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Lake to Bay Inventory + Opportunities


LAKE TO BAY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Lake to Inventory and Opportunities work included a deep review of existing conditions; including research on transportation, topography, land uses, environmental conditions, current amenities, policy documents, and gaps along with future opportunities. This analysis resulted in a re-imaged vision of the Lake to Bay as a city-defining connection between the north end of the waterfront and South Lake Union, along with a focus on creating a high quality public realm for the Lake to Bay zone. This work was supported by the Lake2Bay Coalition, Seattle Parks Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Vulcan Real Estate.

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LAKE TO BAY

Lake to Bay Vision

Create the healthiest urban space in the world to live, w o r k , l e a r n , s t u d y, c r e a t e , visit and play!


TABLE OF CONTENTS GOALS + AMBITION

- PAGE 6 -

OPPORTUNITIES

- PAGE 18 -

APPENDIX: INVENTORY

- PAGE 50 -

APPENDIX: POLICY

- PAGE 73 -

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PROJECT STUDY AREA Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

ue

n ve

tA

lio

El W

South Lake Union

UPTOWN Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

Av

en

ue

BELLTOWN D

W

es

4

LAKE TO BAY

ka

W

ay

Av

en

ue

ue

enue

as

rn

en

Westlake Av

Al

te

Av


Dexter Avenue N

Major gaps in the physical environment hinder a friendly, exciting, fun, high quality experience Ped + Bike Improvements

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Stronger

Mercer Street

ve tA

lio El e

nu

Reconnect

W

Stronger

Br

oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

GAP

Thomas Street

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

GA P

H

W

es

ka

W

ay

Av

Av

ue

en

ue

en

ue

Stronger

Gap east of Seattle Center will be reconnected with Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement Project. There are no existing plans to remove the gap along Broad Street. Leadership will be needed to reconnect the Olympic Sculpture Park and Seattle Center. venue

as

rn

D

en

Westlake A

Al

te

2N

Av

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Goals + Ambition Lake to Bay

Lake to Bay aims to be a model for the future, integrating residential and work spaces with cultural activities, natural systems, and delightful ways to move through the neighborhoods. The ambition for Lake to Bay is high and city-defining, connecting iconic buildings and spaces from Lake Union to Elliot Bay.

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LAKE TO BAY

What is Lake to Bay? It is a Zone It is a Route It is an Idea


What does Lake to Bay do?

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C O N N E C T S L A K E U N I O N T O E L L I O T B AY I N A C I T Y- D E F I N I N G R O U T E

2

F O C U S E S O N S E AT T L E C E N T E R A S T H E C E N T E R

3

SUPPORTS HIGH QUALITY URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS

4

L E V E R A G E S C R E AT I V I T Y A N D I N N O VAT I O N W I T H I N T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

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LAKE

BAY

8

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1

CONNECTS LAKE UNION TO ELLIOT B AY I N A C I T Y- D E F I N I N G R O U T E


City-Defining Ambition Examples from around the world

1

Highline, NYC

3

Lombard Street, San Francisco, CA

2

4

Hollywood, CA

San Antonio Riverwalk, San Antonio, TX

5

La Rambla, Barcelona

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Queen Anne

Uptown

Seattle Center South Lake Union

Belltown Downtown

2 10

F O C U S E S O N S E AT T L E C E N T E R A S T H E C E N T E R

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Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

t lio El ue

en Av W Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

as

ka

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

venu Westlake A

Al

te

Av

Av

en

ue

W

e

ay

3

SUPPORTS HIGH QUALITY URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS

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Model for High Quality Urban Neighborhood Examples from around the world

1

3

12

2

Terry Avenue North, Seattle, WA

16th Street, Denver, CO

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Portland, OR

Parklet, San Francisco, CA

5

8th Street, Washington DC


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Connecting People, Creativity + Innovation in the Public Realm

Creative transportation

1

2

Creative and accessible ways to move 1. Outdoor Street Escalator Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain 2. Trampe CycloCable Bike lift Trondheim, Norway 3. Axle Contemporary Art Gallery Bus Santa Fe, New Mexico

3

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Connecting People, Creativity + Innovation in the Public Realm Curated and idea generating public space

1

BMW Guggenheim Lab: NYC, Berlin and Mumbai

2

Moving Icon pop-up museum : Germany

Creating Seattle’s LIVING LABS 1. BMW Guggenheim Lab : A mobile laboratory traveling around the world to inspire innovative ideas for urban design and urban life. Traveled to NYC, Berlin and Mumbai from 2011 - 2014 2. Moving Icon by Kalhöfer-Korschildgen : pop-up museum moves around the German region of Westphalia – providing residents a rare insight into local history.

3

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Living Innovation Zone, San Francisco

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3. Living Innovation Zone, San Francisco Description of LIZ from mayor: The Living Innovation Zone Program (LIZ) seeks to create a flexible framework that harnesses the city’s creativity by using City-owned assets, such as public spaces, and partnerships with leading organizations as catalysts for exploration, innovation and play


Connecting People, Creativity + Innovation in the Public Realm Physical + Digital installations

1

New York City

2

Currently in prototype

Innovative wayfinding and access to information 1. IBM Thinkwall New York City, NY 2. Digital Carpet and Starpath Products that illuminate pathways 3. Way-finding kiosk Pearson Lloyd Westfield London, England

3

Westfield London, England

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Connecting People, Creativity + Innovation in the Public Realm Seattle inspires

1

Venice, Italy

2

Seatle, WA

The Next Generation “World’s Fair” 1. La Biennale, Venice, Italy 2012 Russian Pavilion QR code room 2. Seattle Center Bumbershoot Annual Event 3. 1962 Seattle’s World Fair

3

16

Seatle, WA

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“Seattle’s fair left the city with a permanent cultural nexus and major infrastructure... It gave us a refurbished waterfront, streetside trees and new facilities at the University of Washington. It helped boost major projects, such as the completion of Interstate 5 through downtown and the SR 520 bridge. It bequeathed to us Seattle Center, a permanent complex of theaters, pavilions, the Pacific Science Center, Coliseum (now KeyArena), Center House, Opera House, the Monorail and open urban space. It gave us an international civic symbol, the Space Needle, second only to the Eiffel Tower as a world’s fair souvenir and a tourist attraction known around the world.” Seattle Magazine, Febuary 2012, Back to the Future: Why Seattle’s World’s Fair Mattered. By: Knute Berger

What would a world’s fair for our generation look like?

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Opportunities Lake to Bay

Along this city-defining Lake to Bay route, key locations are recognized as opportunities for new development and ideas. The following images portray a vision to identify the opportunity and to set the highest level of ambition.

NORTH WATERFRONT CONNECTION BROAD STREET BROAD STREET TRIANGLE BROAD / THOMAS INTERSECTION THOMAS STREET WEST OF AURORA THOMAS STREET AT THE BRIDGE MERCER ENTRYWAY

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Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Stre

LA

Mercer Street

t lio El ue

en

Av W

Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

ka

Av

ue

en

ue

en

ue

venue

as

rn

en

Westlake A

Al

te

Av

Av

W

ay

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N O R T H WAT E R F R O N T C O N N E C T I O N Connections and Future Vision

Dexter Avenue N

Our Ambition

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

e

nu

ve

tA

lio

El

Connects to the Central Waterfront Project

W

Acts a giant green sponge for water runoff

Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

as

ka

LAKE TO BAY

W

ay

te

rn

Av

en

ue

Av

Av

en

ue

en

ue

enue Westlake Av

Al

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Denny Way

5T

Pedestrian Connection to the Olympic Sculpture Park


N O R T H WAT E R F R O N T C O N N E C T I O N Connections and Future Vision

connection to Olympic Sculpture Park green infrastructure

connection to waterfront

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N O R T H WAT E R F R O N T C O N N E C T I O N BEFORE

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N O R T H WAT E R F R O N T C O N N E C T I O N AFTER

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Broad Street

Connections and Future Vision Our Ambition Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

Road Diet, Pedestrian priority

e

nu

ve

tA

lio

El W

Curated Sculpture Park to Sculpture Park connection

Thomas Street

Br

oa d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

ka

LAKE TO BAY

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

Highlight the Elliot Bay

en

ue

enue

as

te

Av

Av

Westlake Av

Al

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Denny Way

5T

Everyone can go up the hill, easy access


Broad Street

Connections and Future Vision

Seattle Center

Sculpture Park

Connection to Waterfront

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Broad Street BEFORE

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Broad Street AFTER

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B r o a d S t r e e t Tr i a n g l e Connections and Future Vision

Our Ambition Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

e

nu

ve

tA

lio

El

Connect Art and Science through fun and interactive elements

W

Thomas Street

St re

et

Terry Avenue N

Br

oa d

Provide a pleasant resting spot and waiting zone

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

ka

LAKE TO BAY

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

en

ue

enue

as

te

Av

Av

Westlake Av

Al

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Denny Way

5T

Provide a clear way to the Seattle Center and Olympic Sculpture Park


B r o a d S t r e e t Tr i a n g l e Connections and Future Vision

Connection SCIENCE CENTER

Expanded Right of Way for Pedestrians

Connection

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B r o a d S t r e e t Tr i a n g l e BEFORE

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B r o a d S t r e e t Tr i a n g l e AFTER

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Broad / Thomas Intersection Connections and Future Vision

Our Ambition Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

e

nu

ve

tA

lio

El

Extension of Seattle Center boundaries, providing a strong entryway

W

Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St re et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

as

ka

LAKE TO BAY

W

ay

te

rn

Av

en

ue

Av

Av

en

ue

en

ue

enue Westlake Av

Al

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Safe and interesting Pedestrian crossing

Activation areas with places to enjoy the Seattle Center elements


Broad / Thomas Intersection Connections and Future Vision

New Broad Street Corner

Seattle center

Active Crossing

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Broad / Thomas Intersection BEFORE

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Broad / Thomas Intersection AFTER

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Thomas Street West of Aurora Connections and Future Vision

Our Ambition Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

e

nu

ve

tA

lio

El

Curated Space related to Seattle City Light, keeping the funk and highlighting infrastructure

W

Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St re et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

D

W

es

as

ka

LAKE TO BAY

W

ay

te

rn

Av

en

ue

Av

Av

en

ue

en

ue

enue Westlake Av

Al

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Denny Way

5T 2N

Lighted Bike Path pavement

Night connection to and from the Seattle Center and South Lake Union


Thomas Street West of Aurora Connections and Future Vision

bus hub industrial influence activities at Seattle Center

activities in South Lake Union

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Thomas Street West of Aurora BEFORE

38

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Thomas Street West of Aurora AFTER

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Thomas Street at Bridge Connections and Future Vision

Our Ambition Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

e

nu

ve

tA

lio

El

Neighborhood open space spot

W

Thomas Street

Park to Park connection

Br

oa

d

St re et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

as

ka

LAKE TO BAY

W

ay

te

rn

Av

en

ue

Av

Av

en

ue

en

ue

enue Westlake Av

Al

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Amplifying Thomas Street Concept Plan


Thomas Street at Bridge Connections and Future Vision

neighborhood anchor

Green Sponge

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Thomas Street at Bridge BEFORE

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Thomas Street at Bridge AFTER

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Mercer Entryway Connections and Future Vision

Our Ambition Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

Strong Gateway to Seattle Center, opening to the neighborhood

e

nu

ve

tA

lio

El W

Arts and Culture Incubator space

Thomas Street

Br o

ad

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

as

ka

LAKE TO BAY

W

ay

te

rn

Av

en

ue

Av

Av

en

ue

en

ue

enue Westlake Av

Al

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Denny Way

5T

Opportunity for civic amenities such as a STEAM school, arts & culture incubator space and tech hub


Mercer Entryway Connections and Future Vision

neighborhood connection

neighborhood connection

Gates Foundation

Entry to Seattle Center

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Mercer Entryway BEFORE

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Mercer Entryway AFTER

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P r o j e c t Te a m r y w a y Framework

Framework was launched in 2013 by Lesley Bain, FAIA, and Jenny Kempson with the goal of strengthening communities with thoughtful, artistic, and inspiring places. Framework brings multiple design disciplines to the many aspects of cultural placemaking. Combining architecture, urban design, art and research, we aspire to work with creative clients to set new models for forward-thinking cities. www.weareframework.com

CMG

Futurewise

CMG is a landscape architecture firm providing award-winning urban design, planning, stormwater management, and ecological and habitat design for a wide range of project types and clients. Principally, CMG specializes in the sustainability and livability of cities.

Futurewise is working to build healthy livable communities, protect our most critical working farmlands, forests, and waterways, and create a better quality of life for present and future generations. We believe smart growth solutions create communities that thrive with strong local businesses and jobs, safe efficient transportation choices, affordable places to live, and healthy natural systems. We work with communities to implement effective planning and policies that prevent waste and stop sprawl. Together, we will create a better quality of life in Washington State for present and future generations.

From major redevelopment master plans to artistic installations, CMG has developed cutting-edge sustainable designs that set precedents and realize solutions. The integration of street life and vibrant urban environments with infrastructure concerns, stormwater management, and responsible design is CMG’s passion.

http://futurewise.org

http://www.cmgsite.com

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Appendix: Inventory Lake to Bay

This appendix contains maps and materials for the following adjacent categories. These maps were created throughout the duration of this project to assist in analysis. Due to the initial scope, some maps relate to the geographic area for the original Lake to Bay Loop streets, while other maps include the full Lake to Bay zone.

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Alleys Arts and Culture Hubs Bike Routes and Counts Bus Activity Heatmap Bus, Streetcar and Monorail Routes Canopy Overhead Experience Developable Properties Edge Condition Experience Existing Planning Documents Existing Elements in the Public Realm Ground Floor Experience Natural Systems Memorial Stadium Size Diagram Parking Planning Documents Boundaries Right of Way Width Sidewalk Width Street Trees Use Zones Walking Tour Mapping Example


Alleys Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El

LAKE

lio e

nu

ve tA W

Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

ka

W

ay

Av

en

ue

ue

en

ue

venue

as

rn

en

Westlake A

Al

te

Av

Av

LAKE TO BAY

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Arts + Culture Hubs

Play

Create

Learn

Innovate Create Play Innovate

Play Learn

Learn

Innovate

Learn

Play

Create

Innovate

Learn

Create 52

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Bike Routes and Counts

data from City of Seattle

Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Mercer Street

Valley Street 358

974

528

141

El

LAKE

lio n ve tA ue W Thomas Street

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

Br

oa

d

BAY

Denny Way

2172 5T

H

2N

D

W

es

Bike Lane Sharrow #

Bike Counts 2012

as

ka

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

ue

en

ue

venue

Al

te

en

Westlake A

1559

Av

Av

Denny Way

917

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Bus Activity Heatmap data from King County Metro

Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El

LAKE

lio n ve tA ue W Thomas Street

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

Br oa

d

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

LAKE TO BAY

as

ka

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

en

ue

venue

Average # of people at stop/day > 175 176-449 450-999 1000-1659 1659-2805

Al

te

Av

Av

Westlake A

KEY

54

Denny Way

5T


Bus, Streetcar and Monorail Routes data from King County Metro

Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El

LAKE

lio n ve tA ue W Thomas Street

Br oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

as

ka

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

en

ue

venue

Average # of people at stop/day > 175 Bus Route 176-449 Streetcar 450-999 Monorail 1000-1659 1659-2805

Al

te

Av

Av

Westlake A

KEY

Denny Way

5T

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Canopy - Overhead Experience

data collected in the field by Framework

Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El

LAKE

lio ue

n ve tA W

Thomas Street

Br oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

1 Building Canopy

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

ka

W

ay

Open Air

ue

en

ue

3

Tree Canopy

Av

en

ue

venue

as

rn

2

en

Westlake A

Al

te

Av

Av

4 Tree - Building

56

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Dexter Avenue N

Developable Properties Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

LA

Mercer Street Valley Street

LAKE

e nu ve tA lio

El Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

W El lio ve tA e

nu

Thomas Street

et re oa

d

St

Terry Avenue N

et

Br

BAY

oa

d

St

re

Denny Way

Br

BAY

5T

Denny Way

H

5T

H

2N

D

2N

D

W

W

ka

rn

Al

Av

W

as

en

ay

ka

ue

te

rn

Av

en

ue

ue

en

ue

W

ay

nue

No data available

as

te

ue

ue

venue

Parcels with high Parcels with high development potential* development potential* Project extents extents NoProject data available

Al

es

en

en

Av

Denny Way

en

Westlake A

Development Potential Development Potential

Av

Av

Av

ve Westlake A

es

*Properties developmnent *Properties withwith developmnent potential been identifiedby by potential havehave been identified the City of Seattle’s analytical model the City of Seattle’s analytical model in their Development Capacity in theirStatus Development Map model.Capacity This model does reflect property Status not Map model. Thisowner model does preference or market conditions not reflect property owner which may produce different preference or market conditions results. which may produce different results.

Terry Avenue N

W Thomas Street

Feet 0

250 500

1,000

0

1,500

2,000

250 500

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Fe

1,0


Edge Conditions Experience - key on following page

data collected in the field by Framework

Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El lio ue

n ve tA W

Thomas Street

Br oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

58

LAKE TO BAY

ka

W

ay

Av

en

ue

ue

en

ue

venue

as

rn

en

Westlake A

Al

te

Av

Av


Edge Conditions Experience Types Edge Experience Types

1

5

Building - closed off

2

landscape setback

6

Building - opened

3

Active Sidewalk

non-active entry/plaza

7

Wall or Fence

4

Openspace

Parking

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Existing Elements in the Public Realm Data collected in the field by Framework

1. Seating

2. Texture

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Existing Elements in the Public Realm Data collected in the field by Framework

3. Trash Receptacles

4. Bike Related

5. Signage

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Ground Floor Experience Data collected in the field by Framework

Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El

LAKE

lio ue

n ve tA W

Thomas Street

Br oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

62

as

Public Industrial Parks Construction as of April 2014

LAKE TO BAY

ka

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

en

ue

venue

Buy Live Work Parking

Al

te

Av

Av

Westlake A

KEY

Denny Way

5T


Memorial Stadium Size Comparison

Olympic Sculpture Park 9.95 Acres

Museum of History and Industry 7.61 Acres

Memorial Stadium 9.75 Acres

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Natural Systems

Fresh water View

View View

Water Flow

View View

Salt water View 64

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Steep

View


Parking Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

LAKE

Mercer Street

El lio e

nu

ve tA W Thomas Street

Br oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

as

ka

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

en

ue

venue

On-Street Parking Parking Lots Parks

Al

te

Av

Av

Westlake A

KEY

Denny Way

5T

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Planning Documents Boundaries - key on following page Dexter Avenue N

1

12 Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

16

El lio nu

ve tA e W

LAKE

9

7

5

13

3

14

10

Thomas Street

et re St d oa

5T

H

4

2N

D

es

ka

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

2

Denny Way

en

ue

venue

as

te

Av

Av

8

Westlake A

Al

LAKE TO BAY

Br

Denny Way

W

66

Terry Avenue N

BAY

6

11

15


Planning Documents Boundaries - Key

1

Uptown Neighborhood

Uptown Neighborhood Framework (2014) Uptown Design Guidelines (2013)

2

South Lake Union Neighborhood

South Lake Union Design Guidelines (2012) South Lake Union Framework (2011)

South Lake Union Mobility Plan (2011)

3

Belltown Neighborhood

Belltown Neighborhood Plan (1998)

Belltown Viaduct Lands Study (2011)

4

North Waterfront Access Project (2002)

5

Centry 21 Masterplan (2008)

6 7

8 9

10

Broad Street Green (2009 - complete) Uptown Triangle Charrette (2010) Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement Project (2011) South Lake Union Concept Plans (2013) Terry Avenue North Design Guidelines (2005)

11

12

13

14

Thomas Green Street Concept Plan (2013) Mercer East /Mercer West (2013 - in construction) Thomas Street Bridge Overpass ( 2013 - complete) UW Medicine Lake Union Facilities (in construction)

15

Cornish Master Plan - tbd

16

August Wilson Way

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Right of Way Width Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El lio e

nu

ve tA W Thomas Street

Br

oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

0-40ft

60ft +

68

LAKE TO BAY

as

ka

W

ay

Av

en

ue

ue

en

ue

venue

40-60ft

Al

rn

en

Westlake A

ROW Width

te

Av

Av


Sidewalk Width Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El lio e

nu

ve tA W Thomas Street

Br oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

Denny Way Denny Way

5T

H

2N

D

W

es

10-15 ft

as

ka

W

ay

Av

en

ue

ue

en

ue

venue

0-10 ft

rn

en

Westlake A

Sidewalk Width

Al

te

Av

Av

15-20 ft 20ft +

LAKE TO BAY

69


Street Trees Dexter Avenue N

Mercer Street

Valley Street

Mercer Street

El

LAKE

lio ue

n ve tA W

Thomas Street

Br oa

d

St

re

et

Terry Avenue N

BAY

Denny Way H

2N

D

W

es

LAKE TO BAY

ka

W

ay

rn

Av

en

ue

en

ue

en

ue

venue

as

te

Av

Av

Westlake A

Al

70

Denny Way

5T


Use Zones

data collected from the Downtown Seattle Association 2011 Demographics Report and company websites

LIVE QUEEN ANNE

Mohai

16% growth

WORK

Gates Foundation

VISIT 150,000 / year

~ 1,200 employees

LIVE UPTOWN

Seattle Center

VISIT

1O3% growth

8 million / year

OSP

VISIT 350,000 / year

LIVE BELLTOWN 183% growth

Pike Place Market

VISIT

LIVE South Lake Union 300% growth

WORK Amazon ~30,000 employees

WORK Downtown ~200,000 employees

10 million / year

LAKE TO BAY

71


Lake to Bay : Walking Tour Map Stakeholder Input

72

LAKE TO BAY


Appendix: Policy Lake to Bay

The following report provides a review the existing planning and policy documents which may impact the design and implementation of Lake to Bay as currently conceived through this Inventory and opportunities project.

Pedestrian Lighting Citywide Plan 2012 Seattle City Light 2013 – 2018 Strategic Plan Right of Way Improvements Manual 2012 2013 – 2018 Adopted Capital Improvement Alaska Way Viaduct North Portal Design 2011 Mercer East Corridor Project Plan 2012 Mercer West Corridor Project Plan 2012 South Lake Union Neighborhood Design Guidelines 2005 Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines 2005 South Lake Union Neighborhood Design Guidelines 2005 Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan 2009 Uptown Neighborhood Design Guidelines 2013 Uptown Triangle Planning Workshop 2010 Complete Streets Ordinance 2007 South Lake Union Mobility Plan 2011 Thomas Green Street Concept Plan 2013 South Lake Union Urban Design Framework 2010 Uptown Framework Plan* 2014 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan 2014 Downtown Seattle Public Spaces & Public Life 2009 Century 21 Master Plan 2008 Seattle Waterfront 2014

LAKE TO BAY

73


Lake to Bay

Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

June 2014


Contents Executive Summary .................................................................................. 3 Report Purpose ..................................................................................... 3 Study Context........................................................................................ 3 Summary of Key Findings ..................................................................... 5 Next Steps ............................................................................................. 6 Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan ................................................................ 7 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan ...................................................................... 9 Bands of Green (2007) and Bands of Green Update (2011) ................. 13 South Lake Union Urban Design Framework ......................................... 15 South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan ................................ 18 South Lake Union Neighborhood Design Guidelines (2014 Update) ..... 21 Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines ....................................... 23 South Lake Union Street Concept Plans ................................................ 26 Thomas Green Street Concept Plan ...................................................... 29 Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan .................................................. 33 Uptown Neighborhood Design Guidelines ............................................. 39 Sustainable Cities Design Academy, Uptown Triangle Planning ........... 42 Denny Way Streetscape Concept Plan .................................................. 44 Strategic Plan for Realizing the Waterfront Seattle Vision ..................... 46 Waterfront 2020 ...................................................................................... 48 Downtown Seattle Public Spaces and Public Life Study ........................ 50 Alaskan Way Viaduct North Portal Design ............................................. 52 Mercer Corridor Project .......................................................................... 56 Pedestrian Lighting Citywide Plan .......................................................... 59 Complete Streets Ordinance .................................................................. 61 Right of Way Improvements Manual ...................................................... 62 2013-2018 Adopted Capital Improvement Program ............................... 65

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

The following document was prepared in support of the Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project in conjunction with Framework, JZ Works and CMG Landscape Architecture under the direction of the Lake to Bay Committee with financial support from The Seattle Parks Foundation and Vulcan, Inc.

Page 2 Contents


Executive Summary Report Purpose

Study Context

The following report provides a review the existing planning and policy documents which may impact the design and implementation of Lake to Bay as currently conceived through the Inventory and Visioning Project completed in June of 2014. It focuses on either City-wide planning documents (like the Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan) or project specific plans located in the Lake to Bay area (like Seattle Waterfront 2020). The purpose of this policy review is to highlight where existing and planned efforts are supportive, neutral or unsupportive of the vision and implementation of Lake to Bay. A potential second phase of this project will include specific policy recommendations and advocacy action items related to these findings.

History The City of Seattle has long been committed to a city-wide system of linear parks incorporating greenspace and recreational opportunities. Beginning in 1892, Edward Otto Schwagerl, Superintendent of Parks, created a plan for four major city parks on Lake Washington and Elliott Bay connected by parkways. In 1900, George Coterrill, an Assistant City Engineer, developed a plan for 25 miles of bicycle paths around the city. These were then incorporated into the Olmstead Brothers’ 1903 parks plan called “A Comprehensive System of Parks and Parkways” which envisioned an ambitious and comprehensive network of parks and open space throughout the city. The Olmstead Brothers worked for the City until 1941 designing elements of the parks system which are still great 1 assets to Seattle today. Lake to Bay continues this legacy of linear parks and boulevards. Supported by a wide variety of stakeholders including The Seattle Center, The Seattle Parks Foundation, the City of Seattle, neighborhood groups and private developers, the Lake to Bay concept has been developed over many years and continues to be refined. In 2001, the Seattle Center spearheaded the creation of the “The Potlatch Trail: Concept Plan”, a linear park connecting Lake Union to Elliott Bay through the Seattle Center. This concept was further developed to be the Lake to Bay Loop whose design and implementation is led by the Lake to Bay Committee. The Committee supports the implementation and improvement of Lake to Bay through planning, visioning and funding. Most recently, they convened 95 city leaders for public visioning and secured funding for way-finding signage along the route. Currently, the trail is called the “Lake to Bay Loop”, and is branded as “Seattle’s Scenic Urban Walking Trail.” It is comprised of a figure eight with two distinct loops – the Lake Loop and the Bay Loop which connect at Seattle Center.

1

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Friends of Seattle’s Olmstead Parks Page 3 Executive Summary


Geography Lake to Bay connects Lake Union and Elliott Bay through some of Seattle’s most historic neighborhoods and its fastest growing, most dynamic neighborhoods – Belltown, Uptown, Queen Anne, South Lake Union, and Downtown, all connected through Seattle’s most iconic asset, the Seattle Center. This area, particularly Belltown, South Lake Union and Uptown are seeing significant growth in both housing and employment and are the location of several infrastructure projects which are changing the landscape of the built environment, re-establishing connectivity between neighborhoods and expanding pedestrian and bicycle networks. In addition, the area contains some of Seattle’s most important cultural assets which are enjoyed by both local residents and visitors, including:            

Bill & Melinda Gates Visitor Center Center for Wooden Boats Denny Park Experience Music Project Key Arena Lake Union Park Museum of History and Industry Myrtle Edwards Park Pacific Science Center SAM Sculpture Park Seattle Center South Lake Union Discovery Center

The Vision Under the leadership of the Lake to Bay Committee, the concept of Lake to Bay has been refined and key projects implemented; however it has not yet reached its full potential. The Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project is intended to expand the Lake to Bay vision and ensure that the ambition of Lake to Bay reflects the strength of the area’s assets and potential. The vision, detailed in the main body of this report is threefold: 

A Route – Create a city-defining boulevard which is nationallyrecognizable as “Seattle” anchored by Seattle Art Museum Sculpture Park, Seattle Center and Lake Union.



A Zone – Create a “web” of great streets which connect neighborhoods, provide multiple routes and connections for pedestrians and cyclists and foster a strong sense of place and vibrancy.



An Idea – The Lake to Bay area is a world center for innovation in business, culture, science, philanthropy and education. The vision for Lake to Bay is that this innovation and leadership is visible and present for all who live, work or visit the area through street level interactions, collaborations and learning.

The map at right shows the Lake to Bay area as well as the focus areas of the plans reviewed in this report.

Source: FRAMEWORK

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 4 Executive Summary


Summary of Key Findings



Of the three elements of Lake to Bay, current planning documents are most supportive of the concept of the Lake to Bay area as “web” of great streets connecting the surrounding neighborhoods. Many of the street design guidelines and neighborhood design plans recommend good practice in design which supports increased opportunity for multi-modal transportation, creation of public spaces, street activation through design and land use and strategies to maintain and reflect the unique character and history of the individual neighborhoods which intersect in the Lake to Bay area.



Of all of the plans, Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan and Seattle Waterfront 2020 are most supportive of Lake to Bay as a route which is a world-class destination and closely identifiable with the City of Seattle. The ambitious plans for improvements to both of these assets would support Lake to Bay both as a route and as a destination itself.



Many of the plans which prioritize funding for infrastructure improvements include the Lake to Bay area in their highest tier for funding priority. Due to its high volumes of vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle traffic, increasing number of residential units and jobs and regional destinations, the area is typically seen as a prime target of public investment for infrastructure and other improvements.



Many of the plans in the following document set forth a street hierarchy, including boulevards, green streets, festival streets, arterials, etc. However, the hierarchies are not consistent with each other nor are they supportive of Lake to Bay as the premiere street through the zone. In particular, Thomas Street - which is classified in many plans as a green street, compared to Boulevards and other street typologies - will need to be featured more prominently to make Lake to Bay stand out through the zone of quality streets.



Many of the street design guidelines incorporate elements of green infrastructure, both as an amenity and as an important element of the urban ecological system. None of the plans incorporate a comprehensive, area-wide green infrastructure approach.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review



As mentioned above, Seattle Waterfront 2020 could be a great complement to the Lake to Bay vision, anchoring the southwest side of the route with a world-class amenity and destination. It is imperative that the projects be perceived as synergistic and mutually supportive. Particularly as funding mechanisms are explored (including public, quasi-public and private), these projects should not be put in a position of competing for public support and funding.



Very few of the plans have associated funding. The primary means by which the plans are implemented are either through the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) or by voluntary implementation by public or private entities during other improvement projects. This leads to an inability to plan and implement a large-scale vision which will necessarily incorporate many smaller implementation steps.



None of the plans reaches the ambition of Lake to Bay as an idea which inspires and reflects the innovation and leadership of the institutions and businesses which are located in the area. Particularly in regard to street activation beyond cafes and other public spaces, there is not a definitive vision for street activation which reaches the “best practice” tier that will differentiate Lake to Bay within Seattle, the nation or the world.



As shown by the remainder of the document, there are a significant number of plans which apply to the Lake to Bay area. Ensuring that all of these plans are consistent with each other and with the Lake to Bay vision will be necessary to provide the clarity and prioritization needed to realize the most ambitious portions of the Lake to Bay vision.



The City of Seattle is limited in public funding mechanisms and must rely significantly on a limited pool of local funding sources including taxing authority to implement public improvements. The ability of Lake to Bay to secure funding from these sources will be hampered by the large number of public projects and initiatives contending for the same small pool of funds.

Page 5 Executive Summary


Next Steps

ADVOCATE

LEAD

INSPIRE

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

As detailed in this plan, a significant number of planning studies have occurred throughout the Lake to Bay area. Where these plans are supportive of the Lake to Bay vision, it will be necessary to advocate for their implementation through private redevelopment efforts, public infrastructure projects or other implementation mechanisms. In particular, advocacy related to the following should be prioritized:  Continue funding of Lake to Bay area infrastructure projects through existing public funding mechanisms like the Capital Improvement Program (CIP).  Incorporate public space and public improvements consistent with the Lake to Bay vision into both public sector projects and private development as it occurs, even through voluntary programs. Where the Lake to Bay vision is not yet supported by existing planning documents, processes or funding, it will be necessary to provide leadership in the following areas:  Communicate the Lake to Bay vision to relevant stakeholder groups for refinement and support.  Explore new funding mechanisms which will generate resources for Lake to Bay.  Expand expectations of planning, design and construction of the built environment in both the public and private arenas to support a Lake to Bay that goes beyond “best practice.” In order to fully realize the ambition of the Lake to Bay vision, inspiration will be needed which goes beyond the built environment and expands our existing concepts of street activation, design, public life and community planning.  “Think big” and encourage ambitious, imaginative ideas which go beyond existing silos of responsibilities, expectations and collaboration.  Explore additional implementation avenues, both in the built environment and in public area programming which expand beyond current planning processes.

Page 6 Executive Summary


Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) September 2009 Citywide Being implemented on a project-by-project basis

Overview The Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan provides the guiding principles for City efforts to improve pedestrian facilities throughout the city. While the plan does not include specific projects, it sets forth the overriding mission and goals related to walkability in Seattle. In addition, it provides an analysis which creates a framework for how to prioritize projects which are then funded in annual project lists, primarily through “Bridging the Gap” levy, and are incorporated into the Capital Improvements Plan. Plan Mission Make Seattle the Most Walkable City in the Nation Plan Goals  Safety—Reduce the number and severity of crashes involving pedestrians.  Equity—Make Seattle a more walkable city for all through equity in public engagement, service delivery, accessibility, and capital investments.  Vibrancy—Develop a pedestrian environment that sustains healthy communities and supports a vibrant economy.  Health—Raise awareness of the important role of walking in promoting health and preventing disease.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Design Elements The Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan sets forth general components which are supportive of walkable environments, but does not make particular recommendations regarding specific design elements. The “pedestrian toolbox” recognizes the following ways to improve pedestrian accessibility:  Frontage Zone—Tools include signage, weather protection, public/private interface, etc.  Walkable Zone—Tools include sidewalks, walkways, shared use trails, stairways, and driveways.  Landscape/Furniture Zone—Tools include buffers, lighting, natural drainage, public art, signage, street furniture, street trees/vegetation, utilities, wayfinding, etc.  Curb Space Zone—Tools include curbs, curb ramps, curb bulbs, parking, etc.  Travelway Zone—Tools include pedestrian overpasses and underpasses, crossing islands, medians, intersection geometry, road diets, roundabouts, traffic signals, traffic calming, traffic management, etc.  Miscellaneous Development—Tools include physical and visual connections, developer improvements, Street Types, mixed land use, open space, parks, etc.

Page 7 Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan


Project Prioritization The Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan sets for a general policy of project prioritization which is based on three factors: (1) Potential Pedestrian Demand (2) Socioeconomic and Health Priority (3) Pedestrian Linkage Priority. The Lake to Bay area scores high on all of these factors and all segments of the loop are in areas that are ranked as Tier 1 or Tier 2 for prioritization in project funding. Projects are divided into “Across the Roadway”, which focuses safety and comfort when crossing streets and “Along the Roadway” which focuses on sidewalks, streetscaping and other elements. Funding The Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan projects are funded by the 2006 Bridging the Gap transportation funding levy, which was estimated to provide approximately $60 million from 2009 to 2014. Key Findings The plan is generally supportive of increased walkability throughout the city which is supportive of potential pedestrian elements in Lake to Bay.

 

All areas of the Lake to Bay are included in Tier 1 or Tier 2 priority areas for project funding and implementation.



The Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan does not contain specific projects – either new infrastructure or improvements/maintenance of existing infrastructure. Those projects are determined on an annual basis and incorporated into the Capital Funding.



The current Bridging the Gap levy is active through 2014. There is currently no funding source for projects beyond 2014, although there is a planned 2015 Bridging the Gap vote.



Actual projects are determined on an annual basis and it is difficult to know what the mid-range or long-range funded projects may be..

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Source: Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan

Page 8 Seattle Pedestrian Master Plan


Seattle Bicycle Master Plan Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) April 2014 Citywide Adopted

Plan Vision Riding a bicycle is a comfortable and integral part of daily life in Seattle for people of all ages and abilities. Plan Goals  Ridership—Increase the amount and mode share of bicycling in Seattle for all trip purposes.  Safety—Improve safety for bicycle riders.  Connectivity—Create a bicycle network that connects to places that people want to go, and provides for a time-efficient travel option.  Equity—Provide equal bicycling access for all through public engagement, program delivery, and capital investment.  Livability—Build vibrant and healthy communities by creating a welcoming environment for bicycle riding. Plan Objectives  Objective 1—Complete and maintain a safe, high-quality bicycle network of on-street and trail facilities throughout the city.  Objective 2—Integrate planning for bicycle facilities with all travel modes and complete streets principles.  Objective 3—Employ best practices and context sensitivity to design of facilities for optimum levels of bicycling comfort.  Objective 4—Build leading-edge bicycle facilities, including on-street separated facilities, multi-use trails, and neighborhood greenways.  Objective 5—Update and apply a prioritization framework for bicycle investments throughout the city.  Objective 6—Identify and implement actions to support and promote bicycle riding. Bicycle Counts As shown on the map at right, bicycle counts in the Lake to Bay area were some of the highest in the city, particularly at the intersections of Elliott Avenue and Broad Street as well as the intersection of Denny Way th and 5 Avenue.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Source: Seattle Bicycle Master Plan

Page 9 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan


Plan Funding The Seattle Bicycle Master Plan sets forth an ambitious list of proposed network improvements detailed below. Funding for these projects will require a variety of sources, including the Seattle Capital Investments Program (CIP), incorporating bicycle facilities into other street improvement projects using the Complete Streets standards, from MAP21 federal funding and from additional grant funding secured by Seattle Department of Transportation. Proposed Network Improvements The Bicycle Master Plan’s recommended network has several facilities which are located within the Lake to Bay context area, including protected bike lanes on several segments, including: North/South  Queen Anne Avenue N. between Roy Street and Denny Way (cycle track) st  1 Avenue N. between Roy Street and Broad Street (cycle track) nd  Broad Street from 2 Avenue to Alaskan Way (cycle track) nd  2 Avenue from Broad Street into downtown (cycle track) th  5 Avenue from Roy Street to Cedar Street (cycle track)  Dexter Avenue from Roy Street to Battery Street (cycle track) th  9 Avenue N. from Lake Union to Denny Way (cycle track) East/West  Thomas Street from Elliott Avenue to Eastlake Avenue (neighborhood greenway)  Republican Street from Dexter Avenue to Eastlake Avenue (in street, minor separation) Catalyst Projects While not in the study area, one important recommendation from the plan is a catalyst project which is a South Lake Union to Capitol Hill Interstate 5 crossing. While not specified in the plan, initial drawings indicate the project could be located around Thomas Street. This project could increase connectivity for both bicycles and pedestrians from Capitol Hill through South Lake Union and into Lake to Bay. Source: Seattle Bicycle Master Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 10 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan


Design The Seattle Bicycle Master Plan details suggested treatments for many types of bicycle facilities. One-way Cycle Tracks

In-Street, Minor Separation

Intersection Treatments

Two-way Cycle Tracks

Shared Street

Source: Seattle Bicycle Master Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 11 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan


Key Findings Plan is supportive of increasing bicycle network through the Lake to Bay area.

 

Plan proposes treatment options which align with Complete Streets and other integrated bike/pedestrian/auto street design frameworks.



Exact location of planned bicycle network may not be along key Lake to Bay priority areas.



No catalyst projects included within the Lake to Bay area, however Thomas Street I-5 overpass would significantly increase East-West connectivity to Capitol Hill.

Bike Share While not detailed in this plan, the coming Puget Sound Bike Share program will have a significant impact on the ability of residents and visitors to utilize the existing and improved bicycle network. Partnerships with employers and other organizations will be a key determinant in the location of bike share facilities and incorporation of bike share in the Lake to Bay area will greatly enhance the area as a cycling destination.

Source: Pronto! and Puget Sound Bike Share

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 12 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan


Bands of Green (2007) and Bands of Green Update (2011) Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Parks Foundation and the Seattle Department of Transportation Original report from 1990, with a major update in 2007, updated in 2011 Citywide Being implemented on a project-by-project basis

Overview The focus of the Bands of Green plans is on linear parks and green connections throughout the City of Seattle. Linear parks and greenways were an integral part of the Olmstead Plan for Seattle and interest in linear parks revived during the 1980s with the public’s support for the construction of the Burke-Gilman trail. Plan Goals The 2007 Bands of Green study set forth the following goals:  Beautify the city;  Diversify and expand the routes available to walkers, runners, and bicyclists;  Add greenery and character to city neighborhoods;  Improve the safety of public thoroughfares for bicyclists and pedestrians;  Encourage the public to venture to parks they have seldom used; and  Relieve overcrowding on existing trails and boulevards by expanding the available resources.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Characteristics of a Good Linear Park According to the 2007 plan, a good linear park incorporates the following for characteristics:  Connection—The proposed boulevard or trail must connect major open space resources such as parks, shorelines, panoramic views or public activity centers.  Continuity—The route must flow to its destination(s) with a minimum of man-made obstacles. The way must be clearly marked by landscaping if possible and with monuments or signs otherwise.  Recreational Potential—When possible, a proposed boulevard should be designed to encourage recreation as well as a utilitarian use within the corridor. This means that pedestrians and bicyclists should not be overwhelmed by multiple lanes of high-speed traffic.  Scenic Values—Proposed boulevards and trails should offer views of significant natural features, historic structures and/or unique human activities as well as opportunities to experience the natural topography and landscape.  The Presence of Nature—Boulevards and trails should be landscaped to reflect their important role in the city’s open space system, and as a means of establishing continuity.  Character—The identity of a linear park is rarely established solely with landscaping. Human-made elements – light posts, sea walls, bridges, railings, fences, and buildings – play a critical role in establishing the “feel” of a linear park.  Safety—The system must be designed to protect the safety of its most vulnerable users. The speeds of motor vehicles should be slowed when required to assure that bicyclists and pedestrians can safely share the right-of-way.

Page 13 Bands of Green


Project Priorities The 2007 Bands of Green study specifically mentions the “Lake-to-Bay Trail” as an important project, stating in part: Another necessary connection is, of course, a pedestrian and bicycle link between South Lake Union, the Seattle Center and the waterfront. Although they are separated by just a few blocks, that distance is a death valley for bicyclists and pedestrians. The new Olympic Sculpture Park, the upcoming Mercer Street redevelopment, and the possible reconnection of the grid system across Aurora Avenue will provide the opportunity to create a safe and attractive connection among these destinations. We suggest the City plan the development of the Lake-to-Bay Trail in conjunction with the construction of these projects. 2011 Update The 2011 Update to Bands of Green conducted significant fieldwork which included the following findings:  While significant improvements had been made in the trail network from the original plan, gaps in the network were a detriment to the functionality of the network as a whole.  There were many areas where a linear parks system and the Bicycle Master Plan can complement each other, however, there is an inherent tension between the two as a balance between “connections” and “green” is established.  Some parks have easy connections to the trail network; however there had not been a consistent application of trail improvements to and from existing parks.  The original plan relied heavily on the boulevard concept and in order to create an extensive network on existing infrastructure, additional concepts for green networks may be required.  Lake to Bay Loop is given as an example of community organizations and employers who have taken the initiative to develop plans incorporating green connections in their neighborhood planning.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

2011 Recommendations The 2011 Update lists recommendations related to specific greenways and trail projects established in the original plan. The specific recommendation for Lake to Bay states: Description: The proposed Lake to Bay Loop will link Lake Union Park, Seattle Center and the Olympic Sculpture Park. The concept plan is complete, and funding for the Thomas Street overpass has been secured. Potential Solution: More detailed planning and additional funding is needed to complete the concept. Potential Park Foundation role: The Foundation has been and should continue to be the catalyst for this project. Key Findings Both Bands of Green (2007) and the 2011 Update and Recommendations are very supportive of Lake to Bay, both conceptually as part of a citywide network of connections, as well as the Lake to Bay project specifically.

 

Seattle Parks Foundation has provided funding and continues to support Lake to Bay financially as well as through advocacy and leadership.



The ability of the Seattle Parks Foundation to fund implementation of the plan is limited and will require the securing of additional funding sources.

Page 14 Bands of Green


South Lake Union Urban Design Framework Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) December 2010 South Lake Union Neighborhood Adopted, incorporated into zoning and incentive zoning ordinances

Overview The South Lake Union Urban Design Framework is intended to set forth clear actions from both the private and public sectors which will achieve the vision set forth in the South Lake Union Neighborhood Plan. The plan encompasses the South Lake Union neighborhood bounded by Denny Way on the south, Broad Street and Aurora Avenue on the west, Galer Street and Lake Union on the north and I-5 to the east. Plan Priorities The Plan reflects five priorities set forth in the South Lake Union Neighborhood Plan:  Community Character–Encourage pedestrian activities with pedestrian nodes and corridors, preserve landmarks and a diversity of business.  Transportation–Reduce car dependency by improving alternate mode infrastructure. Improve Mercer, Valley Street and connections to surrounding neighborhoods.  Parks and Open Space–Improve existing open space such as Lake Union Park, Cascade Playground, P-Patch/People’s Center and Denny Park.  Housing–Create diverse housing options which include affordable units and make the neighborhood attractive to families.  Sustainability–Encourage green building practices and green stormwater infrastructure. Protect natural light and view corridors, and increase vegetation within the neighborhood and along the shoreline.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Guiding Principles The guiding principles of the plan’s design concepts and recommendations are intended to achieve the priorities listed above:  Set a clear vision for South Lake Union’s future development that reflects the neighborhood’s physical setting and embodies the goals of the Neighborhood Plan.  Integrate South Lake Union with adjacent neighborhoods with special attention to the opportunity presented by improvements to Aurora Avenue.  Create a network of great streets with safe connections for all modes.  Develop a diverse system of open spaces and community services.  Revise zoning and design guidelines which activate streets, help preserve neighborhood landmarks, enhance views, encourage sustainable design and support affordable housing.  Create opportunities for families to live in the neighborhood, th particularly in clusters along 8 Avenue and around Cascade Park.  Guide new affordable housing investments through incentive zoning and surplus property.

Page 15 South Lake Union Urban Design Framework


Design Typology The plan establishes several typologies for urban design related to nodes, gateways, various street designs and land uses outlined below. Gateways, Hearts and Edges  Gateways–transition locations that mark entry and departure points into the neighborhood, including Broad and Thomas and Mercer and Terry.  Hearts–centers of activity, with Regional Hearts at Lake Union Park and Neighborhood Hearts at Westlake Commercial District, Denny th and Cascade Parks and a proposed future site on 8 between Valley and Mercer Streets.  Edges–physical characteristics that define the neighborhood which can either be an amenity, like Lake Union, or a challenge, like I-5. Street Character Boulevards/Great Streets – streets of grand scale or importance, often commercial corridors with relatively high intensity for all modes of transportation. The plan proposes several boulevards, including th Denny and Mercer (east-west) and 5 Avenue, Aurora, Dexter, Westlake, Fairview and Eastlake (north-south).  Mixed Use Streets–typical downtown streets with a mix of commercial, residential and retail uses which are secondary routes through and to the neighborhood. Recommended mixed-use streets th include Republican and Harrison (east-west) and 9 Avenue (northsouth).  Festival Streets–flexible streets which are able to be closed down for public use during special events. Recommended festival streets th include John from Dexter to 9 Avenue, Valley from Westlake to Fairview and Terry throughout the neighborhood.  Neighborhood Streets–standard local access streets which are not designed as significantly as green streets, but should have narrower roadways, generous plantings and other amenities. Suggested th streets include Taylor, 6 Avenue, Boren, Minor and Yale.  Green Streets–low intensity streets that prioritize pedestrian and bike mobility over autos and may have ecological functions related to water management, habitat and tree canopy. Thomas and John are recommended as Green Streets.  Woonerf Streets–may act as linear open spaces, with active or agricultural uses and may be closed substantially or totally to th automobiles. The plan recommends that 8 from John to Broad be prioritized as a Woonerf type street. 

Source: South Lake Union Urban Design Framework

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 16 South Lake Union Urban Design Framework


Land Use  Primary Residential Areas–Focus on clustering residential development to achieve a critical mass of units, discourage commercial uses other than ground floor retail or services.  Residential Emphasis Areas–Mixed-use areas which encourage residential development but with more flexibility than primary residential areas.  Pedestrian-Oriented Retail & Services–Locally-servicing businesses like restaurants, banks and other establishments.  Neighborhood Retail and Services–Would provide incentives for small commercial establishments. Open Space, Public Space, Views and Lakefront Open Space Strategies–Use a variety of block configurations to incorporate open space into new development. Open space can be incorporated into mid-block connectors, green alleys, streets and pocket parks.  Public Space Network–The public space network is a combination of existing parks and greenspace as well as open space created by conscientious siting of new development and infrastructure improvements incorporating public space elements.  Views–Significant view corridors exist within the study area, particularly Thomas and John (facing west to the Space Needle) and Terry, Boren and Fairview (facing north, to Lake Union).  Lakefront–Lake Union is one of the neighborhood’s primary assets and the plan seeks to maximize the amenity through street improvements along Terry to create a “grand entrance” to Lake Union Park. In addition, the plan calls for improved pedestrian connections throughout the neighborhood, through activation of Valley using cafes and retail stores, greater spacing between tower buildings close to the waterfront and an expansion of the Cheshiahud Loop. 

Neighborhood Connections The South Lake Union Design Framework prioritizes improving connections to surrounding neighborhoods, and recommends the following which are most likely to influence Lake to Bay:  More crossings at Aurora, including Thomas.  Improved pedestrian connections including the Cheshiahud Loop and Lake to Bay and their connection point at Terry and Valley.  Extend the South Lake Union Streetcar north to Fremont and the U District.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Source: South Lake Union Urban Design Framework

Key Findings The plan acknowledges and supports both Seattle Center and South Lake Union as regional destinations and prioritizes their enhancement and connectivity to the neighborhood through street and building design.

 

The South Lake Union Urban Design Framework focuses on a “web” of great streets with different characters which is supportive of a Lake to Bay zone with many types of connections.



Some of the street character recommendations are not consistent with the Lake to Bay vision as most recently articulated. For example, Thomas Street will need to be reclassified as a Boulevard/Great Street to support the Lake to Bay vision.



There is no specific funding for projects set forth in the plan; however there is a well-organized work plan which sets forth specific actions needed in the public and private sector to enact the plan’s priorities.

Page 17 South Lake Union Urban Design Framework


South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan Produced by: Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce South Lake Union Community Council South Lake Union Chamber of Commerce Uptown Alliance Date: 2011 Geography: South Lake Union Status: Completed, not adopted Overview The South Lake Union Mobility Plan integrates and expands on recommendations from many previous studies to bring together a comprehensive and coherent approach to mobility throughout the South Lake Union and Uptown neighborhoods. The plan addresses several modes of transportation, including biking, walking, transit and freight needs throughout the area. Recommendations The plan’s recommendations fall under seven key themes, described below with key projects and recommendations highlighted. Connect Communities  Creating connections between South Lake Union and Uptown across Aurora Avenue is a top priority. Re-establish the east-west grid across Aurora Avenue at John, Thomas and Harrison Streets. th  Rename Aurora Avenue to 7 Avenue N.  Provide pedestrian and bicycle facilities on Thomas Street consistent with the Green Street designation. th  Enhance the pedestrian crossings of 5 Avenue N. at Thomas and Harrison Streets. Increase Transit Service  Provide east-west transit service connecting Capitol Hill and Uptown on Harrison Street.  Identify bus layover locations in exchange for extending bus routes.  Concentrate transit service at a hub located at Aurora between Harrison and Thomas Streets.  Increase nighttime and weekend service at Seattle Center and Lake Union Park.  Improve pedestrian lighting and amenities at transit stops.  Support additional streetcar routes, prioritizing connections to First Hill Streetcar and the Seattle Center.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Source: South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan

Page 18 South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan


Serve Regional Access & Mobility Complete the Mercer West project. th Convert Roy Street west of 5 Avenue N. to two-way operations with bike lanes and traffic calming.  Improve pedestrian crossings at intersections along Mercer and Roy Streets.  Discourage Republican Street as a high-speed through-route with traffic calming strategies.  

Encourage Walking Signalize pedestrian crossings of Westlake Avenue N., particularly at Thomas Street and John Street.  Implement a comprehensive pedestrian wayfinding program.  Improve pedestrian facilities along the Mercer Corridor, improving crossings of Mercer Street near the Seattle Center.  Improve pedestrian-level lighting throughout the neighborhood.  Complete the Lake to Bay trail.  Enhance the pedestrian connection from Terry Avenue to Lake Union Park. Prepare a Streetscape Concept Plan for Dexter Avenue N. from Roy Street to Denny Way. 

Support Biking Enact planned bicycle improvements as part of Mercer Corridor Project.  Provide bike infrastructure on Thomas Street.  Improve the Dexter Avenue N. bike lanes.  Create a bike sharing program for Uptown, South Lake Union and Seattle Center.  Locate bike storage facilities near major transit stations. 

Leverage Private Transportation Investments Support private shuttles with passenger load zones along public streets at appropriate locations.  Incentivize frontage improvements that are beyond City code requirements.  Coordinate transportation demand management plans among business and institutions.  Manage shared neighborhood parking. 

Source: South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 19 South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan


Create Hubs for Mode Transfers  Create a transportation hub on Aurora Avenue between Harrison and Thomas Streets.  Create a transportation hub on Valley Street near Lake Union Streetcar.  Transportation hubs could include supportive surrounding land uses, small-scale retail and services, placemaking design amenities, convenient transit customer information, wayfinding, good pedestrian connections, bike storage and bike sharing facilities. Key Findings The Southlake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan recommendations are very supportive of the Lake to Bay vision.

 

The plan is most supportive of the “web” of well-designed streets with multimodal infrastructure and connecting neighborhoods like Capitol Hill, South Lake Union and Uptown.



The plan’s recommended transit hubs at Thomas/Harrison (on Aurora) and Valley/Terry would increase Lake to Bay connection points to regional transit service.



Plan reiterates plan for Thomas Street as a green street which is supportive of Lake to Bay as a whole but does not, it itself, meet the ambition of a city-defining, destination boulevard.

Source: South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 20 South Lake Union / Uptown Triangle Mobility Plan


South Lake Union Neighborhood Design Guidelines (2014 Update) Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) 2005, revised in 2013 South Lake Union Adopted

Overview Design guidelines set forth the qualities of architecture, urban design and public space that guide the Design Review Board in their review of proposed projects. In addition to citywide design guidelines, many neighborhoods also have their own guidelines that are specific to the needs and desires of their community. The South Lake Union Design Guidelines set forth the design principles for the South Lake Union Neighborhood, the area bounded by Aurora Avenue, Eastlake Avenue, Denny Way, and the southern shoreline of Lake Union. Character Areas The plan defines four distinct character areas within the South Lake Union neighborhood:  Waterfront–Is characterized by the neighborhood’s water dependent activities and should build upon the industrial maritime nature of the area. 

Aurora Corridor–Is characterized by an eclectic variety of building types and forms that house diverse business uses and serves as a buffer to the SR 99 Corridor.



Westlake–Is characterized by its commercial core consisting of midsized, full block commercial and light industrial buildings.



Cascade–Is characterized by a mixture of commercial, residential and social services with sustainable infrastructure and improvement projects that maintain a creative, collaborative and eclectic nature.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Design Guidelines The South Lake Union Design Guidelines supplement the citywide Seattle Guidelines in many ways. Those most relevant to Lake to Bay include the following: Natural Systems and Site Features  New development is encouraged to take advantage of site configuration to accomplish sustainability goals. Components can include solar orientation, storm water management, sustainable landscaping, and buildings designed for their entire life cycles. Urban Pattern and Form Encourage “outlooks and overlooks” for the public to view the lake and cityscapes from public plazas or other open spaces and designing form and façades to enhance views.  Reinforce community gateways through architectural elements, streetscaping and/or signage. Potential gateway locations include th Westlake and Denny, Westlake and 9 , Dexter and Mercer, Fairview and Valley, Fairview and Denny, and Fairview and Mercer.  Development at “heart” locations, which are community anchors and centers of commercial and social activities, should enhance the character through appropriate site planning and architecture and should incorporate special street treatments such as pedestrian lighting, public art, special paving, landscaping and additional public open space. Areas identified as heart locations include South Lake Union Park, Denny Park, Harrison Street, Terry Avenue N., and Westlake Avenue N..  Address both the pedestrian and auto experience through building placement, scale and details. 

Page 21 South Lake Union Nieghborhood Design Guidelines (2014 Update)


Reinforce retail concentrations with compatible space that encourages pedestrian activity. Create business and community activity clusters. Design entrances to residential buildings to enhance the streetscape through the use of small gardens, stoops and other elements which create a transition between the public and private uses.

Architectural Context and Character  Articulate building faรงades in intervals that relate to the existing structures or existing pattern of development in the vicinity.  Support the existing mix of building styles and re-use.  Preserve important buildings and landmarks where possible.  Expose historic signs and vintage advertising on buildings where possible.  Respond to the working class, maritime, commercial and industrial character of the Waterfront and Westlake areas, which could include window detail patterns, open bay doors or sloped roofs.



Connectivity  Keep neighborhood connections open and discourage closed campuses.  Reinforce pedestrian connections both within the neighborhood and to adjacent neighborhoods.  Design for a network of safe and well-lit connections to encourage human activity and link existing high activity areas.  Support the creation of a hierarchy of passive and active open space within South Lake Union which may include pooling open space requirements on-site to create larger open spaces.  New developments should provide features that enhance the public realm through elements such as curb bulbs, pedestrian-oriented street lighting and street furniture.

 

Walkability Sidewalk-related spaces should appear safe, welcoming and open to the general public.  Encourage provisions of spaces for street level uses that vary in size, width and depth. Encourage the use of awnings and weather protection along street fronts, streetscape amenities such as tree grates, benches and lighting and configure retail space to that it can spill out onto the sidewalk.  Enhance public safety through enhanced pedestrian and street lighting, well-designed public spaces with clear sight lines and eyes on the street as well as locations for police presence and patrols.

Key Findings Supports strong design and construction of public space, landscaping and buildings to support a distinct neighborhood character and strong pedestrian network.



Street-Level Interaction  Create graceful transitions in streetscaping between public and private uses.  Design faรงades to encourage activity to spill out from business onto the sidewalk.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

 

Project Uses and Activities Parking below grade is preferred.



Open Space Concept Encourage landscaping that meets LEED criteria. Install indigenous trees and plants to improve aesthetics, capture water and create habitat.  Retain existing, non-intrusive mature trees or replace with large caliper trees.  Water features which include natural marsh-like installations are encouraged.  Integrate artwork into publically accessible areas of a building and landscaping that evokes a sense of place related to the previous uses of the area, including themes such as laundries, auto row, floral businesses, photography, maritime, etc.  Landscaping should be designed to take advantage of views to waterfront and downtown Seattle.

 

Supports connectivity with Lake Union and related uses, particularly with views and design elements.



Supports uses which activate the street, like outdoor dining, and open retail.



Does not include specific projects and relies on the Design Review process for voluntary inclusion of plan recommendations.

Page 22 South Lake Union Nieghborhood Design Guidelines (2014 Update)


Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) March 2005 Terry Avenue N. Adopted

Overview Like neighborhood design guidelines, street design guidelines supplement citywide design standards and are intended to guide development that is consistent with community vision through the design review process during project permitting. They are voluntary and require the project sponsor, whether a private developer or public entity to commit to meeting the standards. The Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines set for design principles for Terry Avenue N. from Denny Way to Valley Street. The intent of the plan is to take advantage of Terry Avenue North’s low vehicle use, location, width and history and to create a pedestrian oriented street.

Examples of Seattle Streets which Prioritize Pedestrians

Design Intent The intent of the design guidelines is four-fold:  The original community intent called for designing a European-style “woonerf,” or curbless street. However, the regulatory and legal environment in the US prohibits streets without definition between pedestrian and vehicle areas. Therefore, the plan strives to create a perception of continuity by utilizing similar paving materials throughout vehicle and pedestrian areas.  Ensure that traffic volumes and speeds stay low over time so that Terry Avenue N. can function as a pedestrian oriented street where design and traffic devices are intended to reduce and slow traffic.  A third intent was to incorporate sustainability in lighting, draining and landscape.  Finally, design was intended to enhance the character and assets of Terry Avenue N., including its historic atmosphere, topography, settings and connections to downtown and Lake Union.

Source: Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 23 Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines


Plan Goals & Strategies Street Design–Create a functional right of way that:  Allows all of the existing and potential land uses (including nonconforming uses) and their associated access, loading and parking.  Accommodates all modes of transportation including the streetcar.  Promotes low vehicle speeds and discourages through traffic.  Is safe for pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles.  Is accessible for all people, including those with disabilities.  Is durable and maintainable.  Incorporates utilities efficiently and in a way that will accommodate future needs.  Allows for incremental development.  Provides a balance between right-of-way functions with environmental priorities by minimizing stormwater runoff and protecting water and air quality. Placemaking–Create a great place that: Retains a unique character based on its history, industrial uses, topography and views.  Emphasizes pedestrians and amenities for pedestrians.  Makes natural systems both multifunctional and visible where possible.  Uses sustainability in materials and systems. 

Design Guidelines The design guidelines set forth range from very specific to very flexible, with the goal of using some elements to create continuity and a unified sense of place while allowing variation throughout the corridor. Specific guidelines include: Right of Way Zones–Terry Avenue enjoys wide right of way zones and should accommodate a vehicle zone (ranging from 23 to 31 feet), a pedestrian zone (ranging from 9 to 14 feet) and the streetcar infrastructure. Materials should reflect the historic character of the street, retaining as much existing brick as possible, and provide continuity between vehicle and pedestrian zones. Accessibility–Terry Avenue N should be accessible to all people and meet requirements in an attractive manner. Where necessary, pedestrian separation should occur with landscaping, attractive warning strips, low curbs and bollards.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 24 Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines


Intersections–Intersections should receive special treatments which indicate to cross street vehicles that Terry Avenue is a non-traditional street. In addition, intersections should be designed to accommodate large freight vehicle traffic which serves commercial and industrial uses along the street.

Key Findings Supports strong design and construction of public space, landscaping and buildings to support a distinct neighborhood character and strong pedestrian network.



Parking–Parking should be modest and encourage use by visitors and patrons of local establishments. Long-term employee parking on Terry should be discouraged. Parking should continue to be a combination of parallel and angled parking.



Prioritizing pedestrians on Terry Avenue through design, particularly through minimizing separation and lowering curbs is a different approach to street design than most of the plans reviewed, lending Terry a unique character and differentiation supportive of Lake to Bay.

Lighting–Lighting is an element which should provide a sense of visual continuity along Terry Avenue. The lighting in front of the Exchange Building III should be used as a model.



Terry Avenue has right-of-way wider than most streets which provides more opportunity for “street rooms” and other innovative public spaces that are not necessarily linear in character.



Like all street design guidelines, the recommendations are voluntary and depend on participation by public entities or private developers for implementation.

Landscaping–In keeping with the industrial history of the street, plantings should maintain a different feel than other streets, focusing on large-scale, distinctive trees rather than uniform plantings. In addition, ground cover and hardscaping below trees should support both tree vitality and pedestrian access and comfort. Stormwater–A stormwater system focused on an 18 to 30 inch runnel should be installed along Terry with additional planting strips which will retain and filter stormwater runoff. Utility Poles–Electric power should be supplied through upgraded, uniform poles which are located at least 3 feet back from curbs and bollard lines, and 10 feet from the vehicle right-of-way where there are curbs without bollards, and curbless conditions without bollards. Public Art–Art should be integrated into the design of the right-of-way in selecting the surface treatment, landscape, street elements and furnishings. It should reflect the industrial and historical character of Terry Avenue and the surrounding neighborhood. Artistic elements should be incorporated wherever possible, including grates, bike racks, fencing, paving materials and other street elements.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 25 Terry Avenue North Street Design Guidelines


South Lake Union Street Concept Plans Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

City of Seattle, Seattle Department of Transportation April 2013 South Lake Union Neighborhood Adopted; implementation of the plan will occur over time through direct capital investment by the City or other public entities.

Overview The South Lake Union Street Concept Plans focus on the portion of the neighborhood west of Westlake Avenue, creating a guide for a streetscape that will be a key amenity of the neighborhood. The area th covered by the plan is between 9 Avenue and Dexter Avenue, from Denny Way on the south to Mercer Street on the north. It includes Denny Park and the UW Medicine Campus. While the plan does not include specific projects, it sets forth the major opportunities for creating needed public amenities in this neighborhood. Plan Mission The South Lake Union Street Concept Plans provide a vision and guidance to the improvements to the right-of-way. The goal is that incremental improvements by both private and public actors will result in an excellent and functional public realm that is context sensitive. The Street Concept Plans has been adopted as an appendix to Seattle’s Right of Way Improvement Manual. Streetscape Concepts The plan details street concepts for each of the seven streets in the study area, as detailed below:

Source: South Lake Union Street Concept Plans

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 26 South Lake Union Street Concept Plans


th

8 Avenue North Considered to be the “heart of the district” and is designed as a “woonerf” or shared use street with an emphasis on pedestrians and bicycles. The street is planned as a linear park connecting Denny Park and the open spaces at the UW Medicine facility. In addition, the street should add elements of “street rooms” which provide residents in surrounding buildings a place to gather and socialize. The street rooms th would primarily be on alternating sides of 8 Avenue except between Thomas and Harrison Streets which would have a central street room. John Street John Street is envisioned as a Festival Street which can be closed to auto traffic for special events and public gatherings. Because it will be reconnected as part of the Alaska Way Viaduct project, it can serve as an important pedestrian connection. Existing parking should be retained and the green feel along Denny Park should be extended. Thomas Street Thomas Street is envisioned as a Green Street with significant traffic calming measures and ecological features which provide substantial tree canopy, habitat and water management. The proposed configuration includes:  1-travel lane each way  5’ bike lanes each way  No parking and table intersection at 8th Ave  Pedestrian lights, 12-16’ high  Autumn Blaze Maples preferred for consistency with other plans  Encourage undergrounding utilities

Source: South Lake Union Street Concept Plans

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 27 South Lake Union Street Concept Plans


Harrison Street Harrison Street is envisioned as a mixed-use concept which will connect directly to SR 99 and therefore will likely have higher traffic volumes than John and Thomas Streets and should accommodate expected traffic and increased transit uses. Proposed configurations include:  1 travel lane each way at 11’ curbside areas are sized as travel lanes, but may be used as parking if not needed for levels of traffic/transit  11’ sidewalk with planting area - keep existing trees  where healthy and add new Cimmaron Ash trees where \possible  Encourage building setbacks near transit stops  Encourage undergrounding of utilities

Key Findings Supports strong design and construction of public space, landscaping and buildings to support a distinct neighborhood character and strong pedestrian network.

 

Has a well-defined street hierarchy which recommends welldesigned streets accommodating a wide variety of users as well as a variety of street character.



Like all street design guidelines, the recommendations are voluntary and depend on participation by public entities or private developers for implementation.

Republican Street Republic Street will not be reconnected through Aurora Avenue, but will need to accommodate traffic exiting Aurora to the east. The street is designated as mixed-use with the following components:  11’ travel lanes; one each direction  7’ parallel parking both sides  Bicycles allowed in street; consider painted sharrow signage  Keep north curb line set by UW Med development.  Extend landscape character from UW Medicine on north side of street th

9 Avenue th 9 Avenue serves many purposes; it is identified as a major bicycle route in the Seattle Bicycle Plan and is designated as a Principal Arterial and a Minor Transit Street. In order to accommodate these uses, the following components are recommended:  1-lane each way  Bike lanes in both directions  Options for parking vs. landscape Dexter Avenue Because of its width, Dexter is envisioned as a broader boulevard street concept.  2-lanes each way  Parallel parking both sides  Separated cycle track  Sidewalk on both sides, some street trees  Utility lines and cobra-head lighting

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 28 South Lake Union Street Concept Plans


Thomas Green Street Concept Plan Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) and Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) Summer, 2013 Thomas Street from Western Avenue to I-5 Adopted

Overview The Thomas Green Street Concept Plan is one of several street concept plans developed to guide streetscape improvements through public projects and private redevelopment. It is intended to provide conceptual design guidance and is incorporated into the City Right of Way Improvements Manual.

Concept Areas The Thomas Green Street Concept Plan divides Thomas Street into four distinct Concept Areas: Cascade, South Lake Union, The Triangle and Uptown. Though Thomas Street travels through Seattle Center, the plan does not provide specific recommends but instead recommends that the street’s design through should be consistent with the Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan. A detailed overview of the recommendations for the South Lake Union, The Triangle and Uptown concept areas are below.

Source: Thomas Green Street Concept Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 29 Thomas Green Street Concept Plan


South Lake Union Concept Area The South Lake Union Concept Area includes Thomas Street from Dexter Avenue to Fairview Avenue. The Design Principles include: th  Green Promenade–Would begin at 5 Ave. N intersection adjacent to Seattle Center and extend to Fairview Avenue. It is envisioned as a wide sidewalk (30’ wide on the north side of the street) with abundant plantings, large trees, sidewalk cafes and other amenities.  Consistency with Terry Ave N.–Streetscape improvements should be consistent with design elements included in the completed Terry Avenue N., particularly pedestrian scale lighting and textured brick or stone pavers in the landscaping zone.  Coordinate with Zoning Incentives–Allow new developments to participate in the zoning incentive program by constructing sections of the Thomas Street green promenade.  Targeted Green Stormwater Infrastructure–GSI should be included, potentially at the northeast corner at Boren Street, the northwest th th corner of 8 Avenue N. and the northwest corner of 9 Avenue N.







Specimen Trees as Distinctive Elements–One distinctive tree each half block should be interspersed within the row of more uniform tree plantings. Denny Park North Residential Enclave–As part of a planned th residential enclave extending from Denny Park north along 8 Avenue N., streetscape improvements should incorporate a shared th street concept at the 8 Avenue N. intersection. Lake to Bay–The green promenade should be the primary route and location for the Lake to Bay Loop for this stretch. Wayfinding and signage as identification for the Lake to Bay Loop should be carefully integrated within the sidewalk zone, particularly at the Dexter Avenue and Terry Avenue N. intersections.

th

8 Avenue North Intersection Focus Area Concept

Source: Thomas Green Street Concept Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 30 Thomas Green Street Concept Plan


The Triangle Concept Area th The Triangle Concept Area includes Thomas Street from 5 Avenue N. to Dexter Avenue. The Design Principles include:  Support Services Corridor–This area of Thomas Street should be focused on including setbacks for sidewalk cafes and street-facing retail with businesses that would support the Seattle Center and nearby employers.  Blend the Seattle Center Edge – Enhance physical connections with the Seattle Center by blending the edges. This is consistent with the recent improvements at Counterbalance Park and Broad Street Green and should incorporate similar elements such as creative th lighting and seat walls. The pedestrian crossing of 5 Avenue should be dramatically improved for safety and ease of pedestrian access to the center with a wide crosswalk.  Capitalize on Broad Street Remnants–As part of the removal of the th portion of Broad Street north of 5 Avenue, remnants of Broad Street could be reclaimed as a green space that has a relationships and management link with potential redevelopment of private properties in the area.  Explore Improved Substation Screening–Enhance substation screening to contribute to the green street corridor and enhance the approach to Seattle Center, which could include color and light consistent with the elements used to blend the Seattle Center edge. th  Green Promenade–The green promenade would begin at the 5 Avenue North intersection and extend east to Fairview Avenue. In this portion of Thomas Street, the green promenade is envisioned to be 20’ wide with abundant plantings and large distractive trees on the north side of Thomas Street.  Dedicated Bicycle Lanes Near the SR99 Portal–Striped dedicated bike lands are recommended in The Triangle Concept Area due to the high traffic volumes through the area.  Specimen Trees as Distinctive Elements–As in other concept areas, large, distinctive trees should be included in the promenade with one in each half-block and interspersed within the row of more uniform tree plantings.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

th

5 Avenue North Intersection Focus Area Concept

Source: Thomas Green Street Concept Plan

Page 31 Thomas Green Street Concept Plan


The Uptown Concept Area st The Uptown Concept Area includes Thomas Street from 1 Avenue North to Elliott Avenue West. The Design Principles include:  A Balanced Neighborhood Green Street–In this portion of Thomas Street, there should be evenly allocated sidewalk space, parking and landscaping on both sides of the roadway.  Complement ‘Uptown Park’ Neighborhood Character–Improvements should enhance the green, park like feel of the neighborhood and should include a broad planting strip between curb and sidewalk in the range of 8’ wide, a band of landscaping adjacent to buildings and abundantly landscaped planting beds.  Pedestrian Overpass Landing–Improve the landing of the pedestrian rd overpass at Thomas Street and 3 Avenue West.  Seattle Center Access and Loading–Street access needed for Seattle Center loading and unloading functions should be prioritized.  Specimen Trees as Distinctive Elements–As in other concept areas, large, distinctive trees should be included in the promenade with one in each half-block and interspersed within the row of more uniform tree plantings.

Thomas Street at Pedestrian Overpass Focus Area Concept

Key Findings: The plan is supportive of many elements of the Lake to Bay, and specifically mentions incorporating Lake to Bay signage and elements as design principles for several concept areas.



Source: Thomas Green Street Concept Plan



In addition, the plan recommends several Lake to Bay elements, including the blending of the Seattle Center edges, incorporating green space into the Broad Street remnants, shielding the Seattle Light property, and general streetscape improvements throughout Thomas Street.



The plan does not have specific project funding and relies on private development or specific city-led projects to incorporate improvements.



While the plan incorporates many “good practice” elements for street design and landscaping, it does not reach the ambition of Lake to Bay as an innovative, destination street.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 32 Thomas Green Street Concept Plan


Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Century 21 Committee Members 2008 Seattle Center Adopted August, 2008

Overview The Century 21 Master Plan is an ambitious vision for the Seattle Center which envisions the campus to “one’s first place to think of when planning what to do or where to go…a Seattle Center that is vibrant with activity, flexible to accommodate change, open and welcoming, and sustainable in construction and design.” The plan sets forth the following goals:  Enhance Seattle Center’s position as the Nation’s Best Gathering Place  Dramatically increase open space  Connect Seattle Center’s dynamic facilities into a synergistic whole  Provide capacity for existing and future arts, cultural and recreational programs, to be nurtured, grown and developed  Create program and design that captivates and attracts private funding partners  Building on the history of Seattle Center while creating the flexible framework to provide for the needs of the future  Integrate environmental sustainability in design, construction and operations to reduce energy demands and serve as a model for sustainable development  Enrich and connect to the fabric of adjacent neighborhoods through welcoming design, programming and operations  Increase accessibility to the center for the grounds for all users  Encourage greater mass transit use and easier non-motorized connections  Improve pedestrian safety  Provide the programs and destinations to attract a larger and increasingly diverse number of visitors Source: Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 33 Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan


Planning and Design Principles The Plan sets forth 38 Planning and Design Principles, those of which are most relevant to Lake to Bay include: Seattle Center Mission We are the nation’s best gathering place. Supported by the people of Seattle, we are home to the finest cultural and educational organizations, sports teams, festivals, community programs and entertainment facilities. We exist to delight and inspire the human spirit in each person and bring us together as a rich and varied community. The Mission is Sound and the Future is Bright  The future of Seattle Center should be as sparkling and dynamic as its past.  Diversity is the Center’s hallmark strength. Seattle Center should continue to bring together young and old, rich and poor, arts patrons and sports fans, tourists and Northwest residents, festival revelers and conference attendees. Drawn to the Center  The campus should be designed to draw people into the center of the grounds to discover attractions, and be exposed to new programs, people and activities.  Future development should maximize the green space at the “Center of the Center” as a place of refuge from the surrounding city. Open Spaces  Open spaces and gardens contribute to Seattle Center’s unique identity. They should feature diversity both in size and character, providing for the needs of major festivals as well as quiet enjoyment of green space.  Open spaces should feature a mix of active and passive programmatic uses and be available to all.  The amount of open space should be increased wherever possible. Open spaces should build on existing program uses while providing flexibility for future program needs.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Leader in Sustainable Design and Operations  All planning and design work should promote environmental sustainability.  Seattle Center should be used as a compelling and highly visible model to showcase emerging green technology in its buildings and landscape and should help demonstrate ways to reduce the City’s carbon footprint. Arrivals and Visual Connections  Visual access into and through the campus should draw people to the center of the grounds.  Pathways and pedestrian connections into and through the campus should convey a sense of discovery and be clearly legible.  Sightlines to key attractions, such as the International Fountain, Space Needle and Center House should be respected as they give Seattle Center its unique sense of place and assist in campus navigation.  Campus edges should open to the community and entries should be inviting and festive and clearly convey that one has arrived at Seattle Center. A Mix of Activities and Amenities for Diverse Populations  Seattle Center should strive to enliven the campus throughout the hours of the day and the days of the year, balancing out the peaks and valleys of programs and activities.  Development should invigorate and update the campus to appeal to the next generation of users, yet changes should honor the campus’ historic character. Pedestrians First  Pedestrian friendly planning should unify the campus, enhancing the comfort and safety of people on foot.  Pedestrian drop-off points should be located strategically around the perimeter of the campus and vehicular access should not segment the site.  Lighting, signage, a coordinated system of direction and information graphics, and street furniture should reinforce the primary pedestrian corridors and facilitate pedestrian access. Green technology and materials should be emphasized.

Page 34 Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan


Design should emphasize:  Flexibility–To continually adapt to changing needs and opportunities, design flexible multipurpose indoor and outdoor spaces.  Vibrancy–Buildings, programs and landscaping all should work together to create a sense of excitement and discovery, attracting people to the Center and encouraging them to extend their stay.  Legibility–Design, signage and sightlines should work together to create a unified sense of place where visitors can easily find their way to multiple destinations.  Artistic Expression–Artistic expression should be integrated into the design and construction of new campus facilities, and public art should be featured prominently, compatible with current and future campus uses.

Recommendations The Seattle Center incorporates recommendations related to the built environment, both within and outside of the Center, transportation recommendations as well as artistic and cultural programmatic elements. Projects related to the built components and public space are divided into four distinct zones, “Center of the Center” zone, Memorial Stadium Zone, Key Area Zone and the Theater District Zone. 

Center of the Center Zone–Anchored by Center House, the Center zone is the crossroads of Seattle Center’s most iconic elements. A key component to the Century 21 Master Plan is significant changes and enhancements to this central portion of the campus. 

Center House is opened up with restaurants and cafes with outdoor seating and an outward presence and access. The building is opened up physically with a glass roof atrium and more transparent walls. Programmatic elements and tenants would be expanded or introduced and would include The Children’s Museum, The Center House Theater, The Center School, Technology Center, Day Care Center and Seattle Center Administrative Offices. Dining and retail options that enhance patron experience would be expanded and improved.



Open space in the Center Zone is increased through the removal of the Fun Forest and a landscaped area surrounding the Space Needle which will include a naturally forested area, a structured urban forest, sustainable gardens and botanical terraces with a water feature creating a pathway to rain gardens at Broad Street Green and creates a community performance area focused on the Horiuchi Mural. A play area envisioned as a “sculptural jungle gym” is designed as a futuristic space ship with themes of the sun and solar system.

Getting Here  Alternate modes of transportation (bus, bicycle, monorail, streetcar and pedestrian paths) should be planned for and encouraged, connecting Seattle Center to adjacent neighborhoods and other cultural destinations.  Design elements should reach out to the neighborhood and forge stronger pedestrian connections.

Source: Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 35 Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan




Memorial Stadium Zone–Use of Memorial Stadium is shared by the Center and the School District and is redeveloped to actively contribute to the Center’s vitality.  The concrete walls surrounding the stadium are removed, with The Memorial Wall predominantly placed next to a redeveloped Memorial Stadium. The playing field is realigned in a north-south direction with the capacity of 5,000 seats, half under cover and half on a tiered hillside which enables the field to be used as an amphitheater for concerts and performances and expands the Intentional Fountain lawn. A new parking garage and transportation hub is placed under the expanded International lawn.

Source: Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review



KeyArena Zone–KeyArena is improved to ensure that it will continue to be a premiere venue in Seattle four touring concerts and family shows as well as a home court for basketball teams.  The area encircling KeyArena is revitalized with residential and restaurant amenities through public-private partnerships.  The Northwest Rooms are redeveloped to replace the blank st outer wall on the corner of 1 Avenue N. and Republican Street.  NASA and West Court Building are redeveloped with more public amenities, activities and programs consistent with the Uptown Urban Center.



Theater District Zone–The goal of the recommendations for the Theater District is to create a vital and distinct district focused on Mercer Street which is active both day and night. Improvements include:  Mercer Arena redeveloped to house Seattle Opera’s operations.  Mercer Garage property is redeveloped through a public-private partnership into a mixed-use development.  Theater Commons is newly revitalized through a partnership between the Seattle Repertory Theatre and the Intiman Theatre funded by the Kreielsheimer Remainder Trust.



Environmental Sustainability–The Master Plan capitalizes on the ecological function of landscape features around the campus.  New open spaces feature rain gardens, vegetated swales and recirculating water features that work together as an integrated system.  Add more trees and urban habitat around the perimeters.  Continues to incorporate green building technology into new projects.  Use integrated sustainable design elements into demonstration projects which educate the public and visitors about green design.

Page 36 Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan




Transportation–The Master Plan includes several transportation elements including:  A new underground multi-modal transportation and parking center located at the Memorial Stadium site.  A new emphasis on pedestrian safety.  Improved pedestrian paths on August Wilson Way.  Improve transit connections through cooperation with Metro and the Seattle Department of Transportation and a possible expansion of the South Lake Union Streetcar to serve Seattle Center.



Programming–As a key destination in Lake to Bay, the programming at Seattle Center will remain an important piece in creating demand for Lake to Bay and ensuring that it is a world-class destination. The Center has three program areas:  Commercial programs include basketball games, rock concerts and special events. New and enhanced facilities are required to continue to attract commercial events.  Resident organizations offer art, music, film, theater and science programming to visitors, both local and national. Providing space for these organizations to grow is central to the plan.  Public programs are those programs produced by Seattle Center and will be enhanced by the physical improvements discussed above.



Source: Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan

Public Art–Public Art has been an integral part of Seattle Center since the 1962 World’s Fair. The Century 21 Master Plan calls for increasing the number of significant public art installations that:  Are large-scale, significant projects  Express the natural elements of earth, air, water and fire  Demonstrate green and sustainable concepts  Provide focal points at major entries to Seattle Center and newly redeveloped gathering areas  Reinforce urban design for the campus and strengthen new vistas, pedestrian corridors and outdoor spaces  Contribute to placemaking at entry portals and along axial vistas and pedestrian corridors  Integrate into facility redevelopment of new buildings and green space  Reference diverse cultures

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 37 Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan


Funding The recommendations for the Century 21 Master Plan were estimated in 2008 to be a total of $567 million (in 2007 dollars). Improvements will occur over 20 years with a combination of public and private funds, which could include funds raised from:  Center House restaurants and improvements by other Center House tenants  Memorial Stadium Amphitheatre naming rights, exclusive booking options and concession rights  New Upper Northwest Rooms Building private development and retail  New retail, residential and restaurant amenities encircling KeyArena  Theatre Commons and August Wilson Way  Redevelopment of Mercer Garage

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Key Findings Seattle Center is a primary destination on Lake to Bay and contains many of the City’s most iconic landmarks and destinations. The Century 21 Master Plan incorporates recommendations which build and will grow its reputation into the future. The success of the Seattle Center in driving visitation (both local and otherwise) to the area is key to creating a vibrant Lake to Bay.





One of the most important elements of the Century 21 Master Plan is to “blend the edges” of Seattle Center and improve visual and physical connectivity to the surround neighborhoods and the transportation infrastructure. This will be a requirement of successful implementation of the Lake to Bay vision.



Increasing green space within Seattle Center will continue to enhance it as a destination for Seattle residents and visitors alike and will provide a central green amenity for the growing neighborhoods of Belltown, South Lake Union and Uptown.



The Century 21 Master Plan states that in addition to incorporating green infrastructure and green building techniques, it will serve as a “living laboratory” of these ideas, incorporating interactive public education of these principles. This type of bringing ideas into the public sphere is supportive of the Lake to Bay concept.



With a diffused organizational and management structure, Seattle Center will require support from many organizations and governmental entities to fully realize the most ambitious portions of the plan.



The Century 21 Master Plan focuses on pedestrian thoroughfares but does not incorporate other active transportation network connectivity through the campus.

Page 38 Seattle Center Century 21 Master Plan


Uptown Neighborhood Design Guidelines Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) October 2013 (Draft) Uptown Neighborhood Undergoing revisions (2013)

Overview Design guidelines set forth the qualities of architecture, urban design and public space that guide the Design Review Board in their review of projects. In addition to citywide design guidelines, many neighborhoods also have their own guidelines that are specific to the needs and desires of their community. The Uptown Neighborhood Guidelines set forth the design principles for the Uptown Neighborhood, defined as Elliott Avenue on the West, Aurora Avenue on the East, Denny Way on the South and Roy Street to the north, gradually moving to Highland Drive. Priority Design Guidelines For the purposes of the design guidelines, Uptown is divided into three zones: The Uptown Park Character Area–located primarily to the west and north of Seattle Center and is envisioned as an attractive multi-family residential neighborhood with a distinctive park-like character. The Uptown Urban Character Area–located primarily to the south and east of Seattle Center, bounded by Thomas Street to the north and east of Broad Street to Aurora Avenue and is made up of blocks with a rich variety of uses surrounding Seattle Center. It is well suited to the scale of a true urban center and has strong relationships to major institutions. The Heart of Uptown Character Area–located between Roy Street and Republican Street between Queen Anne Avenue and Warren Avenue and includes smaller retail spaces accommodating enduring retail establishments and locally-owned restaurants. Source: Uptown Neighborhood Design Guidelines

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 39 Uptown Neighborhood Design Guidelines


Street Typologies In addition to the character areas, three street typologies are described in the plan: Main Street Corridor–Encourages a mix with the small shops and streetscapes that have particular focus on pedestrian and transit riders. th Streets include Roy Street from Queen Anne Avenue N. to 5 Avenue N., Mercer Street from Queen Anne Avenue N. to Warren Avenue N., st West Harrison, from Queen Anne Avenue North to 1 Avenue North, st Queen Anne Avenue N. from W. Thomas Street to W. Roy Street, 1 th Avenue from W. Thomas Street to Roy Street and 6 Avenue N. from Denny Way to Broad Street Large Scale Commercial Corridor–Larger blocks accommodate and blend larger retail stores and offices and a full range of travel modes in a th balanced way. Streets include Roy Street from 5 Avenue N. to Aurora Avenue N., W. Mercer Street from Warren Avenue N. to Aurora Avenue N. and most connections between Roy and Mercer, including Warren nd rd th th Avenue, 2 Avenue N., 3 Avenue N., 4 Avenue ., 5 Avenue N., th Taylor Avenue N., 6 Avenue N. and Aurora Avenue N. Pedestrian Corridor–Includes pedestrian connections through Seattle Center, most streets adjacent to the Seattle Center as well as W. Thomas Street from Elliott Avenue to Aurora Avenue N.



pedestrian volumes during event times, and create safe, well-marked crossings at entrances to the Center. Streetscape furniture and landscaping should be sited and designed to accommodate the flow of event crowds. Buildings on and adjacent to the Seattle Center campus should be sited to create relationships and connections between the Center and surrounding Uptown neighborhoods. Corner lots are often desirable locations for small publicly-accessible plazas, turrets, clock towers, art, and other special features.

Connectivity  Throughout Uptown, developments that respond outward to the public realm are preferred.  Site outdoor spaces in accordance with the location and scale of adjacent streets, buildings, and uses. For example, an on-site plaza should not unduly interrupt the retail continuity of a street.  Locate plazas intended for public use at or near grade to promote both a physical and visual connection to the street. Special paving materials, landscaping, and other elements can be used to provide a clear definition between the public and private realms.  Define outdoor spaces through a combination of building and landscaping, and discourage oversized spaces that lack containment. Walkability Streets throughout Uptown should be sociable places that offer a sense of security, and residential building projects should make a positive contribution to life on the street.  Throughout Uptown, special attention to the pedestrian experience and street right-of-way should be given along pedestrian corridors.  Throughout Uptown, the use of pedestrian-scaled street lamps within all character areas is encouraged. In addition, streetscape features such as street clocks and benches are encouraged in Heart of Uptown and Uptown Urban character areas.  In the Uptown Urban and Heart of Uptown character areas, encourage Seattle Center campus redevelopment along its boundaries to either open vistas from Uptown into Seattle Center or to provide activation for the street. 

Design Guidelines The Uptown Design Guidelines supplement the citywide Seattle Guidelines in many ways. Those most relevant to Lake to Bay include the following: Urban Pattern and Form  New development should support the neighborhood’s pedestrian character, encourage outdoor dining, utilize art, signage and major public open space at gateway locations. In Uptown, improvements should be consistent with park-like landscaping.  In the Uptown Urban and Heart of Uptown character areas, encourage streetscapes that respond to unique conditions created by Seattle Center. Encourage wide sidewalks to accommodate high

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 40 Uptown Neighborhood Design Guidelines


Street-Level Interaction  Promote active, customer-oriented retail storefronts; create active and vibrant street environments.  Major retail spaces are encouraged in the Large Scale Commercial Corridor.  Encourage outdoor dining. Active Transportation  Include amenities for transit riders within building designs using canopies and other streetscape rather than curbside bus shelters. Project Uses and Activities  Surface parking lots are preferred in the rear of the building and access to new development is preferred via alleyways.  Large walls should have green treatment or decorative surfacing to avoid large blank swaths.  Retaining walls should be constructed of materials with substantial pattern and texture.  Encourage alleys to be activated with subordinate retail spaces.

Key Findings



Supports strong design and construction of public space, landscaping and buildings to support a distinct neighborhood character and strong pedestrian network.



Supports connectivity with Seattle Center and related uses, particularly with transit riders and pedestrians.



Supports uses which activate the street, like outdoor dining, and minimizes visual intrusion of surface parking lots and undesirable uses.



Does not include specific projects and relies on the Design Review process for voluntary inclusion of plan recommendations.

Architectural Concept Emphasize human scale and quality, detailing and materials that is compatible with existing buildings.  Infill development should engage the sidewalk and have storefront transparency. 

Open Space Concept Throughout Uptown, landscaping should be substantial and include a variety of textures and colors and should be used to enhance buildings, setbacks, entrances, open space areas and to screen parking and other less visually attractive areas.



Exterior Elements and Finishes Finishes and landscaping of substance and quality are recommended, particularly those finishes which contribute to the historic character of the neighborhood.  Pedestrian lighting should support shopping and eating experiences after dark. 

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 41 Uptown Neighborhood Design Guidelines


Sustainable Cities Design Academy, Uptown Triangle Planning Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

American Architectural Foundation’s Sustainable Cities Design Academy 2010 Uptown Triangle Complete

Overview The American Architectural Foundation sponsored a three-day charette devoted to creating design solutions to support improvements to the Uptown Triangle, a 36-acre area bordered by Denny Way on the south, Broad Street to the west and Aurora Avenue to the east. Traditionally not included in neighborhood planning, the area has been neglected and underutilized and does not have strong connections to the surrounding areas. However, the area is being impacted significantly by large-scale infrastructure projects and new development.

TRANSIT

Recommendations The plan calls for a framework of improvements outlined below: Transportation Choices and Focus  Connect city trail network through Uptown Triangle – link uptown loop bicycle routes, Lake To Bay, Uptown Loop Pedestrian routes  Create new pedestrian and bicycle connections along John, Thomas,  

Harrison and Mercer Streets. Expand transit connections, including bus and a proposed east/west streetcar connection. Create transportation hub, potentially located on Aurora Avenue between Harrison and Thomas Streets.

GATEWAYS

Complete Streets Plan Build on new and evolving street grids and street hierarchy. Focus on new gateways into Uptown Triangle. Expand street uses.

  

Source: Sustainable Cities Design Academy

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 42 Sustainable Cities Design Academy, Uptown Triangle Planning


Natural Systems Network  Create new open space and green streets.

NATURAL SYSTEMS

Smart Zoning Overlay Thomas Street–Envisioned with a Neighborhood Commercial and retail focus.  John Street–Envisioned as a residential neighborhood street.  Skinny Towers–Managed density through incentive zoning.  Establish district design guidelines to suggest material, colors and signage and detail building relationships to the street. 

Re-branding Strategy  Potentially centered on Denny Park or Denny Hill Key Findings



Supports hierarchy of street classifications with varied land use, design and amenities to create different character throughout the area.



Focuses on linkages between green spaces with green streets and includes the incorporation of green space in private redevelopment.



Charette focused on design ideas but does not include significant action items for implementation or funding sources.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Source: Sustainable Cities Design Academy

Page 43 Sustainable Cities Design Academy, Uptown Triangle Planning


Denny Way Streetscape Concept Plan Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Planning and Development (DPD) Finalized in October 2013 Denny Way Adopted

Overview The Denny Way Streetscape Concept Plan was drafted as part of the greater Center City Strategy and sets forth streetscape design recommendations for the Denny Way from Western Avenue to Melrose Avenue. It has been incorporated in the City of Seattle’s Right of Way Improvements Manual. Design Principles  Roadway Configuration–It was assumed that no dramatic roadway configuration changes will occur and that Denny Way will remain a regional connector with high traffic volumes and will continue to contain two eastbound and two westbound lanes with center turn pockets at major intersections. 

Pedestrians–Pedestrian crossings of Denny will be increasingly important and increasing pedestrian safety and comfort is a primary goal of the Denny Way Streetscape Concept Plan.



Bicycles–Denny Way is not a preferred bicycle route due to its high traffic volumes.



Transit–Denny Way is an important transit corridor and the guidelines strive to incorporate transit uses, including buses which travel along Denny Way and those that cross it.



Placemaking–The plan strives to make Denny Way a more pleasant place through design continuity with adjacent neighborhoods, pedestrian “eddies”, façade activation and entries, a consistent buffered edge to increase pedestrian comfort and traffic flow and grid reconnection with Thomas and Harrison Streets.

Source: Denny Way Street Concept Plan

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 44 Denny Way Streetscape Concept Plan


Improvement Actions  Upgrade Streetscape Adjacent to New Development–Upgrade streetscapes with preferred configuration of sidewalk, planted buffer strip, setbacks and other features. 



Add Options for Pedestrian Crossings of Denny Way–Signalized th crossings at 8 Avenue and Minor Avenue. Enhance Existing Signalized Intersections–Upgrade the design of existing signalized intersections to improve traffic flow and pedestrian safety through stop bars scored, saw cut or colored concrete.



Improve Connections along Denny Way at Odd-Angled –Reconfigure intersections to reduce crossing distances for pedestrians and improve clarity and predictability of vehicle movements. Create a rd series of pedestrian “eddies” at angled intersections, including 3 Avenue/Broad Street.



Support the Success of Denny Park–Enhance connections to Denny Park and continue to ensure that it is a positive amenity for surrounding neighborhoods.



Encourage Alternate East-West Connections–Encourage additional east-west connectivity for automobiles, bicycles and pedestrians.



Coordinate Urban Design Improvements with New Development– Use new infill develop to incorporate design improvements as consistent with incentive zoning systems.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Key Findings Supportive of creating better pedestrian experience and traffic flows along Denny Way which are important elements of the Lake to Bay recommendations, particularly in “the web” of neighborhood streets supportive of the zone.





Suggests improvements which are consistent with good street design but do not reach the



Recommendations rely on the Design Review process for voluntary inclusion of plan recommendations.

Page 45 Denny Way Streetscape Concept Plan


Strategic Plan for Realizing the Waterfront Seattle Vision Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Central Waterfront Committee July 2012 Seattle Waterfront, from Pioneer Square to Belltown Complete, implementation in progress

Plan Overview The Strategic Plan for Realizing the Waterfront Seattle Vision focuses on implementation and funding for the Seattle Waterfront project. It sets forth the specific action items which will be required for planning, policy development, funding and intergovernmental cooperation which will be needed to implement the vision set forth in the Seattle Waterfront 2020 plan.

Action Plan The action plan is intended to be a broad overview of the implementation timeframe that will necessarily change as the process moves forward. Major milestones and actions include: 2013

Update City land use codes and design regulations for the waterfront corridor

The Seattle Waterfront project is an ambitious redevelopment of the waterfront spurred by the necessary removal of the elevated Alaskan Way Viaduct due to structural damage and the replacement of the Elliott Bay Seawall. The plan spans 26 blocks with ending to the north in Belltown. The proposed redeveloped Waterfront will impact Lake to Bay in two critical ways. First, it will further draw visitors to the waterfront – including local residents and visitors to Seattle. Second, the project’s connection north to Belltown and the Seattle Art Museum will be a critical gateway into the Lake to Bay area. The following overview focuses on the implementation steps and funding recommended by the Central Waterfront Committee.

2013 – 2014

Develop plan to secure signifcant private and corproate philanthropic funding Implement several “early win” projects and intiatives

2013 – 2016

Develop plan to secure adequate annual operating funds to maintain, operate and program waterfront Seawall Project Phase 1 construction

Spring 2014

Complete formation of Local Improvement District (LID)

2014 – 2016

Secure additiional public funding for waterfront through City or voter-approved sources

2015 – 2017

Rebuild Piers 62/63 and Union Street Pier/Waterfront Park

Late 2015

Tunnel opening;begin viaduct demolition

2016 – 2017

Revisit roles and responsitiblites of “Friends” group in advance of opening public spaces

2016 – 2018

Construct new Alaska Way, Elliott Avenue, pedestrian promenade, parks and open spaces

Ongoing

Ensure that existing waterfront businesses thrive during construction of the tunnel, seawall and waterfront

Ongoing

Pursue federal funding for Seawall Replacement Ph. 2.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 46 Strategic Plan for Realizing the Waterfront Seattle Vision


Funding Recommendations The following table summarizes the potential funding sources and uses for the projects.

Source: Strategic Plan for Realizing the Waterfront Seattle Vision

Key Findings The Waterfront project (as described below) will greatly enhance the area as a destination and as an amenity for workers, residents and visitors. Creating greater draws to locations on Lake to Bay will greatly increase its success and desirability. Potential LID funding source could provide funding for Lake to Bay projects and connections from Lake to Bay to the Waterfront.





Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review



As a large-scale, public project requiring support from private corporations, foundations and individuals, the funding of Waterfront improvements could be seen as competing for funds and resources for Lake to Bay rather than two complementary and synergistic projects.

Page 47 Strategic Plan for Realizing the Waterfront Seattle Vision


Waterfront 2020 Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Central Waterfront Committee March 2014 Seattle Waterfront, from Pioneer Square to Belltown Plans complete, implementation in progress

Plan Overview Waterfront 2020 is the most recent plan related to the redevelopment of Seattle’s waterfront along Elliott Bay. Waterfront 2020 focuses on proposed design of redevelopment and specific projects and is based on the previously developed Conceptual Framework as well as an extensive public engagement process. As noted previously, the overall Waterfront Project, as envisioned, will signicantly increase the number of visitors and users of the Waterfront – from local residents using the expanded park to increased visitors from the region and beyond.

The specific projects on the northern end of the 26-block corridor will be an important connection point for Lake to Bay and will need to be incorproated into both the zone and the route components of Lake to Bay. The following section focuses on the northernmost redevelopment projects – Blanchard Street – which will connect Waterfront users to the Seattle Art Museum Olympic Sculpture Park and Lake to Bay.

Source: Waterfront 2020

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 48 Waterfront 2020


Blanchard Street The intersection of Blanchard Street with Western Avenue and Elliott Avenue is the effective end of the Waterfront project and it will be a critical connection point for vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists as they travel north or east. Pedestrian and bicycle amenities–Conceptual design shows increased landscaping and pedestrian amenities such as improved sidewalks and improved crossings. A dedicated bike lane is included on Elliott Avenue. Blanchard Street Overlook–Blanchard Street Overlook would provide pedestrians with a public space located at the end of Blanchard Street. The overlook would be situated between the Marriot Hotel and World Trade Center and provide a view of Elliott Bay. Blanchard Street Park–Blanchard Street Park would be located on Blanchard between Elliott and Western Avenues. It will provide an important amenity which will help pedestrians navigate the awkward crossing of Elliott and Western and will extend to Bell Street.

Key Findings The Waterfront project will greatly enhance the area as a destination and as an amenity for workers, residents and visitors. Creating greater draws to locations near Lake to Bay will greatly increase Lake to Bay’s success and desirability. With the Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park, these two amenities will anchor the southern portion of Lake to Bay and the Waterfront will provide additional linkages to the fabric of downtown Seattle.





The extent of the Waterfront project at Blanchard Street does not connect directly to Lake to Bay – planned improvements end at Blanchard Street and are still seven blocks away from the Olympic Sculpture Park. The complementary and synergistic nature of both projects will be greatly enhanced by increasing connections to this



Waterfront improvements could be seen as competing for funds and resources for Lake to Bay rather than two complementary and synergistic projects.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Source: Waterfront 2020

Page 49 Waterfront 2020


Downtown Seattle Public Spaces and Public Life Study Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Gehl Architects, City of Seattle, International Sustainability Institute, UW Green Futures Lab 2009 Downtown Seattle Complete

Plan Overview The Downtown Seattle Public Spaces and Public Life Study is a comprehensive examination of public life in downtown Seattle – a study of the built environment as well as an observational study of how people are actually using public space. The plan presents a detailed conditions analysis as well as recommendations for improvements to public space and public life. The plan’s geographic focus is on downtown Seattle, though its conclusions and recommendations, briefly described below, are applicable to Lake to Bay. In addition, there is a short section with recommendations for the Mercer/Aurora intersection, also described below. The Livable City and Successful Public Life A livable city is one which is safe, lively, healthy, attractive and sustainable. These elements are supportive of successful public life, meaning people use the public realm for a variety of activities during a typical day. More specifically:  Long term stays make lively cities–people are tempted to spend time in inviting and comfortable public spaces.  Balance between road users creates lively cities–low traffic volumes and speeds creates more public life and more opportunities to meet in public spaces. Pedestrians, cyclists and transit riders are often more active in public spaces.  A variation of places create lively cities–A balance between active and passive, sunny and shady, and other qualities provide varied spaces to fulfill a wide-range of user needs.  A strong pedestrian network makes lively cities–A network that connects destinations, lovely promenades, good climatic conditions, interesting things to look at and safety throughout the day all contribute to walking. Walking activities should be concentrated as opposed to spread out.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Source: Downtown Seattle Public Spaces and Public Life Study 



Many user groups create lively cities–Varied user groups, including the elderly, disabled, children, families, young people, working people and others are necessary for lively public spaces. Planning for optional activities create lively cities–Cities cannot be designed only for necessary activities; strong public spaces are those that people choose to visit for optional reasons because they offer a variety of optional experiences.

Page 50 Downtown Seattle Public Spaces and Public Lilfe Study


Mercer & Aurora Vision and Recommendations Noting the significant challenges for pedestrians and cyclists along Mercer and Aurora, the plan makes the following recommendations for the area:  The new Mercer design will add significantly wider sidewalks, bike lanes on Valley Street and both street trees and median trees for added greenery. Develop the empty parcels along it so it is more defined with a built edge.  Let both Mercer Street and Aurora Avenue be part of a greater green system by planting more trees in this area.  Mercer Street and Aurora Avenue become pedestrian and bicycle friendly links.  The new Mercer design will add significantly wider sidewalks, bike lanes on valley street and both street trees and median trees for added greenery.  Close Broad Street, cover the space and allow for urban fabric development.  Green Streets and boulevards in this part of Seattle.  Build up the edges along Aurora Avenue.  Introduce a regular intersection at ground level on Aurora Avenue as soon as it is possible after the tunnel.  Build up the urban fabric.

Source: Downtown Seattle Public Spaces and Public Life Study

Key Findings The public life study, while not focused on the Lake to Bay geographic area, has important guidelines for analyzing public space by examining its use and comfort for a variety of people and activities. Design should not be only an aesthetic consideration, but should be evaluated on its promotion or support of an active public life, which is a part of the Lake to Bay vision.





The public life study was independently produced and has no associated implementation or funding mechanism and requires voluntary consideration by public or private entities while designing public space elements and associated programming within other projects.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 51 Downtown Seattle Public Spaces and Public Lilfe Study


Alaskan Way Viaduct North Portal Design Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) Finalized 2011 SR 99/Aurora Avenue from John Street to Roy Street. Under construction

Plan Overview The Alaskan Way Viaduct replacement project began after the Nisqually Earthquake struck Seattle in February of 2001 and severely damaged the elevated SR 99 highway. After a lengthy public process, a final plan to bore a tunnel and bury SR 99 through downtown Seattle was approved by the Federal Highway Administration. In addition to improvements to the Waterfront/Alaskan Way this will allow, it also presents a significant change at the north portal, or that area where the tunnel ends and SR 99 is reintegrated into the street network at grade. The description below illustrates the planned changes to the street network at the north portal however completion dates are currently unclear due to construction delays related to the tunnel boring.

Key Findings The tunneling of SR 99 and related infrastructure improvements has significant positive impacts on the street network and neighborhood connections – in particular, the reconnection of local streets will enable more options for enhanced vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle networks.

 

Construction delays have made planning improvements concurrent with planned infrastructure projects difficult.

Scheduled Improvements Step 1  Continue building roadway connecting Broad St. to new two-way Mercer St. east of Dexter Ave. N.  Begin building tunnel’s north portal and operations building

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 52 Alaskan Way Viaduct North Portal Design


Step 2  Begin widening Mercer St. and building SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. overpass  Ramps to Broad and Mercer streets permanently closed  Continue building tunnel’s north portal and operations building  Broad St. open with two lanes in each direction  Install traffic signal at Dexter Ave. N. and Republican St.

Step 3  Continue widening Mercer St. and building SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. overpass  Continue building tunnel’s north portal and operations building  Begin building SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. detour route

Step 4  Continue widening Mercer St. and building SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. overpass  Demolish overpass and fill in Broad St. (permanently close Broad St.)  Continue building tunnel’s north portal and operations building  Continue building SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. detour route.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 53 Alaskan Way Viaduct North Portal Design


Step 5  Continue widening Mercer St.  Begin building new section of Sixth Avenue N.  Continue building tunnel’s north portal and operations building  Continue building SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. detour route

Step 6  Mercer St. widening and SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. overpass complete  Finish building new section of Sixth Ave. N.  Finish building tunnel’s north portal and operations building  SR 99/Aurora Ave. N. detour complete

Step 7  Open SR 99 tunnel to traffic  Close Battery Street Tunnel and raise Aurora Ave N to the same level as surrounding streets  Begin streetscape improvements on Sixth Ave. N. and Harrison St.  Permanently close Seventh Ave. between Denny Way and Battery St.

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Page 54 Alaskan Way Viaduct North Portal Design


Step 8  Finish building new Aurora Ave. N. between Denny Way and Harrison St.  Finish streetscape improvements to surrounding streets  Install stormwater systems along Taylor Ave. N, Sixth Ave. N., John St. and Thomas St.

Completion  New SR 99  New Aurora Ave. N. with reconnection of John, Thomas and Harrison Streets  Surrounding street improvements complete.

Source: SDOT

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 55 Alaskan Way Viaduct North Portal Design


Mercer Corridor Project Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) 2008 th Mercer Street from 5 Avenue to I-5 Under Construction, Mercer East completed in 2013 and Mercer West completed in 2015

Plan Overview Long known as “The Mercer Mess”, infrastructure challenges along Mercer Street and its major intersections have been a challenge for the Uptown, Queen Anne and South Lake Union neighborhoods and beyond. As one of the major east-west corridors through the area, it provides access from the Port of Seattle and provides access to the Port’s facilities on the north side of Elliott Bay, the International Cruise Terminal, Fisherman’s Terminal, shipping facilities and other industrial uses connecting to I-5. However, ensuring that the roadway provides

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

needed access and mobility across neighborhoods without destroying neighborhood fabric and enabling the use of Mercer for alternative modes of transportation has been a challenge. In 2009, SDOT secured funding to begin a complex improvement program designed to increase mobility, reduce congestion, re-establish neighborhood connections and provide additional safety and amenities for non-motorized transportation modes, described below.

Source: SDOT

Page 56 Mercer Corridor Project


Mercer East (Dexter Ave. N to I-5) The major components of the Mercer East portion of the project were completed in 2013. Components of Mercer East included:  Widening Mercer Street and establishing two-way traffic between I-5 and 8th Avenue N.  Undergrounding existing overhead lines between Fairview Avenue N and Roy Street.  Rebuilding and repaving sections of Fairview Avenue N, 9th Avenue N, and Westlake Avenue N.  Re-building Valley Street between 9th Avenue N and Fairview Avenue N.  Improving pedestrian and bicycle routes along the corridor.

Source: SDOT

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 57 Mercer Corridor Project


Mercer West (Dexter Avenue N. to 5th Ave. W.) The Mercer West component of the project was begun in 2013 and is scheduled for completion in 2015. Components of the project include:  Complete the two-way Mercer Street connection between I-5 and 5th Ave. W.  Widen Mercer St. between Dexter Ave. N and 5th Ave. N for two-way traffic and modify signals and channelization.  Convert Mercer and Roy to two-way streets west of 5th Ave. N.  Widen sidewalks at the SR 99 Underpass and create a continuous bikeway from Dexter Ave. N to Queen Anne Ave. N.  Permanently close Broad Street from Thomas Street to Broad Street.

Key Findings The challenges of Mercer Street, both for vehicles and other users have long been a hindrance to the development of the surrounding neighborhoods. The improvements underway will greatly increase mobility for a wide-variety of users and will greatly enhance connections, both across Mercer and using Mercer.





Vehicular mobility remains a priority for the transportation improvements along Mercer. While there are pedestrian improvements included like sidewalks and safer intersections, Mercer Street will remain a well-used street for pedestrians due to its efficiency, not its design character or pleasant pedestrian atmosphere.

Source: SDOT

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 58 Mercer Corridor Project


Pedestrian Lighting Citywide Plan Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Transportation June 2012 Citywide Implemented on a project-by-project basis, where funding is available

Overview The Pedestrian Lighting Plan intends to support the goals set forth in the Pedestrian Master Plan and relates specifically to lighting located in cityowned right of way, however the principles can guide lighting in privatelyowned space as well. Project Prioritization The Pedestrian Light Citywide Plan sets forth project prioritization based on  Pedestrian demand based on land use as a generator or attractor for pedestrian use.  Socioeconomic analysis using a variety of social and economic data to prioritize traditionally under-served populations and meet the intent of the City’s race and social justice initiative.  Street-type analysis using a characterization of each street segment based on how the City plans to utilize the street network.  Crime “hot spots� designated by the Seattle Police Department. Plan Goals First, to provide a data-driven approach to placing pedestrian lighting in the right of way for safety, security, economic development, active transportation and access. Second, to improve how the City plans for, designs and implements pedestrian lighting.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 59 Pedestrian Lighting Citywide Plan


Plan Recommendations and Implementation: The Plan acknowledges that there is not a single mechanism for developing and implementing pedestrian lighting improvements. These types of improvements can occur through a variety of mechanisms requiring different recommendations, all of which may be useful in implementing improvements to lighting and other elements for Lake to Bay.  Neighborhood Plans and Urban Design Guidelines  Utilize Pedestrian Lighting High Priority Areas to prioritize and include pedestrian lighting and approved fixtures when neighborhood plans and guidelines are updated.  Provide training and materials to the Design Review Boards and applicants on the importance of including pedestrian lighting.  Street Design Concept Plans Implementation  Provide guidance in the ROWIM to include pedestrian lighting when appropriate in Street Design Concept Plans using approved fixtures.  Capital Improvement Projects (CIP)  Include pedestrian lighting needs in CIP evaluation criteria.  Analyze the need for pedestrian lighting for all CIP candidates and include in initial project descriptions and budgets.  Major Projects  The Pedestrian Lighting program should provide support to Major Projects especially with regard to fixture selection.  Actively pursue local and grant funding for pedestrian lighting at the conceptual design phase of a major project.  Street Improvement Permits (SIP)  Streetlight Districts / SCL Horizon Plan  Integrate the SCL Streetlight Horizon Plan into planning for capital improvement projects and major projects.  Provide City departments and neighborhoods with the Pedestrian Lighting High Priority Areas to help shape pedestrian lighting locations.  Provide additional information including Client Assistance Memo to provide guidance on participation in streetlight districts.  Limit fixture selections to the city approved fixtures.  Pedestrian Lighting Program  Use the Pedestrian Lighting High Priority Areas to guide investment in the pedestrian lighting program.  Local Improvement Districts (LID)

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Key Findings Increases pedestrian safety and comfort by providing pedestrianappropriate lighting which supports active streets throughout the evening, particularly

 

Allows for flexibility in design, which could accommodate more distinctive lighting elements or support the use of lighting as a tool for placemaking for Lake to Bay or its segments.



Lake to Bay area is located in Tier 1 Prioritization Area.



Does not have any associated funding.

Page 60 Pedestrian Lighting Citywide Plan


Complete Streets Ordinance Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

Seattle Department of Transportation May 2007 City-wide Applies to all transportation improvements during planning, design and construction.

Overview Sets forth guiding principles and practices so that transportation improvements are planned, designed and constructed to encourage walking, bicycling and transit use while promoting safe operations for all users. Ordinance Goals  Encourage walking, bicycling, and transit use as safe, use as safe, convenient and widely available modes of transportation for all people.  Design, operate and maintain Seattle’s streets to promote safe and convenient access and travel for all users – pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, and people of all abilities, as well as freight and motor vehicle drivers; and  Design, operate, and maintain transportation network to improve travel conditions for bicyclists, pedestrians, transit and freight in a manner consistent with, and supportive of, the surrounding community;  Transportation improvements will include an array of facilities and amenities that are recognized as contributing to complete streets, including: street and sidewalk lighting, pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, access improvements for freight, access improvements including compliance with ADA, public transit facilities accommodation including to pedestrian access improvement to transit stops and station, street trees and landscaping, drainage, and street amenities; and  SDOT will implement policies and procedures with the construction, reconstruction or other changes of transportation facilities on arterial streets to support the creation of Complete Streets including capital improvements, re-channelization projects and major maintenance, recognizing that all streets are different and in each case user needs must be balanced.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Design Elements The Seattle Complete Streets Ordinance sets forth requirements for SDOT to plan, design and construct all new transportation improvement projects to provide accommodation for pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, and persons of all abilities, while promoting safe operation of all users. Complete Streets principles is to be incorporated into SDOT’s Transportation Strategic Plan, Seattle Transit Plan, Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan, Intelligent Transportation System Strategic Plan, and other SDOT plans, manuals, rules, regulations and programs. Project Prioritization Complete Streets may be achieved through single projects or incrementally through a series of smaller improvements or maintenance activities over time. Funding The intent is that all sources of transportation funding will be drawn upon to implement Complete Streets and that maximum financial flexibility will be applied to implement Complete Streets principles. Key Findings Supports alternate modes of transportation, including walking, biking and transit into street design and construction.





Is incorporated into new transportation improvements instigated through other processes, but does not trigger or prioritize improvements on its own.

Page 61 Complete Street Ordinance


Right of Way Improvements Manual Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

City of Seattle Continually updated to reflect other planning documents Citywide Adopted

Overview The Right of Way Improvements Manual is the document developed by the City of Seattle which sets forth guidelines regarding design, permitting, and construction of improvements to Seattle’s street right-ofway (ROW). It is consistent with citywide regulatory documents such as Seattle Municipal Code, City of Seattle Standard Plans and Specifications, applicable federal, state, regional and local regulatory requirements and related citywide plans, such as the Comprehensive Plan, the Transportation Strategic Plan, the SDOT Pedestrian Master Plan, the SDOT Bicycle Master Plan, and the Comprehensive Drainage Plan. The document is an extensive detailing of the process related to ROW improvements which will be required for implementing many elements of Lake to Bay – the following is intended to be a brief overview of some of the ROW elements that will need to be considered in the implementation of Lake to Bay. Permitting Triggers Right-of-way improvement requirements for private development can be triggered through several different review processes. Some of the more common ways that street improvements are triggered are:  Master Use Permit (MUP) process  Land Use Code Requirements  Right-of-Way Vacation Requirements and Procedures  Discretionary improvements

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Types of Permits SDOT Street Right-of-Way Permits - The City of Seattle requires an SDOT permit for work in or use of a street right-of-way. There are several types of SDOT permits with varying requirements:  Construction Permits include the construction or repair of improvements to the right of way such as street paving, curbs, or sidewalks. The most extensive Construction Permit is “Group 3” or Street Improvement Permit. A Street Improvement Permit is required for significant, permanent improvements in the street rightof-way such as paving a street, widening a street, or extending a public storm drain.  Use Permits are issued for temporary use of the right-of-way during construction. It includes a formal review and approval process.  Shoring and Excavation Permits are issued for excavations in the public right-of-way.  Utility Permits are issued for the installation of underground and overhead utility mains and services in the public rights-of-way.  Non-Construction Permits are issued for private uses of the right of way. These permits include both short and long term uses. Short term uses include street closures for block parties and farmers markets. Long term uses of the right-of-way include signs, private retaining walls, structural overhangs and sidewalk cafes. Permits for uses over one year generally require an annual fee and in some cases liability insurance or a public place indemnification agreement.  Street Tree Permits are required to plant trees in the public right of way. SDOT's Urban Forestry Division provides review and approval of the tree type and planting location. Applicants are responsible for maintenance of trees planted, including regular watering to ensure establishment, mulching, and pruning to ensure appropriate clearances over streets and sidewalks.  Beautification Permits are required for the installation of landscape improvements in the street right-of-way. SDOT's Urban Forestry Division provides support services to promote appropriate planting in the street right-of-way.

Page 62 Right of Way Improvements Manual


Additional Regulations Other City Departments also regulate or provide guidance on a number of other activities that impact the public rights-of-way, including:  Seattle Parks and Recreation Dept Reviews and Approvals–Any street designated as park drives or boulevards are under the jurisdiction of Seattle Parks and Recreation Department (SPR) and require additional permitting.  Department of Planning and Development Tree Policy and Permits– The Department of Planning and Development (DPD) enforces regulations regarding tree and vegetation protection and removal on private property and in the street right-of-way.  Street and Alley Vacation Process–Street and Alley Vacations are reviewed by SDOT, the Seattle Design Commission and City Council who makes the final decision on whether or not to grant the vacation.  Dedication of Street Rights-Of-Way or Easement–Developers and contractors are sometimes required by DPD to dedicate property for transportation purposes in order to receive a Construction Permit. When this occurs, DPD notifies SDOT Real Property Services that a dedication of private property is required.  Shoreline Street Ends and Unimproved ROW–Shoreline Street Ends are those platted streets that run into water and provide access and/or views of Lake Washington, Lake Union or Puget Sound and have additional regulation and permitting requirements.  Landmark’s Certificate of Approval–A Certificate of Approval is required for any project that will alter the appearance (including demolition) of a protected feature of a designated landmark or a property located in an historic or special review district. This process requires submittal of an application to the Department of Neighborhoods (DON) Office of Urban Conservation and review by the Seattle Landmarks Board or the review board for the landmark district.  State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) –If a project is subject to SEPA, it may require additional permitting and regulations.  State and Federal Permits Approval–There are extensive potential state and federal regulations which may require additional review and permitting.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

The Land Use Code The City of Seattle Land Use requires that streets adjacent and leading to lots being created, developed, or redeveloped, be improved or brought up to the minimum conditions. The Department of Planning and Development determines the required right-of-way improvements and the Department of Transportation reviews and permits the construction of those right-of-way improvements through the Street Improvement Permitting Process. The street improvement requirements vary by location, by land use zones and by street types to reflect the intensity of development, the scale and character of the zone, and to provide a balance between the need to accommodate vehicular and pedestrian traffic and the desire to preserve existing neighborhood character. Design Criteria Design criteria are set forth in several documents, including City of Seattle Comprehensive Plan (2005), Transportation Strategic Plan (2005), Complete Streets ordinance (2007), Stormwater Code (2009) as well as local Design Guidelines established for particular neighborhoods or types of streets. Design criteria can include, but are not limited to, the following elements:  Grading  Design Cross Section  Roadway Width  Roadway Pavement  Intersections  Driveways  Curbs  Sidewalks  Crosswalks  Bicycle Facilities  Street Trees and Landscape Architectural Standards  Street Lighting  Street Drainage, Storm Drains and Sewers  Water Mains  Fire Protection  Seattle City Light  Structures in the Right-of-Way  Transit Zones  Street Furniture, Public Art and Unique Objects in the Public Rightof-Way

Page 63 Right of Way Improvements Manual


Streetscape Design Guidelines Chapter 6 of the Right of Way Improvements Manual sets forth the process for the development and approval of a Street Design Concept Plan, which is a solidifies a vision for the street or streets included and can tie that vision back to other planning and design documents that the neighborhood or City may have developed. However, implementation of the plan is voluntary. The Lake to Bay area is impacted by several adopted Concept Plans, detailed in the remainder of this document:  South Lake Union Street Concept Plans  Thomas Green Street Concept Plan  Denny Way Streetscape Concept Plan  Terry Avenue N. Street Design Guidelines

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Key Findings Sets forth the method by which private development can incorporate important amenities into the public right of way, providing an essential implementation tool for Lake to Bay recommendations.





As the guiding document for Right of Way Improvements, it will be necessary to determine how Lake to Bay recommendations can best be incorporated into the Manual, either through a separate Streetscape Design Guideline or through amendment of existing relevant guidelines.



Design guidelines which provide recommendations over and above existing standards are voluntary and not required as part of private development. Therefore, a commitment by private developers and city-sponsored projects will be required to implement Lake to Bay recommendations.

Page 64 Right of Way Improvements Manual


2013-2018 Adopted Capital Improvement Program Produced by: Date: Geography: Status:

City of Seattle 2013-2018 Citywide Being implemented on a project-by-project basis

Overview SDOT develops, maintains, and operates a transportation system that promotes the safe and efficient mobility of people and goods, and enhances the quality of life, environment, and economy of Seattle and the surrounding region. The Transportation Capital Improvement Program (CIP) includes planned spending $1.54 billion over the 20132018 six-year period. Funding Each project listed is allocated funding through the capital funding plan from different sources of revenue in the cities capital budget. In addition to the traditional funding sources (General Fund, Gas Tax, REET, Vehicle Licensing Fee, surplus property sales, Commercial parking tax and Seawall Bond Levy $502 million, 33%), the Adopted CIP includes revenue from Bridging the Gap ($221 million, 14%), and state/federal grants($447 m, 31%), and long term financing like LID and other sources ($286 m, 19%), as well as around $51 million in funding sources yet to be determined.

Plan Mission and Thematic Priorities The role of the transportation system is to connect people, places, and products. To accomplish this, SDOT’s thematic priorities for building and maintaining its capital infrastructure are:  Productivity—Shared prosperity and economic security  Equity—fairness and inclusiveness for all  Livability—Support for neighborhoods as safe and healthy places to live, work, learn and play  Sustainability—Stewardship of the natural and built environments as well as financial stewardship Projects are initiated through a number of methods including planning processes (modal, subarea, neighborhood planning), preservation, operations and safety needs assessment, regulatory requirements, elected official direction and, in some instances, from neighborhood input such as the Neighborhood Street Fund program. Stakeholders have significant input in development of all SDOT plans through public involvement processes. Seattle’s Pedestrian, Bicycle and Freight Advisory Boards also provide input on project needs. Each program area uses different criteria to rank and select projects, based on the thematic priorities as tailored to the specific program purposes. For example, assessment of Bridge Rehabilitation and Replacement projects begin with an inspection in compliance with national standards, and then also considers public safety, economic benefits, social equity, and support for all transportation modes. SDOT strives to implement the City’s policy goals laid out in Seattle’s Comprehensive Plan and individual policy initiatives such as Complete Streets, the Race and Social Justice Initiative and the Environmental Management Initiative. SDOT’s Transportation Strategic Plan, modal plans and subarea plans.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 65 2013 – 2018 Adopted Capital Improvements Program


Highlights of the CIP Walk Bike Ride The 2013-2018 Adopted CIP includes several projects that are consistent with the Mayor’s Walk Bike Ride initiative, which aims to make walking, biking, and riding transit the easiest ways to get around in Seattle. Over the six-year period, the CIP includes over $36 million for implementation of the Bicycle Master Plan and $40.6 million for implementation of the Pedestrian Master Plan. The Transit Master Plan was completed in early 2012, and the CIP includes investments to implement key components of the plan. The CIP includes the following new pedestrian, bicycle, and transit investments relevant to Lake to Bay: 





Transit Corridor Improvements - In addition to the Madison Corridor Improvements, the 2013-2018 Adopted CIP includes another $22 million – including $8 million in the 2013-2014 biennium – to implement other projects that improve transit speed, reliability, access, and convenience, consistent with the Transit Master Plan. Seattle Center City Connector Transit Analysis - Using unrestricted Cumulative Reserve Sub-fund dollars, the CIP includes $1.5 million in 2014 to examine the benefits, costs and impacts of implementing an urban circulator in the downtown corridor. Downtown Cycle Track Network - Of the appropriation in the 2013 budget for the Seattle Department of Transportation's MobilityCapital BCL, $725,000 is appropriated (and of the amount endorsed for 2014, $250,000 is expected to be appropriated) solely for final design and construction of an initial .25 mile segment of the Downtown cycle track network, and may be spent for no other purpose.

Lake to Bay Area Projects Cheshiahud Lake Union Trail Project Start Date: 2012 This project completes Fairview trail improvements and establishes the History Trail. The project addresses the challenges presented along the Fairview Avenues N and E corridors. This may include implementing a new separated bike/pedestrian path along Fairview Avenue N to the south of the old steam plant to Lake Union Park, and improving the shared route along Fairview Avenue E to the University Bridge. This will substantially complete the needed physical improvements along the trail. Three street-end parks will be improved through volunteer efforts. The Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) and the Center for Wooden Boats (CWB) will implement interpretive elements for the History Trail. Denny Triangle Improvements Start Date: 2002 End Date 2013 This project develops street designs, and implements green street or open space amenities within the Denny Triangle. The remaining funds will be used to implement pedestrian way-finding. Eastlake High Capacity Transit Start Date: 2013 End Date: 2014 This project will explore the development of high capacity transit, including street improvements, in the Eastlake Avenue corridor connecting the University District, Roosevelt, Eastlake, and South Lake Union neighborhoods with Downtown. The project is identified as a priority in the Transit Master Plan. This project will consider rail and bus options in determining the most effective approach to transit service within a project area.

Mercer Corridor Project - West Phase The Mercer Corridor Project - West Phase project will convert Mercer Street to a two-way street between Dexter Ave and Elliott Ave West. The project supports vehicular mobility in the vicinity of the north tunnel portal and completes the vital east-west corridor from Elliott Bay to I-5. SDOT has completed final plans, specifications and cost estimates for the project and has secured all of the necessary local, state and federal funding to fully fund construction. Construction is expected to be completed in 2015 and is estimated to cost $95.1 million.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Page 66 2013 – 2018 Adopted Capital Improvements Program


Pedestrian Master Plan Implementation Start Date: 2010 End Date: Ongoing This ongoing program implements the Pedestrian Master Plan. Typical improvements may include the construction of new sidewalks, the installation of curb ramps at high priority pedestrian locations, the installation of pedestrian lighting, and the rehabilitation or replacement of stairways. The goals of the program are to reduce the number and severity of crashes involving pedestrians; make Seattle a more walkable city for all through equity in public engagement, service delivery, accessibility, and capital investments; develop a pedestrian environment that sustains healthy communities and supports a vibrant economy; and raise awareness of the important role of walking in promoting health and preventing disease. Thomas St Pedestrian Overpass (formerly Belltown/Queen Anne/Waterfront Connections-Thomas St.) Start Date: 2003 End Date: 2013 This project consists of constructing a pedestrian/bicycle overpass across the Burlington Northern Railroad tracks and continuing across Elliott Ave along the W Thomas Street cul-de-sac to connect lower Queen Anne to Myrtle Edwards Park with either elevators and stairs or ramps. The overpass allows pedestrian and bicycle access to Myrtle Edwards Park, creating a vital central link from the park to the west side of the Uptown and Belltown neighborhoods. Sidewalk Safety Repair Start Date: Ongoing End Date: Ongoing This ongoing project rehabilitates sidewalks damaged by street trees or where there are serious safety concerns as evidenced by claims, service requests, and potential City liability. The project includes opportunities for public/private partnerships with citizens, property owners, and businesses. Asset management principles are used to guide repair needs and establish priorities for maintaining the sidewalk (or walkway), curbs, curb ramps, and in some cases, a filler strip between the sidewalk and curb.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Mercer Corridor Project Start Date: 1999 End Date: 2016 This project, part of the Bridging the Gap funding package, implements a comprehensive package of transportation improvements in the Mercer Corridor in South Lake Union. Improvements include, but are not limited to, a widened two-way Mercer St., improved pedestrian safety and access to Lake Union Park, and enhanced neighborhood circulation for all modes. The project aims to use existing street capacity more efficiently and enhance all modes of travel, including pedestrian mobility. Mercer Corridor Project West Phase Start Date: 2010 End Date: 2015 This project converts Mercer Street to a two-way street between Dexter Ave and Elliott Ave West. The Mercer underpass at Aurora Ave will be widened to allow for six travel lanes and a bicycle/pedestrian shared use path between Dexter Ave and 5th Ave North. Roy Street, between Aurora and Queen Anne Ave., will also be converted to a two-way street with on-road bicycle lanes. Transit Corridor Improvements Start Date: Ongoing End Date: Ongoing This program implements projects, including street improvements that improve transit speed, reliability, access, and convenience. The program includes projects identified in the Transit Master Plan. Funding from the Bridging the Gap package is used to leverage grant and partnership opportunities. Seattle Center City Connector Transit Alternative Analysis Start Date: 2012 End Date: 2013 This project will examine the benefits, costs and impacts of implementing an urban circulator in the corridor between the Lower Queen Anne, Uptown and South Lake Union neighborhoods in the north and the King Street Station and Chinatown/International District in the south, potentially connecting all three of Seattle’s multimodal transportation hubs

Page 67 2013 – 2018 Adopted Capital Improvements Program


Neighborhood Traffic Control Program Start Date: Ongoing End Date: Ongoing This ongoing program installs traffic calming devices citywide, primarily neighborhood traffic circles, in response to investigations of citizen requests. The program also installs some mid-block traffic calming devices such as speed humps, as well as residential street speed limit signs and warning signs. Neighborhood Large Projects Start Date: Ongoing End Date: Ongoing This program enhances the safety, quality and condition of the pedestrian and neighborhood environments. Improvements may include sidewalk construction, repairs and replacement, installation of curb bulbs or other traffic calming devices, and improvements to crosswalks. The Neighborhood Street Fund is funded by the Bridging the Gap (BTG) transportation levy and is a triennial program. The projects funded are identified by the community and prioritized by the District Councils and the BTG Oversight Committee. Prior to 2013, the elements of this project were included in the NSF/CRS Neighborhood Program. NSF/CRS Neighborhood Program Start Date: Ongoing End Date: Ongoing This ongoing program has two elements: an annual program that identifies projects estimated less than $100,000 that are prioritized by each of the 13 district councils; and a triennial program that identifies projects estimated between $100,000 and $500,000 that are prioritized by the community at large and a project review team. Typical improvements may include, but are not limited to, sidewalk construction, repairs and replacement, installation of curb bulbs or other traffic calming devices, and improvements to crosswalks. The program enhances the safety, quality and condition of the pedestrian and neighborhood environments. Beginning in 2013, the NSF/CRS Neighborhood Program will only reflect improvements that can be completed by City crews, and improvements that are contracted out will be covered by a new project named Neighborhood Large Projects.

Lake to Bay Inventory and Visioning Project Appendix: Policy Review

Waterfront Improvement Program Start Date: 2013 End Date: 2018 The Waterfront Improvement Program includes a number of elements including demolishing the existing Alaskan Way Viaduct, constructing a new Alaskan Way surface street and decommissioning the Battery Street Tunnel. In addition, new public space, from the Olympic Sculpture Park to Pioneer Square, will be created including parks and paths, access to the water, places to enjoy views, vibrant public and cultural spaces, and a new urban street that will accommodate all modes of travel and provide an important connection in the City’s transportation system. Key Findings The CIP is the primary source of funding and implementation of many projects generated through a variety of planning processes.

 

As seen in the plans above, the Lake to Bay area typically scores high in terms of priority for funding in most of the city-wide plans due to high volumes of vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclist and other factors.



While much of the Lake to Bay area is scored as high priority, it is unclear exactly how that prioritization translates directly to funding decisions in the CIP – funded projects are determined internally in each department and will require significant advocacy to ensure that Lake to Bay elements are funded through the CIP process or incorporated into funded projects.



Most of the funded projects fall into the “good practice” category and do not reach the level of ambition of Lake to Bay. It is unclear how Lake to Bay projects, particularly more innovative street design or ambitious programming elements would be supported through the CIP process.

Page 68 2013 – 2018 Adopted Capital Improvements Program

Lake to Bay // Inventory and Opportunities  

The Lake to Bay Inventory and Opportunities work resulted in a re-imaged vision of the Lake to Bay as a city-defining connection between t...

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