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Dance and martial arts spectacle PAGE 24

An edition of the East Valley Tribune

INSIDE

This Week

FREE ($1 OUTSIDE OF GILBERT) | GilbertSunNews.com

GSN NEWS STAFF

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Gilbert vet leading big parade.

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Higley, GPS win all money requests Higley and Gilbert Public Schools get high grades from state Education Department. See page 4.

NEWS......................................

Gilbert cupcake war a sweet fight PAGE 14

V

oters in Gilbert approved all bond and override measures sought by the three school districts that cover the town, according to final results posted by

the Maricopa County Recorder’s office. Only about a quarter of the ballots mailed out were returned in the bond and/or budget override measures for Gilbert Public Schools, Higley Unified and Chandler Unified school districts. Gilbert Public Schools’ request for a $100 million bond issue won overwhelmingly by a 62 to 32 percent margin while its request to increase

a budget override by 5 percent passed by a far narrower margin of 55 to 45 percent. Gilbert District Superintendent Shane McCord thanked voters for their support of both measures. “We are extremely grateful to be a part of such a wonderful community, with excep-

see BONDS page 7

Desert Sky high

BUSINESS..........................

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Couple brings Tough Mudder to Gilbert.

Preley Barr leaps for joy on one of the amazing amenities at the new Desert Sky Park that Gilbert opened last week. Gilbert Sun News Photographer Chris Mortenson was there when the park was dedicated and captured the first few kids to sample its many attractions. For more photos, turn to page 6.. (Chris Mortenson/GSN Staff Photographer)

SPORTS...........................

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Desert Ridge swimmer a 'Ferrari in the pool.'

COMMUNITY...................... 14 BUSINESS..............................17 OPINION.............................. 20 SPORTS................................. 21 GETOUT................................24 CLASSIFIED........................ 29

Gilbert to open a final resting place BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

G

ilbert this week marks another milestone as it dedicates the town’s first cemetery. Gilbert Memorial Park, which officially opens for business after two delayed debuts, touts some unique features typically

not seen in cemeteries. “Our big driver of the development of the cemetery was not just to create a place but an experience for people, to allow them to interact in the space and allow them the opportunity to heal,” said Bryce Bunker, president of Bunker Family Funerals and Cremation. The Mesa company has a 99-year lease

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agreement with Gilbert to build and own the 22-acre cemetery on townland. Bunker Family Funerals will pay Gilbert rent on the land and share revenue from the cemetery’s operation. Gilbert anticipated it will receive between $100,000 and $200,000 annually in rent and

see CEMETERY page 3

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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CEMETERY from page 1

An edition of the East Valley Tribune Gilbert Sun News is published every Sunday and distributed free of charge to homes and in single-copy locations throughout Gilbert. To find out where you can pick up a free copy of Gilbert Sun News, please visit www.EastValleyTribune.com.

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revenue sharing over the course of the lease, according to town documents. According to town estimates, the project is expected to generate more than $13 million in revenue for Gilbert over the course of the lease – well above the $2.3 million the town paid for the land in 1999. Throughout the park are chalk walls where people can write messages to their departed loved ones, water features that provide serenity, music throughout the cremation garden, stations where people can prepare flowers to be placed on the plots of their loved ones and walking paths, Bunker said. “A lot of the design was driven by the experience we wanted to create for people and have it more than fields of grass,” he said, explaining: “When people come, it will be refreshingly different than anywhere they’ve been. They’ll feel a sense of peace and appreciate the level of thought and detail.” The first phase includes a 10,000-square-foot funeral home with a chapel, a banquet facility and kitchen, over 3,100 burial plots, nine private family estates and 88 indoor glass-front niches for cremation remains on 10 acres. Each plot in the cemetery is capable of holding up to two people, buried one atop the other and there are “thousands of (cremation) spots indoor and some outdoor, some above ground and some below ground,” according to Bunker. “I think we certainly have some of the most creative and expansive options for cremations,” he said. Bunker said it was uncertain how many phases the project will have. “We don’t have 100 percent certainty what the subsequent phases will look like,” he said. “The first phase was developed to have a number of different options for families and to figure out what people liked and what they are relating to and what they find value in and that will drive what is in the following phases. It might be more cremations or more burials.” Although there will not be a special section reserved for veterans, Bunker said they were still working on a pro-

Bryce Bunker, president of Bunker Family Funerals and Cremation, is proud of the design of Gilbert's first cemetery, which his mortuary will be running under a 99-year agreement with the town. (Chris Mortenson/GSN Staff Photographer)

gram on how to honor each veteran at the park. Bunker declined to reveal the cost of phase 1. “I will say we certainly made a significant investment to make sure we had a project we could deliver to the community that they can be proud of and have value,” he said. “No corners were cut. We really wanted this to stand apart from other options in other areas, both in beauty and investment.” Bunker said his company visited numerous cemeteries with reputations in the Southwest, including California, New Mexico and Utah while designing Gilbert Memorial Park. “We tried to learn from each of those some of the things they did well,” Bunker said. “A chalk wall was one of those things that give families an opportunity to interact with the space and have an experience that helps them so they feel like they are still communicating with the ones they lost.” Bunker said the price list for burial at the cemetery was expected to be released this week. He noted there will be a resident discount, how much will depend on the plot. Despite project delays, Gilbert, with almost 250,000 residents, is no longer the largest municipality in the county without a cemetery.

GOT NEWS?

When the park broke ground in July 2018, a spring debut was announced and then postponed to the summer. “We were more interested in getting it right than done fast,” Bunker explained. He said a couple of thousand people have already reached out for more information about the cemetery and are looking forward to its opening. “I have been able to design something around what I feel funeral services should be like and the experience people should have – interactive features we have installed and everything in between,” Bunker said, “I feel that it will create an experience for people that will be helpful to them if they are dealing with the most difficult time in their lives.”

IF YOU GO:

Ribbon cutting, open house Ceremony: Ribbon-cutting ceremony for Gilbert Memorial Park with Mayor Jenn Daniels, Bunker Family members and local officials When: 10:30 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 12 Where: 2100 E. Queen Creek Road, Gilbert Open house: Open house for Gilbert Memorial Park with tours. When: 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 16 Where: 2100 E. Queen Creek Road, Gilbert Information: gilbertmemorialpark.com

Contact Cecilia Chan at 480-898-5613 or cchan@timespublications.com


NEWS

4

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Most GPS, Higley schools get high grades BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

H

igley Unified School District has a lot to crow about: 13 of its 14 campuses earned an “A,” according to preliminary letter grades for 2018-19 released by the Arizona Department of Education. Higley outperformed its larger counterpart Gilbert Public Schools, which had 21 “A” schools, 12 with a “B” schools and five with a “C.” “When you have the best and brightest students, staff and community all working for the best in each child, it makes our jobs easy,” said Higley Superintendent Mike Thomason. “The improvements made were by design by providing intentional and targeted support to each child. “ Higley last year had nine A schools and four B schools. This year, Coronado and Centennial elementary and Sossaman Middle School went from “B” to “A.” Coronado’s “B” grade was the same as last year. Thomason also attributed the dis-

Settler's Point Elementary School scored the biggest raise in grades among Gilbert Public Schools campuses, going from a "C" last year to an "A." The school involves the community in many extracurricular activities like this second annual breakfast for grandparents. (Facebook)

trict’s success to its valuing of professional development and professional learning communities for staff. “The principals and teachers worked hard to monitor students’ individualized data,” he said. “The hard work started in the classroom and was customized to in-

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GILBERT

dividual needs.” The state letter grades are based on student academic growth from year to year, scores on the statewide assessment or other assessments for some high schools, high school graduation rates and indicators that a student is ready

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for success at the next level, according to the state Education Department. The annual grades give parents a barometer to compare schools and decide which is best for their child. In Gilbert, six campuses increased their grades while six dropped from the prior year. Boulder Creek, Houston, Oak Tree elementary schools all dropped to a C from a B last year. Islands, Ashland Ranch and Playa Del Rey elementary schools all dropped to “B” from an “A” while Desert Ridge Junior High dropped to a “C” from a “B” in 2018. Harris, Meridian, Patterson and Towne Meadows elementary schools and Highland High School all raised their grades to an “A” from last year’s “B.” Settler’s Point Elementary made the biggest improvement, climbing to an “A” from a “C.” GPS in 2018 had 18 “A” campuses, 18 “B” campuses and two “C” campuses. Despite the increase in “C” grades for 2019, district spokeswoman Dawn An-

see GRADES page 5

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BEHIND the Scenes The Heritage Boondoggle It is reported that the town owns one hundred different parcels in the Heritage Boondoggle. it includes the Park University building which sat vacant for several years and it also includes the Chamber of Commerce building which it has been said they get at below market value. Could it possibly be because the mayor, the entire Gilbert Town Council and even the town manager live in the north part of town that this is the reason for this boondoggle? The people I speak to in the south want no part of this boondoggle and as a matter of fact have some very negative remarks about it. Whatever happened to equal treatment under the law between the north and south of the town?

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NEWS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Gilbert hero is veterans parade grand marshal GSN NEWS STAFF

A

Gilbert World War II veteran will be the grand marshal tomorrow as the 2019 East Valley Veterans Parade steps off. Leading the parade will be Lt. Henry DuBay, 95, of Gilbert. Born in Massachusetts, raised in northern New York, Henry graduated from high school in 1941, six months before Pearl Harbor, and signed up for a new pilot training program. DuBay trained at various bases, including Lawson Army Airfield, where he was trained in dropping paratroopers. Once the US entered the war, DuBay found himself in the European Theater. His first mission was flying supplies from Africa to Sicily in July 1943. During this time, 64 C-47s were shot down in a “friendly fire” incident over Gela, Sicily, costing more than 465 lives. The following months brought a variety of missions, eventually leading to the Normandy Invasion that began June 6, 1944, as part of Operation Overlord, now commonly referred to as D-Day. DuBay piloted a C-47 transport during the Normandy Invasion, the massive Allied invasion that opened western pressure on the German army and ultimately contributed to ending the war in Europe. “He is my hero, as every soldier in World War II is. I have such admiration for these men who risked their lives for freedom,” said his daughter, Dr. Holly West of Gilbert. “My father tells stories of flying through air so thick with smoke that staying in formation was nearly impossible because you couldn’t see the other

GRADES from page 4

testenis noted that a large majority of its schools earned an A or a B this year. “The others, prior to receiving their 2018-19 letter grades, had already begun implementing strategic initiatives to improve student outcomes,” she said in an email. “The professional educators and administrators at each site work diligently to engage students at high-levels and provide intentional, responsive learning opportunities.” She added the district engages in continuous cycles of improvement, con-

Lt. Henry DuBay, 95, of Gilbert, is ready to salute the thousands of spectators who will flock to downtown Mesa tomorrow for the East Valey Veterans Day Parade, for which he has been named the grand marshal. (GSN file photo)

planes 15 feet away. With one navigator for every eight planes, finding your target was your one consuming thought. There was no time to be afraid.” “Henry DuBay certainly qualifies as a member of ‘The Greatest Generation’ and a true war hero, delivering troops, supplies and fuel, often behind enemy lines,” said Rick Hardina of Honor Flight Arizona. During his 2 and a half years of active service, DuBay’s service included delivering supplies to Gen. George Patton’s Third Army and the Red Ball Express, dropping paratroopers, tugging gliders and, during the Battle of the Bulge, landing at night and in bitter cold with only the lights of runway jeeps to assist him. Completing his duty in September 1945 at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, DuBay married, earned this architec-

stantly evaluating practices and providing support for its campuses. “The 2019-20 academic year began with a districtwide K6 English language arts curriculum implementation,” she said, adding: “Along with this, GPS begins year two of the Professional Learning Communities/Data Teams implementation, a standards-based and student learningcentered process that provides extensive professional development and support for school sites.” Antestenis pointed out that Arizona continues to revise its assessment system and accountability models. She said

tural degree and went on to design international airports. He worked on the ICBM and the Apollo Project for NASA, which 50 years ago this July put Americans on the moon. “Dubay personifies the thousands of quiet everyday heroes that demonstrated courage, skill and resolve without regard for personal fame,” a parade spokeswoman said, adding: “His service in face of the threat of almost constant danger resulted in him receiving the Air Medal – the Armed Forces decoration created in 1942 awarded for single acts of heroism or meritorious achievement while in flight – and eight Bronze Stars. The parade’s dual theme is “Commemorate and Celebrate,” echoing the World War II saga “War and Remembrance.”

the district will continue to respond with intention, keeping students at the center of its decisions. “The state accountability system is one useful measure of academic progress,” she said. “It does not take into consideration the value of climate and culture, which is created by the dedicated, professional staff who work with our community’s children. “Gilbert Public Schools continues to be a strong academic community that supports learners of all levels.” Statewide, 28 percent of K-8 schools, 28 percent of 9-12 schools and 46 percent of hybrid schools earned A’s.

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The parade will step off after presentations at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow at University Drive and Center Street in Mesa, then proceed south on Center to First Street, then west to Robson before concluding. Last year over 40,000 Gilbert and other East Valley residents watched more than 100 entries from across the region march in the parade. In commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day – the turning point of World War II – and marking the 100th anniversary of Veterans Day – established in 1919 as Armistice Day – the East Valley Veterans Parade pays tribute to one of the war’s historical moments as well as the nation’s decision to set aside a special day remembering all who served this country in war and peace. “War and Remembrance” was novelist Herman Wouk’s sequel to “Winds of War” and both involved World War II’s impact on several fictitious families while it also portrayed some of the major moments leading up to and during the war. On June 6, 1944, Supreme Allied Commander General Dwight D. Eisenhower gave the go-ahead for the largest amphibious military operation in history. Operation Overload, more commonly known as D-Day, began the Allied invasion of northern France.  By daybreak, over 18,000 British and American parachutists were on the ground, with an additional 13,000 aircraft providing air cover and support.  At 6:30 a.m., American troops came ashore at Utah and Omaha beaches, while British and Canadian troops landed at Gold, Juno and Sword beaches. 

see PARADE page 11

Schools have until 5 p.m., Nov.15, to appeal their letter grade. Depending on the outcome of the appeal, those schools’ letter grades may change when the state Education Board considers appeals in December.

Letter grades:

A – excellent. B – highly performing C – performing but needs improvement on some indicators. D – minimally performing F – failing

Source: Arizona State Board of Education.


NEWS

6

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Trying out the new park CHRIS MORTENSON/GSN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Gilbert's new Desert Sky Park, which opened last week, offers plenty of attractions for kids who want to drop by the new facility at 6624 S. Power Road between Williams Field and Pecos roads. Among the first arrivals were: 1. Paisley Haskins, 2. Adam Rayl, 3. Oliver Giles, 4. a number of adults wowed by the new toys, 5. Emily Ferron, 6. Carter Schlapp. 7. Candra Rader, Frederick Sava and Dustin Armstrong, 8. Jaxsen Weller, 9. Trinity Ovard,

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NEWS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

BONDS

from page 1

tional students, employees, and families,” Dr. McCord said in a released statement. “Now is the time for us to look forward, together, as we build on the incredible momentum in our school district and continue to inspire excellence in every learner.” Higley voters meanwhile gave a whopping 63 to 37 percent approval to that district’s override request and a 65 to 35 percent approval for permission to reallocate capital dollars from an earlier approved bond issue. “We are grateful for the community’s support of both these measures. We will now be able to address the many needs of the district with the existing bond dollars,” said Higley Superintendent Mike Thomason. “I personally want to thank the community and district staff for your continued support,” Dr. Thomason added. “We are grateful to have a Governing Board that is also very supportive.” And Chandler Unified won approval for its $290-million bond – the largest in that district’s history. That vote OKed various construction, renovation and capital projects – including a new elementary school within

Gilbert town limits since the district’s boundaries extend into western Gilbert and a new high school in the city’s eastern area that will partially serve Gilbert students. Gilbert Public Schools’ bond issue will pay for capital projects such as new security camera systems districtwide, renovating and upgrading performing arts and athletic facilities at secondary schools and replacing buses. GPS also got voter OK for a 15-percent maintenance-andoperations override. An override allows a district to increase spending for its day-to-day operations. Voters in 2015, passed a 10-percent Higley Unified gather kids, teachers and other staff to give a video thank you on social media last week to all voters who override, which begins to ex- approved its override and bond requests. Speciall to GSN) pire in the 2021-22 school year. lion bond, of which $90 million has been puses, according to officials. The 15-percent override replaces a spent as of September. Bond debt is generally paid off through previous override and gives an addiThe 2015 bond monies, went for proj- an increase in the secondary proptional $10.6 million to the district – $2 ects such as remodeling student rest- erty tax rate. But district officials say million to reduce class size, $6.8 million room, updating phone systems at cam- residents won’t see an increase in their to retain and attract teachers and $1.65 puses and the district office and new property taxes because the 2015 bond million to hire social workers and men- gym flooring. This past year alone, the debt will be paid off and the new bond tal health counselors. district spent $11 million in upgrades see BONDS page 12 Voters in 2015, approved a $98 mil- and renovations at over 30 of its 40 cam-

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

JOIN US FOR ONE OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS! T U E S DAY, N OV E M B E R 1 2 T H | 1 1 : 3 0 A M – 1 2 : 3 0 P M We Love Daytrips – Do You? (Complimentary Lunch)

Kindred Tours is the guru of travel and they specialize in tours for active Seniors. Join us to learn what trips they have planned that you can join in on and enter for a chance to win a golf foursome at Superstition Springs Golf Club (value $360) and a Kindred Tours Daytrip (value $100) Location: Waldo’s BBQ | 4369 E. Village Parkway, Gilbert, AZ 85295 RSVP’s required by 11/8/19 to: JDolter@SurpassLiving.com or (480) 267–9851

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Know what’s in store for the New Year! Join us for lunch and enter for a chance to win a golf foursome at Superstition Golf Club (value $360) and a Gift Basket (value $50) Speaker: Mark Molina, RIS (Retirement Insurance Specialists) Location: Superstition Springs Golf Club – Overlook Room | 6542 E. Baseline Road, Mesa, AZ 85206 RSVP’s required by 11/14/19 to: JDolter@SurpassLiving.com or (480) 267–9851

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Heartwarming, iconic holiday comedy that is hilarious and charming. Starring Will Ferrell, James Caan, Bob Newhart and Zooey Deshchanel Location: Alamo Drafthouse in Chandler | 4955 S. Arizona Avenue, Chandler, AZ 85248 RSVP’s required by 11/27/19 to: JDolter@SurpassLiving.com or (480) 267–9851

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NEWS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

9

Police: Gilbert couple sold $2M in stolen goods BY CECILIA CHAN GSN Managing Editor

A

tip and cops posing as shoplifters helped nabbed a Gilbert couple accused of selling over $2 million in stolen health-and-beauty items online to fund their lifestyle. Gilbert police arrested Zachary Andrew Robbins, 42, and his wife, Jie Q. Robbins, 48, on Nov. 1. They face charges, including trafficking stolen goods and money laundering. Zachary Robbins faced an additional charge of carrying a gun. Both were scheduled for a Nov. 12, preliminary hearing and each was given a $35,000 cash bail. Police first got information in July that the couple was buying large quantities of items from shoplifters and selling them on websites such as eBay and Amazon, court records state. Detectives posed as shoplifters and met with the couple about half a dozen times from Aug. 8 to Oct. 10, at a grocery store parking lot near Higley and Eliott roads, according to court documents.

Zachary Andrew Robbins

Jie Q. Robbins,

Undercover detectives sold the couple products advertised on their sites from brands, including Nicorette, Rogaine, Viviscal and Prevegen, records state. In one of the transactions, a detective sold $2,283 worth of “stolen” products to the couple for $853, who in turn sold it for below retail cost, according to doc-

uments. For example, on the couple’s active eBay account with the seller name of QBeauty15, a three-month supply of McNeil Rogaine Treatment was selling for $37.80 or best offer, plus $3.80 shipping. The product generally retails for about $49.

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According to police, Jie Robbins provided undercover detectives a list of items she was seeking and a price list of what she would pay for them, usually about 30 percent off retail value. During these contacts, she would coach the detectives to say the items were purchased from close-outs, liquidations stores or swap meets if asked where the items came from, records say. During this time period, detectives were able to obtain from the couple’s trash and recycling containers, shipping boxes from other states with return address labels. “Names and addresses were researched and each individual sending boxes to the defendant had a criminal history of shoplifting or larceny,” according to court documents. There also were numerous discarded empty packages for items with retail security stickers on them from stores in other states and invoices from individuals for those items ranging from $1,000

see COUPLE page 12


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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NEWS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

PARADE from page 5

By day’s end, 155,000 Allied troops had successfully stormed Normandy’s beaches and were able to push inland, opening a second front against Germany. The heroism and bravery displayed by Allied troops changed the course of World War II. In November 1918, Allied powers signed a ceasefire agreement with Germany at Rethondes, France, at 11 a.m. bringing the war now known as World War I to a close. 

On Nov. 11, 1919, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day with these words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory…”  Between the world wars, Nov. 11 was observed as Armistice Day, but after World War II, it was recognized as a day of tribute to veterans of both wars.  In 1954, after the return of veterans from both World War II and the

Korean War, President Dwight Eisenhower signed a bill rededicating Nov. 11  as  Veterans Day  and encouraged Americans to commit themselves to the cause of peace and to honor America’s veterans for their courage, honor, patriotism and sacrifice. The East Valley Veterans Parade has a storied past. When the annual Mesa Veterans Parade fell victim to necessary budget cuts in 2006, local residents Gerry Walker and Frank “Gunny” Alger spoke out on behalf of the 40-year-old Mesa

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tradition. “There will be a Veterans Day parade if it is only me marching down the street with Frank watching,” Walker declared. The Marine Corps League Saguaro Chapter in Mesa took the lead and the Mesa Veterans Parade Association was formed. In 2013, the all-volunteer organization changed its name to the East Valley Veterans Parade Association to reflect the participation of parade entrants and sponsors from most East Valley communities.

Higley senior takes vets’ parade essay crown GSN NEWS STAFF

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Williams Field High School senior took first place in the Phoenix Veterans Day Parade’s annual essay contest. Johnathan Gregus entered the contest through teacher David Vaughn’s class, parade organizers said. Here is his essay in its entirety: Every year, Phoenix hosts an annual Veterans Day Parade. Veterans Day, originally called Armistice Day, began on November 11th, 1919, a year after WWI ended. In 1926, Congress passed a resolution for an annual observance that allowed Veterans Day to become a national holiday beginning in 1938. Since then, we thank our soldiers who put their lives on the line to protect our freedom and our country. In this essay, I will be explaining how Veterans Day was formed and why we observe it. World War I ended on Nov. 11, 1918, with 116,708 American soldiers losing their lives. In 1919, America proudly began honoring its veterans with its first Armistice Day Parade in New York City. In 1954, the Veterans Service Organization urged Congress to replace the word Armistice with Veterans due to the additional wars of World War II and the Korean War. Today, Veterans Day is celebrated

EWilliams Field High School senior Johnathan Gregus earned first place in the Phoenix Veterans Day Parade's annual essay contest. (Higley Unified)

from small towns to large cities all with the purpose of honoring and showing appreciation to those who have served. It’s a chance for everyone to put aside petty differences and unite for a common cause in order to properly thank our Veterans. Our service personnel deserves our

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utmost respect throughout the year and Veterans Day is an opportunity to remind everyone of that fact. Soldiers risk their lives to protect us and our rights so that we don’t have to. They defend our freedoms we enjoy in this country and they have a positive influence on our next generation of ser-

vice personnel. My neighbor, Mark Billingsley, who was a Navy Pilot would always talk to me about what he did in the military and how his experiences shaped him into who he is today. I asked him what America would be like if we didn’t have a military and he responded: “We would be speaking German or Japanese. The USA wouldn’t exist without a military, we would just be a conquered nation in the dustbin of conquered nations that no longer exist. “From WWII history alone, Germany was close winning had our military not joined the fight in Italy.” The America we all know, and love would not exist without these brave soldiers defending our country. I personally have been strongly influenced by the Armed Forces since I was very young. Holding these parades has allowed me to witness these brave men and women who have served our country and put their lives on the line for our safety and freedom. Realizing what these soldiers have done for us has influenced me to want to serve my country and I have elected to enlist with the Air Force National Guard. I am excited to dedicate myself to military service in order to sustain our country’s values that have been so honorably preserved by our Veterans. Veterans Day is truly remarkable.

www.GilbertSunNews.com


NEWS

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

BONDS from page 7

debt will take its place. Fourteen citizens – including former Town Councilman Ben Cooper, former school district governing board members and Gilbert Chamber President/ CEO Kathy Tilque – wrote in favor of both measures in the informational pamphlets that went out to voters. They argued the district needs the money to continue its outstanding educational system – a plus in building a strong community and attracting businesses. Two arguments opposing the passage of both the bond and override were submitted by former school board member Julie Smith and residents Christine and Aaron Accurso.

COUPLE

from page 9

to $23,000, showing payments made through Paypal, documents say. Detectives obtained the couple’s banking records and found a Paypal account owned by Jie Robbins that had taken in $2.8 million in sales from 2015-19. Detectives also found a bank account

Smith questioned the district’s need for more money when she claimed it is “wasting bond money on imprudent renovations and seemingly unnecessary busses.” The Accursos asked why the district was asking for more money to improve buildings that are “half-empty” and pointed to district studies that showed a decline in student enrollment. According to the district, the override would bring in about $31.8 million per year for five years and then decrease by a third in each of years six and seven unless renewed by taxpayers. Property owners will see a secondary property tax increase. Currently, with the 10-percent override, the average monthly tax is $8. It would be $12 with the new override.

Approval of the override averted a $21- million cut from the budget over three years. Meanwhile, Higley won voter approval to continue a 15-percent override approved in 2015 and permission to repurpose unspent money from a $70.5 million bond passed in 2013. The district, which oversees 13 campuses located in Gilbert and Queen Creek, used the 2015 override dollars to increase teacher compensations, hire more staff to reduce class sizes and buy educational resources for classrooms. The override dollars will fund increased teacher compensation, maintain average class sizes and support gifted, special education and all-day kindergarten. With the 2013 bond, Higley has $14.7 million remaining that it wants to redirect

to ongoing student transportation and technology needs, according to officials. At the time the bond went up for election, the district proposed spending for land purchase and a transportation-support facility, which are no longer needed. Seven people, including Tilque and Gilbert Mayor Jenn Daniels, wrote in favor of the override. No arguments opposing the override were submitted. In Mesa Public Schools, officials narrowly won voter approval – 54 to 46 percent– to increase the maintenanceand-operations override to 15 percent from 10 percent. This was the second consecutive year that Mesa schools sought the override, which narrowly failed last year even though voters approved a $300 million bond issue for the district.

with Amazon payments in the “tens of thousands of dollars per month.” The account balance reached as high as $279,000 until high-dollar withdrawals occurred in October 2017, police said. Shipping addresses indicated the couple had sent items domestically and to several countries, including China, Russia and the United Arab Emirates.

Police said the couple used the profits from their illicit enterprise to buy vehicles, their house and to pay for everyday living expenses. Maricopa County Recorder shows the couple purchased a brand-new home in Morrison Ranch in October 2017, taking out a $170,000 loan. The home sold for $370,142. The couple paid off the home loan in

August 2018, records show. When Jie Robbins was arrested, she denied knowing the items were stolen and claimed she purchased them from liquidation stores, swap meets or pawn shops, police said. Police said they recovered $500,000 to $750,000 worth of brand-new merchandise stored throughout the couple’s home.

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Aaron Ezolt joins Mesa financial services company First Guaranty Financial is pleased to announce Aaron Ezolt has joined their Mesa office as an Account Manager. First Guaranty Financial specializes in assisting clients with financial strategies to grow and secure their retirement savings. Through their business platform, clients have access to industry leading companies and proven products. Aaron carefully assists retirees and those getting ready to retire achieve their financial goals, and is able to assist with various financial strategies including Social Security Maximization, Guaranteed Lifetime Income, Legacy Planning and Wealth Preservation. Request a complimentary review of your IRA/401K/CD/SEP/SIMPLE/TSA or other retirement accounts with Aaron at (480) 284-6393 or aezolt@firstguarantyfinancial.net

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Community

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COMMUNITY

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

For more community news visit gilbertsunnews.com

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Sweet competition PABLO ROBLES/GSN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHE4

Greenfield Junior High held its eighth annual Cupcake Wars where 170 students have up to three weeks to strategize, bake and display their cupcakes in themed exhibits. Laurie Doron-Frederick, career and technical education teacher, said the entire project :is fun for all” and on Nov. 1, the “war” culminated in a final battle before judges to see who had the best displays.1. Amaya Bailey, 13, and Dayanara Bustos, also 13, set up their display.. 2. Judge Vicki Jones queries Justin Weeks, 13, about his engineering-themed display. 3. Paige Staymer, 13, bakes her last round of cupcakes. 4. Lexi Bl;awat, 13, used toy soldiers for her exhibit. 5. Ava Williams, 13, put some final frosting touches on her cupcakes.

1 2 4

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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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COMMUNITY

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Arizona bird expert speaking at Gilbert event

GSN NEWS STAFF

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noted authority on birds in Arizona is the featured speaker for the next meeting of the Desert Rivers Audubon chapter. Author Charles Babbitt will discuss some of the state’s most productive and

interesting spots for bird watching at the meeting, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Southeast Regional Library on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Guadalupe roads, Gilbert. Babbitt is the author of a new book, “Birding Arizona—What to Know, Where to Go.” During his talk he will explore a variety

of habitats and discuss Arizona’s bird migration, including the summer influx from the Gulf of California, fall hawk and shorebird migrations, and great places to watch the spring and fall passerine migration. Charles will be signing his book before the program. A third-generation Arizonan, he is a

lawyer, past president of the Maricopa Audubon Society and past member of the Arizona Bird Committee. The Desert Rivers chapter provides environmental education and conservation opportunities to valley residents and advocates for our environment Information: desertriversaudubon.org

played on a wall inside the store as part of the Kroger Company’s commitment to involving artists in beautifying new stores in Arizona,” Kolar said. “The artwork will be expected to create an uplifting experience in the stores, create a space that encourages community gathering, and celebrates the spirit of the community and the unique identity of the neighborhood and its surroundings,” she added. Any artwork would be mounted on panels of durable material, attached to the wall. One piece will hang over bench seating and should be 11 feet wide by 5 feet high. The other, on a wall near a community table, 12 feet wide by 6 feet high.

All professional artists in the East Valley with the ability to produce exemplary large-scale art can apply. This is a “work for hire” with Kroger owning all rights to the work. Interested artists must submit certain documents no later than Nov. 26, and only by email to kayla@hdsouth.org. Besides a resume in Word or PDF format, three images no larger than 5MB documenting previously completed works that demonstrate the ability to design, create and install large-scale art must be submitted. Each image should be accompanied by an information sheet with the title, date, medium and a brief description.

Up to six artists will be selected to prepare a design/drawing of the proposed artwork and will be paid $300 for their proposals. The two artists who are picked will be paid $9,000 each. This commission includes all artist fees, the cost of the design, including fabrication and installation, transportation and insurance costs to deliver said artwork to the stores by April 8, for the Higley-Baseline facility and June 24, for the other. Semi-finalists will be notified Dec. 19, and be expected to submit a design/drawing by Jan. 2. The two winners will be chosen Jan. 22.

Artists sought for two Fry’s stores in Gilbert GSN NEWS STAFF

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ocal artists have a chance to create artwork that will appear at two of the busiest public places in Gilbert – supermarkets. Kayla Kolar, manager of HD SOUTH, home of the Gilbert Historical Museum, said her organization is partnering with Fry’s Food Stores to commission professional artists to create indoor artwork in two Fry’s locations: One at Higley and Baseline roads and another at Williams Field and Recker roads. Both open next year. “The artwork will be prominently dis-


Business

BUSINESS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

GilbertSunNews.com

|

@Gilber tSunNews

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/Gilber tSunNews

Gilbert site of state’s first Tough Mudder Bootcamp GSN NEWS STAFF

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hen the going gets tough and you’re a fitness enthusiast, you might already be at Tough Mudder Bootcamp – the latest addition to Gilbert’s burgeoning fitness scene. The brand that made its name with 10-to-12-mile endurance events across the country, is now bringing one of its brick-and-mortar gyms to Gilbert, the first in Arizona. Owners Jason and Kristina Todd opened their Tough Mudder Bootcamp at 2524 S. Santan Village Parkway. And the gym will offer workouts based on the same principles of the Tough Mudder events – “fostering a sense of community as class participants work together to accomplish their goals during a 45-minute HIIT-based workout.” “What sets Tough Mudder Bootcamp apart and makes it perfect for Gilbert is, it’s extremely organized and streamlines the entire circuit process. It’s the best HIIT class I’ve ever seen,” said Jason, adding: “The scalability of the workout makes

The new Tough Mudder Bootcamp in Gilbert - the first in Arizona - offers lots of equipment to get in shape. (Special to GSN)

it so that no matter what your fitness level, you can always get the most out of each class and never have to worry about repeating workouts.” He’s hoping “Gilbert will fall in love with our classes as an opportunity to maintain a healthy lifestyle for themselves and their families.” The new studio is offering a limitedtime lifetime membership at reduced prices for unlimited monthly classes. People are invited to try out the program free at special introductory classes. “Like many families in Gilbert, staying active and showing our children how to build good habits is extremely important to our family and Tough Mudder Bootcamp is the best method I’ve seen to develop that healthy lifestyle,” said Kristina. She said the gym’s workouts are organized months in advance “and designed to never repeat a workout, giving you time to rest so you’re not over-working sore muscles.” The Todds bring a strong background

see

MUDDER page 19

New Gilbert medical practice focuses on aging GSN NEWS STAFF

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new medical practice opened in Gilbert after a big grand opening last week, and Mayor Jenn Daniels even joined the festivities. GhentMD, which boasts of “integrating innovative health and wellness services” opened at 1434 W. Elliot Road. Founder and medical director Dr. Anthony Aghenta said he uses “concepts from the advancing fields of age management and regenerative medicine” to treat patients suffering from agingrelated skin disorders, obesity, chronic pain, hormonal imbalance, sexual dysfunction, stress and loss of vitality. “I initially resisted getting involved in ‘alternative medicine,’” he said, despite his wife’s prodding to do just that. ”When she developed significant and

Dr. Anthony Aghenta has opened a multi-pronged medical practice in Gilbert called GhentMD. (Special to GSN)

intermittently disabling pain related to childbirth, it became easy to adopt after seeing her recover with the aid of alternative therapies when conventional medicine failed to help her heal,” Aghenta said. “I have reached a point in my career where I feel confident about harmonizing the best of conventional, alterna-

tive and emerging medical technology.” Aghenta said his services include aesthetics, regenerative pain relief, sexual rejuvenation, weight management, nutrient IV therapy, concierge medicine, and primary care. Aghenta graduated from the Unity Health System, Rochester, New York, Internal Medicine Residency Program. He is board-certified in internal medicine and has undergone advanced training and certification in age management medicine. He is affiliated with the American College of Physicians, Arizona Medical Association, Age Management Medicine Group, American Academy of Regenerative Medicine and the International Association of Physicians in Aesthetic Medicine Also on his staff is RiAnn Simmons,

a board-certified family nurse practitioner with 13 years’ experience as a registered nurse where she primarily worked in the acute settings of the emergency department, ICU and pre/ post-anesthesia care unit and another three years in urgent care. She offers skincare and beauty treatments. Another team member is Dr. Vance Inouye, an Arizona-licensed, boardcertified naturopathic physician who is trained in regenerative joint injections, prolotherapy, sports medicine, stem cell therapy, aesthetics, intravenous therapy including nutritional IVs aesthetics, deep tissue massage and anti-aging. Rounding out Aghenta’s team is Vanessa Orquiz, a graduate of Southwest Institute of Natural Aesthetics. Information: ghentmd.com.


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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BUSINESS

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

MUDDER

from page 17

in business and fitness to their gym. The Queen Creek parents of three children ages 4 to 13 are active in the Gilbert soccer scene and said they’ve carved out part of their gym for kids to make their business “a welcoming environment for parents.” Jason, 40, worked in real estate and is the head trainer and general manager at the gym. Kristina, 30, is a physician’s assistant and will use her expertise to help manage the location. Each bootcamp class acts as a “tribe” to motivate members to achieve their fitness goals. And those goals are reached through a series of classes that leverage a variety of equipment: dumbbells, kettlebells, sandbags, bodyweight training, turf, weight plates, assault bikes, rowers and a monkey bar rig “that expands the possibilities for a wide range of challenges within the space,” Jason

said. The couple has integrated technology into their operation with TV screens that show exercise demonstrations, timers that maximize class time and a “MyZone” system for heart rate monitoring. A former college athlete in soccer, Jason said he considered playing professionally but became an educator before going into real estate. Jason, who has always been a coach, said he and his wife decided to start a Tough Mudder gym for a couple of reasons. As a teacher, he liked “helping others rise to stardom and achieve their goals” and wants to do the same as a gym coach. He also said heart disease runs in his family – no male on his father’s side has lived long enough to see their grandchildren.” Jason oversees the day-to-day operations of the business on a full-time basis,

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As parents of three young children, Tough Mudder Bootcamp owners Jason and Kristina Todd wanted to keep their new gym family-friendly. (Special to GSN)

while Kristina helps manage the location on more part-time basis since she is also a physician’s assistant. Their head trainer, Jess Smith, was a

member of the U.S. Women’s National Paintball Team. Information: TMBootcamp.com/Gilbert or gilbert@tmbootcamp.com.

Office building remodels aim for millennials GSN NEWS STAFF

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redevelopment firm plans to invest $14 million in sprucing up two Chandler office buildings and adding amenities appealing to a younger workforce. Yoga studios, juice bars and game rooms are some of the features George Oliver, based in Phoenix, intends to add to two buildings it recently acquired near Arizona Avenue and Chandler Boulevard. Curt Kremer, George Oliver’s founder, said the renovations aim to make the buildings more attractive to the millennial generation, people born between 1981 and 1996. According to census data, millennials recently replaced Generation X as the largest group in the American workforce. This shift in the labor pool prompted some to rethink how workplace environments can be hipper and more stylish. The kids who grew up watching Michael Scott humiliate his employees on “The Office” are thought to want something more than cubicles and conference rooms; they want a place that feels more like home. “That millennial that everybody’s trying to hire just has a different work

Yoga studios, juice bars, pool rooms will all be part of the $14-million remodeling of two buildings near Arizona Avenue and Chandler Boulevard as the redevelopment firm makes them more user-friendly for millennials. (Special to GSN)

style than the baby boomers,” Kremer said. “It’s a lot more experiential.” The five-story facility will be rebranded as The Alexander and offers new amenities like exercise rooms, lounge areas, a training center and a billiards room. Kremer said the renovations help tenants hire and retain new talent looking for trendy features reminiscent of what’s seen in Silicon Valley. “Everybody’s kind of chasing the Google, Apple, Facebook-type campuses where they have heavy amenities,” he said. “It’s just tough to do that for smaller users.” These big-tech companies have headquarters resembling little villages; equipped with cafes, theatres and gyms. Kremer said his firm essentially tries to resemble this model, but on a

smaller scale. In addition, George Oliver is hosting events for its tenants that give a sense of community to workers. They provide on-site concierges to organize food truck festivals, guacamole contests and farmer markets. “We do that because we know employees want to go and find places to work where there are employers that work in those areas,” Kremer added. “When people are happy at work, they tend not to leave.” Current and longtime tenant, First Credit Union signed a 10-year lease agreement with George Oliver to remain in what will eventually become The Alexander. JLL Executive Vice President Brian Ackerman, who represented First Credit Union during the deal, said his

client was interested in working with George Oliver due to the firm’s track record and reputation. “Their renovations will be a gamechanger for how tenants use and enjoy these buildings,” Ackerman said in a statement, “and will keep First Credit Union and its significant jobs in downtown Chandler.” George Oliver also bought another building, 107,500-square-foot, and will redevelop it as The Johnathan with similar features as The Alexander. The two buildings are being renamed after Dr. Alexander Jonathan Chandler, the city’s founder. The total cost for the two buildings came out to $38.8 million. Chandler’s downtown area has so many restaurants and entertainment venues within walking distance to the two buildings, Kremer added, which made this region appealing to the firm. George Oliver has taken on redevelopment projects for buildings in Scottsdale and Phoenix – turning them into modernized offices with open layouts and plenty of lounging spaces. The firm doesn’t have a specific design aesthetic, Kremer said, because each project is influenced by the existing real estate.


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OPINION

Opinion GilbertSunNews.com |

@GilbertSunNews

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

For more opinions visit gilbertsunnews.com /GilbertSunNews

There were no parades when I came home BY DR. THOR STRANDHOLT GSN Guest Writer

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t age 17, I dropped out of High School and decided to join the U.S. Navy. This was back in 1964, and the Vietnam Conflict was ramping up so you did not have to have a high school diploma to get in. I was sent to New York to get sworn in with a bunch of local hoods. Somehow the boot camp got word that a bunch of New York wise guys were on their way. So off to the Great Lakes Naval Training Center we went. The training was brutal and by the time we completed our training, there were no more punks in the crowd.

Vietcong on both sides We trained and of the channel. learned to be a team for Upon arriving at our what was ahead. designated area, we During the training, had to begin a special we were forced into the mission called “Operatear gas chamber where tion Starlight.” we had to remove our During this mismasks and endure sion, we had to shoot the burning eyes and Star Shells up at night coughing spell like we to light up the battlehad never done before. fields for our troops to Upon completion of see the enemy. our training, I was sent During the day we to California and reportwould shoot inland ed to the U.S.S. Galveswith our 6-inch gun ton, CLG-3. Dr. Thor Strandholt, associate pastor of Shortly after that, we Valor Christian Center in Gilbert, was 17 mounts and drive the he joined the Navy as the Vietnam enemy out to the beach set sail for Vietnam. We when War ramped up.(Special to GSN) so that we could shoot had to go up into the Gulf of Tonkin in the black of night with them on the beach with our 5-inch

mounts, or guns. At one time we had to shoot out a bridge using spotters and not hurt anyone down below. The mission was a success and we were awarded a Presidential Citation for our success. Six months felt like six years over there. There were no parades and welcome home crowds when we returned but I would gladly put the uniform and do it again. This country is the best in the world so tell a Veteran thanks when you see one because he fought for the freedoms you have today.

in this land of opportunity. I never could have imagined in my wildest dreams running a company when I was living under the constant fear of an abusive husband, having little education and speaking little English that I would be where I am today. Many immigrants are contributing positively to our country and creating opportunities for others. According to a recent report by the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, “the rate of entrepreneurs in 2017 was much higher for Latinos than in any other group.” Another report by the Brookings Institution found that almost half of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or the children of immigrants. Immigrants are not just starting Fortune 500 companies. They are also innovating and contributing yo places where they work. One of my favorite examples is the story of Richard Montanez, a Mexican immigrant working as a factory janitor

at a Frito-Lay plant in California, responsible for creating Flamin’ Hot Cheetos – a top-selling product. Today, Richard is an executive at Frito Lay. Besides having started at the bottom like me, I also admire Richard’s commitment to giving back. Recently, he said, “Latinos who have made it like myself have a responsibility to open doors to younger generations and teach them that they can do it. I do it because I can and I know what it is like to be hungry.” I couldn’t agree more, which is why I think that one of the best ways we can celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month is not only to celebrate our community’s many accomplishments but also look for ways to pass on what we know to younger generations. My message to anyone who wants to listen is simple: The American Dream is alive and well and my story proves it.

– Mesa resident and Pastor Thor Strandholt is associate pastor of Valor Christian Center, 3015 E. Warner Road, Gilbert. Reach him at 480-545-4321.

My story proves the American Dream lives BY MARTHA LLAMAS GSN Guest Writer

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ome are convinced that the American Dream is dead. I disagree. As an immigrant and a domestic violence abuse survivor, I am proof it’s possible to break down barriers to achieve the American Dream. After arriving in Arizona from Mexico with little money and no English, my mother worked hard as a cook to raise my five siblings and me. Thanks to my mother’s sacrifices, I was able to pursue an education. Eventually, I met my ex-husband. And like many domestic abuse survivors, things were great at first. Then it became a living hell. Fortunately, I was able to escape this nightmare. Being on my own was incredibly scary. Having few discernable job skills and little work experience, the prospect of generating an income was daunting – especially when trying to

raise two young children. Thankfully, I wasn’t entirely alone. My mother was able to get me a job in the janitorial services company where she worked as a janitor. My duties in my new job quite literally included mopping the floors at night. I didn’t earn much money, but I was happy to have a job and earn an honest living. Determined to make the most of this opportunity, I worked hard and stayed focused. I also began learning English and asked my bosses for additional work. My hard work paid off. I was eventually promoted to operations manager. From there, as they say, the rest is history. Today, along with my new husband, I run M & R Inc, a million-dollar janitorial services company and a franchisee of Jani-King Commercial Cleaning – the company that first took a chance on me all those years back. I share my story not to brag, but to serve as a reminder that it is entirely possible to accomplish amazing things

- Martha Llamas owns Jani King of Phoenix Commercial Cleaning & Janitorial Services. She volunteers for the LIBRE Initiative and with the Arizona chapter of Americans for Prosperity.

Send your letters to the editor, to pmaryniak@timespublications.com


Sports & Recreation

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Pazand making waves for Desert Ridge swim BY JACK JOHNSON GSN Contributor

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esert Ridge High School swimmer Camron Pazand was used to being one of the fastest swimmers at his former high school located near Albuquerque, New Mexico. But after moving to Phoenix earlier this year, for his senior season, to be closer to family, he says he immediately felt the differences between competing in a small town and competing in the fifth-largest city in the United States. “The competition here in Phoenix is 10 times what it was in Albuquerque,” Pazand said. “Being here with all of these fast swimmers has kind of made me think I was slow, but after I talked with my coach (Brock Harr) it’s really just a different competition.” Pazand says his transition across state lines for his last year of high school was difficult at first, but his easy-going nature allowed him to quickly fit in and make friends with his teammates. Among his new friends is another senior swimmer

Desert Ridge swimmer Camron Pazand said he immediately felt the differences between competing in his hometown of Albuquerque, New Mexico and the Phoenix-metro area. (Photo courtesy Camron Pazand)

at Desert Ridge, Karina Harr, who says she became fast friends with Pazand. “It took a couple of days to get to know him, but he’s a really good friend and a super nice guy,” Karina Harr said. “We’re all very glad he’s on the team.” To his coach, Brock Harr, Pazand’s talent is comparable to that of a 660-horse-

power sports car. “It’s like having a Ferrari in the garage,” Harr said of having Pazand on the team. “You got a couple of Corvettes and a Ferrari sitting there. He’s made the relays unbelievably fast.” Harr expects Pazand to be one of the top six freestyle swimmers in the

100-and-50-yard events. Pazand agrees freestyle is his best stroke, but noted freestyle is only third on his list of favorite strokes. Instead, Pazand revels in the intensity and determination the butterfly and backstroke offer and with good reason. Last year, at the New Mexico State Championships, he finished third in the 100yard butterfly and fourth in the 100-yard backstroke. To get Pazand to adjust to swimming against an increased level of competition, Harr turned up the intensity on Pazand’s training regimen. Every day, the pair goes through a practice regime designed specifically for Pazand. They focus on exploding off the blocks, and the breakout from underwater, which are two key aspects in shaving time for a sprinter. Harr admitted he was never much of a sprinter when he swam for the University of Arkansas and said teaching Pazand is as much of a learning experience for him

see SWIM page 22

Higley boys golf wins first title in its history BY ZACH ALVIRA GSN Sports Editor

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he Higley High School boys golf program capped off one of its best seasons in program history with hardware, as the Knights captured the Division II state championship in Tucson. “It felt fantastic,” Higley golf coach Ted Horn said. “It was a culmination of all the long hours on the range, the lessons, the tournaments. It was a great feeling.” The Knights finished 28 over par at the Catalina Omni Tucson National, scoring a total of 612 over the course of the twoday event. The Knights beat Cactus Shadows (+33), two-time champion Arcadia (+38) and Notre Dame Prep (+43) to claim the state title. Damon Vilkauskas placed the highest for Higley in the tournament, as the senior shot 5 over par finishing 10th.

The Higley boys golf team won the Arizona Interscholastic Association Division II Boys Golf Championship at the Catalina Course in Tucson. (Photo courtesy Ted Horn)

Brady Wilson, a junior at Higley, finished 11th by shooting 6 over par. Josh Nielsen and Colton Horn also contributed to Higley’s team win by placing 17th and 26th, respectively.

“We didn’t really have any standout performers,” Horn said, “which is rare in golf. The entire team played really well. It was basically all of them coming together.”

Higley led after the first day of the tournament, which Horn admits made him nervous. But the Knights continued to play well on the second day, maintaining a slim lead heading into the back 9. It wasn’t until the final three holes Horn and the Knights knew they had the won the state championship. But it was close. “I was a little nervous because you always want to be chasing people down the stretch,” Horn said. “Down the stretch our kids buckled down and played like champions.” The championship win was the first in program history for Higley, which began competing in 2015. It was also the first for the school district, which includes both Higley and Williams Field. Horn credited the team’s annual Fall

see HIGLEY page 22


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

as it is for his swimmer. When he began coaching Pazand, the first order of business for Harr was to push the transfer swimmer’s limits, and specifically, his endurance. “Yeah, I’ve coached Camron a little harder than he is used to,” Harr said. “Camron had a hard time with the expectation that this coach wants to put a lot of yards on him.” Still, Harr recognized early on he was coaching a unique type of swimmer. Harr described sprinters as “strange,” and compared them to a kicker in football or a goalie in hockey, specialists are typicallu separated from the team. Instead, Harr stated he found one of the most intelligent swimmers he has ever coached in Pazand. A well-rounded swimmer and person. In his free time, Pazand says he likes to play video games, but most notably, he says he enjoys teaching himself to play instruments. Currently, he is learning to play the guitar and piano. Pazand wants to create his own path and live this new experience in a new place for him. Pazand said he doesn’t model himself after anyone but makes

Camron Pazand has emerged as one of the top swimmers for Desert Ridge this season. Jaguars’ coach Brock Harr anticipates him to perform well at state. (Photo courtesy Brock Harr)

goals for what he wants for himself in the future. Unlike most high school seniors, he set distinct goals, both short and long term. “My goals in life are to graduate college with a finance degree and find a job somewhere in Phoenix or California and have a wife and live a happy life,” Pazand

Plan ahead and protect the people you love.

said. “My current goal is to be fast enough to get a scholarship at a Division I, this means I have to make my junior nationals time.” According to USA swimming, the qualifying times for Pazand’s two best events, the 50-yard freestyle and the 100-yard freestyle, are 23.99 and 51.99, respectively. Pazand’s personal bests in those two events are 21.85 in the 50-yard freestyle and 46.81 in the 100-yard freestyle, proving he has the speed to achieve his goals. Although to his teammates, Pazand projects confidence externally, he says he is very hard on himself in practice and can get nervous before races. Still, he sees the nervousness as a catalyst to help him swim faster. “It gets my adrenaline rushing and I love that feeling so much,” Pazand said. “That’s what makes swimming so much fun for me.” One of Pazand’s closest friends on the team, senior Luke Walker, described swimming with Pazand as a “privilege.” If Walker sees any inkling of nervousness from his friend on the blocks, he is quick to offer words of encouragement. “If we are swimming a relay and it’s a close race, I will say something simple

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like, ‘Hey, you got this bro,” Walker said. “I try to turn him from being nervous to excited.” Pazand got into swimming as a way to get closer with his older sister. He has two siblings, both older sisters. One currently resides in Arizona with her husband and the other is a student at Grand Canyon University. The move from Rio Rancho to Phoenix was inspired mostly to become a family unit once more. “I love talking with them and laughing and just having a good time with them,” Pazand says of his time with his sisters, adding, “I love them to death.” Buoyed by the confidence of his coach, Pazand is set to put the Arizona high school swimming community on notice this season. “As a whole, I think he’s on pace to be an elite swimmer,” Harr said. “The kid’s got skills, he’s going to do well at state.”

HIGLEY from page 21

Break trip to Florida for preparing the team to make a run to the state championship. The Knights played back-to-back Florida state champions Ponte Vedra High School in an 18-hole tournament at TPC Sawgrass. The Knights then traveled down the coast to West Palm Beach to play in the 36-hole Honda Classic at PGA National. Higley also played at The Cloister at Sea Island, Georgia, between tournaments. Higley will return all but three senior golfers next season and will likely be a favorite entering the 2020 season, to repeat as state champions. However, Horn knows there is no guarantee of that happening, especially with programs such as Arcadia reloading yearly. “We know we are going to be good,” Horn said. “But you never know what can happen. Who knows, Arcadia or another school could get two outstanding freshmen come in their program. “But we feel really good about our outlook for next season. I’m excited.”

Higley boys golf roster Josh Nielsen, Sr Colton Horn, Jr Brady Wilson, Jr Aadith Mosur, Jr Damon Vilkauskas, Sr Kai Heiner, Jr Declan Mulqueen, Jr Nicolas Becerra, Fr Reed Wright, Fr Bo Xiong, Jr Dalton Lamb, Sr


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Arts Center hosts a dazzling display of dynasty BY SRIANTHI PERERA Guest Writer

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o bring to stage the story of China spanning 2,200 years, from the first Qin dynasty to modern times, is no easy feat. The Phoenix Wushu Academy, which recently moved from Chandler to Gilbert, is attempting to do just that. Seventy of the school’s students, under the age of 18, will dance their way through “Dynasty: A Martial Arts & Dance Epic” Nov. 17 at Chandler Center for the Arts. The Qin Dynasty began in 221 B.C., and was the time that the Great Wall of China began to be constructed. It follows with 10 major time periods, including the Golden Age of the Han Dynasty, when the martial arts flourished; the Song Dynasty, when paper money and gun powder were first used; and

modern China, where the martial arts, dances and art forms of the past have become sports and cultural activities that are being passed to the younger generations. Scriptwriter Jane Ho co-directs the production along with Bonnie Fu and Andrew Ho. Dynasty promises to be a rich spectacle of entertainment where dynasties rise and fall, battles are won and lost and adventures unravel. In essence, it is a treasury of Chinese history and culture, which will be performed without dialogue but with Kung Fu (also known as Wushu, a modern form of traditional Chinese martial arts), dance, music and acting. “However far we progress into our future, it is our past that defines who we once were and reminds us of where we

see DYNASTY page 25

The Phoenix Wushu Academy’s production at Chandler Arts Center later this month will offer a feast for the eyes as it presents an interpretation of 11 major time periods in China through a combination of dance, martial arts and music. (Yeung Photography)

3 jazz musicians to celebrate a legacy label BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI GET OUT Editor

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azz musician James Carter considers his situation “blessed.” He’s toured around the world on solo and band jaunts, but this November, the James Carter Organ Trio will tour with fellow Blue Note artists vocalist Kandace Springs and pianist James Francies in celebration of the label’s 80th anniversary. The musicians will perform a set of their own music followed by a finale with all the acts coming together to perform a classic Blue Note tune. The show comes to the Tempe Center for the Arts at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, November 16. Carter said this is his first Arizona show since the 1990s. “I’ve recently heard of The Nash, which is in Phoenix,” he said. “I’ve been dying to get out there to see it.” The three musicians are stellar in their own right. Springs—a Nashville singer and pianist—will release her third Blue

Note album, “The Women Who Raised Me,” in early 2020. After her head-turning 2014 self-titled EP (which caught the attention of Prince who raved “Kandace has a voice that could melt snow”), Springs released her Larry Klein-produced debut album Soul Eyes in 2016, followed by her 2018 album, “Indigo,” produced by Karriem Riggins. Francies was born in Houston, but is now based in New York City. He released his acclaimed debut album, “Flight,” on Blue Note in 2018. Francies has played with jazz headliners like Pat Metheny, Chris Potter, Jeff “Tain” Watts, Stefon Harris, Eric Harland and

Jazz Musician James Carter will be playing his heart out at Tempe Center for the Arts next Saturday. (Special to GSN)

Terrace Martin, and racked up equally impressive credits in hip-hop and R&B: from gigs with Lauryn Hill, José James, Common and Nas, to studio time with Chance the Rapper and appearances with The Roots on “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.” The Detroit-born Carter released his Blue Note debut, “James Carter Organ Trio: Live from Newport Jazz,” on August 30. On the album, he reinvented Django Reinhardt. He’s well known in the Motor City. As a fledgling musician, Harry Connick Jr. pulled Carter on stage during a gig at the Fox Theatre in 1991. “I’ve definitely been in a blessed situation,” he said. “I’ve worked with different heroes and musical people. I’ve enjoyed all the blessings that have come as a byproduct and continue to flow as a result.” Besides Connick, Carter has enjoyed hanging out with jazz trumpeter Lester Bowie, who died in 1999.

see JAZZ page 25


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GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

19 Asian cultures on display at festival BY CONNOR DZIAWURA GET OUT Staff Writer

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he Arizona Asian Festival will once again bring an assortment of cultures to Scottsdale, where Arizonans can experience the customs and foods of a variety of cultures. Now in its 24th year, the two-day event by the Arizona Asian American Association will run 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, and Sunday, Nov. 17, at the Scottsdale Civic Center Mall, 3939 N. 75th Street. An opening ceremony is at 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Admission and parking are free. Nineteen cultures will participate over the weekend, representing areas that include Bangladesh, Cambodia, Malaysia, the Pacific Islands, Pakistan, Palestine, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. And there will be a host of food vendors serving Burmese, Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Japanese, Korean, Lao and Persian cuisine. Much of the festival’s entertainment will be based around the World Stage and the Cultural Stage. “The World Stage is basically our main stage, and that’s the one near the water fountain,” festival spokeswoman Mai Le said. “That’s where we host the opening ceremony, the ending ceremony and the highlight of the program, the International Culture Fashion Show.” “The Culture Stage is actually near the Avenue of Cultures and where the food court is,” she continued. “It’s a smaller one. And every year we select one culture to be the highlight culture.” The Avenue of Cultures also features informative booths from the various cultures. Every year, the festival picks a different word as a theme and translates it to each

JAZZ from page 24

“He was one of the individuals who really stressed diversity in terms of bands’ portfolios,” he said. “He brought different flavors while being artistically fulfilled. He was one of the main catalysts that stuck with me.” What has really stuck with Carter is Blue Note Records’ legacy. “The items that have been rolling off the assembly since 1939 have been the soundtrack to all of our lives,” Carter said. “That roster is very exhilarating. To

A variety of food, entertainment and wares can be savored at the Arizona Asian festival next weekend in Scottsdale. (Special to GetOut)

culture’s language. This year’s theme is “enchantment.” Two years ago, the festival’s producers put the spotlight on Vietnam and last year they focused on Thailand. This year the majority of the entertainment will evoke Persian culture. The performances are “dynamic,” Le added, with other cultures still represented, and the majority involving dance, singing or martial arts. A highlight of the festival, however, is its International Culture Fashion Show, which will showcase more than 150 models from various cultures at 1 p.m. Sunday. “It’s considered a highlight, because everybody loves to go watch the fashion show to see the beautiful and colorful outfits and learn about the cultures from each region, from each area,” Le explains. Attire will be “traditional,” she says. be able to contribute something seminal in the near future is amazing.”

IF YOU GO

What: “Blue Note 80th Anniversary Celebration: The State of Jazz 2019” When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 Where: Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe Tickets: $17-$50 Info: 480-350-2822, t empecenterforthearts.com

“You will see the colorful and the unique and the custom and the traditional garments that they designed for each culture, and you also will see some similarities from culture to culture,” she explained. Elsewhere, a Chinese tea garden will offer demonstrations of the formal ceremonies and traditions that go hand in hand with tea drinking, as well as provide information about and access to the teas, Le said. “It’s a way to learn about the culture, how before you drink the tea you have to show the respect to the earth and respect to nature,” she said. In between activities and all throughout the weekend, attendees can roam the Scottsdale Civic Center Mall. There will be plenty of artisans comprising a marketplace, as well as booths for civic engagement, health screenings and vet-

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erans. Festivalgoers can pick up a passport at the information booth, visit and learn from each booth and receive prizes, Le said, adding the idea is “to give the children the opportunity to interact with other cultures, to learn about other cultures.” But while the event as a whole is appropriate for the whole family, kids will also have a Children’s Wonderland. In the lead-up to the festival every year, the Arizona Asian American Association runs its Kids Art Expo, a contest where children submit artwork to represent various cultures. It is this youngster-friendly “wonderland” where the art will be displayed, Le said. There will also be activities like origami. Festival organizers expect the event to be bigger than any of the 23 previous years. With more than 15,000 attendees last year, the Arizona Asian American Association has set a goal of more than 25,000 visitors for this year. “The event is growing bigger and bigger,” Le said. “We have more participants each year, from the performances, from the culture participants and then the culinary booths and activities.” But Le emphasized the Arizona Asian Festival attracts more than just those familiar with the customs of its various cultures and that general audiences from a host of different races and backgrounds also attend.

IF YOU GO

What: Arizona Asian Festival Where: Scottsdale Civic Center Mall, 3939 N. 75th Street, Scottsdale. Cost: Free. Information: aaaa-az.org


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DYNASTY from page 24

came from,” said Jane Ho, who teaches Wushu and piano at the school. “We believe it is our duty to bring awareness of our cultural heritage and encourage the people around us to also appreciate the breathtaking history and culture of China.” Jane Ho called the show the school’s “most elaborate” production so far. “Dynasty is a visually stunning show that combines advanced technological moving backgrounds as well as beautiful staging and on-set props,” she said. As visual director, she worked for three months to bring to life every individual scene in Dynasty. She has even collaborated with international visual effect artists to create some of the scenes. The production uses 250 sets of costumes. Head of wardrobe, Chloe Cheng, who has handled similar shows for six years, has custom-ordered the costumes from factories in China that specialize in creating realistic ancient Chinese costumes. The show is also an opportunity to listen to ancient Chinese music. “Throughout the show, there will be traditional Chinese music that varies

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

from epic to sorrowful, depending on the scene,” Jane Ho said. “Since it is traditional Chinese music, most of the songs in the show were composed many years back and have been passed on from one generation to the next.” The performing arts school, which was established nearly a decade ago by Andrew Ho and Bonnie Fu, moved to a larger facility in Gilbert. Currently, about 100 students are enrolled and they come from every city in the East Valley as well as the San Tan Valley, Peoria, Glendale and Phoenix. Intake isn’t limited to those of Chinese ethnicity, however, and it welcomes anyone who would like to study the country’s heritage. “We are blessed to have this facility because it offers a professional and spacious environment for our students to train in,” Jane Ho said. “I like that I get to perform with other people and get to play characters that are very different,” said Elise Yeung, 11, of Chandler, who has studied there for five years. “Even though training takes a lot of hard work and practice, I enjoy being able to perform in both Wushu and dance in Dynasty.” Elise performs three roles, like Wu

Tang tai-chi master, Ming Dynasty assassin-in-training and a Chinese ethnic tribal dancer. “For Wushu, I will do hand forms and tai-chi and also use weapons like the straight sword and broad sword,” she said. “I will also do different styles of Chinese dances; some of them use long ribbons and tambourines.” The school is home to some top athletes that are currently in the US Wushu Team, representing America in the Pan American and World Championships, Jane Ho said. They include Song Tian Ou and Allyson Huang, who have trained there since their studies began. “The sport of wushu entertains the idea of pushing past your limits almost to your breaking point,”16-year-old Allyson said. “It requires a deep understanding of the borderline between ambition and exhaustion.” Allyson is a soloist in Dynasty and performs several roles with an assortment of weapons and styles, each reflective of a specific dynasty. One such weapon is a straight sword from the Qing Dynasty, a long, thin blade without curved edges. “I gracefully slice my sword through the air while sprinting and leaping across the

stage. My quick, light movements wow the audience. The brightly colored silk uniforms represent the silk clothing often worn by nobility in Ancient China,” she said. The school also teaches Sanda, (Chinese kickboxing), Tai-chi, Chinese dance, piano and linguistic Chinese studies. One of the school’s missions is to preserve and promote Chinese culture and the arts because some of its ancient art forms and customs are fading away. An example is the ancient ink painting skill known as “Guo Hua.”  The East Valley is home to a large Chinese-American community, with a steady rise in population over few years. Arizona has an estimated 200,000-plus community, according to the school.

IF YOU GO

What: “Dynasty: A Martial Arts & Dance Epic,” presented by Phoenix Wushu Academy. When: 7:30-9:30 p.m. Nov. 17 Where: Chandler Center for the Arts, 250 N. Arizona Ave. Cost: Tickets start at $20 and discounts are available for groups of 20, seniors and juniors. Details: chandlercenter.org/events/dynastymartial-arts-dance-epic or phoenixwushu. com.

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Please call 480-646-4969 to reserve your spot! Dream Vacations - Karen Coleman-Ostrov & Associates 1140 N. Gilbert Road, Ste 109, Gilbert, AZ 85234 480-646-4969 kcolemanostrov@dreamvacations.com

www.4myvacation.com

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28

GET OUT

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019 GET OUT 3,6, 2019 29 THE SUNDAY EASTFOOTHILLS VALLEY TRIBUNE | |NOVEMBER OUT GETNEWS OUT 3741 AHWATUKEE NOVEMBER 2019

King Crossword King Crossword King KingCrossword

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With JAN D’ATRI

?

GetOut Contributor

Let the holiday baking begin – with a pumpkin roll

e

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PUZZLE PAGE 13 PUZZLE ANSWERS on page 23 PUZZLE ANSWERSON onpage page25 13 on PUZZLEANSWERS ANSWERS 9

N

ow that trick-or-treating is over, all things pumpkin leads the way to Thanksgiving and our holiday baked goodies. Here to kick things off is a deliciously moist and delicate fall favorite, the pumpkin roll. This tasty spice cake rolled around a sweet cream cheese filling is a lovely way to not only satisfy our sweet tooth, but to pay tribute to the pumpkin – one of the first wild plants cultivated for human consumption in America.

For the dough:

¾ cup all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg ¾ teaspoon salt 4 eggs, separated ½ cup sugar ½ cup brown sugar 1 cup canned pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling)

For the filling:

12 oz cream cheese, softened (1 1/2 packages) 4 tablespoons butter, softened 1 cup powdered sugar 1 ½ teaspoons pure vanilla

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 15” X 18” shallow baking sheet with parchment paper. Grease parchment paper with butter or cooking spray and dust lightly with flour. In a bowl sift together: flour, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and salt. Separate egg yolks from whites. In one bowl, combine egg yolks and sugar. Beat at high speed until fluffy and light, about 2-3 minutes. Add pumpkin puree and mix until well blended. Slowly add in dry ingredients (flour and spices). In another bowl, beat egg whites at high

speed until stiff peaks form, about 3-5 minutes. With a rubber spatula, gently fold egg whites into pumpkin mixture to blend. Spread batter evenly in baking sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. Remove cake from oven. Lightly grease another large piece of parchment paper and lay over top of cake. Gently flip cake with parchment paper over. Gently remove the top parchment paper. While still warm, roll the cake up from the shortest side. (with bottom parchment paper) Let cool for about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, make the filling. Beat together softened cream cheese, butter, powdered sugar and vanilla until light and fluffy. Carefully unroll the cake. Spread filling completely over cake. Gently remove the parchment and roll back up. Cover cake with saran wrap to keep roll tight. Refrigerate for at least 4-5 hours or overnight for easy slicing. Slice into 1-inch slices. Serves about 8-10.

For more recipes: jandatri.com/jans-recipe/one-minute-kitchen.


29

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Saving a Life from a potential catastrophe EVERY 10 MINUTES Employment Employment General

but I’m never alone. I have Life Alert.®

In Memoriam

Landscape laborers, 35 temporary full-time positions.

AS SEEN ON

TV

For a FREE brochure call:

1-855-822-1055

Ilse Erna Johnson In Loving Memory of Ilse Erna Johnson 02/15/193610/31/2019 Rest In Peace Mama

Need help writing an obituary?

NOW OPEN In the East Valley: Abrazo Mesa Hospital JOIN US FOR A FAMILY FUN EVENT! | Saturday, Nov. 16 | 10 a.m.-1p.m. 5750 East Baseline Road, Mesa, AZ 85206

Enjoy food, fire trucks and ambulances on display, as well as free blood pressure checks and more!

A COMMUNITY BUILT ON HEALING

We have articles that will help guide you through the process. Deadline for obituaries is Wednesday at 5pm for Sunday. All obituaries will be approved by our staff prior to being activated. Be aware there may be early deadlines around holidays.

Call 480-898-6465 Mon-Fri 8:30-5 if you have questions. Visit: obituaries.EastValleyTribune.com

H E A D STO N E S

Abrazo Mesa Hospital is a brand new, conveniently located neighborhood hospital for families in the East Valley.

60 ABRAZO MESA HOSPITAL E BASELINE RD.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. N/A Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645011. Employer: Unique Landscapes By Griffin, Inc. 114 S Extension, Mesa, AZ 85210. Contact: Pamela Rambus, fax (480) 733-7912. Landscape laborers, 39 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care pruning, fertilization, irrigations systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (7:00am-3:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance.

We bring services and treatment for emergencies and acute conditions closer to home while staying connected with our facilities and physicians within the Abrazo Health network. For non-life-threatening emergencies, check in online at abrazohealth.com/checkin For life-threatening emergencies, please call 9-1-1.

Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

EVERLASTING MONUMENT Co.

“Memories cut in Stone” • MONUMENTS • GRANITE & BRONZE • CEMETERY LETTERING • CUSTOM DESIGNS

N RECKER RD.

N HIGLEY RD.

480-969-0788 75 W. Baseline Rd. Ste. A-8 Gilbert, AZ 85233

Abrazo Mesa Hospital 5750 East Baseline Road, Mesa, AZ 85206

www.everlastingmonumentco.com

Abrazo Mesa Hospital is a satellite of Abrazo Central Campus.

info@everlastingmonument.phxcoxmail.com

Make your choice Everlasting

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644940. Employer: Agave Environmental Contracting, Inc. 1634 N 19th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85009. Contact: Eric Mahler, fax (602) 254-1438.


30

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Gilbert Sun News

1620 W. Fountainhead Parkway #219 • Tempe, AZ 85282 480.898.6465 class@timespublications.com

Deadlines

Classifieds: Thursday 11am for Sunday Life Events: Thursday 10am for Sunday

The Place “To Find” Everything You Need | GilbertSunNews.com Employment General Nursery workers, 3 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa County. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644947. Employer: Ana P Perez, LLC. 7202 S 7th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85041. Contact: Ana Perez, fax (602) 276-4300. Landscape laborers, 36 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Preemployment drug testing.

Employment General

Employment General

Landscape laborers, 34 temporary full-time positions.

Landscape laborers, 85 temporary full-time positions.

Duties: Laborers will be needed for pruning, fertilization, irrigations systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol.. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Cave Creek, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix AZ, 85040. 602-7710630 Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645789. Employer: Aaron Clark Industries, LLC 36815 N Cave Creek Rd, Cave Creek, AZ 85331. Contact: Aaron Clark, fax (480) 488-6230.

Landscape laborer, 12 temporary full-time positions.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644952. Employer: Gothic Landscaping, Inc. 2526 E Southern Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Contact: Matt Busse, fax (480) 557-7879.

Nursery workers, 46 temporary full-time positions.

Employment General Landscape laborers, 20 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Tempe, AZ - Maricopa County. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645014. Employer: Valley Rain Construction Corporation. 1614 E Curry Rd, Tempe, AZ 85281. Contact: Carin Brodland, fax (480) 966-1450.

Landscape laborers, 55 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures around properties. Outdoor work, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Queen Creek, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645614.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645393.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644929.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645762.

Employer: Caretaker, Inc. 741 N Monterey St, Gilbert, AZ 85233. Contact: Patricia Myers, fax (480) 545-8020.

Employer: Fairco, Inc. 828 E Isabella Ave, Ste B, Mesa, AZ 85204. Contact: Gerry Kelly, fax 1 (844) 210-8904.

Employer: Arizona Wholesale Growers, Inc. 24032 N 19th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85085. Contact: Shawn Cox, fax (623) 581-9984.

Employer: Westar Environmental, LLC 42768 N. Murphy Avenue, Queen Creek, AZ 85140. Contact: Kathy Kiefer, fax (480) 279-1414.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Gilber, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.


31

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Employment General

Landscape laborers, 40 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Landscape or maintain grounds of property using hand or power tools or equipment. Workers typically perform a variety of tasks, which may include any combination of the following: sod laying, mowing, trimming, planting, watering, fertilizing, digging, raking, sprinkler installation, and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Employment General

Landscape laborers, 15 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, Arizona - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Housing optional - $185/month, plus utilities.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644965.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645869.

Employer: Greenway Property Maintenance, Inc. 2740 E. Rose Garden Lane. Phoenix, AZ 85050. Contact: Amy Mahan, fax (602) 468-8693.

Employer: Hernandez-Mesquite Landscape Services, Inc. 1043 S. Lewis, Mesa, AZ 85210. Contact: Jose Hernandez, fax (480) 615-9887

Landscape laborers, 120 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work in the outdoors. Physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Landscape laborers, 15 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up and installation or mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Mesa, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644945.

Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645012.

Employer: ELS Companies, Inc. 3329 E Southern Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Contact: Daniel Bang, fax (602) 268-5040.

Employer: Blue Marble Landscape, LLC 840 E Southern Ave, Mesa, AZ 85204. Contact: Dennis Lynch, fax (480) 899-7639.

Employment General

Announcements

Landscape laborers, 65 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for turf care, pruning, fertilization, irrigation system maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures around properties. Work in the outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ. - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Employer will provide daily transportation to and from the worksite. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645010. Employer: Native Resources International, Inc. 1540 W. Happy Valley Road, Phoenix, AZ 85085. Contact: Raquel Coronel, fax (623) 869-6769.

Amusement & Recreation Attendants. 36 temp, f/t positions 12/29/19-10/28/20. Midway West Amusements, Inc. located in Sun City, AZ. Email: mjmidwaywest@gmail.com. Duties: perform variety of attending duties at amusement or recreation facility. May schedule use of recreation facilities, maintain & provide equipment to participants of sporting events or recreational pursuits, or operate amusement concessions & rides. Must be able to lift 50 lbs. Postemployment drug testing may occur based upon the employer’s reasonable suspicion of an employee’s drug use. Work hours: Monday and Tuesday 9:00am-5:00pm, Wed - Friday 4:00pm-10:00pm, Saturday 12:00pm-10:00pm, Sunday 8:00am5:00pm, days off vary, 40 hrs/wk. Wage is a range of $12.01/hr to $12.32/hr depending on the location, OT may be available at $18.02/hr to $18.48/hr depending on the location, OT hrs vary. Raises/bonuses at company’s discretion, based on individual factors incl work performance, skill and tenure. No education and no experience req’d. Optional housing provided at no cost to the worker. Employer provided transportation to/from worksites in the following counties: Pinal (AZ), Maricopa (AZ), Yavapai (AZ), Mohave (AZ), La Paz (AZ), Salt Lake (UT), Davis (UT), Weber (UT), Duchesne (UT), Utah (UT), Elmore (ID), and Canyon (ID). OTJT prov. Transp (incl meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to place of emplymnt will be prov, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if worker completes half the emplymnt period. Return transp will be prov if worker completes the emplymnt period or is dismissed early by emplyr. Emplyr will prov w/o charge all tools, supplies, and equipt reqd to perform job & guarantees to offer work hrs equal to at least 3⁄4 of the workdays in each 12 wk period of total employment period. Apply at the nearest Workforce Agency at 735 N. Gilbert Rd, Ste 134, Gilbert, Maricopa County, AZ 85234 PH: 602-372-9700 or at the office nearest you, or email resumes to mjmidwaywest@gmail.com. JOB ORDER #3608178

Holiday Deadlines: Special Thanksgiving Day Issue on Nov. 28th Deadlines on Tues. Nov. 19th at Noon Don't miss out on our biggest audience of the year!

480-898-6465 Employment General JJ & Sons Concessions, LLC, 3458 E. Illini St., Phoenix, AZ 85040. PH: 480-748-3510. 1st Wrksite: 1933 S Ballpark Way, Goodyear, AZ 85338 – 14 temp/FT Carnival Workers 1/22/20-11/21/20. Perform duties @ amusement facility (traveling carnival) serve customers in eating places specialized in fast svc & inexpnsive carry-out food carnival settings food stand, on-site clean & organize, prepare typical food/bev such as sandwich, salad, soup, corndog, pizza, using proper safety/sanitary measures. Set-up, stock/clean, ready for svc, tear down/pack up, stock/close booth; heavy lifting & physically mobile, operate food concessions, games, rides. Hrs/schedule/days vary - typically a 9-hr shift b/w 10am–11pm; (sample shift: 10am-7pm, 1 hr unpd break); 35- 60hrs/wk (42 median), extra hrs may be req/avail may incl wkends/holidays. Pay varies, $11.32 - $14.07/hr. Merit/sick pay savings program, wage pre-pay @ emplyr discretion. Trvl reqd & prvd’d to work in Maricopa, Pima & Pinal Co., AZ; Skagit, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane, Whatcom, Benton & King Co., WA; Clark Co., NV; Multnomah Co., OR; Salt Lake Co., UT; & Sacramento Co., CA. Trvl prvd’d to all events as per itinerary. Must commute from home @ prior wrksite to next wrksite. Opt transp to wrksites prvd’d @ no cost to wrkr. Wrk outside in all weather. Emplyr may prvd addl pay (performance /tenure). OT is defined by & paid as reqd by prevailing law, varies @ $16.98 $21.11/hr. No min edu/exp reqd. bi-wkly pay, single wrkwk used to compute wages. Emplyr will make all deductions from wrkr paychk reqd by law. Emplyr’s opt shared housing ($120/wk) is avail for wage credit &/or deduction, or any lesser amt to the max extent not prohibited by law. Emplyr will pay cost of housing to extent such cost would reduce pay below the offered wage for areas of intended emplymt. Local convenience trvl ($20/wk value), food avail for wage credit &/or deduction, or any lesser amt to max extent not prohibited by law. Emplyr provds wrkr @ no charge all tools, supplies, equip reqd to perform job. OJT prvd’d. Transp (incl meals, lodging if nec) to place of emplymt prvd’d if wrkr completes 1/2 the emplymt period. Rtrn transp prvded if wrkr completes emplymt period or dismissed early. Wrkr reimb visa/border fees in 1st wrkwk & apprvd trvl expns w/in 1st pay period. Rcpts reqd. Must be qualified, willing & avail entire emplymt @ designated wrksites under adverse weather; to enter into & comply w/ emplymt contracts; follow wrkplace rules/meet job performance standards; comply w/ grooming reqrmnts/dress code/complete job app & interview truthfully. Subject to discharge for cause. Must be willing to work up to 7 days/wk. Apply @ AZ SWA–1840 N. 95th Ave, Ste 160, Phoenix, AZ 85037; 602-372-4200 www.azjobconnection.gov EOE/M/F/D/V JO#3646855


32

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Employment General Landscape laborers, 50 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Laborers will be needed for pruning, fertilization, irrigations systems maintenance and repair, general clean up procedures and installation of mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units. Work outdoors, physical work. 3 months landscape EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/17/20 - 11/16/20. Wage: $13.81/h, OT $20.72/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Tempe, AZ - Maricopa and Pinal counties. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix AZ, 85040. 602-7710630 Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644282. Employer: R. H Dupper Landscaping, Inc. 1020 W Ranch Rd #105, Tempe, AZ 85284. Contact: Lesley Barner, fax (480) 893-6846. Nursery workers, 20 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (7:00am-3:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645395. Employer: Canterbury Enterprises, Inc. 2744 E Utopia Rd, Phoenix. AZ 85050. Contact: Shawn Ryan, fax (602) 569-0064.

OUR JOB BOARD HAS THE TALENT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR. FIND THE BEST TALENT. EASILY POST JOBS. COMPETITIVE PRICING AND EXPOSURE More info: 480-898-6465 or email jobposting@evtrib.com

Most jobs also appear on Indeed.com

J BS.EASTVALLEYTRIBUNE.COM

Employment General Software Engineer: M.S. in Industrial Engineering or Comp. Sci. req’d. Send resumes to: Rancher Labs, Inc. 1400 E. Southern Ave., Ste. 1020, Tempe, AZ 85282, Attn: M. Salcius.

DO YOU OFFER Lessons & Tutoring? Children need your help! Place your ad today Contact us: class@times publications.com or Call 480-898-6465

Your newspaper. Your community. Your planet. Please recycle me. Nursery workers, 10 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6:00am-2:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri, may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Queen Creek, AZ - Pinal County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645777. Employer: Westar Environmental, LLC 42768 N. Murphy Avenue, Queen Creek, AZ 85140. Contact: Kathy Kiefer, fax (480) 279-1414. Nursery workers, 65 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (7:00am-3:30pm); day shift; Mon-Fri. Dates of employment: 01/20/2011/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Queen Creek, AZ - Maricopa County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602771-0630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3645792. Employer: V & P Nurseries, Inc. 21919 E Germann Rd, Queen Creek, AZ 85142. Contact: Dominick Carissimo, fax (480) 917-2856.

Merch andise

Auto - All Makes 1996 Cadilac Deville 55k original miles. 2nd owner, beautiful condition, $3,200 480-219-5179

Employment General Nursery workers, 12 temporary full-time positions. Duties: Work in nursery facilities or at customer location planting, cultivating, harvesting, and transplanting trees, shrubs, or plants. No EXP REQ. No EDU REQ. Days & Hours: 40 hours/week (6am2:30pm or 9am5:30pm); multiple shifts; Mon-Fri , may include wknd/hol. Dates of employment: 01/20/20-11/19/20. Wage: $12.79/h, OT $19.19/h if necessary. Raises, bonuses, or incentives dependent on job performance. OJT provided. Assurances: Transportation (including meals and, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Employer will provide workers at no charge all tools, equipment and supplies required to perform the job. Job location: Phoenix, AZ - Maricopa County. Applicants may send or contact the AZDES Office, 4635 S Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Ph: 602-7710630. Please reference AZDES Job Order #: 3644936. Employer: Dream With Colors, Inc. 3635 E Southern Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85040. Contact: Monica Vega, fax (602) 266-6092.

Garage Sales/ Bazaars

Sunland Village East Arts & Craft Show

Sat. 11/16 8am-1pm. In auditorium 8026 E. Lakeview Ave. Mesa. Sossaman & Baseline 480-380-0106 Parkwide Patio Sale Sunrise RV resort Furniture, Tv's Dishes, HP Print, Vacuum Cleaner, And More 1403 W. Broadway Ave. Apache Junction. Saturday Nov 16 7am-noon

COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE GOLD CANYON EAST Sat. 11/16 Betw 7am-2pm Many homes! Follow signs from Hwy 60 & Superstition Mtn Dr & from Hwy 60 & Kings Ranch Rd Major intersection in center of community is King's Ranch & Golden Rim

Need to hire some help? Call Classifieds Today!

480.898.6465

CLASS@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

Miscellaneous For Sale Dining Table Set Autumn Lane Farmhouse,Hunter Green & Wood with 4 Windsor Chairs Matching Open Hutch,$400 480-586-1751

Wanted to Buy Diabetic Test Strips by the box, unused. Any type or brand. Will pay top dollar. Call Pat 480-323-8846

Manufactured Homes 2008 Cavco

16x70 3/2 F&R B/Rs. Central Air, Concrete drive & patio. Awnings, wood laminate flooring t/o, vaulted ceilings t/o, 4 fans, wood siding, shingle roof, newly refurbished. $39,999 Call Bill at 480-228-7786 GET 1 YR FREE RENT*

Cash 4 Diabetic Strips! Best Prices in Town. Sealed and Unexpired. 480-652-1317

Manufactured Homes 1995 Cavco 12 x 34 Repainted inside, laminate flooring, 2bd/2ba, W/D hookups. Beautiful view from porch. $53,900. Call Woody 480-433-6245 1987 DeRose

Brand New 2019 Clayton MH 16X56, 2B/2B, 3 Ton Cent A/C, Concrete Drive W/Awning, Landscaped, Steps, W/D Hkups, 18 CF Fridge, Gas Range, Dishwasher Ready, Walk in Shower in a 55+ Resort Community in Apache Junction. $52,900. *with a credit score over 700!

Does not include furniture.

Call Bill at 480-228-7786 BRAND NEW NEVER LIVED IN 2 BED / 2 BATH HOMES $58,900 Financing Available. Also Available Affordable Homes Between $5K - $15K

14x66 3/2 F&R, central air, concrete drive & awning. Wood laminate floors. 2 fans, wood siding, newly refurbished, Furnished. New storage shed $24,900. Call Bill at 480-228-7786

Manufactured Homes

THE LINKS ESTATES Why Rent The Lot When

YOU CAN OWN THE LAND And Own Your New Home

FROM THE UPPER 100’S

ASK US HOW YOUR $105,000 CASH INVESTMENT AND OUR SENIOR LOAN PROGRAM ENABLES QUALIFIED 62+ SENIORS MAKING THE LINKS THEIR PRIMARY RESIDENCE HAVE NO MORTGAGE PAYMENT & NO LOT RENT AS LONG AS YOU LIVE IN HOME.

Gawthorp & Associates Realty 40667 N Wedge Dr • San Tan Valley, AZ 85140

602-402-2213

www.linksestates.net

55+ Mobile Home Park in Great Chandler Location. Call Kim 480-233-2035

Real Estate

For Rent Apartments ALMA SCH & MAIN Partially Furnished 1bd/1 ba. Bad Credit OK. No Deposit. Starting at $600 Includes utilities (602) 339-1555

Commerical/Industrial/Retail Outdoor commercial/personal Storage Yards for lease. Secure, gated 24 hour access, and much more. Call 480-926-5957 for details


33

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Cleaning Services

Air Conditioning/Heating

QUALITY, VALUE and a GREAT PRICE!

Lifetime Warranty on Workmanship Seasonal AC Tune Up - $99 New 3-Ton AC Units - $3,995 We are a Trane dealer & NATE-Certified!

SPARKLE & SHINE CLEANING SERVICE Immaculate, Dependable Service. Affordable Rates. Commercial & Residential services All supplies included. " You've tried the rest, now try the BEST!" Ask for Martha or Annie 480-495-5516 or 480-797-6023

0% FINANCING - 60 Months!! ‘A+’ RATED AC REPAIR FREE ESTIMATE SAME DAY SERVICE

Sell Your Stuff! Call Classifieds Today!

480.898.6465

CLASS@TIMESPUBLICATIONS.COM

Garage/Doors GARAGE DOOR SERVICE East Valley/ Ahwatukee

Broken Springs Replaced Nights/Weekends Bonded/Insured 480-251-8610

Not a licensed contractor

Handyman HANDYMAN 37 years experience. Drywall, framing, plumbing, painting, electrical, roofing and more. Stan, 602-434-6057

Contractors

480-405-7588 Appliance Repairs

Appliance Repair Now

If It’s Broken, We Can Fix It! • Same Day Service • On-Site Repairs • Servicing All Major Brands • Quality Guaranteed

We Also Buy, Sell & Trade Used Appliances Working or Not

480-659-1400 Licensed & Insured Cleaning Services

SIR JOHNS CONTRACTING HOME IMPROVEMENTS REMODEL& REPAIR Painting of All Types Interior & Exterior Cabinets Stains & Paints

Weekly, biweekly, tri-weekly, or monthly; same talented crew each visit Flexible, customized services to meet individual needs of each client GREEN eco-friendly products used to clean and sanitize Move-in/move-out and seasonal deep cleans Small, family-owned company with GUARANTEED high quality services Always dependable, excellent references, bonded, and insured

FreeFree estimates estimatesat at 480-802-1992 480-802-1992 or or dennis@simplygrandcleaningaz.com reed@simplygrandcleaningaz.com

BLOCK FENCE DRIVEWAY Since 1999 PLANTERAffordable, Quality WorkSIDEWALK 9 PATIO 199 ce Sin rk Wo y BBQ alit Affordable, Qu

Call Bruce at 602.670.7038 Call Bruce at 602.670.7038

Small Man!”

“No Job Too Work Since 1999 Quality le,Small 2010, 2011 Affordab Man!”

HIG

H

QUA Lice LITY ns ROC ed & B 251 ond 661 ed

Est Free ima tes

602-315-5470

4960 S. Gilbert Rd. Suite #1 Unit #260 John McMillan-Owner Chandler, AZ 85249 sirjohn53@gmail.com

Drywall

JOSE DOMINGUEZ DRYWALL & PAINTING House Painting, Drywall, Reliable, Dependable, Honest!

602.670.7038

602.670.7038

Call Bruce at 602.670.7038

Not a licensed contractor.

Home Improvement

Electrical Services

ACTION CONTRACTING INC.

HONESTY • INTEGRITY • QUALITY

• Panel Changes and Repairs • Installation of Ceiling Fans • Switches/Outlets • Home Remodel

ALL RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL ELECTRICAL Call Jim Endres 480.282.7932 Over 28 Years Experience • ROC #246019 Bonded/Insured

WE DO IT ALL! Bath & Kitchen Remodels • Drywall & Stucco Repairs Plumbing • Electrical • Can Lights Windows • Doors • Cabinets • Painting Block Fences • Wrought Iron Gates Remodeling • Additions • Patios • Tenant Improvements

A+

East Valley 480-833-7353

Please call Elaine at 480-898-7926 to inquire or email your notice to: legals@evtrib.com and request a quote.

CE

19

78

-

aaaActionContractingInc.com

Irrigation

Block Fence * Gates

• Sprinkler/Drip Repairs • New Installs Poly/PVC • Same Day Service

602-789-6929 Roc #057163 Lowest Prices * 30 Yrs Exp Serving Entire Valley

NTY

5-YEAR WARRA

480.654.5600

YOU’LL LIKE US - THE BEST!

azirrigation.com Cutting Edge LLC • ROC 21671

Landscape Maintenance Handyman

Insured/Bonded Free Estimates

LLC

• Drywall Repair • Bathroom Remodeling • Home Renovations

• Electrical Repair • Plumbing Repair • Dry rot and termite damage repair

SERVING THE ENTIRE VALLEY

Deadline for Sunday's Edition is the Wednesday prior at 5pm.

-

N SI

LIC/BONDED/INSURED Res/Comm’l ROC#218802

Fencing/Gates

GENERAL CONTRACTOR / HANDYMAN SERVICES

LEGAL NOTICES

2014

Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor

480.266.4589 josedominguez0224@gmail.com

2010, 2011 2012, 2013, 2014

2012, 2013,

2010, 2011 “No Job Call Bruce2014 at 602.670.7038

2012,92013, PAVER • CONCRETE REMOVAL • HARDSCAPE e 199 Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a LicensedToo Contractor “No Man!” Job Too Work SincAhwatukee Small QualityContractor 2014 Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Notle, a Licensed Affordab 2010, 2011 2010, 2011 BONDED & INSURED • ROC#321648 Small Man!” 2012, 2013, 2012, 2013, Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor 2014 2014 Call Bruce at SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! Ahwatukee Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor Call Bruce at 9 FREE ESTIMATES • 16 YEARS EXPERIENCE Quality Work Since 199 Affordable,Ahwatukee 2010, 2011 Resident/ References/ Insured/ Not a Licensed Contractor RESIDENTIAL CALL JOHN: 480.797.2985 COMMERCIAL 2012, 2013,

Over 30 Years Quality Experience

QUICK RESPONSE TO YOUR CALL! 15 Years Experience • Free Estimates RESIDENTIAL & SMALL BUSINESS CLEANING SPECIALISTS SINCE 2007

DESERT ROCK

- Ahw Resident Since 1987 -

Bonded/Insured • ROC #289252

ItsJustPlumbSmart.com

Concrete & for ALL Your Handyman Needs! Handyman Marks the Spot Masonry Marks the Spot for ALL•Your Handyman Needs! Painting Flooring • Electrical Painting • Flooring • Electrical Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry Marks the Spot for ALL Plumbing • Decks Drywall • Carpentry • Tile • More! Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! Your Handyman Needs! Decks • Tile • More! Painting • Flooring • Electrical Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Needs! • Drywall • Carpentry Plumbing Painting • Flooring • Electrical • Plumbing Marks the Spot for ALL Your Handyman Painting • Electrical • Tile More! Needs! CO NC R E T E & MASON RY • Flooring DrywallDecks • Carpentry • •Decks • Tile • More! Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry Painting • Flooring • Electrical Decks • Tile • More! BLOCKWALL CONCRETE “No Job Too Plumbing • Drywall • Carpentry Too Man!” RETAINING WALL FOUNDATION “No JobSmall Decks • Tile • More! “No Job Too Small Man!”

All Estimates are Free • Call:

520.508.1420

www.husbands2go.com

Licensed, Bonded & Insured • ROC#317949 Ask me about FREE water testing!

Your Ad can go ONLINE ANY Day! Call to place your ad online!! Classifieds 480-898-6465

ALL Pro

T R E E

S E R V I C E

L L C

Prepare for Monsoon Season! LANDSCAPING, TREES & MAINTENANCE

Tree Trimming • Tree Removal Stump Grinding Storm Damage • Bushes/Shrubs Yard Clean-up Commercial and Residential PMB 435 • 2733 N. Power Rd. • Suite 102 • Mesa dennis@allprotrees.com

480-354-5802


34

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

Painting

Landscape Maintenance Juan Hernandez

Juan Hernandez

SPRINKLER

TREE

Drip/Install/Repair & Tune ups!

TRIMMING

Not a licensed contractor

25 Years exp (480) 720-3840

25 years exp. Call Now (480) 720-3840

A-Z Tauveli Prof LANDSCAPING LLC We will give you totally new landscaping or revamp your current landscaping! Tree/Palm Tree Trimming Storm Cleanups Sprinkler Systems

Desertscape • Concrete Work Gardening • Block Wall Real & Imitation Flagstone

Free Estimates 602-471-3490 or 480-289-1673 ROC#276019 • Licensed Bonded Insured

Irrigation Repair Services Inc. Licensed • Bonded • Insured Technician

Specializing in Controllers, Valves, Sprinklers, Landscape Lighting, P.V.C. & Poly Drip Systems

Call Lance White

480.721.4146 www.irsaz.com

ROC# 256752

RAMIRO MEDINA LANDSCAPING ➧ LANDSCAPING ➧ TREE TRIMMING & REMOVAL ➧ IRRIGATION ➧ YARD CLEAN-UP ➧ GRAVEL ➧ COMMERCIAL ➧ RESIDENTIAL LICENSED • INSURED • OVER 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE

Plumbing

Jose Dominguez Painting & Drywall SEE OUR AD IN DRYWALL! Quick Response to your Call! 15 Years Exp 480-266-4589 Not a licensed contractor

Pool Service / Repair

Affinity Plumbing LLC 480-487-5541 affinityplumber@gmail.com

www.affinityplumbingaz.com

All Complete Pool Renovations

Your Ahwatukee Plumber & East Valley Neighbor

Pebble • White Plaster • New Pool Builds Tile • Deck • Pump & Filters

Anything Plumbing Same Day Service

HOME IMPROVEMENT & PAINTING Interior/Exterior Painting 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE Dunn Edwards Quality Paint Small Stucco/Drywall Repairs

Water Heaters

24/7

Inside & Out Leaks

Bonded

Toilets

Insured

Faucets

Estimates Availabler

FREE Estimates • BEST Prices

We Are State Licensed and Reliable!

$35 off

Any Service ROC#309706

602-505-8066 Cell Se Habla Espanõl

Lic’d, Bonded • ROC #235771 • ROC #235770

Disposals

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts

480-338-4011

AE&Sons

Pool Plaster Company

ACCREDITED BUSINESS ®

CDM

POOL SERVICE & REPAIR

Not a licensed contractor

East Valley PAINTERS

ACID WASH SPECIALIST  PUMPS  MOTORS  WEEKLY SERVICE  FILTER CLEANING  DRAINING  GREEN POOL CLEANUP  INSPECTIONS  OWNER OPERATED 

Voted #1 Paint Interior & Exterior • Drywall Repair Light Carpentry • Power Washing • Textures Matched Popcorn Removal • Pool Deck Coatings Garage Floor Coatings • Color Consulting

CALL CLAY FOR FREE ESTIMATES

10% OFF

480.710.8790

We Beat Competitors Prices & Quality Free Estimates! Home of the 10-Year Warranty!

Plumbing

480-688-4770

www.eastvalleypainters.com Family Owned & Operated

Now Accepting all major credit cards

Bonded/Insured • ROC#153131

Call or Text Today for a FREE ESTIMATE

Carlos Medina - 602-677-3200

Plumbing

PlumbSmart Plumbing Heating & Air

Water Heaters

 A

As Iowas

$42Month

A

.II._

700 5-Star Reviews

ROC223709

Nonnalbusinesshours

Nonnalbusinesshours

480-405-7099 ROC 304267 • Licenced & Bonded

• Employees Background Checked • Up-Front Pricing • Tankless Water Heaters • Tank Water Heaters • Fixture Replacements

• Plumbing & Drain Repairs • Water Treatment • Best Warranties • Fully Stocked Vans • Fix It Or It’s Free Guarantee

Drain Specialists…

SERVICE CALLS MONDAY-FRIDAY $BS SAVINGS

What we do…

www.itsjustplumbsmart.com www.itsjustplumbsmart.com

• FREE Camera Inspection With Every Drain Cleared • Hydrojetting

$45 off Any service call With service performed

Financing Available

• Pipe Relining • Clean Out Installation • Sewer Repair/Replacement • Pipe Bursting

*$69 drain good Monday thru Friday during normal business hours and not combined with any other offers.

480-281-7564


35

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019 NOTICE TO READERS:

Pool Service / Repair

Most service advertisers have an ROC# or "Not a licensed contractor" in their ad, this is in accordance to the AZ state law.

Juan Hernandez Pavers • Concrete • Water Features • Sprinkler Repair

Again, this requirement is intended to make sure that the consumer is made aware of the unlicensed status of the individual or company.

Professional service since 1995

Window Cleaning $100 - One Story $140 - Two Story

showing, Pool Light out? I CAN HELP!

FALL SPECIAL! $500 OFF COMPLETE REMODEL! 25 Years Experience • Dependable & Reliable

Includes in & out up to 30 Panes Sun Screens Cleaned $3 each Attention to detail and tidy in your home.

Call Juan at

480-720-3840 Not a licensed contractor.

(480) 584-1643

Remodeling

Roofing

General Contacting, Inc. Licensed • Bonded • Insured • ROC118198

One Call, We Do It All! 602-339-4766

Owner Does All Work • All Honey-Do Lists • All Remodeling • Additions • Kitchen • Bath • Patio Covers • Garage • Sheds • Windows • Doors

• Pointing • Drywall • Roofing Repairs • Painting • All Plumbing • All Electrical • Concrete • Block • Stucco

Bonded & Insured

LLC

What it does require under A.R.S. §32-1121A14(c) www.azleg.gov/ars/ 32/01165.htm is that the advertising party, if not properly licensed as a contractor, disclose that fact on any form of advertising to the public by including the words "not a licensed contractor" in the advertisement.

PPebbleOcracking, O L Plaster R Epeeling, P ARebar IR

APPEARANCE

Public Notices

COUNTS

Arizona Registrar of Contractors (ROC): The advertising requirements of the statute does not prevent anyone from placing an ad in the yellow pages, on business cards, or on flyers.

Window Cleaning

PHILLIPS ROOFING LLC Member of ABM

• Drywall & Roofing Repairs • Stack Stone • All Flooring • Wood • Tile • Carpet • Welding • Gates & Fences • Tractor Services

Licensed • Bonded • Insured ROC 223367

Valleywide

CR 42 DUAL

623-873-1626 All employees verified Free estimates on all roofs 36 Years experience in AZ Licensed contractor since 2006

Free Estimates with Pride & Prompt Service!

Roofing

Contractors who advertise and do not disclose their unlicensed status are not eligible for the handyman's exception. Reference: http://www.azroc.g ov/invest/licensed_ by_law.html As a consumer, being aware of the law is for your protection. You can check a businesses ROC s t a t u s a t :

http://www.azroc .gov/

Tiles, shingles, flat, repairs & new work Free Estimates • Ahwatukee Resident Over 30 yrs. Experience

phillipsroofingaz.com phillipsroofing@cox.net

480-706-1453

Licensed/Bonded/Insured • ROC #236099

Roofing The Most Detailed Roofer in the State

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Mesa is seeking a qualified firm or team to act as the Construction Manager at Risk for the following: THE GRID MIXED USE PROJECT SITE IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. M99-2019-012 The City of Mesa, on behalf of Palladium GRID, LLC, (“Developer”), is seeking a qualified Construction Manager at Risk (CM@Risk) to provide Pre-Construction Services assistance and complete Construction Services as the CM@Risk for the the GRID Mixed Use Project Site Improvements Project. All qualified firms that are interested in providing these services are invited to submit their Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) in accordance with the requirements detailed in the Request for Qualifications (RFQ). The following is a summary of the project. The required tasks will be reviewed with the selected CM@Risk and defined to meet the needs of the project as part of the contract scoping. The scope of work will include upgrades to the Pomeroy Parking Garage, streetscape related improvements, upgrade to Gateway Park, City Court security measures, improvements to Gateway Park Drive and other associated work. The estimated construction cost is $2,500,000 to $4,500,000. A Pre-Submittal Conference will not be held. Contact with City and Developer Employees. All firms interested in this project (including the firm’s employees, representatives, agents, lobbyists, attorneys, and subconsultants) will refrain, under penalty of disqualification, from direct or indirect contact for the purpose of influencing the selection or creating bias in the selection process with any person who may play a part in the selection process. This policy is intended to create a level playing field for all potential firms, to assure that contract decisions are made in public, and to protect the integrity of the selection process. All contact on this selection process should be addressed to the authorized representative identified below.

Tim KLINE Roofing, LLC Roofs Done Right...The FIRST Time! 15-Year Workmanship Warranty on All Complete Roof Systems

www.timklineroofing.com

480-357-2463

The Statement of Qualifications shall include a one-page cover letter, plus a maximum of 8 pages to address the SOQ evaluation criteria (excluding resumes but including an organization chart with key personnel and their affiliation). Resumes for each team member shall be limited to a maximum length of two pages and should be attached as an appendix to the SOQ. Minimum font size shall be 10pt. Please provide eight (8) hard copies and one (1) electronic copy (CD or USB drive) of the Statement of Qualifications by December 4, 2019 at 2:00pm. The City reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Qualifications. The City is an equal opportunity employer. Delivered or hand-carried submittals must be delivered to the Engineering Department reception area on the fifth floor of Mesa City Plaza Building in a sealed package. On the submittal package, please display: Firm name, project number, and/or project title. Firms who wish to do business with the City of Mesa must be registered in the City of Mesa Vendor Self Service (VSS) System (http://mesaaz.gov/business/purchasing/vendor-self-service).

TK

MAKE A LOT!

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ)

RFQ Lists. The RFQ is available on the City’s website at: http://mesaaz.gov/business/engineering/construction-manager-at-riskand-job-order-contracting-opportunities.

®

SPEND A LITTLE…

CITY OF MESA, ARIZONA ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

FREE Estim at and written e proposal

R.O.C. #156979 K-42 • Licensed, Bonded and Insured

Questions. Questions pertaining to the Construction Manager at Risk selection process or contract issues should be directed to Stephanie Gishey of the Engineering Department at stephanie.gishey@mesaaz.gov. BETH HUNING City Engineer

ATTEST: DeeAnn Mickelsen City Clerk Published: East Valley Tribune, Nov 3, 10, 2019 / 25491


36

GILBERT SUN NEWS AN EDITION OF THE SUNDAY EAST VALLEY TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 10, 2019

SEE WHAT 1.4 BILLION IN CHINA

Reviving 5,000 Years of Civilization Based in the U.S., Shen Yun is able to present on the world stage authentic Chinese culture untainted by communism.

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Gilbert Sun News 11-10-2019  

Gilbert Sun News 11-10-2019  

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