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Diesel Directory • RIBs • Marine Finance ®

IN BUSINESS ON THE COASTAL AND INLAND WATERS

JULY 2019

Wind Up

The U.S. market is preparing for more offshore wind.

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ON THE COVER

®

A crew transfer vessel on the Burbo Bank Extension Offshore Wind JULY 2019 • VOLUME 76, NO. 7

Farm off Liverpool, U.K., in the Irish Sea. Ørsted photo

FEATURES 20 Focus: Hard Cash Lenders are still wary, but marine financing is improving.

22 Vessel Report: A Good Ribbing RIB manufacturers are busy with new contracts, new models and new markets.

32 Cover Story: Tailwind Will offshore wind developers on the East Coast find enough heavy-lift vessels and space for their projects?

22

BOATS & GEAR 26 On the Ways • New 1,700-hp ATB tug for Island Tug from Nichols Brothers Boat Builders • Gulf Island begins construction on the second of three Regional-class research vessels funded by the National Science Foundation • Two offshore wind crew transfer vessels to be built at U.S. Workboats and Senesco Marine • Gulf Craft delivers 114' whale watch vessel to Massachusetts operator • St. Johns Ship Building to build four 150-passenger, 30-vehicle ferries • Eastern Shipbuilding delivers first new Subchapter M towboat for Florida Marine Transporters • Chesapeake Shipbuilding launches 3,000-hp push tug for Vane Brothers

38 2019 Power Guide WorkBoat’s annual directory of marine diesel engines.

AT A GLANCE 8 8 9 10 12 13 14

NEWS LOG 16 16 17 17 18

38

On the Water: Protection and safety — Part I. Captain’s Table: SIP is still an effective inspection tool. Energy Level: Break-even costs for oil projects drop. WB Stock Index: WorkBoat stocks get battered in May. Insurance Watch: Maintenance and cure coverage. Inland Insider: Consolidation and high water on the waterways. Legal Talk: Supreme Court hears shipboard asbestos case.

Water, truck and rail rely on each other, ACBL’s Knoy says. Record high water leads to Lower Miss spillway openings. Congress seeks report on vessels needed for offshore wind farms. Coast Guard boosts rates for Great Lakes pilots 11%. NTSB said problems found in Bouchard barge fleet after 2017 explosion.

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

DEPARTMENTS 2 6 51 59 60

Editor’s Watch Mail Bag Port of Call Advertisers Index WB Looks Back

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durability - strength performance - SINGLE PROPELLER - up to 20” diameter - dependable & robust drive optimal for working vessels with moderate speeds - the 620b sets a new standard for stern drive durability

- DUAL PROPELLER - up to 16” diameter - Excellent for performance driven applications demanding high speeds, quick response and better fuel efficiency - optimal for patrol & interceptor type vessels

- DUAL PROPELLER - up to 18.50” diameter - highest torque rated stern Drive & weight carrying capability in the industry - The 680B operates with supreme efficiency for heavy single & twin applications

Application Variations - recreational - center counsel - fishing - landing craft - fire/rescue - passenger - pilot - MILITARY/patrol - COMMERCIAL - GOVERNMENT SERVICE - electric

Editor’sWatch

Wind in your sails

I

s offshore wind power getting ready to take off in the U.S.? Well, not quite yet, but things appear to be heating up. Much is still uncertain, but projects are moving forward, albeit slowly. The East Coast between southern New England and the Carolinas is attractive to developers of offshore energy because it has consistent year-round wind close to major cities such as Boston and New York. After Deepwater Wind and its five-turbine, 30-MW Block Island Wind Farm off Rhode Island went online in 2016, several federal leases were awarded. That same year, Equinor (then known as Statoil) won an 80,000-acre lease for its Empire Wind project in New York, and two years later companies bid almost double what Equinor spent per acre to secure three more leases south of Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., in December 2018. “I think what you’ll see with these leases in place is tremendous acceleration down to Virginia,” said James Bennett, who heads BOEM’s renewable energy program. In U.S. waters, offshore wind developers still face hurdles of finding enough heavy-lift construction vessels and physical space in U.S. ports to accommodate the next generation of giant wind turbines. But as our cover story on offshore wind (see page 32) says, U.S. shipbuilders and others are gearing up for offshore wind. “There are plenty of (U.S.) companies just waiting for you guys to place orders,” Luther Blount of Blount Boats, Warren R.I., which delivered the 70'6"×24'×4' Atlantic Pioneer in 2016, said at an offshore wind conference in

David Krapf, Editor in Chief

April. It takes 12 to 14 months to build such a vessel, subject to Coast Guard safety regulations and certification. So, Blount told attendees, “Please don’t wait until the last second. Give us time to build the boat.” U.S. naval architects and shipyards have had wind farm vessel designs ready to go for a few years. Now, even the offshore service vessel industry sees the opportunity in offshore wind. In June, the Offshore Marine Service Association created a wind committee to develop strategies and initiatives that increase U.S. maritime industry involvement in the offshore wind sector.

dkrapf@divcom.com

Ask about our marine analysis form

www.konradmarine.com 2

WORKBOAT® (ISSN 0043-8014) is published monthly by Diversified Business Communications and Diversified Publications, 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438, Portland, ME 04112-7438. Editorial Office: P.O. Box 1348, Mandeville, LA 70470. Annual Subscription Rates: U.S. $39; Canada $55; International $103. When available, extra copies of current issue are $4, all other issues and special issues are $5. For subscription customer service call (978) 671-0444. The publisher reserves the right to sell subscriptions to those who have purchasing power in the industry this publication serves. Periodicals postage paid at Portland, ME, and additional mailing offices. Circulation Office: 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438, Portland, ME 04112-7438. From time to time, we make your name and address available to other companies whose products and services may interest you. If you prefer not to receive such mailings, please send a copy of your mailing label to: WorkBoat’s Mailing Preference Service, P.O. Box 7438, Portland, ME 04112. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to WORKBOAT, P.O. Box 1792, Lowell, MA 01853. Copyright 20 18 by Diversified Business Communications. Printed in U.S.A.

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


MARINE GENERATORS, AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION

www.workboat.com

RELIABLE. DURABLE. SIMPLE.

EDITOR IN CHIEF

David Krapf dkrapf@divcom.com

SENIOR EDITOR

Ken Hocke khocke@divcom.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Kirk Moore kmoore@divcom.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

ART DIRECTOR

PUBLISHING OFFICES

Capt. Alan Bernstein • Bruce Buls • Michael Crowley • Dale K. DuPont • Pamela Glass • Max Hardberger • Joel Milton • Bill Pike • Kathy Bergren Smith Doug Stewart dstewart@divcom.com

Main Office: 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438 • Portland, ME 04112-7438 • (207) 842-5608 • Fax: (207) 842-5609 Southern/Editorial Office: P.O. Box 1348 • Mandeville, LA 70470 Subscription Information: (978) 671-0444 • cs@e-circ.net General Information: (207) 842-5610

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MARINE DUTY CLUTCHES AND BRAKES

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Kristin Luke (207) 842-5635 • Fax: (207) 842-5611 kluke@divcom.com

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EXPOSITIONS

EXPOSITION SALES DIRECTOR

PRESIDENT & CEO GROUP VICE PRESIDENT

(207) 842-5508 • Fax: (207) 842-5509 Producers of The International WorkBoat Show, WorkBoat Maintenance & Repair Conference and Expo, and Pacific Marine Expo www.workboatshow.com Chris Dimmerling (207) 842-5666 • Fax: (207) 842-5509 cdimmerling@divcom.com Theodore Wirth Bob Callahan bcallahan@divcom.com

Force Control Industries, Inc. 513-868-0900 info@forcecontrol.com www.forcecontrol.com

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Cullen Diesel Power, Ltd. Surrey, BC (604) 888-1211 Servicing: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Northwest Territory, Saskatchewan, Yukon Territory Florida Detroit Diesel Allison Fort Lauderdale, FL (954) 327-4440 Servicing: Al, FL, MS, Bahamas Helmut’s Marine San Rafael, CA (415) 453-1001 Servicing: AZ, CA, HI, NV, UT, Guam Interstate Power Systems Minneapolis, MN (262) 783-8701 Servicing: IL, WI, MN, IA, MI (Upper) Johnson & Towers, Inc. Egg Harbor Township, NJ (609) 272-1415 Servicing: DE, MD, NJ, NY, Eastern PA, Bermuda

Performance without Compromise

Pacific Power Group Kent, WA (253) 854-0505 Servicing: AK, ID, OR, WA Power Products Wakefield, MA (781) 246-1811 Servicing: CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT Star Marine San Carlos, SO (800) 999-0356 Servicing: Mexico Stewart & Stevenson Houston, TX (713) 751-2700 Servicing: TX, LA Superior Diesel, Inc. North Charleston, SC (843) 553-8331 Servicing: GA, KY (Eastern), SC, TN (Eastern) Wajax Power Systems Ste. Foy, QC (418) 651-5371 Servicing: Labrador, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, St. Pierre et Miquelon Western Branch Diesel Portsmouth, VA (757) 673-7000 Servicing: NC, OH, PA (Western), VA, WV

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Commercial vessel definition clarified

I

was pleased to read your news article in the April issue “Charter operators hit with big fines in Coast Guard crackdown.” I’m also happy that the Coast Guard is enforcing charter boat laws. I am a holder of a 50-ton masters license and the operator of an uninspected passenger vessel. Some clarification of the last paragraph of your article is warranted. If a vessel has even one paying passenger it is a commercial vessel, and depending on size, the vessel must be documented or registered as a commercial vessel. Additionally, the operator must hold a valid mariner’s license. If the vessel carries six passengers or less, no certificate of inspection is needed but it must carry additional items not normally required on a recreational vessel. The Coast Guard has a voluntary examination specifically tailored to these

uninspected passenger vessels. I have my boat examined annually to show my charterers that I respect their safety and am in full compliance with the charter regulations. Thank you again for this article and for a fantastic publication. Capt. John Ellis Capt. John’s Sassafras Adventures Georgetown, Md.

Try on your lifejacket

L

ast boating season, the Coast Guard received an increased number of reports of incidents from recreational boaters where infant lifejackets did not perform as expected in the water. These incidents involved multiple models and manufacturers. Investigations were completed, and there were no findings of non-conformance or manufacturing defects. The products met Coast Guard requirements and applicable industry standards.

The investigations did highlight the importance of checking the fit and performance of lifejackets on users, especially infants and children, while floating in water. The Coast Guard recommends everyone try on their lifejacket in a controlled water environment to ensure proper fit and performance. However, the only way to ensure proper fit and performance on an individual is to try it on in the water. Select a lifejacket that is appropriate for your size, environment and activity. Read the label. A lifejacket should fit snugly. In the water, if the user cannot maintain a relaxed “face-up” floating position after getting used to wearing the lifejacket, try another style until one is found that fits and performs properly. U.S. Coast Guard Office of Design & Engineering Standards and Office of Boating Safety Washington, D.C.

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS. IT WON’T. SIMPLE. RELIABLE. MITSUBISHI. When you’re out on the water, every day brings a new, unexpected challenge. It’s a volatile life, but your engine shouldn’t be. Simplify, and choose Mitsubishi. The power you need. The reliability you demand. And the simplicity of a fully mechanical design to handle maintenance yourself.

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On the Water

Protection and safety — Part I

I

By Joel Milton

Joel Milton works on towing vessels. He can be reached at joelmilton@ yahoo.com.

f you are currently active in the U.S. Merchant Marine, theoretically you now have more protections and more safeguards in place than ever before. What do I mean by protected and safeguarded? I’m referring to the entire safety array of working and living on the water. This includes personal protective equipment (PPE), a company’s health and safety policies, safety management systems (SMS), frequent third party audits and inspections, vessel construction standards, and the U.S. Coast Guard’s inspection/prevention activities. There are now layers upon layers of policy, procedure, regulation and oversight (with highly variable rates of effectiveness) aimed at preventing injuries and accidents, from cutting your finger in the galley to explosions and everything in between. If things still go badly there are a multitude of search and rescue (SAR) resources to come to your aid. This includes rescue vessels and fixedand rotary-winged aircraft from several different

Captain’s Table Streamlined Inspection Program is still effective

T

By Capt. Alan Bernstein

Alan Bernstein, owner of BB Riverboats in Cincinnati, is a licensed master and a former president of the Passenger Vessel Association. He can be reached at 859-292-2449 or abernstein@ bbriverboats.com. 8

he domestic passenger vessel industry has been inspected by the Coast Guard for more than 60 years. As a result, operators have amassed a great deal of knowledge about the inspection process and the regulations that apply to their vessels. There have been numerous efforts by the Coast Guard to streamline the inspection process. One was the creation of the optional Streamlined Inspection Program (SIP) in 1997 to give U.S. vessel owners and operators an alternative method of complying with inspection requirements. My company, BB Riverboats in Cincinnati, has operated under the effective and underrated SIP since the program’s start. SIP was an effort to reform the Coast Guard inspection program and identify ways to streamline it while still verifying a vessel’s compliance with regulation. Under SIP, company personnel conduct the inspections based on a management plan, developed in cooperation with local Coast Guard personnel, and then take corrective action if deficiencies are identified.

agencies. The in-water rescue capabilities provided by helicopter-deployed rescue swimmers are enormously beneficial. We literally are protected by an army of helicopters along our coasts. The seaward reach of that protection is often increased by the presence of military shipboard-based helicopters and ship-to-air or air-to-air refueling. But despite all of this, stuff still happens. That’s because the working decks of tugs and barges are by their very nature an unavoidably dynamic and dangerous place to be. If you don’t want to become a statistic or be responsible or contribute to someone else becoming one, then the focus of your efforts should go into the foundational basics of procedure. You must know how to select and lay out your working deck gear, how and where to best position yourself for the different tasks, and, most importantly, how to make sure you don’t put yourself in a bad position. It all starts with these three critical things. Every procedure should periodically be reviewed for potential improvement and fine-tuning. Nothing ever has to be done a certain way just because that’s the way it has always been done. That’s the worst excuse in the book.

While the Coast Guard conducts an inspection, they also check the management of the company’s SIP and spot check certain vessel systems to verify accuracy. For an owner, the SIP program is an excellent alternative to traditional vessel inspection because it empowers employees. Employees provide the energy and knowledge that keeps the vessel in good working order. They are aware of what to inspect and can make the timely decisions necessary to keep the vessel in compliance. The major strength of SIP is that you consistently evaluate the vessel according to the management plan, and when a problem is uncovered, you identify it, report it and fix it. The net effect is a fluid process that allows you to stay ahead of the Coast Guard inspection curve. It builds trust with Coast Guard inspectors and helps increase safety. I was fortunate that my company got in on the ground floor with SIP. A good friend of mine, the late Kenny Stein of Sayville Ferry Service, Sayville, N.Y, worked tirelessly with the Coast Guard to help develop this program. With Coast Guard resources again being squeezed, the time is right to revisit inspection alternatives such as SIP. www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


WORKBOAT GOM INDICATORS

Energy Level

MAR. '19 WTI Crude Oil 59.29 Baker Hughes Rig Count 23 IHS OSV Utilization 31.4% U.S. Oil Production (millions bpd) 12.1

APR. '19 65.66 21 30.3% 12.2*

Sources: Baker-Hughes; IHS Markit; U.S. EIA

*Estimated

WTI Price U.S. Prod 1000s bopd

Oil costs down, prices up

MAY '19 58.40 23 31.1% 12.3*

MAY '18 72.26 18 26.1% 10.7

GOM Rig Count Util. Rate %

GOM RIG COUNT

GOM Rig Count

By Bill Pike, Correspondent

U

.S. shale oil, which just four years ago was the world’s second most expensive oil resource, is now the second cheapest, just behind the giant onshore oilfields in the Middle East ($42 per bbl. breakeven), according to Rystad Energy. As noted recently by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the break-even price for oil in parts of the Permian Basin (the most prolific producer in the U.S.) has fallen below $50 bbl., to $49 in the Delaware Basin and $48 in the Midland Basin. In U.S. shale plays overall, the break-even price in late May varied from $49 to $54 bbl. The drop in break-even prices in the U.S. can be attributed to efficiency gains in two sectors. Decreased costs through pad drilling in which numerous wells can be drilled from one small site, eliminating the need for expensive rig moves and concentrating supply provision. Second, increased efficiencies in horizontal drilling, multistage fracturing, and completion technologies have both contributed significantly to lowered costs and increased activity levels in U.S. shale plays, particularly in the Permian Basin. As a result, U.S. crude production,

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30 25 20 15

5/18

10

5/19

5 0

1

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3

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which began the year at 11.7 million bbls. perMay-18 day (bpd), according to the EIA, has Jun-18 risen to a current high of 12.3 million bpd (as of May 24), with 18-Jul an anticipated increase to 13.4 million 18-Aug bpd by 2020. With oil in the $54 bbl. 18-Sep range (as Oct-18 of June 3) and an average break-even price of around $50, the 18-Nov prospectsDec-18 for onshore oil producers look bright. Jan-19 But things may look even brighter 19-Feb offshore.19-Mar According to Nasdaq, Royal Dutch Shell plc told the Financial Apr-19 Times last fall that the break-even 19-May oil price for deepwater drilling had dramatically decreased to $30 bbl. Moreover, a presentation by Ensco showed that the break-even oil prices

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for several offshore projects were less than $40 bbl. The prices 18 reflect the utilization of existing18 infrastructure in deepwater through (relatively) inex15 pensive tiebacks in addition to low 16 prices for drilling and18 development due to equipment surpluses that have 18 led to reduced day rates 23 and capital costs. 24 If falling break-even 19prices are not enough, the persistent22 commitment by OPEC to maintain23 production cuts should help oil prices.21 OPEC, Russia and other non-member 23producers, an alliance known as OPEC+, agreed to cut output by 1.2 million bpd from Jan. 1 for six months to strengthen prices.

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

PROFESSIONAL GRADE RIBS™ 5/11/18 8:13 AM

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WorkBoat Composite Index Stocks lose 9% in May

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he WorkBoat Composite Index lost 188 points, or about 9%, in May. For the month, losers topped winners by a 5-1 ratio. Ensco Rowan (NYSE: ESV) saw its stock price lose 40% of its value in May. On May 22, the Houstonbased offshore driller announced that it will not pay a regular quarterly cash dividend. Prior to completing the

company’s merger in April, legacy Ensco shareholders received a regular quarterly cash dividend of one cent per share and legacy Rowan shareholders did not receive a regular quarterly cash dividend. In Ensco Rowan’s first quarter earnings call with analysts in May, the first as a newly merged company, Thomas Burke, the company’s president and CEO, said the integration of

STOCK CHART

Source: FinancialContent Inc. www.financialcontent.com

INDEX NET COMPARISONS 4/30/19 5/31/19 CHANGE Operators 328.64 318.49 -10.15 Suppliers 3,491.42 3,037.95 -453.47 Shipyards 2,778.55 3,037.95 259.40 Workboat Composite 2,101.35 1,913.65 -187.70 PHLX Oil Service Index 92.96 74.03 -18.93 Dow Jones Industrials 26,592.91 24,815.04 -1,777.87 Standard & Poors 500 2,945.83 2,752.06 -193.77 www.orca.eu For the complete up-to-date WorkBoat Stock Index, go to: workboat.com/resources/tools/workboat-composite-index/

PERCENT CHANGE -3.09% -12.99% 9.34% -8.93% -20.36% -6.69% -6.58%

the companies has gone well and they have not experienced any disruption to its offshore operations. “This is a major milestone given the complexity inherent in such a large combination …” Burke went over the benefits from the merger. This includes now having the largest and most diverse customer base in the industry, partnering with customers to lower offshore project costs, and, as a larger company with greater scale, being able to streamline innovation efforts and spread them and future investments across a larger rig fleet. . Looking at thewww broad market, Burke said the company continues to see improvement in the offshore drilling industry. With intermediate and long-term crude oil prices relatively stable around $60 bbl. (Brent), “coupled with attractive new project economics have created an environment more conducive PROFESSIONAL to new offshore project investments,” / MILITARY RIB Burke said. — David Krapf

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HOVERCRAFT HOVERCRAFT HOVERCRAFT FIRE AIRCRAFT LIFTING BAG RESISTANCE

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


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Your objective is simple…Deliver your vessel and its contents safely and on time. While it might sound simple, we know it’s not easy! Whether you’re navigating the open ocean, busy harbors, or through congested inland waterways, being aware of your surroundings is paramount. Your number one line of defense is a Radar you can rely on, from a company you can depend on. Furuno’s award winning Radar technology is built to perform and withstand the harshest environments, keeping you, your crew and your precious cargo safe. With unique application features like ACE (Automatic Clutter Elimination), Target Analyzer, and Fast Target Tracking, Furuno Radars will help make that simple objective easier to achieve.

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Insurance Watch Maintenance and cure

E

By Chris Richmond

Chris Richmond is a licensed mariner and marine insurance agent with Allen Insurance and Financial. He can be reached at 800-439-4311 or crichmond@ allenif.com

mployees are your most valuable asset. With many facing a manpower shortage, keeping your workforce healthy and working is essential. Maintenance and cure provides coverage for when your crewmembers get injured on board your vessel, but did you realize that it also provides coverage for when they become ill? When a crewmember is diagnosed with a chronic illness, the vessel’s protection and indemnity policy provides coverage just as if the crewmember had fallen and injured an ankle. Even if the illness had nothing to do with the conditions on board the boat or the crewmember’s duties, if the diagnosis occurs while the crewmember is signed on, then the P&I policy can be responsible for providing benefits under maintenance and cure, often until maximum medical improvement (MMI) has been determined by a physician. While you can’t predict what will happen to crewmembers, there are ways to help mitigate

potential claims. After an employment offer has been made the next step should be a post-offer physical exam. This, as well as a health questionnaire, can help establish pre-existing conditions or injuries which would not be covered under maintenance and cure. Working on board a commercial vessel can be physically demanding and requiring a new employee to conduct a physical abilities test can help prevent potential injuries. A marine P&I policy provides crewmembers with generous benefits, but owners have some safeguards. One is the McCorpen defense. Here an employer may deny benefits to an injured seaman who has knowingly failed to disclose a pre-existing physical condition during their pre-employment examination. This is when a health questionnaire will help you. Three things to remember: • Prudent hiring requirements can help keep your loss history and premium low. • Your vessel’s insurance is there to cover your crew when they are injured or become ill while in your employment. • Document any limitations or medical history so you can avoid potential claims.

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Inland Insider Observations from the Inland Marine Expo

I

n May I attended the 2019 Inland Marine Expo (IMX) in St. Louis. Mark Knoy, president and CEO of American Commercial Barge Line (ACBL), delivered the keynote address. Knoy touched on a number of issues including consolidation. Today, he said, the top seven carriers make up about 72% of the industry’s liquid fleet. On the dry side, eight companies own 73% of the barge fleet. Knoy warned that a big negative from consolidation is a smaller pool of workers with leadership qualities. “Consolidation creates a leadership vacuum,” he said. “What can we do to lead our industry? Volunteer for something. That’s

how I learned about this industry.” Other comments from some of the IMX sessions included: • “The incidence of high-water events is increasing,” Ken Eriksen, senior vice president, IEG Vantage (formerly Informa Economics), said during his annual state of the industry address. “I think the greater concern is what comes after the high water, what kind of mess we’re left with.” • “If you look at what farmers have done, it’s remarkable. It’s just a slow slog.” — Eriksen, addressing U.S.China trade tariffs • “The last thing we need is another humongous soybean crop in the United States.” — Eriksen • At a session on Subchapter M, Capt. Scott A. Stoermer of the U.S. Coast Guard, said, “There is no enforcement plan currently,” referring to boat owners who do not meet Subchapter M requirements come July 20. In some cases,

the Coast Guard is “finding gross lack of compliance.” • “Every company has the option to use the Coast Guard option.” — Robert Keister, vice By Ken Hocke, president, Sabine Senior Editor Surveyors, on choosing a third party organization or the Coast Guard to conduct the Subchapter M inspection for your vessel. • “Make sure your captains call a TSMS (Towing Safety Management System) a TSMS, even when it’s called something else.” — Keister • “It’s the company that’s responsible for that survey.” — Christopher Parsonage, executive director, Towing Vessel Inspection Bureau.

ALL OF THE POWER NONE OF THE BULL

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

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Legal Talk

Shipboard asbestos case reaches Supreme Court

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or younger mariners, asbestos doesn’t often have tremendous relevance. Post-World War II ships commonly used asbestos as an insulating material

for boilers and turbines and as a hightemperature packing material. The reason for asbestos being phased out is health hazards. Asbestos fibers present the greatest danger when they are airborne. When inhaled, they can cause mesothelioma, lung cancer, and other respiratory diseases. And this is how an asbestos lawsuit involving two Navy sailors made its way to the Supreme Court.

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The lawsuit was filed against five equipment manufacturers by widows of the sailors who were exposed to asbestos during shipboard duties. The manufacturers produced turbines, pumps, and blowBy Tim Akpinar ers for three naval vessels. The lawsuit was based on the sailors developing cancer as a result of their exposure. When the components were delivered to the Navy, they did not contain asbestos. They came in bare metal form. The Navy then added asbestos. The manufacturers asserted this reason as a defense in the lawsuit. The plaintiffs did not sue the Navy because they believed it was immune. They did not sue the asbestos manufacturers because they had gone bankrupt. The Supreme Court sided with the widows. It held that a product manufacturer has a duty to warn when its product requires incorporation of a part, the manufacturer knows or has reason to know that the integrated product is likely to be dangerous for its intended uses, and the manufacturer has no reason to believe that the product’s users will realize that danger. The lawsuit also involved theories of negligence. It went back and forth between the district court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit several times before making its way to the Supreme Court. The manufacturers were found liable even though they sold the equipment in its bare metal form because it was reasonably foreseeable that asbestos would be needed for their operational use. Another important lesson is that if you encounter asbestos in your shipboard duties, treat it with respect and caution. Tim Akpinar is a Little Neck, N.Y.-based maritime attorney and former marine engineer. He can be reached at 718-2249824 or t.akpinar@verizon.net. www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


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JULY 2019

NEWS LOG NEWS BITTS

Corps of Engineers Louisville District

Corps of Engineers Louisville District

RECORD RIVER LEVELS ON LOWER MISS FORCE SPILLWAY OPENINGS

Barges at the Cannelton Locks and Dam on the Ohio River near Cannelton, Ind.

Water, truck, rail sectors need each other, ACBL chief says

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arging commodities is cheaper than hauling by rail or truck, if the playing field is level and you travel in a straight line from point A to point B. However, if there is product from the middle of Montana that needs to get to a ship in New Orleans, a barge company cannot go to the middle of Montana to pick up the load, bring it to the inland waterway system and barge it down the Mississippi River to the Crescent City. It takes an intermodal effort, Mark Knoy, president and CEO of American Commercial Barge Line (ACBL), said during his keynote address at the Inland Marine Expo in St. Louis in May. “We don’t really compete with truck and rail. We need them to make our industry work,” said Knoy. “We (barge companies) really compete against each other.” Knoy touched on a number of issues including high water, consolidation and

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technological advancements. Consolidation leads to efficiencies of scale, creating robust capability across end markets and geographically increases offerings and capabilities at less cost per unit, Knoy noted. Also, while there are fewer carriers to choose from, there are more capabilities to handle ship-load quantities to end markets. “Carriers must be vertically integrated just to get the work done,” he said. Today, the top seven carriers — ACBL, Kirby Corp., Canal Barge, Ingram, Florida Marine Transporters, Blessey Marine Services, and Marathon — make up 72.1% of the industry’s liquid fleet. On the dry side, Ingram, ACBL, American River Transport Co., Cargill, CGB Enterprises, SCF (Seacor), and Campbell Transportation Co. control 73% of the barge fleet. But Knoy said that there is one big negative to all of the consolidation — a

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xtraordinary flooding along the Mississippi River and its tributaries along with spring runoff of snow and ice forced the Corps of Engineers in June to open the Morganza Spillway for only the third time in its 65-year history. The purpose of the Morganza Floodway is to divert excess floodwater from the Mississippi River into the Atchafalaya Basin. The floodway consists of two structures — the Morganza Control Structure and the Morganza Floodway — which are designed to pass up to 600,000-cu.-ft.-per-second (cfs) of water to the Gulf of Mexico, alleviating stress for mainline levees downstream along the Mississippi River. The Corps said the structure would be overtopped in June if the gates were not opened. The opening is only the third since high water events of 1973 and 2011. The Corps had to open the Bonnet Carré Spillway for a second time this year in May to protect New Orleans, the first time that’s happened in the spillway’s history, and the first time Bonnet Carré has had to be used in consecutive years. — Kirk Moore

smaller pool of workers with leadership qualities. “Consolidation creates a leadership vacuum,” he said. “What can we do to lead our industry? Volunteer for something. That’s how I learned about this industry.” On the tech side, he pointed out the importance of auto-assist and drone assist, and Rose Point electronic

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


mapping, which has improved situational awareness and overall safety, made for more efficient transit times and increased reliability. “Rose Point is the best investment in tech that we’ve made in a long time,” said Knoy. And electronic buoys and other navigation aids go hand in hand with electronic mapping. As for drones, he said having one tethered behind a tow enhances the perspective of those in the wheelhouse when navigating through a bridge, for example. — Ken Hocke

NEWS BITTS COAST GUARD SAYS HIGHER GREAT LAKES PILOTS' RATES WILL BOOST PILOT RETENTION

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he Coast Guard has set Great Lakes pilots’ rates 11% higher than last year due to inflation, the addition of two working pilots and updated historic traffic data. Under the final rule that took effect June 10, per pilot hourly pay will range from $306 to $733 — depending on the district — up from $271 to $653 last year. Total target pilot compensation rises to $359,887 from $352,485. The rule affects 51 U.S. pilots, three associations as well as the owners and operators of about 256 vessels whose payments will increase $2.8 million over the $25.1 million in 2018. The move extends a years-long battle between the Coast Guard and ports and shippers. “The Coast Guard believes that the new rates will promote pilot retention, ensure safe, efficient, and reliable pilotage services on the Great Lakes, and provide adequate funds to upgrade and maintain infrastructure,” the agency said in the rule. The American Great Lakes Ports Association noted that this is the fifth consecutive year of unprecedented, double-digit increases for the nine-month shipping season. Saying it supports a safe and reliable pilot system, the group and industry partners believe the increases “will negatively impact the competitiveness of the navigation system. As all actors in the supply chain work to control cost and remain competitive, pilotage remains a run-away costcontrolled by federal bureaucrats insensitive to commercial concerns.”. The number of lakes pilots has grown from 37 in 2016 to 51 authorized this year. The Coast Guard has said its goal is 54 “to help reduce fatigue and ensure safety on the waterways.” While raising concerns about some numbers in commenting on the proposed rule, the Western Great Lakes Pilots Association commended the Coast Guard “for taking seriously its role as regulator of Great Lakes pilotage over the past four years (in contrast with previous decades.) Great progress has been made.”. — Dale K. DuPont

Congress wants inventory of offshore wind vessels

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re there enough vessels to handle the construction and maintenance needs of the emerging U.S. offshore wind industry? Congress wants to find out. On May 15, the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee approved an amendment to the Maritime Administration Authorization and Enhancement Act that would require a report on the kinds of vessels needed for offshore wind farms and whether they are available for U.S. offshore projects. If the bill becomes law, the Department of Transportation, in consultation with the Interior and Energy Departments, would produce a report within six months assessing the number of vessels available “to install, operate and maintain emerging offshore energy

infrastructure.” The study would also project the need for additional vessels over the next 10 years and make “policy recommendations to ensure the vessel capacity to support such emerging offshore energy.” These conclusions would presumably update and amplify a similar study done for the Department of Energy in

Deepwater Wind

Congress wants a report on the need and availability of offshore wind vessels.

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

2013, which highlighted a shortage of U.S.-built vessels capable of supporting the offshore wind industry. The amendment was proposed by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., a proponent of green energy whose home state approved offshore wind contracts for the Vineyard Wind project in April, clearing the way for turbine construction to begin later this year. This represents a major turnaround for the Bay State, which just a few years ago rejected another project, Cape Wind, which was to be the nation’s first offshore wind farm ahead of the Rhode Island project. Growth in the U.S. offshore wind sector is expected to spur construction of Jones Act-compliant vessels, and it is hoped that the report will provide further clarity about how that law might affect the different kinds of vessels needed to support offshore projects. Offshore wind vessel construction is 17


— Pamela Glass

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The explosion killed two crewmen and blew a hole in the bow of the Bouchard tank barge.

Coast Guard

in its infancy in the U.S., concentrated mostly on crew transfer vessels, tugs and supply and construction barges which can be built relatively quickly. Vessel design know-how is primarily concentrated in Europe, and the majority of heavy lift jackup vessels necessary for installation of wind turbines and vessels for laying cables are foreign-flagged. There are different and often confusing interpretations about what kinds of vessels must be Jones Act compliant, however, and there is currently no guidance. The possibility always exists that Congress might change the law at any time. This is why many who operate in this sector are being conservative and assume that the Jones Act applies in just about all instances, Charlie Papavizas, a partner at Winston & Strawn LLP who oversees the firm’s maritime practice, said during a webinar on the topic in March. He added that crew transfer vessels and other types are likely to be built in the United States and would be Jones Act compliant. “Although much is known from oil and gas administrative precedents and two offshore wind administrative precedents regarding the application of the Jones Act, many issues remain,” Papavizas wrote in his firm’s MaritimeFedWatch newsletter soon after the Senate panel approved the offshore study amendment. “Presumably, the secretary of Transportation will address some of these issues in order to assess current and future vessel needs.” He noted that the United States is poised for substantial growth with 13 existing commercial leases off the U.S. East Coast from Massachusetts to North Carolina in various stages of permitting and more leases to be offered in the coming months. “Major international renewable energy development companies are among the leaseholders and European companies with significant experience in the construction and operation of offshore wind farms are entering the U.S. market,” Papavizas said.

NTSB finds problems in Bouchard fleet

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nvestigators piecing together causes of the fatal 2017 barge explosion that killed two crewmen near Port Aransas, Texas, traced a string of serious problems in the Bouchard Transportation Co. fleet, despite passing ABS surveys and Coast Guard inspections, according to the National Transportation Safety Board The B. No. 255, a 488' oceangoing tank barge and its 127'×37'×20', 6,140hp tug Buster Bouchard, were getting underway from an anchorage off Port Aransas, Texas, with a cargo of crude oil when it blew up and burned around 4:30 a.m. on Oct. 20, 2017. Zachariah Jackson, 28, of Salt Lake City, and crewmate Du’Jour Vanterpool, 26, of Houston were killed. After Coast Guard investigators found corrosion and poor material conditions on the stricken barge, the Coast Guard took a close look at Bouchard’s entire tank barge fleet. “As a result of these expanded inspections, which were conducted from October 2017 to December 2018, the Coast Guard issued 251 deficiencies to 25 barges and placed operational controls on 10 barges, limiting or preventing their operation until the discrepancies were corrected,” according to the NTSB report issued May 9. “One barge was issued 66 deficiencies, and another was issued 33 deficiencies despite both being inspected by the Coast Guard and classified by ABS. In addition, five of the 10 barges

that were issued operational controls were transporting oil in bulk and had extensive corrosion discovered within cargo tanks and along the hull,” the report says The B. No. 255 itself had been checked by ABS surveyors and Coast Guard inspectors in months prior to the accident and approved for operation. But investigators found Coast Guard inspectors missed electrical discrepancies and other faults that had been identified earlier by ABS, but not yet corrected by the time Coast Guard inspectors came aboard. The NTSB report recommends the Coast Guard and ABS establish new policies and procedures for joint communication and sharing of information for inspecting vessels. That could add pressure to reforming vessel inspections and how third-party surveyors and classification societies like ABS figure into safety management. The same kind of critique emerged from the investigation into the sinking of the Tote Maritime cargo ship El Faro in 2015, when investigators reported that surveys and inspections failed to find material condition problems that contributed to the sinking in Hurricane Joaquin that resulted in the loss of 33 lives. The NTSB recommended the Coast Guard and ABS establish “joint policy and procedures to share information, including all results and findings from audits, surveys, examinations, inspections, and other applicable activities related to vessel safety.” — K. Moore

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Hard Cash

overbuilding. Lenders are drilling deep into balance sheets, high interest loans are being refinanced, inland capacity is about at equilibrium, and offshore is showing faint signs of life. “There is much more emphasis on credit quality, along with cash flow, leverage, collateral and trade type. Overall newbuild and delivery activity has declined due to overcapacity in the fleet,” said Charlie Lee, senior vice president of Wells Fargo Equipment Finance, marine specialty unit. “Most lenders have seen underwriting standards tighten over the past few years with a focus on operating leverage and liquidity.” “Banks are still very, very cautious,” said Ronnie Evans, director of marine finance at KeyBank’s Key Equipment Finance. “Credit is key.” And people are building because of Subchapter M. Day rates seem to be picking up. For barge operators, they have “slowly crept back into the $5,500-$6,000 per day range, increasing as much as 25% depending on the type of products that are being moved,” Evans noted recently.

Banks are still cautious, but financing is picking up.

Banks are becoming more interested in putting capital into green projects.

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eing the first of its kind, Red and White Fleet’s Enhydra — the largest hybrid powered passenger vessel built in the U.S. under Subchapter K rules — has attracted considerable attention. “We do get a lot of inbound interest. Enhydra has been a great billboard,” Tyler Foster, chief financial officer of the San Francisco tour boat company, said of the aluminum-hulled lithium-ion battery 128'×30’, 600-passenger sightseeing vessel launched last year. Red and White is committed to zero-emission fleet renewal. Interest is coming from other operators and lenders. “Big banks are more focused than ever on deploying capital into green,” he said. “Certainly, there’s appetite.” And there’s appetite, too, for Jones Act vessels, LNG and anything with an ironclad contract. But it’s selective. While money is available, both sides are wary of

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Red and White Fleet

By Dale K. DuPont, Correspondent

INTEREST, REFINANCING Interest rates haven’t moved much the last two years. Fixed rate deals are in the 5%-6% range for larger, more established companies and 7%-10% for younger companies or those recovering from a slump with a 10%-20% advance for a conventional loan. Many lenders will consider five- to 10-year terms on assets or for the life of the vessel. Prime was 3.25% about nine years ago. Rates started to creep up in 2015 and prime today is about 5.5%. “A lot of people got spoiled by artificially low interest rates during the recession,” said Michael Sammartino, executive vice president, Thomas USAF Group LLC, Atlanta, whose offerings include government guaranteed loans that range from $1 million to $20 million. “It’s never been a boom since before the recession. It’s been steady. “Our tug and barge business is very strong. Ferry boats are very strong,”

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Conrad Shipyard

Sammartino continued. In addition, “We recently refinanced some private loans that had high interest rates.” On the inland side, in particular, it’s a good time to look at refinancing fleets, said Kyle Parks, senior managing director, head of direct originations for Stonebriar Commercial Finance, Plano, Texas. “The boat and barge market is pretty tight right now,” he said, with shipyard slots hard to find. “Plenty of deals are getting done. Long-term money remains cheap. Credit profiles are improving.” The tug sector “has been a very good area for us the last couple of years — both in refinancing as well as financing new assets,” said Anthony Sasso, head of TD Bank Equipment Finance. “There’s certainly ample liquidity out there.” He and others noted an increase in sale/leasebacks, many driven by the latest tax reform. “The bank will purchase marine assets from the operator and lease it back to the operator for a seven- or 10-year term depending on the type of asset,” Sasso said. “The sale/ lease can also be structured as a tax orientated lease in which the bank can take bonus depreciation which is 100% in year one which will lower the overall cost of the lease.” In general, “There’s definitely a better atmosphere for marine finance than a few years ago,” said Capt. Norm Antrainer, director of strategic asset planning, Florida Marine Transporters Inc., Mandeville, La. Last year FMT ordered three 120'×35' river towboats from Metal Shark-Alabama, Bayou La Batre, Ala. The four-deck, welded steel towboats, designed by John W. Gilbert Associates Inc., Hingham, Mass., will be powered by twin Caterpillar 3512C Tier 3 marine diesels. They went to their normal lenders and got “pretty favorable rates,” he said, so they decided to pull the trigger to keep up with Subchapter M. “Right now, horsepower is key with this high river,” Antrainer said in the spring as the Mississippi River was rising. FMT also wanted to lock in prices, especially with uncertainty over steel

The tug sector has been strong for financing and refinancing.

tariffs. “You need to move on the price you hear that day. We’re being told the next two years are going to be a real bumpy road with steel.” OFFSHORE STILL SOFT Offshore still holds a lot of uncertainty. Parks said Stonebriar has been “pretty defensive” looking for opportunities there. “It’s going to take a while for that idle tonnage to get back to work. It’s still a very challenging market. We’re open minded and getting a little more open minded with each quarter.” Are newbuilds out of the question? “At this point, totally,” said Larry Rigdon, a veteran of the OSV industry. What’s more, “There have been very, very, very few refinancings of any kind,” he said. One of the issues is that operators with the wherewithal are picking up distressed assets cheaply. “That’s really destroyed value from the banks’ perspective.” The only financing is going to companies with non-cancellable contracts. The offshore situation is almost a mirror of the ‘80s, though Rigdon doesn’t think this downturn will last 13 years. There are signs of recovery, but bankers will have to get comfortable that oil prices will stay up and oil companies are committed to offshore. Todd Hornbeck, CEO of Hornbeck Offshore Services Inc., Covington, La., recently told analysts that a recovery should begin to take shape around midyear.” Last year “was probably the darkest year of the offshore industry. We do see it now changing,” he said. The Gulf of Mexico market “has reached the bottom, or at least this is the consensus. Therefore, it’s time

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

for recovery,” said Basil Karatzas, of Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co., New York. More sophisticated vessels, especially, will have better prospects. He also sees bright prospects for Jones Act vessels. “The U.S. economy is moving along well. The fundamentals for marine transportation have stabilized,” he said. “Financial institutions have more money to invest and spend in general, and in the past few years the maritime industry has not been part of their portfolio.” There’s also interest in LNG in the U.S. and overseas. “This potentially could be a game changer,” Karatzas said. “LNG as a fuel is cheaper, more abundant and has lower emissions.” It’s attractive as cargo, too. “What we are working on in the U.S. and also overseas is having sufficient bunkering stations for all these vessels,” he said. “Now banks also have to consider the footprint of projects they finance.” An LNG powered tug checks more boxes for the bank related to regulatory issues. Several operators are building vessels with Tier 4 diesel engines aimed at reducing emissions. Among them is Foss Maritime, Seattle, which has ordered four 100'×40' Tier 4-powered tractor tugs from Nichols Brothers Boat Builders, Freeland, Wash. Foss has an option for an additional six. Financing is done through parent company Saltchuk whose services range from air cargo and logistics to domestic and international shipping. “We find that the markets are strong,” said Steve Giese, Saltchuk’s chief financial officer. And with investment grade credit, “We have very good access to financing.” 21


RIBs

A Good Ribbing

Safe Boats 35 Multi-Mission Interceptor can carry 14 people in shock mitigating seats. By Michael Crowley, Correspondent

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S

afe Boats International introduced its 35 Multi-Mission Interceptor in 2016 and received its first orders in 2018 for both domestic and international government customers. The first 35 MMI was delivered this spring. Since the normal sales cycle for an introductory boat model is 24 to 36 months, “we were about on track for the first sales of that boat,” said Rob Goley, the Bremerton, Wash.-based company’s director of business development. The 35 MMI is similar to Safe’s 41 MMI except that the 41 footer carries up to four outboards, while the 35 MMI is limited to three outboards. It also has a traditional deep-V hull while the 41 MMI is built on a step-hull configuration. The 35 MMI measures 35'×10' and is rated for 1,050 hp. It carries 19 people, 14 of those in shock-mitigating seats. How those seats can be arranged is one of the 35 footers’ selling points

(as it is with the 41'×12' 41 MMI). The deck is laid out with a track system that allows for various seating arrangements. “The track allows you to reconfigure the deck arrangement to meet specific mission requirements,” said Goley. Safe Boats is working on some new models, which the company is not yet ready to disclose. A project the company is very willing to talk about is its new partnership with the Dutch boatbuilder Stormer Marine in Amsterdam, which specializes in aluminum workboats, as a way to compliment Safe’s lineup. The Stormer boats would probably be built in a Safe Boats facility in the U.S. Early models will probably focus on Stormer Marine’s Harbour Series and Porter Series. “Within the year we will definitely have some Stormer workboats in the U.S.,” said Goley, and some of Safe’s lineup might be licensed through Stormer for the European market. www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

Safe Boats International

For RIB manufacturers, new models and new markets.


WILLARD Willard Marine, Anaheim, Calif., has a contract to build 14 rescue boats that will be matched up with three 320'×70' Ollis-class ferries being built at the Eastern Shipbuilding Group in Panama City, Fla., for the New York City Department of Transportation’s Staten Island Ferry. There will be four RIBs on each ferry with launch and recovery davits and two to swap out for maintenance. “We are about to finish the first batch of six boats,” said Cole Christensen, sales manager for Willard Marine. The first boats will be delivered in August and the final four in July 2020. The RIBs for the ferries are Willard Marine’s 16'×6'10" Sea Force 490s, which carry a couple of distinctions. They are “the smallest rescue boat RIB in the U.S.,” said Christensen, and are also SOLAS approved. “No other U.S. manufacturer is building a

SOLAS-approved RIB in the U.S.” The Sea Force 490s have fiberglass hulls, carry up to six people, and will be powered with a tiller controlled 25hp outboard. A recent contract awarded to Willard Marine is for a Sea Force 540 patrol boat tender that will be carried by an 80' patrol boat being built at All American Marine in Bellingham, Wash. The patrol boat is for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Law Enforcement Division, which will operate offshore and in the Gulf of Mexico. The TPWD patrol boat will have a cradle in the transom that will launch and recover the 19'6"×8' Willard RIB while underway. The RIB will be powered with a 150-hp Steyr SE164E diesel connected to a Hamilton HJ213 waterjet. Together they should be able to kick the RIB up to 35 knots. “A small package that can accommodate that kind of a propulsion system is

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

pretty one of a kind,” noted Christensen. A Wing hybrid air and foam collar will protect the RIB in its comings and goings into and out of the cradle. The TDWP RIB is scheduled for an August delivery. Christensen said, “There’s a lot of interest in this style of boat.” For example, Willard Marine is currently working with the Hawaii state police for a boat of the same size with a diesel-powered waterjet “so it can go over shallow reef areas without damaging any coral.” RIBCRAFT Ribcraft, Marblehead, Mass., was awarded a five-year contract in April for seven Ribcraft 11.0s (35'6"×11'6") for the Navy’s explosive ordnance disposal work. Divers and remote underwater vehicles will be deployed from the RIB “to defuse mines or any kind of explosive detonations,” said

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Matthew Velluto, Ribcraft’s director of business development. A Cummins diesel with a Hamilton waterjet will provide the power. Ribcraft will also build a 7.0 (24'×8'8") RIB for the Navy. Ribcraft has always built search and rescue RIBs but the newest wrinkle in the design is a rescue boat with firefighting capabilities. The challenge for designing a boat for these two missions has always been building a search and rescue RIB in the 19' to 30' range with firefighting ability, without losing the rescue capability due to the amount of space taken up by the fire pump. “You might have a fireboat but you don’t have a rescue boat anymore,” said Velluto. Ribcraft’s way around that issue eliminates using a hose that’s run over the side of the boat for the fire pump’s intake. Instead the intake is hard plumbed through the hull with a through-hull fitting and a sea strainer, “so it can be self primed and ready to

Ribcraft

RIBs

Portsmouth, N.H., Fire Department’s 21' Ribcraft 7.8 has a portable fire pump in the bow and enough space aft for rescue work.

go as soon as they hook the pump up.” The fire pump is a portable unit held in place by quick connects that are generally forward of the center console. “Receive a call for fire suppression, you put the pump in and hook it

C&C

MARINE AND REPAIR

up quickly but the rest of the boat is set up for rescue,” said Velluto. With the pump in the bow, the boat can be pointed wherever the fire is. “In the RIB market we are probably the only one doing it,” Velluto said.

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


INVENTECH Inventech Marine Solutions, builder of Life Proof Boats, has designed and built a number of tour boats, including a pair of 40 footers in Hawaii and a 42' whale watching boat for Washington’s Puget Sound. In late May, the Bremerton, Wash., company began design work on a 36'×10' ecotour boat for a Maine operator that should be delivered in spring 2020. The 36' RIB will have a pair of 300-hp Yamaha outboards. “We’ll be shooting for 22 passengers,” said Micah Bowers, the company’s CEO. A bow door will drop down, allowing passengers to disembark on a dock or an island. A boat that Bowers said is “something new for us” doesn’t fall into the workboat category, but it does show what a RIB can accommodate when driven by a bit of imagination. It is a yacht tender whose owner had Inventech design a RIB that can accommodate a hot tub. It will be a 31'×10' RIB with a three-person hot tub. The water is kept hot with a pair of diesel boilers. On the transom will be a pair of 200hp Oxe diesel outboards. They are the first diesels to go on an Inventech boat and will be controlled with a SeaStar Solutions joystick system. Bowers predicts that there will be a growing market for diesel outboards, “as long as they can keep the prices down. Now they are more than twice

the price of a gas outboard of the same horsepower.” While Inventech builds new RIBs that carry their fast collar design, either all foam, a foam-air hybrid or 100% air, a separate part of the company has been retrofitting new collars on older boats for almost four years. In May, RIBs from Zodiac, Rayglass Protector and Rendova were in for new collars. “We can retrofit any existing col-

lared vessels,” said Bowers. “We won’t retrofit a boat that wasn’t designed to have a collar.” In the past year Inventech has built six or seven boats as part of a five year GSA contract. “They are mostly for a police department, usually 23' or 27' boats.” Bowers said that Inventech plans on focusing even more on government and commercial sales in the future.

THIS IS

WHY. S USTAINAB ILIT Y OF T HE SE A.

Sea Explorer plays a fundamental role contributing to sustainability in the Mediterranean. Aboard Sea Explorer, Michel Franck’s team shares

Inventech Marine Solutions

messages of discovery, education, preservation, and respect for the marine environment. As a floating classroom, this catamaran not only facilitates the teaching of environmental sustainability — it is built from recycled aluminum and an energy-efficient power solution that includes John Deere marine engines. Franck says, “We were looking for fuel-efficient engines that would help minimize our impact on marine life.”

Inventech’s 36' Ecotour boat for a Maine operator will resemble this earlier tour boat with its drop-down bow door. www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

Read more about why Sea Explorer runs with John Deere power and find your why at JohnDeere.com/Explorer.

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CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY AT WORKBOAT YARDS

On TheWays

ON THE WAYS

82' tug for British Columbia tug company.

I

n mid-May, Nichols Brothers Boat Builders, Freeland, Wash., completed the Island Regent, a new ATB tug, for Island Tug and Barge, Burnaby, British Columbia. Island Tug is a subsidiary of Tidewater Canada. Nichols didn’t build the hull and house originally, that was done at Island Tug’s Annacis Island facility on the Fraser River, south of Vancouver. The vessel was towed south to the Nichols Brothers shipyard on Whidbey Island in Puget Sound last year. The Island Regent is a sister vessel to the Island Raider, which was also built and completed by Island Tug in B.C. The vessel was designed by Robert Allan Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia With a blunt bow square to the flat, vertical sides, the Island Regent (and Island Raider) is essentially a rectangular steel box that measures 82'×41'×12'. There is neither curved sheer nor camber to the decks, which simplified construction. The bottom isn’t completely flat, but close to it. Justin Nichols, the project manager and owner’s rep, said the bottom has about 8" of deadrise. The house has four decks and a height-of-eye of 40'. The new boat is powered by a pair of Cummins KTA 38M main engines, each rated at 850 hp at 1,800 rpm. The mains turn a pair of Kongsberg US105FP azimuthing thrusters with 4-bladed, Kaplan-style, 63" propellers in nozzles. The Raider and the Regent are the first tugs in Island Tug’s fleet with Z-drives.

26

Their maneuverability impressed William Ford, one of the company’s senior masters. “We were able to perform a full-vessel 360-degree rotation in 20 seconds, at 70 percent power,” he said. “Also, at full ahead, which is about 10.5 knots, I was able to full stop the vessel in less than a vessel’s length, about 25 meters.” The new vessels are paired with 25,000-bbl. petroleum barges with rebuilt sterns to match up with the tugs’ flat bows and 30" hydraulic side pins, which were provided by Articouple. The barges will primarily carry gasoline and diesel from the Vancouver area across the Strait of Georgia to Vancouver Island. Cruising speed is about seven knots. Inside, the new tug has lots of space for the crew of five, including one tankerman. Two of the six staterooms have two bunks, if needed. Heads with showers are situated between two pairs of staterooms; the other two have private heads. All the heads were prefabricated units supplied by Norac. “They even came with toilet brushes,” said Nichols. The galley of the Island Regent was finished differently than that of the Island Raider, which is completely clad in stainless steel: cabinets, walls, ceiling, everything. The Island Regent has stainless countertops and appliances but conventionally covered cabinets and walls. The large mess area has windows on all three outside walls and a variety of seating. The main deck has a large exercise room. In addition to the Cummins main engines, the engine room houses a pair of 99-kW John Deere-powered Stamford www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

Bruce Buls

Nichols completes 1,700-hp ATB tug for Island Tug


Gulf Island begins construction on second research vessel

C

onstruction officially began in May on the $125 million research vessel Resolution at Gulf Island Shipyards in Houma, La., for the University of Rhode Island. The Regional-class research vessel (RCRV) will support scientific studies. RCRVs conduct operations in the coastal ocean ranging from near-shore environments to the outer continental rise, as well as the open ocean. Resolution’s endurance, draft, ice classification and science mission equipment are tailored for essential science throughout the Atlantic Ocean and adjoining seas. The Resolution will be the second in a series of RCRVs funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Resolution will have a range of more than 5,000 nautical miles, with berths for 16 scientists and 13 crewmembers; a cruising speed of 11.5 knots; and a maximum speed of 13 knots. The ship will be able to stay at sea for about 21 days before returning to port and will routinely send streams

199' research vessel will be operated by the University of Rhode Island.

Glosten

UCM274E1, 99-kW gensets. What the engine room doesn’t have is a chief engineer. After initial shakedown runs with an onboard engineer, the ATB will operate with a captain and mate and two crew for the short run across the Georgia Strait. The new boats are well insulated and isolated for both warmth and sound deadening. Nichols said that sound levels in the wheelhouse registered a conversation-level 59 dBA. On deck are a Burrard Iron Works E3W aft-mounted anchor winch and Palfinger Ned-Deck SOLAS davit with Polaris self-righting rescue boat. Other capacities include 26,500 gals. of fuel and 3,700 gals. water. The electronics suite includes JRC integrated ship’s consoles, radar, electronic chart display, compass, AIS, and autopilot and a Sailor radio. Schuyler supplied the laminated fendering. — Bruce Buls

of data to shore via satellite. “The Resolution will carry out scientific expeditions throughout the Atlantic Ocean and adjoining seas over the next 30 years and will be used to conduct a broad range of scientific and environmental studies,” said URI Graduate School of Oceanography Dean and ECOC Director Bruce Corliss. It will be operated by URI and the East Coast Oceanographic Consortium to promote research, education, and outreach collaborations among the member institutions. Led by URI’s Graduate School of Oceanography along with two founding members — the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of New Hampshire School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering — the ECOC includes 13 associate members which will have opportunities to conduct research at sea and will collaborate on research, education and outreach activities. No additional specs were released for Resolution, but the first vessel in the new class, Taani, which is also being built at Gulf Island Shipyards, will have a 12'6" draft and is scheduled for delivery in March 2021. It will measure 199'6"×41'×19', with berths for 16 scientists and 13 crew, a cruising speed of 11.5 knots, and a maximum speed of 13 knots. Each vessel will be ABS Ice-Class CO and DPS-1, Green Marine certified, and acoustically quiet. Main propulsion for the Taani will come from three Caterpillar C32 diesels. The power package will include twin Schottel STP1012 Z-drives. In addition, the research vessel will feature two Schottel thrusters — one SRP170

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

and one SPJ82. For service power, there will be a pair of Siemens generators, sparking 871 kW each. Gulf Island was the boat’s designer, but the shipyard’s engineering department used a team of other engineering firms as subcontractors, bringing to the project people who specialized in certain design aspects. NSF selected Oregon State University to lead the design, construction and transition to operations for as many as three new RCRVs for the U.S. Academic Research Fleet, including the Resolution. In 2017, the NCF awarded OSU a grant of $122 million to launch the construction of the first of three first-ofa-kind RCRVs, representing the largest grant in the university’s history. A year later, the grant was supplemented with an additional $88 million, allowing Gulf Island to proceed with the contract for the second vessel, the Resolution. A construction contract for the third RCRV for OSU was awarded to Gulf Island in April. It represents OSU’s execution of the third option for Gulf Island’s construction of three RCRVs. The RCRVs were designed by Seattle-based Glosten, according to the company’s business development manager, Maggie E. Moon  “Since 2012, Glosten has worked closely with NSF and Oregon State University to develop this class of vessels. We continue to collaborate with Gulf Island Shipyards as they progress through production design,” she said. Resolution is currently scheduled for delivery to the ECOC in January 2022. After an additional six months of outfitting and testing, the ship will be fully operational. 27


On TheWays At that time, with the approval of NSF, Resolution will receive a University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) Research Vessel Designation and begin conducting funded science expeditions starting in 2023. — Ken Hocke

U.S. Workboats, Senesco building offshore wind power support vessels

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wo new U.S.-flag crew transfer vessels (CTVs) for the emerging East Coast offshore wind industry will be built for wind power developer Ørsted and offshore support services provider WindServe Marine LLC. To be built by U.S. Workboats, Hubert, N.C., and Senesco Marine, North Kingstown, R.I., the BMT Groupdesigned vessels will be the second and

third in U.S. service, following the Atlantic Pioneer, built by Blount Boats, Warren, R.I., and servicing Ørsted’s Block Island Wind Farm since 2016. U.S. Workboats will deliver its vessel to Ørsted’s Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind Project, a pilot project with Dominion Energy for two 6-megawatt turbines, and then deployment to other Ørsted projects in the Northeast. The companies did not release much detail about the vessel design, only describing the catamaran as “a highspeed, custom design from BMT Group … built specifically for East Coast sea conditions.” BMT has extensive offshore wind experience and a large portfolio of offshore wind vessels, with 49 CTVs currently operating in Europe. Renderings provided by Ørsted appear similar to BMT’s 26 meter (85') CTVs, which typically can carry up to 36 passengers at service speeds of

25 knots. The boats will be classed by risk management and quality assurance provider DNV-GL. “With over 95 years of experience in the maritime industry, we are committed to offering premier offshore wind support services to the East Coast and look forward to contributing to the future of offshore wind growth,” said Craig Reinauer, president and CEO of the Reinauer Group, WindServe Marine’s New York-based parent company. “Thanks to Ørsted, this partnership between two global leaders in the offshore wind industry will provide new, sustainable jobs for U.S. workers.” U.S. Workboats, which specializes in aluminum catamaran construction, has its CTV in progress with delivery anticipated in early 2020. Senesco will begin construction on the second boat in late 2020 for the Revolution Wind project, and it is

BOATBUILDING BITTS

Gulf Craft

ulf Craft LLC, Franklin, La., has delivered a new 114'×25'×9.5', Tier 4 whale watch vessel to Dolphin Fleet, Provincetown, Mass. Designed by the shipyard, the new aluminum vessel, Dolphin XI, will be able to haul up to 360 passengers into the Atlantic Ocean. The boat has a 5' draft and is powered by three Caterpillar C32 EPA Tier 4 diesel engines connected to Michigan Wheel 43"×47" propellers through Twin Disc MGX6650 SC marine gears. The propulsion package will give the Dolphin XI a running speed of 30 knots at 2,100 rpm. Ship’s service power comes from twin Cat C4.4 gensets, sparking 75 kW of electrical power each. The Subchapter K Dolphin XI was delivered May 7. Conrad Shipyard, Morgan City, La., christened the 123'×36'6", twin-screw oceangoing tug Kāpena Bob Purdy for Young Brothers Ltd., Honolulu, a subsidiary

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New 114' whale watch vessel for New England.

Conrad Shipyard

G

Twin-screw oceangoing tug for Hawaii.

of Foss Maritime Co. The ceremony was held at Conrad Amelia in Amelia, La., on May 4. The Damen USA-designed tug is powered by twin GE 8L250 engines turning 6,000 hp. St. Johns Ship Building, Palatka, Fla., is building four new 152'×52'×12' 150-passenger, 30-vehicle ferries for an unnamed owner. Designed by Seattle-based Elliott Bay Design Group, the new boats, featuring 8' drafts, will also be able to handle concrete trucks. The ferries will be delivered over the next two years. Each vessel will have three lounges — two separate lounges on the main deck, one for residents and one for employees, and a lounge on the second deck for residents. Internet, music and satellite TV will also be available. The twin engine propulsion package will feature Caterpillar C-18 diesel engines, producing 600 hp at 1,800 rpm each. The Tier 3 Cats connect to Hundested VP10 CPG 4-bladed 67″ dia., nibral props through Hundested CPG 38 marine gear with

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


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On TheWays

New crew transfer vessels for the U.S. wind energy industry.

Ørsted

scheduled for delivery in 2023. The second CTV will be constructed at Reinauer’s affiliate shipyard Senesco Marine, located at Quonset Point, the former Navy base and now a marine industrial hub in North Kingstown. WindServe worked on the Block Island project for Deepwater Wind, since merged with Ørsted, and is positioned for the company’s Revolution Wind project to be built with transmission provider Eversource off southern New England. With its Block Island project, Deepwater Wind built local political support by buying and hiring locally. Other wind developers are following that playbook, saying they plan to have ves-

sels built near where they hold federal offshore leases. “Choosing WindServe to build our CTVs at Senesco will provide locally built vessels and a local operator for the domestic offshore wind industry,” said Thomas Brostrøm, president and CEO of Ørsted North America in announc-

ing the contract. “WindServe Marine’s experience with Jones Act vessel operations and full service shipyard fabrication, coupled with their dedication to the future of green energy, make them a great partner as we expand operations along the East Coast.” — Kirk Moore

5.53:1 reduction ratios. The propulsion package will give the boats an operating speed of 10 knots. Eastern Shipbuilding Group Inc., Panama City, Fla., delivered the 90'×32'×10' Brian Boudreaux on May 20. It is the first new construction Subchapter M towboat for Florida Marine Transporters (FMT), Mandeville, La., and the 68th towboat the shipyard has built for FMT. The Brian Boudreaux is powered by two Caterpillar 3512C Tier 3 diesel engines each rated at 1,500 hp at 1,600 rpm, supplied by Louisiana CAT Power Systems, Reserve, La. The reduction gears are direct coupled Twin Disc MG-5600 with 6.04:1 ratios supplied by Stewart Supply, Harvey, La. Electrical power is provided by twin 99-kW John Deere 4045AFM85 Tier 3 generator sets rated for 60 Hz, at 208 VAC provided by Kennedy Engine Co., Biloxi, Miss. Chesapeake Shipbuilding Corp., Salisbury, Md., recently launched the 94'×34'×10'6" push tug Salisbury for Vane Brothers, Baltimore. The new boat, the first of four sisterships, was designed by the shipyard and is Subchapter M compliant. Salisbury is scheduled to be delivered in July. The 3,000-hp boat is equipped with Caterpillar 3512 main engines, conventional shafts, rudders and flanking rudders. It will accommodate up to seven crew. Gulf Island Shipyards recently delivered the Connelly M, a 98'6"×42'8"×16'5" Z-Tech 30-80 terminal/ escort tug, to Bay Houston Towing Co. The Connelly M was designed by Robert Allan Ltd, Vancouver, British Columbia, and built at Gulf Island’s Jennings, La., facilities. The vessel will be operated by G&H Towing for Houston-based Bay Houston. Main propulsion comes

30

Eastern Shipbuilding Group

BOATBUILDING BITTS

The first new construction Subchapter M towboat for Florida Marine Transporters.

from twin Caterpillar 3516 E Tier 4 diesels, producing 3,386 hp at 1,800 rpm each. The Cats are connected to Schottel SRP 510 FP Z-drives. The combination gives the Connelly M a bollard pull of 80 tonnes. The Canadian coast guard’s first new icebreaker in 25 years formally joined the fleet in May. The 307.4'×59' Captain Molly Kool, the former icebreaking anchor-handling tug Vidar Viking, was converted and refitted at the Chantier Davie shipyard, Lévis, Quebec. It entered service in December and will be followed by two sisterships now undergoing refit at the yard to be delivered over two years, under a $610 million (Can.) contract. The total cost has reportedly risen to $827 million. ABB announced in May that it will provide a fuel cell-based power and propulsion solution for a pushboat owned by the France-based Sogestran Group subsidiary Compagnie Fluviale de Transport (CFT), due for delivery in 2021. With hydrogen for the fuel cells sourced from shore-based renewable energy, the complete vessel energy chain will be emission-free.

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Tailwind

Wind developers ready to build off East Coast, but capacity issues loom.

By Kirk Moore, Associate Editor

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O

ff the New Jersey coast, the bright red hull of the Fugro Enterprise has become a familiar sight to commercial fishermen who pull shellfish dredges and tend gillnets. Plodding along at around 4 knots, the 170'×40'×11' survey vessel is making detailed geotechnical surveys for the Ocean Wind energy project, planned by Ørsted to accommodate towering wind turbines that would supply New Jersey with its first 1,100 megawatts of renewable energy generated by offshore wind. To New Jersey’s renewable power advocates and Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy, the work is a welcome sight. It’s the first step toward building what they hope will be 3,500 MW of offshore power by 2030. For people in the state’s seafood industry — including the long-established and profitable scallop and surf clam fleets — the big red boat portends a new struggle to stay in business.

“The impact to New Jersey will be devastating if the commercial fishing industry is displaced at all,” warned Brick Wenzel, a captain who fishes out of Point Pleasant Beach, N.J., as state utility regulators prepared measure so Ørsted and other companies could bid for power contracts. The federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and Coast Guard have put wind developers on notice that they will need to plan for wide, safe vessel traffic lanes through future turbine arrays. But that’s just one challenge ahead for an industry, born in the waters of northern Europe that now looks to develop potentially the richest wind energy market in the world. In U.S. waters, offshore wind developers face hurdles of finding enough heavy-lift construction vessels and physical space in U.S. ports to accommodate the coming generation of giant wind turbines. www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

Siemens

An offshore wind turbine under construction.


WindServe

Damen

LOTS OF WIND, RIGHT SPOT The East Coast between southern New England and the Carolinas is attractive to offshore energy development because it has consistent year-round wind close to “load centers” — Boston, New York and other cities of the eastern megapolis, said James Bennett, who heads BOEM’s renewable energy program. The pioneer was Deepwater Wind (now part of Ørsted) with its fiveturbine, 30-MW Block Island Wind Farm of Rhode Island that went online in 2016. The same year Equinor (then known as Statoil) won a 79,350-acre lease for its Empire Wind project, tucked between shipping lanes into New York Harbor. Two years later companies bid almost double what Equinor spent per acre to secure three more leases south of Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., for $135 million each in December 2018. “I think what you’ll see with these leases in place is tremendous acceleration down to Virginia,” said Bennett. With that market signal, U.S. shipbuilders and other would-be suppliers have been stepping up with their offerings. Two major trade shows, the International Partnering Forum 2019 presented by the Business Network for Offshore Wind in New York City in April, and the U.S. Offshore Wind conference in Boston in June, both counted packed houses with around 1,400 attendees each. In May Ørsted and partner Wind-

Netherlands-based Damen Shipbuilding is looking to market its FCS 3410 crew transfer vessel to the U.S. market.

Two BMT-designed crew transfer vessels are being built for Ørsted’s U.S. projects.

Serve Marine LLC, an affiliate of New York-based Reinauer Group, announced plans to build a pair of crew transfer vessels (CTVs). The BMT Group-designed catamarans will be the second and third U.S.-flag CTVs since Blount Boats, Warren, R.I., built the CTV Atlantic Pioneer to service the Block Island turbines. The first is under construction at U.S. Workboats, Hubert, N.C., to be delivered for use on Ørsted’s Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind Project, a pilot project with Dominion Energy for two 6-MW turbines. Later it will work on other Ørsted projects in the Northeast, and be joined by the second vessel to be built at Reinauer’s Senesco Marine, North Kingstown, R.I. The companies did not release many details about their design for what could soon be a very competitive market. “The big demand for CTVs is during

construction, and you will need them long before you think you will” for early stages of moving generators and other equipment as well as workers, Ian Bryan, interim managing director of CWind, a CTV builder in the United Kingdom, said at a well-attended session on vessel design at the IPF conference in New York. “There are plenty of (U.S.) companies just waiting for you guys to place orders,” said Luther Blount of Blount Boats, Warren R.I., which delivered the 70'6"×24'×4' Atlantic Pioneer in 2016. It takes 12 to 14 months to build such a vessel, subject to Coast Guard safety regulations and certification, Blount added. “Please don’t wait until the last second. Give us time to build the boat.” The next generation of CTVs taking shape in Europe is trending toward more speed, air cushioned hulls and even hybrid power. CWind’s latest CTV is a 22-meter (72') catamaran with capacity to carry 24 technicians with surface effect air cushioning. Readied for charter in Europe in May, it has hybrid diesel and electric power, with a battery boost providing an additional 9 tons bollard push when the boat noses up to a turbine from crew boarding, said Bryan. “So it will be a leading class vessel, and a step toward a fully electric CTV.” While U.S. builders are ready to deliver CTVs, another potential bottleneck looms for the industry: a tight global supply of heavy-lift vessels for turbine installations.

Blount Boats

The CTV Atlantic Pioneer has serviced the Block Island Wind Farm since spring 2016.

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

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JONES ACT CONCERNS With its Block Island project, Deepwater Wind built local political support by buying and hiring locally. Other wind developers are following that playbook, saying they plan to have vessels built near where they hold federal offshore leases. “Choosing WindServe to build our CTVs at Senesco will provide locally built vessels and a local operator for the domestic offshore wind industry,” Thomas Brostrøm, president and CEO of Ørsted North America, said in announcing the contract. Much less clear is when the first purpose-built, U.S.-flag construction vessel will appear. It’s a subject of much debate in the industry.

Unlike projects elsewhere, wind developers must contend with the Jones Act, which mandates that cargo moving between U.S. ports be carried on U.S.built, -owned and -crewed vessels. A 2017 study by Houston-based design and engineering firm GustoMS, commissioned by state energy planners in New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, estimated that building a self-propelled wind turbine installation vessel (WTIV) would cost $222 million delivered from a U.S. shipyard in 34 months, based on estimates provided by World Marine, Edison Chouest/Bollinger Shipyard and Conrad Industries. At that price, the WTIV owner would need at least a decade’s worth of work, or about 3,500 to 4,000 MW of wind

generators installed, according to the study. Another option would use ‘feeder barges’ to carry turbine components and material from Northeast ports to a WTIV jacked up on site. That was the strategy employed by Deepwater Wind, using U.S. tugs and barges out of Rhode Island to supply the Brave Tern, a 433'×128' jackup operated by Norwaybased Fred.Olsen Windcarrier, along with smaller U.S. liftboats that Montco Offshore sent up the East Coast from the Gulf of Mexico. It allowed the Block Island Wind Farm project to proceed within the Jones Act requirements, while using a European WTIV because nothing comparable is yet available in the U.S. But the global supply of those vessels is

WIND POWER NEEDS COOPERATION, SHARED SPACE

E

ast Coast states are avidly marketing themselves to the nascent U.S. offshore wind industry, vying to become the staging hub for renewable energy. But experts say existing ports have limitations, and cooperation among the states and developers will be the only way to develop sufficient shore side infrastructure. “There’s not a Bremenhaven in the U.S.,” said Jay A. Borkland, a senior engineering manager for Lloyd’s Register, referring to the German port and hub of the North Sea offshore wind industry. Borkland, who teaches marine and environmental engineering at Tufts University, was part of a team that studied the European industry and what lessons it had for turning New Bedford, Mass., into a wind energy port. “We came to realize that the level and skill used in Europe was extraordinary,” Borkland said in an interview with  WorkBoat. “The U.S. didn’t have the footprint available. What’s important to attract the supply chain is to at least have the assembly here.” That will mean using a network of locations — ports that are suited for phases of building out offshore wind arrays and working with them in sequence. In the U.S., “what’s beginning to develop is developers are finding their first-, second- and third-choice locations,” said Borkland. With the first major project in federal waters, Vineyard Wind off southern New England is set to begin construction in 2020, port operators are pitching their locations — such as New York City and its South Brooklyn Marine Terminal, with almost 64 acres and 6,400 linear feet of waterfront available for staging wind turbine components. Located some 140 miles north up the Hudson River near Albany, N.Y., the Carver Companies is offering its Port of Coeymans. In Massachusetts, building the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal did double duty of removing and isolating polluted sedi-

34

ment from the harbor, using the fill to build a 21-acre hardened site to handle the huge weight of turbine components. But even it may not be big enough. Next door in Rhode Island, state officials are pitching their port facilities at the former Navy base at Quonset Point in North Kingstown — the support base for Deepwater Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm — and at the Port of Providence. “We have enough to get started,” said Stefan Pryor, the state secretary of commerce, who says expansion plans at both sites aim to make Rhode Island “the lighthouse state” for how to build shoreside support for the wind industry. Other industry observers say states need to work at cooperation, and less at the beauty contest of trying to attract the biggest commitments they can from wind developers. There will be a tendency to overdesign ports around the first projects, said Tim Sullivan, CEO of the New Jersey Economic Development Authority. Sullivan said port planners need to keep their facilities “project-agnostic” and adaptable to future demands — likely to include much bigger and heavier equipment, with the industry shooting to acquire 12-megawatt turbines in the 2020s. In Europe, “we collaborate with other ports. The people installing wind farms like to spread their risk,” said Erik Bertholet, business manager for logistics and offshore wind with Groningen Seaports, which operates the Netherlands wind hub Eemshaven. Around a third of all the energy that is produced in the Netherlands comes from Eemshaven. “It’s not competitive, it’s cooperation, because you want dependable logistics,” said Bertholet. In the U.S., “we will have a series of smaller facilities tied together by a logistics chain,” said Borkland. “A distributed network of ports, and we will need cooperation between the states.” — K. Moore

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Deepwater Wind

limited to about a dozen now, with day rates as high as $180,000, Bloomberg reported in May. “The day rates aren’t competitive now, and you’re paying the day rates for getting across the Atlantic,” said Anthony Logan, a senior analyst in Wood Mackenzie’s power and renewables group. A U.S.-flag WTIV “should have been built a couple of years ago” to be ready for the scale of projects now planned, said Logan. Feeder barges will be the necessity for the first installations, but with both Europe and North America set for major expansion in 2023 “there’s going to be some competition and it will raise rates” for existing WTIVs, he said. That demand will spur someone to build the first Jones Act-compliant installation vessel. With U.S. projects now in the pipeline, “the annual installations by our calculation is above what

Norway-based Fred.Olsen Windcarrier provided its construction vessel Brave Tern to build the Block Island Wind Farm alongside Montco Offshore liftboats.

they need” to finance the vessel, said Logan. The question is what that WTIV will need in capability, he added: “It’s a rapidly evolving industry. They are building 10- and 12-megawatt turbines now … you can’t use the same vessels that were state of the art five years ago. By the end of the next decades we could be looking at 20-megawatt turbines.”

With the accelerating growth of projects worldwide, some in the industry say the tight supply combined with the Jones Act will be a roadblock for U.S. developers. “It will be a hindrance,” said Edgare Kerkwijk of the Asia Wind Energy Association. “I cannot wait for the day that I do not have to answer a Jones Act question,” said Liz Burdock, president of the

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

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35


SUBSIDIES WIND DOWN New York state’s goal of generating 9 gigawatts of offshore wind power by 2030 “has really helped push the U.S. industry to the tipping point,” said Burdock. But that next generation of bigger turbines like the Haliade is critical to achieve efficiencies the offshore industry will need to compete with other power sources, now that it faces phase out of the federal tax credit for renewable energy. “Capacity issues in our supply chain,” and a lack of coordination among the states, has begun to constrain investment by developers and suppliers, said Burdock.

Deepwater Wind

Business Network for Offshore Wind. But Burdock foresees that the U.S. market will be big enough soon to need a U.S.-flag WTIV, “and someone will take a chance and build it.” “I think the bigger question is how do you build a ship that keeps up with the technology?” she added. That’s because wind turbine designers are scaling up the machines in size and generating capacity to achieve greater efficiency in offshore arrays. The GE Haliade-X 12-MW design, planned to be available in 2021, will stand 853' over the ocean, nearly as high as New York’s Chrysler Building and the Eiffel Tower in Paris. With a 722'-diameter rotor, GE says the turbine will turn out 45% more annual electricity production than the largest machine now on the market.

Deepwater Wind’s Block Island Wind Farm was built using U.S.-flag vessels to carry components from North Kingston, R.I., to the construction site offshore.

“The next two to three years are going to be a critical time for U.S. wind energy,” she added. In their bids to supply future power to New York and other states, wind developers have pitched the potential for new local jobs in manufacturing, construction and maintenance. But experience in Europe shows staking local claims to benefits can be counterproductive, said Giles Dickson, CEO of the industry group WindEurope. “The level of liberalization and specialization in Europe has been driven from the bottom up,” said Dickson. “We in Europe understand the desire for local jobs,” but in France where those have been mandated, the industry’s costs are highest, he said. “If you want to have local jobs and low costs, it’s best to leave it to the market,” he said.

Even with a quarter-century of experience with offshore wind, Europe still needs more cooperation and commonality, from aviation warning lights on turbine towers, and moving toward better electric grid connections and coordinating energy auctions. Dickson added: “We have to collaborate and align the rules whenever we can.” BOEM is reviewing three construction and operation plans from East Coast offshore wind energy developers, and expects to have more in hand this year, said Walter Cruickshank, BOEM’s acting director. By the end of 2019, Vineyard Wind could begin shore side construction on the first turbine project in federal waters, an 800-MW array that would be built on one of five leases stacked south of Martha’s Vineyard.

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


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2019 POWER GUIDE

By Ken Hocke, Senior Editor

D

espite the growth of electric power propulsion systems during the past year, diesel engines are still king in the marine industry. Engine companies are complying with environmental regulations from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) by introducing new compliant engines to the market. Man Engines, for example, is offering 12-cylinder, IMO Tier III engines for workboats, ranging from 551 kW (738 hp) to 1,213 kW (1,625 hp). The engines, which are available now, are also EPA Tier 4 certified with SCR for 1,020 hp, 1,200 hp, 1,325 hp, and 38

1,450 hp at medium duty, and 900- and 1,000-hp at heavy duty speed. At November’s Pacific Marine Expo, Cummins formally introduced its new marine X15 diesel engine. The engine has been a staple of the company’s truck engine line for many years. The first pair of the new Cummins X15 marine engines were installed in Weeks Marine’s 65'×17' aluminum crewboat Joseph M. The new 15-liter, six cylinder, in-line engines are each rated at 575 hp at 1,800 rpm. The EPA Tier 3- and IMO Tier II-certified engines were matched up to Twin Disc MG-514-B marine gears with 2:1 reduction ratios that turn 32", 5-bladed propellers on 2.5" shafts. That power package gives the boat a running speed

of 21 knots. Volvo Penta was getting ready to release its list of new Tier 3 engines as WorkBoat went to press. Not many details were available prior to the release. However, the company’s D-3, D-4, D-6, D-8, D-11, D-13 (except for the medium duty D-13 MH) and D-16 models are all Tier 3 rated. In addition, Volvo’s D-6, D-8, D-11 and D-13 IPS (integrated propulsion system) models are all Tier 3 compliant. A commercial dive boat in the San Francisco Bay area is the first workboat to sport a pair of John Deere Power Tech 4045SFM85 Tier 3 engines. The new diesels have two power ratings: the M4 is 275 hp @ 2,600 rpm and the M5, 315 hp @ 2,800 rpm.

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

John Deere Power Systems

John Deere 4045S diesel


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

400 @ 2,900 450 @ 2,900 500 @ 2,900 — 641 @ 2,300 — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 1,001 @ 2,300 1,136 @ 2,300 — — — 1,136 @ 2,300 — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

280 @ 2,300 350 @ 2,500 400 @ 2,600 425 @ 2,700 — 375 @ 1,800 416 @ 2,100 476 @ 2,300 340 @ 1,800 385 @ 1,800 454 @ 2,100 490 @ 2,300 570 @ 2,300 600 @ 2,300 660 @ 2,300 705 @ 2,300 838 @ 2,300 985 @ 2,300 365 @ 1,800 400 @ 1,800 469 @ 1,800 600 @ 1,800 670 @ 1,800-2,100 715 @ 1,800-2,100 803 @ 2,100 — 660 @ 1,600-1,800 1,600 @ 2,000-2,300 750 @ 1,600-1,800 850 @ 1,600-1,800 950 @ 1,600 1,000 @ 1,600-1,800

CATERPILLAR MARINE

Ph: 985-674-5163 2270 7th St., Mandeville, LA 70471 www.cat.com/en_US/• E-mail: info-usa@catpropulsion.com C7.1

6

428

4.13x5.31

43.1

31.4

34.5

1,676

C8.7 C9.3

6 6

531 568

4.6x5.3 4.53x5.87

— —

47.9 57.2

34.7 38.5

38.7 43

2,400 2,083-2,474

C12

6

732

5.1x5.9

62

38.1

39.5

2,588

C12.9

6

787

5.31x5.9

57.6

43.7

42.7

3,635-3,686

3406C

6

891

5.4x6.5

57.3

36.0

50.3

2,921

C18

6

1,106

5.7x7.2

73.0

44.6

47.2

4,0004,299

C32

12

1,659

5.71x6.38

83.5

60.17

60.9

6,950-7,160

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www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

39


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

C32

12

1,959

5.71x6.38

82.9

58.3

56.9

6,780

3508C

8

2,107

6.7x7.5

83.4

67.0

72.0

10,935

3512C

12

3,161

6.69x7.48

102

80.2

75.0

14,40016,340

3512E 12 (EPA Tier 4/IMO Tier III)

3,574

6.69x8.46

104.2

80.2

87.5

16,508

3516C

16

4,211

6.69x7.48

143.1

80.2

77.4

17,55019,025

3516C 16 (High Displacement)

4,765

6.69x8.46

148.0

84.3

84.6

17,55019,025

3516E 16 (EPA Tier 4/IMO Tier III)

4,765

6.69x8.46

125.7

89.9

87.6

21,164

C175-16

16

5,166.88

6.88x8.66

177.8

72.6

97.6

28,750

C280-6

6

6,773

11.0x11.8

158.0

71.0

108.0

34,496

C280-8

8

9,031

11.0x11.8

195.0

71.0

104.0

41,800

C280-12

12

13,546

11.0x11.8

182.0

80.0

134.0

57,276

40

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — (Tier 4) (Tier 4) (Tier 4) (Tier 4) — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

1,300 @ 2,100 1,200 @ 1,800-2,000 1,450 @ 2,000-2,300 750 @ 1,600-1,800 800 @ 1,800-2,100 1,000 @ 1,600-1,800 1,300 @ 1,800-2,100 1,200 @ 1,800-2,000 1,450 @ 2,050-2,150 1,600 @ 2,300 1,700 @ 2,300 1,800 @ 2,300 1,900 @ 2,300 775 @ 1,200 1,000 @ 1,600 850 @ 1,200 900 @1,200 1,050 @ 1,600 1,100 @ 1,600 1,280 @ 1,600 1,300 @ 1,200 1,400 @ 1,600 1,500 @ 1,800 1,409 @ 1,600 1,359 @ 1,600 1,500 @ 1,200 1,749 @ 1,600 1,600 @ 1,600 1,851 @ 1,600 1,650 @ 1,800 1,500 @ 1,200 1,575 @ 1,800 2,012 @ 1,600 2,365 @1,800 2,551 @ 1,800 1,341 @ 1,600 1,502 @ 1,600 1,700 @ 1,600 1,810 @ 1,600 2,000 @ 1,600 2,250 @ 1,800 1,650 @ 1,800 2,000 @ 1,600 2,213 @ 1,800 1,576 @ 1,800 2,549 @ 1,800 2,112 @ 1,600 2,375 @ 1,800 1,650 @ 1,200 2,000 @ 1,600 1,850 @ 1,200 1,750 @ 1,200 2,100 @ 1,600 2,200 @ 1,600 2,260 @ 1,600 2,448 @ 1,600 2,500 @ 1,600 2,375 @1,600 2,682 @ 1,600 2,816 @ 1,600 3,151 @ 1,800 2,816 @ 1,600 3,386 @ 1,800 2,501 @ 1,600 2,682 @ 1,600 3,004 @ 1,800 2,950 @ 1,600 2,816 @ 1,600 3,386 @ 1,800 3,151 @ 1,800 2,683 @ 1,600 2,792 @ 1,600 3,003 @ 1,800 3,256 @ 1,800 2,907 @1,600 3,420 @ 1,800 2,320 @ 900 2,481 @ 1,000 2,548 @ 900 2,722 @ 1,000 3,084 @ 900 3,299 @ 1,000 3,393 @ 900 3,634 @ 1,000 4,640 @ 900

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Model

C280-16

Cyl.

16

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

18,062

DIESEL ELECTRIC PROPULSION — 50 HZ C4.4 Acert — —

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

11.0x11.8

224.0

80.0

134.0

68,343

C7.1

C9.3

C18

3512B 3508C

— — — 12 8

— — — — —

— — — — —

— — — — —

— — — — —

— — — — —

— — — — —

— — — — —

3512C 3516C

12 16

— —

— —

— —

— —

— —

— —

— —

C175-16 C280-6

16 6

— —

— —

— —

— —

— —

— —

— —

C280-8

8

C280-12

12

C280-16

16

C32

DIESEL ELECTRIC PROPULSION — 60 HZ C4.4 — —

C7.1

C9.3

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

C18

C32

3512C

12

3512E

12

3516C

16

3516E

16

C280-6

6

C280-8

8

C280-12

12

C280-16

16

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — —

4,962 @ 1,000 5,096 @ 900 5,444 @ 1,000 6,598 @ 1,000 6,169 @ 900 7,268 @ 1,000 6,785 @ 900 6,785 @ 900 7,577 @ 1,000

94.5 @ 1,500 116.4 @ 1,500 145.6 @ 1,500 134.9 @ 1,500 146.5 @ 1,500 162.6 @ 1,500 172.9 @ 1,500 209.5 @ 1,500 219.8 @ 1,500 292 @ 1,500 362 @ 1,500 404 @ 1,500 514 @ 1,500 587 @ 1,500 660 @ 1,500 923 @ 1,500 1,172 @ 1,500 1,686 @ 1,500 903 @ 1,500 1,100 @ 1,500 1,826 @ 1,500 2,303 @ 1,500 2,600 @ 1,500 3,243 @ 1,500 2,481 @ 1,000 2,722 @ 1,000 3,299 @ 1,000 3,634 @ 1,000 4,962 @ 1,000 5,445 @ 1,000 6,598 @ 1,000 7,268 @ 1,000

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

87.4 @ 1,500 109.2 @ 1,500 145.6 @ 1,500 172.9 @ 1,500 155.8 @ 1,800 172.9 @ 1,500 202.7 @ 1,800 219.7 @ 1,800 239.3 @ 1,800 256.4 @ 1,800 293 @ 1,800 369 @ 1,800 436 @ 1,800 624 @ 1,800 803 @ 1,800 916 @ 1,800 1,047 @ 1,800 1,333 @ 1,800 1,920 @ 1,800 2,183 @ 1,800 2,400 @ 1,800 2,189 @ 1,800 2,399 @ 1,800 2,435 @ 1,800 2,809 @ 1,800 2,984 @ 1,800 3,151 @ 1,800 2,576 @ 1,800 2,823 @ 1,800 3,175 @ 1,800 2,320 @ 900 2,548 @ 900 3,084 @ 900 3,393 @ 900 4,640 @ 900 5,096 @ 900 6,169 @ 900 6,786 @ 900

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

41


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

1,390 @ 900 1,469 @ 900 1,550 @ 1,000 1,632 @ 1,000 2,370 @ 720 2,450 @ 750 2,856 @ 720 2,720 @ 720 2,720 @ 750 2,856 @ 720 2,856 @ 750 3,920 @ 600 4,080 @ 600 4,488 @ 720 4,488 @ 750 4,162 @ 720 4,325 @ 750 8,160 @ 500 8,160 @ 514 8,568 @ 500 8,568 @ 514 7,344 @ 500 7,344 @ 514 7,874 @ 500 7,874 @ 514 9,520 @ 500 8,520 @ 514 9,996 @ 500 9,996 @ 514 8,568 @ 500 8,568 @ 514 9,187 @ 500 9,187 @ 514 1,850 @ 900 1,958 @ 900 2,070 @ 1,000 2,176 @ 1,000 3,160 @ 720 3,260 @ 750 3,630 @ 720 3,630 @ 750 3,808 @ 720 3,808 @ 750 5,220 @ 600 5,440 @ 600 5,984 @ 720 5,984 @ 750 5,549 @ 720 5,766 @ 750 10,880 @ 500 10,880 @ 514 11,424 @ 500 11,424 @ 514 9,792 @ 500 9,792 @ 514 7,720 @ 500 7,720 @ 514 2,082 @ 900 2,203 @ 900 2,326 @ 1,000 2,448 @ 1,000 3,550 @ 720 3,670 @ 750 4,080 @ 720 4,080 @ 750 4,284 @ 720 4,284 @ 750 6,120 @ 600 5,880 @ 600 6,732 @ 720 6,732 @ 750 6,242 @ 720 6,487 @ 750 12,240 @ 500 12,240 @ 500 12,852 @ 500 12,852 @ 514 11,016 @ 500 11,016 @ 514 11,812 @ 500

CATERPILLAR MARINE POWER SYSTEMS (MAK) Ph: +49 (0) 40 2380-3000 • Fax: +49 (0) 40 2380-3535 Neumuehlen 9 • 22763 Hamburg, Germany www.mak-global.com • E-mail: ju_marketing@CAT.com MaK 6 M 20 C

6

7.9x11.8

— MaK 6 M 25 C

6

15.75x10.04

MaK 6 M 25 E

6

15.75x10.04

MaK 6 M 32 C

6

18.90x12.60

MaK 6 M 32 E

6

18.90x12.60

MaK 6 M 34 DF

6

18.11x13.39

MaK 6 M 43 C

6

16.9x24.0

MaK 6 M 46 DF

6

24.02x18.11

MaK 7 M 43 C

7

16.9x24.0

MaK 7 M 46 DF

7

16.9x24.0

MaK 8 M 20 C

8

11.81x7.87

MaK 8 M 25 C

8

15.75x10.04

MaK 8 M 25 E

8

15.75x10.04

MaK 8 M 32 C

8

18.90x12.60

MaK 8M 32 E

8

18.90x12.60

MaK 8 M 34 F

8

18.11x13.39

MaK 8 M 43 C

8

16.9x24.0

MaK M 46 DF

8

24.02x18.11

MaK 9 M 20 C

9

7.9x11.8

MaK 9 M 25 C

9

15.75x10.04

MaK 9M 25 E

9

15.75x10.04

MaK 9 M 32 C

9

18.90x12.60

MaK 9 M 32 E

9

18.90x12.60

MaK 9 M 34 DF

9

18.90x12.60

MaK 9 M 43 C

9

18.11x24.0

MaK 9 M 46 DF

9

18.11x24.0

42

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

MaK 12 M 32 C

12

12.60x18.1

MaK 12 M 32 E

12

12.60x18.1

MaK 12 M 43 C

12

16.9x24.0

MaK 16 M 32 C

16

12.6x16.5

MaK 16 VM 32 E

16

12.6x16.5

MaK 16 M 43 C

86,455

16.9x24

339.4

114.8

191.5

485,017

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —

MaK 12 VM 43 C

— — MaK 16 VM 43 C — — MaK 12 VM 46 DF — — MaK 16 VM 46 DF — —

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

11,812 @ 514 7,830 @ 720 8,160 @ 720 8,160 @ 750 8,650 @ 720 8,650 @ 750 9,139 @ 720 9,139 @ 750 16,320 @ 500 16,320 @ 514 17,136 @ 500 17,136 @ 514 10,880 @ 720 10,880 @ 750 11,533 @ 720 11,533 @ 750 12,186 @ 720 12,186 @ 750 21,760 @ 500 21,760 @ 514 22,848 @ 500 22,848 @ 514 16,320 @ 500/514 17,136 @ 500/514 21,760 @ 500/514 22,848 @ 500/514 14,688 @ 500/514 15,749 @ 500/514 19,584 @ 500/514 20,998 @ 500/514

CUMMINS INC.

Ph: 800-DIESELS 4500 Leeds Ave. • Suite 301 • Charleston, SC 29405 www.cumminsengines.com • E-mail: marine.communications@cummins.com KTA19

6

1,159

6.25x6.25

74.0

40.0

75.0

QSK19

6

1,159

6.25x6.25

79.0

38.0

74.0

KTA38

12

2,318

6.25x6.25

84.0

58.0

82.0

KTA50

16

3,050

6.25x6.25

106

62

89

QSK38

12

2,300

6.25x6.25

90

62

88

QSK50

16

3,050

6.25x6.25

109

62

88

QSK 60

16

3,672

6.25x7.48

130

69

95

QSK95

16

5,797

7.48x8.27

144

63

93

QSC8.3

6

505

4.49x5.31

46

33

39

QSB6.7

6

408

4.21x4.88

42

35

34

4,570 530 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) — 640 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) — 700 @ 2,100 (heavy duty) — 4,825 750 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) 800 @ 2,100 760 @ 2,100 (heavy duty) — 800 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) — 800 @ 2,100 (heavy duty) — 9,300 1,100 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) 1,400 @ 1,950 1,300 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) 1,500 @ 2,050 (intermittent) 1,350 @ 1,900 (heavy duty) — 1,350 @ 1,950 (heavy duty) — — — — — — — — — — — 11,389 1,600 @ 1,900 (heavy duty) 1,875 @ 1,950 1,700 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) — 1,800 @ 1,900 (heavy duty) — 10,692 1,400 @ 1,600 (heavy duty) — 1,400 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) — 1,400 @ 1,900 (heavy duty) — 13,823 1,800 @ 1,600 (heavy duty) 2,050 @ 1,800 1,800 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) 2,200 @ 1,900 1,800 @ 1,900 (heavy duty) — 19,300 2,300 @ 1,900 (heavy duty) 2,500 @ 1,800 2,680 @ 1,900 (intermittent) 2,500 @ 1,900 — 2,700 @ 1,800 — 2,700 @ 1,900 29,282 3,600 @ 1,700 (heavy duty) 4,000 @ 1,700 4,200 @ 1,700 (intermittent) — 1,975 493 @ 2,600 (intermittent)) — — — — — — — 1,398 247 @ 2,600 (heavy duty) 301 @ 2,600 227 @ 3,000 (intermittent)

QSL9

6

542

4.49x5.71

46

33

43

QSM11

6

661

4.92x5.79

52

44

40

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

350 @ 2,800 (intermittent) 350 @ 3,000 (intermittent) 375 @ 3,000 (intermittent) 419 @ 3,000 (intermittent) 473 @ 3,000 (intermittent) 2,000 326 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) 330 @ 1,800 (heavy duty) — 2,620 400 @ 2,100 (heavy duty) 398 @ 2,100 (heavy duty)

— — — — — — 400 @ 2,100 404 @ 2,100 450 @ 2,100 450 @ 2,100 448 @ 2,100

500 @ 1,800 600 @ 1,800 — 500 @ 1,800 660 @ 1,800 750 @ 1,800 600 @ 1,800 850 @ 1,800 1,000 @ 1,800 750 @ 1,600 800 @ 1,800 850 @ 1,800 900 @ 1,600 1,000 @ 1,800 1,050 @ 1,600 1,200 @ 1,800 1,400 @ 1,600 1,700 @ 1,800 1,600 @ 1,800 1,000 @ 1,800 1,300 @ 1,600 1,300 @ 1,800 1,700 @ 1,600 1,700 @ 1,800 — 2,000 @ 1,600 2,000 @ 1,800 2,200 @ 1,800 — 3,200 @ 1,500 — 592 @ 2,800 (government) 593 @ 3,000 (government) — 542 @ 3,300 (light duty) 473 @ 3,300 (light duty) — — — 281 @ 1,800 286 @ 1,800 — 295 @ 1,800 350 @ 1,800

43


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

NTA855

6

855

5.50x6.0

61

32

53

X15

6

5.39x6.65

71

44

52

High Output hp rpm

602 @ 2,300 (intermittent) 661 @ 2,300 (light duty) 705 @ 2,500 (light duty) 3,160 — — 3,080 — — — —

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — — — — — —

349 @ 1,800 398 @ 1,800 — 325 @ 1,800 400 @ 1,800 450 @1,800 500 @ 1,800 575 @ 1,800 600 @ 1,800

CUMMINS RECON PRODUCT LINE

Ph: 800-DIESELS 4500 Leeds Ave., Suite 301 • Charleston, SC 29405 www.cumminsengines.com • e-mail: marine.communications@cummins.com MECHANICAL ENGINES 4BT 6BT

6 6

239 359

4.02x4.72 4.02x4.72

— —

27.8 42.3

30.4 28.0

31.2 32.0

794 150 @ 2,800 150 @ 2,800 (intermittent) 1,025 210 @ 2,600 (heavy duty) 180 @ 2,500

6BTA

6

359

4.02x4.72

40.5

32.5

33.0

1,035 247 @ 2,600 (heavy duty)

260 @ 2,600 (heavy duty)

QSB5.9

6

359

4.02x4.72

40.8

32.9

32.7

287 @ 2,800 (heavy duty) 315 @ 2,800 (heavy duty) 355 @ 3,000 (heavy duty) 1,450 227 @ 2,600 (heavy duty) 227 @ 2,600 300 @ 2,600

— — — 300 @ 2,600 350 @ 2,800 (intermittent) —

325 @ 2,600

— — — — — —

QSB6.7

6

408

4.21x4.88

42

35

34

1,398

350 @ 2,800 375 @ 3,000 436 @ 3,400 472 @ 3,400 419 @ 3,000

6CTA

6

504.5

4.49x5.32

41

33.4

37.5

1,570

430 @ 2,600

300 @ 2,500

QSC8.3

6

505

4.49x5.31

40.8

32.9

32.7

1,450

493 @ 2,600

QSM11

6

661

4.92x5.79

82.3

43.5

39.9

KTA19

6

1,150

6.25x6.25

74

40

75

QSK19

6

1,150

6.25x6.25

79

38

74

593 @ 3,000 — (light duty) — 493 @ 2,600 — 543 @ 3,000 — 593 @ 3,000 — 2,620 295 @ 1,800 450 @ 2,100 350 @ 1,800 602 @ 2,300 (intermittent) 400 @ 2,100 400 @ 2,100 (heavy duty) 450 @ 2,100 — 602 @ 2,300 — 636 @ 2,300 — 661 @ 2,300 — 4,570 700 @ 2,100 (heavy duty) 550 @ 2,100 — — — — 4,825 755 @ 1,800 (intermittent) —

— 210 @ 2,600 (intermittent) 260 @ 2,600 (intermittent) 315 @ 2,800 (intermittent) — — — 300 @ 2,600 375 @ 3,000 (light duty) 420 @ 3,000 (light duty) 472 @ 3,400 (light duty) — — — — 419 @ 3,000 (intermittent) 430 @ 2,600 (Intermittent) 493 @ 2,600 (intermittent) — — — — — 295 @ 1,800 350 @ 1,800 — — — — — 425 @ 1,800 500 @ 1,800 600 @ 1,800 660 @ 1,800

DIESEL ELECRIC ENGINES 50 Hz FIXED SPEED RATINGS KTA19

6

1,150

6.25x6.25

74

40

75

4,570

X15 QSK19

6 6

912 1,150

5.39x6.65 6.25x6.25

— —

71 79

44 38

52 74

3,080 4,825

KTA38 QSK38 KTA50 QSK50 QSK60

12 12 16 16 16

2,300 2,300 3,067 3,068 3,672

6.25x6.25 6.25x6.25 6.25x6.25 6.25x6.25 6.25x7.48

— — — — —

84 90 106 109 130

58 62 62 62 69

82 88 89 88 95

9,300 10,692 11,973 13,823 19,300

QSK95

16

5,797

7.48x8.27

144

63

93

29,282

— — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — — —

480 @ 1,500 550 @ 1,500 500 @ 1,500 580 @ 1,500 705 @ 1,500 1,180 @ 1,500 1,320 @ 1,500 1,470 @ 1,500 1,730 @ 1,500 2,095 @ 1,500 2,547 @ 1,500 3,520 @ 1,500

— — — — —

— — — — —

570 @ 1,800 650 @ 1,800 500 @ 1,800 570 @ 1,800 755 @ 1,800

DIESEL ELECTRIC ENGINES 60 Hz FIXED SPEED RATINGS KTA19

6

1,150

6.25x6.25

74

40

75

4,570

X15

6

912

5.39x6.65

71

44

52

3,080

QSK19

6

1,150

6.25x6.25

79

38

74

4,825

44

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

KTA38 QSK38 KTA50 QSK50

12 12 16 16

2,300 2,300 3,067 3,068

6.25x6.25 6.25x6.25 6.25x6.25 6.25x6.25

— — — —

QSK60

16

3,672

6.25x7.48

QSK95

16

5,797

7.48x8.27

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

84 90 106 109

58 62 62 62

82 88 89 88

9,300 10,692 11,973 13,823

29,282

— — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — —

800 @ 1,800 1,300 @ 1,800 1,400 @ 1,800 1,730 @ 1,800 1,800 @ 1,800 2,183 @ 1,800 2,547 @ 1,800 2,683 @ 1,800 4,224 @ 1,800

130

69

95

19,300

144

63

93

963

80 @ 2,500

JOHN DEERE POWER SYSTEMS Ph: 800-JDENGINE • Fax: 319-292-5075 3801 W. Ridgeway Ave. • Waterloo, IA 50704 www.deere.com/marine 4045DFM70 (Gen Drive Rating: 4045TFM50 (Gen Drive Rating 4045AFM85 Gen Drive Rating: 4045TFM85 (Gen. Drive Rating: 4045SFM85 4045TF285 (Gen Drive Rating: 4045HF285 (Gen Drive Rating: 6068TFM50 6068AFM75 (Gen Drive Rating: 6068AFM75 (Gen Drive Rating: 6068SFM75 6068TFM75 (Gen Drive Rating: 6068AFM85 (Gen Drive Rating: 6068SFM85 (Gen Drive Rating: 6068HF485 6090AFM85 (Gen Drive rating: 6090SFM85 (Gen Drive Rating: 6090HFM85 (Gen Drive Rating: 6090HF485 6135AFM85 (Gen Drive Rating: 6135SFM85 (Gen Drive Rating: 6135HFM85 (Gen Drive Rating: 6135HF485

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

275 4.20x5.00 w/o 29.8 36kW @ 1,500 rpm 40kW @ 1,800 rpm 275 4.20x5.00 w/o 29.4 51kW @ 1,500 64 kW @ 1,800 275 4.20x5.00 w/o 29.1 82kW @ 1,500 99kW @ 1,800 275 4.20x5.00 w/o 29.1 55kW @ 1,500 65kW @ 1,800 275 4.20x5.00 w/o 30 275 4.20x5.00 w/o 34.1 60kW @ 1,800 275 4.20x5.00 w/o 33.9 99kW @ 1,800 415 4.20x5.00 w/o 39.5 415 4.20x5.00 w/.o 40.7 117kW @ 1,500 150kW @ 1,800 415 4.20x5.00 w/o 40.7 128kW @ 1,500 150kW @ 1,800 415 4.20x5.00 w/o 40.7 415 4.20x5.00 w/o 39.5 82 @ 1,500 415 4.20x5.00 w/o 40.7 117-125kW @ 1,500 150kW @ 1,800 415 4.20x5.00 w/o 40.7 150kW @ 1,500 175kW @ 1,800 415 4.20x5.00 w/o 45.7 549 4.7x5.4 w/o 51.1 175kW @ 1,500 200kW @ 1,800 549 4.7x5.4 w/o 51.1 200kW @ 1,500 250kW @ 1,800 549 4.7x5.4 w/o 42.6 200kW @ 1,800 549 4.7x5.4 w/o 47.6 824 5.20x6.50 w/o 51.8 250kW @ 1,500 300kW @ 1,800 824 5.20x6.50 w/o 52..6 300kW @ 1,500 375kW @ 1,800) 824 5.20x6.50 w/o 48.2 350kW @ 1,800 824 5.20x6.50 w/o 52.5

27.7-28.8 35.4 35.9

1,017

150 @ 2,600

135 @ 2,500

120 @ 2,400

27.3-30.4 37.9

27.7

1,274

200 @ 2,500

160 @ 2,300

27.3-27.6 35.9

1,117

125 @ 2,500

100 @ 2,400

32.3 24.7

36.2 41.1

1,230 1,082

315 @ 2,800 —

275 @ 2,600 99 @ 2,200

— —

24.1

40.9

1,082

28 31.7-34

34.7 36.9

1,609 1,735

201 @ 2,600 330 @ 2,600

178 @ 2,500 300 @ 2,500

158 @ 2,400 230 @ 2,300

31.7-34

35.9

1,732

330 @ 2,600

300 @ 2,500

230 @ 2,300

34.3 28

37.7 34.7

1,962 1,609

400 @ 2,800 201 @ 2,600

321 @ 2,600 178 @ 2,500

249 @ 2,400 158 @ 2,400

31.7-34

36.9

1,735

330 @ 2,600

300 @ 2,500

230 @ 2,300

34.3

36.7

1,682

400 @ 2,800

321 @ 2,600

249 @ 2,400

24.3 36.9

44.4 38.7

1,495 2,325

— 425 @ 2,400

251 @2,200 375 @ 2,300

— 285 @ 2,100

36.9

38.7

2,327

550 @ 2,500

425 @ 2,300

325 @ 2,100

28.1

38

1,887

325 @ 2,000

24.8 39

43.8 46.5

1,986 3,108

— 575 @ 2,100

375 @ 2,200 500 @ 2,000

— 365 @ 1,800

39

46.3

3,143

750 @ 2,200

575 @ 2,000

425 @ 1,800

34.4

56.7

2,914

500 @ 2,000

33.7

59.5

3,291

600 @ 2,100

Max Continuous

Continuous

— — — — — — — — —

2,000 @ 900 2,500 @ 900 1,249 @ 750 3,000 @ 900 1,561 @ 750 4,000 @ 900 3,325 @ 750 5,000 @ 900 4,155 @ 750

ELECTRO-MOTIVE DIESEL INC.

Ph: 708-387-6398 • Fax: 708-387-5845 9301 W. 55th St. • La Grange, IL 60525 progressrail.com/powerproducts • E-mail: grwest@progressrail.com EMD 710 Series 8 E 23**

8

710

9-1/16x11

73-3/8

75

127-3/16

32,500

8 E 23B** 12 E 23** 12 E23B** 16 E 23 ** 16 E 23B** 20 E 23** 20 E 23B**

8 12 12 16 16 20 20

710 710 710 710 710 710 710

9-1/16x11 9-1/16x11 9-1/16x11 9-1/16x11 9-1/16x11 9-1/16x11 9-1/16x11

— — — — — — —

73-3/8 130-1/64 259-1/16 292-1/64 292-1/64 321-29/32 321-29/32

75 75 75 75 75 75 75

127-3/16 134-1/4 145-5/64 134-1/4 134-1/4 143-3/8 143-3/8

32,500 42,800 51,000 49,800 49,800 56,700 56,700

— — — — — — — — —

** EPA Tier 4 Final/IMO 3 — check with EMD for details

FIAT DIESEL ENGINES NORTH AMERICA 630-481-2905 • 630-887-2009 6900 Veterans Blvd. Burr Ridge, IL 6052 www.fptindustrial.com

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

MOTOR-SERVICES HUGO STAMP INC.

Ph: 954-763-3660 • Fax: 954-713-0435 3190 SW 4th Ave. • Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315 www.mshs.com

45


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — — 815 @ 2,300 —

580 @ 2,530 500 @ 2,530 450 @ 2,530 500 @ 3,200 450 @ 3,200 750 @ 2,300 650 @ 2,300

— — — — — — —

110 @ 4,000 110 @ 4,400 110 @ 4,000 110 @ 4,400 135 @ 4,000 135 @ 4,400

— — — — — —

C90 620

6

8.7

2,072

N67 570E

6

6.7

1,433

C16 1000

6

15.9

All engines are EPA Tier 3 compliant.

FNM MARINE DIESEL ENGINES Ph: 800-856-9639 • Fax: 586-268-9320 35418 Mound Road • Sterling Heights, MI 48310 HPE 110

4

76.16

2.7x3.2

22.0

18.1

26.1

392

HPE 110

4

76.16

2.7x3.2

HPE 135

4L

391

HPE 135 HPE 205

4 4

76.16 119.36

2.7x3.2 3.3x3.6

— —

— 29.7

— 27.2

— 27.4

— 639

— 200 @ 4,100 —

— 170 @ 4,100 140 @ 4100

— — — — 100 @ 4,000 80 @ 4,000 60 @ 4,000 — — —

70.9 70.9 70.9 70.9 70.9 48.9 48.9 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 70.9 70.9 48.9 48.9 63.5 63.5 63.5 63.5 65.6 70.9 70.9 70.9 48.9 49.7 49.7 63.5 64.2 65.6 65.3 65.3 65.3

36.3 36.3 36.3 36.3 36.3 45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 36.3 36.3 45.4 45.4 50.0 50.0 50 50.0 45.3 36.3 36.3 36.3 45.4 45.4 45.4 50.0 45.4 45.3 45.4 45.4 45.4

43.43 43.43 43.43 43.43 43.43 48.66 48.66 50.75 50.75 50.75 50.75 43.43 43.43 48.66 48.66 50.79 50.79 50.79 50.79 53.15 43.43 43.43 43.43 48.66 48.11 48.11 50.75 50.75 53.15 49.8 49.8 49.8

2,678 2,678 2,678 2,678 2,678 3,968 3,968 5,004 5,004 5,004 5,004 2,678 2,678 3,968 3,924 5,004 5,004 5.004 5,004 5,291 2,678 2,678 2,678 3,924 4,134 4,134 5,004 5,004 5,291 5,214 5,214 5,214

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 730 @ 2,300 800 @ 2,300 850 @ 2,300 1,000 @ 2,300 1,200 @ 2,300 1,300 @ 2,300 1,400 @ 2,300 1,550 @ 2,300 1,650 @ 2,300 1,800 @ 2,300 1,900 @ 2,300 2,000 @ 2,300

— — — — — — — — — — — 560 @ 2,100 650 @ 2,100 800 @ 2,100 900 @ 2,100 1,019 @ 2,100 1,200 @ 2,100 1,325 @ 2,100 1,400 @ 2,100 1,450 @ 2,100 — — — — — — — — — — — —

200 @ 1,800 286 @ 1,800 367 @ 1,800 440 @ 1,800 520 @ 1,800 600 @ 1,800 680 @ 1,800 749 @ 1,800 800 @ 1,800 900 @ 1,800 1,000 @ 1,800 — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — 764 @ 1,800*

— — — — 650 @ 1,650

483 @ 1,840 543 @ 1,840 429 @ 2,000 429 @ 1,940 590 @ 1,600

Most Ratings Available EPA Tier 3 Manufactured in Italy

MAN ENGINES & COMPONENTS INC. Ph: 800-MAN-2842 • Fax: 954-946-9098 591 S.W. 13th Terrace • Pompano Beach, FL 33069-3520 www.man-mec.com • E-mail: mec.info@man.eu •D2676 LE461 •D2676 LE452 •D2676 LE441 D2676 LE434 D2676 LE424 D2868 LE424 •D2886 LE431 D2862 LE434 D2862 LE434 D2862 LE427 (S) D2862 LE447 (S) D2676 LE425 D2676 LE435 D2868 LE425 D2868 LE443 D2862 LE425 (S) D2862 LE435 (S) D2862 LE469 (S) D2862 LE466 D2862 LE486 (S) D2676 LE443 D2676 LE423 D2676 LE453 D2868 LE426 D2868 LE436 D2868 LE466 D2862 LE446 D2862 LE426 D2862 LE456 D2862 LE436 D2862 LE436 D2862 LE496

6 6 6 6 6 8 8 12 12 12 12 6 6 8 8 12 12 12 12 12 6 6 6 8 8 8 12 12 12 12 12 12

758 758 758 758 758 986 986 1,479 1,479 1,479 1,479 758 758 986 986 1,479 1,479 1,479 1,479 1,479 758 758 758 986 986 986 1,479 1,479 1,479 1,479 1.479 1,479

4.96x6.54 4.96x6.54 4.96x6.54 4.96x6.54 4.96x6.54 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 4.96x6.54 4.96x6.54 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 4.96x6.54 4.96x6.54 4.96x6.54 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18 5.04x6.18

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

• IMO Tier II (S) with SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction)

MITSUBISHI TURBOCHARGER AND ENGINE AMERICA INC. Ph: 630-268-0750 • Fax: 630-268-9293 2Two Pierce Place • 11th Floor • Itasca, IL 60143 www.mitsubishi-engine.com S6A3-Y2MPTK S6A3-Y3MPTK S6B3-Y2MPTA S6B3-Y2MPTA S6R-Y1MPTA

46

6 6 6 6 6

1,133 1,133 891 891 1,496

5.91x6.88 5.91x6.89 5.31x6.69 5.31x6.69 6.69x7.09

— — — — —

64.4 65 60.59 61 71

36 36.5 37 37 44

54 54 52.36 52 63.5

4,190 4,100 2,889 2,889 6,130

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Model

S6R-Y1MPTK S6R-Y2MPTK S6R-Y3MPTAW S6R-Y3MPTAW-1 S6R-Y3MPTAW-1 S6R2-Y1MPTA S6R2-Y1MPTK S6R2-Y3MPTAW S12A2-Y1MPTA S12A2-Y1MPTK S12A2-Y2MPTK S12R-Y1MPTA S12R-Y1MPTK S12R-Y2MPTK S12R-Y3MPTAW-4 S12R-Y3MPTAW-3 S12R-Y4MPTAW S16R-Y1MPTA S16R-Y1MPTK S16R-Y3MPTAW

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 16 16 16

1,496 1,496 1,496 1,496 1,496 1,828 1,828 1,828 2,071 2,071 2,071 2,992 2,992 2,992 2,990 2,990 2,990 3,989 3,989 3,989

Gear (w); (w/o)

6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.69x8.66 6.69x8.67 6.69x8.66 5.91x6.30 5.91x6.30 5.91x6.30 6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.73x7.09 6.73x7.08 6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.69x7.09 6.73x7.09

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Dimensions (in.) L W H

71 71.3 71 70.03 71 71.3 71.3 71 78.8 90 90 93.5 93.5 90 116 116 116 115 115 116

44 44 44 44.4 44 44 44 44 56.7 56.5 56.5 59.5 59.5 56 60 60 60 99 99 60

63.5 63.5 64 63.3 64 66.7 66.7 64 63.7 63.7 63.7 68.6 68.6 63.7 69 69 70 77 77 78

Weight (lbs.)

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

6,240 6,240 6,240 6,240 6,240 6,417 6,527 6,395 7,453 8,203 7,453 11,532 11,731 11,731 11,731 11,731 11,731 14,685 14,950 14,950

811 @ 1,800* — — — — 757 @ 1,500* 818 @ 1,500* — 1,040 @ 2,100* 1,150 @ 2,100 * — 1,528 @ 1,800* 1,622 @1,800* — — — — 2,038 @ 1,800* 2,158 @ 1,800* —

697 @ 1,650 — — — — 657 @ 1,400 710 @ 1,400 — 940 @ 2,000 1,040 @ 2,000 — 1,300 @ 1,650 1,394 @ 1,650 — — — — 1,729 @ 1,650 1,850 @ 1,650 —

630 @ 1,600 630 @ 1,600 630 @ 1,600 684 @ 1,800 629 @ 1,940 597 @ 1,350 643 @ 1,350 803 @ 1,400 850 @ 1,940 940 @ 1,940 940 @ 1,940 1,180 @ 1,600 1,260 @ 1,600 1,260 @ 1,600 1,100 @ 1,600 1,260 @ 1,600 1,260 @ 1,600 1,568 @ 1,600 1,676 @ 1,600 1,675 @ 1,600

* Engines listed under High Output are actually Light Duty.

MOTEURS BAUDOUIN 6M26.3

12M26.3

6L

12V

970

1,940

MOTOR-SERVICES HUGO STAMP INC.

Ph: 954-763-3660 • Fax: 954-763-2872 3190 SW 4th Ave. • Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315 www.mshs.com • E-mail: torsten.schmitt@mshs.com —

w/o

w/o

3,935

7,088

All 6M26.3 engines are IMO III and EPA Tier 3 compliant All 12M26.3 engines are IMO III and EPA Tier 4 compliant

MTU

— — — 815 @ 2,100 — — — 1,650 @ 2,300

— — — — — — —

600 @ 1,800 700 @ 2,000 750 @ 2,100 — 1,200 @ 1,800 1,400 @ 2,100 1,500 @ 2,200 —

MTU — COMMERCIAL MARINE OPERATIONS

Ph: 248-560-8000 • Fax: 248-560-8001 39525 Mackenzie Drive • Novi, MI 48377

Ph: 504-467-8000 • Fax: 504-467-3811 125 Mallard St. • St. Rose, LA 70087 www.mtu-online.com • E-mail: jeff.sherman@mtu-online.com Intermittent Maximum

Intermittent

Continuous

SERIES 4000 (EPA Tier 4/IMO II/IMO III) 12V4000 M55R 12 3,491 12V4000 M55R 12 3,491 12V4000 M65 12 3,491 12V4000 M65L 12 3,491 12V4000 M65R 12 3,491 16V4000 M65R 16 4,655 16V4000 M65R 16 4,655 16V4000 M65 16 4,655 16V4000 M65L 16 4,655 20V4000 M65 20 5,819 20V4000 M65L 20 5,819

6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3

— — — — — — — — — — —

108.3 108.3 108.3 108.3 108.3 125.6 125.6 125.6 125.6 136.8 136.8

70.6 70.6 70.6 70.6 70.6 61 61 61 61 61 61

81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5

17,637 17,637 17,637 17,637 17,637 20,503 20,503 20,503 20,503 28,439 28,439

— — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — —

1,500 @ 1,800 1,770 @ 1,600 2,250 @ 1,800 2,575 @ 1,800 2,000 @ 1,600 2,465 @ 1,600 2,680 @ 1,600 3,000 @ 1,800 3,435 @ 1,800 3,755 @ 1,800 4,290 @ 1,800

AUXILLARY/GENERATOR POWER 12V4000 M25S 12 12V4000 M35S 12 16V4000 M25S 16 16V4000 M35S 16 20V4000 M25S 20 20V4000 M35S 20

3,491 3,491 4,655 4,655 5,819 5,819

6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3

— — — — — —

108.3 108.3 125.6 125.6 136.8 136.8

70.6 70.6 61 61 61 61

81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5

17,637 17,637 20,503 20,503 28,439 28,439

— — — — — —

— — — — — —

1,680 kW @ 1,800 1,930 kW @ 1,800 2,240 kW @ 1,800 2,575 kW @ 1,800 2,800 kW @ 1,800 3,220 kW @ 1,800

SERIES 4000 (EPA Tier 3/IMO II) 8V4000 M54 8 8V4000 M54R 8 12V4000 M54 12 12V4000 M64 12 16V4000 M54 16 16V4000 M64 16

2,328 2,328 3,491 3,491 4,655 4,655

6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3

— — — — — —

80.3 80.3 99.2 99.2 117.7 117.7

63.6 63.6 72.8 72.8 72.8 72.8

81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5

12,522 12,522 17,086 17,086 19,489 19,489

— — — — — —

— — — — — —

1,200 @ 1,800 1,000 @ 1,600 1,600 @ 1,800 1,875 @ 1,800 2,260 @ 1,800 2,680 @ 1,800

AUXILLARY/GENERATOR POWER 8V4000 M24S 8 12V4000 M24S 12 12V4000 M34S 12 16V4000 M24S 16 16V4000 M34S 16

2,328 3,491 3,491 4,655 4,655

6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3 6.7x8.3

— — — — —

80.3 99.2 99.2 117.7 117.7

63.6 72.8 72.8 72.8 72.8

81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5 81.5

12,522 17,086 17,086 19,489 19,489

— — — — —

— — — — —

895 kW @ 1,800 1,195 kW @ 1,800 1,399 kW @ 1,800 1,685 kW @ 1,800 1,999 kW @ 1,800

Dimensions listed here should NOT be used for installation purposes. Consult installation drawings

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

47


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) — — — — — — — — — — 450 @ 2,100 500 @ 2,100 550 @ 2,100 600 @ 2,100 — — (patrol craft) — — — _ — — — — — — — — 600 @ 2,300 450 @ 2,100 500 @ 2,100 550 @ 2,100 700 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 450 @ 2,100 500 @ 2,100 550 @ 2,100 825 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 700 @ 2,300 751 @ 2,300 800 @ 21,300 650 @ 2,100

220 @ 1,800 250 @ 1,800 300 @ 1,800 350 @ 1,800 — — — 220 @ 1,800 250 @ 1,800 300 @ 1,800 338 @ 1,800 300 @ 1,600 350 @ 1,800 400 @ 1,800 220 @ 1,800 450 @ 1,800 500 @ 1,800 (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) — — — 350 @ 1,800 400 @ 1,800 450 @ 1,800 500 @ 1,800 550 @ 1,800 450 @ 1,800 400 @ 1,800 500 @ 1,800 550 @ 1,800 400 @ 1,800 450 @ 1,800 500 @ 1,800 (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) —

650 @ 2,100

(intermittent)

700 @ 2,100

(intermittent)

750 @ 2,100

(intermittent)

Continuous 1A: Engines for vessels with unrestricted continuous operation. Average load factor: 70%-90%. Typical operating time: unrestricted. Marine Auxiliary Continuous Power 3A: For onboard power generation and diesel electric drives in unrestricted continuous operation. Marine Auxiliary Prime Power 3B: For onboard power generation and diesel electric drives in continuous operation with variable load. Application Rating Definitions are approximate and consistent for comparative purposes only. See dealer for other model and ratings available.

SCANIA USA INC.

Ph: 210-403-0007 • Fax: 210-403-0211 121 Interpark Blvd. • Suite 1002 • San Antonio, TX 78216 www.scaniausa.com • E-mail: na.contact@scaniausainc.com DI09 70M

5

567.30

5.1x5.5

d,e

55.9

38.4

45.2

DI09 72M

5

567.30

5.1x5.5

d,e

55.9

38.4

45.2

DI13 80M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

59.2

38.3

46.2

DI13 81M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

59.1

38.2

46.2

DI13 82M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

d a,d,f a,d,f d d a,d,f d d a,d,f a,d,f a

59.1

38.2

46.2

DI13 83M

6

774.70

51.x6.3

a

60.5

38.3

46.2

DI13 85M DI13 86M

6 6

774.70 774.70

5.1x6.3 5.1x6.3

a a

59.2 60.5

38.3 38.3

46.2 46.2

DI13 92M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

c,d,e

60.5

38.3

46.2

DI13 70M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

b,d,e

59.2

38.3

46.2

DI13 71M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

b,d,e

59.2

37.6

46.2

DI13 72M DI13 73M

6 6

774.70 774.70

5.1x6.3 5.1x6.3

b,d,e b,d,e

60.5 59.2

38.3 37.6

46.2 46.2

DI13 77M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

b,d,e

60.5

38.3

46.2

DI13 78M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

b,d,e

59.2

38.3

46.2

DI13 76M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

d,e

60.5

38.3

46.2

DI13 87M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

a,d,e,g

60.5

38.3

46.2

DI13 88M

6

774.70

5.1x6.3

a,d,e

60.5

37.6

48.0

DI16 72M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

de

61.1

49.2

47.8

b,d,e DI16 70M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

b,d,e

61.1

49.3

47.8

DI16 71M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

b,d,e

60.4

49.3

47.8

DI16 76M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

d,e

62.0

50.0

47.8

DI16 77M*

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

b,d,e

61.1

49.2

47.8

DI16 80M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

d

61.1

49.3

47.8

48

2,535

— — — — 2,535 300 @ 2,100 350 @ 2,100 400 @ 2,100 2,832 — — — — — — — 2,832 — — — 2,832 — — 2,832 — — 2,832 650 @ 2,300 2,832 600 @ 2,300 675 @ 2,300 — 2,832 — — — — 2,601 — — — — 2,601 — — — 2,832 650 @ 2,300 2,624 — — — 2,832 750 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 2,832 — — — 2,832 875 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 2,832 (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) 2,601 700 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 751 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 3,682 800 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 850 @ 2,300 (pc) (patrol craft) 900 @ 2,300 (patrol craft-short) — 3,681 — — — — 3,526 — — 3,659 1,150 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 1,000 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 1,100 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 3,681 900 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) *1,000 @ 2,300 (patrol craft) 3,681 — —

(intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) 700 @ 2,100 650 @ 2,100 700 @ 2,100 — (intermittent)

800 @ 2,100 (intermittent) — 550 @ 1,800 — 625 @ 1,800 — 700 @ 1,800 — 750 @ 1,800 — 550 @ 1,800 — 625 @ 1,800 650 @ 2,100 (patrol craft) (intermittent) — — — — 900 @ 2,300 (intermittent) — — — 300 @ 1,800 — 350 @ 1,800

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

a,d,f DI16 81M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

a

61.1

49.3

47.8

3,681

DI16 82M DI16 83M

8 8

1,000.40 1,000.40

5.1x6.06 5.1x6.06

a a

61.1 61.1

49.3 49.3

47.8 47.8

3,681 3,681

DI16 73M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

d,e

62.1

49.3

47.8

3,526

DI16 79M

8

1,000.40

5.1x6.06

d,e

62.1

49.3

47.8

3,526

DI16 77M

16

3,682

5.1x6.06

61.1

49.2

47.8

3,682

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

— — — — — — — — 800 @ 2,300 850 @ 2,300 900 @ 2,300 — — — — — — — — 1,000 @ 2,300

— — — — — 650 @ 2,100 700 @ 2,100 800 @ 2,100 (patrol craft) (patrol craft) (patrol craft) 650 @ 2,100 700 @ 2,100 750 @ 2,100 800 @ 2,100 — — — — —

400 @ 1,800 450 @ 1,800 550 @ 1,800 625 @ 1,800 700 @ 1,800 (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) — — — (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) (intermittent) 550 @ 1,800 625 @ 1,800 700 @ 1,800 750 @ 1,800 —

(Emissions Legend: a=U.S. EPA Tier 3, b=U.S. EPA Tier 2, c=IMO Tier III, d=IMO Tier II, e=EU Stage IIIA, f=CCNR II, g=RCD

STEYR MOTORS GMBH

Ph: 850-784-7933 2310 S. Hwy. 77, Ste. 110, #338 • Lynn Haven, FL 32444 www.steyr-motors.com SE144E38 SE164E40 SE126E25 SE156E26 SE196E35 SE236E40 SE236S36 SE266E40 SE266S36 SE286E40 SE306J38*

4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

2.1L 2.1L 3.2L 3.2L 3.2L 3.2L 3.2L 3.2L 3.2L 3.2L 3.2L

— — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — —

569 569 750 750 750 750 750 750 750 750 750

144 @ 3,800 160 @ 4,000 120 @ 2,500 150 @ 2,600 190 @ 3,500 231 @ 4,000 231 @ 3,600 258 @ 4,000 258 @ 3,600 279 @ 4,000 292 @ 3,800

— — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — —

Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 2 — 425 @ 2,200 500 @ 2,600 — 625 @ 2,400 800 @ 2,300

— — — 425 @ 2,200 — — 510 @ 2,250 — 750 @ 1,900

110 @ 3,000 150 @ 3,000 170 @ 4,000 200 @ 4,000 220 @ 4,000 175 @ 2,800 230 @ 3.400 270 @ 3,500 300 @ 3,300 340 @ 3,400 380 @ 3,500 Tier 3 510 @ 2,850 550 @ 2,900 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 3 — Tier 3/IMO III Tier 3/IMO III —

(inboard/sterndrive) (inboard/sterndrive) (inboard/sterndrive) (inboard/sterndrive) (inboard/sterndrive) Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3 450 @ 2,700 Tier 3 Tier 3 140 @ 1,900 160 @ 2,300 208 @ 1,900 237 @ 2,300 230 @ 1,900 265 @ 2,300 248 @ 2,100 550 @ 1,900 — 600 @ 1,900 — 700 @ 2,300

300 @ 1,800 355 @ 1,800 355 @ 2,200 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 3 600 @ 1,800 650 @ 1,800 — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 121 @ 1,900 139 @ 2,300 177 @ 1,900 201 @ 2,300 199 @ 1,900 226 @ 2,300 — 400 @ 1,800 (Tier 3/IMO III) 450 @ 1,800 500 @ 1,800 Tier 3/IMO III

* Waterjet Only.

VOLVO PENTA

Ph: 757-436-2800 • Fax: 757-436-5150 1300 Volvo Penta Dr. • Chesapeake, VA 23320 www.volvopenta.com D9 MH

6

571

4.72x5.43

53.7

38.8

44.6

2,535

D9 MH*** D9-425*** D9-500*** D11-510 D11-625 D16 MH (Tier 3) **D3-110 SOLAS **D3-150 SOLAS **D3-170 SOLAS **D3-200 SOLAS **D3-220 SOLAS D4-175 D4-230 D4-270 D6-300 D6-340 D6-380 D8-450 D8-510 D8-550 D5A TA***

6 6 6 6 6 6

571 571 571 660 660 984

4.72x5.43 4.72x5.43 4.72x5.43 4.84x5.98 4.84x5.98 5.67x6.50

— — — — — —

53.7 51.5 51.5 51.5 51.5 60.9

33.8 33.8 33.8 37.1 37.1 44.0

44.6 39.7 39.7 40.5 40.5 51.3

2,370 2,370 2,370 2,524 2,524 3,858

5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 4

146 146 146 146 146 226 226 226 336 336 336 469.7 469.7 469.7 290

3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67 4.05x4.33 4.05x4.33 4.05x4.33 4.05x4.33 4.05x4.33 4.05x4.33 4.33x5.31 4.33x5.31 4.33x5.31 4.25x5.12

— — — — — — w w w w w — — — —

32.9 32.9 32.9 32.9 32.9 30.9 30.9 30.9 40.1 40.1 40.1 59.1 59.1 59.1 43.5

28.2 28.2 28.2 28.2 28.2 29.6 29.6 29.6 32.2 32.2 32.2 38.8 38.8 38.8 30.0

29.6 29.6 29.6 29.6 29.6 30.7 30.7 30.7 30.7 30.7 30.7 39.5 39.5 39.5 40.0

573 573 573 573 573 1,246 1,246 1,246 1,466 1,466 1,466 1,852 1,852 1,852 1,157

D7A TA***

6

436

4.25x5.12

55.3

33.5

40.0

1,521

D7C TA***

6

436

4.25x5.12

55.3

33.5

40.0

1,521

D13 MH

6

779.7

5.16x6.22

58.0

42.0

50.0

3,197

D13-700

6

779.7

5.16x6.22

58.0

41.8

41.5

3,197

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

49


Model

Cyl.

Displacement Bore x (cu. in.) Stroke (in.)

Gear (w); (w/o)

Dimensions (in.) L W H

Weight (lbs.)

High Output hp rpm

Medium Duty hp rpm

Continuous Duty hp rpm

D13-800 D3-110 SOLAS D3-150 SOLAS D3-170 SOLAS D3-200 SOLAS D3-220 SOLAS

6 5 5 5 5 5

779.7 146 146 146 146 146

5.16x6.22 3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67 3.19x3.67

— — — — — —

70.7 32.9 32.9 32.9 32.9 32.9

42.9 28.2 28.2 28.2 28.2 28.2

41.5 29.6 29.6 29.6 29.6 29.6

3,439 573 573 573 573 573

800 @ 2,300 110 @ 3,000 150 @ 3,000 170 @ 4,000 200 @ 4,000 220 @ 4,000

— — — — — —

Tier 3/IMO III Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3

VOLVO PENTA IPS D6-IPS400**** D6-IPS450**** D6-IPS500**** D8-IPA600**** D8-IPA650**** D8-IPS700**** D11-IPS650**** D11-IPS800**** D-13-IPS900 **** D13-IPS1050****

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

336 336 336 469.7 469.7 469.7 661 661 779.9 779.9

4.05x4.33 4.05x4.33 4.05x4.33 4.33x5.31 4.33x5.31 4.33x5.31 4.84x5.98 4.84x5.98 5.16x6.22 5.16x6.22

— — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — —‚ — —

— — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — —

1,903** 1,903** 1,903* 3,109** 3,109** 3,109** 3,968** 3,968** 5,220* 5,220**

Tier 3 340 @ 3,400 380 @ 3,500 Tier 3 510 @ 2,850 550 @ 2,900 Tier 3 600 @ 2,400 Tier 3 800 @ 2,300

300 @ 3,300 Tier 3 Tier 3 450 @ 2,700 Tier 3 Tier 3 510 @ 2,200 Tier 3 700 @ 2,250 Tier 3

— — — — — — — — — —

**** available in twin, triple or quad only *** Not for sale in the U.S. ** Package weight pair — engine and drive *D3 is classified R5 engine

WESTERBEKE CORP.

Ph: 508-823-7677 • Fax: 508-884-9688 Myles Standish Industrial Park • 150 John Hancock Road • Taunton, MA 02780-7319 www.westerbeke.com 12D TWO 30C THREE 35E THREE 44C FOUR

2 3 3 4

39 58 80 107

2.99x2.76 2.99x2.76 3.07x3.62 3.07x3.62

w w w w

25.6 29.5 30.6 34.0

20.0 20 21.3 21.3

20.4 20.3 22.6 23.0

225 274 386 416

12 @ 3,000 25 @ 3,600 28 @ 3,000 38 @ 3,000

— — — —

— — — —

3.70x3.94 3.70x3.94 3.39x3.78 3.39x3.78 3.39x3.78 3.39x3.78 4.17x4.33 4.17x4.33 4.17x4.33 4.17x4.33 4.33x5.17

w/o w/o w/o w/o w/o w/o w/o w/o w/o w/o w/o

43.0 43.0 50.0 47.0 50.0 47.0 48.0 48.0 51.0 51.0 55.0

28.0 28.0 35.0 39.0 35.0 39.0 28.0 28.0 28.0 28.0 35.0

29.0 30.0 31.0 35.0 31.0 35.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 30.0 39.0

899 944 959 959 959 959 1,179 1,179 1,290 1,887 1,887

311 @ 3,800 311 @ 3,800 315 @ 3,800 315 @ 3,800 345 @ 3,800 345 @ 3,800 326 @ 3,200 371 @ 3,200 394 @ 3,300 434 @ 3,300 355 @ 2,400 394 @ 2,500 457 @ 2,700 502 @ 2,700 274 @ 1,880 345 @ 1,950 493 @ 1,950 591 @ 2,100 641 @ 2,150 691 @ 2,200 650 @ 1,900 650 @ 1,900 744 @ 1,900 744 @ 1,840 818 @ 1,900 744 @ 1,840 803 @ 1,900 818 @ 1,900 898 @ 1,938 898 @ 1,938 988 @ 2,000 1,004 @ 2,000 1,183 @ 1,850 1,381 @ 1,900 1,529 @ 1,840 1,636 @ 1,900 1,797 @ 1,940

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — –—

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — `—

YANMAR MARINE

Ph: 770-877-9894 • Fax: 770-877-9009 101 International Parkway • Adairsville, GA 30103 www.yanmarmarine.com 6LPA-STC 6LPA-STZC* 8LV320C*** 8LV320ZC* 8LV350C*** 8LV350ZC* 6LY2M-WDT** 6LY2M-WST** 6LY400*** 6LY440*** 6CXBM-GT**

6 6 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 6

254 254 272 272 272 272 354 354 354 354 452

6HA2M-WHT**

6

801

5.12x6.50

w/o

62.0

40.0

50.0

3,208

6HA2M-WDT**

6

802

5.23x6.50

w/o

61.0

40.0

45.0

3,053

6AYM-WST** 6AYEM-ST 6AYAM-ET** 6AYM-WET**

6 6 6 6

1,243 1,243 1,243 1,243

6.10x7.09 6.10x7.09 6.10x7.09 6.10x7.09

w/o w/o w/o w/o

79.0 79.0 77.0 79.0

51.0 51.0 50.0 51.0

56.0 60.0 61.0 56.0

5,214 5,331 5,060 5,214

6AYEM-ET***

6

1,243

6.10x7.09

w/o

79.0

51.0

60.0

5,331

6AYM-WGT** 6AYEM-GT***

6 6

1,243 1,243

6.10x7.09 6.10x7.09

w/o w/o

79.0 79.0

51.0 51.0

56.0 60.0

5,214 5,331

12AYM-WSR****

12

2,487

6.10x7.09

w/o

108.0

65.0

67.0

10,913

12AYM-WET****

12

2,487

6.10x7.09

w/o

108.0

65.0

67.0

10,913

12AYM-WGT****

12

2,487

6.10x7.09

w/o

108.0

65.0

67.0

10,913

* Available with Yanmar stern drive. ** IMO Tier II certified and available with Yanmar transmission. *** EPA Tier 3 compliant and available with Yanmar transmission. **** IMO Tier II certified.

50

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


DRILL MORE HOLES

ProductShowcase Featuring new products and services developed for the WorkBoat industy. Ask us about our Product Showcase opportunities and more visit our web page WorkBoat.com/advertise

For repowers, work with the legend.

www.mtu-online.com

From small light weight low profile mag drills to large multi-speed models and a wide range of annular cutters, Hougen has the power, performance & solutions for your holemaking needs.

810-635-7111 • www.HOUGEN.com Hou-728-WorkBoat2.indd 1

508.995.7000

Den Haan Rotterdam Navigation Lights • • • • • •

Robust Design Maintenance Friendly Visibility at High Vertical Angles Excellent Thermal Management 2 - 5 Nautical Mile Range Meets UL Standards

DHR60 LED Series CMYK 0-100-100-0

Lifting • Securing• Mobilizing

SMALL, COMPACT & FLEXIBLE IMO III / US EPA Tier 4 Solutions 12 Cylinder

12 M26.3 up to 1650 mhp Commercial Duty

Motor-Services Hugo Stamp, Inc.

WorkBoat -HMX-productShowcase.ai 1 1/28/2019 2:23:38

www.imtra.com 508.995.7000

11/6/18 11:29 AM

Authorized Distributor and Service Center

www.mshs.com

+1 954-763-3660

Pantone 485

Lifting • Securing• Mobilizing

Container Lift SpreaderS!

Manufactured in the USA

SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS

Lifting • Securing• Mobilizing

In stock!

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

More Info

Packable design taking up minimal deck space yet quickly transforms into a 20’or 40’ fully capable Container Lift Spreader!

CMY

K

SPACE SAVING & RELIABLE

Come see it at booth 4050 www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

51


PortofCall

Your Source For Employment, Equipment & Services EMPLOYMENT

52

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


Inc.

LOYMENT

For Port of Call advertising, email wjalbert@divcom.com or call 800-842-5496

EMPLOYMENT

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS: Captains, Mates, Engineers, AB’s and Deckhands Dann Ocean Towing is A leading provider of marine towing services, serving the Eastern Seaboard, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and beyond. To Apply Please Visit www.DannOceanTowing.com 3670 S Westshore Boulevard Tampa, FL 33629

Phone (813) 251-5100

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

53


PortofCall

Your Source For Employment, Equipment & Services EMPLOYMENT

MARINE GEAR & SUPPLIES

Keel Coolers SEE MORE JOBS ONLINE * * workboat.com/resources/jobs/

MARINE GEAR & SUPPLIES

Trouble free marine engine cooling since 1927!

THE WALTER MACHINE CO, INC Tel: 201-656-5654 • Fax: 201-656-0318 www.waltergear.com

Subchapter M Medical Kits

1-800-40-PILOT Sales@PilothouseCharts.com www.PilothouseCharts.com 54

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


For Port of Call advertising, email wjalbert@divcom.com or call 800-842-5496

Now Manufacturing and Installing Fire Retardant Bunk Curtains

We are a Custom Manufacturer of Wheelhouse Tinted Shades & Crew Quarter Blackout Shades

We custom build every shade to fit each window in our facility. They are Incredibly durable, driven by over-sized clutches and operated by a stainless steel pull chain. We offer measurement and installation services in Southern Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. We carry $5,000,000 workers’ compensation, and liability insurance policies with U.S.L.&H. and the Jones Act.

Download our order form to purchase your shades today.

Contact: Edward Kass III | 504-615-5833 | ekass@solarboatshades.com | www.solarboatshades.com

PLACE YOUR AD HERE workboat.com/about/advertise/

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

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PortofCall

Your Source For Employment, Equipment & Services MARINE GEAR & SUPPLIES Lake Superior Cabs, Inc. Building Pilot Houses, Equipment Cabs and Control Houses since 1992

www.lakesuperiorcabs.com 121 W. Harney Rd Esko, MN Toll Free: 800-328-1823 Fax: 218-879-4640 Dean Myers LSCABS@aol.com

BARGE PUMPS

IMO ROTARY SCREW ASPHALT PUMPS

PLACE YOUR AD HERE * * workboat.com/about/advertise/

BYRON JACKSON TURBINE PUMPS BLACKMER ROTARY GEAR PUMPS OUR 110TH YEAR

DUVIC’S PUMPS “Greater Downtown” HARVEY, LA 70059 Box 1237 • 504-341-1654 PH/FX

SERVICES

Have you thought about the accomplishment you have made by obtaining a Captain’s License? The many hours of study and time at sea?

1-800-584-0242 56

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


For Port of Call advertising, email wjalbert@divcom.com or call 800-842-5496

SERVICES

Become a Certified and Accredited Marine Surveyor

Fishing Vessel Qualified. Complete course and examination for all vessel types and uses. 1-800-245-4425 or navsurvey.com

We Build the Ship First. Production Lofting Detail Design 3D Modeling St. John’s, NL | Vancouver, BC | New Orleans, LA 709.368.0669 | 504.287.4310 | www.genoadesign.com

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

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PortofCall

58

Your Source For Employment, Equipment & Services

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


For Port of Call advertising, email wjalbert@divcom.com or call 800-842-5496

TRAINING

SERVICES

*

*

PLACE YOUR AD HERE workboat.com/about/advertise/ Coast Guard & State Pilotage License Insurance Available Coverages; Legal Defense for CG, NTSB and State Pilot Hearings; Federal and State Civil Actions Reimbursement for Loss of Wages Group Coverage Also Available R.J. Mellusi & Co., 29 Broadway, Suite 2311 New York, N.Y. 10006 Tel. 1(800)280-1590, Fax. 1(212)385-0920, rjmellusi@sealawyers.com www.marinelicenseinsurance.com

ADVERTISERS INDEX Advertiser / Page Ahead Sanitation Systems Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Laborde Products Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Aventics Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Lubriplate Lubricants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Blount Boats Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Marine Propulsion Diesel Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

C & C Marine and Repair LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

McDermott Light & Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Capital Bedding Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Mitsubishi Turbocharger and Engine America, Inc . . . . . . 7

Cummins Filtration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CVR, 37

Motor-Services Hugo Stamp Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

David Clark Company Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

MTU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,51

Duramax Marine LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CV3

Northern Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Force Control Industries Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Panolin America Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23,51

Furuno USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Pennel USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Headhunter Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

RIBCRAFT USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Hougen Mfg ., Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Robert Allan Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Imtra Corp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

R W Fernstrum & Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

International WorkBoat Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Tandemloc, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29,51

John Deere Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Twin Disc Incorporated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CV2

Karl Senner, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CV4

Volvo Penta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Konrad Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat

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LOOKS BACK JULY 1949

• A bill to tighten up the Oil Pollution Act of 1924 by increasing the penalties for violations has been introduced by U.S. Rep. T. Millet Hand, D-N.J. The Act sought to prevent the dumping of bilge oil in the navigable waters of the U.S. New Jersey was mainly interested because of the damage to resort beaches when bilge oil, dumped overboard near the shore, pol-

luted beaches when it drifted in with the tides. The bill would increase the minimum penalty for each violation from $100 to $500 and the maximum fine from $2,500 to $10,000. Prison sentences of up to one year are also proposed under the bill. The 1924 Act has not been successfully enforced, supporters of the Hand bill say. They not only want stiffer penalties, but stronger enforcement for JULY 1959 the measure • Gulf Coast Transit Co., Tampa, Fla., recently purchased the tanker Esso Manhattan from Esso Standard Oil Co. and is converting the 523', 6,600hp steam turbo-electric ship into a self-unloading dry bulk cargo carrier. Gibbs Corp. is doing the conversion at its Jacksonville, Fla., yard. When completed, the converted vessel will be renamed the Martha Mac and make regular trips between JULY 1969 the ports of

• Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co. and McAllister Brothers Inc. have announced an agreement in principle to exchange all outstanding McAllister capital stock for Great Lakes stock, thereby joining the interests of both companies. • Over 5,000 people attended the inaugural Offshore Technology Conference in Houston May 19-21. David 60

that is already on the books. Opponents say it is unenforceable and the real solution is the education of shipping companies, who could order their masters to take the necessary precautions to avoid dumping bilge oil. Baton Rouge, La., New Orleans and Tampa, and will call at other Gulf ports including Houston. Coal capacity on eastbound trips will be 14,500 tons divided between four compartments.

L. Riley, OTC’s assistant manager, said the conference was a “great, great success, bigger than anything we hoped for.” As a result, OTC has changed the venue for next year’s conference. Originally scheduled to be held in New Orleans, the second annual OTC will return to Houston. Original plans called for OTC to rotate between Houston, New Orleans and Los Angeles. www.workboat.com • JULY 2019 • WorkBoat


DURAMAX®

SHAFT SEAL SYSTEMS

Engineered for Optimum Sealing Performance.

The DryMax™ seal is a robust, environmentally friendly, water-lubricated stern tube seal system. Engineered to accommodate the most axial and radial shaft movement of any seal design while eliminating wear on the shaft.

Reversible DuraChrome™ mating ring gives 2X the life extending drydock intervals

Keeps seawater out of your vessel and your bilge dry. The DryMax™ engineered nitrile rubber ring rotates with the shaft and creates a hydrodynamic seal with the DuraChrome™ mating ring.

Superior sealing and wear life. The proprietary rubber polymer seal ring and the DuraChrome™ alloy mating ring have been engineered to provide optimal sealing and long wear life.

Virtually maintenance free. An inflatable seal is built into the housing allowing seal inspection and primary sealing ring replacement at sea without dry docking.

MADE IN U.S.A.

DryMax™ is ideal for vessels operating in both brown and blue water. It accommodates shaft sizes and stern tubes up to 36".

MADE IN U.S.A.

The DryMax™ seal is also available as a rudder stock seal.

For more information on DryMax™ Shaft Seal or to purchase contact: Duramax Marine at 440-834-5400 or go to DuramaxMarine.com

Duramax Marine® is an ISO 9001:2008 Certified Company

Products And Knowledge You Trust

p: 440.834.5400 f: 800.497.9283


Karl Senner, LLC is proud to equip the M/V Evening Breeze with REINTJES Gearboxes behind the first set of 8 cylinder EMD Tier 4 Engines in operation.

Onboard are two REINTJES WAF 1563 Horizontal Offset Reverse Reduction Gearboxes behind a pair of 2,000hp EMD 8 E 23B Tier 4 main engines.

Owner: Bouchard Transportation Shipyard: VT Halter Marine, Inc Naval Architect: Guarino & Cox, LLC

504-469-4000

|

KARLSENNER.COM

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