimes it hurts. There's the kickback when the saw gets stuck. It really, really hurts my hands. The splinters just keep flying in my face.

I WANT TO BE IN THE WOODS MORE CLAUDIA COMTE

And then sometimes I get really angry and I throw the machine to the ground. But after a little break, I just start again. And it feels great.

Is silence important for you?

Is it an option to finally stay in Berlin?

What does fortune mean for you?

No … The interviewer sneezes. … bless you! You know, I never really left Switzerland. I still have the studio there. I wanna be in Switzerland more. Berlin is the best city in the world. But I want to spend more time in the countryside. I'm always in between things, but I want to be in the woods more.

Life. That I am alive. That is a miracle. We don't know why and when and how. But we are. That's fortune.

Silence makes me nervous when I’m working. I need music in the background.

claudiacomte.ch


16 When the Ignaz collective organised the first parties in Frankfurt’s museums the collective’s members weren’t even of legal age. They tell us where to have the best sex and how important pesto rosso is.

COVER STORY What’s more important for a good party: drugs or gays? JOEL: Gays, every time. What is the difference between a party in a museum and one in a club? JAKOB: It’s the intention: in a museum you want to bring people together; clubs are for boozing.

What do you have against boozing? BERNARDO: Yeah boozing is okay too. You can do that, but you shouldn’t only get boozed up. It’s cool to go to a museum party where people are interested in other things too. What’s the secret to a good party? JAKOB: The music, 99 % of the time. BERNARDO: Then the people, then the venue.

What sort of music do you like? JOEL: I usually put on trashy trap or Neptunes stuff. BERNARDO: Kid Cudi What’s the best place for a party? BERNARDO: Just a big hall. JAKOB: Where you can smoke. JOEL: You should never have to go outside to smoke.

BERNARDO: Then it’s

dead in the water. It means gaps in the party. Everyone needs to be inside for the duration. Who is the most talented dancer on the German arts scene? JAKOB: Johann König danced amazingly at the party during Gallery Weekend. What were his best dance moves? JAKOB: He’s got some great arm moves. Is sex at parties a good idea? ALL: Definitely. My problem is always … BERNARDO: Where? Yup, true. It’s always full in the toilets. JAKOB: Yeah, ‘cause everyone’s doing lines. JOEL: We’re no friends of drugs though.

So where do you have sex then? BERNARDO: If you know people, behind the bar or behind the DJ. Standing up? BERNARDO: Yeah,

standing up. The floor’s rank. What’s the perfect party outfit? JOEL: Lots of pockets, comfortable, not too hot. BERNARDO: Like a hiking outfit, base it on the onion principle. JAKOB: You have to feel good. JOEL: Comfy and stylish and … BERNARDO: … cosy. What should you eat before partying? JAKOB: Lots of carbs, pasta with pesto rosso. JOEL: If you’re not veggie, a big bolo or steak. How important is money? JOEL: You don’t need a cent to have fun. @ignaz.de

WE ’RE NO FRIENDS OF DRUGS JOEL OLCHOW, JAKOB BLUMENTHAL AND BERNARDO MACEDO-WEISS


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COVER STORY Before designer Leyla Piedayesh set up her label “Lala Berlin” she worked at MTV. In 1979, aged 9, she fled Iran with her parents to travel to Germany. Her fashion allows her to speak out. Sometimes, though, she prefers to be quieter.

Why are you in fashion? I came to fashion like a woman to a child – I stopped being an editor for MTV and started to knit.

Why did you leave MTV? I grew up with MTV, I was a teenie and this programme was my dream. And I lived the dream. But at some point this dream of mine, this 80s utopia, became a corporation. We sensed it in the editorial team. Music was no longer important. We had to promote reality TV and the Crazy Frog by Jamba. It seemed hollow and superficial to me, I couldn’t identify with the programme any more.

Do you have an all-time favourite fabric? I want to die in cashmere. You can wear it in summer too, depending on the fineness of the fabric. A light, cashmere blanket for summer evenings is pure bliss.

Does fashion make the world better? A piece of clothing? No way. What makes the world better then? Less of what we produce. Fashion can change lives though. Because people take on new roles thanks to fashion, they express themselves, reinvent themselves.

Why do you donate part of your income to the Be an Angel organisation?

How do you feel when you think of Tehran? Is that your home?

Andreas Tölke has set up an association that looks after migrants’ integration. I emigrated to Germany from Iran in 1979. At some point I realised that I have a voice. Maybe fashion as such can’t change the world, but the people behind it (the designers) and the brand itself as a mouthpiece really can. When Trump imposed a travel ban on Muslim countries Iran was also affected. And that’s how it happened.

Iran is my point of origin, of course, because that’s where I come from. Last year I went back there for the first time in 20 years. The food, the colours, the patterns and the smells. I realised how strongly my roots come out in my work. Germany has become my second homeland, though.

lalaberlin.com

I WANT TO DIE IN CASHMERE

LEYLA PIEDAYESH

Even doing interviews with the big stars wasn’t any fun any more.


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3.–7. JULI 2018


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by ANITA TILLMANN

Based in Paris, German designer Lutz Hülle was always ahead of his time. Together with his former school friends Wolfgang Tillmans, now one of the most famous contemporary German photographers, and the artist Alexandra Bircken, Hülle left his home city of Remscheid to dive into the world of fashion and art via a stopover in Hamburg. He studied with Stella McCartney at the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. He worked as a designer for Martin Margiela ­­­ in Paris, where, in 2000, he set up his label Lutz Huelle together with his business partner David Ballu. Since then his designs have been sold in the most important stores around the world, among others by Andreas Murkudis Store 81/Berlin, H. Lorenzo/LA or O ­ pening Ceremony/New York. Hülle is showcasing his Spring/Summer 2019 collection, presented by the Fashion Council Germany Gallery at Halle am Berghain, over Berlin Fashion Week.

© Wolfgang Tillmans

THE MULTIFUNC TIONALIST


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INTERVIEW ANITA TILLMANN: What were your reasons for leaving Germany in 1990? LUTZ HÜLLE: I was having too much fun in Hamburg and thought that if I wanted to do something with my life I needed to go somewhere else. I had dreamt of going to Saint Martin's in London forever, so it seemed the right moment to just go for it.

Did you sense something in London and Paris that you had never felt in your home country? I never compared one country to ­a nother; it was more out of curiosity that I wanted to go and live somewhere else. I've always felt profoundly European, so always considered my ­ home as ­Europe, not only Germany. I love ­ G ermany very much, but I also love France, and ­ E ngland, and ­ Italy, all for different reasons. I've always felt that it would be so sad to restrict yourself to just one place if there's so much else out there.

You once said in an interview that you wanted to find out “who you can be” (Iconist, 30.04.2015). Who have you become? Ha ha … well, still trying to find out … you tell me.

Your approach to designing clothes has been defined as the notion of “decontextualisation”. How would you describe it in your own words? I take things that are familiar and well-known and, by changing them even slightly, they become something else, something new. Taking things out of context by just moving them somewhere else, mixing genres, making things unexpected. When I first started this collection I asked myself how our lives would evolve, and one thing that seemed very clear was that boundaries were going to be far less rigid than before, so I thought that our way of dressing would change in a similar way. It made sense to say that sportswear, for example, would become a wardrobe classic, simply because our lives would accelerate, and we would need clothes that would be easy and comfortable but at the same time beautiful, luxurious, interesting … a lot of things at the same time. The idea of making a tailored blazer in sweatshirt jersey seemed ridiculous to people at the time, but to me the fact that a ­jacket that you could wear to work or any formal occasion would be as easy and comfortable to wear as a simple sweatshirt made total sense.

What is the theme of your latest collection? There's never just one theme, more a continuation of the previous collections. What was more extreme with the last collection was the "Couture" – or ­Parisian influence. I'm strangely obsessed with a certain idea of "the ­ Parisienne" at the moment, how to take the idea of a certain bourgeois style somewhere else, somewhere fresh.

What are your thoughts on collabs and are you planning any? Collabs are great, and really the future of everything. I have always worked with different brands and garments, and all our bomber styles at the moment are in collaboration with Alpha Industries.

Could you imagine working for one of the big commercial names? If so, which one – and what would you do differently? I have been a consultant on other brands for as long as I have had my own collection; at the moment I work for both Max Mara and Brioni. It's extremely interesting and challenging to work for another brand as, contrary to my personal work where I can do what I like, I am there to give them exactly what they need, in terms of product, client and positioning. I think the most important thing today for any brand is to be coherent, true and unafraid to take risks. Whenever a brand is coherent about who they want to be and unafraid to stick to their ideas they will touch people.

You like watching people. Have social media changed your view of people? Social media can drive me mad, but it's also an extremely interesting medium. In our case it has really helped us to break into the mainstream, as it made my work so much more visible. It hasn't necessarily changed my view of people; I just feel sometimes that it's not the healthiest thing to spend too much time on.

The German actor Lars Eidinger recently openly admitted that he spends three hours or more a day on Instagram – and that he’s pretty hooked on it. Keyword “influencer”: who influences you and whom do you influence? I'm still influenced mostly by what happens around me, friends mainly, and just people in the street. I have also always been obsessed with music, film, art, television, books, going out … a nything to do with popular culture ­

really, and anything that could make you look at life in a different way.

Who is your favourite artist? Impossible to name just one.

What music do you listen to in your studio? How do you choose the music for your shows? I don't really listen to music while working as it makes me want to do other things … apart from that it changes constantly. At the moment I have the latest Chvrches, Cigarettes after Sex, MGMT's “Little Dark Age” and Tocotronic on repeat. I've been utterly obsessed with “Ich öffne mich” by Tocotronic for weeks now. I always give an idea of what I would like to use in the show to Wladimir Schall, who does the music for our show, and he proposes a way to mix it together.

You have gained over 20 years of experience in the industry. Is there a piece of advice that you would like to give the next generation of designers on their journey? Be true to and believe in yourself. And always treat people the way you would like to be treated … oh and above all have fun!

What are you particularly looking forward to in Berlin? Spending time with all the amazing people, and getting drunk at Berghain.

Do you see the city with different eyes today? What has changed over the past years in your opinion? I know that people always say that things are changing in Berlin, but for me it's still the most wonderful, open and beautiful place … few things make me happier than spending time with friends in Berlin, sitting in a bar somewhere and letting the world go by.

P.S.: Who is really your favourite designer? What are you wearing? My favourite designer would really be Pierre Cardin, for the absolute modernity, clarity of vision, and the stark, linear beauty that still feels completely relevant today.

lutzhuelle.com

LUTZ HUELLE RUNWAY SHOW presented by Fashion Council Germany 6 July 2018 | 19:00 Halle am Berghain | Friedrichshain By invitation only!


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DESIGNERS FASHION

CACHAREL 60th anniversary “Ready to World” The Cacharel brand is as French as baguettes, Champagne and Jane Birkin. When you hear the name Cacharel you instantly think of girls in airy, floral-pattern summer dresses photographed à la David Hamilton. The cult around the brand, which was established in 1958 by Jean Bousquet and named after a species of bird native to the Camargue region of southern France, has remained intact to this day. At the start of the 1960s Cacharel brought readyto-wear fashion to the market with its gorgeous signature prints paving the way. It was the era of pop art, pop music and the French Nouvelle Vague. In 1963 the French Elle published a cover featuring top model Nicole de Lamargé wearing a pink Cacharel blouse – making history for the company. The brand became très en vogue almost overnight and in a heartbeat Cacharel's creations were exported all over the world. Cacharel also conquered the perfume market with the launch of its first women’s fragrance, “Anaïs Anaïs”. 60 years on, “Monsieur Cacharel”, alias Jean Bousquet, has completely overhauled the iconic traditional market. His design studio is run like a workshop, in which young artists and senior designers interact and share inspiration. The motto is “Ready to World”. Cacharel has wisely not let go of what made it famous in the first place however: its prints. The heritage logo, too, emerges as an all-over print. A pinch of street style does the brand no harm either. This is the way Cacharel is celebrating its 60-year anniversary and its new signature style at the same time. The Spring/Summer 2019 collection is going on show at the Berlin and Paris Fashion Weeks, presented alongside an iconic photo series by the artist Sarah Moon, who photographed the campaigns for Cacharel back at the end of the 1960s. And there is another première, too: “Yes I Am” is the name of the new Cacharel fragrance for the Cacharel girl 2.0. Bon anniversaire!

cacharel.fr


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BARTON PERREIRA shades of Hollywood In 2007 the visionaries Bill Barton and Patty Perreira set up luxury glasses brand Barton Perreira based in Los ­A ngeles. Both have many years of experience in the industry. Patty Perreira has worked for brands including Prada, Miu Miu and Jil Sander, while Bill Barton was President of Oliver Peoples. With such a wealth of expertise it’s no wonder that renowned Hollywood stars are regularly pictured wearing their designs. The corrective glasses and sunglasses, which are produced by hand in Japan, combine traditional craftsmanship with the use of high-end materials and innovative technology. On the company’s 10th anniversary Barton Perreira designed its “10 Year Anniversary” collection, which reinterprets and celebrates the iconic models. To the next ten years!

bartonperreira.com

HORROR VACUI the fear of emptiness Qualified lawyer Anna Heinrichs “only” actually intended her label Horror Vacui to produce beautiful pyjamas, after trying in vain herself to find classic pyjamas with a modern twist. She probably never imagined in her wildest dreams that her designs in wonderful Liberty fabrics would be gracing both the red carpet and editorial pages. Horror Vacui is the “collector” label among the German newcomers. As the daughter of a sewing factory owner Anna Heinrichs knows the industry inside out. This season she will be showing Vogue x Swarovski looks that have been inspired by embroidered baby clothes in the Vogue Salon. She has worked with plain fabrics for the first time here. In parallel to this she is presenting her Spring/Summer 2019 pre-collection at the ­Berliner Salon.

horror-vacui.com


F A I R P L AY polo goes street La Martina launched the iconic Fair Play capsule collection, designed by Danilo Paura, Jacopo Pozzati and Leonardo ­Colacicco. The collection is a combination of heritage and a vision of urban streetwear. Like La Martina, Fair Play is also inspired by polo sport, though its streetwise style appeals to a younger audience. The capsule collection includes 18 trans-seasonal pieces that can be combined in various ways: bomber jackets in denim or nylon, as well as a reinterpretation of the classic Paltò coat, which is presented in a new, oversized version. ­T-shirts, hoodies and cotton fleece tracksuits, as well as oversized jumpers and trousers made from denim or fleece, round off the collection. On 4 July 2018 a bike polo event will take place at the PREMIUM premises from 16.00–19.00.

fairplaybrand.com

BECK TO BECK sophisticated streetwear made in Berlin Uli and Michi Beck have been spinning records for years as DJ team Beck To Beck. Now the duo have founded their own fashion label of the same name. The first collection contains classic basics for women and men – perfectly tailored and using outstanding quality materials and workmanship. Michi Beck claims to live in t-shirts, sweaters and hoodies. After taking on the styling of his band, Die Fantastischen Vier, for so many years it was his wife who inspired him to collaborate on the project. Even during “The Voice of Germany” there were lots of people asking about the “Blinded” sweatshirt that Michi wore. On 3 July 2018 the duo will open their first pop-up store in Alte Schönhauser Strasse 15 in Berlin-Mitte as part of ­Berlin Fashion Week. Check!

beck-to-beck.com


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COLLECTIVE SWALLOW gastronomic fashion The young Swiss designers Anaïs​Marti and Ugo P ­ ecoraio have set up a gender-neutral label together with Collective Swallow that transcends the seasons. The ­ ­label’s design focus is the visual and gustatory perception of food. Fashion meets conceptual art? The quintessential concept is most clearly articulated through their third collection, “Slice Me Nice”, which revolves around Italy’s national dish – pizza. The design duo, who work between Basel and Berlin, have translated this into a clothing range – in the iconic colours of Italy, naturalmente. It’s about the perfect base and a load of different toppings; about enumerating colours, layers, volume and textures – from the hoody with its pizza print to the mozzarella-coloured evening dress. Pizza 24/7 from casual to couture – ci piace! The 4th collection will be appearing in September 2018.

collectiveswallow.it

T-shirt and jeans – all you really need to feel and look great. Worn under a suit a ­t-shirt gives the look a more relaxed feel. It’s by no means easy, however, to find a timeless, perfectly shaped t-shirt. Designer Marie Grönemeyer has made it her mission, through her label KRAGENWEITE BERLIN, to come up with this elusive, ideal t­ -shirt. It is sustainably produced in Germany; Japanese and Portuguese ­cotton jersey guarantee colour fastness; and the garment retains its shape even after ­several washes. 16 colours, 4 sizes, 3 lengths, 2 types of fabric, 1 timeless design – word. And by the way … the label has a famous co-founder – none other than Herbert G ­ rönemeyer, a self-confessed tee-wearer.

kragenweite.berlin

Collective Swallow © Alexander Palacios

KR AGENWEITE BERLIN the perfect tee


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A L P H ATA U R I smart functional wear The clothing of the future can do more: smart textiles are playing an increasingly important role in the fashion sector – and can constitute a definite competitive advantage in a white-hot industry. QED with the AlphaTauri label, launched by Red Bull in 2016, which skilfully combines classic ready-to-wear collections for women and men with innovative technologies. In collaboration with leading manufacturers, inhouse textile technologies are being developed that, for instance, are changing how the body interacts with clothing. Taurex®strengthened clothing affects body and mind, since the innovative textile technology returns the body energy emitted to the wearer. This works by means of a titan mineral complex in the fabric that reflects the far infrared rays back onto the body. This is designed to increase performance, well-being and ability to concentrate. To protect the wearer from moisture AlphaTauri works with nanotechnology. NanoSphere is a robust, abrasion-resistant coating that allows water, oil and dirt to drip off. Constructing upper materials with NanoSphere ensures they remain clean and dry; the same principle as the lotus flower, which repels dirt and water. The innovative reflective print, seen on the Oxom men’s jacket for example, ensures better visibility in the darkness. Full of energy, dry, safe and living life comfortably – what else could you ask for! AlphaTauri will introduce its 3Dknit design lab at PREMIUM. Using a 3D-knit whole-garment knitting machine and integration within virtual reality AlphaTauri gives us a sneak peek into its world of innovative design.

alphatauri.com


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U R B A N I S TA life in motion Swedish brand Urbanista is aimed at active cosmopolitans who love music. The earphones, headphones and loudspeakers are designed to make listening to music 100 % pleasurable, wherever you are – without compromising on audio quality or style. The love of urban life is also reflected in the naming of the products. All the models are named after cities around the globe. “Detroit” is the latest addition. The folding Bluetooth headphones with matte finish in black, peach or green give any outfit that “something special”. The comfy memory foam pads adapt to fit the shape of the wearer’s ears. The battery offers up to 12 hours of runtime and just 15 minutes of charging is enough to give you up to three hours of bonus music pleasure – let the music play!

urbanista.com

JULIA SEEMANN mixed vibes The images of Rihanna and Bella Hadid have already been replicated in Julia Seemann’s designs. The Swiss designer is the talk of the town by all the fashion institutions from New York to Berlin, and published in magazines such as i-D Germany, WWD, Numéro Tokyo and Dazed & Confused. This type of vertical take-off first needs an established foundation. Julia Seemann, who once replicated cutting patterns for Vivienne Westwood, understands this. Her designs are notable for their self-assured aesthetic, which feeds off links to ancient mythology just as much as influences from the Eighties, streetwear, youth culture and the party and music scene. Alongside her work as a designer Julia Seemann regularly organises party performance sessions like “Body Sensations”, which are dedicated to electronic underground music.

juliaseemann.com


ART INSTALLATION BY ANSELM REYLE

3–5 JULY 2018 BERLIN THE PLATFORM FOR COMMERCE, COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY & CONTENT.

WWW.PREMIUM-GROUP.COM


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C A P I TA L K – K o r e a i n B e r l i n

Philippe Périssé has frequently trodden new paths in his career. His company logo, a winged bull terrier, is an appropriate reflection of this. After graduating from the ­Chambre Syndicale de la Couture in Paris he worked in various roles, including for G ­ alliano. He undertook a further course, this time in Luxury Brand Management & Development at the IFM (the French Institute of Fashion), which led him to the Luxury division at L’Oréal. He was drawn back into ­ design, however. After initially working­­purely on assignment, he decided to set up his own label of the same name. His strong shoulders and narrow waists have become his hallmark. He will be presenting at PREMIUM on the ­ invitation of Fashion Council Germany as part of the UNITED ­ ­FASHION EU project.

Korea is THE trend: alongside K-music, K-beauty and K-food there is a special focus on ­K-fashion. The up-and-coming designers from South Korea are non-conformist, radical and bold. They love overloading and playing with silhouettes, situations, colours and textures. The exuberant, lively street scene of the 10 million-strong metropolis of Seoul is a source of inspiration for many – yet the designs are as laid-back as they can be. You can find Korean fashion in Berlin at the Knok Store in Kreuzberg, or at Andreas Murkudis’s concept store in Schöneberg, which also sells the Ader Error brand, cited by Vogue as the “Korean answer to Vetements”. Murkudis loves Korean design and presented the “10 Soul” exhibition at this year's Gallery Weekend in Berlin, which was initiated in 2016 by the Seoul Design Foundation and the Korean government and which has been on show in previous years at Selfridges in London, I.T in Hong Kong, L’Éclaireur in Paris and Excelsior in Milan. D-Antidote, Youser and Münn were among those coming to Berlin again for Berlin Fashion Week and we can recommend them as an absolute must-see. Park Hwan-sung has already collaborated several times with Fila through his label D ­ -Antidote, and is celebrating the 90ies with oversized silhouettes and logo prints. The talented designer completed his degree at Central St. Martin’s College of Art & Design in London, UK, and gained his first experience working at Alexander McQueen, Tom Ford and Burberry, before taking on the role of Design Director at A.Hallucination in London and, finally, setting up his own label, D-Antidote, which he sees as an antidote to today’s fashion market that is split between luxury and fast fashion. The high-end streetwear brand Youser, which was launched in 2011 by designer Mooyeol Lee, also concentrates on oversized looks and all sorts of fabrics, prints and borrowings from sportswear. After working for other brands the designer was keen to tell his own story with his creations. He takes inspiration from music, art and, in particular, from young street subculture. Over the past six years the unisex brand, which encourages mixing menswear and womenswear pieces, has achieved huge growth, because the mid-level price-performance ratio has won over many overseas buyers. Münn, established in 2013, gives classic tailoring street cred. Creative Director Hyun-min Han completed his degree at the Samsung Art & Design Institute (SADI). Always on the hunt for new silhouettes, materials, unusual details and patterns, the brand defines itself through the concept of “luxurious defamiliarization”. For his designs, the designer sometimes likes to use vintage Yves Saint Laurent fabrics and his individual style has captured the hearts of fashion editors. The three brands are being awarded with this year’s PREMIUM Young Talents Award as part of Berlin Fashion Week. They will be showing their Spring/Summer 2019 collections at ­PREMIUM. Check!

philippeperisse.com

d-antidote.com

PHILIPPE PERISSE for strong women

youser.co.kr

munnseoul.kr


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#LISTEN! #LEARN! #EXPERIENCE! #BUSINESS

#FASHION TECH BERLIN by BJÖRN LÜDTKE


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Digitalisation is a topic that has a bearing on all industries, from logistics companies to banks. Sooner or later they will all be affected by disruption – if they haven't been already. The fashion and lifestyle industry is no exception. Despite the constant state of change, fashion is still one of the sectors least permeated by digital transformation. In order to remain competitive in today’s aggressive market environment it’s therefore all the more important to stay on top of the latest deve­ lopments at conferences like #FASHIONTECH Berlin, the con­ference on the future of fashion where top-level speakers from fashion, lifestyle and technology report from their experience and discuss the opportunities and challenges that companies need to tackle.

In online fashion retail customers’ requirements are increasing in line with customised offerings and will increase even further in future. Personalisation is the buzz­word here. To be able to achieve this, the key is to understand customers. Only those who know their customers can offer them a customised offering. Customers supply the data through their user behaviour. These just need to be analysed with the corresponding AI applications to adjust the offering, pricing and range criteria accordingly. Even in the luxury segment the understanding is that it’s the customer calling the shots. People have long tried to extend the boutique experience of the physical store into the digital space. This doesn’t work, however — luxury clients have very different needs online. Michael Kliger from mytheresa.com: “You need to create an online customer experience that corresponds to the requirements of luxury shoppers. Our customers don't have a lot of time. They therefore want to shop for products quickly and easily.”

The online shop has generated revenues of EUR 245 million since its inception.

Michael Kliger / President & CEO mytheresa.com


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Taking mytheresa.com as an example it’s clear that digitalisation is an attitude more than anything. Processes cannot simply be an extension of the physical into the digital world, but need to be thought through afresh — in full.

Tarek Müller / Co-Founder & Managing Director, About You

According to Forbes, “one of the brightest European entrepreneurs” on the “30 under 30” list.

The separation of fashion and technology is, therefore, no longer contemporary. Tarek Müller is co-founder of About You and, as Managing Director, is responsible for marketing and brands. “About You is both — a fashion and a tech company. We certainly have strong DNA when it comes to tech and data, but without fashion, logistics and marketing expertise it’s useless. We should probably just avoid making this distinction.”

Nevertheless, many companies remain trapped in old systems. This needs to change – ideally, by learning from the agile corporate culture of start-ups – or even by bringing them into the company directly. Martin Wild is Chief Innovation Officer of the MediaMarktSaturn Retail Group. He is clear that start-ups bring innovation into companies. The Retailtech Hub, initiated under Wild, is an accelerator where start-ups can come to meet established companies to work on the concepts for the retail of tomorrow. “We rely above all on innovative projects by startups, because we are firm believers that implementation with startups works best in this area. The founders approach issues differently. Sometimes they take us down paths that we wouldn’t have thought possible ourselves.”

FASHION TECH

Martin Wild founded the online electronics store Home of Hardware at the age of 18. Martin Wild / Chief Innovation Officer MediaMarktSaturn


Besonders empfindliche Kleidungsstücke müssen äußerst schonend behandelt werden, damit ihre Qualität erhalten bleibt. Dank der ÖkoMix-Technologie werden Waschmittel und Weichspüler mit Wasser vorgemischt, bevor sie in die Trommel gelangen. So wird jede einzelne Faser erreicht, gereinigt und gepflegt – selbst bei kürzeren Waschzyklen, auch bei 30°. Durch diese und viele weitere bahnbrechende Innovationen lassen Waschmaschinen von AEG den Fasern Ihrer Kleidungsstücke beispiellose Pflege und Schutz zukommen. Erfahren Sie mehr auf www.aeg.de/oekomix


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BUSINESS The crucial thing is to work in an interdisciplinary way. Barriers between the areas need to be broken down. There are also conferences like #FASHIONTECH Berlin, where people meet others whom they might have known nothing about previously, but whom they need in order to turn their vision into reality together. Ultimately, it’s also about capital. Martin Wild will be there giving a keynote talk, as will Florian Heinemann from Project A Ventures, an international venture capital company that invests in companies in the early stages of their development and provides them with access to knowledge and capital. It’s not just connections that count, however. You still have to stay on the ball in operational

terms too. China is a trailblazer where e-commerce is concerned. Karl Wehner is Managing Di­ rector for Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Turkey and Eastern Europe at the Chinese Alibaba Group. Since 2015, the Group is said to have generated more sales than all the retailers in the US put together, including Walmart, Amazon and Ebay. His keynote speech will discuss what we can learn from the Alibaba Group.

fashiontech.berlin twitter.com/fashiontechber

Whitney Bromberg Hawkings / CEO & Co-Founder Flowerbx

Spent almost 20 years working alongside Tom Ford.

#FASHIONTECH BERLIN CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION THE CONFERENCE ON THE FUTURE OF FASHION 2–4 JULY 2018 10.00–18.00 KRAFTWERK BERLIN KÖPENICKER STRASSE 70 10179 BERLIN

With operations in over 200 countries, Alibaba is the world's largest retailer and one of the ­largest Internet and AI companies. Karl Wehner / Managing Director DACH, Turkey, Eastern Europe Alibaba Group


Freitag passiert’s. Intensive Reportagen, anspruchsvolle Fotostrecken, ßberraschende Essays und Kolumnen: Das SZ-Magazin hat eine Wirkung, der sich niemand entziehen kann. Am 7. September 2018 erscheint das MODE-Special des SZ-Magazins.

Weitere Informationen und Mediadaten unter: sz-media.de/sz-magazin.


BUSINESS

CAREER MAKING IN THE BRAVE NEW OF FASHIONTECH

© iStockphoto.com

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WORLD by WESTERN BONIME

Is the new fashion tech industry creating career opportunities for design students? The short answer is: yes. The merging of the traditional craft focus, glamour and seduction of fashion and textiles has been merging with digital technology, first in 3D then in wearables and is now exploding into health tech and materials innovation. As a result, today’s fashion graduates have the option to work in a multitude of ways, wear multiple hats and convince their parents at last that they are in a viable career … which is what Gen Zs love. Today’s students want leadership, growth opportunities and the ability to work with companies using disruptive social media marketing. Online companies like Farfetch and Stitch Fix that have taken a page from Silicon Valley tech methods, using human-centered design practices, have incorporated AI to create consumer customisation options and cut down on production waste with predictive trend forecasting programmes.

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BoF. “It’s not pay, but being given the opportunity to grow through training and be in a business culture that aligns with their values that keeps students at a company the longest.” BoF mentors companies to attract and retain creative talent. “We let companies know they will succeed if they create an inclusive atmosphere and get employee feedback. A company doing this really well is Farfetch. They are asking questions of their employees, listening and implementing what they say.” While there is a lot of excitement about fashiontech with business accelerators and VC firms fashion tech is still the cool kid waiting for everyone else to catch on and catch up. The connection between education and jobs, innovation and monetization is a complex mix and the key stakeholders, universities, accelerators, HR departments, job hunting websites, fashion companies and VC funds are still figuring out which areas need the most support and the best ways to work together.

Based on interviews with senior level execs, the top careers in fashion tech now and in the next five years will be materials innovation, wearables, iOT, data analysis, marketing, storytelling, 3D printing and psychology. In response, to prepare students for these new careers, leading universities in New York and London such as Queen Mary’s College, The London College of Fashion, Parsons School of Design, Pratt and FIT have established exciting, cuttingedge programmes that partner with large companies like Intel and Google to provide students with the opportunity to create senior thesis collections that utilise fashion and technology. Universities and training centres around the world are following suit and trade conferences are springing up to provide a central community for these innovators. The Business of Fashion’s career placement programme has been highly successful in helping both students and companies come together under the guidance of Christian Layolle, European Business Development Director

Given such a rosy picture one would think that fashion tech graduates would be finding jobs left, right and centre but, unfortunately, this is not yet the case. HR is a big part of this picture. Today’s job hunting methods of applying online through Indeed, Monster and Zip Recruiter use a lgorithms and key words that ­ ­often leave fashion students who are not as tech savvy by the wayside. When we spoke to HR personnel and asked if they were hiring for fashion tech, many acknowledged that they were u nfamiliar. It is likely that will ­ soon change. Career fairs may be the answer, as they provide graduates with a chance to meet face to face with company personnel, which is a good fit with the visual nature of fashion design. Still, despite the challenges fashion tech offers an inspiring future for fashion graduates. Its tangible and deeply personal nature makes it highly attractive to students who are looking for meaning and purpose in the digital age. It just needs a little more time and more people to believe in and fund it.

© offenblende; © iStockphoto.com

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4 JULY 2018 – KRAFTWERK BERLIN WWW.FASHIONTECH.BERLIN

FASHION. TECH. DIGITALISATION. INNOVATION. BUSINESS.


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CULTURE CLASH

© iStockphoto.com

by QUYNH TRAN


BUSINESS

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The aspirations of Generation Y have reached the professional sphere. What used in previous years to be a hypothetical discussion about what Millennials want now has very practical consequences, since the demographic born between circa 1980 and 2000 have grown to become the most significant proportion of the working population. Millennials call for a sense of purpose and autonomy. This has become evident in recent years, not only in terms of the consumer market, where the responsibility of economic supply chains has been called into question. It is now apparent in the structure of the world of work as well. The serfdom, corporate hierarchies and self-sacrifice to the point of burn-out that were the norm for previous generations are no longer the case. It is not only demonstrably economically disadvantageous to burn employees out; new employees do not even begin to engage in trading their lives for their careers – neo-liberalism has, so to speak, gobbled up its own children. Even against the backdrop of the oft-invoked shortage of skilled workers, employees are increasingly rewriting the rules. These envisage the compatibility of professional and private life, a certain level of autonomy and flexibility at work, and, ideally, working for a company whose values they can identify with. The paradigm shift in corporate culture by a new generation and the opportunities of digitalisation are restructuring working relationships in particular. The innovators of the economy are forging ahead, pioneering the trend. At the forefront: technology companies and young start-ups. Google still stands at the pinnacle of the disruptors of the old corporate culture. The play area principle at the Googleplex headquarters in Mountain View in California is so legendary that it has already been immortalised in Hollywood films. The thinking is simple: we are creating a work space that will attract the most talented individuals and give them the ideal space in which they can create the best result as autonomously as possible. It sounds nice, but is in fact rooted in hard facts. Google is a data-driven company and, on the basis of data, a setting was created that included communal spaces, relaxation areas, play corners and cafés: all designed to promote creativity and productivity. Googleplex is not a playground for adults, but a ­real-time laboratory that shows how to achieve maximum performance through maximum employee engagement. It’s logical, really, that people work better when they feel comfortable in their surroundings and don't have to worry about other things. Added to this, they are much more motivated when they can work autonomously, without someone peering over their shoulders. Google is by no means the only company in the United States to do this. The computer manufacturer Dell intends to transfer 50 per cent of its employees globally onto ­flexible


working schedules by 2020. This is not only a win for flexibility, but also a very pragmatic consideration: since 2013 the company has already saved USD 21 million on office space. Companies like Dropbox and Netflix offer unlimited holiday and flexible working hours too, in the belief that this increases overall productivity. To date, these companies with their aim to lead the way remain the most innovative and successful in their respective markets.

should not be confused with corporate culture, however. The most successful companies start with values as their foundations. This is the nub of it, especially when it comes to start-ups, because they grow so quickly that it's easy to lose sight of who you want to be and where you’re going,” says Meera Innes, who, as Venture Developer at Investor Atlantic Labs, helps start-ups build a sustainable business structure.

Smaller, German start-ups also make use of similar mechanisms – even going one step further, discussing salaries openly even prior to the prominence of discussions around the gender pay gap. “Incentives and additional benefits

This includes not just additional benefits such as play areas and free cafés, but absolutely essential questions about the company’s values, diversity, flat hierarchies and flexibility. Like at start-up company Einhorn, which produces sustainable condoms and invests half of its corporate profits in sex education. For employees the working hours are flexible; everyone can take as much holiday as they want; and every six months salaries are disclosed and discussed. “The accounts have always been realistic, because everyone knows the company’s situation. When employees feel a sense of responsibility they work better and we can become more innovative the more we give out. With regard to professional and business relationships it’s a question of interpersonal relationships and trust, both for our employees and for our business partners,” explains ­Waldemar Zeiler, the Co-founder and CEO of Einhorn. If employees do not value this open culture of discussion and democratic organisation the team sorts itself out. The fact that not only the work structure seems to work, but also the idea of a commercial enterprise creating social value, is clear not only in the continual growth of the ­Berlin-based start-up, but also in its reception: the crowd funding initiative in 2015 to set up the company exceeded all expectations. Today, almost five million condoms are produced every year and the product range will soon be expanded to include sanitary items. A rethinking of the corporate culture that moves in a ­v alue-based, participatory direction is not only a noble concept, but can also be a very useful practical measure. This can even now be measured at bunch.ai.

Google © iStockphoto.com

54


FEEL THINK ACT Join the Hub for Fashion and Innovation 3 - 5 July 2018, Kraftwerk Berlin


FASHION

57

A BITE-SIZED OPINION ON COLLABORATIONS by CHRIS DANFORTH

Traditionalists might define a collaboration as a partnered project that would have otherwise been impossible to realize without the inclusion of two parties. But today the practice is used heavily as a marketing tool; in fact, there isn’t a much buzzier boardroom term than “collaboration,” despite the resulting product simply bearing two logos. The former criterion sets a high standard that is definitively higher than the state of collaborations today, particularly in the world of streetwear and sneakers. The commercialisation of collaborations has, in many ways, undermined the Oxford Dictionary definition of what a collaboration really is. In 1996, only two years after the brand was founded, iconic New York City skateboarding label Supreme worked alongside Vans for a small collection of co-branded footwear. The result was a range of bespoke sneakers manufactured exclusively, which could be casually summarised as a project “by Vans for Supreme,” rather than an actual collaboration. Today the brand still captures this spirit by announcing its collaborations with the disclaimer “Made exclusively for Supreme". At the time, in 1996, Supreme didn’t have access to production facilities that could make footwear at the level of Vans and, at the same time, Vans could clearly benefit from exposure to the close-knit community that Supreme had developed in New York City. Supreme is now famous for its seasonal collaborations alongside the likes of Nike and The North Face, as well as product collaborations like the Maglite flashlight, Kiddie fire extinguisher, Braun alarm clock, and many more.

Beyond blending the niche strengths of two brands, collaborations have become a way to cross-pollinate and, from an audience perspective, to introduce fans of one brand to another brand. In recent years Adidas has built on the groundbreaking success of its iconic Run DMC partnership, pushing further into the hip-hop arena by collaborating with musicians like Pharrell Williams, Kanye West and Pusha T. currently, Adidas is leading the market by creating products with these artists and further opening up the crossover between sportswear and hip-hop. Puma has also seen huge success in the music-fashion intersection, via the German brand’s partnership with Rihanna for the Fenty Puma by Rihanna collection. As far as collaborations being used for their commercial utility are concerned, Virgil Abloh is working with Swedish furniture giant Ikea on a range of affordable homewares like chairs and rugs. As a borderline, painfully corporate example, Beats by Dre worked with Thom Browne on exclusive headphones worn by the Cleveland Cavaliers during the 2018 NBA Finals. Even the OG founder of seminal streetwear brand Obey recently collaborated with high-end French timepiece purveyor Hublot. The corporate world has become acutely aware of collaborations as revenue boosters, although cross-category partnerships are still a savvy way to introduce different markets, and the most poignant example still remains the 2017 Supreme x Louis Vuitton collection, which truly awakened the couture community to the cool factor of streetwear. In 2018, the sky is the limit when it comes to collabs.


58

PUMA × RIHANNA Rihanna has worked on the Fenty Puma by Rihanna collection together with Puma since 2015. The fourth season is an amalgam of two worlds, motocross and surfing, and presents a bright, flamboyant mix of high fashion, extreme sports and beachwear constructed from tech materials like light leather, air-tech mesh and nylon. There’s everything you could want for summer: bikinis, monokinis, airy, laced leggings, caps, bum bags, holdalls, and oversized hoodies for cool evenings. What would summer be like without the new Fenty slides? We can choose between slip-on espadrilles or leather and neoprene versions. Let’s go surfing! Or maybe motocross? Both.

eu.puma.com


59

ZUCCA × CHRISTOPHE BRUNNQUELL For its 30th anniversary Zucca collaborated with art director and artist Christophe Brunnquell. The Frenchman was a pioneer of the culture scene in the 1990s, Director of Purple magazine and has already worked for brands like Louis Vuitton, Balenciaga and Céline. A collection of drawings and photo collages by Brunnquell was launched for Zucca's anniversary year on the theme of “happy birthday”. The sought-after anniversary pieces have been available in Zucca stores since the end of May.

zucca.cc

MYKITA × MAISON MARGIELA Berlin-based eyewear manufacturer Mykita is known for extravagant collaborations with designers like Bernhard Willhelm or Damir Doma. Mykita has had a creative dialogue with Maison Margiela since 2013. The “Craft” collection was launched in May 2018. It reinterprets an historical, ornamental aesthetic within a modern, functional context. The glasses frames are carefully crafted by hand. The flat, stainless steel undergoes complex manual remodelling, creating delicate designs with three-dimensional depth. The richly coloured lenses are placed in a shiny metallic frame – recalling items of Victorian jewellery.

mykita.com maisonmargiela.com


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JEREMY SCOTT × MOON BOOT Jeremy Scott likes things brash – and he loves collaborations. The American fashion designer, who previously designed sneakers with wings for Adidas and composed a capsule collection for UGG, surprised the audience at New York Fashion Week in February by sending his models down the runway in moon boots. The men wore classic height boots; the women wore over the knee versions. The unusual creations made from neon-coloured faux fur, or featuring animal prints on a silvery background, generated huge debate in the media. Retro goes future!

jeremyscott.com moon-boot.com

CAMPER × DUST On the hunt for innovative concepts to appeal to a new generation of youth culture, Camper collaborated with a magazine for the first time. Together with Berlin's Dust magazine they have created a limited edition men’s sandal for the Spring/Summer 2018 collection. The adjustable straps with micro-injected rubber attachments and featuring the Dust logo on the ankle strap give off a cool, urban vibe.

camper.com dustmagazine.com


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FASHION

PLANTATION × DESCENTE For the Fall/Winter 2019 season the Japanese brand Plantation has joined together with the well-known manufacturer of sports and outerwear, Descente. Descente has been involved with sports clothing technology for over 50 years. The brand has already kitted out the Japanese team for the Winter Olympics a number of times.

plantation1982.com descente.com

ANSELM REYLE × PREMIUM Art meets fashion: during Berlin Fashion Week, Berlin’s König Galerie will be exhibiting a kinetic sculpture at the PREMIUM fashion show by one of the most prominent German contemporary artists – Anselm Reyle. The imposing material presence and simultaneous lightness of the sculpture on show at PREMIUM reflect the current zeitgeist re contemporary fashion. The use of often everyday materials, like decorative foil, remnants of neon lights or other finds that he reinvents in a different context, is typical Reyle. His best-known series of works also include the “foil paintings”, foil pictures draped inside plexiglas boxes.

koeniggalerie.com premiumexhibitions.com


© DC Shoes

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EVENT

SKATEISTAN

Heavily influenced by artists’ perspectives since the earliest days, fashion, streetwear and street culture continue to reflect the latest approaches one can find in studios and galleries around the globe. Berlin’s BRIGHT and SEEK trade shows perfectly epitomise this ongoing love affair … It’s hardly news that exciting brands have always borrowed from the arts. You might as well say hi-jacked: long before Barbara Kruger got really angry with a certain NYC streetwear institution, even higher spheres of the fashion world peered hard over their cut-and-sew shoulders – and found a whole lot of inspiration in studios, workshops, dark rooms, and galleries. What originated at some point in the last century when photography was still black-and-white – Dalí hooking up with Schiaparelli? YSL featuring Mondrian? Pollock’s abstract expressionism featured in Vogue back in 1951? – began to really take off after Warhol’s and Lichtenstein’s pop-loving, border-erasing effects had fully arrived in all parts of culture: the triumph of sampling culture indeed went hand in hand with a growing fondness for cross-genre/cross-cultural pollination and thus paved the way for E ­ lmgreen & Dragset’s “Prada Marfa” – and, more importantly: for the many, many collaborations streetwear and fashion have seen recently, from Hirst to Kaws and back via Lynch and Futura to Lichtenstein (and that’s just that one brand’s mighty résumé). Over the last decade, both BRIGHT and SEEK trade shows have attracted crowds that live and breathe this ongoing love affair between art, culture and (street-savvy) fashion. Fittingly, their teams have established a unique vibe by adding a whole range of side events, exhibitions, art launches and screenings to the shows’ already jam-packed schedules.

For their summer 2018 editions, both trade shows come with art-heavy campaigns: presenting his city in a new light, Berlin-based photographer Johannes Böttge is responsible for SEEK’s latest campaign – and of course the results are fun and tongue-in-cheek as usual. It’s that little twist Böttge adds to the all-toowell known icons of the German capital … remember the modernist claim “Make It New”? The BRIGHT team, however, kicks off its next chapter by realigning some eclectic art backdrops with the show’s core skateboarding roots – a culture, after all, that for some reason can always be found near massive art institutions such as MACBA or Berlin’s Kulturforum – via a collaboration with UK artist Nat Jones. Praised for his colourful juxtapositions of art and skate photography, Jones’ “Requiem For A Screen” series of collages perfectly sums up the vibe and feel of BRIGHT’s upcoming edition. For Jones, who’s been particularly inspired by art on record sleeves, it all starts with skateboarding, of course. But it’s all one big conundrum anyway: “Skateboarding introduced me to different music, art and fashion, so it’s always been interconnected for me,” he says. This July, there will be a tonne of art events going down once again: apart from a workshop curated by Böttge, BRIGHT is going to showcase works by artists Laura Kaczmarek, Clara Knör and Johannes Brückner, for example. And if all that’s too much to see at once, don’t forget what the great Saul Bellow once said: “Art has something to do with the achievement of stillness in the midst of chaos.”

brighttradeshow.com seekexhibitions.com requiemforascreen.com jbbuttge.com laurakaczmarek.com instagram.com/claraknoer johannesbrueckner.com


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66

CU LTU R E

THE ART OF FOOD by KATE LEWIN

ANOMALIE ART CLUB

Art and food have long been meal companions. In France’s golden artistic ages painters such as Picasso famously paid restaurateurs by hanging their artworks on the walls. But whilst you might not be able to pay for a Michelin-starred meal with 3D printed money (yet), we are living in an era where the lines between the two disciplines are gloriously blurred.

Visually, Berlin boasts some outstanding part-restaurant, part-art spaces. Over on the outskirts of Prenzlauer Berg, the La Mifa Restaurant at Anomalie Art Club was made to blow away borders with a cavernous space in which every element is elevated to create one continuous Gesamtkunstwerk. The oasislike restaurant is alive – quite literally – with a full length vertical wall garden installation; a ceiling-mounted geometric mirror sculpture

by Isabelle Tellié; and incredible black and white photography taken of the space’s owners by Berlin’s late, great photographer, Oliver Rath. At Mitte’s Pauly Saal as well, eight-metre high ceilings are combined with green velvet couches and an integrated glass-cube kitchen, while a surreal six-metre red and white rocket hangs ominously above stunned diners.


CU LTU R E

Pauly Saal © Freunde von Freunden

PAULY SAAL

67

And at modern Asian fusion restaurant Dae Mon the restaurant’s snug interiors are complemented by a small gallery of especially commissioned pictures by Tina Winkhaus, who took the restaurant’s “open-minded cuisine” tagline and stretched it out of the kitchen, onto the walls.

this continuum clearer than at Entretempo Kitchen Gallery (home of Berlin Food Art Week), which uses what it calls the two “languages” as a form of social activism through which interdisciplinary interactive exhibition experiences challenge the viewer/diner/subject/ guest to consider how and why they eat.

Incredible restaurant spaces are not all we have on offer though. This is Berlin – a city revered internationally for both its artistic and culinary credentials – where the boundaries between art and food are so fluid, they regularly become one and the same. Nowhere is

Our city also boasts its own culinary residency programme, Bon Bock, which hosts 18 open residencies per year, for which chefs, restaurateurs, food enthusiasts and artists wanting to explore the convergence points between art, food and experience can apply.


68

DAE MON

The residency (which takes its name from a Manet painting) draws on the concept of worldwide artist residency programmes after founder Mark Pennock realised “what was available to artists via international residencies wasn’t available to chefs or the culinary arts”.

This co-creator mentality is an idea furthered by pioneering organisation Be an Angel, which helps refugees get accustomed to their new lives in Germany through a variety of projects. At the project's Syrian restaurant, Kreuzberg Himmel, chefs cook authentic Syrian cuisine in a space that also hosts revolving art exhibitions. The first one launches on 7 July 2018 in partnership with Galerie Hilaneh von Kories and exhibits pictures taken by photo­ grapher Hami Roshan (whose Berlin street scenes have appeared in Italian Vogue) in Tehran and which explores feelings of anger levied at clothing restrictions forcing women to wear headscarves in public. The exhibition is called “Aufatmen” (“breathing free”). Can food be a form and art converge as a form of artistic expression? This is a question posed frequently as evermore cultivated culinary manifestos emerge from the world’s most prestigious kitchens. In Berlin at least, we already know the answer is yes.

ART EXHIBITION AT KREUZBERGER HIMMEL

lamifa.de paulysaal.com dae-mon.com entretempo-kitchen-gallery.com bonbock.com beanangel.direct

Dae Mon ©Tina Winkhaus; Kreuzberger Himmel © Hami Rowshan

The residency’s most recent participant was chef/artist Chelsea Turowsky, who spent time here researching and preparing for a dinner pop-up. “I think what moved me most was the sense of pride and boundlessness that I felt from food folk in Berlin” she said, “the man selling mushroom brushes made by hand, for example, or Eva, a lady I met randomly and who took me on foraging walks for healing flowers and herbs. There was a compelling coexistence of new ideas and inter-generationalism.”


Photo: Stefan Lucks

032c Presents Reference Berlin A 24-Hour Festival for Creativity in the Infinite Present Halle am Berghain

October 27th, 2018


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Prenzlauer Berg

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nickels-berlin.de

PONY HÜTCHEN VINTAGE

BAZAR NOIR

Pücklerstrasse 33

Kreuzbergstrasse 78

Kreuzberg

Kreuzberg

ponyvintage.de

bazar-noir.com


77 AMODO Linienstrasse 150 Mitte amodoberlin.com

HOUSE OF DOTCITY Graefestrasse 2 Kreuzberg houseofdotcity.com

BOLIA Chausseestrasse 1 Mitte bolia.com

CHARISSCHWARZ Tucholskystrasse 47 Mitte charisschwarz.de

STATION KÜCHE Hortensienstrasse 28 a–b Steglitz

Urban Industrial © Peter Gesierich

station-kueche.de

HOTEL ULTRA

URBAN INDUSTRIAL

Friedrichshain

HOTEL ULTRA’s guests

Urban Industrial is the place to

coroto.de

are selected products from

go to find that unique item for

international designers and

your home, hotel or restaurant.

brands that ‘check in’ to 36

Urban Industrial have consider-

BEYZA’S TEMPLE

COROTO

Sredzkistrasse 44

Karl-Marx-Allee 134

Prenzlauer Berg beyzas-temple.com

BRUNNEN 190

ATELIER OBLIQUE

different ‘rooms’, where they

able experience in finding and

Brunnenstrasse 190

Mulackstrasse 20

wait for you to check them out.

restoring old vintage items.

Mitte

Mitte

Although each guest has their

With a 1,000 m2 showroom and

fb.me/brunnen190

atelier-oblique.com

own (design) language, here

workshop located at ­Hasenheide

they happily inhabit the same

13, they have created a space

space, whether it’s a paperclip

where everything is possible. Do

JAN KATH

ORIGINAL IN BERLIN

next to a floor lamp or a vase

you have a dream of creating

Brunnenstrasse 3

Karl-Marx-Allee 83

sharing a spot with an arm-

your own table? They can make

Mitte

Friedrichshain

chair. From aesthetic designs

it come true! Have you seen a

jan-kath.de

originalinberlin.com

to minimalist elements, every

special lamp you cannot get out

budget and taste is catered for

of your mind? They can find it

here.

for you!

OBJEKTE UNSERER TAGE

PARKHAUS

Alexanderstrasse 7

Schröderstrasse 13

Torstrasse 155

Hasenheide 13

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Kreuzberg

objekteunserertage.com

parkhausberlin.de

hotelultra.de

urban-industrial.de

HALLESCHES HAUS

TYPE HYPE

10119

DECO ARTS INTERIOR

Tempelhofer Ufer 1

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 9–13

Linienstrasse 106

Motzstrasse 6

Kreuzberg

Mitte

Mitte

Schöneberg

hallescheshaus.com

typehype.com

10119.com.de

decoarts.eu

NANDI STORE

TING

DOPO DOMANI

SCHEE

Dunckerstrasse 11

Rykestrasse 41

Kantstrasse 148

Rosenthaler Strasse 15

Prenzlauer Berg

Prenzlauer Berg

Charlottenburg

Mitte

nandistore.com

ting-shop.com

dopo-domani.de

schee.net


WELLBEING

78

BEARDY BOYS

SHAN’S TRUE BEAUTY

Gethsemanestrasse 1

Kurfürstendamm 196

Prenzlauer Berg

Charlottenburg

beardy-boys.de

shanrahimkhan.com

ROWDY BARBER

FINE & DANDY

Kollwitzstrasse 71

Lychener Strasse 43

Prenzlauer Berg

Prenzlauer Berg

rowdy-barber.de

fineanddandy.de

GENTLEMEN'S CIRCLE

MDC CURE

Charlottenstrasse 35

Diedenhofer Strasse 5

Mitte

Prenzlauer Berg

gentlemens-circle.com

mdc-cosmetic.de

DOUBLE DRAGON

TREAT BEAUTY LOFT NEW

Invalidenstrasse 155

KaDeWe | Tauentzienstrasse 21–24

Mitte

Schöneberg

doubledragonberlin.com

treatbeautyloft.com

DODO’S BLOW DRY BAR

SCHÖN SCHÖN

Rosenthaler Strasse 66

Dieffenbachstrasse 56

Mitte

Kreuzberg

dominic-keller.de

schoenschoen.berlin

VIKTOR LESKE

OLE BERLIN BOUTIQUE SPA

Joachimstrasse 8

Tieckstrasse 10

Mitte

Mitte

viktorleske.net

oleberlin.de


79 PURESKIN-BERLIN Rückerstrasse 2 Mitte pureskin-berlin.de

COWSHED SPA Soho House Torstrasse 1 | Prenzlauer Berg sohohouseberlin.com

HAUT & SEIN Mulackstrasse 32 Mitte hautundsein.de

PHILIPP HOFSTETTER BEAUTY DEPARTMENT Gneisenaustrasse 58 | Kreuzberg philipphofstetter.de

EMMA BEAUTY Marienburger Strasse 8 Prenzlauer Berg

vabali spa Berlin © vabali spa Berlin

fb.me/emma.salon.berlin

VABALI SPA BERLIN

BECYCLE

Mitte

The VABALI SPA BERLIN is

BECYCLE is Berlin’s answer

maccosmetics.de

an oasis of tranquillity infused

to FlyWheel. The addictive

with Balinese charm and

45–60 minute indoor cycling

located in the centre of the

classes are set to thumping

LIQUIDROM

MAC

Möckernstrasse 10

Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41

Kreuzberg liquidrom-berlin.de

DR. BRONNER'S ALL-ONE! NEW

SEPHORA

capital. The spacious wellness

music and the beat of pulsat-

Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41

Galeria Kaufhof

area within the textile-free

ing lights. Barre, HIIT, and

Hof VII | Mitte

Alexanderplatz 9 | Mitte

facility offers eight saunas and

yoga help refine muscles to

drbronner.de

sephora.com

three steam baths. A large

improve one's cycling perfor-

indoor and outdoor pool area,

mance or to better one's overall

including a plunge pool and re-

fitness. A lounge invites wifi-

AESOP

DIPTYQUE

laxation pool, offers guests the

seeking athletes who want to

Alte Schönhauser Strasse 48

Kurfürstendamm 193–194

opportunity to refresh and cool

kick back pre or post-workout

Mitte

Charlottenburg

down; while the many places to

where they can recharge their

aesop.com

diptyqueparis.eu

retreat, such as pavilions, wa-

batteries with an organic snack

terbeds and relaxation couches,

from the adjacent My Goodness

add the finishing touch.

café.

JO MALONE

WHEADON

Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41

Steinstrasse 17

Seydlitzstrasse 6

Brunnenstrasse 24

Mitte

Mitte

Moabit

Mitte

jomalone.com

wheadon.de

vabali.de

becycle.de

LE LABO

BELLE REBELLE

MÜHLE

BEFINE SPORTS & SPA

Schlüterstrasse 37

Bleibtreustrasse 42

Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41

Chausseestrasse 30

Charlottenburg

Charlottenburg

Hof IV | Mitte

Mitte

lelabofragrances.com

bellerebelle.de

muehle-shaving.com

befine-clubs.de

AVEDA EXPERIENCE CENTER

BREATHE COSMETICS

ADIDAS RUNBASE BERLIN

EAT AND TREAT

Rosenthaler Strasse 40|41

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 28

Schleusenufer 4

Wühlischstrasse 37

Mitte

Mitte

Kreuzberg

Friedrichshain

aveda.com

breathe-cosmetics.com

runbase.berlin

eatandtreat.de


KÖNIG GALERIE

C/O BERLIN

Alexandrinenstrasse 118–121

Hardenbergstrasse 22–24

Kreuzberg

Charlottenburg

koeniggalerie.com

co-berlin.org

BLAIN | SOUTHERN Potsdamer Strasse 77–87

GALERIE FÜR MODERNE FOTOGRAFIE

Tiergarten

Schröderstrasse 13 | Mitte

blainsouthern.com

galeriefuermodernefotografie.com

GALERIE GUIDO W. BAUDACH

NEUGERRIEMSCHNEIDER

Potsdamer Strasse 85

Linienstrasse 155

Tiergarten

Mitte

guidowbaudach.com

neugerriemschneider.com

CONTEMPORARY FINE ARTS

PSM

Grolmannstrasse 32|33 

Schöneberger Ufer 61

Charlottenburg

Kreuzberg

cfa-berlin.de

psm-gallery.com

GALERIE EIGEN + ART

ESTHER SCHIPPER

Auguststrasse 26

Potsdamer Strasse 81e

Mitte

Tiergarten

eigen-art.com

estherschipper.com

ALEXANDER LEVY

GALERIE NEU

Rudi-Dutschke-Strasse 26

Linienstrasse 119abc

Kreuzberg

Mitte

alexanderlevy.net

galerieneu.net

C/O Berlin, Amerika Haus © David Becker

ART

80


81

JULIA STOSCHEK COLLECTION Leipziger Strasse 60

HELMUT NEWTON FOUNDATION

CAMERA WORK

Liminal moments are valu-

The “Made in Berlin” group exhi-

In 2018 the personal friendship

able sources of creativity

bition encompasses around 100

between Carla Sozzani, the for-

and insight. The exhibition

works by more than 20 German

mer Editor-in-Chief at the Ital-

“Liminal” invites you to tune

and international photographic

SEXAUER GALERIE

ian Elle and Vogue, and ­Helmut

into a new way of seeing. Each

artists whose works deal with the

Streustrasse 90

Newton has culminated in the

photograph is a door of oppor-

architecture, the diverse sub-

Prenzlauer Berg

presentation of the multi-­

tunity for you to shift, rethink,

cultures, famous personalities

sexauer.eu

layered Sozzani collection at the

reframe and reorganise your

and the fashion world of Berlin.

Helmut Newton F ­ oundation.

own boundaries. Carolin Saage

The exhibition features works

The exhibition "­Between Art

works all over the world, always

from artists including Ellen

KINDL – ZENTRUM FÜR ZEITGENÖSSISCHE KUNST

& Fashion“ includes over 200

at the boundaries of things:

von Unwerth, Joachim Baldauf,

works, one focus is on the

the boundary between the

David LaChapelle, Elliott Erwitt,

Am Sudhaus 3 | Neukölln

collaborations between Carla

known and the unknown, the

Anton Corbijn, Martin Schoeller,

kindl-berlin.de

Sozzani and Paolo Roversi,

familiar and the different, be-

Jim Rakete, Olaf Heine, F.C.

Sarah Moon, Bruce Weber and

tween the old way and the new

Gundlach and Kristian Schuller

Helmut Newton.

way, the past and the future.

among many others.

Hallesches Ufer 70

Jebensstrasse 2

Gormannstrasse 7

Kantstrasse 149

Kreuzberg

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Charlottenburg

thefeuerlecollection.org

helmut-newton.de

7starberlin.com

camerawork.de

URBAN NATION

MARTIN-GROPIUS-BAU

BERLINISCHE GALERIE

CIRCLE CULTURE GALLERY

Bülowstrasse 7

Niederkirchnerstrasse 7

Alte Jakobstrasse 124–128

Gipsstrasse 11

Schöneberg

Kreuzberg

Kreuzberg

Mitte

urban-nation.com

berlinerfestspiele.de

berlinischegalerie.de

circleculture-gallery.com

HAMBURGER BAHNHOF – MUSEUM FÜR GEGENWART

ME COLLECTORS ROOM

SPRÜTH MAGERS

SAMMLUNG BOROS

Auguststrasse 68

Oranienburger Strasse 18

Reinhardtstrasse 20

Invalidenstrasse 50–51 | Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

smb.museum

me-berlin.com

spruethmagers.com/home

sammlung-boros.de

Mitte jsc.berlin Paolo Roversi, Meg, Alaïa Dress, 1987 © Paolo Roversi; © Carolin Saage; © Ellen von Unwerth/Courtesy of CAMERA WORK

SEVEN STAR GALLERY

THE FEUERLE COLLECTION


EATING

82

THE FUTURE BREAKFAST NEW

1000GRAD NEW

Australian

Asian

Böhmische Strasse 46

Kurfürstendamm 90

Neukölln

Charlottenburg

thefuturebreakfast.com

fb.me/Eintausendgrad

PANAMA

TOKI THE WHITE RABBIT NEW

International

Vietnamese

Potsdamer Strasse 91

Kantstrasse 135–136

Tiergarten

Charlottenburg

oh-panama.com

toki-thewhiterabbit.de

SLATE

ERNST

European

International

Elisabethkirchstrasse 2

Gerichtstrasse 54

Mitte

Wedding

slateberlin.com

ernstberlin.de

AL CONTADINO SOTTO LE STELLE

PAULINSKI PALME NEW

Italian

Richardstrasse 76

Auguststrasse 36 | Mitte

Neukölln

alcontadino.eu

paulinskipalme.de

BEUSTER BAR

PETERPAUL

International

German

Weserstrasse 32

Torstrasse 99

Neukölln

Mitte

beusterbar.com

peterpaul.berlin

International


v

83

CHICAGO WILLIAMS BBQ

TO THE BONE

SONS OF MANA

DAE MON

American

Italian

Hawaiian

Open-minded Cuisine

Mitte

Inspired by the regional

SONS OF MANA serves the

In the contemporary restau-

chicagowilliamsbbq.de

­c uisines of northern Italy

freshest poké bowls at Bikini

rant, with its modern design

TO THE BONE offers a con-

Berlin’s open terrace food

and art-decked walls, guests

temporary take on the tradi-

market. Food entrepreneurs

can indulge their senses

PAULY SAAL

tional dishes from that region.

Ngoc Duc Nguyen, Duy Quang

and enjoy the finer things in

International

Bone marrow with oxtail confit

Ngo, Huy Tran and Hieu

life – octopus with rhubarb,

Auguststrasse 11–13

and artichoke with baccalà

Nguyen founded this ground-

asparagus with melon, or

Mitte

crostini are examples of the

breaking restaurant, which

tartare topped with summer

paulysaal.com

dishes on offer alongside the

epitomises social responsibil-

truffle. The dishes are playful

changing seasonal dishes and

ity on the Berlin gastronomy

and an essential part of the

signature steaks from special-

scene. Spotting the most Insta-

culinary experience of central

Hannoversche Strasse 2

W PIZZA

NEW

ised Italian meat suppliers. Spe-

grammable interior with a

Berlin. Why not pay us a visit!

Italian

cially developed cocktails and

Hockney-esque pastel palette,

(Lunchtime 12.00–14.30,

Fuldastrasse 31

negroni variations are served

plus a fantastic view of Berlin

Dinner 18.30–23.00)

Neukölln

well into the night during and

Zoo’s aviaries makes for an

wpizza.de

after dinner service.

unforgettable food experience.

Torstrasse 96

Budapester Strasse 38–50

RYONG

Mitte

Charlottenburg

Vietnamese

tothebone.bonita.berlin

fb.me/SonsOfMana

QUY NGUYEN

L.A. POKE NEW

NOBELHART & SCHMUTZIG

RICHARD

Vietnamese | Vegan

Hawaiian

International

International

Oranienburger Strasse 7

Alte Schönhauser Strasse 44

Friedrich­strasse 218

Köpenicker Strasse 174

Mitte

Mitte

Kreuzberg

Kreuzberg

quynguyen.de

lapokebowls.com

nobelhartundschmutzig.com

restaurant-richard.de

Monbijouplatz 11 Mitte dae-mon.com

Torstrasse 59 Prenzlauer Berg ryong.de


84

RAMEN X RAMEN NEW

AKEMI

TO BEEF OR NOT TO BEEF

SAGE RESTAURANT

Japanese

Asian

Italian

International

Friedrichshain

AKEMI’s creators have set

As part of its mission to pro-

Located in an old brick build-

ramenxramen.com

out to deliver delicious,

mote authentic Italian food and

ing in Kreuzberg that has been

healthy Asian dishes that

meat culture, TO BEEF OR

turned into an artistic, urban

delight both the body and

NOT TO BEEF works closely

space, SAGE RESTAURANT

KIN DEE

the soul. Diners can embark

with Italian star butcher Dario

features creative cuisine, great

Thai

on a culinary voyage across

Cecchini and other suppliers to

cocktails and a first-class wine

Lützowstrasse 81

the Far East, particularly

provide speciality meats of the

menu. Open every day from 6pm,

Tiergarten

by sampling the Chinese,

highest order. The menu ranges

you can choose from a changing

kindeeberlin.com

Japanese and Vietnamese

from signature steaks like the

menu of meat, fish and vegetar-

tapas, which showcase the

Bistecca alla Fiorentina to fresh

ian dishes. On warm summer

finest cuisine from each

and light options and vegetar-

days you can also enjoy the

NITHAN THAI

country. Some of the most

ian, seasonal summer dishes.

atmosphere at the beach bar.

Thai

popular delicacies include

Over 100 wines as well as a sea-

Chausseestrasse 5

crispy shrimps with avocado

sonal drinks menu are on offer

Köpenicker Strasse 18–20

Mitte

tartare, seaweed salad with

to complement the menu.

Kreuzberg

nithanthai.de

sesame oil and marinated

Gabriel-Max-Strasse 2

pork with honey glaze.

sage-restaurant.de Akazienstrasse 3 Schöneberg

THE STORE KITCHEN

Rykestrasse 39

Soho House Berlin

Prenzlauer Berg

International

akemi-berlin.squarespace.

Torstrasse 1 | Prenzlauer Berg

com

tobeefornottobeef.bonita.berlin

thestores.com

SALE E TABACCHI

LES PÂTISSERIES DE SEBASTIEN

BEETS & ROOTS

893 RYOTEI

Italian

International

Japanese

Rudi-Dutschke-Strasse 24

French

Grosse Hamburger Strasse 38

Kantstrasse 135

Kreuzberg

Invalidenstrasse 157

Mitte

Charlottenburg

sale-e-tabacchi.de

Mitte

beetsandroots.de

893ryotei.de


85 CASSAMBALIS Greek Grolmannstrasse 35 Charlottenburg cassambalis.de

GRILL ROYAL International Friedrichstrasse 105b Mitte grillroyal.com

MAISON DANG NEW Vietnamese Tucholskystrasse Mitte

PANTRY International Friedrichstrasse 120 Mitte pantry-berlin.com

BENEDICT

FUNKY FISH

International | Breakfast

International

BRASSERIE COLETTE TIM RAUE

Uhlandstrasse 49

Kantstrasse 135

French

Charlottenburg

Charlottenburg

benedict-breakfast.de

funky-fish.de

MONDO PAZZO Italian “Good Italian cuisine and

BRASSERIE COLETTE

wines are not a replacement

Tim Raue is located at 5–7

for good sex, but rather the

­Passauer Strasse, directly op-

foundation of it,” goes the

RESTAURANT ODERBERGER

CECCONI’S

posite KaDeWe, and is open

motto of the It-restaurant

German

Italian

both at lunchtime (Mon–Sun,

MONDO PAZZO near

Oderberger Strasse 57

Torstrasse 1

12.00–15.00) and in the even-

Ku’damm. Here, aficionados

Prenzlauer Berg

Prenzlauer Berg

ing (Mon–Sun, 18.00–23.00).

of upmarket Italian cuisine

restaurant-oderberger.berlin

cecconisberlin.com

The menu offers classical

can find superb dishes on the

French brasserie cuisine fea-

ever-changing menu, includ-

turing all Tim Raue’s typical

ing vitello tonnato, sea bass,

DATA KITCHEN

KATZ ORANGE

gastronomic hallmarks with

grilled veal loin and fedelini

International

International

regard to aroma and presenta-

topped with truffle shavings.

Rosenthaler Strasse 38

Bergstrasse 22

tion. The interior is charac-

The wine menu and efficient

Mitte

Mitte

terised by classical brasserie

service are also instrumental

datakitchen.berlin

katzorange.com

elements paired with contem-

in winning the hearts of an

porary design.

illustrious clientele.

THE BIRD

KUCHI

Passauer Strasse 5–7

Schlüterstrasse 52

American

Japanese

Schöneberg

Charlottenburg

Am Falkplatz 5

Gipsstrasse 3

brasseriecolette.de

mondopazzo.de

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

thebirdinberlin.com

kuchi.de

MRS ROBINSON’S

LE PETIT ROYAL

DISTRICT MÔT

GOOD BANK

Asian

French

Vietnamese

International | Deli

Pappelallee 29

Grolmannstrasse 59

Rosenthaler Strasse 62

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 5

Prenzlauer Berg

Charlottenburg

Mitte

Mitte

mrsrobinsons.de

lepetitroyal.de

districtmot.com

good-bank.de


86

DALUMA

KREUZBERGER HIMMEL

SUCRE ET SEL

CHARLOTTE & FRITZ NEW

International

Syrian

French

Casual Dining

Mitte

KREUZBERGER HIMMEL in

Traditional French cuisine

The ambiance at CHARLOTTE

daluma.de

Yorckstrasse serves up Syrian

served in a cosy, trendy

& FRITZ is classic yet modern.

specialities. The restaurant

atmosphere. Since 2012

The ‘casual dining’ restaurant

operates under the patronage

the family-run business has

opened recently and is located

THE KLUB KITCHEN

of Be an Angel e.V. and is run

been located in the à la mode

on Charlottenstrasse/the cor-

Asian

by those who have fled their

area of Berlin. We offer

ner of Französische Strasse.

Mulackstrasse 15

homelands. The ten strong

lunch, dinner, private par-

Its concept reflects the idea of

Mitte

team of Syrians, Iranians,

ties and more with delicious

an elegant Berlin salon poised

theklubkitchen.com

Pakistanis and Afghans

food: Magret de Canard,

between yesterday and today.

indulges guests with culinary

Entrecôte, Moules

Chef de Cuisine Jörg Lawerenz

specialities and incomparable

Marinières, Plateau de

and his team create amazing

COOKIES CREAM

hospitality. The menu offers a

Fromage, Fois Gras and

lunches and dinners: the cui-

International | Vegetarian

broad range of starters, main

more. Come to taste Paris!

sine is balanced and fresh, us-

Behrenstrasse 55

courses, salads, desserts and

Mitte

breakfasts – not forgetting

cookiescream.com

vegetarian and vegan options.

Torstrasse 132

Good food is like love.

Mitte

Weinbergsweg 3

ing selected regional products paired with a focus on superb

sucreetsel.de

quality meat. Charlottenstrasse 49

KATERSCHMAUS

Yorckstrasse 89

Mitte

International

Kreuzberg

charlotteundfritz.com

Holzmarktstrasse 25

kreuzberger-himmel.de

Friedrichshain katerschmaus.de

GRACE

STICKS’N’SUSHI

ARAI NEW

MÄDCHENITALIENER

Asian & European

Japanese

Japanese

Italian

Kurfürstendamm 25

Potsdamer Strasse 85

Straßburger Strasse 60

Grolmannstrasse 52

Charlottenburg

Schöneberg

Mitte

Charlottenburg

grace-berlin.com

sticksnsushi.berlin

araiberlin.com

fb.me/maedchenitaliener


BESUCHE UNS AUF DER PLAYGROUND H2

„FASHION CHANGES, BUT STYLE ENDURES.“ Coco Chanel


DRINKING

88

THE GREENS NEW

ELSE

Alte Münze | Am Krögel 2

An den Treptowers 10

Mitte

Treptow

the-greens-berlin.de

else.tv

CRACKERS

PAULY SAAL BAR

Friedrichstrasse 158

Auguststrasse 11–13

Mitte

Mitte

crackersberlin.com

paulysaal.com

BAR SAINT JEAN

HOTEL ZOO ROOFTOP BAR

Steinstrasse 21

Kurfürstendamm 25

Mitte

Charlottenburg

barsaintjean.com

hotelzoo.de

KATER BLAU

MELODY NELSON

Holzmarktstrasse 25

Novalisstrasse 2

Friedrichshain

Mitte

katerblau.de

melodynelson.de

HOLZMARKT

MONKEY BAR

Holzmarktstrasse 25

Budapester Strasse 40

Friedrichshain

Charlottenburg

holzmarkt.com

25hours-hotels.com

HAUBENTAUCHER

BAR ZENTRAL

Revaler Strasse 99

Lotte-Lenya-Bogen 551

Friedrichshain

Charlottenburg

haubentaucher.berlin

barzentral.de


89

NO FIRE NO GLORY

SCHWEIN

THE BARN

Mitte

NO FIRE NO GLORY: spe-

SCHWEIN’s repertoire in-

Café Kranzler – reinvented.

bonbonbar.de

ciality coffee and the best

cludes 245 exciting wines, 103

THE BARN Coffee Roasters

breakfast in Prenzlauer Berg.

gins, plus a style of cuisine that

are pioneers of speciality coffee

Our coffee has to be mature,

fuses fine dining with bar food.

in Berlin and known for high-

CHAUSSEESTRASSE 131

hand-harvested and directly

Chef de Cuisine Christopher

est qualities, handbrewed cof-

Chausseestrasse 131

traded. It is roasted in small

Kümper, whom Berlin’s master

fees and legendary flat whites.

Mitte

drum roasters by micro-roast-

chefs named “Newcomer of the

With their bold take-over of

chausseestrasse131.com

ers. In our cappuccino we use

Year” in summer 2017, places

the traditional Café Kranzler

Demeter organic milk from

consistent emphasis on region-

they claimed the best spot on

the eco-village of Brodowin;

al products and international

Ku´damm 18: the 360 degree

THE GRAND

all cakes are home-made; and

flair. In line with the nose-to-

bird's eye view offers a great

Hirtenstrasse 4

we offer brunch with avo-toast,

tail principle, this guarantees

space to meet & mingle. Vegan

Mitte

eggs Benedict and pancakes

treats in store beyond the fillet

options and homemade cakes.

the-grand-berlin.com

until 4pm.

of beef.

Near Bikini House – just jump

Rykestrasse 45

Mommsenstrasse 63

GRIESSMÜHLE

Prenzlauer Berg

Charlottenburg

Auguststrasse 58 | Mitte

Sonnenallee 221

nofirenoglory.de

schwein.online

Schönhauser Allee 8

BON BON Torstrasse 133

on the U-Bahn at PREMIUM.

Neukölln

Prenzlauer Berg

griessmuehle.de

thebarn.de

KLUNKERKRANICH

TIGER BAR Potsdamer Strasse 91

AMANO GRAND CENTRAL ROOFTOP

DRAYTON BAR

Karl-Marx-Strasse 66 Neukölln

Tiergarten

Heidestrasse 62 | Tiergarten

Mitte

klunkerkranich.de

oh-panama.com

amanogroup.de

draytonberlin.com

BAR FAHIMI

BAR TAUSEND

GQ BAR BERLIN

Skalitzer Strasse 133

Schiffbauerdamm 11

Patrick Hellmann Schlosshotel

HOUSE OF WEEKEND ROOF GARDEN

Kreuzberg

Mitte

Brahmsstrasse 10 | Zehlendorf

Alexanderstrasse 7 | Mitte

fahimibar.de

tausendberlin.com

gqbar.de

houseofweekend.berlin

Behrenstrasse 55


90

BAR MILANO

SOLAR

ORANIA.BERLIN

Kreuzberg

BAR MILANO is the clas-

SOLAR is Berlin's viewing

Discover an eclectic selection

princecharlesberlin.com

sic Italian aperitivo bar in

platform for creatives and

of artisan brands as well as

the heart of Berlin. Here you

visionaries. The menu presents

crafty compositions of ­exotic

can enjoy the real Negroni or

outstanding classics and fresh

ingredients mixed by Bar

SOHO HOUSE BERLIN ROOFTOP

Spritz combined with deli-

creations with regional ingredi-

­Manager Merlin Braun and his

cious homemade finger food

ents from mostly organic sourc-

team. Experience daily live con-

Torstrasse 1 | Prenzlauer Berg

in the stylish, new, classic

es. SOLAR offers enjoyment for

certs performed by local art-

sohohouseberlin.com

bar. The cool Italian team will

all the senses. An insider's tip:

ists. Enjoy cosmopolitan food

make you feel like you’re living

awaiting you just one flight up

made by Managing D ­ irector

la dolce vita in Milano. Enjoy

the spiral staircase, on the 17th

and Chef Philipp Vogel, as well

the Italian way of life.

floor, is the Sky Lounge with

as warm-hearted service from

a spectacular 270° view. Art

his team. Orania.Berlin is not

PRINCE CHARLES Prinzenstrasse 85f

CLUB DER VISIONÄRE Am Flutgraben Treptow

Brunnenstrasse 11

and design spread across three

only one of the most hip and

clubdervisionaere.com

Mitte

floors – from Berlin's only DJ

lively places in Berlin but also

barmilanoberlin.com

elevator through to video instal-

the ideal overture to Berlin’s

lations and urban art.

most exciting clubs.

Brandenburgische Strasse 21

Stresemannstrasse 76

Oranienstrasse 40

Wilmersdorf

Kreuzberg

Kreuzberg

provocateur-hotel.com

solarberlin.com

orania.berlin

PROVOCATEUR BAR

PARIS BAR

NEUE ODESSA BAR

AMANO ROOFTOP BAR

CAFE AM NEUEN SEE

Kantstrasse 152

Torstrasse 89

Auguststrasse 43

Lichtensteinallee 2

Charlottenburg

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

Tiergarten

parisbar.net

neueodessabar.de

amanogroup.de

cafeamneuensee.de

CHALET

VELVET

JOURNEY INTO THE NIGHT

JACKIE O

Vor dem Schlesischen Tor 3

Ganghoferstrasse 1

Else-Ury-Bogen 605

Köpenicker Chaussee 1–4

Kreuzberg

Neukölln

Charlottenburg

Treptow

chalet-berlin.de

velvet-bar-berlin.de

journeyintothenight.com


I

D

P

T+

NA TIGHITA AL | D A

AGA MLY NEWS |Z

MRIO RE N

HOOK UP. E INSPECIALS

2018

UT

HTIRN

IN

FO R

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AT I

ON

#O PI NI ON LE

,I

SINCE 1975 BE UP TO DATE

NS

SPORTSWEAR INTERNATIONAL

#N EW SL ET TE R# AP PM AG AZ IN E# HI GH LY FA SH IO NM IN DE D

T PIRATION & ORIENTATION#FASHION INTERNATIONAL BREAKING NEWS

FABRICS, BRANDS, RETAIL, AGENCIES, INTERNATIONAL FASHION TRADE SHOWS

NO

SPORTSWEAR-INTERNATIONAL.COM/SHOP

A MEDIA BRAND OF

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ND U I D I M M EG ON Y ISI C E M AT LD N A N O TIM IO T N A UL RN IO E E T IN SH TH FA M # NI E #D E AK

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SLEEPING

92

25HOURS HOTEL

GORKI APARTMENTS

Budapester Strasse 40

Weinbergsweg 25

Charlottenburg

Mitte

25hours-hotels.com

gorkiapartments.com

DAS STUE

ELLINGTON HOTEL BERLIN

Drakestrasse 1

Nürnberger Strasse 50–55

Tiergarten

Schöneberg

das-stue.com

ellington-hotel.com

MICHELBERGER HOTEL

HOTEL ZOO

Warschauer Strasse 39–40

Kurfürstendamm 25

Friedrichshain

Charlottenburg

michelbergerhotel.com

hotelzoo.de

HENRI

GARDEN LIVING

Meinekestrasse 9

Invalidenstrasse 101

Charlottenburg

Mitte

henri-hotels.com

gardenliving.de

HOTEL THE YARD

LUX 11

Alexandrinenstrasse 125

Rosa-Luxemburg-Strasse 9–13

Kreuzberg

Mitte

hotel-theyard.berlin

lux-eleven.com

TITANIC CHAUSSEE BERLIN

HOTEL DE ROME

Chausseestrasse 30

Behrenstrasse 37

Mitte

Mitte

titanic.com.tr

roccofortehotels.com


ADVERTORIAL

93

THE EASIEST WAY TO YOUR TEMPORARY HOME

The creators of the world-­renowned Soho House Berlin have reached another milestone in cosmopolitan living with the launch of Tannhaus apartments. A temporary ­ living concept made by creatives for creatives embodying Berlin in its ­urban, hip and laissez-faire nature. As a resident of a ­Tannhaus apartment, it is guaranteed to be one of the fastest and easiest ways of settling in Berlin with fully-­ ­ furnished and beautiful living ­spaces that are conveniently ­located in the most ­vibrant and captivating districts of Berlin – perfect for anyone looking for a temporary urban retreat. Tannhaus offers 82 micro-lofts within the former Cuban board of trade directly at Frankfurter Tor in Berlin’s trendy Friedrichshain –

TANNHAUS Berlin Frankfurter Tor & Berlin Mitte-Wedding info@tannhaus.com www.tannhaus.com

a sought-after sub-district. Capitalizing on the ­success of Tannhaus Frankfurter Tor, a second location is opening in Berlin close to ­Mauerpark and historical ­Bernauer Straße in Summer 2018 with a ­total of 142 apartments. In cooperation with r­enowned designers ­Humbert & Poyet and the B ­ erlinbased ­ a rtists Peachbeach, every apartment was created as a unique amalgam of art for comfort and contemporary lifestyle. Complimentary amenities such as regular housekeeping, highspeed internet and ­security services complete the care-free lifestyle residents of Tannhaus can e­ njoy.


94

HOTEL AM STEINPLATZ

SELECT HOTEL BERLIN THE WALL

GRIMM'S POTSDAMER PLATZ

The HOTEL AM STEINPLATZ

The SELECT HOTEL BERLIN

Located in the heart of the park

is Berlin’s most private luxury

THE WALL is located on one of

at Gleisdreieck is the elegant

hotel. This unique property in

the most famous city squares in

and urban 3-star Superior

ORANIA

Berlin City West broadcasts a

all of Europe. 170 modern and

GRIMM’S HOTEL, only 5 min-

Oranienstrasse 40

sense of soulfulness and char-

generously furnished rooms and

utes’ walk from ­PREMIUM.

Kreuzberg

acter. The elegant ambience is

apartments in 4-star category

Individually designed, fairytale-

orania.berlin

shaped by the perfect combi-

await guests. With its unique mix

like motifs form a unique

nation of modern Art Deco

of creativity, culture and busi-

symbiosis with modern design.

elements with the flair of the

ness, an overnight stay in this

Fairy­tale dreams come true

SIR SAVIGNY

golden 1920s. Enjoy the private

new SELECT Hotel in Berlin’s

here, thanks to the 110 rooms,

Kantstrasse 144

atmosphere, creative fine din-

historic centre becomes a special

including six imperial suites;

Charlottenburg

ing cuisine, innovative drinks at

experience.

an exclusive fitness area and

sirhotels.com

our award-winning bar and our

MANI Torstrasse 136 Mitte amanogroup.de

sauna with roof terrace; as well

exclusive and individual service

Zimmerstrasse 88

as the in-house restaurant with

attitude!

Mitte

direct access to the park.

HOTEL LULU GULDSMEDEN

select-hotels.com

Potsdamer Strasse 67

Steinplatz 4

Flottwellstrasse 45

Tiergarten

Charlottenburg

Tiergarten

guldsmedenhotels.com

hotelsteinplatz.com

grimms-hotel.de

MOXY BERLIN OSTBAHNHOF

SOHO HOUSE BERLIN

AMANO GRAND CENTRAL

MAX BROWN HOTEL KU'DAMM

Andreasstrasse 76–78

Torstrasse 1

Heidestrasse 62

Uhlandstrasse 49

Friedrichshain

Prenzlauer Berg

Tiergarten

Wilmersdorf

moxy-hotels.marriott.com

sohohouseberlin.com

amanogroup.de

maxbrownhotels.com

HOTEL ODERBERGER

MOTEL ONE POTSDAMER PLATZ

THE WEINMEISTER

GRAND HYATT BERLIN

Oderberger Strasse 57

Leipziger Strasse 50

Weinmeisterstrasse 2

Marlene-Dietrich-Platz 2

Prenzlauer Berg

Mitte

Mitte

Mitte

hotel-oderberger.berlin

motel-one.com

the-weinmeister.com

berlin.grand.hyatt.com


Fashion Week driven by Mercedes-Benz.


MEETS

PURE STYLE TECHNOLOGY NEW COLLECTION_LAUNCH SPRING / SUMMER 2019 + Introducing a fresh, minimalist pure-white colour palette, designed to focus on product functionality – enhanced silhouettes and special attention to detail, blended together with advanced construction techniques.

PREMIUM hall 3 | H3-D23 WOLFSKIN-TECHLAB.COM

Berlin Fashion Week Magazine #26  

GALERIE KÖNIG – Where better rave about art? / Why Rihanna, Virgil Abloh, Jeremy Scott and Maison Margiela love cross-pollution / Designer a...

Berlin Fashion Week Magazine #26  

GALERIE KÖNIG – Where better rave about art? / Why Rihanna, Virgil Abloh, Jeremy Scott and Maison Margiela love cross-pollution / Designer a...

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