Page 1

OK SMILE

TAYLOR UPSAHL READY FOR THE CAMERAS

TAKING THE IT’S A HONORS SETUP ASU NAMED NUMBER 1 IN INNOVATION

PHOENIX COLLEGE VBALL NOW BEING SERVED

DECEMBER 2019

EST. 2002

WINTER SHAPE UP How to stay fit during the holidays

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Itchin’ for an Etchin’


ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019 1


student life

contents student life 3

11 Ways to Stay in Shape

It's easier than going to the gym

4

Upsahl

5

PUBLISHER

Steve T. Strickbine VICE PRESIDENT

Taylor Upsahl returns home

Michael Hiatt

No. 1

EDITOR

ASU is recognized for innovation

Christina Fuoco-Karasinski

voices 8

COPY EDITOR

April Morganroth

Adam Hoffman

Veni, Vidi, Veggie

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Laura Latzko, Octavio Serrano, Annika Tomlin

success & money 10 Everything Etched

DESIGNER

sports

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

Christy Byerly

ASU grad just scratching the surface

Aaron Kolodny

12 Phoenix College Volleyball

ASSOCIATE ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Tionna Hood plays for her sister

Nadine Whitehead

entertainment

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14 Right Track

Courtney Oldham

Isiah Brown is a rapper, too

15 Sauce

Pass me a bowl please

16 Numbers

2 accountants walked into a bar....

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11 WAYS TO

STUDENT LIFE

STAY IN SHAPE DURING THE HOLIDAYS ANNIKA TOMLIN • COLLEGE TIMES

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t’s that time of the year again where the family comes in and the pounds stack on. This time of year calls for every kind of sweets, treats and good eats. It’s no wonder why there is such a struggle to keep fit during winter break. Students from all around try there best to not get the freshman fifteen during school, but when the holidays are here, there is no holding back. What if this year you didn’t have to worry about gaining those extra pounds during winter break? Here are 11 tips for you to keep your figure during this holiday season. Nothing shakes up your day-to-day routine like the holidays. Don’t let them change. Keep your workday morning routine. It helps with energy and with your eating schedule. Continue eating at the same times throughout the day so your digestive system isn’t thrown out of whack trying to keep up with all the new food that is coming in.

vacation for two weeks, you better make sure there is a gym near where you are staying. If you are staying in a hotel, see if they have a fitness facility. A treadmill and a few weights can go a long way. If you are staying at someone’s house you have two options: see if they have a home gym or equipment that you can use, or see if your local gym membership extends out of state to a gym that is close to the house. All else fails, you can always go for a walk/jog/run around the area where you are staying. If you plan ahead to work out during vacation, you are more inclined to do it when you are there..

#10 • KEEP HYDRATED

#5 • TAKE THE STEPS

#11 • STICK TO A ROUTINE

Holidays are known as the perfect time to let loose and pig out. Don’t forget you need to stay hydrated to keep all that alcohol and food moving through your body. Water is the perfect reset button to keep you going all throughout the holidays. You should be drinking more water than anything else to keep you awake and healthy.

This seems like a really simple way to stay fit—and it is. If you’re in a multifloor building, take the stairs. If you live on the 14th floor of your apartment complex, plan to leave earlier than normal and take the strairs. If you have the time, track how long it takes you to use the stairs and plan your day around that.

#9 • EAT BEFORE YOU HEAD OUT FOR DINNER

#4 • PARK IN THE BACK

Most holiday dinners involve figure-ruining food. Why put yourself through all of that when you can have a healthy meal at home and be full enough when you get there. Not everyone is going to know that you are on a diet or watching your figure. You are in control of your own food intake. Skip the junk and greasy food. It’s really that simple. If your friends or family want to know why you aren’t eating much, say you’re dieting or tell a white lie that you’re not hungry. You could also bring a protein bar to tide you over until you get home.

#8 • PRIORITIZE SLEEP

Sleep starts to become a foreign concept when family and friends in town take up all of your free time. Take time for yourself, even if it is just getting a full night’s worth of sleep. Nothing is more frustrating than being sluggish when you have to up and moving with the rest of the family or friends. Sleep is best when it comes to staying fit because it is the main time that you are digesting all of your food. That’s why it is perfectly OK and encouraged to take that power nap after a big meal. Sleep is also a great way to relieve stress.

#7 • MANAGE STRESS

Managed stress equals no stress eating. Having visitors from out of town can be stressful. Find ways that help you destress in those tough situations. It could be 10 minutes of meditation. Or it could be reading your favorite book for the hundredth time. One of the best ways to relieve stress is to workout. It is like the “Legally Blonde” quote by Elle Woods goes, “Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy.” Get some more exercise so you are less stressed during the holidays.

#6 • PLAN FITNESS DURING VACATION

If you’re traveling, be sure fitness is on your to-do list. This goes back to keeping a routine. If you work out three times a week and you’ll be on

4 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019

Holidays equals holiday shopping, and everywhere is going to be crowded. To get exercise, park in the back of the lot. It’ll give you the extra energy boost you need to shop. Plus, with all of your shopping bags in tow on the way back to the car, you get some weightlifting in your day.

#3 • GET A WORKOUT BUDDY

People have more free time during the holidays to get out and do stuff, so get out and do stuff. Grab a friend or a family member and take a walk or lift weights at the gym. A workout buddy can help you push yourself and it’ll relieve stress.

#2 • TV WORKOUTS

A lot of the time during the holidays you are sitting at home watching TV. You can so easily fit in a workout during the commercials watching a holiday special. During car commercials get up and jog in place. Try this: 20 to 30 crunches during clothing commercials; 30 jumping jacks during food spots; 20 squats for a movie trailer; and 20 lunges for a jewelry ad. Take a water break during the other commercials.

#1 • FACETIME/SKYPE

All of the foods that are served during the holidays have a healthier option. There is a substitution for pretty much every key ingredient to a main dish. You can replace oil in a recipe with plain yogurt to help cut a lot of that fat and help boost the amount of protein. You can swap out a banana in place of butter. Try and cut out as much sugar or find a replacement for it as best you can. A second on lips means years on the hips. Keep that in mind while you go after that cookie that your mom strategically left out for you. It is not worth it in the long run. Consider doing a vegetarian or even a vegan option for some of your side dishes. The side dishes are what you devour the most anyways so they should be the healthiest option on your plate. CT


COMING HOME

student life

TAYLOR UPSAHL IS READY TO SMILE FOR PHOENIX CAMERAS CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI • COLLEGE TIMES

A

lterna pop singer Taylor Upsahl peppers her conversation with “stoked” and “dope.” She just turned 21 on Thanksgiving, but she speaks like a record industry veteran. Upsahl has owned 2019, and she’s optimistic about 2020. She’ll celebrate that success with Alt AZ and the “Ugly Sweater Concert Series” by opening for Angels and Airwaves at the Marquee on Wednesday, December 4. “I’m very excited,” says Upsahl, who performs using only her last name. “I haven’t been home in a minute. Normally, when I come home—especially in the past year—I see as many people as I can. But I’m excited to see everyone around the holidays.” She better do it now, as she has a busy 2020. Upsahl has several new singles lined up for 2020 and is working to finalize those tracks. She just released the single “Smile for the Camera.” “It’s definitely my favorite video to date,” she says. “It was crazy to smash all this stuff. That morning, I said any anger I have I’m putting into this music video. Patrick Lawler, who did the video for ‘Drugs’ too, did it. He’s so amazing. She showed me the

concept and I was sold, with all the different colors.” Whenever she returns from touring, Upsahl immediately heads into writing sessions. She figures this year she’s penned at least 350 songs. “I’m just trying to put out as many of them as possible,” she says with a laugh. “I just want to share more music with my fans.” She collaborated recently with the production team Space Primates and songwriter Asia Whitacre, the latter of whom she dubs an “incredible writer out of L.A. who’s been one of my true favorites.” “Her melodies are insane,” she adds. “She’s fun to be around and she’s really not scared to take risks. For me, it’s important to surround myself with other creatives who want to take risks. She likes to do weird (stuff), which I think is really dope. “One of the things I’ve loved about making music is doing stuff people are thrown off by. I’d rather take the PHOTOS • COURTESY UPSAHL risk and make something amazing Taylor Upsahl—who performs under the moniker Upsahl—grew up in Phoenix and will open and groundbreaking than just a new for Angels and Airwaves on Wednesday, December 4. song.” When Upsahl plays the Marquee, she’s bringing her recently while being classically trained on equally as supportive. reconfigured set of new songs and piano, guitar and choir. “All the bands and artists in unreleased “I started going to the Arizona Phoenix are so amazing. Let’s say tracks. School for the Arts when I was 10 there were three bands on a show. “I’ve years old,” she says. “I graduated high Somehow, everyone would find a incorporated school there. Every morning we’d do way to collaborate on one song,” she playing bass our academics, and after lunch we says. into the set, would just have arts classes all day Nevertheless, she’s looking which is fun,” long. It was great to be surrounded forward to seeing everybody at she says. by a bunch of people who were home. “I’m running “Seeing everyone around the around playing studying dance, theater or music. It instruments so was a very supportive place to grow.” holidays will be dope,” she says. Her first show was a 93.9 gig at “Most of my friends will be home it’s really high the Salty Senorita as a high school from college. I’m just super, super energy.” freshman. grateful for the support system I still Her success “My dad helped me put together have in Phoenix.” CT has been a a live show,” she says with a laugh. long time “It was great. Then I was slowly coming. When introduced to the Crescent Ballroom she was 17, and Valley Bar.” Upsahl wrote She moved to Los Angeles after and released a Angels and graduation and quickly signed with self-titled EP, Airwaves w/IDKHOW David Gray of Universal Music which gained Publishing Group as an artist. Her and Upsahl recognition goal was to work with several throughout 8 p.m. Wednesday, writers and producers to up her the Valley. A December 4 graduate of the game. Marquee Theatre, The plan worked, as she was the Arizona School first artist signed to Arista Records, 730 N. Mill Avenue, for the Arts, which was resurrected by music Tempe a performing exec David Massey. She calls it “the arts middle/ $40 in advance craziest opportunity ever.” high school, 480-829-0607, Coming full circle to Phoenix is Upsahl luckymanonline.com just as gratifying. She recalls gigs continued to with .decker and others who were hone her craft,

5 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019

ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019 5


student life

NO. 1

PHOTOS • CHRISTY BYERLY

ASU RECEIVES RECOGNITION FOR INNOVATION LAURA LATZKO • COLLEGE TIMES

O

ver the years, ASU has developed a strong reputation for its innovative approaches. Now, ASU has been recognized on a national level by the U.S. News and World Report for that creative approach to education. This is the fifth consecutive year that ASU has been named No. 1 in innovation, ahead of other top schools including Georgia State University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Stanford University. The ranking was developed through peer nominations from college presidents, admission deans and provosts, and is based on factors like improvements to facilities, overall campus life, curriculum and technology. Innovation is a campuswide idea, implemented in different ways. It touches different aspects of ASU, including teaching and research methodologies. Different programs, research projects and teams have helped ASU to become recognized as one of the most innovative schools in the country. This includes the allfemale Desert WAVE robotics team, a canine cancer vaccine trial and the BioSpine adaptive learning biology degree. ASU has also developed partnerships with Uber to provide opportunities for drivers to get a college education and the Maryvale community to implement a revitalization project called the One Square Mile Initiative. Innovation is part of the business model of ASU, but it also touches students and faculty in more tangible ways. Professors in different schools are bringing

innovation to their classrooms through their methodology and hands-on projects. Brent Sebold, the executive director of entrepreneurship and innovation for the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, teaches the importance of entrepreneurship and value creation to business and engineering majors. He feels innovation is tied to whether something

hundreds of thousands of people value,” Sebold says. ASU students have applied these lessons about value creation through projects such as an entertainment company that makes ride-share trips less awkward as well as through a campus parking reservation service. Students are encouraged to not wait until they graduate but instead release their products or services into the market right now. “We are trying to blur the line

has a greater use or purpose— on a local, national or global level. “Whether you are building a robot, developing a new skill for the Alexa or developing a nonprofit, you have to have a novel value proposition that people are willing to pay for,” Sebold says. He tries to communicate to his students that when creating anything, it is important to be able to understand and anticipate the needs of audiences. “The sales process goes away when you get it right, when you truly are empathetic to the end user. Empathy in the design process will enable you to create something like a new American university that

between society, the marketplace and the classroom every day. I think that’s pretty much across the board at any forward-thinking university,” Sebold says. Collaboration among different schools and with community partners has also helped ASU to be forward thinking. It is through these projects that ASU students and faculty have been able to make

6 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019

change not just on campus but in a larger context. Students have had a chance to work with people in other disciplines and with community partners as part of smart city project involving Belmont Properties, the Gammage and Burnham law firm, and ASU. As part of a related independent study/externship, four students from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law are helping to develop a framework for governing a smart city. “These students are being exposed to real estate law, development and design with the idea of actually helping to shape this 22,000acre property in Arizona,” says Diana Bowman, associate dean of international engagement for the law school and co-director of the Center for Smart Cities and Regions. Bowman says being part of collaborative efforts will allow students to be able to communicate with people in a range of disciplines. “The sooner you get exposed to the different languages of the different disciplines, the sooner that you can find ways to work together and problem-solve because no longer are you feeling excluded from those discussions,” Bowman says. CT


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BOLD AMBITION

VOICES

INSTRUCTOR ADAM HOFFMAN WANTS TO MAKE ASU VEGAN BY 2021

JESSICA CARPENTER • COLLEGE TIMES

A

nimal rights activist and ASU instructor Adam Hoffman is on a mission. Hoffman—who is also working toward a Ph.D. in English literature— wants to save the planet, one issue at a time. His goal now is to make ASU vegan by 2021 by participating in animal rights and environmental marches and participating in webcasts and podcasts to educate students and staff. He’s used to being heckled, and sometimes passersby become confrontational and get in his face. “In Arizona, you have this incredible destruction of our desert ecosystem for cattle,” Hoffman says. “We are depleting our groundwater to grow alfalfa for cattle in Saudi Arabia.” According to marketplace.org, a Saudi dairy company purchased 14,000 acres in Arizona and California to grow alfalfa, a waterintensive plant, to feed its cows. Hoffman is fed up with the inhumane treatment of dairy and free-range cows, saying some of these animals live outside with almost no coolant throughout the year in Arizona. They are then slaughtered between the ages of 18 months to 4 years. One of Hoffman’s goals through protesting on campus is to bring awareness to and change how students are eating. “We can eat something and be better students and not destroy the planet. It’s such an easy fix,” he says.

Garden introduction

PHOTO • SUBMITTED

Adam Hoffman takes action during a Direct Action Everywhere fur protest outside a San Diego mall.

news stories and applies them to real life as he specializes in science Born and raised in Grand Rapids, writing and humanities. Michigan, Hoffman was introduced “Growing up, I discovered in to gardening by his mother, who lived on a 3-acre lot. At the property, human societies, ‘The pen is mightier than the sword,’” Hoffman Hoffman took care of numerous animals, including dogs, cats, rabbits, says. “Since I can do cool things with words, I decided that’s how I’d try to frogs, turtles and fish. help people.” While living in Michigan, Unsatisfied with the news Hoffman said his life changed. He coverage of issues impacting the shot a “chipmunk-like” ground hog environment with a BB gun and animals, because it was he turns on digging holes his webcam in the yard. and discusses The animal was these issues. only injured. The topics When he went have interested to finish the Hoffman for job the next years, but only day, Hoffman in the last watched year has he as another been moved to groundhog educate those came running around him. across the “I was writing grounds to the these papers, injured one’s and I’m realizing aid. PHOTO • SARAH MITCHELL PHOTOGRAPHY people need “It literally Graduate student and ASU instructor Adam to know that tried to pull its Hoffman is determined to make the university scientists are vegan by 2021. injured friend trying to wipe out to safety—away from me,” Hoffman says. Crushed by entire (bug) species,” he says. “People need to know the orangutans are his “callous action,” Hoffman vowed probably going to go extinct in the to never kill animals again. next 10 years. It’s one of those things “At that point I knew I’d try to where I’m trying to do my part.” befriend animals, not execute them,” In terms of cows, Hoffman shows Hoffman says. 2015 Great Acceleration Charts by While studying at ASU, Hoffman the Anthropocene Review that show uses themes and situations from

8 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019

trends in emissions from carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane. Methane emissions have nearly doubled since 1997. “We need somebody who will say this is a justice issue,” Hoffman says. “That’s how I got involved. I can’t pretend like there isn’t a problem anymore. I felt like I had to do my part in trying to save humans and animals.” Hoffman’s work to bring awareness to campus is based largely on his concern for the students’ health. He has spoken to the ASU alumni who own the vegan restaurant Twenty-Four Carrots, whom he says have “agreed to pitch a high-volume sales model to Aramark,” ASU’s restaurant provider, for a restaurant on campus. Veg Out, an ASU club dedicated to promoting veganism and animal rights, is working toward the same goal. Veg Out President Katherine Poe says there are two powerful tools: education and protest. “Educating students about animal agriculture and the benefits of veganism is critical, as is educating the administration about why veganism is in line with ASU’s values, particularly sustainability,” Poe says. “We are in full support and want to be supportive of one another in whatever way is needed.” Hoffman also wants to remove

continued on pg. 9


VOICES

AMBITION continued from pg. 8 Chick-Fil-A restaurants from around ASU because they are “a wreckingball socially.” The restaurant has been protested for its alleged antiLGBTQ stance. Hoffman is working with Friends of Animals, an ASU club of which he is a member. Jeremiah Miller, an officer in the Friends of Animals club on the Polytech campus, says, “They not only treat chickens terribly, but they also support other outdated ideas like being against LGBT rights. We think that the common goals of LGBT people and allies, as well as the animal rights movement, will help get the ball rolling on moving towards a vegan campus. “Adam’s been an amazing help for the club. He’s helped organize tabling and protests, as well as doing most of the administrative work for the club. We definitely couldn’t be doing what we are without his help and passion for the cause.”

Inviting conversation As an instructor, Hoffman shares his movement with his students and openly invites conversation and disagreements. “They don’t have to agree with me,” Hoffman says. “I am very

PHOTO • SUBMITTED

Adam Hoffman protests against United Dairymen of Arizona in Tempe.

tolerant of different points of view in the classroom. I enjoy helping people learn and try to give them the tools for their own liberation: language and writing skills.” Through all of his activism, Hoffman says he does worry about it affecting his job at ASU. “I care about academia; I don’t want to get kicked off,” he says.

PHOTO • SUBMITTED

Adam Hoffman protests a rodeo with Action for Liberation in Prescott.

He values the platform of campus and uses it as a helpful way to educate students on issues outside of the classroom. He is known to bring his protest signs with him everywhere, including English department meetings. “We need to get justice for animals, humans and the environment, and there’s a lack

of people willing to speak up in powerful places, which ASU is,” Hoffman says. “Am I worried? Sure. But, the world needs something right now more than Adam Hoffman’s career plan. It’s not really my business what people think of me. I’ve been known to act on this urgent issue, and I think I’ve done my job.” CT

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COLLEGE TIMES THURS 12/05/19 4-COLOR


SUCCESS TYLER CADWELL IS JUST SCRATCHING THE SURFACE WITH EVERYTHING ETCHED CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI • COLLEGE TIMES

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our years ago, Tyler Cadwell made a hand-engraved wine cork holder for his mother that read “Keep Calm and Drink Wine.” The ASU graduate’s family was so impressed that his aunt suggested he sell those items on Etsy. The job was about an hour and a half, but he plugged along. A year later, he discovered laser engravers, which made his tasks more efficient. He started Everything Etched and moved to the Airpark in 2015. He’s found tremendous success. “We started in one unit and six months later we were busy enough to take over the unit next to us,” he says, “Six months after that, we kept growing and we needed more space. So we knocked a hole in the wall and we have three units.” The Scottsdale resident has three reasons for his success. “We provide great customer service,” he says. “We treat everyone as an individual and we’re very personable with everybody. We understand. This is a gift someone’s giving. When you want something personalized, it’s because the gift means something to you.” He also offers unique, contemporary products, unlike his competitors, that are functional. Everything Etched doesn’t charge by the character, either. “We make it very, very simple and we create beautiful designs that people can personalize,” says Cadwell, who graduated from Cactus Shadows High School in

Cave Creek. “We have templates so they can have something a little bit more unique than just one letter or initial. “It’s all built into the price. I’ll say one of the key differentiators for us is our speed. We can get something out within four hours from the order being placed online—and that’s completely custom, made to order. We do same-day engravings.”

Filling a niche Cadwell says his business was a logical choice for him. He initially just wanted to make extra money, but when he saw the potential, “the switch just flipped on.” “I thought I had something here and I put all my energy and time into it,” he says. “It allows me to be creative and create different designs and create different products. “I think that’s what has propelled the company forward.” He was a bit artistic growing up in the North Valley. Cadwell drew somewhat, but he channeled his creativity into film. Armed with an IMDB page, Cadwell was a director of photography for videos and films. “I enjoyed creating with light and different camera angles to make a different sort of visual,” he says. The most well-known movie he worked on was “Jolene,” with Jessica Chastain, Frances Fisher, Dermot Mulroney and Michael Vartan. After a while, Cadwell wanted to do something he could create and sell online so he could continue his hobby of traveling the world. He

Laura Cherry works with a printer at Everything Etched.

has visited 30 countries. “Thailand’s great,” says Cadwell, who has also hiked Machu Picchu. “Iceland is beautiful, and you can drive around the whole country and see glaciers and volcanic areas. My fiancée and I just did six weeks in South America. The Galapagos was just beautiful and amazing. You can walk right up to animals and they’re not scared because it’s so protected.” Cadwell attended Scottsdale Community College, from which he earned an associate degree. He then went to ASU and earned a four-year degree in business finance.

A refresh When Cadwell and his fiancée, Liz Ann Hewett, returned from South America, he decided he wanted to take Everything Etched to the next level. He invited in new equipment—including new laser engravers, a UV printer, a sandblaster and a CNC machine. UV printing is a form of digital printing that uses ultra-violet lights to dry or cure ink as it is printed. “I just love doing custom things,” he says. “It’s fun to figure it out and use the tools I need to make the pieces

Kevin Cadwell inspects the final product at Everything Etched in the Scottsdale Airpark.

10 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019

that are requested. “Those machines are amazing. I like to try to put together the different mediums and the tools to make something more unique. You never know what someone is going to bring. It’s a fun challenge. We really don’t say no to anybody. We’ve actually started to be known for that.” Everything Etched is hosting a public open house from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, December 21. The day will feature discounts, tours, giveaways, food and music. Cadwell is grateful for his success, as is the community. He was selected to be a part of an emerging leaders program through the SBDC. He was also nominated for a local innovation contest, and a finalist for a Cox Communications entrepreneur contest. “I haven’t won anything yet, but I’m about ready to win,” he says with a smile. CT

PHOTOS • PABLO ROBLES

Everything Etched owner Tyler Cadwell found success quickly after starting his company.


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SPORTS

SISTERLY LOVE

PHOENIX COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL STAR INSPIRED BY HER SIBLING’S MEMORY CHRIS FAHRENDORF • COLLEGE TIMES

W

hile volleyball is just a sport for most athletes, for Tionna Hood it means much more. The freshman on Phoenix College’s girls’ volleyball team lost her 24-year-old sister, Brett Singer, on September 7, 2014, to lupus at the end of her first year of high school. Singer collapsed in the family’s bathroom, hit her head and was knocked unconscious. At the hospital, doctors found an aneurysm in her brain. She died three weeks later. Since then, Hood has dedicated her volleyball career to her sister. Hood admired Brett, who volunteered at their church and loved children. “I looked up to her because she was just always happy no matter what she was going through,” Hood says. “She just always would find the good in life no matter what she was going through personally. You would never be able to know that she was going through something because her way

12 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019

of giving back was by helping others.” After Singer’s death, Hood looked to her Dysart High School coach Tanner David and senior Rylee Halla for comfort. David was around the same age as Singer, and Hood immediately took to her because she reminded her so much of her sister. “She was really motivating,” Hood says. “She really helped me get my mind off of it when I was sad. She was just a really motivated person like Brett was. They were very similar to me.” Halla was also going through similar problems. Halla drew a symbol on her arm before games that meant “God is greater than the highs and lows.” Hood adopted the tradition. Even though her sister’s death will always be in the back of her mind, Hood is dedicated to winning. During the season that recently wrapped, Phoenix College went 8-17 with a young roster of 13 freshmen and two

sophomores. Hood believes that now that they have had a season under their belt, the team will only improve. “Yes, this year didn’t go as we wanted, but it was kind of like a recouping year,” Hood says. “We just needed one year to get to know each other. I do believe that next year we will have a winning season.” Although it took Hood and her family a long time to realize it, they now believe that some good actually PHOTO • COURTESY PHOENIX COLLEGE Tionna Hood of Phoenix College's volleyball team lost came out of her her sister in 2014 to lupus. sister’s death. “It’s sad to say, says. “Obviously, we miss her, but if Brett didn’t pass away, and we still love her, but we we feel like we wouldn’t be as know that she wouldn’t want us close are we are now. It was like to be sad all the time.” CT a blessing in disguise,” Hood


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ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019 13


GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY BASKETBALL STAR

ENTERTAINMENT

ISIAH BROWN

the

right TRACK A PEEK INSIDE THE PLAYLISTS OF PHOENIX’S MOST INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI • COLLEGE TIMES

G

rand Canyon University basketball player Isiah Brown is a multitalented wonder. Not only does he shoot hoops, but Brown is a musician who’s studying arts and digital film with an emphasis on screenwriting. “I write songs, rap and sing,” Brown says, “I’m in the process of learning how to produce, too. But that’s on hold until after basketball season.” Born in Anchorage to Gerald and Yolanda Brown, the college student moved to Seattle with his family after his seventh-grade year so he could pursue basketball. He’s following in the footsteps of his father, who played college ball at Alaska-Anchorage from 1978 to 1985 and in professionally in Germany. His parents inspired him to pursue music as well as basketball. “Music was always around my house,” he says. “Both of my parents were into music; same with my grandparents. I listened to a lot of different stuff growing up.”

TOP SIX FAVORITE SONGS OF ALL TIME “PSA (Public Service Announcement) by Jay-Z It’s my favorite Jay-Z song. He’s my favorite rapper and it’s the first song I remember as a kid. I remember memorizing all the words. It’s one of my dad’s favorite songs, too, I remember being really young and knowing every word. It’s a song I’ll never forget my whole life. “Hustler Musik” by Lil Wayne “Hustler Musik” is my favorite Lil Wayne song. It’s another one of those songs I definitely remember from an early age, like 9 or 10. Me and my dad heard it in the car and I’ve loved it ever since. “The Ride” by Drake and The Weeknd I committed this song to memory right away. I loved it. “Love” by Nipsey Hussle That’s a song I heard when I first moved to Seattle. I didn’t know

anybody at first. It was the first Nipsey Hussle song I ever heard. I had to know who that guy was. His lyrics are something that’s close to me. “Smells Like Teen Spirit” by Nirvana I grew up listening to a lot of different stuff. My dad was into rock and folk music. When I was growing up, I listened to pop music and alternative growing up. I was a big Nirvana fan, a Kurt Cobain guy. I loved the instrumentation that I heard. It was a song I learned when I first started playing in band. “Dirty Diana” by Michael Jackson My dad, my mom, grandparents— everyone else in the world—we’re all big Michael Jackson fans. I remember the video for “Dirty Diana”—really vividly. It was a different sound for Michael. It was dark and smoky. It’s always been one of my favorite songs. That’s a special one. It gets me out of my seat.

Go-to guilty pleasure track or classic karaoke tune? “Let Me Love You” by Mario. If I had to do karaoke, I’d choose that one. It’s another one of those songs that I was really into in the early 2000. I remember when that song came out. I love the timing of the word and I love belting it out in the car. CT

PHOTO • COURTESY GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY

Alaska-born Isiah Brown plays basketball and is a songwriter in his free time.

Preferred way of listening and why? In the car, late at night, driving through the city. I love the vibe of listening to music in the car. Music always sounds best to me there.

What artist would provide the soundtrack for the movie about your life? Drake and Tyler, the Creator

Favorite song by an artist from your country? “Mr. Tambourine Man” by Bob Dylan for a country song; “Black” by Pearl Jam for a rock song.

14 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019

PHOTO • COURTESY GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY

Isiah Brown comes from a sports-minded family, as his father played basketball for Alaska-Anchorage.


ENTERTAINMENT

Beyond the Tagline SAUCE OFFERS UNIVERSITY STUDENTS QUALITY LUNCH OPTIONS

OCTAVIO SERRANO • COLLEGE TIMES

F

or Scott Kilpatrick, opening a Sauce Pizza & Wine in Tempe was an obvious move. But it wasn’t until recently that Sauce made its mark on Downtown, “We’re just a great option for college students in terms of the variety of products we offer, which is made fresh here every day,” says Kilpatrick, the company’s chief executive officer. “So, for the value that we have in terms of pricing and quality.” Sauce opened its newest location, 705 S. Myrtle Avenue, at East Seventh Street, in October. The 2,960-square-foot space is in The Union Tempe. “We just think it’s a very accessible piece of real estate for students, residents, tourists and people visiting,” Kilpatrick says. “It’s close enough to all the employment that’s been built around the area.” Sauce prepares everything from scratch, Kilpatrick says, which helps with the quality and consistency of the dishes. “Everything is made fresh in house,” Kilpatrick says. “So, we have staff in the restaurant at 7:30 a.m. who are coming in to freshly prep all the sauces, the dressings and we bake our own cookies.” For those who want a classic pizza, The Pig ($13.75) comes with applewood smoked bacon, Italian sausage, pepperoni, smoked ham and sopressata. Guests can try the best of two Italian dishes—lasagna and pizza—with the lasagna pie ($12.75) with spinach, mushrooms, ricotta, meatballs and fresh garlic. Paninis are varied. The Italian ($10) comes with ham, turkey, sopressata, mozzarella, lettuce, yellow roasted tomatoes and roasted garlic vinaigrette. Customers can always get a classic meatballs and mozzarella ($10) with housemade red sauce. The pastas are also an important part of the menu. The baked beef lasagna ($9.50) is made fresh daily but is in limited quantities.

PHOTOS • COURTESY SAUCE PIZZA & WINE

“Our tagline is 'pizza and wine,' but the reality is we actually sell more salads than we do pizza,” Kilpatrick says. “We offer paninis and bruschetta, and we do a ton of our mac and cheese, and we make our own meatballs in house that are amazing. What makes us unique is the diversity of the menu.” Sauce is just as creative with its décor. Skateboard decks with illustrations and phrases that reference the menu and the new location hang on the walls. “We have a local artist who actually works for Sauce, her name is Sage Aune, and she’s done some artwork that is unique to the space,” Kilpatrick says. “We have several skateboard decks on the wall that she designed and that we had printed on, so it’s kind of cool.” Sauce has been incorporating draft beer at its locations and Tempe will feature four local offerings— SanTan Brewing, Uncle Bear’s, O.H.S.O. Brewery and Papago Brewing Co. “We think it’s a great location for the brand for what we offer, in terms of the fresh quality, fast-casual environment, and a great value that students and faculty can love,” Kilpatrick says. “With everything that is going Downtown, with the amount of developments, cranes in the air and the high-rise buildings, we’re excited to just be a part of that community.”

Sauce Pizza & Wine has a diverse menu that goes beyond its tagline. Customers can find salads, paninis, pizzas, pastas and desserts, which are made with fresh ingredients.

Sauce Pizza & Wine’s Tempe location features art by Sage Aune. Each skateboard references the menu and the location.

CT

Sauce Pizza & Wine 705 S. Myrtle Avenue, Suite 101, Tempe 480-597-4260, saucepizzaandwine.com

Sauce Pizza & Wine opened its Tempe location in October at East Seventh Street and South Myrtle Avenue in a 2,960-squarefoot space at The Union Tempe. ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019 15


ENTERTAINMENT

NUMBERS

OCTAVIO SERRANO • COLLEGE TIMES

✔ The tradition of graduates tossing their caps in the air originated at the Naval Academy in 1912. When students graduated, they were no longer commissioned to wear the caps.

✔ The number of students who earned their first undergraduate degree in 2017-2018 was 2.3 million, which was a 1.5% increase from the previous

two years.

✔ It is estimated that for the 20192020 academic year, there will be 3.9 million college graduates in the United States.

✔ Only about 56% of students earn degrees within the six years.

✔ Completion rates have been found to be higher at 72% among students who started at a four-year university than students who started at two-year colleges at 39%.

✔ Statistics show that 29.5 million women in the labor force had at minimum a bachelor’s degree while only 29.3 million men earned a degree. Women earn roughly 57% of the bachelor’s degrees. CT

16 ECOLLEGETIMES.COM | DECEMBER 2019


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