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CREAM OF THE CROP

5 ICE CREAM SHOPS TO TRY

PLAY IT COOL

11 SUMMER SURVIVAL TIPS

END OF AN ERA

WARPED TOUR’S FINAL YEAR

MAY 17-JUNE 27, 2018

EST. 2002

SPLASH INTO SUMMER!

4 Stellar Staycation Spots

ASU THURSDAYS

We are turning the ICE HOUSE over to

MILL & BROADWAY

U freezersicehouse.com


change the way you see the world At Northern Arizona University, we stand at the threshold of tomorrow. Every day at NAU is a chance for discovery—to not just move forward in time, but to shape the future. Whether you study in Flagstaff, online, or at any of our community campuses, we can help you build a better tomorrow.

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nau.edu/transfer

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POP QUIZ

WE KNOW HOW MANY TESTS AND QUIZZES YOU TAKE, BUT WE THINK THIS ONE WILL BE YOUR FAVORITE. HERE IS A QUICK QUIZ ON SOMETHING POPULAR

PUBLISHER

OR IMPORTANT WE THINK YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Steve T. Strickbine

What was the highest temperature ever recorded in Phoenix?

VICE PRESIDENT

Michael Hiatt

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

A. 122 °F

Niki D’Andrea

B. 128 °F

EDITOR

Madison Rutherford

C. 134 °F ANSWER: A. On June 26, 1990, the temperature in Phoenix reached an all-time high of 122 degrees. Four years later, on June 29, 1994, the statewide high record was broken when it reached 128 degrees in Lake Havasu City. Death Valley, California holds the record for the highest temperature in the world for its scorching 134 degree temp on July 10, 1913.

NUMBERS On average, there are 107 days per year that reach 100 degrees or higher in Phoenix. Americans eat an average of 20 quarts of ice cream every year. The Popsicle was accidentally invented by an 11-year-old boy in 1905.

With nearly 3,872 hours of sun a year, Phoenix receives the most sunshine of any major city on Earth. An average person in the U.S. consumes

15 pounds

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

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of watermelon annually.

More than 33 million people across 8 states, including Arizona, depend on the Colorado River for their daily water supply. Arizona is home to 200 lakes and reservoirs.

THINGS TO D O ON

SUMMER STAYCATION: Eat watermelon. Do a cat video marathon! Nap. Nap some more. Cat around town. Go to the beach... litter box for miles! Put on a play! Demand a massage... daily! Get your paws on travel books at the library & plan your great escape: Greece – lots of singles & great fishing! Hemmingway's Estate, Key West, FL Kathmandu Japan – home to Cat Island & some great cafes Catfish Paradise, AZ Ahhhh summer! There's a hammock & tuna fish sandwich waiting for you!

HEY writers can you put words into sentences? Are you connected to the cool things happening on campus?

STAYCATN

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Brian Benesch, Connor Dziawura, Carson Mlnarik, Eric Newman, Wayne Schutsky DESIGNER

Christy Byerly CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

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Nadine Whitehead PRODUCTION MANAGER

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One copy per reader. © 2018, 4M PUBLISHING, LLC The College Times is published once a month on the third Thursday. College Times is a nationally registered trademark. Reproduction of material in whole or in part without the express written consent of the publisher is prohibited. The College Times is a member of Times Media Group. Calendar and editorial submissions can be made to editorial@ecollegetimes.com.

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ASU THURSDAYS U

We are turning the ICE HOUSE over to

Karaoke Wednesdays The VJ mic goes live at 8:00pm ‘til Midnight!

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Drink and Food Specials!

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11 THINGS

STUDENT LIFE

YOU PROBABLY DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT SUMMER IN ARIZONA CARSON MLNARIK • COLLEGE TIMES

Y

ou may break a sweat walking to class in August, but by October, it’s all short sleeves and cool breeze. Real Arizonans know that the heat doesn’t hit hard till May, where it stays in full, dehydrating madness until the end of July. Just how hot does it get – and is there anything you can do to escape it? We’ve got a few cool facts that might help you cool down… no guarantees, though!

#11 • HOTTIES

The highest recorded temperature in Arizona history was 128 degrees in Lake Havasu City, but Phoenix follows close behind with a record 122 degrees in June 1990. Here’s to hoping this summer is not one for the books…

#10 • DIY TATTOOS

Ever wanted Abraham Lincoln’s face on your inner thigh? Leave a penny sitting heads-up on the car seat for a few hours, pop a squat and voila! You’ve got the 16th president burned in your skin for the world to see. Use a silver

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#9 • FEAR FOR BEER

It’s a tough one: bottle or can? No one wants a warm brew and thankfully, scientists were dedicated to finding an answer. One investigation found aluminum cans cool at the same rate as bottles; however, cans stay colder longer in the cooler and bottles stay colder longer in hand.

#8 • DASHBOARD DELIGHT

Stuck at work with a hankering for something sweet? Grab some pre-made cookie dough, a baking tray and let your unshaded spot in the parking lot do the work. We recommend removing any air fresheners during the baking process – the last thing you need is chemicals served on the side of salmonella.

#7 • YES, THAT’S WHAT IT’S CALLED

Ever seen a haboob? Phoenix is one of the few cities in the world, alongside places like the Sahara Desert and Mars, to experience these intense dust storms carried by atmospheric gravity currents, generally after thunderstorms.

#6 • LITERALLY DEAD

The heat is known to do tricky things to Valley vehicles, including zapping car batteries. If your battery is three or more years old, you might want to consider having it checked… or start practicing superstitions every morning.

#5 • HAPPY HOURS FOR HYDRATION

A number of fast food faves offer discounted soft drinks or Slurpees to reward those brave enough to leave the house. McDonalds and Taco Bell offer $1 soft drinks for people patient enough for the drive thru, while Sonic discounts slushies and sodas by 50 percent from 2 to 4 p.m. during the week.

#4 • NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

If 100-plus temperatures are interfering with your busy life, try taking after the habits of furry friends like hedgehogs, owls and foxes and go nocturnal. Arizona summers can bless us with temperatures in the mid-70s… if you’re awake from 3 a.m. to 6 a.m.

#3 • SCREEN YOUR SUNSCREEN

A cute label or handy aerosol can might seem like the make-or-break, but the most important part of a sunscreen is its SPF, or sun protection factor. Experts recommend a minimum of 30 SPF if you’re looking to get some color and a maximum of 50 for full effectiveness.

#2 • BE CAREFUL

While many residents laugh the summers off as a “dry heat,” it’s not completely a laughing matter. In 2016, 130 people died of heat-related causes in Maricopa County, the highest number in a decade.

#1 • YOU’VE BEEN WARNED

Arizona is so notoriously hot that the Department of Transportation has a page dedicated to “Extreme Heat.” Its best pieces of advice? Drink water and STAY INSIDE. CT


student life

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student life

GTFO!

DO YOURSELF A FAVOR AND CATCH THESE 9 EVENTS OR YOU’LL BE FEELING SOME SERIOUS F.O.M.O.

CARSON MLNARIK • COLLEGE TIMES

SILENCE! THE MUSICAL What happens when The Silence of the Lambs’ creepy Hannibal Lector opens up his mouth… to sing? This goofy musical puts a dark comedic twist on the horror film with an award-winning, albeit R-rated, soundtrack of songs like “Are You About a Size 14” and “Put the Effing Lotion in the Basket.” Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe, tempecenterforthearts.com, times vary, Thursday, May 17, to Saturday, May 19, $30-$40.

SPARK! AFTER DARK: ARE WE HUMANS, OR ARE WE DANCERS? The Killers offered this age-old question in 2008 and this monthly dance party at Mesa Arts Center is as close as we can get to an answer. Each month,

Mesa Arts Center is taken over by a different artist who helps curate a unique and crazy selection of live music, live art, bites and brews. Mesa Arts Center, 1 E. Main Street, Mesa, mesaartscenter.com/sparkafterdark, 8 p.m. Saturday, May 19, free.

ONE MORE TIME: A TRIBUTE TO DAFT PUNK Is there ever a bad time to listen to “Get Lucky”? This 21-and-up night dedicates itself to one of electronic pop’s most unique groups. The evening opens with performances by Nk-Riot and Apache Grosse and finishes with One More Time, the Daft Punk tribute group that’s authentic to the max. With Phoenix temperatures already hitting triple digits, you may want to leave the motorcycle helmets at home, though. The Van Buren, 401 W. Van Buren

aSMOOTHIES! aENERGY DRINKS! aPROTEIN SHAKES! aPRE/POST WORKOUTS!

Street, Phoenix, thevanburenphx.com, 8 p.m. Friday, May 25, $15.

DANE COOK It may be hard to believe, but this prolific joker is as funny in person as he is on screen. You’ll recognize Dane from comedies like Good Luck Chuck and My Best Friend’s Girl, as well as his chart-topping comedy album, Retaliation. He brings his guy-next-door raunchiness to Scottsdale for one night, but you won’t want to wait on tickets – his evening show is almost completely sold out. Talking Stick Resort, 9800 E. Talking Stick Way, Scottsdale, talkingstickresort. com, 8 p.m. Friday, June 1, $30-$60.

AN EVENING FOR AVICII The EDM community remembers the legendary Swedish DJ, Avicii, with a night of music, good vibes and love. Featuring glow sticks, bubble machines and scrumptious carbonated concoctions by the Sodalicious truck, the night will be filled with nonstop hits and house music, alongside tributes to the dreamer behind tracks like “Wake Me Up” and “Hey Brother.” 12 West Main, 12 W. Main Street, Mesa, bit.ly/2KTvzrV, 8 p.m. Friday, June 1, $10 cash and $15 card.

MARKET ON THE MOVE

special events! MixxedFit®: May 18th at 5:30pm Strong by Zumba : May 25th at 5:30pm ®

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

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Line Dancing: June 1st at 5:30pm 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION: Saturday, June 9th *SPECIAL HOURS 10am-2pm*

2450 W. Broadway Rd Suite 120B Mesa, AZ 85202 Mon-Thurs 7am - 3pm Friday 7am - 7pm

Whether you’re looking to eat healthier this summer or are a sucker for a good deal on watermelon, this monthly market in Glendale is for you. While each month differs in produce, visitors can expect offerings like lettuce, grapes and peppers each month – and at a smoking price. Foothills Christian Church, 3951 W. Happy Valley Road, Glendale, bit.ly/2IxZoQz, 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Saturday, June 2, $10 for up to 60 pounds of produce.

THE ADVENTURES OF KESHA AND MACKLEMORE It sounds like an unlikely duo – glitter pop queen Kesha and nice guy rapper Macklemore – but after collaborating on “Good Old Days,” the two musicians are heading out for a summer of adventure. Their joint tour kicks off with their Phoenix stop, so expect as much surprise as you do sweat. Ak-Chin Pavilion, 2121 N. 83rd Avenue, Phoenix, ak-chinpavilion.com, 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, $26-$299.

MAROON 5 It’s been 16 years since Maroon 5 dropped Songs About Jane, a little album with big hits like “She Will Be Loved” and “Harder to Breathe.” Adam Levine and the boys are still rolling strong with their latest album, Red Pill Blues, which features poppier and funkier cuts, as well as a duet with tour opener Julia Michaels. Talking Stick Resort Arena, 201 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, talkingstickresortarena.com, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 7, $44.75-$1,000.

PHOENIX BACHATA FESTIVAL Get your dance fix with three days and nights of workshops, pool parties, performances and socials, all in the name of bachata! Musical guests include Henry Santos and Toby Live, as well as Jr. Whether you’re looking to tap a toe or watch the pros, there will be nothing short of the best at this first-of-its-kind celebration. The Wigwam, 300 E. Wigwam Boulevard, Litchfield Park, bit.ly/2wvSshR, times vary, Thursday, June 14, to Monday, June 18, $32-$175. CT

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student life

HALF TIME

MOXY TEMPE

FOUR PHOENIX STAYCATION SPOTS THAT WON’T BREAK THE BANK MADISON RUTHERFORD • COLLEGE TIMES

N

o one wants to visit the Valley during the sweltering summer months, but if you’re stuck here, you might as well make the most of it! We’re talking taking a dip in a state-of-the-art swimming pool, taking a nap in a luxurious king-size bed or taking a selfie on a private balcony. But you don’t have to break the bank to live in the lap of luxury this summer. One reprieve from the sizzling temps is the opportunity to stay at five-star hotels for half the peak-season price. Here are four Phoenix hotels with sweet summer hookups, so you can get your staycation on and still have some cash left over to splurge on a sumptuous meal, cocktail or craft brew.

FOUND:RE

An urban artistic oasis

THE STAY Minutes away from major landmarks like the Phoenix Art Museum and trendy eateries like Fair Trade Café, Found:RE is the ultimate urban oasis. It’s also located across the street from the light rail, so most downtown destinations are within reach. With a large, modern lobby and comfy, loft-inspired rooms, Found:RE is luxurious without being pretentious. Each room features custom furnishings with an industrial feel, floorto-ceiling windows and walls adorned with local art, evoking an upscale but approachable vibe. Guests will also enjoy cozy beds, soft towels, comfy bathrobes and a Keurig coffeemaker, but the real showstopper is the spacious shower. With a unique design and unparalleled water pressure, this extravagant amenity is an excellent example of how Found:RE goes above and beyond. Gourmet twists on down-home gastronomic delights take center stage on the menu at MATCH Cuisine & Cocktails. We recommend the mac and cheese bites or truffle fries for a flavorful and filling, yet affordable, snack. And if you don’t feel like going downstairs to the restaurant, in-room dining is available!

HOTEL PALOMAR

FOUND:RE

Style and sophistication in the city center

THE STAY Right across from Talking Stick Resort Arena and a stone’s throw away from Chase Field, Hotel Palomar is the perfect place to stay if you want to catch a game. It’s also within walking distance of dozens of downtown bars and restaurants and is the premier destination if swimming and sipping on cocktails is your scene; Palomar’s rooftop bar and pool, Lustre, kicks off its “100 Days of Summer” event series this month, which will feature poolside bands, DJs and more all summer long. This modern boutique motel combines comfort and sophistication, from the living room-like lounge adjacent to the hotel’s bar and restaurant to the plush throw pillows and leather and gold accents in each room, while panoramic windows provide stunning views of the city center. Bump some tunes with the portable Bluetooth speakers or stretch out with the yoga mat provided in each room, or cruise around downtown on a complimentary Kimpton bike.

THE SPECIALS From Memorial Day to Labor Day, Hotel Palomar’s rates are reduced by 54 percent, with rooms starting at $199 per night.

THE INSIDE SCOOP

THE SPECIALS

Hotel Palomar’s “Fast Forward to Summer Package” includes a daily $25 dining credit, so treat yourself to dinner and drinks at Blue Hound Kitchen and Cocktails. This New American eatery serves innovative, seasonally inspired fare, featuring an atmosphere that seamlessly blends both rustic and elegant elements. Standout menu items include dry-rubbed chicken bites paired with housemade pickles, braised Brussels sprouts with pork belly and parmesan, roasted citrus salad and handmade pasta tossed in basil pesto.

Take advantage of Found:RE’s “Summer Fun Package” from now until the start of September. In addition to a room with rates as low as $149, the package includes sunblock, sunglasses, a personal pool floatie and a $50 poolside food and beverage credit.

Kimpton Hotel Palomar Phoenix 2 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix 602.253.6633 hotelpalomar-phoenix.com @palomarphx

Found:RE is a fully functioning art gallery that exclusively features pieces by Arizona artists. In addition to art around every corner, the hotel offers photo ops galore — check out the beach-themed mural by the pool or the giant neon sign encouraging you to “FIND YOURSELF” out front.

Found:RE Phoenix 1100 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix 602.875.8000 foundrehotels.com @foundrephx

THE PHOENICIAN

A relaxing resort experience with adventure around every corner

THE STAY Trust us, you’ll never get bored at The Phoenician — amenities abound at Arizona’s premier resort destination. With seven pools, dozens of dining options, chic rooms with elegant, desert-inspired décor and a picturesque landscape that encapsulates the elegance and mystique of the Southwest, The Phoenician allows you to live large for less this summer. The resort blends the beauty of nature, art and architecture to create a unique aesthetic that is both relaxing and invigorating. The lush landscape

THE PHOENICIAN

includes a stunning two-acre cactus garden and sprawling lawns, while the lobby boasts high ceilings, luxurious lighting fixtures and fine art. The rooms boast 24-hour room service, marble bathrooms, signature bathrobes, a luxury bathtub, expansive balconies and much more. The hotel’s recently opened restaurant, Mowry and Cotton, offers a one-of-a-kind dining experience, laidback atmosphere and approachable, globally inspired fare with a local flair. The restaurant is running a special this summer that includes a buttermilk bun, two vegetable selections, a meat and fish selection and one dessert for $30, as well as 50 percent off select beverages. Must-try menu items include charred Brussels sprouts, caramelized cauliflower and the Pacific striped sea bass with ancho chili and lime crema. For dessert, we recommend the warm s’mores pie or peanut butter bar and a night cap — cappuccino that is! The coffee drinks are reasonably priced and come with a rock candy stirrer. Rooms start at $169 per night, which is more than half off the peak-season rate. Guests can enjoy this summer special from May 29 to August 31, along with complimentary self-parking.

and antique art and seating arrangements. The spacious lobby is also the place to be this summer, with innovative fun for every night of the week: On Mondays from 4 to 7 p.m., guests can enjoy a themed movie night with $7 drink specials and complimentary popcorn and cotton candy; $5 margaritas and all-you-can-eat chips and salsa take over on Taco Tuesday; Blacklight Bingo brings glow-in-the-dark lemonade and neon snacks to the lobby from 8 to 10 p.m. on Thursdays and Sunday Funday features a mimosa bar and $10 Bloody Marys from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Guests are greeted with an on-the-house cocktail upon check-in and can take advantage of all the amenities the common area has to offer, like free beach cruiser rentals, arcade games, an array of board games and a vending machine with Millennial essentials like selfie sticks and Polaroid film for poolside snaps, Kylie lip kits and fidget spinners. Or they can opt to go straight to their room, decked out with design elements that blend Pinterest and Pottery Barn, a balcony with beach chairs, ‘50s-inspired furniture and a 49-inch flat-screen with Netflix compatibility.

THE INSIDE SCOOP

THE SPECIALS

THE SPECIALS

In 2017, the pools at The Phoenician got a major makeover. Be sure to check out the Mother of Pearl pool, which is lined with real pearls and cost an estimated $1 million to construct.

The Phoenician Resort 6000 E. Camelback Road, Scottsdale 480.941.8200 thephoenician.com @the_phoenician

MOXY TEMPE

Modern vacation vibes with a vintage twist

THE STAY Located next to ASU, Moxy is a Millennial playground with a whimsical, vintage flair. The reception area features lush, contemporary-meets-retro-cool décor like trendy lighting fixtures, large rugs with colorful designs

Valid until August 6, Moxy’s “Summer Hibernation Package” encourages locals to beat the heat with a two-night stay in a spacious suite, a $50 food and beverage credit, a poolside cabana and beer bucket and a 2 p.m. late checkout starting at $89 per night.

THE INSIDE SCOOP Upgraded rooms feature an acoustic guitar and record player, with a small selection of vinyls to spin while sipping your morning coffee. The lobby features a larger collection of records including old-school classics like The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix and Johnny Cash that you can take back to your room.

MOXY Phoenix Tempe/ASU Area 1333 S. Rural Road, Tempe 480.968.3451, moxy-hotels.marriott.com/ hotels/tempe @moxytempe CT

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

THE INSIDE SCOOP

HOTEL PALOMAR

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student life

CONE FOR YOUR THOUGHTS THE TOP STOPS FOR LOCAL ICE CREAM

CARSON MLNARIK • COLLEGE TIMES

W

hen it’s hot outside and a McFlurry or Blue Bell gallon won’t cut it, a variety of local ice cream shops offer their own twists and takes on your favorite frozen classics.

Melt Ice Cream Shop This quirky eatery recently relocated from Roosevelt Row to a cart at Phoenix favorite Jobot Coffee. Even from its new digs, Melt continues to serve the city’s most unforgettable flavors in a unique Chinese takeout box container. Whether you’re looking for something classic like butter pecan or mango sorbet, or willing to expand your flavor horizons to something slightly savory, the service, samples and sweets here are unparalleled. Wackiest flavors: SanTan Devil’s Ale Maple Bacon Beer; Horchata Place to rest your feet: Inside and outside seating at Jobot Coffee 333 E. Roosevelt Road, Phoenix, meltphx. com, @meltphx

Churn Hit this local ice cream parlor at the right

time and you might find yourself waiting in a line out the door. Nestled near Phoenix favorites like Joyride Tacos and Postino, Churn is the perfect dessert stop on an evening out, as well as a good place to “treat yourself.” In addition to scoops, Churn offers sundaes, milkshakes, floats and ice cream sandwiches. Many mix-ins and toppings are made in-house and their selection rotates daily. Regular fan favorites include cookies and mint, Vietnamese coffee and peanut butter. Wackiest flavors: Rotationals like Bailey’s Crunch and Goat Cheese; Honey; Pistachio Place to rest your feet: Outside patio behind Churn 5223 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix, churnaz. com, @churnicecream

Creamistry The newest ice cream franchise to hit Arizona, Creamistry locations have popped up all over Phoenix, Gilbert and Scottsdale. The preparation process has never been so interesting; Creamistry uses liquid nitrogen to craft each scoop of ice cream as it’s ordered. Stand close to the counter and you’ll

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feel an extremely cool breeze as expertly trained “Creamologists” mix up scoops in cups and Nitroshakes. Wackiest flavors: Matcha Green Tea; French Toast Crunch; Milk Coffee Place to rest your feet: Indoor and outdoor seating 100 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix, creamistry. com, @creamistry

Sugar Bowl An Old Town Scottsdale staple, the Sugar Bowl is as historic as it is delicious. The vintage-themed ice cream parlor has been serving up sweetness for 60-plus years. Their pink décor, spin-top stools and cutesy menus make for a fun date night or Instagram opportunity. While they offer a wide variety of sandwiches, soups, and salads, their “bread and butter” is the sweets: sherbets, ice creams, sodas, shakes, floats, sundaes and splits – oh my! Wackiest flavors: Camelback Ice Cream Soda; Peanut Butter Shake Place to rest your feet: Indoor table and bar seating 4005 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale, sugarbowlscottsdale.com, @sugarbowlaz CT

MacAlpine’s Diner and Soda Fountain This diner and soda fountain is a must for anyone looking for vintage vibes and old-time hospitality. The bar is decorated with retro Coca-Cola signs and their ice cream menu is as wide as the imagination. You’ll want to dedicate some time to read through their varieties of phosphates, egg creams, floats, sundaes, Italian and ice cream sodas and old fashioned shakes, blended from Thrifty ice cream. A tasty selection of sandwiches, burgers and salads await those who save enough room for “before dessert!” Wackiest flavors: Bubble gum; wedding cake; dill pickle Place to rest your feet: Indoor seating

NEW TOWN HOMES FOR SALE! From the mid $200,000’s. 15 minutes on Light Rail to ASU campus 3 Bedroom/2.5 Bath 2 Car Attached Garage Community Pool & Spa

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CLOSE TO HOME

VOICES

NEW STUDY QUANTIFIES HUNGER AND HOMELESSNESS IN HIGHER EDUCATION WAYNE SCHUTSKY • COLLEGE TIMES

T

he college experience typically conjures images of carefree young adults straddling the line between adolescence and adulthood by balancing going to class and hitting the books with parties, hanging out with friends and drinking lots of… caffeine (and perhaps some other beverages). However, for students living with food insecurity or homelessness, enjoying this time in their lives can be difficult. A recent survey from the Wisconsin HOPE Lab found that 36 percent of university students were food insecure in the 30 days leading up to the study. The number for community college students was even more dire at 42 percent. The report, which surveyed 43,000 students at 66 colleges and universities in 20 states and Washington, D.C., also found that homelessness affected 9 percent of university students and 12 percent of community college students in the past year. The HOPE Lab surveys are some of the first of their kind in the country that attempt to quantify the problems homelessness and hunger in the country’s high-education institutions. Those problems exist on a local level for college students in Arizona, as well, though the numbers here are slightly below the national and regional figures. Similar numbers do not exist for ASU,

because there is not a HOPE Lab study associated with the university. “We have offered any college the opportunity to participate,” says Sara Goldrick-Rab, professor of higher education policy and sociology at Temple University and founder of the Wisconsin HOPE Lab. “We offered (ASU) the chance to do the survey.” “I would hope Michael Crow would want to do this,” she adds. “The most important part is not the national numbers, but dealing with what is on your campus.” The Wisconsin HOPE Lab worked with the Maricopa County Community College District in the fall of 2016 to determine the scope of the problem for students in Maricopa County. That survey includes responses from 2,665 students attending Maricopa County Community College schools. It found that food insecurity is slightly less prevalent in the MCCC survey than similar surveys conducted nationally and in the western region.

The problem is still significant, though. The food insecurity question included questions from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Six-item Food Security Survey Module to determine how many students in the past 30 days could not afford balanced meals, could not afford enough food and/or skipped meals because of money issues. The survey found that 64 percent of MCCCD students suffered from marginal to very low food security. Thirtyone percent of the students surveyed suffered from very low food security, meaning they answered yes to at least five of the USDA questions. Homelessness is another issue facing community college students in Maricopa County, with 12 percent of students experiencing homelessness in the 12 months prior to the survey. This could mean they were thrown out or evicted from a home, stayed in a shelter, lived in a non-housing structure like a car or abandoned building, or did not know where they were going to sleep, even for

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one night. That 12 percent figure is below the figure for community college students in the western region, which is 17 percent, and right in line with the most recent national survey results. While 12 percent may seem like a low figure, it extrapolates out to approximately 24,000 of the estimated 200,000 students that attended Maricopa County Community Colleges in 2015-2016. These problems are also worse for some minority groups. The MCCCD survey found that African American and American Indian students are more likely to be food insecure and/or suffer from homelessness than other students. There is not one specific cause to these problems on college campuses. Rather, a confluence of pressures have exacerbated the issues in recent years. “There are several things going on,” Goldrick-Rab says. “One is college is expensive, more so than in past. That is not the main issue, though. It is not just tuition.” She also noted that cost of living and housing is on the rise and many students erroneously think that financial aid and, in some cases, a part-time job, will cover those costs. “Work is hard to find,” Goldrick-Rab says. “Most people in this country work their way through college and minimum


voices

Sara Goldrick-Rab

shed light on the problem, which is why the group is conducting nationwide, regional and localized surveys. They are also working with policy makers to create better legislation to protect students. They are also working with colleges and nonprofits to create new services and programs to help students, such as emergency housing provided by schools. Locally, there are some resources already available to students in Arizona. ASU’s Student Advocacy and Assistance office is a resource for students that connects them with university programs and community partners that can help them overcome barriers to their education. Maricopa County Community Colleges has a similar resource within the Office of Student Affairs that can help students with a range of issues, including housing assistance. The community college district also has Foster Youth Student Success Initiative that provides support and services to students aging out of the foster care system. CT

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

wage doesn’t go as far as it used to.” Housing costs are also an issue as high-end developments pop up around universities and colleges. Real estate is certainly contributing to it,” Goldrick-Rab says. “Most students live off campus and there are those who have figured out there is money to be made.” This can be seen at ASU’s Tempe Campus, which is adjacent to several new market-rate luxury apartment projects like The Local, which is currently under construction at University Drive and Ash Avenue. There are also complications at a policy level. Goldrick-Rab noted that college students do not qualify for all forms of housing assistance, such as the low-income tax credit. “It can actually be harder to get subsidized housing as a college student than when you’re not in college,” she says. To combat these issues, Goldrick-Rab’s group is tackling the problems from all angles. The first step is conducting research to

11


SUCCESS & MONEY

THE NEW CLUB ON THE BLOCK MILL AVE’S NEW NIGHTCLUB PROVIDES UNIQUE EXPERIENCE FOR PARTYGOERS IN TEMPE

ERIC NEWMAN

Narender Raju (left) and Cahleb Branch

• COLLEGE TIMES

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ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

URA Nightclub, Venue and Lounge, a newly opened space at 411 S. Mill Avenue, is certainly unique to the area surrounding ASU’s campus. Billed as a venue for local large-scale companies to host corporate events, and a stylish nightclub and music venue in the evenings, owner Narender Raju hopes to add another element to the already vibrant Mill Avenue scene. With some of the Valley’s best music technology, including a large stage with state-of-the-art sound and lighting systems, and even VIP bottle service reservation technology online, AURA fits right into what Millennials might expect from a venue that hopes to attract some of the world’s best performing musicians on a regular basis. Raju and executive director Cahleb Branch have been partners for nearly five years, after opening The Pressroom, a concert venue in downtown Phoenix. Neither originally hails from Phoenix – Raju comes from Chicago; Branch from the Bay Area – and one of the club’s main goals is to present a true music and party venue similar to the ones they grew up going to. “We don’t feel like there are that many clubs in Arizona that fit the bill of what we’re used to seeing,” Raju says. “What we wanted 12 to do is bring that feel and flavor here.”

Because they believe the space is so different from other venues in the area, both in ambiance and clientele, Raju says the goal is not to compete with other popular clubs, but add another option. Raju says the competition is with other areas around the Valley, like Scottsdale or downtown Phoenix, where those looking for a more formal club setting tend to flock, instead of staying in Tempe. “A lot of people ask us whether it’s competition. It’s not that; it’s that we’re something totally different on the street, and we’re trying to add to Mill Avenue instead of trying to take customers from the other places,” Raju says. “We thought Mill was missing that piece. There are a lot of cool bars, a lot of great places, but it’s missing that nightclub venue, and that’s what we’re trying to be.” Since the club’s official opening in early April, Branch says the club has received numerous positive reactions, especially from younger crowds. College freshmen and sophomores, usually under the age of 21, are welcome at AURA. Knowing students, specifically those at ASU, will likely comprise most of their customers, Branch says the goal of opening up to the underage crowd will provide a safe space for younger students to party, while

still being safe and legal. “We’re the only 18-plus club in the city, but only on Thursdays as a college night, to give something back to them,” Branch says. “Functioning as an 18-plus club, the bar is still open on the other side. Those who are legal can still buy drinks, and it’s just segregated from the other area, where we have a juice bar.” Also, in an attempt to attract more college students, Branch says the club has placed a large emphasis on attracting campus Greek life, to which a lot of ASU’s student population belongs. A lot of local fraternities and sororities have members under the legal drinking age, which can severely limit the options the houses have to host events or socials. “It’s kind of a place where they can all come and hang out together, but the ones that are 21 or older can still drink in the bar but leave their drink at the bar area and come boogey down in the dance room,” Branch says. In addition to these formal events, the large, 45-by-15-foot stage can be utilized for house DJs, aspiring artists that are members of the groups or those hired by the organizations to host their parties, which can give the performers exposure and experience.

“Greek life is a big part of a lot of students’ college experience. But they don’t always have a venue to (host parties), so it’s in someone’s home or their house, and we want to be somewhere they can count on to be safe, but give that true feel they’ve wanted the whole time. Having their own DJ makes it even more convenient for them,” Branch says. Moving forward, Raju says the club will consistently change its look, as well as the types of artists that perform on a weekly basis, to offer a different experience and atmosphere. With dozens of different light projectors, and changeable walls, the look of the facility can literally change overnight. “We want to be a spot on Mill that is all-encompassing, and that people can come to every night to see national-level artists and DJs on a weekly basis, without even looking at the calendar,” he says. “You walk into the door, and you know you’re going to see something great, regardless of the night you’re there.” An event calendar, as well as information about bottle service and private events, can be viewed on the club’s website. AURA Nightclub Tempe, 411 S. Mill Avenue, Tempe, 480.210.2872, auratempe.com, @auratempe. CT


DOUBLE DUTY

SPORTS

FORMER ASU BASKETBALL STAR RETURNS TO THE VALLEY TO HELP COACH THE SUN DEVILS AND PLAY FOR THE PHOENIX MERCURY NIKI D’ANDREA • COLLEGE TIMES

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“Unfortunately, Father Time is undefeated and you have to be very strategic as you kind of accumulate more miles on your body, so it just worked out.” When asked about her coaching style, January laughs and thinks for a moment. “Oh, man… I think I bring a different dynamic from a lot of the coaches in that I’m able to relate. I played through Charli’s system for four years, and I was able to be successful in that program, so for me to come back and give my insights, share my stories and help them through their process, I think it’s huge for them,” January says. “One of the reasons I want to coach is because it’s such a pivotal time in a young woman’s life, and Charli is one of the reasons I’m here today.” Turner Thorne has coached the women’s basketball team at ASU for 21 years and is the school’s winningest coach since the program was established in 1975, with a career record of 343-208. In February, she told ASU’s The State Press, “Ever since I knew (January) was thinking about transitioning to coaching, it was a matter of if she was ready or not and if she wanted to... It was a win-win for everybody,” and added, “Ever since she’s gotten here, she’s just an incredible mentor. She’s incredible as a person.” The respect is mutual. “The time I was at Arizona

PHOTOS • MELISSA FOSSUM

Sun Devils standout Briann January is embarking on her first season in a Phoenix Mercury uniform.

January set several records while playing basketball at ASU, and recently joined the team’s coaching staff.

State, Charli really impacted my life,” January says. “She pushed me to levels I didn’t know I could get to, and I think that’s what I do (as a coach). I’m here to challenge the girls. I’m here to broaden their thoughts and the way they process things – for me to be able to say, ‘Hey, I play at the highest level, and this is what it’s going to take. I’ve been successful on and off the court. So I’m here as a resource, a sounding board, and I’m here to push you every day.’”

As a player, January also continues to push herself, and says she’s excited to see what’s in store for the Phoenix Mercury, who will play the Dallas Wings in their season opener at Talking Stick Resort Arena on Friday, May 18. “I think we have depth, I know we have experience, and we have firepower at every position, which is exciting,” she says. “We just have to get out there and work hard. If we get out there and we give it our all every game, we’re going to be dangerous.” CT

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

or Briann January, a concussion is what great memories are made of. When January played basketball at Arizona State University from 2005-2009, she was a twotime Pac 10 (now the Pac 12) Defensive Player of the Year, she set ASU women’s basketball records for most assists and highest free-throw percentage, and she established the school’s single-season record for three-point field goals (65) during her senior year. January is the only player in ASU history to lead the team in steals and assists for four straight years. But her favorite ASU memory is of a game she didn’t even play in. During her sophomore year, the Sun Devils were competing in the Elite 8 against the Louisville Cardinals, and at the end of the game, January sustained a concussion from contact with Louisville forward Angel McCoughtry. When the Sun Devils met the Bowling Green Falcons in the next game, January says, the Falcons coach at the time, Curt Miller, was optimistic about her being on the sidelines. “He was like, ‘Oh, January’s out – we have a chance! We have a shot!’” she recalls. “And my team just came out and killed them, just smashed them. They played such great basketball, and I was there on the sideline with my head ringing, but it was the most amazing basketball game I’ve ever seen and I didn’t even play. That was a great experience. I had some great teammates while I was at ASU.” It’s that team spirit that drew January to basketball during her childhood. She started playing in the third grade in her hometown of Spokane, Washington, after taking up soccer and karate (her father is a karate instructor, and January holds a black belt in the discipline). “The one thing I do love about basketball is watching a team full of individuals come together and achieve goals. I think that’s one of the most spectacular things in life… That’s what I love,” January says. “And I’ve been blessed enough to play for coaches who believe in that, who believe there’s value in teamwork and togetherness and unity. That’s what I believe in, and I think it’s awesome – just going out there and playing for the person next to you, having their back. Going to war together. There’s not a better feeling than that.” January will bring her team spirit – and her considerable basketball skills in the point guard position – to three-time WNBA champions the Phoenix Mercury this season. Jim Pitman, the team’s general manager, stated, “Briann is a differencemaker in our league. We’ve seen her success guarding the best-scoring guards and wings on the biggest stage, and we’ve seen her run a team as an All Starcaliber point guard. We are excited to add perhaps the best women’s player in the history of Arizona State University to our roster.” It’s a double-platinum homecoming for January, who had played her entire WNBA career so far for the Indiana Fever, who drafted her in 2009 in the first round (6th pick overall). In addition to joining a strong Mercury roster that includes WNBA all-time leading scorer Diana Taurasi and 6-foot-9 center Brittney Griner, January accepted a position as assistant coach for the ASU women’s basketball team in the off-season. Rather than playing overseas in Turkey as usual, January spent this past fall and winter working alongside her mentor, ASU women’s basketball head coach Charli Turner Thorne. January, who turned 31 this year, says the coaching gig gave her body a needed break from playing basketball year-round. “It was time for my body to have a rest,” she says.

13


sports

SPORTS CALENDAR ALL THE BEST SPORTS EVENTS TO CATCH, TACKLE AND HIT

BRIAN BENESCH • COLLEGE TIMES

PHOENIX MERCURY VS. DALLAS WINGS WNBA all-time leading scorer Diana Taurasi and company open the 2018 regular season at home. The Wings are the first opponent that stands in the Mercury’s way of a fourth championship. Talking Stick Resort Arena, 201 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, 602.379.2000, mercury.wnba.com, Friday, May 18, 7 p.m., tickets start at $11.

ARIZONA RATTLERS VS. IOWA BARNSTORMERS Head to Talking Stick Resort Arena as the defending United Bowl champions host the Iowa Barnstormers. These two teams met back in March, with the Rattlers losing their only game this season. They will look for revenge in front of the home crowd. Talking Stick Resort Arena, 201 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, 602.379.2000,

azrattlers.com, Sunday, May 20, 3:05 p.m., $13-$145.

YOGA IN THE RAINFOREST This all-levels yoga class is taught by professional teachers from India Bee Yoga. Yogis will find their inner peace inside the 10,000-square-foot conservatory, surrounded by lush vegetation, flowering plants and 3,000 tropical butterflies. Attendees just need to bring a mat and get ready to fly – only spiritually, of course. Butterfly Wonderland, 9500 E. Via de Ventura, Scottsdale, 480.800.3000, butterflywonderland.com, Tuesday, May 22 and Thursday, May 24, 5:15 p.m., $20.

PHOENIX MERCURY VS. SEATTLE STORM WNBA superstars Diana Taurasi and Brittney Griner will provide entertainment on a Wednesday evening in downtown Phoenix. The Mercury

meets the Storm in a heated 2017 postseason rematch. Talking Stick Resort Arena, 201 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, 602.379.2000, mercury.wnba.com, Wednesday, May 23, 7 p.m., tickets start at $11.

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS VS. MIAMI MARLINS The Diamondbacks gear up to host the Marlins on a special Friday evening. The team hopes to extend its hot start into the month of June. After the game, a postgame fireworks display will light up the downtown Phoenix sky! Chase Field, 401 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, 602.514.8400, mlb.com/dbacks, Friday, June 1, 6:40 p.m., $13-$155.

PHOENIX MERCURY VS. LAS VEGAS ACES The Aces visit the Valley for the first time this season. Don’t miss the action as the Mercury hopes to send them back to Sin City with a loss. Talking Stick Resort Arena, 201 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, 602.379.2000, mercury.wnba.com, Sunday, June 10, 3:00 p.m., $9-$237.

PHOENIX RISING FC VS. LAS VEGAS LIGHTS FC The Rising host the Lights in Scottsdale during $1 beer night. No beer? No problem. These soccer matches are fun for all ages. With affordable tickets and cheap beverages, this just may be the best entertainment value in town! Phoenix Rising FC Soccer Complex, 751 N. McClintock Drive, Tempe,

623.594.9606, phxrisingfc.com, Wednesday, June 13, 7:30p.m., $17-$103.

SCOTTSDALE BEAT THE HEAT 10K AND 5K RACE Combat the blistering sun with some outdoor fun. As Phoenix approaches the 28th anniversary of its hottest day on record, runners from all over the Valley will compete for $8,000 in total prize money. 16601 N. Pima Road, Scottsdale, 480-3126815, westworldaz.com, Saturday, June 16, 2:47p.m., entry fees are $51-$62.60.

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS VS. NEW YORK METS Head to Chase Field for a Father’s Day afternoon filled with family fun. Select fans will have a chance to play catch on the field before the Diamondbacks face the Mets. Then sit back and relax as the pros go to work on the diamond. Chase Field, 401 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, 602.514.8400, mlb.com/dbacks, Sunday, June 17, 1:10p.m., $22-$235.

PHOENIX MERCURY VS. MINNESOTA LYNX The Mercury welcomes the Minnesota Lynx, defending league champions, on a Friday night. Come cheer on the team for one of the biggest regular season games of the year. Fans can only hope this meeting offers a preview of a possible WNBA Finals matchup! Talking Stick Resort Arena, 201 E. Jefferson Street, Phoenix, 602-379-2000, mercury.wnba.com, Friday, June 22, 7 p.m., $9-$275. CT

SUN DEVIL BASEBALL

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

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Thursday, May 17, 6 p.m. Friday, May 18, 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19, 4:30 p.m. Tucson

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Thursday, May 24, 7 p.m. Friday, May 25, 6 p.m. Saturday, May 26, 6 p.m. Phoenix CT

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IN THE MIDDLE

ENTERTAINMENT T

BO BURNHAM’S DIRECTORIAL DEBUT ENCOURAGES EVERYONE TO FIND THEIR INNER EIGHTH GRADER be more confident

e mak e r o m nds e i r f

MADISON RUTHERFORD • COLLEGE TIMES

and threedimensional and not like audiences are being catered to with hollow, contrived versions of their own experiences. Burnham says he didn’t put pressure on Fisher and the rest of the young cast to talk or act a certain way, which allowed for organic and authentic character development. “I didn’t want to put a poster in her room that she wouldn’t have. I wasn’t going to put, like, Battletoads in there because you have that in movies… where a kid is a fan of the Ramones,” he says. “A cool kid isn’t a fan of Velvet Underground. A cool kid is a fan of Frank Ocean. I didn’t want to project my sh*t on the kids, so I asked them, ‘What do you like? What do you do?’” He also wanted to tell a new story, not a nostalgic one, so Kayla’s eighth-grade experience is different from his own. The film may bring up feelings from the audience’s own adolescence, but Burnham says it’s strange how little he thought of his own coming-of-age story while writing it. “If anything, it parallels my current experience way more,” he says. “Her feelings of being isolated on the internet or feeling lonely and self-conscious or how her life appears to other people, those are all things I feel now.” But why eighth grade? Put simply, Burnham felt like it hadn’t been done before, unlike the often clichéd high school narratives played out in John Hughes movies. “There are so many movies about high school… I feel like we’ve seen the freshman thing… but with eighth grade, it feels so transitional. I couldn’t think of an eighth grade movie, but when you say eighth grade to someone, everyone has an image in their mind,” he says. Burnham found fame on social media when it was still in its infancy. He says the way YouTube has evolved from a place to share creative efforts, to a platform to present yourself as a person is “totally

Director Bo B urnham and actress Elsie Eighth Grade Fish

PHOTOS • A2

er on the set

freaky.” “And to see young kids get involved with it was wild,” he says. “I think kids feel more real on the internet than in real life, which is really strange.” He does, however, remember what it’s like to be 13 and feel like the weight of the world is on your shoulders. Kayla’s life, not unlike most middle schoolers, is a rollercoaster of emotions. In fact, one of the most inadvertently insightful quotes in the movie comes from when she is struggling to explain the complexities of anxiety to her internet audience. She says she feels nervous all the time, and equates it to constantly waiting in line for a rollercoaster, but never experiencing the relief of taking the ride. Burnham says it was a challenge to come up with creative ways to describe complex feelings from the perspective of a pre-teen. “A lot of movies about this age are full of these overly articulate, young poet laureate kids, when the experience of being a kid, and honestly the experience of being a person, is not having words for how you’re feeling,” he says. Burnham admits he was struggling with his own anxiety while writing the script, which was at times “unspeakable.” Because there are often no words to describe a feeling to someone who’s never felt it, it’s easier to compare it to a universal or familiar feeling, like waiting in line for a rollercoaster. Adolescents have access to adult emotions, but don’t have the adult words to define them, he says. “That was the struggle of the film, in all departments, really,” he continues. “How do you write something for someone who doesn’t know how to talk? How do you dress someone that doesn’t know how to dress? That’s the idea of it… How do you craft something to be perfectly inarticulate?”

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Kayla’s imperfections are so accurately crafted, in fact, that it’s easy to forget she is a fictional character. It is the same phenomenon the film touches on in the first place — following the lives of other people, even if you haven’t met them in person. Kayla’s story is so captivating; it will force audiences to wonder about where life takes her long after the credits roll. It is Burnham’s hope that some piece of the plot will ring true for everyone. He does not, however, want it to come off as a cautionary tale about the internet. “I think there’s a way to talk about the internet that isn’t just scare tactics like, ‘Oh, the internet is all about cyber bullying and leaking nudes or the internet is Russia.’ There’s something in the middle where it’s like, the internet’s kind of sad and makes us all kind of nervous and makes us suspicious of each other and ourselves,” he says. “And it’s not because it’s a generation of selfobsessed, awful kids, it’s just a generation of kids that have been given this thing that turns them inwards and forces them to think about themselves and their own image.” Eighth Grade allows audiences to think about society and themselves without feeling barraged with social commentary. “I would hope maybe younger people watching this can come out feeling like they’ve seen something that feels true to them, and hopefully older people come out understanding what kids are going through, where their frustrations come from,” he says. “This isn’t a lesson; it’s not like, ‘OK, throw your phone in the ocean and you’ll be happier.’ It’s more just like, hopefully anyone can come out feeling less lonely and like 15 you’re not alone in your feelings.” CT ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

he internet is a very different place than when Bo Burnham’s irreverent YouTube videos went viral in 2006. Burnham is a pioneer of post-Instagram and Snapchat internet fame, gaining popularity for posting videos of himself singing and playing electric piano in his bedroom when YouTube was barely a year old. Nowadays, he says he doesn’t even recognize the internet. “It’s changing so rapidly, it just feels like I won NASCAR when they were racing Model Ts,” he jokes. “Now they’re going 10 times quicker and I probably would’ve never caught up to what’s happening now.” Burnham wrote and directed his first feature film, Eighth Grade (slated for theater release on July 27), which paints a brilliantly cringe-inducing portrait of what it’s like to be in eighth grade in 2018. But it is also a blisteringly earnest account of the human experience. The film is at once poignant and sidesplitting, and will make audiences recoil and rejoice as 13-year-old protagonist Kayla Day (Elsie Fisher) navigates the last days of her last year of middle school. Eighth Grade opens with a close-up of Kayla as she talks to her computer camera about self-confidence, boys, being yourself and growing up. Burnham skillfully blurs the lines between the internet and reality throughout the movie; though Kayla’s advice on adolescence seems insightful and selfassured via social media, she struggles with social anxiety and low self-confidence in real life. But how did someone who knows virtually nothing about going through puberty in 2018 pen such an accurate portrayal of it? “The lucky thing about it is, if you want to know about adolescents in 2018, they’re posting everything about themselves online, so it’s pretty easy to find,” Burnham says. Writing the screenplay required extensive research that included watching hundreds of YouTube videos of kids talking to their cameras and transcribing each video verbatim to capture the voice of a generation in script form. The film has a slew of contemporary pop culture references, such as Kayla’s quirky signature sign-off “gucci,” which young audiences will know isn’t a nod to the Italian luxury brand, but a slang admission of approval. It is small, subtle references like this that make Eighth Grade feel authentic


entertainment

WARPED TOUR’S LAST LAP THE COUNTRY’S LARGEST TRAVELING FESTIVAL SAYS FAREWELL AFTER 23 YEARS OF MUSIC AND MEMORIES MADISON RUTHERFORD • COLLEGE TIMES

F

rom the mohawks and mosh pits of early ‘90s punk to the crowd-surfing, skanking, tight pants and studded belts that stemmed from subsequent subgenres like ska, emo, pop punk and post-hardcore, Vans Warped Tour has been a calling card for contemporary counterculture since 1995. The tour, which is the longest continuous traveling music festival in North America, stops in cities across

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the country every summer from June to August. It comes to Ak-Chin Pavilion in Phoenix on June 28. But it won’t be coming back next summer. The tour’s founder, Kevin Lyman, is ready to move on to the next chapter. “I think that we have done everything we can in the format that it is in and on a personal level, I am looking for new challenges,” Lyman says. It is certainly not a lull in success or a lack of passion that caused Lyman to call it a wrap on Warped. Though it had humble beginnings, Warped Tour quickly became a linchpin of the alternative music scene. “I have always looked at Warped as a lifestyle event driven by music. It has been a platform to prove yourself or reconfirm yourself,” Lyman says. “From bands to nonprofits, to brands to being a crew person, it has been a place to cut your teeth or come back and show you still have it.” When he first started, he says he depended on people who trusted his concept and creative process, so he asked bands who were both friends and all-stars of the ‘90s alternative scene, like Sublime, No Doubt, Pennywise and NOFX, to be part of the first few lineups. Now, he gets over 2,000 submissions every year. The tour has also helped bolster the careers of some of the most successful independent and alternative acts on the scene. “It has been an honor to see so many people who got their start in those parking lots go on to do amazing things,” Lyman says. One of the bands that partially owes its success to those parking lots is Floridabased Mayday Parade, who have graced the Warped Tour stage six times since 2007 and will be playing the final tour in its entirety. “We drove to the Jacksonville Warped Tour one day and just sold some CDs in the parking lot and realized that if you hustle, you could sell a decent amount of CDs,” bassist Jeremy Lenzo says. “When we started Mayday Parade, the first thing on our list was to write and record an EP and follow Warped Tour and promote our EP, so we did that in 2006 and ended up selling, like 50,000 CDs… we had like 20 people out there selling our CDs, just trying to put it in as many people’s hands as possible.” Eventually, they caught the attention of Fearless Records, which is also responsible for putting pop punk and hardcore heavyweights like At The Drive-In, Pierce The Veil and Underoath on the map. Though Warped Tour helped kickstart their careers, Lenzo says it is also nostalgic for him and his bandmates because they went as fans in high school. The scene has changed a lot since then –

the sound, the style of dress and even the definitions of what genres like “punk” and “rock” mean. One thing that has remained the same, however, is the unwavering sense of comradery that made Warped Tour a runaway success in the first place, and it’s what continues to set it apart. “I think the culture of Warped Tour, of having a community of people that feel like they all belong there… is what really makes it such a special tour,” says Pat Kirch, who plays drums in Tempe-based band The Maine. According to Kirch, Warped Tour played a huge role in helping the band achieve commercial success. This year will be the band’s sixth time playing the tour. “Going out there and playing shows and asking people to buy our albums, it was a very big part of what got us going,” he says. “We were able to reach so many people and there are not really that many other opportunities to reach that many people in a single day.” Warped Tour provides a unique platform for bands to connect with their fans. He says their first few years of the tour were marked by tons of bands promoting their music by directly interacting with fans, but that has faded over time. “People just play their set and hang out on the bus and that’s about it,” he says. The lineups have evolved over the years as well. Kirch recalls the “Drive-Thru Records era,” when bands like Dashboard Confessional, The Early November and Senses Fail were at the peak of their careers. Now, people might only come to see one or two bands and are less likely to stay the whole day to discover new ones. “You were almost excited about every band that was there,” he recalls. “It was Taking Back Sunday and Underoath, but you’d be excited to see Newfound Glory and Rx Bandits… Now, people might only be into a handful of bands.” Kirch also says that pop punk doesn’t appeal to the masses as much as it did a decade ago. “In 2008, a band like us could be on MTV. In 2007, your mom would’ve heard of Pete Wentz… Now there are people that are just as important to the fans that are coming, but it’s more of a niche,” he says. In addition to giving bands an opportunity to do what they love and reach as many people as possible, Kirch says Warped Tour is a rare place where people can forget about polarizing perspectives and enjoy a sense of solidarity through music. “Warped Tour is a place where you can feel like you’re a part of something. Everybody’s there for the same purpose,” he says. “I think if you go to a place like Warped Tour, you see that we’re all not that different. It’s just a place to have a good time and enjoy music and see new bands.” Kirch says the “spirit of Warped Tour” will live on and Lyman insists that though this is the final tour, it may “manifest in different ways” in the future. He hints at plans for the tour’s 25th anniversary, which will be announced soon. “We’re sad to see it go, but we’re grateful to be a part of the last one,” Lenzo adds. CT


A PEEK INSIDE THE PLAYLIST OF PHOENIX’S MOST INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE

N

atalie Allen is a free-spirited photographer, writer and yoga instructor “running with the wolves in the wild Southwest,” as she puts it. “As a reportage photographer and writer with a focus on outdoor adventure and social impact storytelling, I am passionate about the stories, people, brands and projects that influence an intersection of art and conversation,” she says. The Mesa native graduated from ASU last year and is currently living at the Broadstone Arts District as part of its Artist-in-Residence Program, which allows local artists to live rent-free for four months while making a name for themselves in the downtown Phoenix arts community through gallery displays, community events, resident classes and workshops. Check out a snapshot of this ambitious artist’s Spotify playlist below.

entertainment

THE RIGHT TRACK Natalie Allen

TOP 5 FAVORITE SONGS OF ALL TIME

“El Condor Pasa,” Simon & Garfunkel “My dad would always play this song growing up and when it debuted in one of my favorite films, Wild, when Reese Witherspoon’s character trudged through the Sierra Nevada wilderness, my heart stopped.” “If I Ever Was a Child,” Wilco “Whenever I imagine a scene from my life playing out like a movie (which happens way more often than I’d like to admit) this song always plays in the background.” “A Life of Illusion,” Joe Walsh “A song my boyfriend and I endlessly played while driving down the highway in Iceland.” “Tell It How It Is,” The Growlers “A song my existentially confused heart would always play during my college years. It would make me feel a whole lot better.” “Mystery of Love,” Sufjan Stevens “A song that first debuted on the soundtrack of my favorite film, Call Me By Your Name, and I can’t get it out of my mind.”

PREFERRED WAY OF LISTENING

“Spotify all the way, baby. I like to stick headphones in and tune out while listening to my favorite movie soundtrack on a plane. I can easily doze off for hours.”

DESERT ISLAND ALBUM

“Gah. I don’t know about a specific album, but I would definitely play a mixtape (playlist on Spotify, rather) over and over again featuring all of my favorite ‘70s rock/folk songs.”

“Probably Wilco – a beautiful indie rock/ alternative band. Their song ‘If I Ever Was A Child’ immediately puts me in a nostalgic mood.”

GO-TO GUILTY PLEASURE TRACK OR CLASSIC KARAOKE TUNE “Definitely either ‘Baba O’Riley’ by The Who, ‘What’s Up’ by 4 NonBlondes or ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ by Queen. Gotta love those classic rock jams.” CT

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

WHAT ARTIST WOULD PROVIDE THE SOUNDTRACK FOR THE MOVIE ABOUT YOUR LIFE?

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ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | APRIL 19, 2018

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LIVE MUSIC

CALENDAR MAY 17 The Lighthouse and the Whaler The Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $12-$15 Mac Lethal w/WAX Pub Rock Live, 8:30 p.m., $18-$22 Mestis Club Red, 6 p.m., $15 Peter Hook & The Light The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $26-$41 Todrick Hall Mesa Arts Center, 7:30 p.m., $30-$199

MAY 18 Dirtwire Shady Park, 9 p.m., $10 Lynyrd Skynyrd w/Bad Company, The Outlaws Ak-Chin Pavilion, 6 p.m., $29.50-$425 Marisela Celebrity Theatre, 8:30 p.m., $50-$95 Pedro the Lion Crescent Ballroom, 8:30 p.m., $20-$33 Pond Valley Bar, 7:30 p.m., $14-$16 Silent Scream w/Madrost Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free The Wonder Years Marquee Theatre, 7 p.m., $25-$37

MAY 19 Condemned Till Dawn Club Red, 6 p.m., $10-$13 Cullen Omori w/The Gloomies Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., $10-$12 The Gipsy Kings Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino, 8 p.m., $55-$150 Natalia LaFourcade The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $42 Preoccupations Valley Bar, 7:30 p.m., $13-$15 Soulfly w/Nile Marquee Theatre, 6:15 p.m., $12.50$55

MAY 20

MAY 21 Geographer Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $14-$16 Primitive Man Club Red, 7 p.m., $14-$16

Texas Hippie Coalition Marquee Theatre, 6:15 p.m., $23-$38

MAY 31 MAY 22

Bleachers The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $27.50 The Brevet Valley Bar, 8 p.m., $12-$14 Machine Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free MC Chris The Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $16-$18

MAY 23 Phantogram w/Tycho The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $41

MAY 24 Days N’ Daze Club Red, 6 p.m., $15-$17

MAY 25 Bhad Bhabie Club Red, 7 p.m., $20-$25 Body Count Marquee Theatre, 6:15 p.m., $22-$52 Kimbra w/Son Lux Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $20-$22 One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $15 Peter Bradley Adams Valley Bar, 7:30 p.m., $15-$18 The Sugar Thieves The Rhythm Room, 8 p.m., $10

MAY 26 Bob Log III The Rhythm Room, 9 p.m., $12-$15 Chon Club Red, 7:30 p.m., $20-$25 Smallpools w/GGFO Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $20-$59.99 Timbiriche Ak-Chin Pavilion, 8 p.m., $29.50$217.75

MAY 27 Amber Mark Valley Bar, 8 p.m., $12-$15 Caloncho Crescent Ballroom, 8:30 p.m., $21-$31 Dave Vito & The Volunteers Yucca Tap Room, 6 p.m., free Obituary Club Red, 6 p.m., $23-$25 Subhumans The Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $15-$18

MAY 28 Gatecreeper w/Full of Hell Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $11-$13 Hawthorne Heights The Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $20-$22

Greg Laswell Musical Instrument Museum, 7:30 p.m., $30-$40 Melvins Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $20 Sugarland Gila River Arena, 7 p.m., $47-$770.25

JUNE 1 Authority Zero Marquee Theatre, 6:30 p.m., $20-$35 Calexico w/Julia Jacklin The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $25-$40 Mega 104.3 Summer Jam Talking Stick Resort Arena, 7:30 p.m., $30.50-$57.50 Night Riots w/courtship Valley Bar, 7:30 p.m., $15-$18 Sundressed Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $10-$12 Wand The Lunchbox, 8 p.m., $12-$15

JUNE 2 Cozz Rebel Lounge, 9 p.m., $15-$65 D.O.A. w/MDC Marquee Theatre, 6:15 p.m., $20-$35 Eminence Ensemble Last Exit Live, 9 p.m., $10-$15 Larry & His Flask w/Acousta Noir Yucca Tap Room, 7:30 p.m., $15-$18 Shoreline Mafia Pub Rock Live, 7 p.m., $22-$50 Transviolet Valley Bar, 7:30 p.m., $12

JUNE 3 Headwinds Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free Kansas Salt River Grand Ballroom at Talking Stick Resort, 8 p.m., $30-$266.50 Mario Aguilar The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $49-$89 Michael Jackson Tribute The Pressroom, 7 p.m., $20-$50

JUNE 4 Charley Crockett Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $12 Power Trip Club Red, 8 p.m., $18-$20

JUNE 5 Ray LaMontagne w/Neko Case Comerica Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $39.50$292.50 Sick of It All w/Murphy’s Law Pub Rock Live, 7 p.m., $17 Speedy Ortiz Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $13-$15 Uli Jon Roth Club Red, 7 p.m., $23-$25

MAY 29 James Taylor & His All-Star Band Talking Stick Resort Arena, 7:30 p.m.,

JUNE 6 Aly & AJ

JUNE 7 Maroon 5 Talking Stick Resort Arena, 7:30 p.m., $44.75-$195.98 Ramsey Lewis and His Electric Band Musical Instrument Museum, 6 and 8 p.m., $35-$60 T.S.O.L. Yucca Tap Room, 7:30 p.m., $15-$18

JUNE 8 Blue October The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $28 Emery w/’68 Pub Rock Live, 7 p.m., $20 Enanitos Verdes w/Hombres G Comerica Theatre, 8 p.m., $69.50-$350 Genesis Company w/Lo’ There The Nile, 6 p.m., $10-$12 Lago Club Red, 6 p.m., $10-$13 The Paladins Rhythm Room, 9 p.m., $16-$20 UFOMAMMUT Club Red, 7 p.m., $13-$15

JUNE 9 Insomnium Club Red, 6 p.m., $20-$55 Justin Townes Earle w/Lydia Loveless Musical Instrument Museum, 7:30 p.m., $37-$42 Maps & Atlases Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $15-$17 The Punk Rock All Stars Last Exit Live, 8:30 p.m., $8-$10

JUNE 10 Devastation on the Nation Club Red, 4 p.m., $22-$25 Reina Del Cid Last Exit Live, 8:30 p.m., $12-$15 I’m Still Weak Rhythm Room, 7 p.m., $10-$12 The Yardbirds The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $34.50-$99.50

JUNE 11 Ana Popovic Musical Instrument Museum, 7 p.m., $30-$35 Chad Valley Valley Bar, 8 p.m., $12-$15 Nick Moss Band Rhythm Room, 8 p.m., $10

JUNE 12 Hailshot w/Kamikaze Zombie Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., $10 Onward, Etc. Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $10-$12 Too Slim & The Taildraggers Rhythm Room, 8 p.m., $10

JUNE 13 Brewfish Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free Har Mar Superstar sings Sam Cooke Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $15-$18

JUNE 14 Brownout Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $18-$20 John Butler Trio The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $32-$47 Paula Cole Musical Instrument Museum, 7:30 p.m., $37-$42 Post Animal Valley Bar, 8 p.m., $12-$14

JUNE 15 Bruno Major Valley Bar, 7:30 p.m., $12-$15 Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $35 The Iron Maidens Marquee Theatre, 6:15 p.m., $16-$31 Nonpoint w/Butcher Babies Club Red, 5:30 p.m., $22 Rival Coast w/Baseline Pub Rock Live, 7 p.m., $12-$15

JUNE 16 Blue Water Highway Valley Bar, 7:30 p.m., $12 Hammerfall Marquee Theatre, 8 p.m., $25-$70 Rowdy Rebels Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $25-$50 Yellow Claw The Pool at Talking Stick Resort, noon, $20

JUNE 17 Cash’d Out Rhythm Room, 7 p.m., $15 Chicago w/REO Speedwagon Ak-Chin Pavilion, 7:30 p.m., $29.50$375 Dave Vito & The Volunteers Yucca Tap Room, 6 p.m., free Nora En Pure Maya Day + Nightclub, noon, $10 Regina Belle Chandler Center for the Arts, 7 p.m., $38-$58

JUNE 18 The Get Up Kids Crescent Ballroom, 8:30 p.m., $23-$27

JUNE 19 Deca Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $12-$15 The Lucky Eejits Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free Men I Trust Pub Rock Live, 8 p.m., $12-$15 New Found Glory Marquee Theatre, 7 p.m., $25-$45 Small Leaks Sink Ships Valley Bar, 7 p.m., $7-$10

JUNE 20 Bent Knee Valley Bar, 8 p.m., $10-$12

continued on pg. 20

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

Benni Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free Carvin Jones Band The Rhythm Room, 6 p.m., $5 Life of Agony Club Red, 6 p.m., $23-$25 MGMT Marquee Theatre, 8 p.m., $45-$75 Mike Love Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $13-$15 Smokepurpp The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $24-$50 Volac Shady Park, 2 p.m., $1

MAY 30

Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $20-$150 The Atlas Moth Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $13-$15 Kesha w/Macklemore Ak-Chin Pavilion, 7 p.m., $30.50-$299 Minus the Bear Marquee Theatre, 7 p.m., $28-$58 Petrification Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free A Place to Bury Strangers Valley Bar, 8 p.m., $15-$17

entertainment

$70.75-$1,250 Okkervil River Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $20-$32

19


entertainment

WE DON’T BELIEVE IN

TOTALLY ACCURATE PREDICTIONS YOU SHOULD PROBABLY TAKE WITH A GRAIN OF SALT AQUARIUS (JANUARY 20-FEBRUARY 18) Sensory overload has you feeling overwhelmed by crowds and the constant pressure of interaction. Take a night for yourself and stay in – you will have to talk to your Postmates driver, though, otherwise it’s just awkward. PISCES (FEBRUARY 19-MARCH 20) Balance seemingly evades you and you find yourself slowly cutting off half of those close to you. It’s time to take a step back, evaluate your decisions… and stop yourself from going to see Avengers: Infinity Wars in theaters again.

boyfriend or not running the dishwasher, you’ll want to cut corners somewhere before the AC starts running your bill up! LEO (JULY 23-AUGUST 22) The stars find you in a dilemma – do you play your cards or keep them hidden? Of course, we’re talking about checking out at the grocery store with that worn out Visa, but if you can afford a game of poker, go all in! VIRGO (AUGUST 23- SEPTEMBER 22) Actions speak louder than words but emojis are easier to text. Remember that this Father’s Day… :)

ARIES

(SEPTEMBER 23-OCTOBER 22) You’re the first to psychoanalyze your problems but the last to find a solution. Might we suggest starting at the bottom of a container of Oreos ice cream?

TAURUS

SCORPIO

(APRIL 22-MAY 20) Summer is your season, Taurus, so wake up early and seize the day! Now since it’s summer, “waking up early” for you probably means sleeping in until 10 a.m., but that’s no one’s business.

(OCTOBER 23-NOVEMBER 21) While you’re struggling with your own authenticity around those close to you, remember: Always be yourself. Unless you can be Beyoncé… then be her.

GEMINI

(NOVEMBER 22-DECEMBER 21) You’re the first to shoot for the stars but everyone needs boundaries every once in a while. Maybe start with the top of a really tall building and go from there?

(MAY 21-JUNE 21) Self-discipline comes in many forms, Gemini. Sometimes it means stopping yourself from going on a full-blown H&M shopping spree… and sometimes it means only spending $50. ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | MAY 17, 2018

20

LIBRA

(MARCH 21-APRIL 21) A recent interaction has you feeling hotter than usual. We’re not mind readers, so either call that person who gave you their number at the bar… or put on some sunscreen.

CANCER (JUNE 22-JULY 22) Watch out for things that are unnecessarily draining your energy and reconsider their presence in your life. Whether that means ditching a bad

MUSIC

continued from pg. 19

The Chamanas Last Exit Live, 8:30 p.m., $12-$15 Spectral Voice w/Superstition Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., $12 Ziggy Marley The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $36-$60

JUNE 21 The B Sharps Yucca Tap Room, 8 p.m., free Niki J. Crawford Rhythm Room, 8 p.m., $12 Shakey Graves The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $25 Slightly Stoopid Mesa Amphitheatre, 5:30 p.m., $35-$152.77 Stars Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $21-$38.50

JUNE 22 Elevate Music Festival 2018 Grand Canyon University Arena, 6:30 p.m., $22.50-$129 Puddle of Mudd Marquee Theatre, 7 p.m., $25-$55 Shwayze w/Cisco Crescent Ballroom, 7 p.m., $25-$30 The Sugar Thieves Rhythm Room, 8 p.m., $10 Trixie Mattel The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $37-$52

JUNE 23 Elevate Music Festival 2018 Grand Canyon University Arena, 5:30 p.m.,

$22.50-$129 Errra The Nile, 6:30 p.m., $13-$15 Headbang for the Highway Battle for Summer Slaughter 2018 Club Red, 5 p.m., $13-$15 Hockey Dad Rebel Lounge, 6:30 p.m., $13-$15 Katchafire Marquee Theatre, 5:15 p.m., $22-$47 Who’s Bad: Tribute to Michael Jackson The Van Buren, 8 p.m., $20

JUNE 24 Chris Brown Ak-Chin Pavilion, 7 p.m., $25-$495 Elevate Music Festival 2018 Grand Canyon University Arena, 4 p.m., $22.50$129

JUNE 25 The Regrettes Rebel Lounge, 7:30 p.m., $10-$12

JUNE 26 The Rocksteady 7 Valley Bar, 8 p.m., $10-$12 U.S. Bombs Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $16-$18

JUNE 27 Cold Cave Crescent Ballroom, 8 p.m., $15-$18 Combichrist Club Red, 6 p.m., $22-$25 Fantastic Negrito Last Exit Live, 7 p.m., $13 Street Dogs Rebel Lounge, 8 p.m., $16-$18 CT

INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO THE ADVANCE SCREENING OF

SAGITTARIUS

FOR A CHANCE TO RECEIVE PASSES FOR TWO, EMAIL PHOENIXFREE SCREENINGS @YAHOO.COM

CAPRICORN (DECEMBER 22-JANUARY 19) As the season of summer selfies comes around, remember: Your ego is not your amigo… but that one filter on Snapchat front-camera has always been a good friend. CT

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. THIS FILM IS NOT YET RATED. Please note: Passes Received Do Not Guarantee You A Seat At The Theatre. Seating Is On A FirstCome, First-Served Basis, Except For Members Of The Reviewing Press And Select Guests On A Guest List. Theater Is Overbooked To Ensure A Full House. No Admittance Once Screening Has Begun. All Federal, State And Local Regulations Apply. A Recipient Of Tickets Assumes Any And All Risks Related To Use Of Ticket, And Accepts Any Restrictions Required By Ticket Provider. Paramount Pictures, College Times And Their Affiliates Accept No Responsibility Or Liability In Connection With Any Loss Or Accident Incurred In Connection With Use Of A Ticket. Tickets Cannot Be Exchanged, Transferred Or Redeemed For Cash, In Whole Or In Part. We Are Not Responsible If, For Any Reason, Guests Are Unable To Use His/ Her Ticket In Whole Or In Part. Not Responsible For Lost, Delayed Or Misdirected Entries. All Federal And Local Taxes Are The Responsibility Of The Guest. Void Where Prohibited By Law. No Purchase Necessary. Participating Sponsors, Their Employees & Family Members And Their Agencies Are Not Eligible. No Phone Calls. This Screening Will Be Monitored For Unauthorized Recording. By Attending, You Agree Not To Bring Any Recording Device Into The Theater And You Consent To Physical Search Of Your Belongings And Person For Recording Devices. If You Attempt To Enter With A Recording Device, You Will Be Denied Admission. If You Attempt To Use A Recording Device, You Consent To Your Immediate Removal From The Theater And Forfeiture Of The Device. Unauthorized Recording Will Be Reported To Law Enforcement And May Subject You To Criminal And Civil Liability. No Cell Phones Allowed.

Enjoy your summer! Look for our Housing Issue on June 28 & the College Survival Guide in July

IN THEATRES JUNE 1, 2018 @ActionPointMov

@ActionPointMovie #ActionPoint


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REGISTER for FALL maricopa.edu/register-now Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) is an EEO/AA institution and an equal opportunity employer of protected veterans and individuals with disabilities. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin. A lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in the career and technical education programs of the college. The Maricopa Community Colleges do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability or age in its programs or activities. For Title IX/504 Concerns, call the following number to reach the appointed coordinator: (480) 731-8499. For additional information, as well as a listing of all coordinators within the Maricopa College system, visit the following weblink: www.maricopa.edu/non-discrimination.

College Times - May 17, 2018  
College Times - May 17, 2018