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Productivity is the generator of a new urban env relationships a city can begin to reassess its potentia generated as a result of existing variables within a co

1

ABSTRACT


vironment. Through ecologies created by innovative al for growth. An area can become formal or informal, ommunity. Production comes as a result of encounters.

ABSTRACT

2


ROYAL DOCKS

3


4


ROYAL DOCKS Index

....

5

INDEX

Introduction

01. The Potentials of a Productive Ecology in the Royal Docklands

02. Tools, Themes, and Methodologies of Investigation

History

Tools

Site conditions

Themes

Potential

Methodologies


ii

03. Two Sectors: Food and Film

04. The Projects

05. Towards a Productive Ecology

Appendix

Intro of Food and Film

Industry, Institution, Infrastructure.

Execution

Images

Scale

Articles

New Productive Ecology

Bibliography/Notes

Food Film

The Film Studio/The Education Center. Synergies between Food and Film. Sky Chef and a School for Hotel Management and Hospitality Training. Introducing new Institutions and new Sectors to the Site. Expanding the Institution and Completing the Infrastructural Loop.

INDEX

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7

INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION The goal of the project is to reinterpret the Royal Docklands through tools, themes, and methodologies that can be used to create a new productive environment. By reclaiming introverted industrial land and introducing new industrial sectors, on varying scales, we will develop an idea that will respond to existing conditions as well as create new potentials of productivity. We have chosen to respond to three areas of activity: industry, infrastructure, and institutions. These three tools will help to drive our argument further as we learn about their existing influence, as well as experiment with the potential for their evolution. Urban themes based around production, consumption, and education will progress the existing tools of our investigation into a reinterpretation of a productive environment in the Royal Docklands.

INTRODUCTION

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CHAPTER 01


CHAPTER

01

The Potentials of a Productive Ecology in the Royal Docklands.

CHAPTER 01

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HE ROYAL DOCKLANDS - DEINDUSTRIALIZED LAND Docklands circa 1965 Docklands circa 2005

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CHAPTER 01


History of the Docklands From the largest industrial shipping port in all of England to an area that contains one of the largest exhibition centres in London, the Royal Docklands has been used over time by a multitude of industries and institutions at varying scales. The Docklands was a destination for the storage and processing of good coming to and from England. Its proximity to local waterways that ran through the country made it an advantageous location. However, due to an increase in containerization, the Docklands could no longer support the size of ships and cargo. As a result the area began to decline slowly, and activity in the once busy dock became nearly non-existent. Over time large corporations and business moved in to take advantage of large tracts of land and left over industrial sheds so close to central London. One of the largest industrial food manufactures, Tate and Lyle, has been a significant presence in the Docklands for over 200 years, and has continued to grow at a national and international scale. Connection to the rest of the city was only by road, any residential communities that developed were taken by individuals and families that could afford the commute. The Docklands finally embraced another means of accessibility in 1987 by building the London City Airport. The Docklands Light Rail (DLR) way opened to speed travel to and from Central London a few years later. Since the increase in new infrastructure, the Docklands has developed new industries and institutions that take advantage of the unique characteristics so close to Central London. Today the Royal Docklands is a short distance to the vibrant heart of London and the business distract of Canary Wharf. It sits just south of the Olympic site and at the start of the Thames Gateway Development scheme. Major venues have situated themselves along the former docklands and are trying to revitalize some areas through exhibition-based activities. Residential communities have developed in response to the DLR, and a university has located itself along the north-western corner of the site. Various urban tools of industry, institution, and infrastructure are ensuring a positive growth in the area. However, the Docklands becomes notable when it is possible to think about the amount of potential that lies in its unique characterizes and existing conditions. The next step is to recognize these aspects and how their potential can be executed to generate a productive environment.

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CHAPTER 01


Site Conditions Stretching over 650 hectares the Docklands is an enormous site with a unique landscape that is not seen anywhere this close the Central London. It provides one of the largest stretches of land, in one borough, that fronts the Thames River. The site also has an expansive stretch of interior waterscape from its shipping port days. Most of the land is relatively flat and from the top of any tall building it is possible to get a view of the London skyline. The Docklands is well connected by the DLR, airport, and expansive road network. The major transportation services of the DLR and roads run along similar paths and cut north-to-south at key instances along the east-west dominated landscape. This transportation network helps to service exiting industries and institutions that exist on the site. The area also holds highly functioning examples of urban tools. The Excel Centre is one of London’s largest exhibition halls and it does its job of attracting visitors to the area from the regional and the world. The University of East London is able to enroll over 23,000 students. Additionally some of the largest food industries in the world located large processing and manufacturing plants in the heart of the Docklands southern industrial-belt. A myriad of activities are generating a productive level of business for the Docklands, but they do not take full-advantage of all the area has to offer.

CHAPTER 01

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Existing Conditions

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CHAPTER 01


Existing infrastructural network and limited waterfront access

CHAPTER 01

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Existing Conditions

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CHAPTER 01


Urban grain

Urban character

Tube lines (DLR)

Roads Water connections

CHAPTER 01

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Siemens

Cable Car

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CHAPTER 01


Siemens

Potential

ExCeL University East London Cable Car Thames Gateway River Crossing

The landscape of the Docklands creates an attractive site for further investigation into creating a new productive urban centre. The amount of land available, ease of connections – locally, nationally, internationally, surrounding landscapes of the waters edge, as well as a variety of industries and institutions in close vicinity are key characteristics of the landscape. To create this new productive environment our project has taken into account the main attributes of the Docklands as well as urban themes that can be used to guide our thinking. This project will experiment with ways to create potential from existing urban conditions by reassessing them with new methodologies.

CHAPTER 01

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Potential Existing Industries, Institutions, and Infrastructure

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CHAPTER 01


museum

CHAPTER 01

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CHAPTER 02


CHAPTER

02

Tools, Themes, and Methodologies of Investigation

CHAPTER 02

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Tate and Lyle

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CHAPTER 02


Tools. Industry The tools for our investigations are primary elements in the urban environment, industry, institutions, and infrastructure (3 i’s). Each of these tools functions dependent on the others, creating an urban system of reliant services and activities. These tools allow us to develop an understanding of the existing site conditions as well as create a point of reference to further develop ways to create production-generating interventions. When we started the investigation of the “3 i’s” it was noted that particular companies of each dominated their sector. While the Docklands hold numerous instances of industries and institutions, and provides more than one mode of infrastructure, only a few are seen as exemplars to help us investigate the potentials of a new productive environment. Established industries on the site are operating at large scales. Tate and Lyle is one of the largest food manufacturers in England. It utilizes a few of the industrial sheds that were left over from the shipping industry in a campus that centres around a large processing plant. Currently Tate and Lyle engage the rest of the Docklands by providing jobs in its processing plant. Another prominent industrial site is Loon Fung, a Chinese food importer with an attached grocery store. It operates next to, but does not interact with the Tate and Lyle campus. Other industrial sites are given over to logistical services, creating large tracts of land that are used infrequently. Most of the industries on the site operate autonomously of one another, as their functions do not depend on the other. Yet all of the industries rely on the infrastructural system to ensure their products are distributed. Using industries as tools of investigation gives our projects an understanding of the function and utilize the land, as well as how one tool (industry) can create a dependent relationship with another (infrastructure).

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Industry Manufacturing/ Storage

Open/ Closed edges

Industrial pattern

Description of Industries

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CHAPTER 02


Industry

industrial cluster

industrial open space residential cluster infrastructure infrastructure

industrial cluster

residential cluster

infrastructure

industrial cluster

industrial open space

infrastructure

CHAPTER 02

28


Industry

World scale

Metropolitan scale

Local scale

Existing condition

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CHAPTER 02


Industry+Institutions

Possible ways to achieve the permeability of the industrial belt

Characteristics of the industrial belt

CHAPTER 02

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Excel Centre

UEL

Siemens Centre

Britannia Community Centre

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CHAPTER 02


Tools. Institutions Institutions in the Royal Docklands range in size, from small community centers operating with public funds, to large commercial exhibition halls that attract international business. The institutions play a strong role in developing the current character of the Docklands. They bring in most of the outside traffic into the site, primarily the Excel Center, the University of East London (UEL), and the soon-to-be Siemens center. These three organizations each represent different elements of institutions – commercial, educational, and technological. The Excel Center attracts visitors from London, England, and the world by hosting a variety of events and conferences. Excel is one of the main businesses that are associated with the Docklands, making it a significant presence and representative. The UEL draws more than 23,000 students to the area, making it one of the largest higher education institutes in East London. The university is a key figure in the Docklands, because it provides a variety of educational resources for the surrounding community, creating a valuable resource. The Siemens center will be a new research center that will promote sustainable choices and products. This technology-based institution will be the first of its kind in the Docklands, allowing us to use this as a catalyst to generate new technology based projects. These instances of institutions provide good tools into the investigation of a productive urban centre. Each functions as different elements and provides us with opportunities in which we can extend their influence into the rest of the site and our new projects.

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Institutions The footprint and interconnection of existing and upcoming Institutions

UEL Siemens

ExCeL

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CHAPTER 02

The Royal Business Park


Institutions The footprint of existing Institutions UEL

ExCeL

CHAPTER 02

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LARGE SCALE Excel

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CHAPTER 02

LARGE SCALE UEL


LARGE SCALE Siemens

SMALL SCALE Britannia Village. Community Centre

CHAPTER 02

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CHAPTER 02


Tools. Infrastructure The existing infrastructure acts as a generator to the industries and institutions. The DLR provides immediate services with the rest of London with 11 stations scattered across the Docklands. The DLR forks in the north-west portion of the site and splits running along the northern and southern part of the Docklands. The DLR services all major institutions and industries, but does not create an enclosed transportation loop. The track provides linkage to and within the site, but also creates physical barriers, which are somewhat alleviated by viaducts and pedestrian overpasses. This generates land underneath and on either side that is unused. London City Airport provides international connections to the rest Europe and the world, bringing in almost 9,000 people per day. The airport supports other related industries, such as catering, cargo shipping, and logistics storage. It is an important link for the rest of the Docklands because of its convenient location for travel to and from London and England. These tools of infrastructure will prove to be advantageous in the future projects because they will provide ample opportunities for experimentation.

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Infrastructure

DLR line

Pedestrian routes

Roads

Water path

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CHAPTER 02


Infrastructure+Industry

International scale

Metropolitan scale

Local scale

Existing condition

CHAPTER 02

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Infrastructure Sections

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CHAPTER 02


Infrastructure Sections

CHAPTER 02

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CHAPTER 02


Proposed Cross Rail station Excel centre

CHAPTER 02 CHAPTER 02

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Themes

Methodologies

Production, Consumption, Education The “3 i’s” are parts of cities, and in our investigation we will use them as tools. To develop and understand these tools on our site, we have taken into consideration themes of production, consumption, and education. Each of these themes operates in the “3 i’s”, but helps to clarify them as productive generators. We utilize these themes in our project by assessing their viability to operate on different scales and with the existing conditions throughout the site. The theme of production can be used to understand the development of business incubators. New business becomes a generator of production because it brings in people and capital. To create an environment on our site that will benefit new businesses we need to understand where potentials of production lie. Production may be generated through the DLR network that services existing institutions and industries, or by reclaiming the industrial sheds; perhaps it becomes a tool in which one rethinks the lack of cross-over between the industries and institutions. Consumption and education will act as supporters to the theme of production. Consumption will become a way to measure positive growth. The giving and taking of goods and services will be the quantities measured in consumption, the by-product of a productive environment. An educational theme will work with existing institutions, such as the UEL, but also become a way to explore the potentials of new ways to exchange information. Education is exchange of ideas, something that will be essential to our new productive environment. Production, consumption, and education all work together and support one another. These themes will become points of interaction through a series of composite strategies. They are ways to reestablish the tools of our initial investigation. Production, consumption, and education must work on a variety of scales because of the size of the Docklands, but because they will help us to understand the variations of the “3 i’s” in our projects.

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CHAPTER 02

The tools are ways to understand the site conditions and the themes are ways to readdress the tools in the unique environment of the Docklands. In our investigation of our site with these tools and themes, and our experimentation of a new productive urban ecology we have become interested in the potentials of the existing site conditions, particularly how the “3 i’s” can re-relate to one another. Tate and Lyle is the biggest industry on our site, not only in land mass but also as an economic generator. We have chosen to take this industry, food, as a catalyst for our project. However, in order to fully express the potentials of productivity that are inherent in the food industry we have thought it best to use another seemingly unrelated industry to further develop the potentials of food. The film industry has a presence within close proximity to the Docklands; an active studio is accessible via the DLR and takes under 10 minutes from most stations. There may already seem to be a superficial relationship between food and film, as both operate within the themes of production and consumption. However, it is about readdressing these industries with an understanding of how their relationship can be interpreted on the site with our tools and themes.


International scale

Metropolitan scale

Local scale

CHAPTER 02

46


By re-qualifying industry, institutions, infrastructure, a generate an urban ecology that will create a new produ

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CHAPTER 02


and introducing two new sectors, food and film, we will uctive environment.

CHAPTER 02

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CHAPTER 03


CHAPTER

03

Two Sectors: Food and Film

CHAPTER 03

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51

CHAPTER 03


Food, Film We have chosen food and film as the drivers of our productive ecology because of the possibilities each of these industries has in developing beyond their typical models. Food and film are established industries that could function independently of each other. In London they both operate and distinguish neighborhoods with their unique roles. Our new productive urban environment is about creating an ecology that can happen between the existing and new; not limiting a reassessment of our tools and themes by introducing an economically proven industry. By choosing food and film as our industries we question how to push their individual functions further by developing a new relationship between them. The strength of each industry relies in its ability to produce something to be consumed. Their inter-relationship would alter this function to produce more and at a larger variety of scales and services. Aspects of the food industry can be used in the creative industry of film. The functions of film will be serviced by the food industry. By rethinking food and film through a reassessment of our themes, tailoring them to respond to the tools of investigation on our site, and influencing one industry with the other we can generate a new urban ecology.

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CHAPTER 03


Food Food occupies two of the largest industries in the Royal Docklands. Tate and Lyle is a significant presence in the Docklands. It rests on the shore and provides access to the Thames, however it is a closed campus and interaction only happens within, making it completely autonomous. The other prominent food industry on the site is Loon Fung, which has a campus set-up similar to Tate and Lyle and occupies a series of reused industrial sheds. When assessing the existing food industries on our site we see that they are mainly concerned with manufacturing and exporting. The relationship with the rest of the Docklands is extremely limited. Our proposals for the food industry would be to address all aspects of food production, consumption, and education through the tools of investigation. Food is an industry that is made up of various levels of services and activities. We have approached our understanding of the potentials of the food industry by the scale in which it operates, and the possibility for these multi-scalar activities to take advantage of the amount of infrequently used land in the Docklands. Farming represents the food industry at its fundamental base. An urban farm would be the start to create a closed-loop food system within the docklands and a generator for a myriad of other related activities. The food industry also require means of logistic, packaging and processing, inherent activities that will supplement fundamental and new interactions between food and film. Research facilities are also characteristics of the food industry that we will explore, and with the advent of the Siemens Centre another research-based venture has strong potential. By using the themes of production, consumption, and education we can start to reassess the ways food functions may start to service and rely on the film industry. New educational facilities, that partner with the existing institutions, may provide an opportunity to mix food and film in an environment that promotes learning and experimentation. Reassessing the production aspect of the food industry and how it provides services to communities will also be fundamental. New methods of production may come out of the shared education facilities, creative partnership between elements of food and film will be stimulated in these types of environments. Consumption of goods, services, and knowledge will be the factors that will make food and film a viable crossover.

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The case of Tate&Lyle - London - UK

Aerial view of Tate&Lyle.

Section 55

CHAPTER 03


The case of Loong Fung - London - UK

Aerial view of Loong Fung.

Section CHAPTER 03

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57

CHAPTER 03


We have used a case-study to understand the possibilities of the food industry to create an urban centre. Greater Grimsby is a city in the United Kingdom that has become the largest fish-producing town in the nation. It has engaged the rest of the town and has embedded itself as the largest economy in Greater Grimsby. Fish manufacturing and its supported industries are separated across the town, resulting in a connection that passes through the town core. This creates a zone of dense productivity in the centre of the city. As a result of the mix of services directly related to the fishing industry other services have popped up to cater to the needs of workers, shipping, and manufacturing. We use Greater Grimsby as a model to understand the potentials generated when an industry engages with its surrounding community, in this instance in a physical and economic way.

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CHAPTER 03


Film We have chosen to utilize the creativity of the film industry to drive a re-qualification of the food industry. 3-Mills Film Studio is located 3km north of the Docklands, and another abandoned studio is 2km to the north-east, both are easily accessible via the DLR. While the creative industry currently has little impact and presence in the Docklands, its proximity and characteristics hold high potential for a new urban ecology with the food sector. The film/creative industry will be viable in our site because of the multi-scalarity of its activities. Currently there do exist community and media performance centres that are used by local residents. These are small and act within a community radius. Yet, there presence is enough on which we can start to establish new creative industries that can act at a higher capacity. Some aspects of the creative industry are being supported by related activities in existing institutions. The Excel Centre holds a biannual film festival and UEL offers classes in the creative arts. There exists the possibility to create and recreate relationships with these institutions, the existing community centres, and new elements of the creative industry. These elements are only enhanced by the active infrastructure network that ensures the Docklands is connected to the vibrant creative communities in Central London and beyond. The film and creative industry create activities that have high potentials of production. New business incubators may facilitate the growth of a young creative class. This group of individuals may take advantage of educational facilities and centres that tailor to their profession, while creating new ways of expressing their learning via the food industry. There will be opportunities for creative studios to operate, possibly working for large food related businesses. Additionally new mixed residential services will be provided, mixing the young creative class of food and film. The potentials to this new urban ecology will not be made to function within the confines of the Docklands. The network of infrastructure will ensure people and services are utilized wherever there are connections. Re-engagement with the existing elements of the creative industry in institutions may help to act as catalyst to ensure integration into the existing neighborhoods.

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CHAPTER 03


The case of Culver City - California - USA

Aerial view of Culver City.

Section CHAPTER 03

62


The case of Ealing Studios - London - UK

Aerial view of Ealing Studios.

Section 1 63

CHAPTER 03

Section 2


The case of SoHo - London - UK

Aerial view of SoHo.

Section CHAPTER 03

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65

CHAPTER 03


As with food we have used a variety of case-studies to understand how different scales of the creative industry can integrate themselves into a community and create productive economies. The neighborhood of Soho in Central London is an explosion of micro creative clusters that act in harmony with one another. Theatres rely on acting schools, and artists’ studios tailor to larger professional design studio. Soho becomes an example of creative sub-sectors crossing over one another to make a relationship of dependencies and interactions. Culver City is a film studio that functions as a completely introverted environment in the centre of a city. It is small in scale and support activities directly related to filming, however it must rely on services available outside its immediate vicinity as it cannot function solely on what is contained within the studio. Ealing Studio is located in a residential neighbor in North London, and while it is introverted like Culver City it can operate independently without reliance on outside services. These examples of active creative industries allow us to understand, in an urban setting, how a creative industry can relate to its surroundings. Through complete, partial, or no segregation, each creative industry gives us a variety of ways to deal with creative services. When we apply this to our projects we may use introverted activities in filming studios where security and control are essential, yet when we integrate film and food we need to know how relationship and dependencies are created and maintained.

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We understand that each of these industries has stron and the capacities they have for expansion onto the re characteristics of each that will respond to our site an each of them to hold their own individuality as a sector combine and produce a new productive synergy.

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CHAPTER 03


ng potentials to functions effectively as individuals est of the site. However, it is the unique nd make it a productive environment. The ability for r also presents a flexible platform in which they can

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DLR

69

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER

04

The Projects

SYNERGIES BETWEEN FOOD and FILM THE FILM STUDIO/ THE EDUCATION CENTRE

SKY CHEF and a SCHOOL FOR HOTEL MANAGEMENT and HOSPITALITY TRAINING

INTRODUCING THE NEW INSTITUTIONS

EXPANDING OF INSTITUTIONS

and

and

NEW SECTORS

to the

SITE

COMPLETING THE INFRASTRUCTURAL LOOP

CH

WI OL

WO

CHAPTER 04

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71

CHAPTER 04


Industry, Institution, Infrastructure Rethinking typologies

Our new urban ecology is formed from encounters of food and film as well as a retention of key aspects in their autonomous function. Through planned interventions we create formal and informal environments for the sectors to interact and create a new type of productive ecology. The functioning of food and film will change from their interactions. As a result, new ways to address their activities will emerge from our experimentation and understanding of the tools, themes, and methodologies. Typological reasoning is used to compliment the new activities that will be generated from the ecology of food and film. We have picked sites along the Royal Docklands that will take advantage of the existing site conditions as well as interact with local communities, institutions, and industries. The projects will be presented moving west to east as to show dependencies in their interaction and how new modes of infrastructure ensure their connectivity. While all projects will not happen in a sequential or simultaneous manner we present them in this way to show the intricacies of their encounters.

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Bringing Film to the Royal Docklands

The first site of our projects houses a large film studio. The scale of this plot, sandwiched between two functioning industrial sites, creates room for the large program associated with a film studio to establish. Space can be provided for filming sets, workshops, and offices. Unique programmatic needs of a film studio and the sites proximity to a residential neighborhood were addressed by sinking parts of the program, allowing accessibility onto the site by the creation of a public park. The second site for a film related intervention stems off the initial film studio by providing educational facilities as well as live/ work studio space. The site is situated in a prime location just south of a large residential neighborhood as well as a proposed food related intervention. This new area creates a productive environment by showcasing the possibilities of a synergy between food and film

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Diagrams Linking Britannia Village to the waterfront/Inserting the Workshops building as a sound buffer.

Inserting the program related to the Film Industry.

Thickening the ground covering parts of the program.

Porosity of the thickened ground level allowing different levels of interaction (public/services) and allowing transparency vis-a-vis the program.

Different layers of interaction with the site: public, amateur, professionals.

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CHAPTER 04


The Cinematographic Park

The new park allows access via a 25m wide underpass, from the community of Britannia, linking to a new infrastructure along the waterfront of the Thames. A boat dock will be created to connect to the rest of London and other various landmarks along the water. The underpass will serve as a showcase for public art and enhanced by the introduction of greenery. The film activities being housed under the elevated park vary in size and thus the topographical landscape of the park transforms. Film professionals can access the film sets and other sunken areas from a road which runs lower, while the public can make their way across the park by a series of bridges above the service areas. This creates a unique experience for the user, as they will only be given a visual hint of the hive of activity beneath. The sunken program contains a theatre, a variety of movie sets, workshops, storage areas, and loading docks. However this complex arrangement of programs is porous, allowing the user to move freely around the different functions, not having to go to the surface to access other areas. Because of the proximity of the site to a residential neighbor precaution has been taken to buffer any noise that my come from the day or night. An office building has been designated towards the northern periphery of the site. It is raised above ground level, additionally creating a designated entry point for the park.

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Sections

Existing urban condition

Insertion of the program

77

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

78


Sections

Section in process

Final section

79

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Diagrams Bringing manufacturing/knowledge and residential on a common site.

Inserting the school (education layer) and live/work clusters (Productivity layer). Linking the central Mixed area of the overall project with the added diagonal.

Pushing the slabs, creating pockets. Planted terraces on the educational building. Superposed live/work spaces and planted roofs

Bringing the public inside the building from the ramp level. Raising the live/work spaces, generating more porosity and flexibility to the site.

Different layers of interaction with the site: amateur, professionals and visitors.

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The Educational Centre

The site reproduces the diagonal from the adjacent Thames Barrier Park. This landscape element splits site program, one side containing education the other production and consumption based enterprises. The educational facility functions around a giant staircase that allows the creative studios to climb up the building and interact with each other, providing the school community and visitors a unique perspective on their surroundings. On the other side, the create live/work spaces are designed to be light on the landscape. They are elevated off the ground and sometimes situated between trees, giving them a treehouse quality. This environment creates a unique environment for young creative talent to work. The diagonal cutting through the site acts as the main pedestrian thoroughfare, bringing people in as well as connecting with the quay site across the road by an underpass. People emerging from the underpass will discover a new type of environment by the complex layering of functions on the site. Public services are located on the ground floor, gardens suspended from the school and workshops, and professional work studios generate this creative-exchange based environment.

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Sections

Existing urban condition

Insertion of program

83

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

84


Sections

Section in process

Final section

85

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

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87

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Requalification of leftover spaces CHAPTER 04

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CHAPTER 04


Synergies Between Food and Film

Traversing through the underpass the user is now immersed in the cross-over relationships of food and film. This site, located around the Silvertown Quay, is unique in its landscape and existing architecture. The three interventions take advantage of the location as well as carefully attune to the distinct qualities of food and film

1

4

3 2

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90


Existing structure: Research and development Housing ______________ Retail Commercial

waterfront /retail /walk

#1 housing + research fish nursery

roof planting

eco walk

#2 fish tank + farming 91

CHAPTER 04

#3 film workshops fish tanks

farming ROW

ROW

season appara

#4 pavillion +farm 0

6m


Sections through various typological projects

key sites of the Silvertown Quay

t public space

h

alk

ng

cycling path

waterfront /retail /walk

film workshops

#3 film workshops fish tanks

farming ROW

ROW

seasonal apparatus pivot door

#4 pavillion +farming 0

6m

CHAPTER 04

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Area calculations

CHAPTER 04

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FARMING CYCLE

Water/Farming Cycle

Farm

Distribution to retail

95

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Harvesting

Transportation

Processing Washing Packing Sorting...

Storage /24-48h


CHAPTER 04

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Research and Education Clusters

Across the quay from the farm sits the abandoned Millennium Mills, a prime building to be reused as a basis for research and education related to aquaculture and floriculture. The building will incorporate a research centre with classrooms, lecture halls, computer and scientific laboratories, conference rooms, libraries, and residential quarters on the top floors for staff, researchers, students, and guests. The ground floor is divided from the research centre to accommodate commercial and retail activities that will open up to the waterfront and the neighboring community. The research building works on the land in front and adjacent to the Mills. Flower plantations are designed on mounds to create interesting patterns and distinct growing zones. They are sloped to create room underneath to house facilities for the adjacent fishfarm. Flowers were chosen for research as to not risk crossbred contamination with the vegetable farm a few hundred meters away. The flower plantation also provides a striking visual aesthetic. This clubbed with leisure and knowledge based activities on the site create a place for the new and existing community to interact and enjoy. To activate the waterfront, apart from the leisure and recreational activities, a fish-farm was designed, fortifying the objective to creative innovative uses of the new sectors to enhance productivity. The farm will produce consumable fish that will be sold to local restaurant and used in the cooking schools – places utilized by everyone. The program for the fish-farm is located in the calm waters of the quay. Workshops, nurseries, storage, and an information centre take advantage of the space created by the sloped flower plantations. A vehicular road, along the periphery, links all of these activities and services with the rest of the Docklands.

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Alternative 1a

Alternative 2a

Alternative 1b

Alternative 2b

Alternative 1c

Alternative 2c


Functional layers of a typical extensive green roof

1a /2a - Workshops, nurseries, information centre, storage rooms and multifunctional spaces arragend below the mounds. 1b /2b - Topographical variation of the mounds 1c /2c - Different variations of plantation layouts

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Slope angles study

Section BB - through the research plantation mounds

101

CHAPTER 04

Section AA - through the research plantation mounds


Section through Millennium Mills

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Cluster section /Film workshops

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Creative Cluster The combination of food and film creates an incredible range of activities and urban environments by mixing small/large scales, industries, and workshops. After analyzing the constraints and potentials of the site, this group started to test different design approaches and programs in order to achieve a creative urban environment. The land on the southern edge of the quay and the one first accessed by the sub-terrain underpass becomes the prime location for a synergy between food and film. Through the mixture of typological experiments, this project looks to enhance the “3 i’s� in a wider territory. The arrangement of buildings is organized in a permeable manner, enhancing the patterns of movement throughout the whole site. The program comprises of small-scale industrial workshops (creative clusters), film/food related workshops, agriculture, and a marketing and advertising school. These programs are designed through multiple articulations and address the livelihood of their encounters through multiple scales and hybrid typologies. The small scale workshops are arranged in different clusters. They create themed pockets which organize the workshops according to use, such as cenography, graphic design, sound editing, costume, lighting, and photography amongst others. The services provided in these workshops will be used by both food and film. It is essential to have a coherent spatial strategy to enhance the existing conditions of the city as well as create a more creative urban territory. The ability to synchronize different aspects of the territory is a substantial measure that is done in the design strategies.

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Cluster View Cluster View **film workshops film workshops

Conceptual Diagrams /workshop clusters 105

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19.

13. -0.22 -0.15

-0.30

0.

-0.15

-0.15

0

11m Film cluster arrangement CHAPTER 04

106


Cluster section /Film workshops

107

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Cluster section /Film workshops

109

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110


Sections

food school / institution

plant nursery roof planting

Existing structure: Research and development Housing ______________ Retail Commercial

fish nursery

roof planting

eco walk

fish tanks

#5*

0

6m

film waterfront /retail /walk

#1 0

cycling path

#2 6m

plant nursery

0

roof planting

6m

eco walk

waterfront /retail /walk

eco walk

cycling path

film workshops

#**

public spa waterfront /retail /walk

#3 0

#4 6m

0

6m

#**

existing structure - new housing plus retail + commercial

plant nursery leisure

CHAPTER 04 111 #6* 0

6m

fish nursery

leisure

eco walk

fish tanks

Dock

cycling path


#1 housing + research seating

plant nursery

roof planting

#3 film workshops

eco walk

fish nursery

roof planting

eco walk

fish tanks

farming ROW

seasonal apparatus

ROW

pivot door

school

#2 fish tank + farming market

DLR

#4 pavillion +farming 0

ace

retail

market installation

film workshops

6m

DLR

#1

#2

#5

#6

#3 #4

waterfront /retail /walk

eco walk

cycling path

royal docks

film workshops

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Plan

A

A

113

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The Urban Farm: Educator and Producer To the east of the quay sits flat and easily accessible land, a prime location for the implementation of an urban farm. The fundamental program of a food industry is a farm and better yet, one which will develop to serve as a producer and educator. The agriculture program that site on this site produces food, creates a venue for its showcase and consumption, and provides interactive educational activities. The farm occupies almost nine hectares. The land is divided into short rows to allow for hand-harvesting, there is a reinsertion of a vehicular road to ease transport. A seasonal pavilion is placed towards the north-western portion of the site to not cast any shadows over the field and to take advantage of a unique location on the corner of the docklands. The pavilion’s interior quality responds the variety of vegetation in-season. During the warmer “growing” months the glass walls of the doors fill with green vines. Light is filtered through the doors and an iridescent shadow is cast within. Users of the building can enjoy the seasonal vegetables in the restaurant or café, as well as shop for locally produced goods from the farm or nearby creative studios. In the winter months, when there is little vegetative activity, the pavilion emits a softer glow from the light of the gray winter sky. The vines in the doorways have receded, leaving the opaque glass to filter the haziness of winter. The pavilion responds to the environment around it and provides the user with an experience that enlivens all the senses. Another building is situated diagonally across the site from the seasonal pavilion. This building acts as a storage and processing shed for the farm. Its architecture mimics that of the pavilion. On the land visitors can walk through the fields and spot their favorite vegetable. Paths are cut diagonally to allow for variation in scenery, and sloped to give the visitor a whole new perspective to their food. The slopes range in height from a few centimeters to a few meters, giving an assortment of heights an opportunity to experience a variety of views. A child will see a row of beets differently than that of a full-grown adult. This way of walking through the field is meant to create a new level of understanding where ones food comes from, and how a person really is what they eat.

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114


Section AA’ Urban farm

Understanding the farm from the new view 115

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Sloped path


Seasonal pavilion “Summer”

Vines growing in window of door

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116


117

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Sky Chef and a School for Hotel Management and Hospitality Training

A post-industrial site sits across the street from the urban farm and this project takes advantage of the large tract of land available to the west of the Tate and Lyle campus. The site is divided into two parts, one housing a series of logistical warehouses and the other serves as a training and education facilities. These two sides of the site are linked with a commercial kitchen that is able to transmit activities. The logistical warehouses abut to the east, which in the future could be used by Tate and Lyle. The services on the other side of the territory are predominantly serving the London City Airport, which is in close proximity. A Sky Chef service is incorporated into the commercial kitchen, providing pre-made meals to be used in-flight. Additional services for Sky Chef such as warehouses for raw material (supplied by the urban farm) and finished products, as well as distribution buildings are also created. For the purpose of institutionalizing the industries, catering institute and hotel management schools were integrated. Providing and making organic food will also be fundamental in the Sky Chef service as well as the new educational programs. An organic food corporation, which existed on the site, is relocated to a building next to the schools, creating a social courtyard. The new school facilities are connected to the organic food corporation by a slanting sky bridge, creating a physical connection as well as an aesthetic value. The same sky bridge connects from below the ground to a newly design multi-purpose auditorium on the other side of the road.

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Plan

Sections Seasonal food Pavilion

Section BB’ Travellodge

Section AA’

Travellodge

Existing Section 119

CHAPTER 04


Multipurpose auditorium connected with the school

Shurgard Storage

Etap Hotel

Shurgard Storage

Etap Hotel

Institution for catering and Hotel Management

Institution for catering and Hotel Management

CFE-organic food enterprise

CFE-organic food enterprise

Bishop’s Gate Iron&Steel

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120


Sections

Section DD’

Catering School

Section СС’

121

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Sky Chef (commercial kitchen)

Packaging

Logistics Depot

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122


TER

CLUS L A R U

CULT

IOS

UD N ST O I T C U

ROD

-P POST

Y

WA

M RA LT

CA

LO

123

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Introducing new Institutions and new Sectors to the Site

The area for this project is defined by separated entities: selfcontained communities to the north and an industrial belt to the south. Two hidden anchor points currently occupy ends of a road that run diagonally through the site. One is the semi-active Music Hall and the other is a community plaza, which is already connected to the welldeveloped infrastructure. The plaza contains a library, shops, a hotel, and restaurants. This area also links to a pedestrian tunnel, which passes under the Thames and links with the other bank. Despite being well connected and with a variety of services and activities this area is underused. Acupuncture type projects are created to bring the separated entities together, and to create new conditions for the site, which will consequently help to transform the area.

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124


spaces for rent

children

local

elderly

communities

people

music hall hotel

dlr line

airport

charity organization

storage

storage

technology service

125

CHAPTER 04

storage

tate

&

food

lyle

primary school

logistic


Existing condition The Music Hall works at a local scale and holds a variety of events, ranging from music classes to theatre production. It site on a site that is adjacent to the airport, the new Sky Chef park, and the urban farm; it is in a prime location to be reassessed through an integration of food and film. The other site for the project intervention addresses the industrial belt, which is used to store and process goods from the existing food industries. The goal is to regenerate the existing industrial territory and create a new innovative environment with conditions that will allow this area to transform spatially, economically, and institutionally.

primary school

how do these industries perform? what impact they have on the land?

storage chinese food

storage

broadcasting

unnel foot t

woolwich library vocational training learning centre

local centre

shop

CHAPTER 04

126


EFS

SKY CHEF TATE & LYLE

MUSIC HALL expanding of the current understanding of the music hall 127

CHAPTER 04


Proposal

Besides expanding the Music Hall by creating a new institution this project will develop on multiple scales: local and regional. By adding theatre workshop spaces, equipment storage, performance practice studios, kitchen and catering facilities, and other services provided in other examples of theatres, we can re-qualify the Music Hall.

The industrial sheds are rethought to create post-production clusters to support an introduction of the film industry. As a result of this transformation the waterfront hidden by the industrial belt will be partially opened up. The sheds retain their existing structure, but the dimensions have changed, creating separated clusters and interesting spaces.

industry

DCAS BROA

META

POST-PRODUCTION

TING

POST-PRODUCTION industry

L REC YCLIN G

MUSIC HALL

how do these industries perform? what impact they have on the land? how they transform the area?

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128


A diagram of Post-Production Industry

DLR Line LOCAL COMMUNITIES

WOOLWICH LIBRARY

connection with the existing food Industries METAL RECYCLING

CHINESE FOOD

TATE & LYLE

DYNAMIC FOOD INDUSTRY

AIN

TR

FOOT TUNNEL

POST-PRODUCTION

-television programmes -radio programmes -advertising -videos -audio recording/soundtracks -photography -digital art -voc. schools

Relationship of Post-Production Industry with the surroundings E

YL &L E AT

T

E NES

CHI

D

FOO

NG

CLI

AL

MET

Y REC

G

TIN

S DCA

A

BRO

DLR

Y FOOD

INDUSTR

LOCAL

TRA

M

Y INDUSTR -PRODUCTION

ACTIVATION OF T HE W ATERFRONT

LO

CA

L

CE

NT

RE

POST

129

CHAPTER 04

N

TIO

A ST

LOCAL MAIN STREET

TRAM

BROADCASTING

LOCAL

LOCAL COMMUNITIES

Line


Post-Production Industry The shed is considered as a shell to house multiple sectors within. The structure of the post-production sheds will hold studios for the film industry, rentable studio, as well as school and public facilities. This will open the post-production cluster to the food industry. Cooking schools, cafes, and restaurants will be created to attract people and create new jobs. Moreover, the whole site will develop a transparent and porous building to accentuate the waterfront access. The existing industrial businesses will benefit from the new food venues but also the skilled work force that can receive training in schools on the site.

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130


Transformation of the Shed WHAT DO SHEDS OFFER? EXISTING CONDITION

131

CHAPTER 04

PROPOSAL can only volumes provide the collective space?


PROPOSAL ...or the inner space should participate in space formation?

CHAPTER 04

132


WATERFRONT...

133

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

134


Sections Section showing interrelation of the outer and inner space

Section along waterfront showing the connection with the foot tunnel

Emergence of spaces of different qualities

135

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CHAPTER 04

136


EXISTING...

137

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

138


PROPOSAL...

139

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

140


A diagram of the new Cultural Institution

AIRPORT DLR Line HOTEL (AIRPORT)

LOC

AL

FARM (organic food)

TRA

M

MUSIC HALL (multi

SKY CHEF (AIRPORT) access

-receiving and storage -production line final delivery of the

LOCAL COMMUNITIES

LOCAL COMMUNITIES

programmatic building)

-workshops, related to performance -drama schools connection with the existing food Industries -bars, restaurants TATE & LYLE -rehearsal areas -studios for recording to the river -spaces for elderly people -art studios -main hall -spaces for rent -lectures about healthy food

product

-deep

frozen food

Sequence of spaces spaces for rent --> different scenarios

FARM

(orga

nic fo od)

SK

Y

CH

EF

(A

IRP

OR

T)

HOTEL (AIRPORT)

MUSIC HALL

DLR Line

141

CHAPTER 04

T

POR

AIR

M L TRA LOCA


Music Hall This project creates an “exploded” version of a traditional theatre by spreading all of the essential facilities onto the site, rather than housing them within one building. This will provide the opportunity to create themed clusters that support one another but are architecturally independent. This clustering of services will create a favorable atmosphere for the airport hotel, rather than it functioning as an autonomous building in the landscape it can start to engage its surroundings. Café and restaurants supported by Sky Chef and the urban farm will help maintain the active atmosphere in the area.

SURFACES

different qualities of spaces/sequences of spaces connection: -through buildings -through secondary routes

LINES

Different road layers the hierarchy of circulation -local scale -metropolitan scale

DOTS

Spatial quality -formation of clusters -functional differentiation

CHAPTER 04

142


SEQUENCE OF SPACES spaces for rent --> different scenarios Functional scheme of traditional theatre

rehearsal

foyer/bar

hall rooms

foyer

workshops

technical support

technical support

SECTION

hotel (airport) cafes/small offices

fashion school drama school/workshops technical workshops

143

CHAPTER 04


Music Hall + Clusters on the site food drama school/

+

hall

workshops

technical support

fashion school rehearsal rooms

lecture hall/demonstration centre rooms for rehearsal

CHAPTER 04

144


EXISTING...

145

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

146


PROPOSAL...

147

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

148


BRICK LANE MUSIC HALL NEW INSTITUTION

MUSEUM/ RAILWAY STATION

149

CHAPTER 04

STORAGE PLACE POST-PRODUCTION INDUSTRY


New Local Infrastructure The main link between the anchors and a means of stimulating the new environment built in the industrial belt will be a new infrastructural spanning the distance of an existing and unused railway. A tram will run along the railway and provide a local service to link the new mixed-use post-production territory to the east with the creative theatre cluster to the west.

BRICK LANE MUSIC HALL NEW INSTITUTION

STORAGE PLACE POST-PRODUCTION INDUSTRY

LOCAL CENTRE

CHAPTER 04

150


151

CHAPTER 04


Expanding of Institutions and Completing the Infrastructural Loop The aim of this project is to increase productivity through institutions. Expanding the University of East London will provide a platform of knowledge and create a new network of interaction that will enhance the productive capacity of the territory. A crossover between students, professors, local communities, and economic sectors will be generated. An intervention will complete the infrastructure loop towards the eastern end of the dock with a new productive loop incorporating spaces for business incubators, educational facilities, workshop spaces, commercial spaces, and a pedestrian walkway. Architecturally the projects will engage users differently during various periods of time – day and night. The morphology of the project is derived from the pattern of the existing urban fabric. Structural lines and agriculture field orientation are defined, allowing for a composition of buildings and ground that create a continuity of space between the surrounding and the project. A new typology of institution is created from the combination of programs that create the new network of interaction among the relevant sectors. This new typology leads to both horizontal and vertical spatial organization that encourages a mix of spaces and uses. These are the demonstration spaces and research units for food and film, workshops, an organic supermarket, learning centre for creative industries, local facilities, and residential spaces for students and researchers. The form for the building is meant to become an organic, typological, gradation of the character of functions. Moving from food and film demonstration space to the more formal block of the institution. The landmark of the project is a learning centre converted from an old warehouse. This introverted box is designed to be the element that interacts most with the area. A double skin is applied to the form to create an interactive outer façade that overlaps with the solid box inside. This spatial concept will allow the flexible space between inside and outside of the learning centre as well as the waterfront promenade to perform as a learning landscape at night. The infrastructure is re-qualified by inserting a new pedestrian walkway into the vehicle bridge. This will change the relationship between the infrastructure and area from one divided to one connected. This project is the experimentation of spatial strategies and design intervention to address the issue of productivity of the Royal Dock. It explored the possibility to create synergies between institution, industry and infrastructure for the transformation of the area. By focusing on the institution as a key driver, in combination with the new economic sectors-food and film, it can be suggested that this articulation of space will formulate a richer and more complex understanding of how various dimensions- economic, social, spatialcan be integrated with design to generate a more productive urban ecology.

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152


EXISTING CONDITION Large institutions, Siemens Centre, Excel Centre, and the UEL are situated on the northern side of the Royal Docklands. Smaller institutions such as community and training centres are located along the southern side. In the eastern end of the Docklands there is a mix of large and small institutions. The segregation of the area made by the infrastructure of roads, railways, and the dock results in an exaggerated introverted operation of these institutions.

153

CHAPTER 04


UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON (UEL) sequence of space DLR station architecture and visual art dockland Knowledge centre business

student house

community

infrastructure institution

infrastructure (airport & dock)

left over space infrastructure community infrastructure industries

LOCAL CENTRE primary school

adult learning

child learning

shops

library

museum

old railway station

CHAPTER 04

154


PROPOSAL Synergies will be created between new economic sectors and an enhancement of the role of large and small institutions. A platform of knowledge will provide a new network of interactions that allow cooperation between university, small institutions, communities, existing and new industries, and business incubators. Requalifying existing infrastructure will provide a physical connection to link and reactivate the disconnected area of the Docklands.

155

CHAPTER 04


NEW KNOWLEDGE- BASED ECONOMY platform of knowledge& new interactions

DLR station UEL

business incubator

docks

community

community

to local infrastructure post-production music hall

community

small institution local centre industries

CHAPTER 04

156


RE-QUALIFY INFRASTRUCTURE A pedestrian walkway is inserted underneath the existing bridge, creating new relationships and access points to the water. The new walkway will also accommodate a floating business incubator. The businesses will be supported by a floating orthogonal structure. This will facilitate a flexible configuration of the cluster, both horizontally and vertically, to respond to the needs and demands of the business.

HORIZONTAL

FLOATING PONTOON

157

CHAPTER 04

HORIZONTAL


CHAPTER 04

158


EXISTING URBAN PATTERN new articulation LIVING

LEARNING

SHARING

TESTING

local centre auditorium residential

workshops

demonstration unit1

demonstration unit2

organic food supermarket

service

159

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

160


PROPOSAL Layout

161

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

162


163

CHAPTER 04


NEW MODEL OF INSTITUTION dynamic learning environment

CHAPTER 04

164


165

CHAPTER 04


LAYOUT AND PLAN mix of types and programmes

CHAPTER 04

166


OPEN UP THE WATERFRONT to the communities and the city

167

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

168


residential

local centre

learning centre auditorium class, workshop

169

CHAPTER 04

demonstration unit food film


SECTION mix of types and programmes

demonstration unit

supermarket

food film

CHAPTER 04

170


DYNAMIC LEARNING ENVIRONMENT day and night

171

CHAPTER 04


CHAPTER 04

172


173

CHAPTER 04


THE NEW PRODUCTIVE CENTRE

CHAPTER 04

174


175

CHAPTER 05


CHAPTER

05

Towards a Productive Ecology

CHAPTER 05

176


177

CHAPTER 05


Execution The sites for our interventions take advantage of large tracts of post-industrial land that have close proximity to functioning industries and existing communities. The surrounding environments of our site create a greater potential to develop a critical mass of activity that would be essential to a new productive environment. Most of the post-industrial land is scattered with large sheds that are used for logistical purposes by various sectors, including food. By incorporating larger programmatic needs of food and film with existing sheds and enhancing them through an introduction of elements of the new sectors at various scales, we can establish a mix of activity based on functions and requirement. Food and film both operate in a multi-scalar and functional manner. Aspects of each sector can shift to operate at various scales. The scope influential elements of food and film have on the site will become dependent on their requirements by the new and existing industries, institution, and infrastructures. The residential community of North Woolrich may desire smaller cafes and restaurants while the proposed research centre, east of the Quay, may need larger logistical buildings for food related material. The execution of projects not only respond to the availability of post-industrial land and the architecture already situated; but to the diversity of programs that are inherent in food and film and the need to recognize existing industries, institutions, and infrastructure. The Royal Docklands is a large site, providing the opportunity to implement a myriad of new interactions. The new sectors of food and film operate across different scales, from the community garden to large sheds for film production. Food and film can be both large and small; by recognizing these features of each sector we can then create a way to implement their scales in variation across the large site of the Royal Docklands.

Scale Our projects are executed in a multi-scalar manner to respond to variations that are created by the diversity of program. While the footprint of each project is large, aspects of each operate at different hierarchies. Smaller instances of food provide services in larger areas dedicated to the film industries, while post-production film modules set up shop in leftover warehouses around the site. The variation of scales in our project creates the catalyst for the greatest easement into a new productive environment. Portions of the site are segmented because of the introduction of the food and film industries, creating the transition from monofunctional to multi-functional. A site that has a higher diversity of functions will ensure a longer term of success. Food and film are such strong and independent sectors that they can maintain themselves. By mixing their functions across different scales we can ensure that dependence is created in this multi-functionality. Food will rely on film and film will need the services of food, yet each is productively independent of the other. We have chosen to integrate food and film on large footprints across the site in order to test our tools, themes, and methodologies within the inherent complexity of the combination of the new sectors. Using large foot-prints along with multiple scales allows us to consider different relationships that can happen in the crossover as well as new ways to think about food and film independently of each other. The large scale of the site gives us the room to push food and film to generate new idea, and in turn a new productive urban ecology.

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178


Upcoming multi programmatic Institution

SIEMENS

The surrounding environment of our site creates a greater potential to develop a critical mass of activity that would be essential to a new productive environment.

EXCEL

conn

ectio

n wi th r esea rch clus ters

+

requalification of leftover spaces

requalification of the Sheds Most of the post-industrial land is scattered with large sheds that are used for logistical purposes by various sectors could be reused

179

CHAPTER 05

logistics buildings

? +


The Royal Docklands is a large site, providing the opportunity to implement a myriad of new interactions.

UEL

AIRPORT

tion

ion

ct nne

ch h resear it w n io t nnec

new

hr ese arc hc lus ter s

co

h wit

itu Inst

clusters

nec

tion

wit

co

con

+

Aspects of each sector can shift to operate at various scales.

+

cafes, to serve the Music Hall

+

Infrastructure in Local Scale

cafes,restaurannts

+

Infrastructure in Local Scale

Food and film can be both large and small not only in terms of the size but also in terms of the impact.

CHAPTER 05

180


181

CHAPTER 05


New Productive Ecology Food and film have the ability to stand and create their own urban environments, yet limitations are inherent in their functions. The new sectors function in production and consumption by creation of services relevant to each industry. The new ecology on our site is based on creating common points of interaction between food and film. Development of a productive ecology in the Royal Docklands happens between the new, existing, and independent points of reference between food and film. New elements of education, working in conjunction with the University of East London, create places where ideas and relationships between food and film can be experimented. These new educational institutions are situated to act as a link between the introduction of new food and film elements and the established communities and institutions. A mixture of the programs will have film directors mixing with future chefs, plants researches will be down the hall from creative classes. The diversity of programs associated with the new educational institutes creates classes and exhibitions that will provide outreach to existing communities. Creative workshops and commercial spaces for the sub-sectors of food and film are mixed to promote a cross over of skills and abilities. Residential spaces are made adjacent to provide for the craftsman as well as encourage an influx from the young and talented. The new productive ecology is based on the introduction of food and film, but most importantly what is done to integrate the resurgence of these new sectors onto the site. It is about rethinking their functions through physical and economic mixes. Promoting one place to become a base for food (another for film), but providing opportunities for smaller scale aspects of the opposite sector establish.

CHAPTER 05

182


183

APPENDIX


Appendix/Bibliography Viljoen Andre. Katrin Bohn, Joe Howe. ed. Continuous productive urban landscapes: designing urban agriculture for sustainable cities. Architectural Press. 2005. Koster, Egbert. Oostelijk Havengebied Amsterdam = Eastern docklands: new architecture on historic grounds. Architectura & Natura. 1995. Ellmers, Chris. London’s lost riverscape: a photographic interpretation. Viking. 1988. Holzer, Christoph. Riverscapes: designing urban embankments. Birkhauser. 2008. Abrahamse, Jaap Evert. Eastern harbour district Amsterdam: Urbanism and architecture. NAi Publishers. 2003. Bruttomesso, Rinio. ed. Waterfronts: A new Frontier for Cities on Water. Cities on Water. Meyer, Han. City and Port: Transforming of port Cities London, Barcelona, New York, Rotterdam. International Books. 1999. Lopate, Phillip. Waterfront: a walk around Manhattan. Anchor Books. 2005. Williamson, Elizabeth, Nikolaus Pevsner, Malcolm Tucker. London docklands. Penguin. 1998. London Docklands Development Corporation. London docklands today. LDDC. 1997. Al Naib, S. K. London docklands: past, present and future. Polytechnic of East London. 1990.

APPENDIX

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26.03.2011

Budget's Enterprise Zone is vital to an Olympic legacy of pr…

Budget's Enterprise Zone is vital to an Olympic legacy of prosperity The Chancellor's strategy for growth. 7:00AM GMT 24 Mar 2011

SIR – We welcome the announcement in the Budget of new Enterprise Zones. The new zone in London will be in the Royal Docks. It is crucial that the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games bring sustainable employment to East London as part of a lasting legacy. Newham alone has an employment rate of 60 per cent of the working age population – 10 percentage points below the national average. But East London has the potential to contribute an additional • 13 billion to GDP. We must ensure that we get the incentives right for each area, to maximise investment potential. Last year, the Prime Minister announced his plan for a tech city, stretching from Old Street to the Olympic Park. We look forward to working with the Government to maximise the opportunities for technology to drive our economy. Sir Robin Wales Mayor of Newham Andreas J. Goss Chief Executive, Siemens Plc 26.03.2011 John Burton

London’s Royal Docks to become one of country’s largest E…

London’s Royal Docks to become one of country’s largest Enterprise Zones Director, Westfield Stratford City

23 MARCH 2011

Saving libraries is the way to boost child literacy (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/letters/8402311/Saving-libraries-is-the-way-to-boost-child-

The literacy.html) regeneration of London’s historic Royal Docks came a step closer today as 125 hectares of development land adjacent to City Airport and with

excellent transport connections, were given Enterprise Zone status, following successful negotiations between the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, and the coalition government. Kevin Murphy Thousands of jobs are expected to be created by this status which will provide a significant boost to the Mayor’s plans to transform the Royal Docks into a Chief Executive, London brand new district toExCeL live, work and invest in.

New businesses locating there during the term of the current Parliament will benefit from reduced business rates for five years and, most importantly, the Richard Gooding business rates London collectedCity from those newly established businesses in the zone will be retained by London’s recently created Local Enterprise Partnership for Chairman, Airport the next 25 years. This will create an ongoing economic development fund which can be re-invested in promoting economic growth elsewhere in the capital or set against borrowings for investment. Hamid Kefayati ManagingHaringey Director,Council Buhlerhas Sortex Limited Separately, invited the Mayor to enter into discussions to explore establishing a Mayoral Development Corporation (MDC) in the

N17 area of the borough – one of London’s most deprived neighbourhoods. This would be London’s second MDC after the one proposed for the Olympic Park and would also be able to offer business rate incentives to new enterprises using powers being granted under the Localism Bill. Talks SIR – IHaringey wish theleaders Chancellor hadlocal increased tax on everything don'timmediately. buy and increased income tax for everyone who earns more than I do. between and the businessthe community are set to Istart Together these initiatives will help create significant economic growth for two of London’s key regeneration areas in the Upper and Lower Lea Valley. Rodney Howlett Darley Dale, Derbyshire

185

The Mayor of London Boris Johnson said: “This new status is the icing on the cake for my vision to return the Royals to their former glory as a thriving, vibrant place to live, work and visit. Already home to the colossal ExCeL Exhibition Centre and the new International Convention Centre, investors are SIR – How refreshing to have a Budget largely free of hubris and sleight-of-hand. beating a path to the door of golden opportunities arising in this emerging district.


Appendix /Publications 05.05.2011 Click here to print

All aboard the Boris cable car | Mail O…

26.03.2011

Thousands already ride his Boris bikes, now it's all aboard... The Boris cable car

London dock projects revealed | New…

Saturday26 March 2011

London dock projects revealed

By David Jarvis Last updated at 2:09 AM on 18th April 2011

3 March 2011 | By Andrea Klettner London Development Agency and Newham Council will use Mipim to unveil plans for Royal Docks Next week’s Mipim property fair in Cannes will hear details of the self-styled “last great development opportunity in London” centred around the Royal Docks. BD has been given a preview of what’s in store for this area of east London, owned primarily by the London Development Agency and Newham Council and stretching from the Olympic Park to the largely derelict docks themselves. According to Clive Dutton, executive director of regeneration, planning and property at the council what is proposed also represents “the highest quality of architecture and design that lifts the spirits and inspires people”.

Stratford Village Stratford Village ( pictured) will be the first phase of housing developed post the 2012 Games on the

05.05.2011 aboard the Boris cable car | Mail O… main Olympic site by the OlympicAllPark Legacy Company. The cable cars will transport 2,500 people across the Thames every hour, the equivalent of about 40 buses.

Located in the area near the athletes’ village and the velopark, the development will be 60% housing,

It will stretch two-thirds of a mile and have up to 34 gondolas carrying a maximum of ten passengers each. The 300ft focusing on families. support towers will rival the 440ft London Eye on the skyline, but will still be dwarfed by the Shard, which at 1,017ft will be A set of building traditional London housing typologies – including mews, terrace and stacked – have been the tallest in Europe when it is completed next year.

identified for chosen architects to interpret.

High life: An artist's im pression of the planned tow ers and cable cars

Canning Town

A spectacular new cable-car system is set to soar high above London’s River Thames. The stunning addition to the capital’s skyline will see gondolas glide 300ft above the water suspended from cables anchored to giant towers, giving commuters and tourists a majestic new view of the city. 26.03.2011

Developer Bouygues is responsible for the £500 million five-phase regeneration of Canning Town (pictured), with separate architects set to design each stage, together with a landscape architect. Working with Newham Council, Bouygues selected Haworth Tompkins for the first phase, which includes a new Morrisons supermarket and 177 homes.

Canary Wharf owners eye Royal Docks - Telegraph

It will cross the river from the Greenwich peninsula to the Royal Docks, linking the O2 Arena south of the river to the ExCeL exhibition centre in East London. The £40million project – which has the full backing of London Mayor Boris Johnson – already has planning permission and, if funding can be agreed, it could be operating in time for next summer’s Olympic Games.

Canary Wharf owners eye Royal Docks

Work will start later this year to draw up a long-list for phase two, which covers the design of a new and residential, with a winner selected at the start of 2012.

MrThe Johnson who last year pushed through city-wide cycle enterprise hire scheme,zone, nicknamed Boris Bikesthe – iscreation of new zones by the chief–executive of Canary Wharf,the thecapital’s UK's most famous has welcomed high street confident it will a major tourist attraction rivalling similar cable cars in Rio de Janeiro and Barcelona. Coalition asbecome a "fantastic idea".

Silvertown Quays

He said: ‘We are a significant step closer to being able to cruise the East London skyline via an elegant cable car spanning the mighty Thames.

At Mipim, the LDA and Newham Council are to announce a programme of selection of purchasers and developers, including masterplanners, for sites at Silvertown Quays and the Royals Business Park.

‘It will be an exhilarating way for Londoners and visitors to explore our great city while providing a much-needed river crossing to support the regeneration of this quarter of the capital.’

dailymail.co.uk/…/All-aboard-Boris-ca…

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Last year a £1.5 billion deal involving the LDA and the Bank of Scotland to build 5,000 homes and a Terry Farrell aquarium collapsed after failed funding attempts.

Gallions Quarter The cable car w ill cross the river from the Greenw ich peninsula to the Royal Docks, linking the O2 Arena south of the river to the ExCeL exhibition centre in East London

Another LDA-owned site with procurement for a development partner underway. An announcement is expected next week on who will build the cable car system, which has been designed by architects Four housing-associated led teams are vying for the job, with architects including Feilden Clegg Wilkinson Eyre.

Bradley, Maccreanor Lavington, Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, Jestico & Whiles and Space Craft

There were concerns the cables might pose a danger to planes flying in to London City Airport, but a review by National Architects in the running. Air Traffic Services said the risks were minimal, concluding that an accident would be likely to happen ‘less than once every 15million years’. bdonline.co.uk/news/…/5014275.artic… Transport for London believes there is a need for a new crossing east of Tower Bridge where it can be difficult to cross construction of the cable car had been selected

bike or foot, and said last week a ‘preferred bidder’ for the The continued su ccess of Canary Wharf was highlighted on Friday in the grou p's annual results which showed the v alue of its properties increasedthe 4 .1river pc to •by 4.91 bn in and would be announced following the signing of legal agreements. 2 01 0. Photo: Ian Jones By Graham Ruddick (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/journalists/graham-ruddick/) 5:56PM GMT 25 Mar 2011

Mace, the company building the Shard, are current favourites. It had been hoped that a private-sector company would fund the construction but Transport for London is still seeking a private partner and said that it would get funding from advertising, branding, fare revenue and sponsorship.

George Iacobescu said Government support had been "absolutely critical" to the success of the East London business estate and said Canary Wharf Group will "look" at becoming involved in London's new enterprise zone at the Royal Docks, which is just two miles away. The continued success of Canary Wharf was highlighted on Friday in the group's annual results which showed the value of its properties increased 4.1pc to

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Typology


“3 i”


Site conditions


Proposal The sequence of movements

A connection between the post-industrial studios with the local centre/activation of the local centre

The sequence of movements


ARCHITECTURAL ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE HOUSING & URBANISM Worked by: Courtney Erwin Olivia Fontanetti Gaurang Nabar Anagha Patil Pornpan Thaveelertnithi William Wehbe Olga Yatsyuk Tutors: Jorge Fiori, Elena Pascolo and baby, Alex Warnock-Smith

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Lower Lea Valley Group 2  

AA Housing and Urbanism Lower Lea Valley Group 2