__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Quo vadis Europa? Wohin die freie Szene? Welche Tragkraft haben in einem von Euroskepsis geprägten Klima die unabhängigen darstellenden Künste, deren Arbeitsbegriff sich auf Werte wie Toleranz und Offenheit stützt? Sind diese Werte konstituierend für Europa, wie können sie gestärkt werden? Diese Fragen standen im Mittelpunkt des Treffens des International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts (IETM) in München, das in diesem zweisprachigen Buch dokumentiert wird. Im Zentrum der Reflexionen rund um die Rolle der darstellenden Kunst in Europa stehen Postkolonialismus, Diversität sowie Visionen für die Zukunft. Mit Beiträgen von Ulrike Guérot, Robert Menasse und Kathrin Röggla.

ISBN 978-3-95749-201-2

www.theaterderzeit.de

Res publica Europa – Networking the performing arts in a future Europe

Quo vadis Europa? And where are the independent performing arts heading? Driven by values such as tolerance and openness, what power do the independent performing arts possess in a climate dominated by Euroscepticism? Are those values essential for Europe and if so, how can they be strengthened? These were the questions focussed on at the IETM’s Plenary Meeting Munich (International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts) which is documented in this bi-lingual book. Central to the reflexions around the role of the performing arts in Europe were the topics “Post-colonialism”, “Diversity” and “Visions for the Future”. Including contributions by Ulrike Guérot, Robert Menasse and Kathrin Röggla.

9,5mm

Recherchen 147

Rücken – 14025.04.19 mm TdZ_Rech_147_IETM München_2019_Cover_fin2.qxp__ 14:19 Seite 1

Titel – 140 mm

Res publica Europa Networking the performing arts in a future Europe Christopher Balme, Axel Tangerding (Hg./Ed.)


RES PUBLICA EUROPA


Mit freundlicher Unterstützung/ Supported by:

Gefördert vom Praxisbüro des Departments Kunstwissenschaften Additional audio-visual materials can be obtained here

Res publica Europa Networking the performing arts in a future Europe Herausgegeben von / edited by Christopher Balme and / und Axel Tangerding unter Mitarbeit von / with the assistance of Gabi Sabo Recherchen 147 © 2019 by Theater der Zeit Texte und Abbildungen sind urheberrechtlich geschützt. Jede Verwertung, die nicht ausdrücklich im Urheberrechts-Gesetz zugelassen ist, bedarf der vorherigen Zustimmung des Verlages. Das gilt insbesondere für Vervielfältigungen, Bearbeitungen, Übersetzungen, Mikroverfilmung und die Einspeisung und Verarbeitung in elektronischen Medien. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopied, recorded or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher. Verlag Theater der Zeit Verlagsleiter Harald Müller Winsstraße 72 | 10405 Berlin | Germany www.theaterderzeit.de English translations: Howard Fine Cover: Design: Sibyll Wahrig, Image: Chantal Maquet Photos (unless otherwise noted / soweit nicht anders gekennzeichnet): Regine Heiland, Silke Schmidt Grafik / Graphic Design: Bild1Druck GmbH, Berlin Printed in Germany ISBN 978-3-95749-201-2 (Taschenbuch) ISBN 978-3-95749-247-0 (ePDF) ISBN 978-3-95749-248-7 (EPUB)


RES PUBLICA EUROPA Networking the performing arts in a future Europe

Herausgegeben von / edited by Christopher Balme and / und Axel Tangerding

Recherchen 147


CONTENTS / INHALT

Christopher Balme Introduction / Einleitung

6 / 12

Axel Tangerding Beyond the Net

18 / 22

INTERVENTIONS / INTERVENTIONEN Ulrike Guérot The European Balcony Project

28

Constructing the European Republic Robert Menasse und Kathrin Röggla im Gespräch mit Axel Tangerding Kathrin Röggla Listen to Europe / Europa hören

33

39 / 44

ARTICLES / ARTIKEL Miriam Bornhak On Stages, Balconies and Politics: The Theatre as a European Mouthpiece in the European Balcony Project Von Bühnen, Balkonen und Politik. Das Theater als europapolitisches Sprachrohr im European Balcony Project

50

Elisabeth Luft Res Publica Europa: A Political Utopia as a Challenge for the Independent Performing Arts? Res Publica Europa. Eine politische Utopie als Herausforderung für die freien darstellenden Künste?

61

Lisa Haselbauer Struck Blind: On Rediscovering Political Sensuality Geschlagen mit Blindheit Zur Wiederentdeckung des politisch Sinnlichen

4

56

66

71 76


Klaudia Laś Faster, Higher, Stronger: Performance Pressure in the Independent Performing Arts Schneller, höher, stärker. Über den Leistungsdruck in den freien darstellenden Künsten

81

Marion Geiger Fortress Europe or Network of Cultures? Why Europe Can Learn from Hip-Hop Festung Europa oder Netzwerk der Kulturen? Warum Europa von HipHop lernen kann

90

Ursula Maier Postcolonial Minefields: The Example of Shit Island Postkoloniale Minenfelder am Beispiel von Shit Island

86

96

102 109

Luisa Reisinger About Shifts in the Perception of Disabled Bodies on Stage A Call for Change Über Wahrnehmungsverschiebungen beeinträchtigter Körper auf der Bühne. Ein Plädoyer zur Veränderung

114

Claus Michael Six Field Research as Performance – Performance as Field Research An Interview with Flinn Works, Junges Ensemble Stuttgart (JES) and the Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (CKK) Feldforschung als Performance – Performance als Feldforschung Ein Interview mit Flinn Works, dem Jungen Ensemble Stuttgart (JES) und dem Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (CKK)

128

121

135

TALKS OF THE DAY Fabio Tolledi and Nora Amin Eurocentrism is the new Colonial

142

Liwaa Yazji and Ramzi Maqdisi They Call me an Artist

146

Authors / Autorinnen und Autoren

150

5


Christopher Balme

INTRODUCTION

IETM is composed of over 500 organisations and individual members working in the independent theatre scene mainly in Europe but also internationally in the areas of theatre, dance, circus performance and media arts. Members include festivals, production companies, producers universities and research institutes. The network meets twice a year in different European cities and additionally in smaller conferences worldwide. As the first European network for the independent scene IETM has been in existence since 1981 and is closely linked to the European project (EU). The acronym stands for Informal European Theatre Meeting, but the organisation now uses the title ‘International network for the independent performing arts’. The word ‘network’ featured in the title is not an arbitrary label but rather refers to a special organisational form characterised by a certain freedom of connections and association, but nevertheless means more than simply a series of regular meetings. Therefore the development of IETM from an informal gathering or meeting to a network is a logical step and characterised by a certain degree of formalisation. When the first meeting took place in 1981 in the context of the Polverigi festival in Italy, international cooperations were mainly organised through state or parastatal institutions. The innovative aspect of IETM was the self-organisation of professional theatre artists by means of individual memberships. It was not until 1989 that the organisation was formally established as a not-for-profit international organisation on the basis of Belgian law with a secretariat in Brussels and membership fees.

Networks A network is more than just an arbitrary term. It refers to a specific form of organisation and cooperation characterised by lateral rather than hierarchical connections. In his book The Square and the Tower (2018), historian Niall Ferguson uses spatial metaphors to contrast hierarchies (towers) and networks (squares).1 The invention of the printing press led to at the beginning of the early modern period European networks of social and eco-

6


nomic exchange: Protestant circles, trade routes and Freemasons all constituted networks in heterogeneous but also highly effective and powerful forms. After 1790 we see, according to Ferguson, an increasing dominance of hierarchies (states with the bureaucracies, large companies, permanent armies) which have only begun to be destabilised in recent times through the emergence of digital technology which favours once again networks. Although this differentiation, as Ferguson admits, is somewhat simplistic, his arguments regarding networks cannot be dismissed out of hand especially regarding their power and influence. The word network is ubiquitous, but nevertheless the theoretical concept and the methodologies of network analysis provide clear and productive criteria for examining social and historical phenomena. We all belong to social networks made up of friends and families, sports clubs as well as Facebook friends. Trading networks have existed since the Stone Age with the goal of providing for the differential needs of groups living far apart. While hierarchies (from the Greek “rule of a high priest”) tend to concentrate power, networks fulfil precisely the opposite function of evening out and distributing human relationships. Although the word network is very rare before the end of the 19th century, network analysis as a theory and method is now well established. Whether mathematical, historical or sociological, network analysis always differentiates between ‘nodes’ and ‘edges’, where the nodes are usually the actors and the edges represent the relationships between them. These relationships or connections are examined in turn in reference to their centrality, their degree and proximity. ‘Betweenness centrality’ means for example which actor provides the most information in a network or via which the most valuable communication is relayed: in family networks for example it is usually the mother, and in companies the secretaries. Furthermore network theory differentiates between homo- and heterophilic networks. Homophilic ones are those held together by strong affective relationships such as families or clans. Heterophilic networks are in contrast characterised by weak connections. Paradoxically, the weak, heterophilic networks are the more valuable ones when it comes to fostering and distributing innovation. Homophilic networks tend towards closure and isolation, whereas heterophilic networks because of their weak internal connectedness are much more open for exchange and new ideas: they build bridges between other often disparate networks. Heterophilic networks offer many ‘structural holes’, these are gaps between the nodes and clusters where innovations can enter and establish themselves. This process is normally enabled by mediating figures or brokers.

7


Introduction

IETM as a network IETM is a prototypical heterophilic network. Although the secretariat in Brussels represents an important node and no doubt provides a high degree of betweenness centrality, the true strength of the network resides in its many small and ‘weak’ relationships. These manifest themselves particularly in the active forums and working groups which either meet over a longer period of time or constitute themselves for one particular meeting. At the Munich conference they formed around topical themes which attracted a large number of interested parties. Groups that meet regularly such as the Sound and Music Theatre group or a group interested in art in rural areas (their session was entitled ‘dig where you stand’) are examples of long-standing collaborations. Other forums concern themselves with topics familiar in the larger public sphere such as for example the future of gender in the working place, also in the independent performing arts (‘The gender of the future’), Europe’s problematic postcolonial legacy (‚Postcolonial Minefields‘) (see the article by Ursula Maier), or the institutional challenges faced by professional artists with disabilities on a daily basis (see the article by Luisa Reisinger). Whether established or new, all forms were open to both long-standing members and guests. The best proof of the heterophilic character of the IETM network were the working sessions such as ‚Next steps – learning from exchanges‘, which took place in collaboration with ITI Germany and the 10th edition of the theatre festival Politik im freien Theater which took place in Munich at the same time.2 In this case three different networks formed an alliance. Discussions in the various forums demonstrated the high degree of transnational collaborations within the independent performing arts scene. Because most of these groups are not hierarchically organised, they possess considerable potential for and capacity to establish and foster intensive cooperation with groups in other countries. The larger, usually publicly financed theatres (in Germany the state and municipal theatres) internationalism usually means the occasional guest performance with very little long-term sustainability. An artists collective such as Kainkollektiv from Bochum on the other hand has engaged in intensive contacts over many years, with regular visits and working collaborations in Poland, Croatia and Cameroon. In all cases the local Goethe Institute played the role of broker in order to facilitate the connections between the nodes, in this case the local groups. Their production Fin de mission is for example the result of a six-year collaboration between the group and artists from Cameroon which examined Germany’s involvement in the slave trade in the country. 3 Also certain productions shown at the festival such as Global Belly and Girls Boys Love Cash would not have been possible without transnation-

8


Christopher Balme

ally operating collaborations. In Global Belly the independent group Flinn Works (Berlin/Kassel) examined the globalised surrogacy business on the basis of intensive research, and the Young People‘s Theatre JES from Stuttgart presented in collaboration with the Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv the results of two years of fieldwork on the topic of sex work in Stuttgart and in Bucharest/Romania. In an interview with Claus Six the artists Sophia Stepf and Lucy Kramer, (a dramaturg at JES) and the Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv explain that such performances requiring a high degree of intensive longterm preparation would not be possible at the established theatres. Despite this high degree of organisational and financial investment the independent scene is continually struggling to obtain financial support beyond the usual cycle of short-term grants and project funding. It is characterised by reliance on a large number of diverse types of support. The more prominent and established the group, the longer the list of coproduction partners and sponsors. This dependency on heterogeneous sources of funding is perhaps the most striking characteristic of the independent scene which has emerged since the end of the 1980s as a transnationally organised network of venues and festivals. This transnational network structure is the most important distinguishing characteristic compared to the first generation of independent groups, which, after they had obtained permanent venues, often remained locally focused and were seldom active beyond their immediate locality. Although theatre historian Manfred Brauneck observes that ‘mobility was always a principle of the work of independent groups’, this observation cannot really be generalised.4 The goal was mostly to secure some kind of modest funding, either municipal or regional, in order to manage the venue. This is completely different from the following generations which mostly work independent of venues and understand themselves primarily as production collectives. While the independent scene has traditionally had to carry the burden of being continually avant-garde and experimental, it is by no means set in stone in a dynamic theatre landscape that this requirement to be continually in the artistic vanguard of the established theatres – especially as the latter are now often entering into collaborations with the independent scene – is always guaranteed. Instead of looking at distinguishing criteria on the aesthetic level, it would be perhaps more productive to study the network structure which seems to be constitutive of the independent performing arts scene as its true institutional-aesthetic innovation. If the network structure itself with its weak connections represents the innovative aspect of the organisational form, then it was somewhat surprising to see that parallel to IETM a new organisation representing the independent performing arts has been established: the European Associ-

9


Introduction

ation of Independent performing arts (EAIPA). As Elisabeth Luft shows in her contribution EAIP is an umbrella organisation consisting of eight exclusively national associations. That such a new organisation is necessary at all can be explained by the lack of a European funding system for the performing arts, the goal of this new association. This funding system can apparently only function within national structures. Luft correctly observes that now a new hierarchically organised structure has emerged in order to provide sufficient pressure for the necessary lobbying that seems to be the prerequisite to obtain European money. A different kind of network is suggested by Ulrike Geiger in her essay on hip-hop culture. During the IETM meeting a working session on the topic of ‚Hip-Hop Culture and its Related Dance Forms‘ took place as part of the street art festival. Geiger sees in the transnational network structure of hip-hop culture perhaps even a model for the European Republic proposed by Ulrike Guérot: a melting pot of cultures that transcends borders both in terms of activities and organisation. The idea of a European Republic provided a frame not just for the IETM meeting through its title Res Publica Europa but it radiated out into the city and beyond. A key role played the European Balcony Project. On 10 November 2018, just a few days after the IETM meeting, a manifesto was read out from the balconies of hundreds of theatres and cultural institutions throughout Europe in which a European Republic was proclaimed. The authors of the manifesto are the novelist Robert Menasse and the political scientist Ulrike Guérot who explains in her recent book, Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss: Eine politische Utopie (2017) (Why Europe must become a republic), the political and historical background for the demands. The short two-minute text of the manifesto was conceived consciously for theatrical staging and alludes to the many Republican proclamations from the year 1918. In her essay Miriam Bornhak examines these connections and finds particularly in Munich rich material where the establishment of the first Bavarian socialist democracy was mainly the initiative of writers and theatre artists such as Kurt Eisner and Ernst Toller. Bornhak shows how they used their new political functions as members of Parliament to agitate for an improvement of the working conditions of theatre artists, including a demand for the nationalisation of all theatres, the establishment of a state funded Academy for the Performing Arts, social security benefits for artists and the introduction of a minimum wage. The political (and less politics) is the topic of the essay by Lisa Haselbauer in which she examines the project wirklich sehen by the performance group from Cologne katze und krieg consisting of Julia Dick und katharinajej. In this performance participants are invited to relinquish their sense

10


Christopher Balme

of sight for a few hours in order to perceive their environment and above all their accompanying partner with their remaining senses. It is, as Haselbauer subtly argues, an exercise in rediscovering the political in ourselves. Community also means responsibility to intervene. The political does not mean just filling out a ballot paper on election day but developing a sense of community in which the social and the political are inextricably interconnected. Two people relying on one another represent perhaps a social network in its simplest form, it certainly demonstrates balanced power relations. Networks are of course about power, as the subtitle of Ferguson‘s book suggests. That social networks such as Google and Facebook possess considerable power is a given, even though they might not be traditionally hierarchical in the organisation. Ten years ago the network theoretician David Singh rule warned: „power operates in the sphere of sociability just as it does in the sphere of sovereignty“.5 Power should not, however, be condemned per se, but we should strive to ensure that it is equitably distributed, even if this is a utopian vision. The problem of power as of capital lies in its tendency towards concentration. The positive potential of networks lies in their ability to distribute power more equitably. The network structure of the independent performing arts as realised in IETM is therefore perhaps a model, not just for the performing arts but perhaps for the political processes in a future Europe.

1

Niall Ferguson, The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power from the Freemasons to Facebook, New York: Penguin, 2018.

2

The theatre festival Politik im freien Theater is organized by the Bundeszentrale für Politische Bildung, a federal agency dedicated to fostering knowledge of Germany’s political institutions and democracy. It is funded by the Ministry of the Interior.

3

Although Fin de Mission was invited to the festival, the production could not be shown, because some of the Cameroonian performers were not issued with German visa. During the conference a video was shown with commentary by two members of the group, Fabian Lettow and Mirjam Schmuck.

4

„Preface“, in: Manfred Brauneck and ITI Germany, (eds.): Independent Theatre in Contemporary Europe: Structures – Aesthetics – Cultural Policy, Bielefeld 2016, p.15.

5

David Singh Grewal, Network Power: The Social Dynamics of Globalization, New Haven 2009, p. 294.

11


Christopher Balme

EINLEITUNG

Das IETM (International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts) setzt sich aus über 500 Organisationen und Einzelmitgliedern zusammen, die in der freien Szene vor allem in Europa, aber auch weltweit in Theater, Tanz, Zirkus, Performance-Kunst und Medienkunst arbeiten. Zu den Mitgliedern gehören Festivals, Produktionsfirmen, Produzenten, Hochschulen und Forschungseinrichtungen. Das Netzwerk trifft sich zweimal im Jahr in verschiedenen europäischen Städten und darüber hinaus auf kleineren Konferenzen weltweit. Als erstes europäisches Netzwerk für die freie Szene besteht das IETM seit 1981 und ist mit dem europäischen Projekt (EU) eng verknüpft. Das Akronym selbst steht für Informal European Theatre Meeting, die Organisation firmiert inzwischen unter der Bezeichnung „Internationales Netzwerk für freie darstellende Künste“. Das im Titel genannte Wort ‚Netzwerk‘ ist keine beliebige Etikette, sondern benennt eine spezielle Organisationsform, die sich durch eine gewisse Freiheit der Verbindungen auszeichnet, aber trotzdem mehr bedeutet als nur regelmäßig stattfindende Treffen. Insofern ist die Entwicklung des IETM vom informellen Treffen zum Netzwerk folgerichtig und durch einen gewissen Grad an Formalisierung gekennzeichnet. Als 1981 das erste Treffen im Rahmen des Polverigi Festivals in Italien stattfand, war internationale Kooperation im Wesentlichen durch staatliche oder quasistaatliche Institutionen organisiert. Das Innovative am IETM war die Selbstorganisation professioneller Theaterkünstler durch individuelle Mitgliedschaften. Erst 1989 erfolgte die formale Gründung als gemeinnütziger Verein (notfor-profit international organization) nach belgischem Recht mit einem Sekretariat in Brüssel und Mitgliedsbeiträgen.

Netzwerke Ein Netzwerk ist mehr als eine lockere Bezeichnung. Es ist eine Organisations- und Kooperationsform, die durch laterale statt durch hierarchische Verbindungen gekennzeichnet ist. In seinem Buch Türme und Plätze: Netzwerke, Hierarchien und der Kampf um die globale Macht (2018) unterscheidet der Historiker Niall Ferguson anhand des räumlichen Metapherpaares

12


zwischen Hierarchien (Turm) und Netzwerken (Platz).1 Mit der Einführung der Druckerpresse dominieren am Anfang der frühen Neuzeit Netzwerke den sozialen und wirtschaftlichen Austausch: Von protestantischen Zirkeln über Handelsrouten bis hin zu den Freimaurern existieren Netzwerke in recht unterschiedlichen, aber auch wirkungsmächtigen Formen. Ab circa 1790 beginnt nach Ferguson die Epoche der Hierarchien (Staaten mit ihren Bürokratien, große Firmen, permanente Armeen), die erst in der jüngsten Zeit aufgrund des Siegeszugs digitaler Technologie wieder durch Netzwerke infrage gestellt werden. Obwohl die Unterscheidung, wie Ferguson zugibt, etwas vereinfacht ist, kann man mit Gewinn seine Thesen zu Netzwerken und deren Macht und Einfluss lesen. Das Wort Netzwerk ist ubiquitär, was aber nicht davon ablenken soll, dass der theoretische Begriff und die Netzwerkanalyse als Methode über durchaus klare und definierbare Konturen verfügen. Wir sind alle Teil von sozialen Netzwerken, die aus Freunden und Familienmitgliedern, Sportvereinen und nicht nur Facebook-Freunden bestehen. Handelsnetzwerke gibt es seit der Steinzeit, um Bedürfnisse zwischen räumlich getrennt lebenden Gruppen besser zu befriedigen. Während Hierarchien (vom Altgriechischen ‚Herrschaft eines hohen Priesters‘) dazu tendieren, Macht zu konzentrieren, erfüllen Netzwerke eher die gegenteilige Funktion, menschliche Beziehungen zu egalisieren und zu distribuieren. Obwohl das Wort ‚Netzwerk‘ bzw. ‚network‘ vor Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts kaum belegt ist, hat sich die Netzwerkanalyse als Theorie und Methode schnell etabliert. Egal, ob mathematisch, historisch oder soziologisch, Netzwerkanalyse unterscheidet immer zwischen ‚Knoten‘ und ‚Kanten‘, wobei die Knoten normalerweise Akteure und die Kanten die Verbindungen zwischen ihnen repräsentieren. Diese Verbindungen oder Beziehungen werden wiederum im Hinblick auf ihre Zentralität, ihren Grad und ihre Nähe untersucht. Zwischenzentralität bedeutet zum Beispiel, über welchen Akteur die meisten Informationen in einem Netzwerk vermittelt werden bzw. über wen die meiste und die wertvollste Kommunikation läuft: Das sind in Familiennetzwerken häufig die Mütter, in Firmen die Sekretärinnen. Des Weiteren unterscheidet die Netzwerktheorie zwischen homo- und heterophilen Netzwerken. Homophil sind diejenigen, die durch stark affektive Beziehungen zusammengehalten sind, wie z. B. Familien oder Clans. Heterophile Netzwerke sind durch schwache Verbindungen gekennzeichnet. Paradoxerweise sind die schwachen, heterophilen Netzwerke die wertvolleren, wenn es darum geht, Innovationen und deren Verbreitung zu fördern. Homophile Netzwerke tendieren zur Geschlossenheit und Abschottung, während heterophile Netzwerke aufgrund ihrer ‚schwachen‘ internen Verbundenheit für Austausch und neue Ideen viel offener sind: Sie bauen Brücken zwischen anderen, oft disparaten Netzwerken. Heterophile Netzwerke bieten viele

13


Einleitung

‚strukturelle Löcher‘, das sind Lücken zwischen den Knoten und Clustern, in die Innovationen stoßen und Fuß fassen können. Dieser Prozess wird meistens durch Vermittlerfiguren (brokers) ermöglicht.

Das IETM als Netzwerk Das IETM ist ein klassisches heterophiles Netzwerk. Obwohl das Sekretariat in Brüssel einen wichtigen Knoten darstellt und sicherlich für eine hohe Zwischenzentralität sorgt, besteht die eigentliche Stärke des Netzwerks in seinen vielfältigen kleinen und ‚schwachen‘ Beziehungen. Diese manifestieren sich besonders in den aktiven Foren und Arbeitsgruppen, die sich entweder über einen längeren Zeitraum treffen oder auch nur zu einem bestimmten Treffen konstituieren. In dem Münchner Treffen bildeten sie sich um aktuelle Themen, die eine große Zahl an Interessenten anzogen. Regelmäßig sich treffende Gruppen wie zum Beispiel die ‚Sound and music theatre‘ Gruppe oder eine Gruppe, die sich mit Kunst in ländlichen Regionen auseinandersetzt – ‚Art in rural areas: Dig where you stand‘ – zeichnen sich durch längerfristige Kooperationen aus. Andere Foren befassten sich mit Themen, die eine Dauerpräsenz im öffentlichen Diskurs haben, wie zum Beispiel der Zukunft der Geschlechterbeziehungen in den Arbeitszusammenhängen der freien darstellenden Künste (‚The gender of the future‘), den Aporien des postkolonialen Erbes (‚Postcolonial Minefields‘) (vgl. den Beitrag von Ursula Maier) oder den institutionellen Herausforderungen, mit denen professionell arbeitende oder arbeiten-wollende Künstler mit Behinderungen tagtäglich konfrontiert sind (‚The Majority is Different‘) (vgl. den Beitrag von Luisa Reisinger). Egal, ob etabliert oder neu, alle Foren waren für langjährige Mitglieder und Gäste gleichermaßen offen. Der beste Beweis für den heterophilen Netzwerkcharakter waren working sessions wie ‚Next steps – learning from exchanges‘, die in enger Kooperation mit ITI Deutschland und dem gleichzeitig stattfindenden 10. Theaterfestival Politik im Freien Theater organisiert waren. In diesem Fall bildeten drei unterschiedliche Netzwerke eine Allianz. Inhaltlich zeigten die Diskussionen in den Runden, wie ausgeprägt der Grad der transnationalen Kooperationen innerhalb der freien Szene inzwischen gediehen ist. Weil die meisten freien Gruppen nicht hierarchisch organisiert sind, verfügen sie über ein großes Potenzial, in anderen Ländern mit dortigen Gruppen eine intensive Zusammenarbeit aufzubauen und zu pflegen. Bei den großen Häusern (Staats- und Stadttheater) erschöpft sich Internationalität meistens in gelegentlichen Gastspielen mit geringer Nachhaltigkeit.2 Ein Künstlerkollektiv wie Kainkollektiv aus Bochum pflegt über Jahre intensive Kontakte, regelmäßige Besuche und gemeinsame Arbeitszusam-

14


Christopher Balme

menhänge in Polen, Kroatien und Kamerun. In allen Fällen spielte das dortige Goethe-Institut die Rolle des Brokers, damit Verbindungen zwischen den Knoten (den jeweiligen Gruppen vor Ort) zustande kamen. Ihre Produktion Fin de Mission ist das Ergebnis einer sechsjährigen Kollaboration zwischen der Gruppe und Künstlern aus Kamerun, die sich mit dem Sklavenhandel, an dem Deutschland beteiligt war, beschäftigt.3 Auch die auf dem Festival gezeigten Produktionen Global Belly und Girls Boys Love Cash wären ohne transnational operierende Kollaborationen kaum realisierbar gewesen. In Global Belly bereitet Flinn Works (Berlin/Kassel) nach eingehenden Forschungen das Thema „globalisierte Leihmutterschaft“ auf, das Junge Ensemble Stuttgart (JES) präsentiert zusammen mit dem Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (Stuttgart) seine zweijährige Feldforschung zum Thema „sex work“ im Raum Stuttgart und in Bukarest/Rumänien. In einem Interview mit Claus Six erläutern die Macher Sophia Stepf (Flinn Works; Regie) sowie Lucia Kramer (Junges Ensemble Stuttgart; Dramaturgie) und das Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (Stuttgart), dass Performances mit einer derart intensiven und Zeit beanspruchenden Vorarbeit an institutionellen Theatern kaum denkbar wären. Trotz dieses hohen organisatorischen und finanziellen Aufwands kämpft die freie Szene um finanzielle Unterstützung jenseits von Kurzförderprojekten. Sie zeichnet sich dadurch aus, dass sie auf meist diverse Förderquellen angewiesen ist. Je prominenter und etablierter die Gruppe, umso länger die Liste der Koproduktions-Partner und Sponsoren. Diese Abhängigkeit von diversen Finanzierungsquellen ist vielleicht das auffälligste Merkmal der freien Szene, seit sich Ende der 1980er Jahre ein transnational organisiertes Netzwerk von Spielstätten und Theaterfestivals herausbildete. Diese transnationale Netzwerkstruktur ist das wichtigste Unterscheidungsmerkmal gegenüber der ersten Generation der freien Gruppen, die, nachdem sie sich feste Spielstätten sicherten, häufig lokal gebunden und nur gelegentlich außerhalb dieser städtischen Koordinaten aktiv waren. Obwohl Manfred Brauneck konstatiert, dass „Mobilität stets ein Prinzip der Arbeit Freier Gruppen [war]“, lässt sich dieser Befund nicht verallgemeinern.4 Das Ziel war meistens, eine bescheidene städtische Förderung zu ergattern, um die Spielstätte betreiben zu können. Ganz anders die nächsten Generationen, die ohne Spielstätten arbeiteten und vom Selbstverständnis her Produktionsgemeinschaften waren. Während der freien Szene seit jeher die Last des Avantgardistischen und Experimentellen anhaftet, ist es in einer dynamischen Theaterlandschaft keinesfalls ausgemacht, dass diese ästhetische Vorreiterrolle gegenüber den Stadt- und Staatstheatern – zumal diese zunehmend mit der freien Szene Kooperationen eingehen – auf inhaltlicher Ebene gewährleistet ist.

15


Einleitung

Anstatt auf theaterästhetische Unterscheidungskriterien zu schauen, wäre es lohnender, die der freien Szene immanente Netzwerkstruktur selbst als eine institutionsästhetische Innovation zu betrachten. Wenn die Netzwerkstruktur mit ihren losen Verbindungen das eigentliche Innovative an der Organisationsform darstellt, wundert es umso mehr, dass parallel zu IETM eine neue Organisation der freien darstellenden Künste entstanden ist: die European Association of Independent Performing Arts (EAIPA). Wie Elisabeth Luft in ihrem Beitrag zeigt, handelt es sich bei EAIPA um einen Dachverband von derzeit acht ausschließlich nationalen Verbänden. Diese Neugründung lasse sich darauf zurückführen, dass ein europäisches Finanzierungssystem für die darstellenden Künste bisher gefehlt habe, dessen Schaffung sich EAIPA nun annehmen wolle. Dieses Finanzierungssystem könne aber nur innerhalb nationalstaatlicher Strukturen funktionieren. Luft konstatiert zu Recht, dass nun eine neue hierarchisch organisierte Struktur entstehe, um der geplanten Lobbyarbeit genügend Nachdruck zu verleihen. Ein Netzwerk anderer Art postuliert Geiger in ihrem Aufsatz über HipHop-Kultur. Im Rahmen des IETM-Treffens fand auch eine working session zum Thema ‚HipHop Culture and its Related Dance Forms‘ im Rahmen des StreetArt-Festivals statt. Geiger sieht in der transnationalen Netzwerkstruktur der HipHop-Kultur sogar ein Vorbild für die von Ulrike Guérot konzipierte Europäische Republik: ein Schmelztiegel der Kulturen, der grenzüberschreitend agiert und organisiert ist. Die Idee zu einer Europäischen Republik rahmte nicht nur das IETM-Treffen durch seinen Titel „Res Publica Europa“, sondern strahlte in mehrere Veranstaltungen und darüber hinaus in die Stadt aus. Am wichtigsten war das European Balcony Project. Am 10. November 2018, also wenige Tage nach dem IETM-Treffen, wurde an mehreren hundert Theatern und Kulturinstitutionen in ganz Europa zeitgleich von Balkonen ein Manifest verlesen und die Gründung einer „Europäischen Republik“ ausgerufen. Verfasser des Manifests sind der Schriftsteller Robert Menasse und die Politikwissenschaftlerin Ulrike Guérot, die in ihrem aktuellen Buch die politischen und historischen Hintergründe ihrer Forderungen ausführt. Der kurze, circa zweiminütige Text wurde bewusst für eine „theatrale Inszenierung“ konzipiert und spielt auf republikanische Proklamationen aus dem Jahr 1918 an. In ihrem Beitrag spürt Miriam Bornhak diesem Konnex nach und wird besonders in München fündig, wo die Gründung der ersten Bayerischen sozialistischen Demokratie durch Schriftsteller und Theaterleute wie Kurt Eisner und Ernst Toller geprägt wurde. Bornhak zeigt, wie sie sich unmittelbar für eine Verbesserung der Arbeitsbedingungen der Theaterschaffenden einsetzten: eine Verstaatlichung aller Schauspielbetriebe, die Bildung

16


Christopher Balme

einer staatlichen Hochschule der Künste, Sozialleistungen für Künstlerinnen und Künstler und die Setzung einer Minimalgage. Das Politische (und weniger die Politik) ist das Thema von Lisa Haselbauers Beitrag, in dem sie das Projekt wirklich sehen von katze und krieg, dem Kölner Performance-Duo bestehend aus Julia Dick und katharinajej, darstellt. Hier werden Menschen dazu eingeladen, „sich für ein paar Stunden von ihrem Sehsinn zu verabschieden und ihre Umwelt, vor allem aber ihr Gegenüber, mit den verbleibenden Sinnen wahrzunehmen“. Es handelt sich, wie Haselbauer subtil argumentiert, um eine Übung „zur Wiederentdeckung des Politischen in uns“. Was Gemeinschaft auch bedeutet, ist die Pflicht der Einmischung. Politisch sein bedeute nicht, ein Kreuz am Wahltag zu setzen, sondern einen Gemeinschaftssinn zu entwickeln, in dem Soziales und Politik untrennbar miteinander verbunden sind. Zwei aufeinander angewiesene Menschen stellen vielleicht ein soziales Netzwerk in seiner einfachsten Ausprägung dar, es definiert auf jeden Fall mehr oder wenige ausgeglichene Machtverhältnisse. Netzwerke haben auch mit Macht zu tun, wie der Untertitel von Fergusons Buch („der Kampf um globale Macht“) nahelegt. Dass soziale Netzwerke wie Google und Facebook über beachtliche Macht verfügen, steht außer Frage, auch wenn sie nicht traditionell hierarchisch organisiert sind. Vor zehn Jahren hat der Netzwerktheoretiker David Singh Grewal gewarnt: „power operates in the sphere of sociability just as it does in the sphere of sovereignty“.5 Macht ist aber nicht per se abzulehnen, sondern sie soll nur möglichst gleichmäßig verteilt werden (wenngleich das eine utopische Vorstellung ist). Das Problem der Macht wie auch des Kapitals liegt in ihrer Tendenz zur Konzentrierung. Die positiven Potenziale von Netzwerken liegen aber in ihrer Möglichkeit, Macht zu distribuieren und zu egalisieren. Die Netzwerkstruktur der freien darstellenden Künste, wie sie in IETM realisiert ist, hat daher auch Vorbildcharakter, nicht nur für die darstellenden Künste, sondern vielleicht auch für die politischen Prozesse eines künftigen Europas. 1

Niall Ferguson: Türme und Plätze: Netzwerke, Hierarchien und der Kampf um die globale Macht, Berlin 2018.

2

Aber auch hier gibt es neue Ansätze wie z. B. das auf mehrere Jahre angelegte Projekt „Weltbühne“ des Münchner Residenztheaters, das sich der Förderung von Nachwuchsdramatikern aus verschiedenen Kontinenten widmet. Vgl. Laura Olivi, „Aus der Ferne ganz nah – der Welt eine Bühne“, in: Georg Diez (Hrsg.): Die Erde ist gewaltig schön, München 2018, S. 270–283.

3

Obwohl Fin de Mission zum Festival eingeladen wurde, konnte die Produktion nicht gezeigt werden, weil einige Darsteller aus Kamerun kein Visum bekamen. Stattdessen wurde eine Videoaufzeichnung gezeigt und von zwei Gruppenmitgliedern kommentiert.

4

Manfred Brauneck: „Vorwort“, in: Brauneck, Manfred (Hrsg.): Das freie Theater im Europa der Gegenwart, Bielefeld 2016, S. 15.

5

David Singh Grewal: Network Power: The Social Dynamics of Globalization, New Haven 2009, S. 294.

17


Axel Tangerding

BEYOND THE NET

“Dear independent artists and theatre makers, dear Europeans, dear networkers, it’s great that you are independent. It’s great that you are a network. It’s great that you are concerned about Europe and that you want to exchange and collaborate. Really great. But it is not enough.”1 Freely produce, co-produce, transcend national borders, conduct research, initiate innovative projects, test experimental forms of expression as individual artists, in a collective or as an ensemble with its own performance venue: the forms of working in the field of the independent performing arts are more diverse than ever. Cross-disciplinary cooperative models between protagonists from the independent scene and large institutions have also become an integral part of cultural promotion and are opening up new opportunities. The “independent sector” is very strongly present in public perception today and is already sometimes described as the “second pillar” of the German cultural landscape. A retrospective look at the beginnings in the 1970s and 1980s shows that this development has happened very quickly. My own first theatrical experiments likewise took place in the ’70s and ’80s. As a young architecture student, I began experimenting with a few like-minded associates as La Mama Munich, with socio-political commitment, in search of new forms of theatre. This evolved in the 1980s into the Meta Theater, a building in Bauhaus style and a freelance production site. At the same time, several festival organizers met in Polverigi in 1981 and founded the first network, IETM (Informal Theatre Meeting), which is now known as the “International Network for the Contemporary Performing Arts”. These years witnessed the sudden emergence throughout Europe of the alternative, experimental scene, which still referred to the founders of the “movement” such as Ariane Mnouchkine, Peter Brook, Jerzy Grotowksi, the La Mama Theatre or the Living Theatre. In Italy, many of these groups were founded on the initiative of Eugenio Barba and his Odin Teatret; while in France, the numerous cultural centres initiated in the provinces by Jack Lang formed the basis for these new forms of work.

18


At the same time, international festivals were discovered as appropriate platforms and along with them, mobility was discovered in a Europe which was still defined by borders and still divided into East and West. Most independent groups operated their own venues, some in vacant industrial buildings or other unused properties and also at locations far from the theatre. By the 1990s at the latest, the always broadly diverse theatre scene needed production sites, independent venues and platforms, along with corresponding financial support. Despite all their self-confidence and social commitment, and although this is an economically flourishing era, little has changed in the precarious work situation of the protagonists in this scene. And this phenomenon is perceptible throughout Europe. That the notorious lack of money is publicly discussed, that approaches to solutions are sought, that there are demands for a guaranteed minimum fee,2 a Fair Practice Code3 or the introduction of certain standards, for example, with regard to accessibility: we owe all this to the commitment of creative artists and to their solidarity in networks and associations. In 2015, for example, public spending on culture per inhabitant in Germany amounted to 126.77 euros; this figure includes municipal and state institutions.4 The associations and networks deserve credit for documenting the actual conditions, comparing the financial and structural situation with the circumstances, and formulating political demands based on them. Initial studies have been commissioned at national level (e.g. by the Performing Arts Fund5) and at European level (e.g. by the networks themselves, e.g. by the IETM6). Tracking down and classifying developments in the independent scene shows that qualitative self-empowerment, along with artistic self-assignment, are constitutive characteristics of an independent arts scene throughout Europe. Publications accordingly gather information, present practical toolkits on topics such as fair collaboration, especially between countries with different resources,7 and offer mappings8 on the situation in individual countries. The recording, visualization and detailed documentation of productions, processes and structures of the independent scene, directly from the practical context, has crystallized out as existentially necessary. As already mentioned, the IETM International Network for the Contemporary Performing Arts has existed since 1981. It convened in Munich for the first time in November 2018 to discuss the topic of “Res Publica Europe�. The four-day event welcomed some 500 artists from nearly all European countries, along with their colleagues from Canada, Australia and Asia. The agenda focused on the question of how the performing arts can shape the future, i.e. how performance can succeed where politics has failed. We, the IETM Munich team, wanted to set a positive example in a

19


Beyond the Net

Europe that seems characterized by de-democratization, de-liberalization and division, and in which it is essential to mobilize centripetal forces, i.e. the connective power of the artists, but also that of the funding structures and not least that of the audience. Res Publica Europe was our theme and our objective: to comprehend Europe as a community, as a matter that concerns us all, as a common cause, as a construct between an imagined space enlivened by hopes on the one hand and a geopolitical reality for which controversial political battles are fought on the other. Our meeting was intended to initiate cross-border modes of production, but also to discuss their diverse problems. The IETM Munich’s four-day agenda explored these topics in theoretical discussions on the performing arts, as a transnational encounter between artists, and as aesthetic practice. The meeting offered Europe a stage and put Europe to the test as an idea with a colonialist heritage, while at the same time creatively envisioning an open Europe for the future, where stages can be utilized as open spaces for discussions and as platforms for civil society to advance the European project. The art business should play a pioneering role in networking practice for an open Europe. To explore Europe performatively, a jury had selected ten thematically relevant productions from the independent scene in the German-speaking region to be performed at the IETM meeting. In the preliminary discussion of the manifesto for the proclamation of the European Republic, the authors Ulrike Guérot and Robert Menasse focused on the reality-generating power of a text with which they counteract antidemocratic, anti-European, exclusionary tendencies. The lead organization for the meeting of the IETM network in Munich in 2018 was entrusted to the Meta Theater Munich in cooperation with the IETM and the numerous local, regional and national networks, which were involved early and constructively, as well as to the newly founded European Association of Independent Performing Arts (EAIPA). From the experience of increasingly international cooperation among actors, groups and theatres, a growing need emerges for stronger networking beyond national work contexts and for a deeper understanding of the framework conditions for independent artistic work in the various European countries. In the early summer of 2018, the association published recommendations for the repositioning of the European cultural funding programme “Creative Europe” starting in 2021 and also published an initial study, in time for the IETM Munich, which showed the wide variety of living and working realities for artists and creators of culture and examined the social differences between individual countries and regions.9

20


Axel Tangerding

One fact in particular must not be forgotten: the independent performing arts are a driving force in Europe’s theatre landscape. Well over one million participants throughout Europe not only stand for innovative artistic formats, new forms of production, interdisciplinary collaborations and mobile work, but also nourish culture by making essential contributions in nearly all artistic disciplines. Like the performative independent scene as a whole, the EAIPA must play a pioneering role by creating future structures and models that include national associations and enable them to play their parts. The articles in this publication show the viability and necessity of the network idea and blaze creative paths into the future. Because one thing is certain: Europe is not an object of theory, but of practice – a multilayered, strenuous and conflict-laden practice for which discussions, debates, performances and controversial manifestos comprise the creative breeding ground.

1

Leysen, Frie: “Foreword”, in: Introduction to the Independent Performing Artist in Europe. Eight European Performing Arts Structures at a Glance, Vienna 2018, p. 3.

2

See the recommendations of the Bundesverbands Freie Darstellende Künste (BFDK) [German Federal Association of the Independent Performing Arts] on a minimum fee: https:// darstellende-kuenste.de/de/themen/soziale-lage/diskurs/honoraruntergrenze.html.

3

See the recommendations of DutchCulture on the Fair Practice Code: https://dutchculture. nl/sites/default/files/atoms/files/FAIR_PRACTICE_CODE_NL_Version%201_ENG_0. pdf

4

Statistische Ämter des Bundes und der Länder (eds.): Kulturfinanzbericht 2018, Wiesbaden 2018, p. 21. “In relation to Germany’s economic power, public funding for culture in 2015 achieved a share of 0.34% of the gross domestic product. Compared to the total budget, public budgets made available a total of 1.73% for culture in 2015.” (ibid., p. 19).

5

Jeschonnek, Günter, Fonds Darstellende Künste (ed.): Report Darstellende Künste: Wirtschaftliche, soziale und arbeitsrechtliche Lage der Theater- und Tanzschaffenden in Deutschland, Essen 2009.

6

Fitzcarraldo, Fondazione: How Networking Works. IETM Study on the Effects of Networking Authors, Brussels 2001. Last accessed on 29 January 2019, https://www.ietm.org/en/ publications/other4.

7

Van Graan, Mike: Beyond Curiosity and Desire: Towards Fairer International Collaborations in the Arts, Brussels 2018. Last accessed on 29 January 2019, www.ietm.org/en/publications.

8

Slevogt, Esther: The performing arts in the Federal Republic of Germany, Brussels 2018. Last accessed on 29 January 2019, www.ietm.org/en/publications.

9

Introduction to the Independent Performing Artist in Europe, Eight European Performing Arts Structures at a Glance, Vienna 2018.

21


Axel Tangerding

BEYOND THE NET

“Dear independent artists and theatre makers, dear Europeans, dear networkers, it’s great that you are independent. It’s great that you are a network. It’s great that you are concerned about Europe and that you want to exchange and collaborate. Really great. But it is not enough.”1 Frei produzieren, koproduzieren, über nationale Grenzen hinweg, Recherchen durchführen, innovative Projekte initiieren, als Einzelkünstler, im Kollektiv oder als Ensemble mit eigener Spielstätte, experimentelle Ausdrucksformen erproben – im Bereich der freien darstellenden Künste sind die Arbeitsformen so vielfältig wie noch nie. Auch spartenübergreifende Kooperationsmodelle zwischen Akteuren der freien Szene und großen Institutionen sind inzwischen integraler Bestandteil der Kulturförderung und eröffnen neue Spielräume. In der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung ist der „independent sector“ heute sehr präsent und wird bisweilen bereits als zweite tragende Säule der deutschen Kulturlandschaft bezeichnet. Blickt man auf die Anfänge in den 1970er und -80er Jahren zurück, ist das eine rasante Entwicklung. In diese Zeit fallen auch meine eigenen ersten Theaterexperimente. Als junger Architekturstudent begann ich, mit ein paar Gleichgesinnten als La Mama Munich zu experimentieren, mit soziopolitischem Engagement, auf der Suche nach neuen Theaterformen. In den Achtzigern formierte sich daraus das Meta Theater, eine frei produzierende Produktionsstätte in einem Gebäude im Bauhausstil in Moosach. Zeitgleich trafen sich 1981 einige Festivalmacher in Polverigi und gründeten das erste Netzwerk, IETM – Informal Theatre Meeting, das heute als International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts firmiert. In dieser Zeit gab es in ganz Europa eine sprunghafte Entwicklung der alternativen, experimentellen Szene, die sich noch auf die Gründer*innen der „Bewegung“ wie Ariane Mnouchkine, Peter Brook, Jerzy Grotowksi, das La Mama Theatre oder das Living Theatre bezogen. In Italien gingen viele dieser Gruppengründungen auf die Initiative von Eugenio Barba und seinem Odin Teatret zurück, in Frankreich bildeten die zahlreichen Kulturhäuser in der Provinz – angestoßen durch Jack Lang – eine Basis für diese neuen Arbeitsformen.

22


Gleichzeitig wurden die internationalen Festivals als Plattform entdeckt und damit auch die Mobilität, in einem noch von Grenzen gekennzeichneten Europa, in einem noch in Ost und West gespaltenen Europa. Die meisten der freien Gruppen betrieben eigene Spielstätten, zum Teil in leerstehenden Industriegebäuden oder anderen ungenutzten Liegenschaften und auch an theaterfernen Orten. Die immer breitgefächertere Szene benötigte spätestens ab den neunziger Jahren Produktionsorte, freie Spielstätten, Plattformen, mit der entsprechenden finanziellen Unterfütterung. Bei allem Selbstvertrauen und bei allem gesellschaftlichem Engagement hat sich an der prekären Arbeitssituation der Akteure dieser Szene in einer wirtschaftlich florierenden Epoche wenig geändert. Und dieses Phänomen ist europaweit wahrnehmbar. Dass der notorische Geldmangel öffentlich diskutiert wird, dass nach Lösungsansätzen gesucht wird, dass es Forderungen nach einer Honoraruntergrenze2 oder einem Fair Practice Code3 oder Einführung gewisser Standards bezüglich etwa der accessibility gibt, das verdanken wir dem Engagement und Zusammenschluss von Kulturschaffenden in Netzwerken und Verbänden. So wurden beispielsweise für die Kultur in Deutschland 2015 an öffentlichen Ausgaben je Einwohnerin und Einwohner 126,77 Euro aufgewendet – die städtischen und staatlichen Institutionen eingeschlossen.4 Hier die tatsächlichen Bedingungen zu erfassen, den Gegebenheiten die tatsächliche reale finanzielle und strukturelle Situation gegenüberzustellen und daraus politische Forderungen zu formulieren, ist der Verdienst der Verbände und Netzwerke. Erste Studien wurden in Auftrag gegeben, auf nationaler Ebene wie z. B. über den Fonds Darstellende Künste,5 wie auch auf europäischer Ebene, etwa über Netzwerke selbst, z. B. durch das IETM.6 Das Aufspüren und Einordnen von Entwicklungen der freien Szene zeigt die qualitative Selbstermächtigung, parallel zur künstlerischen Selbstbeauftragung als konstituierendem Merkmal einer freien „Szene“ europaweit. So bündeln Publikationen Informationen, präsentieren praktische Toolkits zu Themen wie faire Zusammenarbeit gerade zwischen Ländern mit unterschiedlichen Ressourcen7 und bieten Mappings8 zur Situation in einzelnen Ländern. Die Erfassung, die Sichtbarmachung, die detaillierte Dokumentation der Produktionen, Prozesse und Strukturen der freien Szene aus der Praxis heraus kristallisiert sich als existenziell notwendig heraus. Das IETM existiert – wie schon erwähnt – seit 1981 und fand im November 2018 zum ersten Mal in München zum Thema „Res publica Europa“ statt. Es trafen sich 500 Kulturschaffende aus fast allen europäischen Ländern sowie aus Kanada, Australien und Asien. Vier Tage Programm

23


Beyond the Net

zur Frage, wie darstellende Kunst die Zukunft gestalten kann, Performance dort, wo Politik gescheitert ist. Wir – das IETM Munich Team – wollten ein positives Zeichen setzen in einem Europa, das von Entdemokratisierung, Entliberalisierung, Entzweiung geprägt scheint, und in dem die Zentripetalkräfte, die Bindungskraft der Künstler und Künstlerinnen, aber auch die der Förderstrukturen und nicht zuletzt die des Publikums mobilisiert werden müssen. Res publica Europa, Europa als Gemeinwesen, als unser aller Angelegenheit, als gemeinsame Sache begreifen, dieses Konstrukt zwischen hoffnungsbeladenem Imaginationsraum und geopolitischer Realität, um das brisante politische Kämpfe ausgefochten werden. Das Treffen sollte grenzüberschreitende Produktionsweisen anstiften, aber auch mit all ihren Problematiken diskutieren. Das war die viertägige Agenda von IETM Munich im theoretischen Diskurs über die darstellende Kunst, als transnationale Künstlerbegegnung und als ästhetische Praxis. Europa eine Bühne bieten, es als Idee mit kolonialistischem Erbe genauso auf den Prüfstand zu stellen wie zugleich sich ein zukünftiges offenes Europa kreativ vorzustellen. Die Bühnen als offene Diskussionsräume und zivilgesellschaftliche Plattform zu nutzen, um das Projekt Europa voranzubringen. Eventuell könnte der Kunstbetrieb sogar eine Vorreiterrolle spielen in der Vernetzungspraxis für ein offenes Europa. Um Europa performativ zu erforschen, waren zehn thematisch passsende, von einer Jury ausgewählte Produktionen der freien Szene des deutschsprachigen Raums zu sehen. Bei der Vorabdiskussion des Manifests zur Ausrufung der „Europäischen Republik“ rückten die Autoren Ulrike Guérot und Robert Menasse den Fokus auf die realitätserzeugende Kraft eines Textes, mit dem sie den antidemokratischen, anti-europäischen, exklusiven Tendenzen entgegenarbeiten. Für das Netzwerktreffen IETM Munich 2018 lag die federführende Organisation beim Meta Theater München in Zusammenarbeit mit dem IETM sowie den früh und konstruktiv eingebundenen zahlreichen lokalen, regionalen und nationalen Netzwerken und dem neu gegründeten Europäischen Dachverband der Freien Darstellenden Künste EAIPA, European Association of Independent Performing Arts. Aus der Erfahrung der zunehmenden internationalen Kooperation der Akteur*innen, Gruppen und Theater wächst das Bedürfnis nach einer stärkeren Vernetzung jenseits der nationalen Arbeitszusammenhänge und nach einem tiefergehenden Verständnis für die Rahmenbedingungen des freien künstlerischen Arbeitens in den verschiedenen Ländern Europas. Bereits im Frühsommer 2018 veröffentlichte der Verband Empfehlungen zur Neupositionierung des Europäischen Kulturförderprogramms

24


Axel Tangerding

‚Creative Europe‘ ab 2021 und publizierte rechtzeitig zum IETM Munich eine erste Studie, die die große Vielfältigkeit an Lebens- und Arbeitsrealitäten der Künstler*innen und Kulturschaffenden aufzeigt und das soziale Gefälle zwischen einzelnen Ländern und Regionen untersucht.9 Denn eines darf man nicht vergessen: Die freien darstellenden Künste sind eine treibende Kraft in der Theaterlandschaft Europas. Weit mehr als eine Million Akteur*innen in ganz Europa stehen nicht nur für innovative künstlerische Formate, neue Produktionsformen, interdisziplinäre Kollaborationen und mobiles Arbeiten, sondern sie leisten auch eine wichtige kulturelle Grundversorgung in fast allen Kunstsparten. Es fällt EAIPA, ähnlich wie der performativen freien Szene insgesamt, eine Vorreiterrolle zu, indem es gilt, zukünftige Strukturen und Modelle zu schaffen, die es den nationalen Verbänden erlauben werden, sich darin einzubringen. Die Beiträge in diesem Band zeigen die Tragfähigkeit und Notwendigkeit des Netzwerkgedankens und weisen kreative Wege in die Zukunft. Denn eines ist sicher: Europa ist kein Gegenstand der Theorie, sondern der Praxis, einer vielschichtigen, anstrengenden, konfliktreichen Praxis, für die Gespräche, Diskurse, Performances und streitbare Manifeste den kreativen Nährboden bilden.

1

Frie Leyson: “Foreword”, in: Introduction to the Independent Performing Artist in Europe. Eight European Performing Arts Structures at a Glance, Wien 2018, S. 3.

2

Siehe hierzu die Empfehlungen des Bundesverbands Freie Darstellende Künste (BFDK) zur Honoraruntergrenze: https://darstellende-kuenste.de/de/themen/soziale-lage/diskurs/ honoraruntergrenze.html.

3

Siehe hierzu die Empfehlungen der DutchCulture zum Fair Practice Code: https://dutchculture.nl/sites/default/files/atoms/files/FAIR_PRACTICE_CODE_NL_Version%201_ ENG_0.pdf

4

Statistische Ämter des Bundes und der Länder (Hrsg.): Kulturfinanzbericht 2018, Wiesbaden 2018, S. 21. „In Relation zur Wirtschaftskraft Deutschlands erreichten die öffentlichen Ausgaben für Kultur im Jahr 2015 einen Anteil von 0,34% am Bruttoinlandsprodukt. Im Verhältnis zum Gesamtetat stellten die öffentlichen Haushalte im Jahr 2015 insgesamt 1,73% für Kultur zur Verfügung.“ (ebd., S. 19).

5

Günter Jeschonnek, Fonds Darstellende Künste (Hrsg.): Report Darstellende Künste: Wirtschaftliche, soziale und arbeitsrechtliche Lage der Theater- und Tanzschaffenden in Deutschland, Essen 2009.

6

Fondazione Fitzcarraldo: How Networking Works. IETM Study on the Effects of Networking Authors, Brüssel 2001. Letzter Zugriff am 29. Januar 2019, https://www.ietm.org/en/ publications/other4.

7

Mike Van Graan: Beyond Curiosity and Desire: Towards Fairer International Collaborations in the Arts, Brüssel 2018. Letzter Zugriff am 29. Januar 2019, www.ietm.org/en/publications.

8

Esther Slevogt: The performing arts in the Federal Republic of Germany, Brüssel 2018. Letzter Zugriff am 29. Januar 2019, www.ietm.org/en/publications.

9

Introduction to the Independent Performing Artist in Europe, Eight European Performing Arts Structures at a Glance, Wien 2018.

25


IETM Munich, at Gasteig Cultural Centre / im Gasteig Kulturzentrum

IETM Munich, Opening Ceremony / Erรถffnungsveranstaltung


INTERVENTIONS / INTERVENTIONEN

„Acting Europe“, Opening Dialogue, Eröffnungsrede, Ulrike Guérot

„The European Republic under Construction“, Bayerische Akademie der Schönen Künste, with / mit Robert Menasse, Kathrin Röggla and / und Axel Tangerding


Ulrike Guérot

THE EUROPEAN BALCONY PROJECT

Why the European Republic? Res Publica Europa? In a nutshell, the political paradigm we suggest is the following: We started off with a single market, then we got a common currency, but we are still missing a single democracy. We are taught to be citizens of the European Union, but actually, “citizens of the European Union” is a meaningless phrase. The EU legal community supposedly offers freedom of movement for everything. In reality, it is goods, capital and services, basically us as people in our factor as work, who are equal in front of the law. The only ones who are not equal before the EU now, in the European community, are the EU citizens themselves. We are still compartmentalized in legal containers as Finns, Germans, Portuguese, whoever. In regard to the things which are the most important things for the citizens, which are le sacre du citoyen to quote the famous French sociologist Pierre Rosanvallon, − voting, taxation, social rights – the European citizens are not equal. If we were to be equal, we would build a European Republic − equality before the law, equium jus. That is Cicero’s definition of a republic. So the people who decide to create a community on the basis of equal law, they build a republic. In my book, Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss, I basically tried to pick up this heritage, which is a cultural heritage from Plato, Aristotle, Cicero to Kant and Rousseau. You cannot fall in love with a single market or a European currency. What we should do on this continent is to create a political unity which gives us – the citizens – the sovereignty of the political project we are in. If we want to have that, I am just suggesting, together with Robert Menasse, that the one market and the one currency must be embedded in one political democracy. Our suggestion for this is the European Republic, a democratic way to organize Europe based on legal equality of all European citizens. This is it, in essence. It would be very easy. We achieved a lot in Europe in the last 60 years. Now the EU faces many challenges (e.g. populism and nationalism) but I think we should push the European project further and take it, in a way, out of the hands of the nation states, who do or do not do Europe, and bring it back to the citizens. This means as artists thinking about the linkage between citizens and sovereignty. Citizenship is the central topic that we have to strive for in Europe. One example: The Treaty of Maas-

28


tricht of 1992 was supposed to give us a union of states and a union of citizens. If we had today a normatively valid European citizenship, the UK as a country could easily leave the European Union, but the British people would still remain European citizens. The fact that the European citizenship has no normative meaning, that is the problem for the British living on the continent, those who belong to the remain camp and want to be in. Thinking about what belonging really means, − a sense of belonging as a European citizen to an entity like Res Publica Europa. Robert Menasse and I are working on a normative base, which is legal equality as a perspective for European citizens. This is the way to move us out of the crisis.

The European Balcony Project is a project to proclaim the European Republic on 10th November. Many big theatres like the Schaubühne in Berlin or the Burgtheater in Vienna are participating; as well as schools, youth groups, free artists and trade unions. Bert Brecht always said, theatre can shape the world. I am deeply convinced that we need to speak out. This is the theory of the speech act. This is what we want to do, we want to do a pan-European speech act. We want speak out on 10 November at 4pm and we proclaim the European Republic. Together with Milo Rau, we have written a manifesto, a very short text that has been translated in more than twenty languages including sign language. The idea is: you print it this out, you speak it out. We all want to be European citizens under the premises of equal law. We invite all theatres, artists, citizen to do this as a little act of ten minutes, it does not have to be long, but we invite every participant to add whatever performance – art, theatre, discussion – they want to do. Discuss the manifesto. It is free. Our aim is to do the speech act and, for the first time, horizontally unite European citizens on one single moment in time. Why 10th of November 2018? Hundred years ago, in November 1918, all these republics were proclaimed, the Bavarian, Austrian, Weimar, Hungarian Republic. Hundred years later we look back and we want to turn the past into the future. The European Balcony Project is about the emancipation of European citizens. 11th November is the end of the First World War. Combining these two dates, it gives us a new “Lieu de memoires”, which could be that we turn dates of the past in a common date of the future. That is the idea. European democracy on a new scale – what is the new scale, what does it want to point to? One sentence, which sounds radical, but is very important. We went back to the proclamations 100 years ago. They were pretty radical! Die Wittelsbacher Monarchie ist abgeschafft, the Wittelsbach monarchy is abolished! We tried to find the tone of what they did

29


The European Balcony Project

hundred years ago, to apply it to what is the moment in time now. One of the sentences in the manifesto goes like this: The European Council is abolished. That is what corresponds to the idea that if we want to be European citizens on the basis of equal law, if we want a fully fledged democracy and if we want parliamentarization and division of power, there is no such thing as a European Council that should govern us. I do not know whether you have followed what Varoufakis has been doing, there is this concept of Colin Crouch that the EU is a post-democracy: You can always vote, but you have no choice. That is what the EU did to the Greeks. They voted a lot, and had a referendum but at the end of every vote always came the memorandum of understanding. Now we are struggling with Italy, which is a similar case. I am not a big fan of Salvini, but there is this thing that Habermas calls executive federalism. He means that there cannot be an EU commission which runs the Italian budget. Because that is the most noble right of parliament. There cannot be another executive body that controls this budget. What we are experiencing here, this week, is an arm wrestling between the Italians and the commission over who will win on the project thing. I do not know what will happen, but it points to precisely this democratic deficit we are experiencing.

Another example: the refugee crisis. We have an existing EU council resolution that refugees should be distributed according to an allocation formula. Hungary should take 963 refugees. There is even a court ruling that Hungary should take these refugees. Orbán says no, I don’t take them! We cannot sanction the European Union’s own regulations. And who decides in the European Union? The EU? the EU Council and its allocation formula? Or is it Orbán? Robert Menasse’s and my answer is: Neither the EU nor the so-called nation-state is the sovereign, because sovereignty always and exclusively emanates from the people. If we want to scale the European project up to a different dimension, then we – as the people – need to be the sovereign. We need a parliament that unites. It is the necessary but not sufficient condition, that for one single democracy we need legal equality of all citizen. That is le sacre du citoyen – that is where our project is modelled like hundred years ago. What was the thing that the Workers’ and Sailors’ Councils wanted to see a hundred years ago? They wanted to see general, secret, direct and equal assembly. We are taking this demand of a hundred years ago, and we want to apply it to the European situation today. The European Parliament in its current structure offers us general, secret and direct elections, but not equal elections. Because wherever you are, Slovakia, Finland, Portugal et

30


Ulrike Guérot

cetera, we are not “one person, one vote”. But we are one electoral body: le sacre du citoyen. With the European Balcony Project, we want to get these arguments out. I write academic articles − no one reads them, it is a pity, but it is the truth. We are relying on theatres to get a social science wisdom into a broader public. Robert Menasse and I have experienced what theatres can do in the last weeks. They reduce complexity to simple lines, they feed it with music, they make it sexy and then make it work. So, I am very happy that the European Balcony Project relies on theatres to get our message across to publics we cannot reach. I am not an artist! I cannot sing. I can just teach you that a democracy cannot work with legal equality. That is basically what we want to achieve. I think speech acts matters. And if you could participate, we would be very happy.

To illustrate the problems with the European Council we could look at the European unemployment scheme, for example. It would have helped a lot with the crisis in Spain, Italy, Greece. The Hungarian commissioner, László Andor, brought up the idea of a European unemployment scheme already years ago. The council said no. Basically, the council, in advance, has no accountability, no transparency. Nobody knows who voted how. As a citizen, you should know what your representative voted for. This is the first point, which is about transparency. We know afterwards, because Varoufakis wrote it down in his memoir, the German government voted against the European unemployment scheme. I am not represented. Had 80 million Germans voted, a lot of the people, maybe more than 50%, would have voted in favour of the European unemployment scheme. If you want a full parliamentarization of the system, there is a deep need to abolish the council. Because the composition of the European Council results in countries being played off against each other. Every country has a business model, the German export industry, for example, makes out of Hungary and Poland a protectorate of German export industries. Citizens should not be in competition. If you want to be European citizens, we want to be European citizens, we cannot accept that we are the only sort of element in the whole European Union that does not benefit from equality. This is a message that should be kicked off and distributed. Vive la République européenne!

The one thing is clear. It is not about a super-state, equality of law, this is not centralisation. I come from the Federal State of Germany − equality,

31


The European Balcony Project

voting, taxation, social rights. But it is not a centralized state. A super-state argument does not tap into what we want to do. We want a decentralised and social and democratic Europe for the regions. We have claims from Scotland, Catalonia, Tyrol, even Bavaria. If we are really bold about how we want to imagine the next generation, the Europe of the 21st-century, there are a lot of imaginative ideas in circulation. You can find a lot of material on our website about restructuring the European space, which can give people what they actually want. They want their identity, but most of the time, this identity is local and regional. I am from Nordrhein Westfalia, Bavaria is not my identity. What makes me equal with the Bavarians and the Bundesrepublik Deutschland, that is not the Oktoberfest or the Dirndl, it is equal law. You can imagine, in Europe, there are two components of our idea: firstly law and equality, a republic means nothing else than that. And secondly, a different arrangement of the European space beyond today’s nation state. With this big, fat Germany, that plays animal farm in Europe, we will not get far with the European project. We have a lot of ideas on how to deconstruct the regional space into other spaces, so that everybody can find his or her identity, and we can make the dream of Europe come true. Unity in diversity. Unity is normative, diversity is cultural, and basically one level below the national identity.

32


CONSTRUCTING THE EUROPEAN REPUBLIC Robert Menasse und Kathrin Röggla im Gespräch mit Axel Tangerding

Axel Tangerding: Ihr habt mit dem Balcony Project ganz konkrete Handlungsanweisungen entwickelt. Was können wir tun am 10. November? Robert Menasse: Es ist eine ganz einfache Idee. Alles, was wir von Republikausrufungen historisch wissen und kennen an Bildmaterial und Tondokumenten usw., ist, dass es immer von Balkonen aus geschehen ist. Auch die großen Bewegungen in der Gesellschaft stehen häufig mit Menschen in Verbindung, die von Balkonen aus etwas ausgerufen oder etwas gesagt haben, im Guten wie im Schlechten übrigens. Hitlers Verkündung des Anschlusses Österreichs ans Deutsche Reich vom Balkon auf dem Wiener Heldenplatz; der ganze Heldenplatz voll von Menschen. Das Bild des Redners auf dem Balkon ist in Hinblick auf die Bewegung von Gesellschaft ein ganz starkes Bild. Und deshalb haben wir gesagt: Machen wir es von Balkonen aus und nennen wir es Balcony Project. Es geht um den Versuch, den öffentlichen Raum zu erobern, der Balkon ist sozusagen eine Einheit, eine kleine Einheit des öffentlichen Raums. Tangerding: Und was bedeutet das konkret? Menasse: Alle, die mitmachen, alle Theater und Kulturinstitutionen haben sich verpflichtet, zur selben Uhrzeit am selben Tag das Manifest zu verlesen, die Europafanfare zu spielen und zu Diskussionen einzuladen. Auch über das Manifest und die Zukunft Europas. Jeder kann das machen: In Wien beispielsweise werden Menschen es vom Balkon eines Gemeindebaus machen, während gleichzeitig auch das Burgtheater mitmacht. Tangerding: Wenn ich mit einzelnen Sätzen des Manifests nicht einverstanden bin, kann ich trotzdem mitmachen? Menasse: Ja. Dann diskutierst du diese Sätze. Ich bin auch mit einzelnen Sätzen nicht einverstanden.

33


Constructing the European Republic

Tangerding: Ich habe Schwierigkeiten mit der Abschaffung des Europarats. Darüber haben wir auch schon gesprochen. Aber natürlich ist das ein Diskussionsgrund. Menasse: Das können sich viele Menschen nicht vorstellen. Wir fordern im Manifest die Abschaffung des Europäischen Rats. Und wie ist meine Position dazu? Ich bin der Meinung, der Europäische Rat gehört abgeschafft. Das wäre die vernünftigste Lösung. Es hat keinen Sinn, dass die letzte und wichtigste Entscheidungsinstanz in der Europapolitik der Rat der nationalen Staats- und Regierungschefs ist, auch wenn es heißt, das sind die demokratisch Legitimierten, weil sie in ihren Ländern gewählt wurden. Genau an diesem Punkt sehen wir, dass es gleichzeitig radikal undemokratisch ist. Denken wir doch z. B. an England, den Brexit: Wen vertritt Theresa May? Die Brexit-Anhänger oder die, die gegen den Brexit waren? Das ist eine gespaltene Gesellschaft, fünfzig zu fünfzig, mehr oder weniger. In dem Augenblick, wo ein Mensch kommt, um dieses Land zu vertreten, vertritt er nicht die vollständige gesellschaftliche und politische Realität dieses Landes. Wen vertritt Herr Kurz aus Österreich im Europäischen Rat? Er ist halb Anhänger der Regierung, arithmetisch haben sie die Mehrheit, in absoluten Zahlen nicht, und jeden Donnerstag gibt es in Österreich Massendemonstrationen gegen diese Regierung. Aber er vertritt Österreich. Das ist absurd, vollkommen grotesk. Nicht nur, dass sich die politische und gesellschaftliche Realität auf diese Weise im Rat nicht demokratisch abbildet, erschwerend kommt noch hinzu, dass selbst ein Heiliger, der zufälligerweise Staatschef wäre, versuchen würde, ja, in der Situation wäre, dass von ihm erwartet würde, nationale Interessen zu vertreten oder zu verteidigen. Und nationale Interessen sind nicht kompatibel mit den Notwendigkeiten von europäischen Gemeinschaftslösungen. Das ist ja vollkommen klar, d. h. die politische, gesellschaftliche und soziale Realität Europas würde sich erst durch europäische Wahlen in ein europäisches Parlament wirklich demokratisch abbilden. Warum? Weil dann die für den Brexit und die gegen den Brexit drinnen sind, zum Beispiel. Und da wollen wir dann sehen, wie sich in diesem Parlament Mehrheitsverhältnisse bilden, das ist Demokratie. Kathrin Röggla: Und das wäre ein Spiel Kommission – Parlament. Wie würde Gewaltenteilung dann aussehen? Menasse: Das Parlament wählt eine Regierung, die dann vom Parlament kontrolliert wird. Und ursprünglich war das ja auch in den ersten Schritten nach den Römischen Verträgen so gedacht. Nach den Römischen Verträ-

34


Robert Menasse und Kathrin Röggla im Gespräch mit Axel Tangerding

gen sollte die Kommission die Keimzelle sein, aus der dann die zukünftige europäische Regierung wächst. Und das Problem war ja nur – das ist eine innere Logik –, dass man das zum damaligen Zeitpunkt nicht beschließen konnte. Man konnte das nur demokratisch legitimieren, wenn demokratisch legitimierte Personen der Mitgliedstaaten dem zustimmen. Aus diesem Grund ist der Rat gegründet worden. Und der Rat war dazu da, dem Start demokratische Legitimation zu geben. Er wurde dann im Laufe der Jahre zum Hindernis, zum Widerspruch der demokratischen Entwicklung Europas, und jetzt ist der Moment gekommen, wo das abgeschafft werden muss. Es gibt dazu viele politische Theorien. Ich habe begonnen, sehr interessiert und neugierig mit Verfassungsrechtlern zu diskutieren. Weil man jetzt etwas entwickeln muss, was es historisch noch nicht gegeben hat – eine nachnationale Verfassung –, das ist historisch etwas vollkommen Neues. Verfassungsrechtler müssen darüber nachdenken, wie das gemacht werden kann. Es gibt die Idee, dass der Rat degradiert wird zur zweiten Kammer des Parlaments, oder es gibt andere Vorschläge. Die demokratische Entwicklung Europas wird blockiert durch den Rat, und wir müssen die kommende Rolle des Rats diskutieren. Das ist die notwendige Debatte. Und ich sage: Schaffen wir ihn ab. Ich kann das sagen, ich bin ein Dichter und Träumer. Wohin wir kommen, werden wir sehen. Tangerding: Eure These ist: Wir haben eine Wirtschaftsunion, eine Währungsunion, uns fehlt der dritte Baustein, die demokratische Union. Menasse: Wir haben noch mehr. Wir haben nicht nur einen gemeinsamen Markt und eine gemeinsame Währung, sondern auch eine gemeinsame Bürokratie. Aber was in der Tat fehlt, ist die gemeinsame Demokratie. Ein demokratisches System. Ich höre oft bei Diskussionen, das kann es nicht geben, das hat es noch nie gegeben, eine nachnationale Demokratie, was soll das sein? Und dann erinnere ich die Menschen, die diese Einwände haben, immer daran, dass auch die Demokratie, die ihnen vertraut ist, irgendwann erst einmal begonnen oder entwickelt wurde. Vielen scheint es, als ob die nationale Demokratie ein ontologisches Bedürfnis der Menschen wäre, als ob Demokratie nur so vorstellbar ist. Wenn das so wäre, dann hätten wir die nationale Demokratie seit dem Neolithikum. Das ist bekanntlich nicht der Fall. In der Geschichte ist es in Wahrheit so, dass sich – im Jargon der siebziger Jahre – entsprechend der Entwicklung der Produktivkräfte bestimmte Formen der politischen Organisation herausgebildet haben, darunter auch Demokratiemodelle. Was wir heute unter Demokratie verstehen, das haben Verfassungsrechtler wie Hans Kelsen im Jahr 1918 mit genialischem Federstrich und großer Vernunft entwickelt für die damalige

35


Constructing the European Republic

Situation. Das war schon ein historischer Fortschritt, und dieses Kapitel ist zu Ende. Jetzt passiert etwas, was es hundertmal in der Geschichte gegeben hat: Wir überlegen uns auf dem heutigen Stand der Zeit und mit den Herausforderungen, die wir für uns sehen, die beste Möglichkeit für ein politisches, partizipatorisches, demokratisches System zur Bewältigung all dessen, was wir in Zukunft gestalten müssen. Dass wir etwas Neues brauchen, ist nicht das erste Mal in der Geschichte so. Röggla: Ich finde interessant, dass du es so neutral ausdrückst. Für mich ist der Grund, warum ich mich da engagiere, dass es das einzig mögliche linke Projekt ist. Dass es darum geht, wie man Gewerkschaften verbinden kann, wie man stärker auftreten kann. Das ist genau das, was fehlt. Ihr habt in eurem Manifest stehen, dass es auch darum geht, die koloniale Verantwortung zu übernehmen und damit umzugehen. Wie kam dieser Gedanke? Menasse: Europa hat diese Geschichte. Und Milo Rau stand aufgrund seiner Aktivitäten besonders dahinter, dass das im Manifest klipp und klar formuliert wird. Tatsächlich haben wir mit den ehemaligen Kolonien der europäischen Mächte nicht nur diese Geschichte, mit deren Konsequenzen wir eindeutig zu leben haben oder wo wir eine Form der politischen Arbeit finden müssen. Es ist nicht nur eine geschichtliche Frage, sondern auch eine zeitgenössische und zukünftige Frage. Und das müssen wir begreifen. Vor ein paar Tagen hat ein Kommentator in einer österreichischen Zeitung geschrieben, er sieht überhaupt nicht mehr ein, warum er sich ununterbrochen damit beschäftigen und entschuldigen muss für Dinge, die Väter und Urgroßväter gemacht haben. Kolonien in Afrika oder Genozidversuche in Polen usw. Es ist ein zeitgenössisches Problem geblieben. Das alleine ist schon der Grund, warum wir uns damit auseinandersetzen müssen. Gut, und wenn ich ganz hochfliegend träume – obwohl ich gar nicht sicher bin, ob es vernünftig ist, zum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt auch diese Dinge zu sagen –, dann kann ich mir perspektivisch vorstellen – ich werde es nicht mehr erleben –, die Europäische Union wirklich im kulturgeschichtlichen Sinn eines „Mare Nostrum“ zu organisieren. Das heißt, auch die nordafrikanischen Staaten und vor allem auch Israel in die EU zu holen. Israel ist die Antwort gewesen auf ein Problem, das wir in Europa produziert haben, und ich finde, das gehört nach Europa zurückgeholt und ist nur so lösbar. Das ist meine Meinung. Darüber kann man auch lange diskutieren. Aber was wichtig ist, glaube ich, auch für die zukünftigen Debatten, ist, dass wir nicht von „historischer Schuld“ reden, sondern von akuten zeitgenössischen Problemen und Krisenherden.

36


Robert Menasse und Kathrin Röggla im Gespräch mit Axel Tangerding

Tangerding: Zum Schluss würde mich noch dein Standpunkt interessieren, Kathrin, du bist auch Vizepräsidentin der Akademie der Künste in Berlin. Diskutiert ihr auch diese Europafragen oder wie Künstler da Stellung nehmen können? Röggla: Absolut. Kunst ist international oder transnational, lässt sich sowieso nicht national begrenzen. Wir haben auch Projekte, mehr auf der institutionellen Ebene, der internationalen Zusammenarbeit, und wollen, dass man die stärkt und dass man miteinander diskutiert in den unterschiedlichen europäischen Akademien. Das ist ein Projekt, das in Berlin im nächsten Jahr starten wird. Für mich ist die Frage, die mich persönlich als Schriftstellerin auch immer wieder packt, wie man sozusagen Europa erzählt kriegt. Es ist immer die Rede von den Narrativen. Das klingt immer so schön, aber Narrative sind letztlich auch etwas Großes, Abstraktes. Wie kriegt man das konkret, dass wir uns wirklich als Europäer begreifen? Jenseits der Künstler, die sich ohnehin so begreifen, scheint noch viel zu erledigen zu sein, damit man ein anderes Bild bekommt. Ich fand ja auch deinen Passvorschlag ganz schön, dass man einen europäischen Pass bekommt. Es gibt zahlreiche Vorschläge, wir müssen das in vielen, vielen Projekten fassen. Menasse: Es gibt viele Ideen, die nicht einmal etwas kosten. Der europäische Pass. Man könnte mit einem Stichtag, z. B. 1.1.2020, einführen, dass jeder Mensch, der in Europa zur Welt kommt, einen europäischen Pass bekommt. Da ist der Geburtsort eingetragen, nicht mehr die Nationalität. Ich glaube, dass eine Generation, die mit dem Pass aufwächst, nicht mehr kompliziert sagen muss, da gibt es ein Narrativ. Es ist ein Drama mit dem Narrativ. Ich glaube, man kann das schon jetzt ganz kurz so erzählen, dass Menschen sofort sagen könnten, eigentlich ist das vernünftig. Und ich rede jetzt nicht davon, dass man sagt, ja, da waren so furchtbare Kriege, und da sind die Deutschen einmarschiert in Frankreich, und das wird nie wieder geschehen dürfen, dass diese uniformierten Menschen in den Tod gehen. Nein, man kann einfach sagen, wir haben jetzt die Europäische Union. Die Gründergeneration hat damit auf der Basis einer historischen Erfahrung begonnen. Die historische Erfahrung waren die Kriege der Nationen. Und die historische Erfahrung war, dass alle Versuche, zwischen den konkurrierenden Nationen Frieden zu stiften, immer wieder gescheitert sind. Friedensverträge haben nichts genützt, die Kriege sind trotzdem gekommen. Bündnisse zwischen den Nationen haben nichts genützt, die Nationen sind trotzdem übereinander hergefallen. Also müssen wir das jetzt anders machen. Das ist die historische Erfahrung. Was die damals, als sie es als

37


Constructing the European Republic

Befriedungsprojekt begonnen haben, gar nicht gewusst haben – wie hat Karl Marx so treffend gesagt –, dass die Verflechtungen der Ökonomien und der Transfer von nationalen Souveränitätsrechten in Fragen wie Krieg und Wiederaufbau und in Hinblick auf Güter wichtig waren. Was sie nicht gewusst haben, war, dass sich parallel zu der Entwicklung dieses Friedensprojekts das entwickelt, was wir heute so selbstverständlich Globalisierung nennen und vor dem wir uns fürchten. Was ist die Globalisierung? Die Globalisierung ist nichts anderes als die Zerstörung und Zerschlagung aller nationalen Grenzen und die Zerschlagung von nationalen Souveränitäten. Das ist Globalisierung. Und jetzt gibt es weltweit ein politisches Projekt, das als einziges seit sechzig Jahren bewusst eine nachnationale Entwicklung begonnen hat, also die einzige Expertise hat, mit Zerstörung von nationaler Souveränität umzugehen, mehr noch, sie bewusst gestalten will. Und wenn wir das akzeptieren, dass es nicht nur eine Reaktion auf eine historische Erfahrung ist, sondern die einzige Möglichkeit, auch Zukunft zu gestalten, und wenn wir das mit der Frage verbinden: Bist du nicht auch der Meinung, dass es ein Skandal ist, dass wir uns alle heute europäische Bürgerinnen und Bürger nennen können, aber je nach unserem Lebensort unterschiedlich hohe Steuern zahlen, unterschiedlich guten Zugang zu Bildungs- und Sozialsystemen haben, unterschiedlich gute Altersabsicherung, unterschiedlich gute Absicherung gegen Armut – bist du nicht der Meinung, dass das, was als Friedensprojekt begonnen hat, sich als Friedensprojekt vollendet, wenn sozialer Friede und soziale Gerechtigkeit in diesem gemeinsamen politischen Projekt durchgesetzt ist? Dann wird es keinen Menschen geben, der sagt, nein, das will ich nicht. Diese Diskussion führe ich.

38


Kathrin Röggla

LISTEN TO EUROPE

Many people have failed in the attempt to draw a world map. Perhaps you have heard about the project of an American schoolchild who challenged his fellow students to draw world maps from memory? The distortions were catastrophic. My situation is even worse: I cannot draw the borders of Europe. I suffer for several reasons from what might be called an inhibition of drawing borders. I can find Europe only at distinct locations and I do not know exactly where it ends. For example, when I was in Georgia in 2007, I thought: Europe is here. Georgia seemed to me to be a highly active crossroads between Russia, Iran, Turkey, Israel and the West, primordially European somehow or, above all, European. When I was in Warsaw this winter, I thought Europe should really be here, covering the whole of the country, so to speak. Just as in Dresden, here again I found Europe present only at individual moments. In Austria too, the specifically European aspect has been in retreat for some time. Austria is a long way from what I would consider to be European. This rather intuitive attitude can easily be dismissed scornfully because, unfortunately, others know very well where Europe’s borders lie. Furthermore, Europe’s frontiers currently determine the continent’s fate. But Frontex is not Europe, although it has unfortunately become a defining part of the narrative, which in fact consists of numerous components. In principle, the only question that arises is: What should we talk about first? Perhaps one ought to take a step back and echo the Austrian writer Karl Markus Gauss, who says that Europe is determined by its margins rather than by its borders. Not only do margins have no sharply contoured shapes, they also have entirely different functions: margins connect more than they separate. This would be desirable in a Europe of expiry dates and disintegration, as the political scientist Ivan Krastev recently sketched in his essay “European Twilight”. No, I cannot visualize Europe, but I can very probably hear it. This occurred to me during a conversation with the Iraqi-German writer Najem Wali, who asked me directly: “What is this Europe for you, as an abstract idea?” And I came up with a very tricky answer: “Listen.” Europe is a certain culture of listening, very vague, even a bit kitschy when one thinks

39


Listen to Europe

about the history of Europe, which certainly hasn’t been characterized by listening. Maybe this answer came about as a result of my involvement with the conference interpreters for my play die unvermeidlichen (the unavoidable ones), which was also the reason for my visit to Brussels. It seemed to me that the very heart of Brussels was these booths in which languages go back and forth, in which multiple tongues coexist, run along side by side and try to reflect one another. Extremely high demands are placed on interpreters in the European capital. They are true diplomats. They lower the volume of their own expression to give others more space, which could also be a position of strength, as one would have said until recently. Interpreters are the heroes and heroines of volume control. Their work seems to me to contain the essence of the European idea because, as we know, we currently have the greatest problems with controlling the volume. But perhaps the notion of listening also came to mind because, while listening to Europe, I listened to the publicist Mathias Greffrath on Deutschlandfunk news radio. This was extremely insightful. Greffrath travelled through six different countries – Poland, Hungary, Portugal, Romania, France and Denmark – and listened to very diverse people from the worlds of art, politics and civil society. He left a certain space in his listening. He did not make too much of it, just so much that it made me feel thoughtful. We ought to form listening communities, I mused, and offer training sessions in the art of listening, because listening is by no means easy. First, one needs certain preconditions, which are somewhat in disrepair right now. One could say that the potential space for listening is terribly constricted at the moment. Why should Greeks listen to Germans? Why should Italian women listen to Polish women, of all people? What kind of ears would it take to perceive Moldavians and Transnistrians at all? And why can’t one sometimes close one’s ears when one would like to? This topic has been taken up by networks organized by civil society, e.g by the initiative “A Soul for Europe”. Co-initiated by Nele Hertling, it brings significant European politicians into conversations with protagonists in civil society expressly for the purpose of listening to one another. There are also numerous artists, who have been underway for decades: they are prepared to listen, attuned to listening and ready to undertake the task of listening. Above all the theatre, from the independent scene to the big houses and from the smaller festivals to the larger ones, engages quite unspectacularly in European networking as a simple practice. Indeed, theatre would be inconceivable without the European and the cosmopolitan idea. Stories are a part of listening. Post-war stories like those of my father-in-law, who as an EU employee had the employee number 27. Before

40


Kathrin Röggla

working for the European Commission in the agricultural sector, he travelled from farm to farm in France, listening to the farmers. This seemed incredible at the time, as a German and so soon after the war, but he succeeded thanks to his open ears. His activity seems difficult to imagine today, in an era when listening is organized only by lobby groups, and yet it too is part of the history of the EU. Then there are the typical Interrail stories, railway journeys through the pre-war Balkans to Greece and Italy, where I met East Germans who were camping independently (i.e. not at designated campsites) in 1987. They were harbingers of the coming fall of the Berlin Wall. This memory clearly contrasts with the scene in a Milanese theatre in 2014. Many students had gathered there for a panel discussion on the subject of “Economy and Theatre”. Their professor of economics told them that they would be best advised to emigrate from Italy because good working conditions no longer existed for them there. The same scenario continually and dramatically repeats itself in Southern and Eastern Europe. These are stories like those from the occupied Embros Theatre in Athens or from Jeton Neziraj’s independent group and his Multimedia Center theatre company in Pristina, stories of civil society’s survival and resistance that stand diametrically opposed to the so-called “Brussels experience” which my journey brought me in 2013 as part of a research project and which could have been lifted from the pages of Robert Menasse’s novel “The European Courier”. I experienced the cafeteria in the European Parliament as the site of huge and hectic confrontations, lively debates and struggles for the European idea. Now we are all witnesses to political upheavals that intend to shape the future of Europe. Emmanuel Macron’s commitment to Europe from above, which was acclaimed with the conferral of the Charlemagne Prize, is by no means the only noteworthy event of this sort. We are likewise aware of Ulrike Guérot’s idea of a republic, which she is currently promoting with a European balcony project in collaboration with Robert Menasse and Milo Rau. And we are also conversant with David van Reybrouck’s idea of democracy, which calls for greater inclusion of citizens in civil society. All these initiatives aim to make Europe politically viable. As you all know, the responsibility for shaping European policy should not be left solely to the European Central Bank or the Troika. And yet, oddly, I stumble in the telling of my own European narrative. When I had a public exchange of letters with the Scottish writer A.L. Kennedy around the time of the Brexit decision, she described the polarized and inflammatory mood in England and I described the polarized and inflammatory mood in Germany. Her fear for the safety of the German

41


Listen to Europe

television team which she visited there competed with my fear of the mob in Dresden. When we meet each other today, we unfortunately exchange information about even more depressing conditions. This may be logical, but the problem with my aesthetically undertaken pessimism is that tales of doom and gloom are still more entertaining than the deliberately optimistic and constructive mood that typically accompanies public thinking about Europe. Speeches about Europe are boring. They are vague. They have a challenging character that always seems to miss its mark and shoot over the target. And now they seem pointless as well. Ivan Krastev pointed out in his essay that there is no political theory of European disintegration, only one of integration. The European project had planned only for the integrative political direction and now we find ourselves hard pressed to cope with the threat of disintegration. Moreover, tales of cultural suicide and narratives of catastrophe are more popular than stories of agreement. But reality is far more complex: Europe is still the place where one can move in two different directions at the same time. You can find it squatting in Polish cities, lying in the riverbed of the Hungarian Danube and cowering in parliaments, but suddenly appearing with abundant self-confidence in many little everyday conversations, in which one can quickly become the most hated man or woman. You can stare the spectre of populism squarely in the face and never be defeated in the competition for victim status. One can confuse Europe with airport terminals and yet not separate the locals, who stay here, from the globals, who stay there. You can invent crazy names for political parties like the “Hungarian Two-tailed Dog Party” or you can see it solely in translation errors, only to continue speaking. You can suppose it’s a traffic accident, but then you think it wouldn’t be wise to leave the scene. You can accuse it of lying and deny it any teleology and yet say that it shouldn’t be the EU’s job to solve all the problems. You can describe it as the epicentre of global disorder and simultaneously as an automatic thing. You can drift into identity politics, from which you never return, and at the same time you feel that you have been blown clear off the map. It is the site of numerous paradoxes and ambivalences. And yet: increasingly many Europeans are betting on the European Union! That, at least, is what all the opinion polls say. But we know surveys are the institutionalized and preformatted listening that we add as an optional extra amenity when we lack a certain amount of our own listening. My artistic work too consists to a large extent of listening. And I know from experience that one overhears at least one third of every conversation. Can it be that we deliberately overhear certain things in this preformatted listening? Maybe we overhear the future of Europe because the connection

42


Kathrin Röggla

repeatedly breaks or we receive the wrong signals? Could it be that we are not filtering out the right voices from the ambient political noise? To listen into the future, one would have to listen around the corner, so to speak. This would not just require a European radio station or European media, not only a joint European telephone campaign or a series of long tables for everyone to sit at or, as Emmanuel Macron suggested, a programme that enables young Europeans to spend at least six months in another European country. It would also require a common political space, a democratic consolidation of a very German austerity redistribution monster, which is drifting about in economic and monetary policy and which makes southern Europe look increasingly impoverished. The future is indeed a peculiar thing. It is buried differently nowadays than it was twenty years ago. Heiner Müller told us that we have to seek dialogue with the dead to uncover the future buried within them. But now the relationships of obligations are reversed: we have to seek dialogue with the still unborn so they can disinter the future that lies buried with us in the rubble of the eternal present. There is a German saying: “Ich leihe Dir ein Ohr” (“I lend you an ear”). The marvellous thing about lent ears is that they also remain attached to one’s head after one has lent them. We are dealing here with a wondrous multiplication. I am sure this potlatch-like increase in listening could truly work wonders.

43


Kathrin Röggla

EUROPA HÖREN

Bei dem Versuch, Weltkarten zu zeichnen, ist schon so mancher gescheitert. Sie kennen vielleicht das Projekt eines amerikanischen Schülers, der Studierende Weltkarten aus der Erinnerung hat zeichnen lassen. Die Abweichungen waren verheerend. Bei mir ist es noch viel schlimmer. Ich kann die Grenzen von Europa nicht zeichnen, ich habe eine Grenzzeichnungshemmung sozusagen, aus mehreren Gründen. Ich kann es nur punktuell auffinden und weiß nicht genau, wo es aufhört. Als ich 2007 in Georgien war, dachte ich beispielsweise: Hier ist Europa. Georgien erschien mir als hochaktiver Kreuzungspunkt zwischen Russland, dem Iran, der Türkei, Israel und dem Westen, also irgendwie ureuropäisch oder vor allem europäisch. Als ich in diesem Winter in Warschau war, dachte ich mir, hier sollte eigentlich Europa sein, sozusagen flächendeckend, und habe es ebenso wie in Dresden nur noch momenthaft aufgefunden, auch in Österreich befindet sich das Europäische seit einiger Zeit im Rückzug. Was ich für europäisch halte, ist es also noch lange nicht. Diese eher intuitive Haltung kann man leicht spottend abtun. Denn leider wissen andere sehr genau, wo die Grenzen Europas sind. Mehr noch, die Grenzen Europas bestimmen derzeit das Schicksal des Kontinents. Doch Frontex ist nicht Europa, es ist nur ein leider bestimmender Teil des Narrativs geworden, das in Wahrheit aus vielem anderen besteht. Im Prinzip stellt sich alleine die Frage, worüber man denn zuerst zu reden hat. Vielleicht aber müsste man dann doch einen Schritt zurückgehen und mit dem österreichischen Schriftsteller Karl-Markus Gauß sagen, dass Europa von seinen Rändern her bestimmt wird und eben nicht von seinen Grenzen. Ränder haben nicht nur keine scharf konturierten Formen, sie haben auch ganz andere Funktionen, sie verbinden mehr als sie trennen. In einem Europa der Ablaufdaten, der Desintegration, wie es der Politologe Ivan Krastev in seinem Essay Europadämmerung vor Kurzem gezeichnet hat, wäre das wünschenswert. Nein, ich habe Europa nicht vor Augen, wohl aber kann ich es hören. Das fiel mir in einem Gespräch mit dem irakisch-deutschen Schriftsteller Najem Wali ein. Er fragte mich ganz direkt: Was ist es denn für dich, dieses Europa, so als abstrakte Idee? Und ich kam auf eine ganz vertrackte Antwort: zuhören. Eine gewisse Kultur des Zuhörens. Sehr vage, etwas

44


kitschig obendrein, wenn man an die Geschichte Europas denkt, die sich so gar nicht durch Zuhören ausgezeichnet hat. Vielleicht kam diese Antwort auch zustande durch meine Beschäftigung mit den Konferenzdolmetschern für das Theaterstück Die Unvermeidlichen, das mich auch nach Brüssel geführt hat. Das Herzstück von Brüssel schienen mir diese Kabinen zu sein, in denen die Sprachen hinund hergehen, in denen sie ko-existieren, direkt nebeneinander fortlaufen, sich zu spiegeln versuchen. Die Anforderungen, die in der europäischen Hauptstadt an Dolmetscher gestellt werden, sind extrem hoch. Sie sind wahre Diplomaten. Sie dimmen den eigenen Ausdruck ein wenig herunter, um den anderen mehr Raum zu geben, was auch eine Position der Stärke sein könnte, so hätte man bis vor Kurzem noch gesagt. Sie sind Helden und Heldinnen der Lautstärkeregelung, und so scheint mir in ihrer Arbeit die Essenz des europäischen Gedankens zu liegen. Denn mit der Lautstärkeregelung haben wir, wie wir wissen, derzeit die größten Probleme. Vielleicht kam mir der Gedanke des Zuhörens aber auch, weil ich dem Publizisten Mathias Greffrath auf Deutschlandfunk beim europäischen Zuhören zugehört habe. Und das war äußerst erkenntnisreich. Er war durch sechs unterschiedliche Länder – Polen, Ungarn, Portugal, Rumänien, Frankreich und Dänemark – gereist und hatte ganz unterschiedlichen Menschen aus Kunst, Politik und Zivilgesellschaft zugehört und ließ seinem Zuhören einen gewissen Raum, stellte es nicht zu sehr aus, gerade so sehr, dass es mich nachdenklich machte. Man müsste Zuhörgemeinschaften bilden, dachte ich, und Zuhörtrainings anbieten, denn es ist ja nicht so einfach mit dem Zuhören. Man benötigt schon mal gewisse Bedingungen, und um diese ist es im Moment nicht gut bestellt, man könnte sagen, der Möglichkeitsraum des Zuhörens ist im Moment ganz schön arg beschnitten. Warum sollten Griechen Deutschen zuhören oder Italienerinnen gerade Polinnen? Welche Ohren bräuchte es, um Moldawierinnen und Transnistrier überhaupt wahrzunehmen? Und warum kann man manchmal die Ohren nicht verschließen, wo man es gern würde? Es gibt zivilgesellschaftlich organisierte Netzwerke, die sich dieses Themas angenommen haben, wie die von Nele Hertling mitinitiierte Initiative A soul for Europe, die entscheidende Europapolitikerinnen mit zivilgesellschaftlichen Akteuren ins Gespräch bringt und eben zum Zuhören. Und dann gibt es zahlreiche Kunstschaffende, die seit Jahrzehnten unterwegs sind, aufs Zuhören vorbereitet, eingestellt, und durchführbereit. Vor allem die Theater von der freien Szene bis zu den großen Häusern, von den kleineren bis zu größeren Festivals, betreiben europäische Vernetzung, ganz unspektakulär als einfache Praxis. Ja, Theater ist gar nicht ohne den europäischen, gar kosmopolitischen Gedanken vorstellbar.

45


Europa hören

Zum Zuhören gehören die Geschichten. Nachkriegsgeschichten wie die meines Schwiegervaters, der als Mitarbeiter der EU die Mitarbeiternummer 27 hatte. Er reiste, ehe er in der Europäischen Kommission für den Landwirtschaftsbereich tätig wurde, in Frankreich von Hof zu Hof, hörte den Bauern zu, was damals, als Deutscher so kurz nach dem Krieg, eine Ungeheuerlichkeit schien, aber dank offener Ohren gelang. Es war eine Tätigkeit, die heute in Zeiten, in denen Zuhören alleine von Lobbygruppen organisiert wird, kaum vorstellbar scheint, und doch gehört auch sie zu der Geschichte der EU. Dann sind da die üblichen Interrailgeschichten, Eisenbahnfahrten durch den Vorkriegsbalkan nach Griechenland und Italien, auf denen ich 1987 wilde ostdeutsche Camper kennenlernte. Schon Vorboten des Mauerfalls. Diese Erinnerung kontrastiert deutlich mit jener Szenerie in einem Mailänder Theater 2014, in dem sich viele Studierende anlässlich einer Podiumsdiskussion zu dem Thema „Ökonomie und Theater“ versammelt hatten und dann von ihrer Ökonomieprofessorin hörten, sie sollten am besten aus Italien auswandern, weil es keine guten Arbeitsbedingungen mehr für sie dort gebe. Ein Szenario, das sich in Süd- und Osteuropa auf dramatische Weise permanent wiederholt. Es sind Geschichten wie die aus dem besetzen Embros-Theater in Athen, oder die von Jeton Nezirajs freier Gruppe und seinem Media Center in Prishtina, Geschichten des zivilgesellschaftlichen Überlebens und des Widerstands, die dem sogenannten Brüssel-Erlebnis gegenüberstehen, das mir meine Reise 2013 im Rahmen einer Recherche beschert hat und aus Robert Menasses Europäischem Landboten stammen könnte. Die Kantine im europäischen Parlament erlebte ich als Ort einer riesengroßen geschäftigen Auseinandersetzung, ein lebhaftes Debattieren und Kämpfen für die europäische Idee. Wir alle nehmen derzeit politische Aufbrüche wahr, die das zukünftige Europa gestalten wollen, da ist beileibe nicht nur Emmanuel Macrons mit dem Karlspreis gefeiertes Europa-Engagement von oben zu nennen, sondern auch der Republikgedanke von Ulrike Guérot, den sie gerade mit einem europäischen Balkon-Projekt zusammen mit Robert Menasse und Milo Rau befeuert, oder die Demokratie-Idee von David van Reybrouck, die eine zivilgesellschaftliche, bürgerschaftliche Einbindung fordert. Alle diese Initiativen wollen Europa politisch überlebensfähig machen. Sie alle wissen, dass die politische Gestaltung nicht alleine der Europäischen Zentralbank oder der Troika überlassen sein darf. Doch merkwürdigerweise stocke ich in meiner eigenen Europa-Erzählung. Als ich einen öffentlichen Briefwechsel mit der schottischen Schriftstellerin A. L. Kennedy zur Zeit der Brexitentscheidung führte, schilderte

46


Kathrin Röggla

sie die polarisierte und hetzerische Stimmung in England und ich die polarisierte und hetzerische Stimmung in Deutschland. Ihre damalige Angst um das deutsche Fernsehteam, das sie dort aufsuchte, konkurrierte mit meiner damaligen Angst vor dem Mob aus Dresden. Wenn wir uns heute begegnen, tauschen wir uns leider über immer noch deprimierendere Zustände aus. Das mag folgerichtig sein, das Problem an meinem ästhetisch vollzogenen Pessimismus ist, dass die Untergangsgeschichten immer noch unterhaltsamer wirken als jene gewollt positiv konstruktive Stimmung, die meist die öffentlichen Gedanken zu Europa begleitet: Europa-Reden sind langweilig. Sie sind vage, haben einen Aufforderungscharakter, der immer übers Ziel zu schießen scheint. Und jetzt erscheinen sie zudem sinnlos. Ivan Krastev machte in seinem Essay darauf aufmerksam, dass es keine politische Theorie der europäischen Desintegration gibt, nur die der Integration. Das europäische Projekt hatte nur diese eine politische Richtung vorgegeben, und jetzt kommt man nicht mit dem drohenden Zerfall klar. Dazu kommt, dass kulturelle Selbstmorderzählungen und Katastrophennarrationen beliebter sind als die der Übereinkunft. Dabei ist es in Wirklichkeit noch viel komplizierter: Europa ist immer noch der Ort, an dem man in zwei Richtungen gleichzeitig gehen kann. Man kann es hockend in polnischen Städten finden und liegend im Flussbett der ungarischen Donau und verschreckt in Parlamenten, aber plötzlich in vielen kleinen Alltagsgesprächen ganz selbstbewusst auftretend. Man kann darin schnell zum meistgehassten Mann oder Frau werden. Man kann dem Gespenst des Populismus direkt ins Gesicht sehen und im Wettbewerb um den Opferstatus niemals unterliegen. Man kann Europa mit Flughafenterminals verwechseln und doch die Lokalen, die Hierbleiber und die Globalen, die Dortbleiber nicht auseinanderkriegen. Man kann in ihm verrückte Parteinamen erfinden wie den des „Zweischwänzigen Hundes“ in Ungarn, oder kann es alleine in Übersetzungsfehlern stecken sehen, um dann doch weiterzusprechen. Man kann es für einen Verkehrsunfall halten, den zu verlassen man dann doch für unklug hält. Man kann es der Lüge bezichtigen und ihm jede Teleologie absprechen, und doch sagen, dass die EU nicht alle Probleme lösen wird müssen. Man kann es als Epizentrum der Weltunordnung bezeichnen und gleichzeitig für eine automatische Sache halten. Man kann darin in Identitätspolitik abdriften, daraus nie wieder zurückkommen und gleichzeitig das Gefühl haben, von der Landkarte geblasen worden zu sein. Es ist der Ort zahlreicher Paradoxien und Ambivalenzen. Und doch: Immer mehr Europäer setzen auf die Europäische Union! Das zumindest sagen alle Meinungsumfragen. Aber wir wissen, Umfragen sind das institutionalisierte und vorformatierte Zuhören, das wir dazubuchen, wenn uns ein gewisses eigenes Zuhören fehlt.

47


Europa hören

Auch meine künstlerische Arbeit besteht zu einem großen Teil aus Zuhören, und ich weiß aus Erfahrung, man überhört mindestens ein Drittel eines Gesprächs. Kann es sein, dass wir in diesem vorformatierten Zuhören gewisse Dinge gezielt überhören? Vielleicht etwa die europäische Zukunft, weil die Verbindung immer wieder reißt oder wir falsche Signale empfangen? Kann es sein, dass wir aus dem politischen Grundrauschen, das uns umgibt, vielleicht gar nicht die richtigen Stimmen herausfiltern? Um in die Zukunft hineinzuhören, müsste man gewissermaßen um die Ecke hören. Und dazu bräuchte es nicht nur einen europäischen Radiosender oder europäische Medien, es bräuchte nicht nur eine gemeinsame europäische Telefonaktion oder etwa eine Reihe langer Tische für alle oder etwa, wie Emmanuel Macron vorschlug, ein Programm, das junge Europäer mindestens sechs Monate in einem anderen europäischen Land verbringen lässt. Es bräuchte darüber hinaus einen gemeinsamen politischen Raum, eine demokratische Verfestigung eines in Wirtschafts- und Geldpolitik umherdümpelnden, durchaus sehr deutschen Austeritäts-Umverteilungsungeheuers, das den Süden Europas immer ärmer aussehen lässt. Mit der Zukunft ist es so eine Sache. Sie ist irgendwie anders begraben als sie noch vor zwanzig Jahren begraben war. Heiner Müller hat uns gesagt, man müsste den Dialog mit den Toten suchen, um das Zukünftige, das in ihnen begraben liegt, freizulegen. Heute haben sich die Schuldverhältnisse zeitlich umgedreht. Wir müssten den Dialog mit den noch nicht Geborenen suchen, damit sie das Zukünftige freilegen, das mit uns im Schutt der ewigen Gegenwart begraben liegt. Es gibt im Deutschen eine Redewendung „Ich leihe dir ein Ohr“ – das Tolle an den verliehenen Ohren ist, sie bleiben gleichzeitig bei einem – wir haben es also mit einer wundersamen Vermehrung zu tun. Ich bin mir sicher, diese potlatchartige Zunahme des Hörens könnte wahre Wunder bewirken.

48


ARTICLES / ARTIKEL

Interview on / zum Thema “They call me Artist”

Working Session on Inclusion / Arbeitsgruppe zum Thema Inklusion “The Majority is different”


Miriam Bornhak

ON STAGES, BALCONIES AND POLITICS The Theatre as a European Mouthpiece in the European Balcony Project

“Es lebe die Europäische Republik!” “Long live the European Republic!” “Viva la República Europea!” On 10 November 2018, several hundred theatres and cultural institutions simultaneously and jubilantly proclaimed the dawn of a new political epoch: the founding of the “European Republic”. Its basis is a manifesto expressing radical demands: Everyone who is presently in Europe shall be declared a citizen of the European Republic! Alongside a common market and a common currency, we call for the creation of a common European democracy! Irrespective of their nationality and origins, all citizens of the European Republic have equal rights. Legislative power lies with the European Parliament! The government of the European Republic shall act in the best interests of all its citizens!1 The authors of this manifesto are the author Robert Menasse and the politic scientist Ulrike Guérot, whose new book Why Europe Should Be a Republic: A Political Utopia2 explicates the political and historical backgrounds of their demands. In the so-called European Balcony Project3, they call upon everyone at theatres and cultural institutions throughout Europe to leave their buildings and come out onto the balconies, which shall serve as the outdoor stages from which to disseminate the manifesto and to proclaim the founding of the “European Republic”. State, municipal and private theatres joined forces in Stuttgart, the capital city of Baden-Württemberg, to participate in the European Balcony Project.4 Approximately 300 interested people gathered for this purpose on the plaza in front of the Stuttgart State Opera on 10 November 2018. The “Vielfalt” network, which promotes greater diversity in our society, was represented along with various information stands of the political initiative “Pulse of Europe”. Television cameras filmed the event, beer tables were set up, the sun was shining, and the overall atmosphere was casual and expectant. A large colourful cape labelled “Vielfalt” (“Diversity”) hung decoratively over the shoulders of the statue of Friedrich Schiller at the

50


Staatstheater / State Theatre Stuttgart, participants attend the proclamation of the „European Republic“ / Zuschauer nehmen an der Ausrufung der „Europäischen Republik“ teil. Photo: Björn Klein

plaza. Punctually at four o’clock in the afternoon, fanfares rang out to herald the official start of the event and thus to proclaim the founding of the “European Republic”. A mood of joyful anticipation filled the audience. After a brief introduction to the project, the manifesto and its key points were read aloud in several languages. Factual, content-related appeals were voiced, and these were repeatedly given rhetorical support by emotional and dramatic exclamations. The message was unambiguous: let us celebrate European diversity, but fight for political unity. The individual sections of the manifesto were read aloud. Jubilant applause greeted each successive segment. The solidarity among the assembled listeners seemed even more important than the manifesto’s contents. It was a pleasure to cheer the speakers on the balcony, to share their vision and afterwards to join in

51


On Stages, Balconies and Politics

singing the European anthem. The vocal rendition lacked a bit of the confidence that will hopefully come with future practice, but the “European Republic” is still young. It is astonishing to realize how little it actually takes to proclaim a new republic. Very little on this afternoon was reminiscent of an art project. Instead, the event created the impression of witnessing a genuine political rally. In less than twenty minutes, we here in Stuttgart and – through linkage via social networks – countless others throughout Europe created a new political basis for living together. What will change now? Have we really just proclaimed a new Europe? No, unfortunately not, because ultimately this was all just make-believe, a theatrical event. Although the European Balcony Project felt surprisingly real to its participants, we were in a protected artistic space – and the “European Republic” exists only in our imaginations. A genuine and direct political impact is highly unlikely. Why, then, did the initiators nonetheless choose the performing arts as their political mouthpiece? What role does theatre play in the proclamation of the “European Republic”? The historical model for the European Balcony Project is the proclamation of the German Republic on 9 November 1918. One hundred years ago, the Social Democrat Philipp Scheidemann proclaimed the end of the monarchy, the takeover of the government by the Social Democrats and the founding of the German Republic. The stage for Scheidemann’s announcement was a balcony of the German Reichstag in Berlin, in front of which thousands of demonstrators are said to have gathered. Although no original recordings of his historic speech are known to exist today, the balcony has permanently impressed itself on our collective cultural memory as the stage for the declaration of a political upheaval.5 Two nights prior to the proclamation of the German Republic, the founding of the Free State of Bavaria had already been proclaimed by the Social Democrat Kurt Eisner, who would afterwards become Bavaria’s first prime minister. Both Eisner and Scheidemann pursued the selfsame goals of a parliamentary democracy based on the will of the people, unification of the disunited German people and achievement of an immediate armistice, which marked the end of the First World War on 11 November 1918. The newly formed parliament was aware of theatre’s importance for the formation of a socialist state and the unification of its populace, so the parliament especially supported performing artists and theatre-makers. This is documented in the minutes of the ninth official session of the Provisional National Council of the People’s State of Bavaria,6 which record that, among his other demands, the actor and Member of Parliament Albert Florath called for the nationalization of all theatre companies, the establishment of a state university of the arts,

52


Miriam Bornhak

social benefits for artists, and the setting of a minimum wage for performing artists.7 The overriding objective of Florath’s demands was socialization of the theatre business, whose employees had thus far suffered under the exploitative conditions of the capitalist market. Today’s artists can only dream of the enthusiastic and approving reception that the National Council unanimously showered on Florath’s proposal. The socialist politicians were convinced: “For socialism, theatre is … a cultural institution; the art of theatre is a cultural necessity. If socialism is fully conscious of itself, its goals and its purposes, then it will regard the cultivation of the art of theatre as one of its most important tasks.”8 For Social Democratic politics at the beginning of the 20th century, it was crystal clear that theatre must exist. Albert Florath was not the only theatre-maker among the members of the Bavarian Parliament. Prime Minister Eisner, who was also active as a theatre critic and author, declared: “Theatre should be a matter of common concern to the state and the cities, and it should become accessible to the entirety of the population.”9 It is accordingly not surprising that the performing arts played a significant role in Eisner’s brief political career and that he strove to improve working conditions for theatre professionals. In the course of the negotiations, Eisner emphasized theatre’s potential as an educational institution and an instrument for educating society. He described theatre as “a propaganda tool for promulgating revolutionary politics.”10 Theatre appeals to spectators’ “emotions and imaginations”11 rather than addressing itself to their education. The audience experiences possibilities for action and responds emotionally to what takes place on the stage. Theatre can accordingly present alternative realities and can experiment with and depict a possible future in the context of the theatrical performance.

Uplift yourselves on wings emboldened Above your epoch’s course be drawn; See in your mirror now engoldened The coming century’s fair dawn.12 Friedrich Schiller, whose sculpture seemed to observe the demonstration in Stuttgart, wrote those lines about artists. Art is the “prosecutor of society, the avenger of insulted humanity, the herald of freedom” and the “dreamingly creative mother of all humaneness. In play, art anticipates science; with one blow, art judges and punishes the blasphemers of humanity; and in images, art gazes toward and creatively arms the future”.13 What Eisner

53


On Stages, Balconies and Politics

concluded from his reading of Schiller’s texts is also valid, at least in part, for today’s European Balcony Project. After the revolution, a number of theatre-makers in the Bavarian Parliament contributed to decisions affecting the political future of the Free State. They were convinced that theatre can and must be utilized for successful politics. Theatre exerts an influence on political education and on the canon of values of the citizenry. Theatre’s identity-forming effect creates a sense of solidarity and also makes it possible to prepare for a possible future. Historical observations can help us understand the political role of the performing arts in the European Balcony Project and why the arts are being mobilized as ambassadors of the “European Republic”. Menasse, Guérot and Rau similarly use theatre as a mouthpiece for their political agenda. Irrespective of the level of education of the participants, the three initiators address their audience’s emotions through the European Balcony Project and call their listeners attention to current political circumstances and irregularities in the European Union. Their manifesto is an appeal for justice, community and cultural diversity. Although their project tries to influence the political education of its participants, it would be an exaggeration to echo Eisner’s words and describe theatre as a “propaganda tool for promulgating revolutionary politics”.14 Rather, the radicalism of the manifesto’s demands prompts spectators to reflect on what they have seen, to grapple with the current politics of the European Union and to share their thoughts with others. This encourages a climate of debate with diverse opinions rather than merely propagating a political solution. The initiators hope that their project will stimulate the development of a shared European identity. What was successfully achieved in Stuttgart on a small scale with the audience’s jubilant cheers rising upward to the balcony and the unanimous singing of the European anthem is much more difficult to achieve on the European level. Cooperating partners for The European Balcony Project were found and an attempt was made to create a Europe-wide context for it through simultaneous scheduling and sharing on social networks, but this was not perceptible on site. Reasons for this could be that the project’s (media) presence was not sufficiently visible and the number of participants was not sufficiently large. We accordingly felt as though we were merely a small group of people in the heart of Baden-Württemberg who had established the “European Republic”. Nonetheless, our proclamation of the Republic’s existence felt surprisingly real. This reaffirms the potential of the performing arts, which created a hybrid theatrical form here. The power of virtuality is inherent in the performing arts: the power of make-believe, “to act as if”, to play a possible reality together with us as participants. Even if we are not yet ready for the

54


Miriam Bornhak

European Republic to exist as a genuine reality, theatre already offers us today – as it offered our predecessors one hundred years ago – a stage for political action, experimentation and testing – a stage on which a possible future can be prepared.

1

All of the specified demands are cited indirectly from the manifesto of the European Balcony Project. The entire manifesto is accessible online in 37 languages at https://europeanbalconyproject.eu/en/manifesto [last downloaded on 2 December 2018].

2

Munich, 2016.

3

The European Balcony Project is an initiative of the European Democracy Lab in collaboration with Robert Menasse, Ulrike Guérot and the theatre director Milo Rau.

4

Among other institutions represented in the European Balcony Project in Stuttgart are: Staatstheater Stuttgart, Altes Schauspielhaus, Theaterhaus Stuttgart, JES Junges Ensemble Stuttgart and FITZ! Zentrum für Figurentheater.

5

The currently known film footage by Philipp Scheidemann, which purports to document the proclamation of the German Republic, was actually filmed at a reenactment staged ten years after the historical event.

6

See: Verhandlungen des Provisorischen Nationalrates des Volksstaates Bayern, Bd.: 1918/19, Munich, 1919, pp. 263-283, downloadable online at http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/ bsb00009665/images/index.html?fip=193.174.98.30&seite=281&pdfseitex= [last downloaded on 2 December 2018].

7

Cf. ibid, p. 276 f.

8

Ibid, p. 266 f.

9

Ibid, p. 277.

10 Ibid, p. 276. 11 Ibid, p. 277. 12 Schiller, Friedrich: Die Künstler. With comments by Dr. J. Imelmann (ed.). Berlin, 1875, verse 466, downloadable online at http://mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb11319674-6 [last downloaded on 2 December 2018]. English translation by Marianna Wertz, downloadable online at https://archive.schillerinstitute.com/trans_schil_1poems.html#the_artist [last downloaded on 9 January 2019]. 13 Cf. Eisner, Kurt: “Über Schillers Idealismus”, in: Gesammelte Schriften 2. Geister. Berlin, 1919 [1905], pp. 217–234. 14 Verhandlungen des Provisorischen Nationalrates, p. 276.

55


Miriam Bornhak

VON BÜHNEN, BALKONEN UND POLITIK Das Theater als europapolitisches Sprachrohr im European Balcony Project

„Es lebe die Europäische Republik!“ „Long live the European Republic!“ „Viva la República Europea!“ Unter großem Jubel wurde am 10. November 2018 an mehreren hundert Theatern und Kulturinstitutionen in ganz Europa zeitgleich der Aufbruch in eine neue politische Ära, die Gründung der „Europäischen Republik“ ausgerufen. Als Grundlage dient ein Manifest mit radikalen Forderungen: Alle, die sich in diesem Augenblick in Europa befinden, werden zu Bürgerinnen und Bürgern der Europäischen Republik erklärt! Neben einem gemeinsamen Markt und einer gemeinsamen Währung wird die Gestaltung einer gemeinsamen europäischen Demokratie gefordert! Alle Bürgerinnen und Bürger der Europäischen Republik besitzen gleiche Rechte, unabhängig von ihrer Nationalität und Herkunft. Die gesetzgeberische Gewalt liegt beim Europäischen Parlament! Die Regierung der Europäischen Republik handelt im Wohle aller Bürgerinnen und Bürger!1 Verfasser des Manifests sind der Schriftsteller Robert Menasse und die Politikwissenschaftlerin Ulrike Guérot, die in ihrem aktuellen Buch mit dem Titel Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss! Eine politische Utopie2 die politischen und historischen Hintergründe ihrer Forderungen ausführt. Im sogenannten European Balcony Project3 fordern sie europaweit Theater und Kulturinstitutionen auf, aus ihren Häusern herauszutreten und ihre Balkone als Bühnen zur Verbreitung des Manifests zu nutzen, um die „Europäische Republik“ auszurufen. Auch in der baden-württembergischen Landeshauptstadt Stuttgart haben sich Staats-, Stadt- und Privattheater zusammengetan, um am European Balcony Project teilzunehmen.4 Etwa dreihundert Interessierte haben sich hierfür an diesem Tag auf dem Vorplatz der Stuttgarter Staatsoper versammelt. Neben verschiedenen Infoständen der politischen Initiative „Pulse of Europe“ wirbt das Netzwerk „Vielfalt“ für mehr Diversität in unserer Gesellschaft. Das Fernsehen ist vor Ort, Biertische sind aufgestellt, die Sonne scheint, und insgesamt ist die Stimmung locker und erwartungs-

56


voll. Die Statue Friedrich Schillers, die sich auf dem Platz befindet, ist mit einem überdimensional großen bunten Umhang geschmückt, der mit dem Begriff „Vielfalt“ beschriftet ist. Um Punkt sechzehn Uhr verkünden Fanfaren feierlich den Beginn der Veranstaltung und damit die Ausrufung der „Europäischen Republik“. Im Publikum herrscht freudige Erwartung. Nach einer kurzen Einführung in das Projekt werden das Manifest und dessen Kernaussagen in verschiedenen Sprachen verlesen. Dabei werden sachliche, inhaltsbezogene Appelle ausgesprochen, die immer wieder durch emotionale, reißerische Ausrufe rhetorisch unterstützt werden. Die Botschaft ist eindeutig: Lasst uns die europäische Vielfalt feiern, aber für eine politische Einheit kämpfen. Unter Applaus werden die einzelnen Abschnitte des Manifests von der Menge zustimmend bejubelt. Wichtiger noch als dessen Inhalt aber scheint die Verbundenheit des Publikums. Es macht Spaß, gemeinsam für eine Vision den Rednern auf dem Balkon zuzujubeln und abschließend in die Europahymne einzustimmen. Zwar fehlt es hierbei noch etwas an Selbstbewusstsein und Übung, aber die „Europäische Republik“ ist ja noch jung. Es ist erstaunlich, wie wenig es tatsächlich braucht, um eine Republik auszurufen. An ein Kunstprojekt erinnert an diesem Nachmittag nur wenig. Stattdessen wird der Eindruck erweckt, Zeitzeuge einer realen politischen Kundgebung zu sein. In nicht einmal zwanzig Minuten haben wir hier in Stuttgart und, verbunden durch die sozialen Netzwerke, in ganz Europa eine neue politische Grundlage des Zusammenlebens geschaffen. Was wird sich nun ändern? Haben wir gerade wirklich ein neues Europa ausgerufen? Leider nein, denn letztendlich war alles nur ein Spiel. Auch, wenn sich für die Beteiligten das European Balcony Project überraschend wirklich anfühlt, befinden wir uns in einem geschützten Kunstraum, und die Europäische Republik existiert lediglich in unserer Imagination. Eine unmittelbare reale Auswirkung auf die Politik ist nicht zu erwarten. Warum aber haben die Initiatoren trotzdem ausgerechnet die darstellenden Künste als politisches Sprachrohr gewählt? Welche Rolle spielt das Theater bei der Ausrufung der „Europäischen Republik“? Historisches Vorbild für das European Balcony Project ist die Ausrufung der Deutschen Republik am 9. November 1918. Vor einhundert Jahren verkündete der Sozialdemokrat Philipp Scheidemann das Ende der Monarchie, die Übernahme der Regierung durch die Sozialdemokraten und die Gründung der Deutschen Republik. Schauplatz war ein Balkon des Deutschen Reichstags in Berlin, vor dem sich Tausende Demonstrierende versammelt haben sollen. Auch wenn heute keine Originalaufnahmen der historischen Rede vorliegen, hat sich der Balkon als Bühne der politischen Umwälzung in unser kulturelles Gedächtnis eingeprägt.5 Be-

57


Von Bühnen, Balkonen und Politik

reits zwei Nächte vor der Deutschen Republik wurde der Freistaat Bayern durch den Sozialdemokraten und anschließenden ersten Ministerpräsidenten Bayerns, Kurt Eisner, ausgerufen. Sowohl Eisner wie auch Scheidemann verfolgten das Ziel einer parlamentarischen Demokratie, die auf dem Willen des Volkes basiert, sie wollten das gespaltene deutsche Volk einigen und erwirkten einen sofortigen Waffenstillstand, der das Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs am 11. November 1918 markiert. Das neu gebildete Parlament in Bayern war sich dabei der Bedeutung des Theaters für die Bildung eines sozialistischen Staates und eines geeinten Volkes bewusst und unterstützte daher besonders theaterschaffende Künstler. Ein Zeugnis dessen ist das Protokoll der neunten öffentlichen Sitzung des provisorischen Nationalrates des Volksstaats Bayern.6 Hier fordert der Schauspieler und Abgeordnete Albert Florath unter anderem die Verstaatlichung aller Schauspielbetriebe, die Bildung einer staatlichen Hochschule der Künste, Sozialleistungen für Künstlerinnen und Künstler und die Setzung einer Minimalgage.7 Ziel seines Antrags ist die Sozialisierung des Theaterbetriebs, dessen Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter bis dato unter den ausbeuterischen Bedingungen des kapitalistischen Marktes litten. Von der Begeisterung und Zustimmung, die Florath für seinen Antrag vom gesamten Nationalrat erhält, können heutige Kulturschaffende vermutlich nur träumen. Die sozialistischen Politiker sind überzeugt: „Für den Sozialismus ist das Theater […] eine Kulturanstalt, die Theaterkunst eine Kulturnotwendigkeit. Ist der Sozialismus seiner selbst, seiner Ziele und Zwecke sich voll bewußt [sic!], so wird er die Pflege der Theaterkunst als eine seiner wichtigsten Aufgaben ansehen“.8 Für die sozialdemokratische Politik Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts ist klar, Theater muss sein. Albert Florath ist nicht als einziger Theaterschaffender Abgeordneter im Bayerischen Parlament. Auch der Ministerpräsident Eisner selbst ist als Theaterkritiker und Schriftsteller tätig und erklärt: „Das Theater soll eine gemeinsame Angelegenheit des Staates und der Städte sein und soll zugänglich werden dem gesamten Volke.“9 Es ist daher nicht verwunderlich, dass in seiner kurzen politischen Karriere die darstellenden Künste eine bedeutende Rolle einnehmen und er für bessere Arbeitsbedingungen für Theaterschaffende einsteht. Eisner betont im Verlauf der Verhandlungen das Potenzial des Theaters als Bildungsanstalt und Erziehungsmittel für die Gesellschaft und bezeichnet es als „Propagandamittel zur Verbreitung der revolutionären Politik“10. Das Theater wendet sich dabei an „Gefühl und Phantasie“11 der Zuschauer, anstatt an ihre Bildung. Das Publikum erfährt Handlungsmöglichkeiten und reagiert emotional auf das Gesehene. So kann man im Theater alternative Realitäten, eine mögliche Zukunft im Spiel ausprobieren und aufzeigen.

58


Miriam Bornhak

Erhebt euch mit kühnem Flügel Hoch über euren Zeitenlauf; Fern dämm’re schon in eurem Spiegel Das kommende Jahrhundert auf.12 Diese Zeilen schreibt Friedrich Schiller, dessen Abbild uns auch heute in Stuttgart beobachtet, über die Künstler. Die Kunst als „Anklägerin der Gesellschaft, Rächerin der beleidigten Menschheit, Verkünderin der Freiheit“, als „träumerisch schaffende Mutter aller Menschlichkeit; im Spiel ahnt sie die Wissenschaft voraus, im Schlag richtet sie die Frevler an der Humanität, im Bild schaut und rüstet sie schöpferisch die Zukunft“.13 Was schon Eisner aus Schillers Texten herauslas, gilt, zumindest in Teilen, auch heute für das European Balcony Project. Im Bayerischen Parlament entschieden nach der Revolution eine Reihe von Theaterschaffenden mit über die politische Zukunft des Freistaats. Für sie stand fest, das Theater kann und muss für eine erfolgreiche Politik eingesetzt werden. Es hat Einfluss auf die politische Bildung und den Wertekanon der Bürgerinnen und Bürger. Es schafft Zusammenhalt durch seine identitätsstiftende Wirkung und ermöglicht es, darüber hinaus eine mögliche Zukunft vorzubereiten. Die historische Betrachtung kann uns helfen zu verstehen, welche politische Rolle die darstellenden Künste im European Balcony Project einnehmen und warum sie daher als Botschafter der Europäischen Republik mobilisiert werden. Auch Menasse, Guérot und Rau nutzen das Theater als Sprachrohr ihrer politischen Agenda. Unabhängig von dem Bildungsgrad der Teilnehmenden sprechen sie durch das European Balcony Project die Zuschauer emotional an und machen auf die aktuellen politischen Umstände und Missstände in der Europäischen Union aufmerksam. Dabei appellieren sie in ihrem Manifest an Gerechtigkeit, Gemeinschaft und kulturelle Vielfalt. Damit versucht das Projekt zwar, auf die politische Bildung der Beteiligten einzuwirken, das Theater jedoch, wie Eisner es tat, als „Propagandamittel für eine revolutionäre Politik“14 zu bezeichnen, wäre übertrieben. Vielmehr wird das Publikum durch die Radikalität der Forderungen angestoßen, über das Gesehene zu reflektieren, sich mit der gegenwärtigen Politik der Europäischen Union auseinanderzusetzen und den Austausch mit anderen zu suchen. Dadurch wird eine Debatte mit diversen Meinungen gefördert, anstatt nur eine politische Lösung zu propagieren. Die Initiatoren möchten mit ihrem Projekt die Entwicklung einer gemeinsamen europäischen Identität anregen. Was im Kleinen bei der Veranstaltung vor Ort durch einstimmigen Jubel hoch zum Balkon und dem gemeinsamen Singen der Europahymne einfach gelang, ist auf europäischer

59


Von Bühnen, Balkonen und Politik

Ebene deutlich schwieriger. Zwar wurden in ganz Europa Kooperationspartner für The European Balcony Project gefunden und versucht, durch eine einheitliche Veranstaltungszeit und das Teilen auf sozialen Netzwerken eine europaweite Verbindung zu schaffen, die war aber vor Ort nicht spürbar. Ein Grund dafür könnte sein, dass die (mediale) Präsenz des Projektes nicht sichtbar genug und die Teilnehmerzahl nicht ausreichend war. Wir blieben daher gefühlt nur eine kleine Gruppe im Herzen Baden-Württembergs, die die „Europäische Republik“ gründete. Und dennoch fühlte sich die Ausrufung überraschend real an. Das ist das Potenzial der darstellenden Künste, die hier eine hybrid-theatrale Form schaffen. In ihnen liegt die Macht der Virtualität. Die Macht, „so zu tun, als ob“. Die Macht, mit uns Beteiligten eine mögliche Realität zu spielen. Auch wenn wir noch nicht so weit sind, dass die Europäische Republik Wirklichkeit ist, bietet uns das Theater heute, wie vor einhundert Jahren, eine Bühne für politisches Handeln, auf der experimentiert und getestet und eine mögliche Zukunft vorbereitet wird.

1

Alle oben genannten Forderungen wurden indirekt aus dem Manifest des European Balcony Projects zitiert. Das gesamte Manifest ist online in 37 Sprachen abrufbar unter https://europeanbalconyproject.eu/en/manifesto [zuletzt abgerufen am 2. Dezember 2018].

2

München, 2016.

3

Das European Balcony Project ist eine Initiative des European Democracy Labs in Zusammenarbeit mit Robert Menasse, Ulrike Guérot und dem Regisseur Milo Rau.

4

Unter anderem sind beim European Balcony Project in Stuttgart die Staatstheater Stuttgart, das Alte Schauspielhaus, das Theaterhaus Stuttgart, das JES Junges Ensemble Stuttgart und das FITZ! Zentrum für Figurentheater vertreten.

5

Die heute bekannten Filmaufnahmen der Ausrufung der Deutschen Republik durch Philipp Scheidemann wurden erst zehn Jahre später bei einer Nachstellung der Ereignisse aufgenommen.

6

Siehe hierfür: „Verhandlungen des Provisorischen Nationalrates des Volksstaates Bayern“, Bd.: 1918/19, München, 1919, S. 263–283, online abrufbar unter http://daten.digitalesammlungen.de/bsb00009665/images/index.html?fip=193.174.98.30&seite=281&pdfseitex= [zuletzt abgerufen am 2. Dezember 2018].

7

Vgl. ebd., S. 276 f.

8

Ebd., S. 266 f.

9

Ebd., S. 277.

10 Ebd., S. 276. 11 Ebd., S. 277. 12 Schiller, Friedrich: „Die Künstler“. Mit Anmerkungen von Dr. J. Imelmann (Hrsg.). Berlin, 1875, Vers 466, online abrufbar unter http://mdz-nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de: bvb:12-bsb11319674-6 [zuletzt abgerufen am 2. Dezember 2018]. 13 Vgl. Kurt Eisner: „Über Schillers Idealismus“, in: ders.: Gesammelte Schriften 2. Geister, Berlin 1919 [1905], S.217–234. 14 Verhandlungen des Provisorischen Nationalrates, a.a.O., S. 276.

60


Elisabeth Luft

RES PUBLICA EUROPA: A POLITICAL UTOPIA AS A CHALLENGE FOR THE INDEPENDENT PERFORMING ARTS?

The idea of a Res publica Europa, a European Republic, is currently a political utopia. The people who live in Europe today do not all have the same political rights. Europe has no common continental political platform and lacks a future-oriented vision. Rather than promoting the common good of all citizens, politicians focus on a plethora of diverse political demands, economic interests and bureaucratic guidelines. In times of unceasing crises, artists and other creators of culture are all the more vulnerable to the effects of this sort of politics on their everyday life and work. Freelance artists above all are deprived of their livelihood: in many cases, they can survive only by working part-time at other jobs, which all too often become full-time occupations that downgrade their art-making to secondary status. Not only in Eastern Europe, poor pay and the lack of suitable conditions for artistic production jeopardize artists’ sheer survival. Although the situation is undoubtedly better for artists in Germany or the Netherlands than for their colleagues in Serbia or Greece, artists often struggle to survive in the most precarious circumstances. Questions are being raised about the meaning and value of art, and the metier of the freelance performing artist is facing an acid test. The self-empowerment of artists and how they can support one another was the initial focus at the second of two semi-annual conferences of the IETM (International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts) in Munich in 2018.1 A key role was played by their mutual artistic identity and whether it is also a shared European identity. Artists throughout the European continent are considering their geographical proximity to one another in terms of its content, putting this nearness to practical use and increasingly seeking ways to collaborate across national frontiers. Transnational co-productions are being created, mostly with support from foundations or associations, and some of these productions could be seen in the IETM’s evening programme or at the Politics in Independent Theater festival, which took place simultaneously.2 It may accordingly come as a surprise that the IETM conference devoted little or no discussion to the contents of these performances, to the subject of artistic work per se and to the ways in which it is staged. Rather, the meeting obviously focused

61


Res publica Europa

“Mapping Europe”, with / mit EAIPA (The European Association of Independent Performing Arts)

on the highly diverse financial, organizational and production possibilities available for artists in the various countries. The predominant topics were whether and how art can be made possible at all and who can join forces with whom to stage new productions. The meeting in Munich clearly showed that the possibilities seem to be exhausted for the independent theatre scene to attract society’s attention solely through its creative work and thus to spark broadly effective discussions and perhaps even to promote political transformation. Overburdening oneself and performance pressure were the themes of many conversations; resignation towards one’s own artistic calling was widespread.3 The meeting in Munich provided a forum for exchange and discussion against the background of these lived realities, which have worsened significantly as a result of the economic and political developments that followed the financial crisis of 2008. Political change seems to be the only way to improve the situation for freelance performing artists, whose lot has been deteriorating for decades. The starting point for the talks was the idealistic vision of a post-national order, a European republic of the sort described by the political scientist Ulrike Guérot in her book Why Europe Should Be a Republic: A Political Utopia. Guérot calls for a European democracy that is transnational, decentralized, regional, sustainable and communally social. National parliaments are to serve only as administrative apparatuses; in their stead, a European senate and house of representatives are to be created, to which far-reaching and radical competences are to be transferred.

62


Elisabeth Luft

Representatives should increasingly work on the regional level to facilitate closer exchange with local citizens. Guérot hopes that this will resolve the current socioeconomic crisis and create a genuine democracy that is close to its citizens and promotes the common good. Assisted by a network of regional representatives, the European continent will successfully revamp and overcome the system of nation-states. The following principle applies: the closer the political structures are to the citizens, the closer the politics are to the citizens’ issues and needs. But to what degree can a utopia of this sort help freelance artists in Europe? What food for thought and what ideas can this utopia give them to reform their working and improve their conditions of production? What possibilities for action can be derived from this? What strategies can be developed while the political situation continues to deteriorate?4 It became clear at the IETM’s conference that the production of art is no longer the principal means by which freelance performing artists can fulfil their cultural-political mandate. Instead, political commitment has become the activity which can restore the significance and visibility of the performing arts for social discourse. One acts as an artist and as a private individual, joins leftist pan-European political movements, endeavours to take a stand and become prominently visible in the political arena. Cross-border, post-national cooperation and networking are perceived as the central elements of a united, sustainable Europe. Horizons should be broadened and borders should be crossed rather than fortified. This is why networks are founded indefatigably and networking is the year’s it-word. The aim, however, should not be to further lionize already outstanding individuals on the performing arts scene, for whom nation-states would be Guérot’s counterpart, but to cultivate flat hierarchies that can help to strengthen the independent performing arts throughout Europe. It was therefore quite surprising that the newly founded European Association of Independent Performing Artists (EAIPA), an umbrella organization currently comprising ten exclusively national associations, was presented at the IETM conference. The structure of this umbrella organization is strongly hierarchical and traditional. The reason for its establishment is the absence of a functional European financing system for the performing arts. The EAIPA now intends to foster such a system, which can only function within the structures delineated by the frontiers of the current European nation-states.6 It is remarkable that the establishment of a hierarchical umbrella organization such as the EAIPA was so warmly received, especially when one recalls that the movement since the 1980s has increasingly been away from, rather than towards, this traditional organizational form. Amalgamations

63


Res publica Europa

based on existing geographic and national borders have disintegrated since the 1980s and their former members have diffused into networks that transcend national and geographical borders. That such associations are now being re-established suggests that the potentials of these networks were insufficient to adequately promote artists, to improve long-term financing for the performing arts in the various countries and to assure adequate conditions for artistic production. To achieve success in cultural policy negotiations, it seems politically necessary to once again resort to hierarchical organizational structures. This is why artists are not only eager to join various networks, but are also keenly interested in knowing that the associations include representatives from the artists’ own countries. The newly founded EAIPA nevertheless seems diametrically opposed to Guérot’s transnational vision, because the concept of this umbrella association is based on the assumption of national borders. It soon became clear during the EAIPA’s presentation that the word independent in the association’s name denotes different and only marginally comparable structures and conditions in the various European countries. The problem already begins in the definition of the group. Independent in the context of the performing arts is translated in Germany as frei (free) or freischaffend (freelance). This is because the separation between the socalled “free” scene and the institutionalized system of city and state theatres is very sharply defined in Germany, where performing artists can be clearly assigned to either one or the other structure. But the selfsame word has a totally different meaning in other European countries: for example, permanently established production houses and clear structures exist in the Netherlands, where performing artists are not employed on a permanent basis, but tour from one theatre to another with their collectives and their individual productions or are dependent on receiving commissions for theatrical projects. Theatres in England similarly do not employ permanent ensembles, but likewise hire actors for individual productions. Still other and entirely different situations exist in Greece or Spain. In view of these national dissimilarities, the EAIPA objectively defines the independent European theatre scene on the basis of self-commissioning, as was customary in Germany in the 1970s and ’80s. Despite the different national circumstances, the umbrella organization thus tries to be as open as possible and to include all interested countries and their representatives.7 Alongside the trend towards networking, which has been evident since the 1980s, and the associated establishment of European networks with flat hierarchies, a return to traditional hierarchical organizations such as the EAIPA can presently be observed. The utopia of a European republic

64


Elisabeth Luft

as envisioned by Ulrike Guérot would accordingly only be usable for the performing arts and transferable to their own structure if political structures were already changing and moving in the direction of such a republic. At the present time, however, this idea can only provide food for thought, promote a process of self-empowerment among independent performing artists and encourage them to advocate their interests self-confidently and decisively. This can counteract the widespread impression of artistic powerlessness and provide a welcome updraft to elevate the status of freelance performing artists in Europe.

1

See IETM: What is IETM. https://www.ietm.org/en/about/what-is-ietm, last downloaded 1 December 2018.

2

See the IETM’s programme: https://www.ietm.org/en/node/9133/all, last downloaded 7 December 2018 and the programme of the Politik im Freien Theater festival: https://www.politikimfreientheater.de, last downloaded 7 December 2018.

3

Relevant for this is the event What’s in Our Power during the IETM in Munich 2018: https://www.ietm.org/en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/whats-in-our-power, last downloaded 1 December 2018.

4

See Guérot, Ulrike: Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss. Eine politische Utopie. Munich, 2016.

5

Illustration: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ietmnetwork/43977886740/in/album72157701872893721/, last downloaded 7 December 2018.

6

Compare: EAIPA – The European Association of Independent Performing Arts: Introduction to the Independent Performing Arts in Europe. Eight European Performing Arts Structures at a Glance. Berlin, 2018, accessed at https://darstellende-kuenste.de/images/Introduction_to_the_ Independent_Performing_Arts_in_Europe-compressed.pdf, last downloaded 7 December 2018.

7

This definition was discussed in greater detail at the event Mapping the European Landscape of Independent Performing Arts during the IETM in Munich 2018. See: https://www.ietm.org/ en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/stronger-together, last downloaded 7 December 2018.

65


Elisabeth Luft

RES PUBLICA EUROPA. EINE POLITISCHE UTOPIE ALS HERAUSFORDERUNG FÜR DIE FREIEN DARSTELLENDEN KÜNSTE?

Die Idee einer Res publica Europa, einer Europäischen Republik, ist aktuell eine politische Utopie. Menschen, die heute in Europa leben, haben keineswegs gleiche politische Rechte. Es gibt keine gemeinsame kontinentale europäische Politik, es mangelt an einer zukunftsorientierten Vision. Im Fokus der Politik steht nicht das Gemeinwohl aller Bürger*innen, sondern eine Vielzahl unterschiedlicher politischer Ansprüche, wirtschaftlicher Interessen und bürokratischer Richtlinien. In Zeiten anhaltender Krisen sind besonders Kulturschaffende in ihrem alltäglichen Leben und Arbeiten den Auswirkungen einer solchen Politik ausgeliefert. Vor allem freischaffenden Künstler*innen wird die Lebensgrundlage entzogen: Häufig können sie nur mit Hilfe von Nebentätigkeiten überleben, vielmals werden diese gar zum Vollzeitjob und verdrängen die Kunst auf einen Nebenschauplatz. Nicht nur in den osteuropäischen Ländern geraten die Künstler*innen durch schlechte Bezahlung und mangelnde Produktionsbedingungen immer wieder an den Rand ihrer Existenz. Auch wenn die Situation in Deutschland oder den Niederlanden ungleich besser ist als in Serbien oder Griechenland, leben die Künstler*innen auch hier häufig in prekärsten Verhältnissen. Fragen nach der Bedeutung und dem Wert von Kunst werden laut, der Berufsstand freischaffender darstellender Künstler*innen steht auf dem Prüfstand. Während der zweiten Jahreskonferenz 2018 des Internationalen Netzwerks für zeitgenössische darstellende Künste (IETM) in München ging es zunächst um die Selbstermächtigung der Künstler*innen und darum, sich gegenseitig zu stärken.1 Eine tragende Rolle spielte dabei die gemeinsame künstlerische Identität, ob gar eine europäische Identität, stand zur Debatte. Es ist zu beobachten, dass die geografische Nähe zueinander inhaltlich aufgegriffen und praktisch genutzt wird, Künstler*innen des europäischen Kontinents suchen zunehmend Wege, sich über Ländergrenzen hinweg zusammenzutun. Transnationale Koproduktionen entstehen, zumeist gefördert durch Stiftungen oder Vereine – einige davon sind auch im Abendprogramm des IETM oder dem parallel stattfindenden Festival Politik im Freien Theater zu sehen.2 Es mag daher erstaunen, dass auf der Konferenz des IETM kaum über die Inhalte dieser Produktionen diskutiert wurde,

66


der Gegenstand künstlerischer Arbeit und die Art, ihn in Szene zu setzen, wurde kaum thematisiert. Unverkennbar standen stattdessen die stark divergierenden finanziellen wie organisatorischen und produktionstechnischen Möglichkeiten der Künstler*innen in den unterschiedlichen Ländern im Fokus. Es ging allein darum, ob und wie Kunst ermöglicht werden kann oder wer sich für eine Produktion mit wem zusammenschließt. Die Möglichkeiten der freien Szene, allein durch ihr kreatives Schaffen von der Gesellschaft wahrgenommen zu werden und so breitenwirksam Diskussionen und sogar politische Veränderung zu befördern – das wurde in München deutlich –, scheinen erschöpft. Von Selbstüberforderung und Leistungsdruck war die Rede, Resignation gegenüber dem eigenen künstlerischen Auftrag ist weit verbreitet.3 Vor dem Hintergrund dieser Lebensrealitäten, die sich durch die wirtschaftlichen und politischen Entwicklungen seit der Finanzkrise 2008 deutlich verschlechtert haben, bot das Treffen in München ein Forum zu Austausch und Diskussion. Politische Veränderung scheint die einzige Möglichkeit zu sein, um die seit Jahrzehnten schlechter werdende Situation freier darstellender Künstler*innen endlich nachhaltig zu verbessern. Als Ausgangspunkt der Gespräche wurde das Ideal einer postnationalen Ordnung genutzt, einer Europäischen Republik, wie es die Politikwissenschaftlerin Ulrike Guérot in ihrem Buch Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss! Eine politische Utopie entwirft. Sie fordert eine europäische transnationale Demokratie, dezentral, regional, nachhaltig und gemeinschaftlich-sozial. Nationale Parlamente sollen nur noch als Verwaltungsapparate dienen, dafür soll ein europäisches Senats- und Repräsentantenhaus entstehen, dem weitreichende und radikale Kompetenzen übertragen werden. Repräsentant*innen sollen verstärkt auf regionaler Ebene arbeiten, um somit einen engen Austausch mit den Bürger*innen vor Ort zu ermöglichen. Damit soll die gegenwärtige sozio-ökonomische Krise überwunden und eine wirkliche, bürgernahe, am Gemeinwohl orientierte Demokratie geschaffen werden. Der europäische Kontinent soll das System der Nationalstaaten mit Hilfe eines Netzwerks regionaler Vertreter*innen überwinden. Es gilt: Je näher die politischen Strukturen an den Bürger*innen, desto näher die Politik an ihren Themen und Bedürfnissen. Doch inwieweit kann eine solche Utopie für freischaffende Künstler*innen aus Europa hilfreich sein? Welche Denkanstöße und Ideen kann sie ihnen für die Reformierung der eigenen Arbeits- und Produktionsbedingungen liefern? Welche Handlungsmöglichkeiten können daraus abgeleitet und welche Strategien entwickelt werden, während sich die politische Lage weiter zuspitzt?4

67


Res publica Europa

Auf der Konferenz des IETM wurde deutlich, dass die Kunstproduktion heute nicht mehr das zentrale Mittel ist, mit dem Künstler*innen der freien Szene ihren kulturpolitischen Auftrag erfüllen können. Stattdessen ist politisches Engagement zu der Aktivität geworden, die die Bedeutung der darstellenden Künste für gesellschaftlichen Diskurs wieder sichtbar machen soll. Man agiert als Künstler*in und als Privatperson, schließt sich links-orientierten gesamteuropäischen politischen Bewegungen an, will sich positionieren und politisch in Erscheinung treten. Länderübergreifende, postnationale Zusammenarbeit und Vernetzung werden als die zentralen Elemente eines vereinten und zukunftsfähigen Europas wahrgenommen. Horizonte sollen erweitert und Grenzen überschritten, nicht gestärkt werden. Unermüdlich werden deshalb Netzwerke gegründet, „Networking“ ist der Begriff der Stunde. Ziel ist es allerdings nicht, dadurch einzelne herausragende Repräsentant*innen der Szene zu stärken – das Pendant bei Guérot wären hier die Nationalstaaten –, sondern mit Hilfe flacher Hierarchien eine flächendeckende Stärkung der freien darstellenden Künste in Europa möglich zu machen. Erstaunlich ist deshalb folgendes Ereignis: Während der Konferenz des IETM wurde der frisch gegründete Europäische Verband freier darstellender Künstler*innen (EAIPA) vorgestellt, ein Dachverband von derzeit zehn ausschließlich nationalen Verbänden. Dieser Dachverband ist stark hierarchisch-traditionell organisiert. Grund für diesen Zusammenschluss war das bisherige Fehlen eines funktionierenden europäischen Finanzierungssystems für die darstellenden Künste, dessen Schaffung sich EAIPA nun annehmen will. Das beabsichtigte Finanzierungssystem kann nur innerhalb der Strukturen nationalstaatlicher Grenzen funktionieren.5 Es ist bemerkenswert, dass die Gründung eines hierarchischen Dachverbandes wie dem EAIPA auf solch großes Interesse stößt – hatte man sich seit den achtziger Jahren doch zunehmend von dieser althergebrachten Organisationsform entfernt. Seit dieser Zeit lösten sich Zusammenschlüsse, deren Basis die bestehenden geografischen, nationalen Grenzen waren, auf. Ihre Mitglieder diffundierten in länderübergreifende und geografische Grenzen überschreitende Netzwerke. Aufgrund dessen, dass solche Verbände heute wieder gegründet werden, lässt sich vermuten, dass die Möglichkeiten von Netzwerken nicht ausgereicht haben, um Künstler*innen adäquat zu fördern und in den unterschiedlichen Ländern langfristig eine bessere Finanzierung der darstellenden Künste durchzusetzen und hinreichende Produktionsbedingungen zu sichern. Es scheint politisch notwendig zu sein, erneut zu hierarchischen Organisationsstrukturen zu greifen, um in kulturpolitischen Verhandlungen erfolgreich zu sein. Das Interesse, neben der persönlichen Mitgliedschaft in zahlreichen Netzwer-

68


Elisabeth Luft

ken auch Vertreter*innen des eigenen Landes in einem solchen Verband zu wissen, ist bei den Künstler*innen deshalb groß. Dennoch scheint die Neugründung von EAIPA der transnationalen Idee Guérots gänzlich zu widersprechen, basiert das Konzept des Dachverbandes doch auf der Annahme nationaler Grenzen. Bei der Vorstellung von EAIPA kristallisierte sich schnell heraus, dass das im Titel des Verbands genannte Wort „independent“ in den europäischen Ländern jeweils unterschiedliche Strukturen und Gegebenheiten bezeichnet, die kaum miteinander vergleichbar sind. Das Problem beginnt bereits bei der Definition der Gruppe. In Deutschland wird „independent“ im Kontext der darstellenden Künste mit „frei“ oder „freischaffend“ übersetzt. Das liegt daran, dass die Trennung zwischen der sogenannten freien Szene und einem institutionalisierten Stadt- und Staatstheater-System in Deutschland sehr deutlich ist und Künstler*innen klar entweder der einen oder der anderen Struktur zuzuordnen sind. In anderen europäischen Ländern wiederum hat das Wort an selber Stelle eine gänzlich andere Bedeutung: In den Niederlanden beispielsweise gibt es zwar feste Produktionshäuser und dortige klare Strukturen, allerdings werden Künstler*innen nicht fest angestellt, sondern touren mit ihren Kollektiven und einzelnen Produktionen von Haus zu Haus oder sind auf Auftragswerke angewiesen. Ebenso gibt es in England keine festen Ensembles an Theaterhäusern, auch hier werden Künstler*innen jeweils für einzelne Produktionen engagiert. In Griechenland oder Spanien sind die Situationen wiederum gänzlich andere. EAIPA definiert die freie europäische Theaterszene aufgrund dieser Diversitäten nüchtern über die Selbstbeauftragung, wie es in Deutschland in den siebziger und achtziger Jahren üblich war. Auf diese Weise wird versucht, trotz der unterschiedlichen nationalen Gegebenheiten, möglichst offen zu sein und alle interessierten Länder und deren Vertreter*innen in den Dachverband aufnehmen zu können.6 Neben dem seit den achtziger Jahren zu beobachtenden Trend des Networkings und den damit einhergehenden Gründungen europäischer Netzwerke mit durchweg flachen Hierarchien ist heute eine Rückbesinnung auf traditionell-hierarchische Organisationen wie dem EAIPA zu beobachten. Die Utopie einer Europäischen Republik nach den Vorstellungen Ulrike Guérots wäre daher für die darstellenden Künste erst dann nutzbar und auf das eigene Gefüge übertragbar, wenn sich die politischen Strukturen bereits in Richtung einer Europäischen Republik ändern. Gegenwärtig kann diese Idee jedoch nur Denkanstöße liefern. Sie kann einen Prozess der Selbstermächtigung freier darstellender Künstler*innen fördern und sie dazu ermutigen, ihre Interessen selbstbewusst und bestimmt zu vertre-

69


Res publica Europa

ten. So kann dem weit verbreiteten Eindruck künstlerischer Machtlosigkeit entgegengewirkt werden, kann der Berufsstand freier darstellender Künstler*innen in Europa Antrieb erfahren.

1

Vgl. IETM: „What is IETM“, entn. https://www.ietm.org/en/about/what-is-ietm, letzter Zugriff: 1.12.2018.

2

Siehe hierfür das Programm des IETM: https://www.ietm.org/en/node/9133/all, letzter Zugriff: 7.12.2018, sowie des Festivals „Politik im Freien Theater“: https://www.politikimfreientheater.de, letzter Zugriff 7.12.2018.

3

Hierfür relevant u. a. die Veranstaltung „What’s in our power“ während des IETM in München 2018: https://www.ietm.org/en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/whats-inour-power, letzter Zugriff: 1.12.2018.

4

Siehe hierfür Ulrike Guérot: Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss! Eine politische Utopie, München 2016.

5

Vgl. „EAIPA – The European Association of Independent Performing Arts: Introduction to the Independent Performing Arts in Europe. Eight European Performing Arts Structures at a Glance“, Berlin 2018, entn. https://darstellende-kuenste.de/images/Introduction_to_ the_Independent_Performing_Arts_in_Europe-compressed.pdf, letzter Zugriff: 7.12.2018.

6

Auf diese Definition wurde bei der Veranstaltung „Mapping the European landscape of independent performing arts“ während des IETM in München 2018 näher eingegangen. Siehe hierzu: https://www.ietm.org/en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/stronger-together, letzter Zugriff: 7.12.2018.

70


Lisa Haselbauer

STRUCK BLIND On Rediscovering Political Sensuality

It’s Friday night in a bar somewhere in Munich. Neither a chic club nor a trendy pub, this bar is simply a place that seems content to serve its function of bringing people together. Background music mingles with the sound of numerous conversations to create a cosy atmosphere. People are seated at the tables, engrossed in stimulating conversations with their friends. Someone from the staff comes by every now and then to ask if anyone would like another drink. I am one of the guests this evening, which couldn’t be more normal and relaxed until the moment when I need go to the toilet. I raise my hand and soon I am dependent on the assistance of the woman who’ll lead me there – because tonight I am blind, just like all the other guests at this bar. This unusual situation was created by katze und krieg, the Cologne-based performance duo of Julia Dick and katharinajej, whose project wirklich sehen (Really See) invites people to say goodbye to their eyesight for a few hours and perceive their surroundings, especially their companions, with the other senses that remain after the eyes have been blindfolded. How the people find each other, whether they find each other at all and how the situation develops from there is the experimental part of this project. In other words, this highly participatory artform raises several questions. What is the product per se? Is there a product at all? Or is the commercially freighted notion of “product” wholly out of place in this context? Habit teaches us to expect every artistic undertaking to culminate in something tangible or at least visible. Whether sculptures, exhibitions or stagings, the efforts must all lead toward some predefined intention. Participatory artforms evolve these objectives through collaboration between performers and participants, whose collaboration may last for shorter or longer lengths of time, depending on the particular project. In the case of wirklich sehen, the interval lasts about two hours and is spent with several different people, but the whole event ends in neither a material nor a transitory object. This distinguishes katze und krieg from other participative artists, because Julia Dick and katharinajej focus on the experience itself. Their intention is provide a real space and sensitive guidance which combine to create a sheltered environment where a special experience becomes

71


Struck Blind

possible. Of course, anyone can blindfold themselves and seek encounters with total strangers; but relatively few of us actually do such things, because without an artistic framing, anyone who sought such an extreme and instructive experience would risk being ostracized, at least temporarily, as a social outcast. Art accordingly serves here as a legitimizing authority, occupying an extremely important position from which it can gain the trust of the event’s participants. And trust is indeed the buzzword in this situation. Not only do we participants “blindly trust” the performers: trust is also the pivotal point in our relationship with the temporarily blind person across the table from us, whom we likewise cannot see. How much trust are we willing to place in this unknown individual, whose unseen face offers us no clues about whether we are dealing with a trustworthy person? Our mutual trust or lack of trust determines how much we reveal to each other, whether our conversation remains superficial or ventures deeper, and whether the atmosphere is tense or relaxed. We tend to treat strangers with suspicion at first. And it is precisely the fact of not being able to see that complicates the situation here. A surefire breeding ground for anxiety is what we cannot see, but know is there – or what other people have told us is there. Exploiting this suspicion is a typical strategy of populists, who never tire of the black-and-white metaphor that incites xenophobia. Europe, which is currently ailing, is struggling with ever louder populist and nationalistic voices, and its citizens have lost their sense for politics. This is precisely where wirklich sehen begins: through its participatory character and its concentration on genuine encounters, the evening becomes, in a certain sense, a therapy session to heal social estrangement and overcome xenophobia. Jana, a 37-year-old actress from Slovakia, was one of my “blind dates” on this remarkable Friday evening. Soon after taking her seat at the table and introducing herself, she reached for my hands, with neither hesitation nor unnecessary shyness, and found them to be ice-cold, in large part because of my nervousness. Our physical encounter proved to be a stroke of good luck, because she had uncommonly warm hands. So we sat there holding hands for a while, laughing because of the peculiar circumstances and gradually getting to know each other through our senses, i.e. hearing and touch. Although the course of our conversation revealed that each of us had imagined a totally absurd and inaccurate picture of the other, this did not lead to a loss of confidence. Just the opposite, in fact: the substance and depth of our encounter grew progressively greater. The participants in this project feel its value in two ways. First, there’s the honest confrontation with oneself that happens while blindfolded, when questions inevitably arise about one’s willingness to give up seeing,

72


Lisa Haselbauer

one’s fear of sightlessness and whether this anxiety can be overcome. Second, and this is the central element, there’s the encounter with another individual, whom we can perceive only with our remaining senses in this “unforeseeable” situation. Social perception is the process by which we appraise other people. An essential factor is the feeling of likeability that even a brief encounter can spark. Likeability largely depends on how physically attractive the other person appears to us. But we immediately confront the primary difficulty in wirklich sehen. Now we can no longer judge the other person on the basis of physical attributes that we cannot see and neither can we rely on nonverbal clues such as eye contact, facial expressions and gestures. What remains are paralinguistic and proxemic signs. We are obliged to rely on them in order to infer, for example, that the other person is smiling, and our sense of touch must replace eye contact as a psychological component of paramount importance. That we nonetheless find a person likeable whom we meet without being able to see, and that we are perhaps even quicker to bestow this positive appraisal on them, is due to the fact that the true character of an individual cannot be fairly assessed on the basis of their outward appearance. Their degree of physical attractiveness contributes to our experiencing them as likeable, but it is only marginally related to their personality. When we are able to see them, we automatically perceive details and attribute traits to them on the basis of these perceptions because cues such as body size, skin colour, luxurious accessories and clothing facilitate our assessment process. Wirklich sehen evades these barriers, which mislead us into making prejudiced verdicts, by simply switching off the decisive organ, i.e. the eye. Jana and I spent most of the evening together. Contrary to my expectations, our encounter did not stop on a superficial level focused solely on perceptions. In less than an hour, we talked about our musical preferences and our greatest fears. But since we were both curious, we decided to adjourn our tête-à-tête and meet other people. As if fate had heard our promise to meet again after the performance as sighted persons, I was soon led outside to finish the evening by including passers-by in my sightless experience. Never before have I experienced a more peculiar feeling of loss than on this evening. We came from different cultures, were brought up under totally different circumstances, ten years of life experience lay between us, and we struggle with wholly dissimilar challenges in our daily lives. We were essentially total strangers, yet we encountered each other on a level that could make do perfectly well without being able to see at all. What was formerly deemed alien becomes a neutral unknown, a terra incognita to discover as curious explorers rather than as missionaries who arrive with prejudices and stereotypes. “Become political again” is either

73


Struck Blind

„wirklich sehen“ (Really see), katze und krieg. Photo: Cardinal Sessions

an unvoiced hope or an enthusiastic appeal, but above all it is the cornerstone on which we set up the equipment for our research. Could it be that making do without the sense of sight impels us to sharpen a different sense: namely, our political sense? In their hours of blindness, the participants become better acquainted with ideas that are increasingly losing significance but are essential for genuinely democratic politics, e.g. trust and confidence, participation and involvement. These are the concepts that ought to fill the methodological toolbox with which we begin our exploration of the unknown other. To borrow two buzzwords from Ulrike Guérot’s book Why Europe Should Be a Republic: neither the individual’s pursuit of happiness nor the blasé shrug of anything goes in the sense of everything is possible and nothing is obligatory is appropriate here. When we experience another individual without our eyesight, we sharpen our remaining, often neglected senses, including our political sense. And that is precisely what this project by katze und krieg is all about. This exercise helps us rediscover the political in us. As active participants, we learn how compassion functions and we swap our ego-based individualism for responsible and responsive togetherness. During this sojourn in sightlessness, external society is forgotten and a community based on trust and cooperation is restored. And the duty to get involved is inherent in community. Of course, “getting involved” might seem like uninvited rudeness, like poking one’s nose into other people’s business. Perhaps we should try to disburden “get-

74


Lisa Haselbauer

ting involved” of its negative connotations and see it in a new light, because “getting involved” has many synonyms which are free of pejorative undertones (e.g. mediating, contributing or assisting) and, perhaps most importantly, interceding rather than insisting. Being part of a community means being willing to get involved on each other’s behalf – because involvement is essential for cultivating contacts and sharing with others in our community. If we can change our view of “getting involved” so it can again mean looking after one another, caring for one another and participating in one another’s lives, then this consciousness can spread into a global context, where we discover that being political does not mean casting a ballot on election day, but cultivating a sense of community in which the social and the political are inseparable. Perhaps the question of the product of this performance was answered prematurely because the situation was viewed through the analytical eyes of a pragmatic, academically trained scholar of theatre. Why can’t content also be a product? And doesn’t content point beyond all material, tangible facts? katze und krieg catalyzes the creation of a caring connection between two former strangers. In this respect, wirklich sehen begins small. By relearning how to openly encounter people, by allowing voluntary sightlessness to prevent us from jumping to prejudiced conclusions, by overcoming our suspiciousness toward strangers and granting them an advance of trust, and by letting ourselves rediscover the familiar, we reveal and reinvigorate our stunted sense of the political.

Further literature: Cornwell, Terri Lynn: Democracy and the Arts: The Role of Participation. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1990.  Brown, Kathryn [Hg.]: Interactive Contemporary Art. Participation in Practice. London: I.B. Tauris & Co. Ltd., 2014. Uslaner, Eric M.: “Trust as a Moral Value”. In: Castiglione, Dario/ Van Deth, Jan W./ Wolleb, Guglielmo [eds.]: The Handbook of Social Capital. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. 

75


Lisa Haselbauer

GESCHLAGEN MIT BLINDHEIT Zur Wiederentdeckung des politisch Sinnlichen

Es ist ein Freitagabend in einer Bar, irgendwo in München. Weder Schickeriaschuppen noch angesagte Hipsterkneipe, eher ein Ort, der sich in seiner Funktion des Zusammenführens selbst genügt. Musik wird gespielt und erzeugt zusammen mit dem lebhaften Stimmenteppich eine behagliche Atmosphäre. An den Tischen sitzen Leute, angeregt ins Gespräch mit dem Gegenüber vertieft. Ab und zu kommt jemand von der Bar vorbei und fragt, ob es noch Getränkewünsche gibt. Ich bin eine unter den Gästen und der Abend könnte normaler und entspannter nicht sein, bis ich zur Toilette muss. Ich zeige auf und bin auf die Hilfe einer Frau angewiesen, mich dort hinzuführen. Denn heute Abend bin ich blind, genau wie alle anderen Besucher der Bar. Die ungewöhnliche Situation ist das Werk von katze und krieg, dem Kölner Performance-Duo bestehend aus Julia Dick und katharinajej, das die Menschen bei seinem Projekt wirklich sehen dazu einlädt, sich für ein paar Stunden von ihrem Sehsinn zu verabschieden und ihre Umwelt, vor allem aber ihr Gegenüber, mit den verbleibenden Sinnen wahrzunehmen. Wie sie zueinanderfinden, ob sie überhaupt zueinanderfinden und wie es sich von dort entwickelt, das ist der experimentelle Anteil. Eine höchst partizipative Kunstform also, bei der die Frage nach dem eigentlichen Produkt auftaucht. Was ist das bei dieser Spielart? Gibt es überhaupt eines? Oder geht es vielleicht gar nicht um diesen recht ökonomisch geprägten Begriff? Die Gewohnheit lehrt uns, am Ende jedes künstlerischen Unternehmens etwas Greifbares, oder zumindest Sichtbares, zu erwarten. Skulpturen, ganze Ausstellungen, eine Inszenierung – zu irgendetwas muss die Arbeit im Vorfeld führen. Partizipative Kunstformen erarbeiten solche Dinge in einer Kooperation von Performern und Teilnehmenden, die je nach Projekt unterschiedlich lange andauern kann. Im Fall wirklich sehen sind das etwa zwei Stunden, die man mit unterschiedlichen Menschen verbringt, an deren Ende jedoch weder ein materielles noch transitorisches Objekt steht. Darin unterscheiden sich katze und krieg von anderen partizipativ arbeitenden Künstlern, denn bei ihnen steht die Erfahrung im Mittelpunkt. Es geht darum, durch die Bereitstellung eines realen Raums und sensible Anleitung einen Schutzraum zu generieren, in dem diese spezielle Erfah-

76


rung möglich wird. Denn natürlich ist niemand daran gehindert, sich die Augen zu verbinden und auf die Suche nach der Begegnung mit wildfremden Menschen zu machen. Nur tun das verhältnismäßig wenige, denn ohne künstlerische Rahmung wird jeder, der eine solche zugleich extreme und lehrreiche Erfahrung sucht, zumindest temporär zum gesellschaftlich Aussätzigen. Insofern agiert die Kunst hier als legitimierende Instanz, eine überaus wichtige Position, von der aus sie in der Lage ist, das Vertrauen der Partizipierenden zu gewinnen. Und Vertrauen ist in dieser Situation das Schlagwort: nicht nur gegenüber den Performern, es ist der Dreh- und Angelpunkt in der Beziehung zum blinden Gegenüber, das man selbst auch nicht in der Lage ist zu sehen. Wie viel Vertrauen schenkt man dieser fremden Person, deren unsichtbares Äußeres keinen Aufschluss darüber gibt, ob man es mit einem rechtschaffenen Charakter zu tun hat? Das entscheidet darüber, wie viel man einander preisgibt, ob das Gespräch an der Oberfläche bleibt oder in die Tiefe geht, ob die Atmosphäre eine angespannte oder gelassene ist. Fremden begegnen wir tendenziell mit Misstrauen, und gerade die Komponente des Nicht-Sehens scheint die Sache noch zu verkomplizieren. Ein guter Nährboden für Angst ist immer das, was wir nicht sehen können, von dem wir aber wissen, dass es da ist. Oder von dem uns gesagt wird, es sei da. Das Spiel mit dem Fremden ist bekanntermaßen eines der Fachgebiete des Populismus, der nicht müde wird, mittels blühender Schwarz-Weiß-Metaphorik die Angst vor Überfremdung in uns zu säen. Das derzeit kränkelnde Europa hat mit lauter werdenden populistischen wie nationalistischen Stimmen zu kämpfen, der Sinn für Politik ist seinen Bürgern abhanden gekommen. Und genau an diesem Punkt setzt wirklich sehen an: Durch seinen partizipativen Charakter und die Konzentration auf echte Begegnung wird der Abend in gewisser Weise zu einer Therapiesitzung gegen Entfremdung. An besagtem Freitagabend traf ich auf Jana, eine 37-jährige Schauspielerin aus der Slowakei. Während sie am Tisch Platz nahm und sich vorstellte, tastete sie ohne zu zögern und ohne unnötige Zurückhaltung nach meinen Händen, die nicht zuletzt aufgrund der Nervosität eiskalt waren. Das traf sich gut, denn sie hatte sehr warme Hände. So blieben wir eine Weile sitzen, lachten aufgrund der seltsamen Umstände und begannen, uns über unseren Hör- und Tastsinn kennenzulernen. Und obwohl sich im Verlauf des Gesprächs herausstellte, dass wir ein völlig abwegiges Bild vom jeweils anderen hatten, führte das nicht zu einem Vertrauensentzug. Im Gegenteil, die Begegnung gewann zunehmend an Substanz und wurde tiefgründiger. Der Mehrwert für die Partizipierenden dieses Projekts macht sich auf zweierlei Weise bemerkbar. Zunächst einmal ist es die ehrliche Auseinan-

77


Geschlagen mit Blindheit

dersetzung mit sich selbst, die währenddessen stattfindet, denn Fragen nach der Bereitschaft, das Sehen aufzugeben, nach der Angst davor und ob sich diese Angst bewältigen lässt, sind unausweichlich. Hinzu kommt – und das stellt das zentrale Element dar – die Beschäftigung mit einem anderen Individuum, welches nur mit den verbleibenden Sinnen in dieser ‚aussichtslosen‘ Situation wahrgenommen werden kann. Die soziale Wahrnehmung ist der Prozess, in dem wir andere Personen einschätzen. Ein wesentlicher Faktor dabei ist die Sympathie, die bereits durch eine flüchtige Begegnung entstehen kann und davon abhängt, wie physisch attraktiv uns die Zielperson erscheint. Hier aber liegt bereits das hauptsächliche Erschwernis, denn alle Attribute, die die Physis unseres Gegenübers betreffen, können in diesem Fall nicht zur Beurteilung herangezogen werden. Und auch aus dem non-verbalen Verhalten müssen Aspekte wie Blickkontakt, Mimik und Gestik ausgesondert werden. Was bleibt, sind paralinguistische und proxemische Zeichen. Durch sie muss ein Lächeln identifiziert, und der Blickkontakt, eine wichtige psychologische Komponente, muss durch Berührung ersetzt werden. Dass uns eine Person, der wir blind begegnen, nichtsdestotrotz sympathisch ist, wir vielleicht sogar schneller bereit sind, dieses Prädikat zu vergeben, hängt damit zusammen, dass der Charakter eines Menschen ohnehin nicht äußerlich erfassbar ist: Der Grad der physischen Attraktivität ist zwar verantwortlich für unser Sympathieempfinden, hängt aber nur in geringem Maße mit der Persönlichkeit eines Menschen zusammen. Wenn wir also sehen, nehmen wir automatisch Dinge wahr, auf die wir mit Zuschreibungen reagieren, weil sie uns den Einschätzungsprozess erleichtern – Körpergröße, Hautfarbe, Luxusartikel, Kleidung. wirklich sehen umgeht diese Barriere, die zu Vorurteilen verleitet, und schaltet das dafür entscheidende Organ einfach aus. Jana und ich hätten beinahe den gesamten Abend miteinander verbracht. Denn entgegen meiner Erwartung blieb die Begegnung nicht auf einem Level stehen, das sich ausschließlich auf die Wahrnehmung konzentrierte. Wir unterhielten uns in weniger als einer Stunde sowohl über musikalische Präferenzen als auch über unsere größten Ängste. Da wir aber beide neugierig waren, beschlossen wir einvernehmlich, noch andere Menschen zu treffen. Und als hätte das Schicksal unser Versprechen, uns nach Ende der Performance zu suchen und sehend zu begegnen, vernommen, wurde ich Minuten später nach draußen geführt, um den Abend unter Einbezug der Passanten dort zu beenden. Nie zuvor durchlebte ich ein seltsameres Gefühl von Verlust als an diesem Abend. Wir kamen aus unterschiedlichen Kulturen, wurden unter völlig anderen Bedingungen erzogen, zwischen uns lagen zehn Jahre Lebenserfahrung, und unser Kampf im Alltag bezieht sich auf verschiedene Dinge. Im Grunde waren wir völlig

78


Lisa Haselbauer

Fremde. Und trotzdem fanden wir auf einer Ebene zusammen, die ohne Sehen auskam. Was vormals als Fremdes beschrieben wurde, wird hier zum neutralen Unbekannten, zum Unerforschten, das auf neugierige Entdecker wartet, nicht auf Missionare, die mit Vorurteilen und Stereotypen hantieren. ‚Wieder politisch werden‘, das ist wahlweise stille Hoffnung oder überzeugter Appell, aber vor allem ist es der Grundstein, von dem aus wir unser Equipment zur Erforschung zusammenstellen müssen. Vielleicht bedeutet der Verzicht auf das Sehen die Ausprägung eines anderen Sinnes, nämlich des politischen. In den Stunden der Blindheit werden die Teilnehmenden mit Konzepten vertraut gemacht, die zunehmend an Bedeutung verlieren, die jedoch essenziell sind für echte demokratische Politik: (An)Vertrauen, Teilhabe, Mitmachen. Damit sollte der methodologische Werkzeugkasten gefüllt werden, mit dem ab sofort das Unbekannte untersucht wird. Um zwei Schlagworte aus Ulrike Guérots Publikation Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss! zu bemühen – individueller „pursuit of happiness“ und das der Egalheit entspringende „anything goes“ im Sinne des „Alles kann, nichts muss“ sind hier fehl am Platz. Wer seinen Gesprächspartner ohne Sicht erfährt, schärft die restlichen, vernachlässigten Sinne, auch den politischen. Denn nichts anderes ist dieses Projekt von katze und krieg: eine Übung zur Wiederentdeckung des Politischen in uns, wenn wir als aktiv Partizipierende lernen, wie Anteilnahme funktioniert und den Ego-Individualismus zugunsten eines verantwortlichen Miteinanders eintauschen. Für einen Moment ist die Gesellschaft vergessen, und es existiert wieder eine auf Vertrauen und Kooperation basierende Gemeinschaft. Was Gemeinschaft auch bedeutet, ist die Pflicht der Einmischung. Natürlich klingt ‚sich einmischen‘ nach Unhöflichkeit, nach jemandem, der ohne Manieren die Grenzen bis zur Übergriffigkeit strapaziert. Möglicherweise sollte versucht werden, dem Begriff die negative Konnotation zu nehmen und ihn in ein neues Licht zu rücken, denn ‚einmischen‘ verfügt über viele Synonyme jenseits des pejorativen Untertons, so zum Beispiel ‚dazwischengehen, beifügen, unternehmen‘, und vielleicht am wichtigsten ‚eingreifen‘, statt ‚übergreifen‘. In einer Gemeinschaft darf man sich einmischen, es ist sogar wesentlich, um den Kontakt und den Austausch miteinander zu halten. Wenn sich unser Eindruck dahingehend verändert, dass ‚sich einmischen‘ in Zukunft wieder aufeinander achtgeben, sich umeinander kümmern, am Leben anderer teilhaben bedeutet, dann strahlt dieses Bewusstsein in einen globalen Kontext ab, in dem wir feststellen, dass politisch sein nicht bedeutet, ein Kreuz am Wahltag zu setzen, sondern einen Gemeinschaftssinn zu entwickeln, in dem Soziales und Politik untrennbar miteinander verbunden sind. Vielleicht wurde die Frage nach dem Produkt dieser Performance

79


Geschlagen mit Blindheit

anfangs zu schnell – durch die analytischen Augen einer pragmatischen Theaterwissenschaftlerin – beantwortet. Kann denn ein Produkt nicht auch Inhalt sein? Und weist Inhalt nicht über alles Materielle hinaus? katze und krieg produzieren eine Bindung zwischen vormals Fremden. Insofern fängt wirklich sehen im Kleinen an. Indem wir lernen, Menschen erneut offen zu begegnen, durch die Blindheit gehindert an sofortiger Ablehnung, ihnen einen Vorschuss an Vertrauen zu gewähren und uns auf die Neuentdeckung von Altbekanntem einzulassen, legen wir unseren verkümmerten Sinn für das Politische wieder frei.

Weiterführende Literatur: Cornwell, Terri Lynn: Democracy and the arts: the role of participation, New York: Praeger Publishers, 1990. Brown, Kathryn [Ed.]: Interactive Contemporary Art. Participation in practice, London: I.B. Tauris & Co. Ltd., 2014. Uslaner, Eric M.: „Trust as a moral value“. In: Castiglione, Dario/ Van Deth, Jan W. / Wolleb, Guglielmo [Eds.]: The Handbook of Social Capital, New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

80


Klaudia Laś

FASTER, HIGHER, STRONGER Performance Pressure in the Independent Performing Arts

Do you feel overloaded and overwhelmed by the speed of the contemporary art world? Then join the IETM, the international network for contemporary performing arts! You’ll become a member of a global community of artists and art lovers.1 The network’s principal goal is to “advocate the value of the arts and culture in a changing world and empower performing arts professionals through access to international connections, knowledge and a dynamic forum for exchange”2. The IETM’s semiannual plenary sessions convene with circa 500 participants at changing locations in Europe. There are also numerous smaller meetings throughout the world. The community critically examines a wide of topics, does not shy away from critiquing itself, and commissions publications and research projects. Thanks to its sensitivity for the artists’ highly diverse professional and economic situations, the promotion of cooperation among international theatre professionals can remain the community’s primary goal. In the run-up to the meeting, a pre-meeting trip to the artists’ village of Moosach: culture in the countryside provided an opportunity to visit the Meta Theater and get to know the communal life of the artists and residents there. Although Axel Tangerding3 primarily focused on presenting the artistic history and current living situation of the local community, the subsequent discussions did not focus on creative activity and its social aspects, but principally explored questions related to the financing of such projects. It turned out that I was the only participant in the pre-meeting who was interested in further information about the Meta Theater’s artistic work. I felt the need to emphasize a problem and ask a (simple) question, which remains one of the most important ones for me: Why is nothing said in Poland about contact with Jerzy Grotowski, although he was so influential for the development of the Meta Theater? The IETM meeting focused on the difficulties that freelance performing artists face in their daily work. The Mentor Room4 event was especially important. After four participants had presented the problems, doubts and questions that they confront in their everyday work, groups were formed so we could familiarize ourselves with different perspectives on specific topics and cases. Each group consisted of one of the previous participants,

81


Faster, Higher, Stronger

“Rush hour”, Choreografie Ceren Oran. Photo: Christoph Gredler

two mentors and several listeners. The themes of these conversations were then summarized and presented to the other groups. The coaching sessions were intended to show the participants additional perspectives and enable them to gain a new perception of their own work in the contemporary art world: “They aim to create a more inclusive contemporary arts field by helping our members to diversify their organizations and work, and stimulating underrepresented performing arts professionals.”5 The diversity of themes and working methods among the participating artists and their projects was so great that it could scarcely be perceived in its entirety at the IETM meeting in Munich. The Mentor Room provided a good opportunity to make new contacts, learn from one another and share advice. Young artists weren’t the only ones who benefitted from this coaching: time-saving and goal-oriented working methods are also urgently needed nowadays in the performing arts. It is nearly impossible to get an overview of the vast quantity of offers and options that presently exist. Certain selective methods are therefore needed in order to preserve a degree of self-determination and to be able to express oneself freely. Due to this situation, the IETM programme designed to augment intensive conference days with a rich evening programme that sparked discussions on a broad spectrum of topics. The issue of artists’ personal and professional living situations was strongly evident in many of the performances. This existential aspect has become the primary theme of the artists’ work. The IETM’s evening programme featured a selection of the most important and most distinctive performances from German-speaking

82


Klaudia Laś

“Fight! Palast #membersonly”, Peng! Palast. Photo: Rob Lewis

countries and provided an important context for the topics discussed at the IETM meeting. Alongside new incentives for research, participation in these performances underscored the importance and significance of our mutual field of activity. Although it is impossible to provide a simple and unambiguous summary of the entire course of the meeting, the events were surely formed a productive starting point for further considerations and research. Two productions in particular exemplify a multilayered relationship of this sort: Fight! Palast #membersonly and Rush hour. The former takes a critical look at the supposed freedom and self-determination of Generation Y.6 This project is based on the biographies of the performers – their daily routines at work in low-paying part-time jobs and their experiences in kickboxing cellars or self-help groups. While watching, I asked myself whether I ought to laugh or cry. It became clear that everything nowadays revolves around performance: “just perform or else!”7 I am referring here to the book of the same name by Jon McKenzie: this categorical imperative can no longer be mastered and has gotten out of control in diverse facets of everyday life. The command to perform is much too excessive and ubiquitous. The sole decisive factor is either/or: either continue to function as demanded “or else” face the consequences. The performance showed the audience the three primary skills that make survival possible. The Swiss group PENG! Palast created its own fighting arena and got the audience involved in it. The performance began with two spectators painstakingly assembling a set of IKEA bookshelves, which they then brutally destroyed

83


Faster, Higher, Stronger

with a hammer soon afterwards. In the final part of the show, the audience took part in a basic survival course. Three groups were formed on stage, where audience members could acquire new skills and coalesce into communities with experts and individual course participants.8 Although weak connections characterize these communities, these links are paradoxically the more valuable ones, especially when it comes to promoting and spreading innovation.9 The survival lessons ended without a definitive culmination, thus intermingling fictional play and reality. The Rush hour performance by Ceren Oran was very moving and almost shocking, but this time not because of audience participation. Oran’s complex yet simply organized choreographic reflection on the concept of time is based on interactions among three actors and three treadmills. Together with the trio of performers and one musician, the audience could reflect on the way time is understood in contemporary art and also experience time’s effects at firsthand. What do time pressure and the breakneck pace of contemporary life mean for the individual human being? As the author Ceren Oran said: “Looking at the situation Europe’s currently in, especially with regards to the growing nationalism, the three performers become symbols of a destructive force originating in an exclusive concentration on the self.”10 The performance pressure that permeates contemporary society was presented on stage as a paradoxical phenomenon. The dramaturgy of this extremely body-oriented performance was closely linked to the human body and the psyche. At first, the three performers familiarized themselves with the treadmill in their own way; the whole process seemed alternately amusing, witty, aloof and disconcerting. Through one of the performer’s slogans and the pressure of competition, but also through the almost animalistic instincts and the need to fight, the initially playful atmosphere gradually morphed into tragic and deadly performance pressure. Although these performances provided exciting starting points for further discussions and research, they could not be intensively discussed and analyzed at the conference. The problems presented by Rush hour and FIGHT! Palast #membersonly directly concern the IETM’s members in their professional and private lives. We too are all victims of today’s ubiquitous time pressure. The events at the conference were surely not meant as “aesthetic relaxation”: these performances undoubtedly had wholly different intentions. The fact that the performances could not be discussed in detail is a regrettable but logical consequence of the lack of time. It should not be forgotten that the international meeting in Munich was organized to facilitate sharing, to strengthen and support one other and to enable freelance artists to live and work in a more secure situation over the

84


Klaudia Laś

long term. The conference aimed to enhance participants’ self-awareness and help them develop the skills they need. Above all, the ability to cope with current economic, political and institutional circumstances remains the primary objective for future meetings of the IETM. Optimizing individual self-management must be prioritized – because we hamsters, who run inside this spinning wheel, must perform with ever greater professionalism and efficiency.

1

Christopher Balme, Einführung, [in:] (Res publica Europa, Berlin 2019), p. 6.

2

IETM: What is IETM. https://www.ietm.org/en/about/what-is-ietm, last downloaded: 9 December 2018.

3

Axel Tangerding is artistic director of Meta Theater and one of the organizers of the IETM in Munich. See: IETM Munich 2018: Res publica Europa, programme brochure, pp. 94, 95.

4

See: Mentor room/ chambre des mentors, [in:] IETM Munich 2018: Res publica Europa, programme brochure, p. 67.

5

Ibid.

6

IETM programme, https://www.ietm.org/en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/ fight-palast-membersonly-peng-palast, last downloaded: 5 December 2018.

7

See: Jon McKenzie, Perform or Else: From Discipline to Performance, New York 2001. This remains one of the most influential publications in the discipline of Performance Studies in the new millennium.

8

See: Erika Fischer-Lichte, Ästhetik des Performativen, Frankfurt am Main 2014.

9

Christopher Balme, ibid.

10 https://www.ietm.org/en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/rush-hour-ceren-oran, last downloaded: 1 December 2018.

85


Klaudia Laś

SCHNELLER, HÖHER, STÄRKER Über den Leistungsdruck in den freien darstellenden Künsten

Sie fühlen sich überlastet und sind überfordert von der Geschwindigkeit der gegenwärtigen Kunstwelt? Dann werden Sie Mitglied des IETM, des Internationalen Netzwerks für zeitgenössische darstellende Künste! Hier sind Sie Teil einer globalen Gemeinschaft von Kunstschaffenden und daran Interessierten.1 Primäres Ziel des Netzwerks ist es, „[to] advocate the value of the arts and culture in a changing world and empower performing arts professionals through access to international connections, knowledge and a dynamic forum for exchange“2. Zweimal pro Jahr findet an wechselnden Orten in Europa die Plenarsitzung des Netzwerks mit rund 500 Teilnehmern statt, darüber hinaus gibt es zahlreiche kleinere Treffen auf der ganzen Welt. Die Community setzt sich kritisch mit einer Vielzahl von Themen auseinander, spart auch nicht mit Selbstkritik und gibt Publikationen und Forschungsprojekte in Auftrag. Dank einer Sensibilität für die stark divergierenden beruflichen wie ökonomischen Situationen der Künstler*innen kann die Förderung der Zusammenarbeit internationaler Theaterschaffender das Hauptziel der Gemeinschaft bleiben. Im Vorlauf des Treffens bestand während des Pre-meeting trip to the artists‘ village Moosach. Culture in the countryside die Möglichkeit, das dortige Meta Theater zu besichtigen sowie das gemeinschaftliche Leben der Künstler*innen und Bürger*innen vor Ort kennenzulernen. Zwar wurden besonders die künstlerische Geschichte und das heutige Zusammenleben der lokalen Gemeinschaft von Axel Tangerding3 vorgestellt, in den anschließenden Gesprächen und Diskussionen ging es dennoch nicht um die kreative Tätigkeit und ihre sozialen Aspekte, sondern in erster Linie um Fragen nach der Finanzierung solcher Projekte. Letztendlich war ich die einzige Teilnehmerin des pre-meetings, die an weiteren Informationen über die künstlerische Arbeit des Meta Theaters interessiert war. Ich muss das Problem betonen und die (einfache) Frage stellen, die für mich letztendlich eine der wichtigsten bleibt – warum wird in Polen nichts über den Kontakt mit Jerzy Grotowski gesagt, obwohl er für die Entwicklung des Meta Theaters so prägnant war? Während des IETM-Treffens standen die Schwierigkeiten im Fokus, denen freie darstellende Künstler*innen heute in ihrem Arbeitsalltag be-

86


gegnen. Von besonderer Bedeutung war dabei die Veranstaltung Mentor Room.4 Nachdem vier Teilnehmer hier die Probleme, Zweifel und Fragen vorgestellt hatten, mit denen sie sich während ihrer alltäglichen Arbeit konfrontiert sehen, wurden Gruppen gebildet, sodass die Möglichkeit bestand, unterschiedliche Perspektiven zu bestimmten Themen und Fällen kennenzulernen. Zu jeder Gruppe gehörten einer der zuvor berichtenden Teilnehmer*innen, zwei Mentor*innen sowie einige Zuhörer*innen. Die Themen der so zustande gekommenen Gespräche wurden anschließend zusammengefasst und den anderen Gruppen vorgestellt. Solche Coaching-Sessions sollen den Teilnehmenden weitere Perspektiven aufzeigen und ihnen eine neue Wahrnehmung der eigenen Arbeit in der gegenwärtigen Kunstwelt ermöglichen: ,,They aim to create a more inclusive contemporary arts field by helping our members to diversify their organisations and work, and stimulating underrepresented performing arts professionals […].“5 Die Vielfalt der Themen und Arbeitsweisen der teilnehmenden Künstler*innen und ihrer Projekte war so groß, dass sie während des IETM-Treffens in München kaum vollends wahrzunehmen war. Die Veranstaltung Mentor Room bot eine gute Gelegenheit, neue Kontakte zu knüpfen, voneinander zu lernen und sich gegenseitig zu beraten. Nicht nur junge Künstler*innen konnten von dieser Coaching-Session profitieren: Heutzutage sind zeitsparende und zielorientierte Arbeitsweisen auch im Bereich der darstellenden Künste von großer Notwendigkeit. Über die Menge an Angeboten und Möglichkeiten, die es gibt, ist kaum noch Überblick zu gewinnen. Bestimmte Auswahl-Methoden sind daher notwendig, um sich eine gewisse Selbstbestimmung zu erhalten und sich frei äußern zu können. Aufgrund dieser Situation wurde ein IETM-Programm gestaltet, das neben intensiven Konferenztagen ein reiches Abendprogramm bot, aus dem sich ein weites Feld an Gesprächsthemen ergab. Besonders das Thema der persönlichen und beruflichen Lebenssituation war in vielen Aufführungen präsent. Dieser existenzielle Aspekt ist zum Hauptthema der Künstlertätigkeit geworden. Das Abendprogramm des IETM bestand aus einer Auswahl der wichtigsten und markantesten Aufführungen des deutschsprachigen Raums und sorgte für den wichtigen Kontext der während des IETM-Treffens diskutierten Themen. Neben neuen Forschungsanreizen wurde man durch die Teilnahme an den Aufführungen an den Sinn und die Bedeutung des gemeinsamen Tätigkeitsbereichs erinnert. Zwar kann man kein einfaches, eindeutiges Resümee des gesamten Tagungsverlaufs ziehen, jedoch waren die Veranstaltungen ein produktiver Ausgangspunkt zu weiteren Überlegungen und Recherchen. Zwei Inszenierungen sprechen beispielhaft für ein solch vielschichtiges Verhältnis: Fight! Palast #membersonly und Rush hour. Erstere beschäftigt

87


Schneller, höher, stärker

sich kritisch mit der angeblichen Freiheit und Selbstbestimmung der Generation Y.6 Die Grundlage dieses Projekts bilden die Biografien der Performer*innen: tägliche Routinen und Erfahrungen in schlecht bezahlten Nebenjobs, Erfahrungen aus Kickboxing-Kellern und Selbsthilfegruppen. Beim Zusehen stellte ich mir die Frage, ob ich weinen oder lachen soll. Es wird deutlich, dass es heute nur noch um Leistung geht, „just perform or else …!“7 Ich knüpfe hier an das gleichnamige Buch von Jon McKenzie an: Dieser kategorische Imperativ lässt sich nicht mehr beherrschen, geriet außer Kontrolle in unterschiedlichen Hinsichten des gegenwärtigen Alltags. Dieser Leistungsbefehl ist einfach übermäßig präsent, entscheidend ist nur, ob man dranbleibt „or else“. Während dieser Performance lernte das Publikum die drei wichtigsten Fähigkeiten kennen, die uns das Überleben ermöglichen: Die Schweizer Gruppe PENG! Palast schafft ihre eigene Kampfarena, bindet die Zuschauer*innen mit ein. Am Anfang bauen zwei Zuschauer*innen mühsam ein IKEA-Regal zusammen, um es kurz danach mit einem Hammer brutal zu zerstören. Während des letzten Teils der Aufführung nahmen die Zuschauer*innen an einem Überlebensgrundkurs teil. In den drei Gruppen, die auf der Bühne gebildet wurden, hatten die Zuschauer*innen die Möglichkeit, sowohl neue Fähigkeiten zu erwerben als auch Gemeinschaften mit Experten und einzelnen Kursteilnehmer*innen8 zu bilden. Obwohl diese Gemeinschaften durch schwache Verbindungen gekennzeichnet sind, sind sie paradoxerweise die wertvolleren – insbesondere, wenn es darum geht, Innovationen und deren Verbreitung zu fördern.9 Diese Überlebenskurse bildeten ein offenes Ende – fiktives Spiel und Realität vermischten sich. Die Aufführung Rush hour von Ceren Oran war sehr bewegend, fast schockierend – diesmal nicht mehr aufgrund von Partizipation. Diese einerseits komplexe, andererseits einfach organisierte, choreografische Reflexion zum Zeitbegriff beruht auf der Interaktion zwischen drei Schauspieler*innen und drei Laufbändern. Gemeinsam mit den Performer*innen und einem einzelnen Musiker konnte das Publikum nicht nur über das Zeitverständnis in der zeitgenössischen Kunst nachdenken, sondern seine Auswirkungen auch hautnah erfahren. Was bedeuten der Zeitdruck und die extreme Lebensgeschwindigkeit für den einzelnen Menschen? Wie die Autorin Ceren Oran selbst sagte: „Looking at the situation Europe’s currently in, especially with regards to the growing nationalism, the three performers become symbols of a destructive force originating in an exclusive concentration on the self.“10 Der Leistungsdruck, von dem die Gesellschaft heute geprägt ist, wurde als paradoxes Phänomen dargestellt. Die Dramaturgie der extrem körperbetonten Performance war eng mit dem menschlichen Leib und der Psyche verbunden. Am Anfang haben sich alle drei Künstler*innen auf eigene Art und Weise mit dem Laufband bekannt

88


Klaudia Laś

gemacht, wobei der ganze Prozess lustig, witzig und abwechselnd sowohl distanziert als auch beängstigend wirkte. Durch die Schlagworte eines Performers und den Wettbewerbsdruck, aber auch die fast tierischen Instinkte und Kampfbedürfnisse, verwandelte sich die anfängliche Spielatmosphäre stufenweise in einen tragischen, tödlichen Leistungsdruck. Obwohl die Aufführungen einen spannenden Ausgangspunkt für weitere Diskussionen und Forschung bilden, konnten sie während der Konferenz nicht intensiv besprochen und gemeinsam analysiert werden. Die Problematik, die bei Rush hour und FIGHT! Palast #membersonly thematisiert wurde, betrifft die IETM-Mitglieder sowohl im beruflichen als auch privaten Alltag, auch wir alle sind Opfer des gegenwärtig überall präsenten Zeitdrucks. Die Veranstaltungen der Konferenz sollten sicher nicht der ‚ästhetischen Entspannung‘ dienen – die Aufführungen verfolgten mit Sicherheit ganz andere Ziele. Die Tatsache, dass nicht ausführlich über die künstlerischen Arbeiten gesprochen werden konnte, ist eine bedauerliche, aber logische Folge des Zeitmangels. Es sollte nicht vergessen werden, dass das internationale Treffen in München organisiert wurde, um einen Austausch zu ermöglichen, sich gegenseitig zu stärken und freien Künstler*innen auf diese Weise langfristig eine sicherere Lebens- und Arbeitssituation zu ermöglichen. Die Selbstwahrnehmung der Teilnehmenden sollte verbessert und benötigte Kompetenzen erarbeitet werden. Vor allem die Fähigkeit, mit den jeweils aktuellen wirtschaftlichen, politischen und institutionellen Umständen zurechtzukommen, bleibt Hauptziel auch für kommende IETM-Tagungen. Der Optimierung des individuellen Selbstmanagements muss Vorrang gegeben werden – immer professioneller und effektiver muss man sich in diesem exklusiven Hamsterrad drehen. 1

Christopher Balme: „Einführung“, [in:] (Res publica Europa, Berlin 2019), S. 12.

2

IETM: „What is IETM“, entn. www.ietm.org/en/about/what-is-ietm, letzter Zugriff: 09.12.2018.

3

Axel Tangerding ist artistic director des Meta Theaters, außerdem einer der Münchner IETM-Veranstalter. Siehe: IETM Munich 2018: Res publica Europa, Programmheft, S. 94, 95.

4

Siehe: Mentor room / chambre des mentors, [in:] IETM Munich 2018: Res publica Europa, Programmheft, S. 67.

5

Ibid.

6

IETM Programm, www.ietm.org/en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/fightpalast-membersonly-peng-palast, letzter Zugriff: 05.12.2018.

7

Siehe Jon McKenzie, Perform or else: From Discipline to Performance, New York 2001. Es handelt sich um eine nach wie vor prägende Publikation der Performance Studies im neuen Jahrtausend.

8

Siehe Erika Fischer-Lichte, Ästhetik des Performativen, Frankfurt am Main 2014.

9

Christopher Balme, ibid.

10 www.ietm.org/en/ietm-munich-plenary-meeting-2018/session/rush-hour-ceren-oran, letzter Zugriff: 01.12.2018.

89


Marion Geiger

FORTRESS EUROPE OR NETWORK OF CULTURES? Why Europe Can Learn from Hip-Hop

“Fort Europa My so called Utopia Where I can’t find no culture Feel the walls getting closer and closer and closer Right here in Fort Europa (Right here)” Looptroop, Fort Europa, 2008 The Swedish rappers describe their perception of the European Union in the lyrics quoted above. Europe as a fortress, sealed off from the outside world, was already perceptible years before the refugee crisis began. Looptroop’s criticism does not refer to border fences in a European Union whose internal frontiers were opened by the Schengen Agreement, but to the economic crisis which, according to Looptroop, results from national ideologies, liberalism and other causes. Moreover, the band characterizes European trade policy as exclusion within the European fortress. The Scandinavian rappers yearn for a stronger feeling of shared community and for a society in which people are not divided into winners and losers. They dream of a society in which everyone gets a slice of the European prosperity pie, a society based on appreciation and concern for one’s neighbours. Although this basic affirmation may seem somewhat naïve, it should not come as a surprise because it is an integral part of the values on that underlie and inform hip-hop culture. Hip-hop also represents the people who are excluded from mainstream society. On the surface, these are individuals with a migration background and so-called “people of colour”, as well as artists and creative lateral thinkers. Hip-hop is not based on hierarchical power structures, but on a transnational network. It is informative to take a closer look at hip-hop culture because it embodies an alternative model which, if applied to political processes, could well be worthy of imitation. Hip-hop already delivers the results of the demands that Ulrike Guérot articulates in her political utopia Why Europe Should Become a Republic, in which she envisions a more social, fairer and more humane Europe.

90


Among others, the buzzwords of contemporary critique are a Europe of banks, a Europe of industry and a Europe of business. In a nutshell, a Europe of winners, in which the rights of the ordinary citizens fall by the wayside. The poor are becoming poorer. The rich are growing wealthier. The opening of territorial borders is a bygone relic and nationalistic ideologies are on the rise. This is why Ulrike Guérot is developing the idea of the European Republic. The fundamental concept in this reorganization of Europe is transnationality, which is to be achieved through the abolition of nation-states and their sovereignty. On the one hand, the post-national structure not only applies to territorial reorganization, but also to the identity of the citizenry on the basis of cultural rather than national criteria. On the other hand, an inherent element of transnationality is democracy based on participation and equal rights for all Europeans. According to Guérot’s concept, this transnationality is accompanied by a post-national network structure that divorces itself from (patriarchal) hierarchies. Precisely this transnationality is already inscribed in hip-hop culture. Hip-hop crystallized in the melting pot of cultures. By tradition, hip-hop is a migrant culture that breaks free from racist enmity and discriminatory hatred. This is why hip-hop can exemplarily show the aforementioned components of identity, democracy and network structure.

“Because rap is my talent and my identity”1 Hip-hop is a paradigmatic example of a transnational or non-national identity: especially its beginnings in Germany in the 1980s were characterized by a global feeling of identity. “The performers understood themselves as part of a worldwide youth culture, as hip-hop cosmopolites who were not subject to national or ethnic barriers.”2 Hip-hop can accordingly create identity especially where cultural, national or family affiliation is lacking. For example, young people with migration backgrounds in the second and third generations, who can scarcely identify with their culture of origin anymore and who also cannot find a connection to German culture because institutional exclusion hinders them, can find their individual expression in hip-hop. This identity-forming function, which is frequently inherent in pop cultures, compensates for the deficiency and offers disadvantaged groups an alternative to majority society. They find a home in hip-hop and can define themselves as subjects without having to answer the question of whether they are Turkish or German. A gathering of like-minded people, which is embodied in hip-hop by the so-called “crew”, is tremendously important for an individual’s sense of identity. It creates a frame of reference. In it, the crew members expe-

91


Fortress Europe or Network of Cultures?

rience a sense of belonging, ease their anxieties and learn to present themselves with self-confidence. But the crew can do much more than connect an individual with friends from the street on the basis of a mutual interest. In diasporic circumstances, the crew often evolves into a kind of substitute family – because in most instances, children of guest workers and emigrants lack not only cultural ties, but also a family-based network. Also responsible for this high identification potential are the individual elements in which each person can find and live their talents. Hip-hop offers various disciplines that are freely selectable and reflected in rap, DJing, break dance and graffiti. Identification via a national language plays only a subordinate role in hip-hop. A German-speaking scene quickly developed in Germany and differs linguistically from its American model, but the reasons for its development lay initially in the knowledge that the crew’s members could communicate better in German. This is about “conscious rap”, which makes it possible to formulate criticisms of society and politics. Freundeskreis, on the other hand, is seeking a universal language that can be understood across national frontiers, and this is why Freundeskreis relies on Esperanto. The song of the same name emphasizes hip-hop’s multilingualism: Our lingo expresses the melting pot We bring you hip-hop sound reflecting the world … The philosophy: street poetry A lingua franca for all leftists and immigrants … Esperanto: eloquent definition: A quickly learnt lingo for understanding throughout the nation Based on Romansh, German, Yiddish, Slavic No language imperialism or privilege of the educated elite.3 Freundeskreis is no exception. Several languages repeatedly appear in many rap songs, where the multiple tongues symbolize the group’s cohesion, which functions via cultural criteria. The crews often include members of different nationalities, and this multinational constituency immediately sets limits to “language imperialism”.

“Give respect to break dancers, DJs and graffiti”4 Another building block of the European Republic proclaimed by Guérot & Co. is post-national democracy”5, which means that all citizens in Eu-

92


Marion Geiger

rope are equal before the law regardless of their nationality, income or social status. This accordingly calls for political and social equality with active participation in current events, which should ultimately lead to a transnational democracy. Hip-hop is based on precisely these same principles. The “laws” of hiphop are worldwide respect and tolerance, but also fairness and authenticity. In Immer das alte Lied, DavidPe from Main Concept describes the ideal image of the relevant laws and rules in hip-hop by juxtaposing hip-hop’s old and new schools: The old hands show the ropes to the newcomers, point the way without a halo floating over their heads, tolerant, we stick together, age can’t split us up, we’re not divided according to class or social status like in the Middle Ages, there’s no podium where some stand above others, and if they do, then because of their talent, not their age, that’s for sure.6 Equality before the law of respect occupies centre stage in the cultural hip-hop community. Anyone who presents a “real” artistic performance receives respect and recognition from their crew members. The battles in hip-hop, which are fueled by peaceable competitiveness, are fair and always obey the same rules. If you don’t like what’s being performed on stage, then you can simply climb up there and perform as persuasively as your talent allows. Participation in hip-hop culture is open for anyone who wants to take part in it. “Jams and battles are based on the dialogical calland-response principle, which creates an ongoing interaction between the DJ, the emcee, the b-boy and the audience.”7 This situation is the basis for a continual questioning of what deserves to be deemed authentic. The striving to outdo one another generates a positive friction which does not constitute a hostile battle, but forms the prerequisite for creating something new. The basis for what is “real” is created in the moment of encounter among the people who are actively involved in hip-hop. “If a rapper, a breaker, a piece or a track is judged positively and if its creator is respected as real, then the expression of respect by the individual is always a confirmation of the scene-specific code of norms, which in turn refers to the origin myth of authentic hip-hop among Black lower-class youths.”8 Hip-hop culture is democratized by this communal process, in which courageous

93


Fortress Europe or Network of Cultures?

attempts are made, miserable failures are suffered and impressive wins are celebrated.

“And you know what, you guys? I love this city!”9 The basic criteria of cultural practice in hip-hop develop in precisely this way and are not stipulated as norms by a handful of privileged individuals, so all members can identify equally with these principles, which are responsible for the tremendous success of hip-hop. The special character of the horizontal network, in contrast to the vertical hierarchical nation-state model, is clearly visible here. Within the network’s rhizomatic structure, hip-hop’s globally evolved values can manifest themselves in the local scene, which plays a decisive role in the quest for personal identity, participation and the empowering feeling of being able to influence one’s own circumstances. This is why the protagonists frequently emphasize their immediate surroundings within a narrow radius and often explicitly mention their hometown in their lyrics: “Beginner” loudly exclaims enthusiasm for Hamburg, “Blumentopf” praises Munich’s local beer, the members of “Massive Töne” ride around Stuttgart aboard “Yellow Blitz” underground trains and “Torch” reports directly from Heidelberg’s youth centre. The local allusions convey a feeling of solidarity and representation. Guérot sees the key to a new Europe in this concept. She is convinced that equal and autonomous regions can be governed with greater strength and efficiency than hierarchically organized nations.

Die Urbane – Eine HipHop-Partei “Die Urbane – Eine HipHop-Partei” (“The Urbanites – A Hip-Hop Party”) has been on the ballot in Germany’s federal elections since 2017. The party derives its extensive platform from the canon of values that inform and underlie hip-hop culture. In so doing, the party demonstrates how political hip-hop can be and how usable its concept is. The founding myth of hip-hop serves Die Urbane as a starting point for the party’s vision. Just as communities suffering discrimination in New York in the 1970s found wholly new and creative forms of expression to combat poverty and violence, Die Urbane wants to encounter politics with creativity and authenticity and to respond to the pressing problems of our day with nonviolent conflict resolution. Might hip-hop’s philosophy soon contribute toward shaping democracy in the German Bundestag? And if it can do that in Berlin, then why not in Brussels as well? Hip-hop culture shows what still remains for

94


Marion Geiger

Europe to accomplish. And it also demonstrates that abolishing the nation-state and overcoming the narrow limits of national thought are not coupled with loss or devaluation, but can achieve precisely the opposite.

1

Freundeskreis: “Erste Schritte”. In: Esperanto, Cologne. Four Music, 1999.

2

Loh, Hannes: “‘All die Brüder und Schwestern von gestern. 1985-1991: Globale Identität.” In: the same. / Verlan, Sascha: 35 Jahre HipHop in Deutschland, Höfen: Hannibal, 2015. p. 91. Loh also chronicles the further development in the 1990s, when rap reached the mass media and began to evolve from a “national and multicultural identity” to a “regional identity” around the turn of the millennium. A national identity can be traced to the reunification of East and West Germany and could be more effectively marketed than a multicultural identity. The connotations of the “regional identity” are not entirely positive: especially the Aggro Berlin label provided a platform for some performers who, by conveying contents that glorified violence or encouraged racism, made it clear that they did not want to integrate themselves into Germany’s predominant culture. National chauvinism has only recently begun to acquire greater relevance. These musicians no longer have anything in common with the founding generation of hip-hop culture. In the meantime, the project has to do with the marketing and commercial success of rap as a building block.

3

Freundeskreis: “Esperanto”. In: Esperanto, Cologne: Four Music, 1999.

4

Curse: “Zehn Rapgesetze.” In: Feuerwasser, Jive Records, 2000.

5

Guérot, Ulrike: Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss. Eine politische Utopie, Bonn: Dietz Verlag, 2016. p. 119.

6

Main Concept: “Immer das gleiche Lied”. In: Coole Scheiße. Munich: Move, 1994.

7

Klein, Gabriele: Is this real? Die Kultur des HipHop, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 2003. p. 45.

8

Ibid., p. 159.

9

Blumentopf: “Mein Block”.

95


Marion Geiger

FESTUNG EUROPA ODER NETZWERK DER KULTUREN? Warum Europa von HipHop lernen kann

“Fort Europa My so called Utopia Where I can’t find no culture Feel the walls getting closer and closer and closer Right here in Fort Europa (Right here)” Looptroop, Fort Europa, 2008 Was die schwedischen Rapper in obigem Zitat beschreiben, ist deren Wahrnehmung der Europäischen Union. Die Festung Europa, die sich nach außen hin abschottet, war schon Jahre vor der Flüchtlingskrise spürbar. Allerdings bezieht sich Looptroops Kritik nicht auf Grenzzäune in einer nach dem Schengen-Abkommen offenen Europäischen Union, sondern auf die Wirtschaftskrise, die Looptroop zufolge u. a. auf nationale Ideologien und Liberalismus zurückzuführen ist. Weiter bezeichnet die Band europäische Handelspolitik als Ausgrenzung innerhalb der Festung und sehnt sich nach einem stärkeren Miteinander und einer Gesellschaft, in der die Menschen nicht zu Siegern oder Verlierern gespalten werden. Sie träumen von einer Gemeinschaft, in der jeder ein Stück vom europäischen Wohlstandskuchen abbekommt und die auf Wertschätzung und Sorge um den Nächsten basiert. Diese Grundüberlegung, die zunächst ein wenig naiv erscheinen mag, darf dennoch nicht verwundern, da sie zum Wertekanon der HipHop-Kultur gehört. HipHop repräsentiert auch diejenigen, die in der Mehrheitsgesellschaft nicht vorkommen. Das sind vordergründig Menschen mit Migrationshintergrund und sogenannte People of Colour, außerdem auch Künstlerinnen und Künstler sowie kreative Querdenkerinnen und Querdenker. HipHop basiert nicht auf hierarchischen Machtverhältnissen, sondern auf einem transnationalen Netzwerk. Deshalb lohnt sich ein genauerer Blick auf die HipHop-Kultur, da sie der Europäischen Union ein Gegenmodell aufzeigt, das – auf politische Prozesse übertragen – nachahmenswert erscheinen könnte. HipHop liefert bereits die Resultate der Forderungen von Ulrike Guérot, die in ihrer politischen Utopie Warum Europa eine

96


Republik werden muss! ein Europa entwirft, wie es sozialer, gerechter und humaner sein könnte. Die Schlagworte der heutigen Kritik sind u. a. ein Europa der Banken, ein Europa der Industrie und ein Europa der Wirtschaft, kurzum ein Europa der Gewinner, in dem die Rechte der Bürgerinnen und Bürger auf der Strecke bleiben. Die Armen werden ärmer, die Reichen immer reicher, territoriale Grenzenlosigkeit war gestern, und nationalistisches Gedankengut hat Aufwind. Deshalb entwirft Ulrike Guérot die Idee der „Europäischen Republik“. Grundlegend an dieser Neuordnung Europas ist die Transnationalität, die über die Abschaffung der Nationalstaaten und deren Souveränität erreicht werden soll. Einerseits betrifft die postnationale Struktur nicht nur eine territoriale Neuordnung, sondern ebenso die Identität der Staatsbürgerinnen und Staatsbürger über kulturelle statt nationale Kriterien. Andererseits gehört zur Transnationalität eine Demokratie, die auf Partizipation und gleichen Rechten für alle Europäerinnen und Europäer beruht. Mit dieser Transnationalität nach Guérots Konzept geht eine nach-nationale Netzwerk-Struktur einher, die sich von (patriarchalischen) Hierarchien löst. Genau diese Transnationalität ist der HipHop-Kultur bereits eingeschrieben: HipHop hat sich aus dem Schmelztiegel der Kulturen gegründet. Es ist sozusagen qua Tradition eine Migrantenkultur, die über die Mittel der Kreativität aus rassistischer Feindschaft und diskriminierendem Hass ausbricht. Deshalb können genannte Elemente – Identität, Demokratie und Netzwerk-Struktur – exemplarisch an HipHop aufgezeigt werden.

„Denn Rap ist mein Talent und meine Identität“1 HipHop ist ein mustergültiges Beispiel für eine trans- bzw. nicht-nationale Identität: Gerade die Anfänge in Deutschland in den achtziger Jahren sind geprägt von einem globalen Identitätsgefühl. „Die Akteure selbst verstanden sich als Teil einer globalen Jugendkultur, als HipHop-Weltbürger, die weder nationalen noch ethnischen Schranken unterworfen waren.“2 So kann HipHop besonders da Identität stiften, wo kulturelle, nationale oder familiäre Zugehörigkeit fehlt. Beispielsweise erreichen Jugendliche mit Migrationshintergrund in zweiter und dritter Generation, die sich kaum mehr mit ihrer Herkunftskultur identifizieren können, aber auch zur deutschen Kultur keinen Bezug finden, da die institutionelle Ausgrenzung sie daran hindert, ihren individuellen Ausdruck im HipHop. Diese identitätsstiftende Funktion, die Popkulturen häufig innewohnt, gleicht das Defizit aus und bietet den benachteiligten Gruppen einen Gegenentwurf zur Mehrheitsgesellschaft. Sie finden eine Heimat im HipHop und können

97


Festung Europa oder Netzwerk der Kulturen?

sich als Subjekt definieren, ohne die Frage beantworten zu müssen, ob sie nun türkisch oder deutsch sind. Die Versammlung innerhalb von Gleichgesinnten, die durch die sog. Crew im HipHop verkörpert wird, ist für die persönliche Identifikation von großer Bedeutung. Sie schafft einen Bezugsrahmen, in dem sich die Mitglieder einander zugehörig fühlen, Ängste abbauen und selbstbewusst auftreten lernen. Die Crew kann aber weit mehr, als sich mit den Freunden aus der Straße über eine Gemeinsamkeit zu verbinden. Sie entwickelt sich in diasporalen Verhältnissen häufig zu einer Art Ersatzfamilie, da Gastarbeiterkindern und Emigranten in den meisten Fällen neben der kulturellen Anbindung auch das verwandtschaftliche Netzwerk fehlt. Für dieses hohe Identifikationspotenzial verantwortlich sind außerdem die einzelnen Elemente, in denen jeder seine Fähigkeiten finden sowie ausleben kann. HipHop bietet verschiedene Disziplinen, die sozusagen frei wählbar sind und sich in Rap, DJing, Breakdance und Graffiti niederschlagen. Identifikation über eine Nationalsprache spielt im HipHop nur eine untergeordnete Rolle. Zwar hat sich innerhalb kürzester Zeit in Deutschland eine deutschsprachige Szene ausgebildet, die sprachlich vom amerikanischen Vorbild abweicht. Doch die Gründe dafür liegen zunächst im Bewusstsein der besseren Verständigung. Hier geht es um „Conscious Rap“, der es ermöglicht, Kritik an Gesellschaft und Politik zu formulieren. Freundeskreis wiederum ist auf der Suche nach einer Universalsprache, die über die Nationen hinaus verständlich sein soll, und behilft sich mit Esperanto. Im gleichnamigen Lied wird die Vielsprachigkeit im HipHop betont: Unser Lingo ist der Ausdruck dieses Schmelztiegels Wir bring’n euch HipHop Sound, in dem sich die Welt spiegelt […] Die Philosophie: Street Poetry Ne Lingua Franca für alle Linken und Einwanderer […] Esperanto: eloquente Definition: Ein schnell erlernter Lingo zur Verständigung der Nation Basiert auf Romanisch, Deutsch, Jiddisch, Slawisch Kein Sprachimperialismus oder Privileg des Bildungsadels.3 Dabei ist Freundeskreis keine Ausnahme. In vielen Rapsongs tauchen immer wieder mehrere Sprachen auf, was den Zusammenhalt, der über kulturelle Kriterien funktioniert, symbolisiert. Häufig setzen sich die Crews auch aus Mitgliedern unterschiedlicher Nationalitäten zusammen, wodurch dem „Sprachimperialismus“ sogleich Grenzen gesetzt werden.

98


Marion Geiger

„Gib Respekt an die Breaker, die Djs und an Graffiti“4 Ein weiterer Baustein der Guérot’schen Republik ist die „postnationale Demokratie“5, die besagt, dass alle Bürgerinnen und Bürger in Europa unabhängig von Nationalitäten, Einkommen oder sozialem Status vor dem Gesetz gleich sind. Ihre Forderung besteht also in einer politischen und sozialen Gleichheit mit aktiver Teilhabe am Geschehen, was letztlich zu einer transnationalen Demokratie führen soll. HipHop basiert auf genau diesen Grundsätzen. Die Gesetze im HipHop lauten weltweit Respekt und Toleranz, aber auch Fairness und Authentizität. DavidPe von Main Concept beschreibt in Immer das alte Lied das Idealbild der relevanten Gesetze und Regeln im HipHop anhand der Gegenüberstellung der Alten und Neuen Schule: Die Alten weisen die Neuen ein, zeigen den Weg ohne ihren Heiligenschein, der über ihren Köpfen schwebt, tolerant halten wir zusammen, das Alter ist kein Spalter, keine ständische Gliederung, wie einst im Mittelalter, kein Podest, durch welches manche höher stehen als der Rest, und wenn dann, nur durch Können, nicht durch Alter, das steht fest.6 Die Gleichheit vor dem Gesetz des Respekts steht innerhalb der kulturellen HipHop-Gemeinschaft im Vordergrund. Wer eine künstlerische Leistung erbringt, erfährt dafür von seinen Crewmitgliedern Respekt und Anerkennung. Die Battles im HipHop, die von einer friedlichen Konkurrenz angetrieben werden, verlaufen fair und nach den immer gleichen Regeln. Wem nicht gefällt, was auf der Bühne dargeboten wird, der steigt einfach selbst hinauf und gibt sein Talent zum Besten. An der HipHop-Kultur kann jeder teilhaben, der teilhaben möchte. „Jams und Battles beruhen auf dem dialogischen Call-and-Response-Prinzip, das eine permanente Interaktion zwischen DJ, MC, B-Boy und dem Publikum herstellt.“7 Aus dieser Situation heraus wird kollektiv immer wieder neu hinterfragt, was als authentisch gilt. Im gegenseitigen Überbieten entsteht eine positive Reibung, die keinen feindlichen Kampf darstellt, sondern die Voraussetzung schafft, Neues zu kreieren. Erst durch das Aufeinandertreffen der HipHop-Aktiven entsteht die Basis für das, was „real“ ist. „Wenn ein Rapper oder Breaker, ein Piece oder ein Track positiv bewertet und dessen Produzent als real respektiert wird, dann liegt in der Respektbekundung des Einzelnen auch

99


Festung Europa oder Netzwerk der Kulturen?

immer eine Bestätigung des szene-spezifischen Normenkodex, die wiederum auf den Ursprungsmythos des authentischen HipHop schwarzer Unterschichtsjugendlicher rekurriert.“8 Dieser gemeinschaftliche Prozess, in dem mutig ausprobiert, kläglich gescheitert und imposant gewonnen wird, demokratisiert die HipHop-Kultur.

„Und Leute wisst ihr was? Ich lieb’ die Stadt!“9 Weil grundlegende Kriterien der kulturellen Praxis im HipHop auf genau diese Art und Weise entstehen und nicht von wenigen Privilegierten als Norm gesetzt werden, können sich alle Mitglieder gleichermaßen damit identifizieren, was für den großen Erfolg von HipHop verantwortlich ist. Hier wird der besondere Charakter des horizontalen Netzwerks im Gegensatz zum vertikalen, hierarchischen Nationalstaatsmodell sichtbar. Innerhalb der rhizomatischen Struktur des Netzwerks können sich die global gewachsenen Werte in der lokalen Szene manifestieren. Letztere spielt bei der Identitätsfindung, bei Partizipation und dem Gefühl, Einfluss auf die eigenen Lebensumstände zu haben, eine entscheidende Rolle. Deshalb betonen die Protagonisten häufig ihr unmittelbares Umfeld im kleinen Radius und verweisen in den Songtexten oftmals auf die Heimatstadt. Schwärmen die Beginner von Hamburg, preist Blumentopf heimisches Bier aus München, die Massiven Töne fahren mit dem „gelben Blitz“ durch Stuttgart, und Torch berichtet direkt aus dem Heidelberger Jugendhaus. Die regionale Verortung vermittelt ein Gefühl der Verbundenheit und Repräsentanz. In diesem Konzept sieht Guérot den Schlüssel für ein neues Europa. Sie ist davon überzeugt, dass gleichberechtigte und autonome Regionen stärker und effizienter regiert werden können, als hierarchisch organisierte Nationen.

Die Urbane – Eine HipHop-Partei Seit 2017 nimmt Die Urbane – Eine HipHop-Partei an der Bundestagswahl teil. Sie beruft sich auf den Wertekanon der HipHop-Kultur und baut darauf ein umfangreiches Parteiprogramm auf. Die Partei verdeutlicht damit, wie sehr HipHop politisch sein kann und wie verwertbar sein Konzept ist. Der Gründungsmythos von HipHop dient der Vision als Ausgangspunkt. So wie die diskriminierten Communitys im New York der siebziger Jahre völlig neue und kreative Ausdruckformen gefunden haben, um Armut und Gewalt zu bekämpfen, so möchte Die Urbane der Politik mit Kreativität und Authentizität begegnen und mit einer gewaltfreien Konfliktbewältigung auf die drängenden Probleme der Zeit reagieren.

100


Marion Geiger

Mit HipHop im Gepäck lässt sich also vielleicht bald schon Demokratie im Bundestag aktiv gestalten. Warum nicht auch in Brüssel? Die HipHop-Kultur zeigt, was Europa noch schaffen muss. Und sie zeigt, dass die Abschaffung der Nationalstaaten, das Lösen von nationalem Denken, nicht mit Verlust oder Abwertung gekoppelt ist, sondern genau das Gegenteil bewirken kann.

1

Freundeskreis: „Erste Schritte“, in: Ders.: Esperanto, Köln: Four Music, 1999.

2

Hannes Loh: „All die Brüder und Schwestern von gestern. 1985–1991: Globale Identität“, in: Ders. / Sascha Verlan: 35 Jahre HipHop in Deutschland, Höfen 2015, S. 91. Loh führt auch die weitere Entwicklung in den neunziger Jahren aus, als Rap die Massenmedien erreichte und sich eine „nationale und multikulturelle Identität“ hin zu einer „regionalen Identität“ zur Jahrtausendwende abzeichnet. Eine nationale Identität kann auf die deutsch-deutsche Wiedervereinigung zurückgeführt werden und war besser zu vermarkten als eine multikulturelle. Die „regionale Identität“ ist hier nur bedingt positiv besetzt: Vor allem mit dem Label Aggro Berlin treten Protagonisten zutage, die mit gewaltverherrlichenden und rassistischen Inhalten vermitteln, dass sie sich nicht in die deutsche Leitkultur integrieren möchten. Erst jetzt gewinnt Nationalchauvinismus an Relevanz. Mit der Gründergeneration der HipHop-Kultur haben diese Musiker nichts mehr gemein. Inzwischen geht es um Vermarktung und kommerziellen Erfolg des Bausteins Rap.

3

Freundeskreis: „Esperanto“, in: Ders.: Esperanto, Köln: Four Music, 1999.

4

Curse: „Zehn Rapgesetze“, in: Ders.: Feuerwasser, Jive Records, 2000.

5

Ulrike Guérot: Warum Europa eine Republik werden muss! Eine politische Utopie, Bonn 2016. S. 119.

6

Main Concept: „Immer das gleiche Lied“, in: Ders.: Coole Scheiße, München: Move, 1994.

7

Gabriele Klein: Is this real? Die Kultur des HipHop, Frankfurt am Main 2003, S. 45.

8

Ebd., S. 159.

9

Blumentopf: „Mein Block“.

101


Ursula Maier

POSTCOLONIAL MINEFIELDS The Example of Shit Island

“The story of Nauru could be fictitious, like a parable or a fable. Unfortunately, it is not.”1 Post-colonialism is an omnipresent theme at international theatre meetings and symposia. Especially in the independent theatre scene, the complex issues associated with post-colonialism are represented in numerous productions, whether on stage or in reports about the institutional framework conditions for the productions. For the latter, the neo-colonial infrastructure is a representative example: to attend meetings within the continent of Africa, and likewise in South and Central America, it is usually much cheaper and quicker to fly via Europe or the USA/Canada. For example, in the Postcolonial Minefield panel discussion, Ramiro Noriega recounted how the infrastructure of international air transportation inserted an obligatory stopover in Miami into his trip from Quito to Buenos Aires. Sophie Becker, one of the two artistic directors of the Spielart international theatre festival (which focused on post-colonialism in 2017), told a similar story about preparations for the festival’s previous edition. A meeting was expressly scheduled in Durban, i.e. on the African continent, so all participants would meet as peers rather than putting the Europeans in the role of donors whom the African participants must visit as supplicants. But it turned out that this well-meaning approach obliged many African participants to travel to African destinations via European stopovers, i.e. through their former colonizers’ countries. Postcolonial minefields were the theme of several panel discussions at the IETM meeting, first and foremost the homonymous Postcolonial Minefields panel and, for example, Next Steps – Learning from Exchanges as well as “Talks of the Day” such as They Called Me an Artist and Eurocentrism is the New Colonial. Performances such as Shit Island likewise explored this problem and raised issues that were afterwards discussed in the panels. The Shit Island production by the Cologne-based independent group Futur3, which was nominated for the Cologne Theatre Prize in 2018, is practically a textbook example of the diversity of the problems associated

102


“Shit Island”, Futur3. Photo: Meyer Originals, www.meyeroriginals.com

103


Postcolonial Minefields

with post-colonialism. The production deals with the colonial and postcolonial history of Nauru, an island in the South Pacific, and thus ventures onto nearly every “postcolonial minefield” discussed in the homonymous panel. Although Nauru is surely a special case in colonial history, it is nevertheless exemplary for the problem in many respects. Nauru is a special case because bird droppings that accumulated on this veritable shit island four million years ago transformed into rich deposits of phosphate, the mining of which brought incredible prosperity to the island. Nauru was the world’s wealthiest country several times during the 1970s. Nauru is exemplary because, due to the natural resource phosphate, the island became a contested prize for the colonial powers of Germany, France and Australia, a fate that Nauru shared with many other South Pacific islands. Like many former colonies, Nauru suffered ruthless ecological exploitation. Contemporary Nauru resembles a lunar landscape that raises many questions about the shortcomings of non-sustainable development. After decades of litigation, Nauru finally won its independence on 31 January 1968. At that time, circa 4,000 people inhabited its 21 square kilometres of surface area, which make it the world’s third-smallest independent nation.

Aesthetics and Representation The performance by Futur3 begins in darkness. The spectators are seated in a semicircle, in close contact with researchers, where they hear cliché-like sounds and inhale aromas that have been associated with the South Seas since the days of the so-called “human zoos” in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The staging, which is based on Georg Forster’s Entdeckungsreise nach Tahiti und in die Südsee 1772–1775 [Voyage of Discovery to Tahiti and in the South Sea 1772–1775], shows how the foundations of colonial attitudes toward the South Seas were already laid in the 18th century. The performers, all of whom are German, deliberately refrain from portraying indigenous islanders and remain consciously with the Eurocentric view of the island, which began with early travellers’ reports and which project attributes and images derived from “human zoos”. Performed in dim light and with strong musical accompaniment, the first part of the event is reminiscent of a radio play format. The “scientific” view of the people of Nauru begins with a change of location and a change in the arrangement of the audience so the spectators now observe events from a much more distanced perspective. In the brightly lit room, Nauru is judged by European standards, which are symbolized by measuring the islanders with a protractor. Parameters associated with the European mode of thought determine how the island is perceived.

104


Ursula Maier

“Shit Island”, Futur3. Photo: Meyer Originals, www.meyeroriginals.com

The radio station 166.9, which hosts discussions with various guests, serves as a frame for the second part of the performance. The guests introduce the various phases of Nauru’s history, which are then portrayed on stage. These include an online chat and a Skype interview, as well as a distorting mirror to visualize the problem of diabetes that resulted from the years of prosperity. Nauru’s ecological plight is represented in the middle of the stage, where a small heap of sand with a wide ring road and a remote-controlled toy excavator symbolize technology and the destructive colonial infrastructure. “Nauru lies halfway round the globe, but is nonetheless a crossroads for developments that occur on our planet wherever wealth and catastrophes converge … an open-air laboratory.”2 To address the question of how to deal with criticism of the policies that prevailed during Nauru’s prosperous decades, Futur3 presents reflection and alienation in the guise of two tourists chatting about their stay on the island. They talk about Nauru as a lost paradise in the South Sea, as an island that is now unattractive because it underwent exploitation and non-sustainable use. There was no ecological concept for the time when phosphate mining would no longer be possible. A court order in 1993 obliged Australia to pay for the restoration of the island’s habitat,3 but the people of Nauru used the funds from Australia to purchase new technology rather than to buy fresh humus and finance the restoration of the natural environment of their exploited homeland.4 Their decision seems all

105


Postcolonial Minefields

the more questionable because they took it just one year after Agenda 21 had been declared at the UNCED conference on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. But, then again, who among us has the right to criticize the Nauru people? These two tourists are not random Westerners, but Swiss visitors, whose nationality can be inferred from their dialect – a kind of Brechtian estrangement. They are supposed to thematize the issue here through their linguistic distance to the problem: Switzerland is regarded the epitome of a neutral and independent nation, but also as a country that is preoccupied with itself and sets itself aloofly apart from all others. Unlike many other European states, Switzerland was never a colonial power and was not integrated in colonial structures. But as a non-EU country, Switzerland is neither obliged to identify with this European colonial heritage nor to grapple with it via potential communal ideas. If the chatting tourists had been citizens of a former European colonial power, they would either be identified with the colonizing nation or cast blame upon it; but the two Swiss women are experienced as playing a messenger-like role. These tourists are not only Swiss but also female – women did not participate in colonial journeys until the mid-19th century – so they can speak derogatorily about the Nauru people’s inability to maintain their economic prosperity, which at times made this island into the world’s most prosperous republic and which the local population subsequently squandered. These two women were never among the “perpetrators” – their nationality and gender put them beyond this suspicion.5 Shit Island combines inherently dissimilar aesthetics. These are intended to confront viewers with the fact that, although they approach colonies and former colonized regions with different intentions at different times, their view remains the European and Eurocentric perspective. The intention to intervene always serves one’s own advantage.

Art = Culture? Europeans’ postcolonial reappraisal of colonialism is one of the largest postcolonial “minefields”. This topic was not examined in Shit Island, but it was a subject for the homonymous panel. Ramiro Noriega, an Ecuadorian artist from the Universidad de las Artes in Quito, describes the problems inherent in the system with the danger of disappearance. To make the mistake here on my part: as Ramzi Maqdisi from Palestine complained in his “Talk of the Day” They Call Me an Artist, he is not called “an artist” first and foremost, but a “Palestinian artist” and, like most artists, he wants this order to be reversed. He is an artist, regardless of his national origin. Art is not national. A labelling of this kind relativizes art and reduces the

106


Ursula Maier

artist to a keeper of the “national heritage”. However, such labels can be advantageous when applying for grants. Old colonial structures once again serve as the framework for thought in the effort to preserve or revive cultural assets that were often destroyed by colonial masters in the past, a project which often occurs in UNESCO’s immaterial cultural heritage. Ramiro Noriega describes this as fading and disappearing. A contemporary art scene has no chance to flourish because it is subjugated to heritage and the perspective of heritage. This perspective manifests itself in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and is rarely reflected upon. The European view of art typically focuses on the formation of traditional lineages, i.e. the personal canon from which an artist develops (or has developed) and which embodies national or at least regional heritage. The assumed equivalence of the terms “art” and “culture” is evident in European laws and guidelines, where it reveals the serious problem inherent in this conflation. Article 167 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union states: “(1) The Union shall contribute to the flourishing of the cultures of the Member States, while respecting their national and regional diversity and simultaneously emphasizing the common cultural heritage.” This definition does not make national heritage and art wholly identical, but it supports this perspective and also has a strong normative effect as a law. Article 27(1) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 10 December 1948 states: “Every person has the right to participate freely in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to participate in scientific progress and its benefits.” The declaration distinguishes between art and cultural life, but only passively formulates the human right with regard to art. That Ramiro Noriega is not alone, but describes feelings shared by many artists the world over, was evident at this well-attended panel in the responses of the participants, many of whom thanked Noriega for focusing attention on this topic. Postcolonial minefields are diverse and can only be thematized selectively and repeatedly. The Shit Island production successfully revealed a thought-provoking and entertaining spectrum of themes which enriched many panel discussions and which, unlike the non-sustainable exploitation inflicted upon the island of Nauru, can be expected to have a long-lasting and sustainable effect. It is to be hoped that this will also exert a structural effect on the independent theatre scene in erstwhile colonies and on the mode of thought in former colonial powers.

107


Postcolonial Minefields

Sources Anghie, Anthony: Certain Phosphate Lands in Nauru. In: The American Journal of International Law, Cambridge University Press Vol. 87, No. 2 (Apr., 1993), pp. 282–288. Folliet, Luc: Nauru. Die verwüstete Insel. Wie der Kapitalismus das reichste Land der Erde zerstörte, Berlin, 2011. Forster, Georg: Entdeckungsreise nach Tahiti und in die Südsee 1772–1775, Belle Époque Verlag, Tübingen, 2015. Futur3: Shit Island – Ein postkolonialer Südsee-Traum. [programme brochure], 2018. Harley I. Manner, Randolph R. Thaman and David C. Hassall: “Phosphate Mining Induced Vegetation Changes on Nauru Island.” In: Ecology, Wiley on behalf of the Ecological Society of America, Vol. 65, No. 5 (October 1984), pp. 1454–1465. International Legal Materials: “Australia – Republic of Nauru: Settlement of the case in the international court of justice concerning certain phosphate Lands in Nauru.” In: International Legal Materials, Cambridge University Press, Vol. 32, No. 6 (November 1993), pp. 1471–1479.

1

Luc Folliet: Nauru. Die verwüstete Insel. Wie der Kapitalismus das reichste Land der Erde zerstörte. Berlin, 2011, p. 9.

2

Ibid.

3

International Legal Materials (1993): Australia – Republic of Nauru: Settlement of the case in the international court of justice concerning certain phosphate Lands in Nauru. International Legal Materials, Cambridge University Press, Vol. 32, No. 6 (November 1993), pp. 1471–1479.

4

Anthony Anghie (1993): “Certain Phosphate Lands in Nauru.” In: The American Journal of International Law, Cambridge University Press Vol. 87, No. 2 (April 1993), pp. 282–288.

5

Ramzi Maqdisi’s theme in the “Talk of the Day” They Call Me an Artist was “Who has the right to talk about whom in the form of art and also, as here, within an artform?”.

108


Ursula Maier

POSTKOLONIALE MINENFELDER AM BEISPIEL VON SHIT ISLAND

„Die Geschichte Naurus könnte frei erfunden sein, wie ein Gleichnis oder eine Fabel. Leider ist dem nicht so.“1 Postkolonialismus ist auf internationalen Theatertreffen und Symposien ein omnipräsentes Thema. Insbesondere in der freien Szene sind die damit verbundenen Themenkomplexe in zahlreichen Produktionen vertreten, sei es auf der Bühne oder in Berichten über die institutionellen Rahmenbedingungen für die Produktionen. Für Letzteres ist die neokoloniale Infrastruktur ein repräsentatives Beispiel: Zu Treffen innerhalb des Kontinents in Afrika bzw. Süd- und Mittelamerika ist die Anreise mit Flugverbindungen über Europa bzw. USA/Kanada in der Regel sehr viel günstiger und schneller. Ramiro Noriega beschrieb im Panel Postcolonial minefield als Beispiel eine Reise von Quito nach Buenos Aires mit infrastrukturell erzwungener Zwischenstation Miami. Aber auch Sophie Becker, eine der beiden künstlerischen Leiter des internationalen Theaterfestivals SPIELART, das 2017 Postkolonialismus in den Fokus rückte, berichtete darüber bei den Vorbereitungen zur letzten Ausgabe. Dabei wurde ein Treffen extra in Durban angesetzt, also auf dem afrikanischen Kontinent, um auf Augenhöhe zu sein und nicht bei europäischen Geldgebern vorstellig werden zu müssen. Tatsächlich zwang dieses Vorgehen aber viele afrikanische Teilnehmer zur Anreise über Europa, also über die Länder der ehemaligen Kolonialherren. Beim IETM-Meeting zog sich die Thematik „postkolonialer Minenfelder“ durch verschiedene Panels, allen voran im gleichlautenden Postcolonial Minefields, aber zum Beispiel auch in Next Steps – learning from Exchanges und in den Talks of the day wie z. B. They called me an artist oder Eurocentrism is the new colonial. Auch Inszenierungen wie beispielsweise Shit Island griffen die Problematik auf und strahlten wiederum in die Panels aus. Geradezu ein Lehrbuchbeispiel für die Vielfältigkeit der mit Postkolonialismus verbundenen Problematik ist die Produktion Shit Island der

109


Postkoloniale Minenfelder am Beispiel von Shit Island

Kölner freien Gruppe Futur3, die 2018 für den Kölner Theaterpreis nominiert wurde. Die Produktion thematisiert die koloniale und postkoloniale Geschichte der südpazifischen Insel Nauru und streift dabei nahezu jedes „postcolonial minefield“, das im gleichlautenden Panel eröffnet wurde. Nauru stellt in der Kolonialgeschichte sicher einen Sonderfall dar – und ist trotzdem in vielerlei Hinsicht exemplarisch für die Problematik. Ein Sonderfall, da es durch dort vor vier Millionen Jahren angelagerten Vogelkot (ein wahres shit island), der inzwischen zu Phosphat wurde, zu unglaublichem Wohlstand kam. Nauru war in den siebziger Jahren zeitweise das reichste Land der Welt. Exemplarisch, weil es aufgrund der Ressource Phosphat auch zum Spielball der Kolonialmächte Deutschland, Frankreich und Australien wurde, ein Schicksal, das Nauru mit vielen anderen südpazifischen Inseln teilte. Und wie viele ehemalige Kolonien wurde auch Nauru ökologisch ausgebeutet. Es existiert heute in einer Art Mondlandschaft und wirft viele Fragen zu verfehlter nachhaltiger Entwicklung auf. Nauru erstritt sich in jahrzehntelangem Rechtsstreit zum 31. Januar 1968 die Unabhängigkeit. Mit damals 4000 Einwohnern und ca. 21 km² Fläche ist es der drittkleinste Staat der Welt.

Ästhetik und Repräsentation Im ersten Teil der Aufführung sitzt der Zuschauer im Dunklen im Halbkreis auf Tuchfühlung mit den Forschern und erlebt klischeehaft Klänge und Gerüche, die seit den Tagen der Völkerschauen des 19. und beginnenden 20. Jahrhunderts mit der Südsee assoziiert wurden. Ausgehend von Georg Forsters Entdeckungsreise nach Tahiti und in die Südsee 1772–1775 wird gezeigt, wie bereits im 18. Jahrhundert die Wurzeln kolonialer Perspektiven auf die Südsee gelegt werden. Dabei verzichten die allesamt deutschen Performer bewusst auf Darstellungen der indigenen Bevölkerung und bleiben bei der eurozentristischen Perspektive auf die Insel, die von den Reiseberichten angefangen auch Attribute und Bilder projiziert, die aus Völkerschauen generiert wurden. Im Dämmerlicht mit starker musikalischer Untermalung vorgetragen, erinnert der erste Teil an ein Hörspielformat. Mit einem Ortswechsel und einer veränderten Zuschaueranordnung, bei der der Zuschauer nun viel distanzierter auf das Geschehen blickt, beginnt der „wissenschaftliche“ Blick auf die Nauruer. Im hell erleuchteten Raum werden die europäischen Messlatten angelegt, bildlich umgesetzt in der Vermessung der Menschen mittels eines Geodreiecks. Parameter der europäischen Denkweise bestimmen die Wahrnehmung der Insel.

110


Ursula Maier

Als Klammer dient dem zweiten Teil der Radiosender 166.9, der unterschiedliche Gesprächspartner zu Gast hat. Diese führen in die verschiedenen Stationen der Nauruer Geschichte ein, die dann szenisch dargestellt werden. Dabei gibt es einen Online-Chat genauso wie ein Skype-Interview, aber auch Zerrspiegel, um die Diabetesproblematik als Folge der Überflussjahre zu zeigen. In der Mitte der Bühne wird an einem kleinen Sandhaufen der ökologische Zustand Naurus repräsentiert, inklusive einer breiten Ringautobahn und eines ferngesteuerten Spielzeugbaggers als Symbol für die destruktive koloniale Infrastruktur und Technik. „Nauru liegt auf der anderen Seite des Erdballs und ist dennoch der Schnittpunkt für Entwicklungen unserer Welt, an dem Reichtümer und Katastrophen zusammenlaufen. […] Ein Labor unter freiem Himmel.“2 Der Frage, wie man mit Kritik an der Politik der reichen Jahrzehnte Naurus umgehen soll, begegnet Futur3 mit Spiegelung und Verfremdung durch ein Touristinnen-Paar, das sich über ihren Aufenthalt auf der Insel Nauru unterhält. Sie sprechen über das heute unattraktive ehemalige Südseeparadies Nauru, weil es ausgebeutet und nicht etwa nachhaltig genutzt wurde. Es gab kein ökologisches Konzept für die Zeit, wenn der Phosphatabbau nicht mehr möglich ist. 1993 wurde Australien zur Wiederherstellung des Lebensraums gerichtlich verurteilt.3 Die Nauruer verwendeten das Geld aber sehr bald für neue Technik, anstatt die ausgebeutete Insel durch Humusaufschüttungen zu renaturieren.4 Das war ein Jahr nach der Konferenz der UNCED von Rio de Janeiro 1992 zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung mit der Agenda 21 umso fragwürdiger. Aber wer ist hier berechtigt, die Nauruer zu kritisieren? Es sind nicht beliebige Touristen, sondern am Dialekt erkennbare Schweizerinnen. Eine Art Brecht’scher V-Effekt. Sie sollen hier durch die sprachliche Distanz zur Problematik diese thematisieren: Die Schweiz gilt als der Inbegriff des neutralen unabhängigen Staates, aber auch des mit sich selbst beschäftigten und sich abgrenzenden Landes. Sie war im Gegensatz zu vielen anderen europäischen Staaten niemals Kolonialmacht und nicht in koloniale Strukturen eingebunden. Die Schweiz ist als Nicht-EU-Land auch nicht über potenzielle Gemeinschaftsideen dazu verpflichtet, sich mit diesem europäischen Erbe zu identifizieren und auseinanderzusetzen. Wo Touristen aus ehemaligen europäischen Kolonialmächten hier entweder zur Identifikation oder zur Schuldzuweisung an die andere Nation führen würden, gesteht man den Schweizerinnen eine gewisse Botenrolle zu. Schweizer Touristinnen – Frauen sowieso, sie waren erst ab Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts auf Kolonialreisen dabei – dürfen abwertend über die Unfähigkeit der Nauruer sprechen, ihre wirtschaftliche Prosperität zu erhalten, die sie zeitweise zur wohlhabendsten Republik ge-

111


Postkoloniale Minenfelder am Beispiel von Shit Island

macht hat, und die sie wieder verspielt haben. Sie waren ja niemals „Täter“, über diesen Verdacht sind sie erhaben.5 Shit Island vereint in sich unterschiedliche Ästhetiken. Diese sollen den Zuschauer darauf stoßen, dass er zwar in unterschiedlichen Zeiten mit unterschiedlichen Intentionen an Kolonien und ehemalige koloniale Gebiete herantritt, dass aber die Sicht immer die europäische und eurozentristische Perspektive bleibt. Die Absicht der Intervention dient immer dem eigenen Vorteil.

Kunst = Kultur? Eines der größten postkolonialen „Minenfelder“, das in Shit Island nicht thematisiert wurde, aber Gegenstand des gleichnamigen Panels war, stellt die postkoloniale Aufarbeitung des Kolonialismus durch die Europäer dar. Ramiro Noriega, der ecuadorianische Künstler von der Universidad de las Artes in Quito, beschreibt die systemimmanente Problematik mit der Gefahr des Verschwindens. Wie bereits Ramzi Maqdisi aus Palästina, um hier meinerseits gleich den Fehler zu begehen, den er im Talk of the day They call me an Artist beklagt, dass er eben nicht zuvorderst „an artist“ genannt wird, sondern a „Palestinian artist,“ er aber diese Reihenfolge, wie die meisten Künstler, umgedreht wissen will. Er ist ein Künstler, unabhängig von seiner nationalen Herkunft. Kunst ist nicht national. Ein Labeling dieser Art relativiert die Kunst und reduziert den Künstler auf einen Bewahrer des „National Heritage“. In der Vergabe von Fördermitteln kann dieses Labeling jedoch von Vorteil sein. Im Bemühen, vergangenes, oft von Kolonialherren zerstörtes Kulturgut zu konservieren oder auch wieder zu beleben, was im immateriellen Kulturerbe der UNESCO geschieht, wird erneut in alten Kolonialstrukturen gedacht. Ramiro Noriega beschreibt das als Verblassen und Verschwinden. Eine aktuelle Kunstszene hat keine Chance, da sie dem Erbe und der Perspektive des Erbes unterworfen wird. Diese Perspektive manifestiert sich im Vertrag über die Arbeitsweise der Europäischen Union und wird selten reflektiert. Der europäische Blick auf Kunst ist in der Regel auf die Bildung von Traditionslinien gepolt, der persönliche Kanon, aus dem man sich als Künstler entwickelt (hat) und der nationales oder zumindest regionales Erbe darstellt. Die Gleichsetzung der Begriffe „Kunst“ und „Kultur“ ist in Europa in Gesetzen und Leitlinien manifestiert und zeigt an dieser Stelle ihre große Problematik. Im Artikel 167 des Vertrages über die Arbeitsweise der Europäischen Union heißt es: „(1) Die Union leistet einen Beitrag zur Entfaltung der Kulturen der Mitgliedstaaten unter Wahrung ihrer nationalen und regionalen Vielfalt sowie gleichzeitiger Hervorhe-

112


Ursula Maier

bung des gemeinsamen kulturellen Erbes.“ Diese Definition setzt nationales Erbe und Kunst zwar nicht in eins, aber unterstützt diese Perspektive und hat als Gesetz auch eine stark normative Wirkung. Der Artikel 27 Absatz 1 der Erklärung der Menschenrechte vom 10.12.1948 lautet: „Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, am kulturellen Leben der Gemeinschaft frei teilzunehmen, sich der Künste zu erfreuen und am wissenschaftlichen Fortschritt und dessen Wohltaten teilzunehmen.“ Sie trennt zwischen Kunst und kulturellem Leben, formuliert das Menschenrecht hinsichtlich der Kunst aber nur passiv. Dass Ramiro Noriega hier nicht allein steht, sondern das Gefühl vieler Künstler aus aller Welt beschreibt, zeigen die Reaktionen der Teilnehmer an diesem gut besuchten Panel. Viele bedanken sich bei ihm für die Thematisierung. Postkoloniale Minenfelder sind vielfältig und können immer wieder nur punktuell thematisiert werden. Der Produktion Shit Island ist es gelungen, eine nachdenkliche und trotzdem unterhaltsame Bandbreite anzureißen und damit auch in viele Panels auszustrahlen und, anders als die Insel Nauru, nachhaltig zu wirken. Es ist zu hoffen, dass sich das auch strukturell für die freie Theaterszene ehemaliger Kolonien genauso wie im Denken ehemaliger Kolonialmächte niederschlägt.

Quellen Anghie, Anthony: „Certain Phosphate Lands in Nauru“, in: The American Journal of International Law, Cambridge University Press Vol. 87, No. 2 (Apr. 1993), S. 282–288. Folliet, Luc: Nauru. Die verwüstete Insel. Wie der Kapitalismus das reichste Land der Erde zerstörte, Berlin 2011. Forster, Georg: Entdeckungsreise nach Tahiti und in die Südsee 1772 – 1775, Tübingen 2015. Futur3: Shit Island – Ein postkolonialer Südsee-Traum. [Programmheft], 2018. Harley I. Manner, Randolph R. Thaman and David C. Hassall: „Phosphate Mining Induced Vegetation Changes on Nauru Island“, in: Ecology, Wiley on behalf of the Ecological Society of America, Vol. 65, No. 5 (Oct. 1984), S. 1454–1465. International Legal Materials: „Australia – Republic of Nauru: Settlement of the case in the international court of justice concerning certain phosphate Lands in Nauru“, in: International Legal Materials, Cambridge University Press, Vol. 32, No. 6 (November 1993), S. 1471–1479. 1

Luc Folliet: Nauru. Die verwüstete Insel. Wie der Kapitalismus das reichste Land der Erde zerstörte, Berlin 2011, S. 9.

2

Ebd.

3

International Legal Materials (1993): Australia – Republic of Nauru: Settlement of the case in the international court of justice concerning certain phosphate Lands in Nauru. International Legal Materials, Cambridge University Press, Vol. 32, No. 6 (November 1993), S. 1471–1479.

4

Anthony Anghie (1993): „Certain Phosphate Lands in Nauru“, in: The American Journal of International Law, Cambridge University Press Vol. 87, No. 2 (Apr., 1993), S. 282–288.

5

Die Frage, wer über wen in Form von Kunst, und auch innerhalb einer Kunstform wie hier, sprechen darf, wurde auch im Talk of the Day They call me an artist von Ramzi Maqdisi thematisiert.

113


Luisa Reisinger

ABOUT SHIFTS IN THE PERCEPTION OF DISABLED BODIES ON STAGE A Call for Change

A daughter asks her mother, “What is that white, muscular, healthy man doing at the edge of the stage with that young, slim, immaculately beautiful woman?” She is perplexed. She is looking for the ordinary, normal, everyday bodies that she’s accustomed to seeing in the theatre, where she finds people with every imaginable body shape that she knows from her surroundings. She is also familiar with the kinds of bodies that want to be concealed: frail, health-impaired, handicapped. They have become a normal sight in theatre: neither conspicuous nor disturbing, neither exhibited by others nor presenting themselves, simply part of the whole. Wake up! Is this a dream? A wish? A utopia? There’s still a long way to go, also in the year 2018. Because only those who constantly sharpen their gaze will find mentally or physically disabled people – actors, singers, dancers, performers – who are given the opportunity to participate in the creation of the performing arts in the German-speaking theatre landscape. Of course, state-subsidized houses, i.e. state and municipal theatres which focus on diversity in their ensembles and promote a change in perception among conventional spectators are not a new phenomenon. “We also make inclusive theatre!” is the motto embroidered on the flags that flutter in the winds of change. But this obviously only exacerbates the differences between the two. Other paths must be taken and they can be rough and stony sometimes. Lisette Reuter, artistic director of the Cologne-based interdisciplinary mixed-abled Un-Label Performing Arts Company,1 knows all about those rock-strewn roads. In performances, workshops and discussions, her organization offers opportunities to work with people with and without disabilities. These laboratories host networking, testing and experimentation – for those who produce and for those who want to receive. Reuter’s initiative is obliged to knock on door after door to solicit funding and request support from private foundations so it can continue to grow, enlarge and attract attention as a performing arts institution in Europe. Lisette Reuter wants one thing above all else: for her company to be perceived as a seed sown in the broad field of the performing arts rather than as a paltry component of projects to promote social inclusiveness. She battles – unceasingly, tirelessly, na-

114


“I would prefer not to ... Re-creating Europa”, an inclusive project, ein Inklusionsprojekt. Performance initiated by Cornelia von Gosen, TheaterAtelier München

tionally and internationally – for the recognition of impaired performers as professional artists. Nadja Dias is another freelance producer. Among other performers, Dias promotes the physically impaired dancer and choreographer Claire Cunningham,2 who has articulated a new movement language that includes her use of crutches. This physically disabled performing artist was given a platform to experiment and express herself at Tanzhaus Nordrhein-Westfalen in Düsseldorf. But Dias also notes that it’s not just a question of carefully sowing the seeds of the projects, because the aesthetic of impaired performing artists remains an undeniably small sprout among nondisabled plants that have already grown strong. Far from the big stages, these tender little plants become festival participants or are given the opportunity to be artists-in-residence, but they must live with the fact that the appreciation of their work is not placed on the level of a certified professionalization. Let’s let those who are directly affected have their say. For example, Lucy Wilke, who is handicapped by spinal muscular atrophy. As a young actress, dancer and singer with a very busy rehearsal schedule, Wilke can report firsthand on emotionally touching projects such as Fucking Disabled, David von Westphalen’s3 play about sexuality and disability. She can talk about her wish to be appreciated, to be perceived first and foremost as a performer rather than as a physically impaired performer, to be seen without that which her body tells at first sight, without having to exhibit and without having to thematize. She dreams of being part of a permanent ensemble, although she feels comfortable in the independent theatre scene,

115


About Shifts in the Perception of Disabled Bodies on Stage

where she can experiment, explore her abilities and experience extraordinary encounters and sincerity in the rehearsal process. Maximilian Dorner can report from a different perspective. An author and creative artist who relies on a wheelchair for mobility, Dorner works in the cultural department of the city of Munich. Both professionally and in his private life, Dorner deals with the topic of inclusion and disability on a daily basis and on both a financial and an artistic level. He has an overview of which funds flow where and he confirms what can be assumed: financial possibilities exist, but the focus is naturally not on projects that promote inclusion.4 Is this really what we want? To consciously divide ourselves into two camps, with the healthy on one side and the handicapped on the other? No! So what can we do? Should we resume criticizing the system? Should we condemn the educational system of the acting schools, which accept neither physically nor mentally handicapped applicants but are nevertheless the only institutions that confer the title of “professional actor”? Would the utopia be possible then? Namely, that in the near future, unimpaired actors will perform side by side with their physically impaired colleagues, jointly bringing an expressive richness of facets to the stages of the big theatres? That the youngest spectator in the theatre audience feels perplexed when conformism offers no space for individualism?

So What Is To Be Done? If you read through the literature of drama, you will notice that the spectrum of roles doesn’t only call for muscular heroes and dainty princesses. Rather, dramas depict figures who portray the most diverse characters in a society, including those with all the many facets of physical and mental impairment. One doesn’t find fairytale perfection in the guise of a group of conforming robots here. Fortunately. Nonetheless, the statement from the breeding grounds of acting remains steadfast: the market demands actors whose appearance corresponds to current ideals of beauty. Full stop. Period. End of the discussion. The theaters respond by explaining they can work only with actors who have excellent professional diplomas in their pockets. Thus both parties – the acting schools on the one hand and the theatres on the other – neatly argue their way out of the dilemma. But a shift in the perception of impaired bodies on stage can take place only via the institutional path because no other route can accomplish a fundamental change in the audience’s perspective. What is presented on the big stages gains credibility as a phenomenon and becomes established as a fact in the culture. But the question of the content of authenticity is repeatedly raised in the theatre. In his Statement zur Darstellung alternativer Körperbilder5

116


Luisa Reisinger

“I would prefer not to ... Re-creating Europa”, an inclusive project, ein Inklusionsprojekt. Performance initiated by Greta Moder, TheaterAtelier München

[Statement on the Representation of Alternative Body Images], the scholar of theatre studies Philipp Schulte argues that what audiences accept as authentic is generated by a representative system of symbols that have previously been formed by the spectator’s perception. Accentuation of the other thus simultaneously means putting the other on public display. Schulte’s suggestion for improving this situation references the ideas of Bertolt Brecht, who wants to give a moment of conspicuousness to the natural per se, i.e. to the diversity of individual bodies. This already occurs in a society that cultivates uniformity, where the natural, which for us is foreign and different, attracts attention without digression. The intention isn’t to challenge audiences by confronting them with the provocative visibility of impaired bodies, but rather to disclose “the social and physical processes that lead us to regard the presentation of certain body images as normal and others as abnormal”. This project deliberately makes the debate fundamental because it directly questions the structures of representation, i.e. the power structures of social standardization, while simultaneously using the aesthetic process to call for interest in other artistic practices and forms of representation. The relationship between the disciplines of theatre studies and disability studies has been growing for several years and not solely thanks to numerous conferences and research projects which examine the different developments of plays, the potentials of rehearsal and performance processes and the institutional conditions that can be recognized in them and how these differ from their traditional counterparts. This growth also creates an important platform for sensitization because its significance as

117


About Shifts in the Perception of Disabled Bodies on Stage

a social and societal issue that affects all of us cannot be emphasized often enough. Time and again, the path that leads through aesthetics is the one that facilitates an important political contribution to tolerance and acceptance of all fellow human beings, no matter what their physical circumstances may be. Interactions with performers who have a mental or physical disability are no less individual and diverse than the respective players themselves. Difficulties that can arise in the rehearsal process and/or the performance on stage are frequently resolved or undermined by thematizing one’s own handicap through its distancing in a dramatic figure. It is helpful that inclusive theatre groups from Germany (Theater RambaZamba), Switzerland (Theater HORA) or Australia (Back to Back Theatre) develop their work as communal collectives. In the process of rehearsing and developing the play, questions are addressed that interest the disabled actors so they not only identify with what is presented, but also and above all learn to deal with it and play with it uninhibitedly. Theatre director Michael Elber, who heads Theater HORA in Zurich, explains that it is not the disability of his actors that is important to him, but their uniqueness, which their disabilities make visible. Elber says that he would rather change the plays than modify the performers.6 Beyond this, Theater HORA also does pioneering work because it offers physically handicapped people a two-year programme of vocational training as professional actors so they can learn their métier by undergoing the same curriculum as their colleagues at state and private acting schools. This is an important step toward someday realizing the dream of handicapped and healthy actors encountering each other on stage as colleagues and peers. Until then, however, the separate camps continue to work independently of each other. The piquant soup of the individualists simmers alongside the bland porridge of artistic conformity. The independent groups that experiment with disabled actors in uninhibited play spend their time living their freedoms and independently paving the way for absolutely unique and imaginative projects whose style of speaking and performing not only puts the audience’s conventions of perception to the test, but above all shatters, exposes and thematizes social norms and stereotypes “with irony and wit”7. There is ultimately a political potential in this because “the art of acting can turn social logic upside down …”8 The stage serves as a venue for questioning and as a forum for experimentation, further thinking and empathy. This can potentially uncover and simultaneously deconstruct social structures. The theater scholar Benjamin Wihstutz, whose work profoundly explores the potentials of disability performances, talks about an aesthetic of imperfection that represents a force which can

118


Luisa Reisinger

be interpreted as running contrary to the addiction to self-optimization. He postulates that “through aestheticization, the incomplete and the dilettantish can also be transformed into art”9 and that actors with disabilities not only make their own theatrical forms possible for the audience through their play, but above all undermine common categories and subvert the normative system of “able” versus “disable” by giving disability the same aesthetic status in art as ability. The literature of theatre studies uses stagings of Disabled Theater – a dance performance by the choreographer Jérôme Bel with performers from Theater HORA – as examples for analyzing how to work aesthetically with impaired performers on stage, where the performers self-reflexively experiment to discover how they can present their bodies to the audience. Another example is Christoph Schlingensief’s Freakshow 3000, a satire that discloses the audience’s attitude by bringing disabled people on stage and displaying them to the spectators, who thus undergo an aesthetic experience of gawking and staring. The time has come to stop gawking! Because the change and the accompanying affirmation of diverse bodies – with and without impairment, whether on stage or in everyday life – can only succeed when spectators stop clinging to standardized notions and become willing to critically question their preconceptions.10

A Call for Change Theatre creators who collaborate with disabled people should not give up the hope that their actions will finally bring diverse body images out of invisibility and that the theatre will offer a multifaceted framework for encounter and discussion. Theatre creators who collaborate with disabled people should not give up the hope that audiences will be touched by their actors’ unique way of performing and that the theatre is indeed the place where emotions can be conveyed directly and without detours. Theatre creators who collaborate with disabled people should not give up the hope that, through the aesthetic experience of humorous, provocative, sentimental and/or satirical evenings, spectators will realize that the society they live in is not characterized by conformist physical uniformity, but by heterogeneity and fluent diversity, which create a force that establishes tolerance for more sincere coexistence. When acting schools open their doors and admit all talented individuals, whether they happen to be white or black, short or tall, chubby or slim, and whether they sit in wheelchairs or walk with crutches, then the

119


About Shifts in the Perception of Disabled Bodies on Stage

theatre will become a place that advocates and appreciates specialness in our society. Then the aesthetics of art will become flexible and multifaceted. Then all kinds of bodies will perform on stage; the unusual will become the usual; and people will reconsider how they interact with one another. The dream will come true when the gaze finally goes beyond the physical because what is alien and impaired is, in fact, truly natural and has been accepted as part of the whole. Hear the call! Open your hearts and perform, all together, under the shared premise that “everybody – and every body – is welcome!”11 Don’t look away, don’t work on separate segregated stages, but experiment together and learn from one another. Pave the way for each other to find new ways for theatre to soon foster an affirmative relationship between the impaired and the healthy. Because in a society in which every human being is equal before the law, art too should not treat some bodies as more equal than others.

1

Lisette Reuter, Un-Label Performing Arts Company, https://un-label.eu.

2

For more information about Claire Cunningham, see https://www.clairecunningham.co.uk.

3

David von Westphalen, Fucking Disabled, world premiere on 2 June 2017, Munich, http://www.pathosmuenchen.de.

4

All standpoints expressed by the cited creators of culture are excerpted from the panel The Majority is Different in the context of the IETM’s “Res Publica Europe” meeting, 3 November 2018, at Gasteig in Munich. The event was moderated by Ben Evans; the participants on the podium were Maximilian Dorner, Lisette Reuter, Nadja Dias and Lucy Wilke.

5

Philipp Schulte, “Das Auffällige muss das Moment des Natürlichen bekommen. Ein Statement zur Darstellung alternativer Körperbilder”, in: Ästhetik vs. Authentizität. Reflexionen über die Darstellung von und mit Behinderung, edited by Imanuel Schipper, Berlin: Theater der Zeit, Recherchen 94, 2012, pp. 130–136.

6

Michael Elber, “Gespräch über das Handwerk des ‘Behindertentheaterregisseurs’” in: Theater HORA. Der einzige Unterschied zwischen uns und Salvador Dalí ist, dass wir nicht Dalí sind, edited by Marcel Bugiel, Berlin: Theater der Zeit, 2014, pp. 124–125.

7

Benjamin Wihstutz, “Schauspiel als Emanzipation. Das australische Back to Back Theatre, seine Ästhetik und Arbeitsweise” in: Ästhetik vs. Authentizität. Reflexionen über die Darstellung von und mit Behinderung, edited by Imanuel Schipper, Berlin: Theater der Zeit, Recherchen 94, 2012, pp. 145–151.

8

Ibid.

9

Benjamin Wihstutz, “Nichtkönnen. Nichtverstehen. Zur politischen Bedeutung einer Disability Aesthetics in den Darstellenden Künsten” in: Re/produktionsmaschine Kunst. Kategorisierungen des Körpers in den Darstellenden Künsten, edited by Friedemann Kreuder, Ellen Koban, Hanna Voss, Bielefeld: Transcript, 2017, pp. 61–74.

10 Additional literature: Sandra Umathum, Benjamin Wihstutz, Disabled Theater, Zürich, Berlin: Diaphanes 2015. 11 Philipp Schulte, “Das Auffällige muss das Moment des Natürlichen bekommen. Ein Statement zur Darstellung alternativer Körperbilder” in: Ästhetik vs. Authentizität. Reflexionen über die Darstellung von und mit Behinderung, edited by Imanuel Schipper, Berlin: Theater der Zeit, Recherchen 94, 2012, pp. 130–136.

120


Luisa Reisinger

ÜBER WAHRNEHMUNGSVERSCHIEBUNGEN BEEINTRÄCHTIGTER KÖRPER AUF DER BÜHNE Ein Plädoyer zur Veränderung

„Was macht dieser weiße, muskulöse, von Gesundheit strotzende Mann da vorne am Bühnenrand mit dieser jungen, schlanken, makellos schönen Frau?“, fragt die Tochter ihre Mutter. Sie ist irritiert. Sie sucht nach den gewöhnlichen, normalen, den alltäglichen Körpern, die sie sonst gewohnt ist, im Theater zu sehen. Dort sind Menschen mit jeden erdenklichen Körperformen zu entdecken, die sie aus ihrem Umfeld kennt. Aber sie ist auch vertraut mit denjenigen Körpern, die versteckt werden wollen. Gebrechliche, gesundheitlich Beeinträchtigte, Behinderte. Sie sind Normalität geworden im Theater. Weder auffällig noch störend. Weder ausstellend noch präsentierend. Einfach Teil des Ganzen. Aufwachen! Dies ist ein Traum, ein Wunsch. Eine Utopie? Es bleibt ein weiter Weg. Auch im Jahr 2018. Denn nur wer unentwegt seinen Blick schärft, findet in der deutschsprachigen Theaterlandschaft überhaupt Menschen, Schauspieler*innen, Sänger*innen, Tänzer*innen, Performer*innen, die durch eine geistige oder körperliche Behinderung die Möglichkeit erhalten, Kunst zu machen. Die staatlich subventionierten Häuser, Staats- und Stadttheater, die auf Diversität im Ensemble setzen und einen Umschwung der konventionellen Zuschauerwahrnehmung ankurbeln, sind dabei selbstverständlich keine Neuerscheinung. „Wir machen auch Inklusionstheater!“, steht auf den Fahnen, die im Wind der Veränderung wehen. Dass hierbei die Unterschiede des Dazwischen jedoch nur verschärft werden, ist offensichtlich. Es müssen andere Wege eingeschlagen werden, die zuweilen steinig sind. Von diesen kann Lisette Reuter, künstlerische Leiterin der interdisziplinären mixed-abled Performing Arts Company Un-Label1 aus Köln sprechen. In ihrer Organisation werden Performances, Workshops, Diskussionen als Möglichkeit für die Arbeit mit Menschen mit und ohne Behinderung angeboten. Ein Labor, in dem sich vernetzt, ausprobiert und experimentiert wird, für diejenigen, die produzieren, für diejenigen, die rezipieren wollen. Eine Initiative, die von Tür zu Tür gehen muss, um Förderungsbeiträge zu erhalten, Unterstützungen privater Stiftungen zu bekommen, um kontinuierlich zu wachsen, größer

121


Über Wahrnehmungsverschiebungen beeinträchtigter Körper auf der Bühne

zu werden und Aufmerksamkeit als Institution der darstellenden Künste Europas zu bekommen. Lisette Reuter wünscht sich dabei vor allem eines: Ihre Company als Saat auf dem weiten Feld der Performing Arts zu säen, nicht nur ein kümmerlicher Teil sozialer Inklusionsprojekte zu bleiben. Sie kämpft dabei unaufhaltsam für eine Anerkennung beeinträchtigter Performer*innen, national und international, als professionelle Kunstschaffende. Eine weitere, Nadja Dias, freischaffende Produzentin, unterstützt unter anderem die Tänzerin und Choreographin Claire Cunningham2, die durch ihre körperliche Beeinträchtigung eine neue Bewegungssprache im Mitbenutzen ihrer Krücken gefunden hat. Am Tanzhaus Nordrhein-Westfalen in Düsseldorf bekam die Künstlerin eine Plattform, sich mit ihrer körperlichen Behinderung auszuprobieren und auszudrücken. Doch auch Dias bemerkt, dass es nicht alleine auf das behutsame Aussäen der Projekte ankommt, denn die Ästhetik beeinträchtigter Künstler*innen bleibt im großen Gebinde zwischen den stark Gewachsenen auffällig klein. Fernab von den großen Bühnen werden da die zarten Pflänzchen zwar zu Teilnehmer*innen von Festivals, bekommen die Chance einer Artist in Residence, müssen aber damit leben, dass die Wertschätzung ihrer Arbeit nicht auf die Ebene einer beglaubigten Professionalisierung gesetzt wird. Lassen wir diejenigen zu Wort kommen, die es betrifft. Zum Beispiel Lucy Wilke, gehandicapt durch eine spinale Muskelatrophie. Eine junge Schauspielerin, Tänzerin und Sängerin, die von vollen Probenkalendern sprechen kann, von rührenden Projekten wie Fucking Disabled, ein Stück von David von Westphalen3 über Sexualität und Behinderung und von einem Wunsch: den der Würdigung. Sie als Performerin wahrzunehmen, ohne ihre Beeinträchtigung, ohne das, was ihr Körper zuallererst erzählt, ohne das ausstellen, das thematisieren zu müssen. Sie träumt davon, Teil eines festen Ensembles zu sein, auch wenn sie sich in der freien Theaterszene wohlfühlt, sich dort ausprobieren kann, von außergewöhnlichen Begegnungen und einem aufrichtigen Umgang im Probenprozess spricht. Aus einer anderen Perspektive berichtet der ebenfalls im Rollstuhl sitzende Autor und Kulturschaffende Maximilian Dorner, der im Kulturreferat der Stadt München arbeitet und sich tagtäglich mit dem Thema der Inklusion und Behinderung finanziell und künstlerisch auseinandersetzt, geschäftlich wie privat. Er hat einen Überblick, wohin welche Gelder fließen und bestätigt das, was anzunehmen ist: Finanzielle Möglichkeiten sind zwar vorhanden, doch im Fokus sind diejenigen Projekte, die sich um Inklusion bemühen, selbstredend nicht.4 Will man das überhaupt? Sich bewusst in zwei Lager aufspalten: Hier die Gesunden, dort die Beeinträchtigten? Nein! Was also tun? Erneut Systemkritik üben? Am Ausbildungsmechanismus der Schauspielschulen, die

122


Luisa Reisinger

weder körperlich noch geistig Behinderte aufnehmen, die alleine jedoch die Institutionen sind, die das Prädikat der Professionalität vergeben? Wäre dann die Utopie möglich? Dass in naher Zukunft körperlich Gewöhnliche und Beeinträchtigte Seite an Seite einen ausdrucksstarken Facettenreichtum den Bühnen der großen Theater bescheren? Dass der*die kleinste Theaterzuschauer*in stutzig wird, wenn der Konformismus dem Individualismus keinen Raum gibt?

Was also tun? Durchforstet man die Dramenliteratur, fällt auf, dass die Rollenfächer eben nicht nur die muskulösen Helden und zierlichen Prinzessinnen verlangen. Vielmehr sollen Figuren abgebildet werden, die den unterschiedlichsten Charakteren einer Gesellschaft mit allen Facetten der körperlichen wie geistigen Beeinträchtigung entsprechen. Hier findet man keine märchenhafte Perfektion, die aus einem Pulk konformer Roboter besteht. Zum Glück. Das Statement der Brutstätten des Schauspiels bleibt dennoch standhaft: Der Markt verlange Schauspieler*innen, die den gängigen Schönheitsidealen entsprechen. Punkt. Aus. Schluss. Und das Theater antwortet darauf, dass es nur mit denjenigen arbeiten könne, die eine ausgezeichnete Profession auf dem Papier vorweisen können; und somit haben sich beide Parteien aus dem Dilemma herausargumentiert. Ungeachtet dessen wird jedoch eine Wahrnehmungsverschiebung beeinträchtigter Körper auf der Bühne nur über den institutionellen Weg erfolgen können, denn erst dadurch kann ein grundlegender Perspektivenwechsel der Rezipierenden vorgenommen werden. Was sich auf den großen Bühnen präsentiert, wird als Phänomen beglaubigt und als Faktum einer Kultur etabliert. Wobei im Theater immer wieder die Frage nach dem Gehalt der Authentizität laut wird. So argumentiert der Theaterwissenschaftler Philipp Schulte in seinem Statement zur Darstellung alternativer Körperbilder5, dass alles, was als authentisch rezipiert wird, sich bereits aus einem repräsentativen System an Symbolen generiert, welches sich durch die Wahrnehmung des Zuschauenden zuvor gebildet hat. So ist das Akzentuieren des Anderen gleichzeitig eine Zurschaustellung dessen. Schultes Vorschlag für eine Besserung dieses Zustandes nutzt die Gedanken Bertolt Brechts, der dem Natürlichen (eben den vielfältig individuellen Körpern) selbst ein Moment des Auffälligen geben will. Dies geschieht bereits in einer auf Gleichheit getrimmten Gesellschaft, wo das Natürliche das für uns Fremde und Andersartige ist und ohne Umschweife Aufmerksamkeit erregt. So soll keine provokative Sichtbarkeit beeinträchtigter Körper herausgefordert werden, sondern „die sozialen und physischen Vorgänge, welche dazu führen, dass

123


Über Wahrnehmungsverschiebungen beeinträchtigter Körper auf der Bühne

wir die Darstellung bestimmter Körperbilder als normal betrachten und andere nicht“6, aufdecken. Mit diesem Versuch wird die Debatte zielgerichtet fundamental, indem die Strukturen der Repräsentation, die Machtgefüge einer gesellschaftlichen Normierung direkt befragt werden und gleichzeitig über den ästhetischen Vorgang für ein Interesse an anderen künstlerischen Praktiken und Darstellungsformen plädiert wird. Die Beziehung zwischen den Disziplinen Theaterwissenschaft und Disability Studies wächst nicht nur seit mehreren Jahren durch zahlreiche Tagungen und Forschungsprojekte, in denen sich den unterschiedlichen Stückentwicklungen, den Möglichkeiten der Proben- und Aufführungsprozesse sowie den darin erkennbaren, im Verhältnis zu den traditionellen anders gestalteten institutionellen Gegebenheiten angenähert wird, sondern schafft darüber hinaus eine wichtige Plattform der Sensibilisierung. Denn der Stellenwert dessen, als ein uns alle betreffendes, sozial-gesellschaftliches Thema kann nicht häufig genug hervorgehoben werden. Es ist wiederholt der Weg über das Ästhetische, der es ermöglicht, einen wichtigen politischen Beitrag zur Toleranz und Akzeptanz gegenüber aller Mitmenschen, egal, welcher körperlicher Gegebenheiten, evident zu machen. Der Umgang mit Performer*innen, die eine geistige oder körperliche Behinderung haben, ist dabei so individuell und divers wie die jeweiligen Spieler*innen. Im Probenprozess selbst wie auch in der finalen Darstellung auf der Bühne können hierbei Schwierigkeiten auftreten, die erkennbar häufig durch die Thematisierung der eigenen Behinderung in einer Distanzierung durch eine dramatische Figur aufgelöst, bzw. unterlaufen werden. Hilfreich ist, dass inklusive Theatergruppen aus Deutschland (Theater RambaZamba), der Schweiz (Theater HORA) oder auch Australien (Back to Back Theatre) ihre Arbeiten weitestgehend als gemeinschaftliches Kollektiv entwickeln. Im Proben- und Entstehungsprozess werden Fragen thematisiert, die die Schauspieler*innen mit einer Beeinträchtigung interessieren, sodass sich diese nicht nur mit dem Gezeigten identifizieren können, sondern vor allem lernen, damit umzugehen und frei damit zu spielen. Michael Elber, Leiter und Regisseur des Theaters HORA in Zürich, äußert, dass ihm eben nicht die Behinderung seiner Schauspieler*innen wichtig ist, sondern ihre dadurch sichtbare Einzigartigkeit. Lieber ändere er die Stücke, als dass er die Menschen modifiziere.7 Das Theater HORA leistet darüber hinaus Pionierarbeit, denn es bietet denjenigen, die körperlich eingeschränkt sind, eine zweijährige Berufsausbildung als professionelle Schauspieler*innen an, um dabei das zu erlernen, was ihre Kolleg*innen an den staatlichen und privaten Schauspielschulen ebenfalls durchlaufen.

124


Luisa Reisinger

Ein wichtiger Schritt, der den Traum, dass sich behinderte und gesunde Schauspieler*innen irgendwann als Kolleg*innen auf Augenhöhe begegnen, wahr werden lässt. Bis dahin werkeln die getrennten Lager jedoch unabhängig voneinander vor sich her. Neben dem künstlerischen Einheitsbrei des Konformen dampft dabei die pikante Suppe der Individualisten. Denn die freien Gruppen, die mit behinderten Schauspieler*innen im ungenierten Spiel experimentieren, nutzen ihre Zeit, um Freiheiten ausleben zu können, und ebnen sich eigenständig den Weg, immer wieder absolut einzigartige wie individuelle Projekte, deren Sprech- wie Spielstil nicht nur die Wahrnehmungskonventionen des Publikums auf die Probe stellen, sondern vor allem gesellschaftliche Normen und Stereotypen durchbrechen, aufzudecken und „mit Ironie und Witz“8 zu thematisieren. Darin steckt letztlich ein politisches Potenzial, denn gerade „durch die Kunst des Schauspiels kann die gesellschaftliche Logik auf den Kopf [gestellt werden] […]“.9 Die Bühne bietet den Ort der Infragestellung, ein Forum, in dem ausprobiert, weitergedacht und mitgefühlt werden kann. Hier wird die Möglichkeit der Aufdeckung der gesellschaftlichen Strukturen und gleichzeitig deren Dekonstruktion geboten. Der Theaterwissenschaftler Benjamin Wihstutz, der sich eingehend mit den Möglichkeiten der Disability Performances beschäftigt, spricht von einer Ästhetik der Imperfektion, die eine Kraft darstelle, welche gegenläufig zur Sucht nach der Selbstoptimierung zu lesen sei. Er postuliert, dass eben auch das „Unfertige und Dilettantische durch eine Ästhetisierung in Kunst zu verwandeln“10 ist und dass die Schauspieler*innen mit Behinderung nicht nur eigene Theaterformen durch ihr Spiel für den Rezipierenden ermöglichen, sondern vor allem gängige Kategorien und das normative System eines Können vs. Nichtkönnen aushebeln, indem die Dis-ability den gleichen ästhetischen Stellenwert in der Kunst wie die Ability erhält. In der theaterwissenschaftlichen Literatur werden vor allem mit den Beispielinszenierungen Disabled Theater, eine Tanzperformance des Choreografen Jérôme Bel mit den Performer*innen des Theaters HORA analysiert, wie mit beeinträchtigte*r Spieler*in auf der Bühne ästhetisch gearbeitet werden kann, indem die Performer*innen selbstreflexiv ausprobieren, wie sie ihren Körper auf der Bühne präsentieren können. Als weiteres Beispiel dient Christoph Schlingensiefs Freakshow 3000, eine Persiflage, die die Positionen der Rezipierenden sichtbar macht, indem auf provokante Art und Weise dem Publikum auf der Bühne behinderte Menschen vorgeführt werden und diese in eine ästhetische Erfahrung des Gaffens und Glotzens versetzt werden. Hiervon muss sich endgültig gelöst werden! Denn die Veränderung und die damit einhergehende Bejahung für diverse Körper mit und ohne

125


Über Wahrnehmungsverschiebungen beeinträchtigter Körper auf der Bühne

Beeinträchtigung auf der Bühne, wie auch im alltäglichen Leben, kann nur dann gelingen, wenn die Zuschauer*innen ihre normierten Vorstellungen loslassen und bereit sind, diese kritisch zu hinterfragen.11

Aufruf zur Veränderung Theaterschaffende, die gemeinsam mit behinderten Menschen arbeiten, sollen die Hoffnung nicht aufgeben, dass durch ihr Tun diverse Körperbilder endlich aus der Unsichtbarkeit geholt werden und das Theater einen vielfältigen Rahmen der Auseinandersetzung bietet. Theaterschaffende, die gemeinsam mit behinderten Menschen arbeiten, sollen die Hoffnung nicht aufgeben, dass die Performer*innen mit ihrer einzigartigen Spielweise die Rezipierenden berühren werden und das Theater jener Ort ist, der Emotionen ohne Umwege transportieren kann. Theaterschaffende, die gemeinsam mit behinderten Menschen arbeiten, sollen die Hoffnung nicht aufgeben, dass durch die ästhetische Erfahrung humorvoller, provokanter, sentimentaler, ironischer Abende die Zuschauenden erkennen, dass in der Gesellschaft, in der sie leben, keine konforme, körperliche Gleichheit, sondern eine heterogene, flexible Diversität existiert, durch die eine Kraft entsteht, die eine Toleranz für ein aufrichtigeres Miteinander etabliert. Wenn sich die Schauspielschulen für alle diejenigen Talente öffnen, egal, ob weiß, schwarz, klein, groß, dick oder dünn, im Rollstuhl sitzend oder auf Krücken gehend, wird das Theater ein Ort, der sich stark machen kann für das Besondere unserer Gesellschaft. Dann wird die Ästhetik der Kunst flexibel und facettenreich. Dann stehen alle Körper auf der Bühne, das Ungewohnte wird gewöhnlich, und es wird nachgedacht über den Umgang mit- und untereinander. Der Traum wird wahr werden, wenn der Blick endgültig über das Körperliche hinausgeht, weil das Fremde und Beeinträchtigte das wahrhaft Natürliche und Teil des Ganzen geworden ist. Ein Aufruf geht hinaus! Öffnet euch und spielt alle gemeinsam unter der Prämisse: „Jeder ist willkommen!“12 Schaut nicht weg, arbeitet nicht nebeneinander her, sondern experimentiert und lernt voneinander. Ebnet euch gegenseitig neue Wege, wie Theater in der nahen Zukunft eine bejahende Beziehung des Beeinträchtigten mit dem Gesunden eingehen kann, denn in einer Gesellschaft, in der jeder Mensch vor dem Gesetz gleich ist, darf die Kunst keine Segmentierungen vornehmen.

126


Luisa Reisinger 1

Lisette Reuter: Un-Label Performing Arts Company, un-label.eu.

2

Für mehr Informationen zu Claire Cunningham: www.clairecunningham.co.uk.

3

David von Westphalen: Fucking Disabled, Uraufführung 2.6.2017, München, www.pathosmuenchen.de.

4

Alle Standpunkte der genannten Kulturschaffenden wurden dem Panel The Majority is Different im Rahmen der Tagung „Res Publica Europa“ der IETM entnommen, 3.11.2018, Gasteig München. Moderiert wurde die Veranstaltung von Ben Evans, die Teilnehmenden auf dem Podium waren Maximilian Dorner, Lisette Reuter, Nadja Dias und Lucy Wilke.

5

Philipp Schulte: „Das Auffällige muss das Moment des Natürlichen bekommen. Ein Statement zur Darstellung alternativer Körperbilder“, in: Imanuel Schipper (Hg.): Ästhetik vs. Authentizität. Reflexionen über die Darstellung von und mit Behinderung, Berlin 2012, S. 130–136.

6

Ebd., S. 133.

7

Michael Elber: „Gespräch über das Handwerk des ,Behindertentheaterregisseurs‘“, in: Ders., Marcel Bugiel (Hg.): Theater HORA. Der einzige Unterschied zwischen uns und Salvador Dalí ist, dass wir nicht Dalí sind, Berlin 2014, S. 124 f.

8

Benjamin Wihstutz: „Schauspiel als Emanzipation. Das australische Back to Back Theatre, seine Ästhetik und Arbeitsweise“, in: Imanuel Schipper (Hg.): Ästhetik vs. Authentizität. Reflexionen über die Darstellung von und mit Behinderung, Berlin 2012, S. 145–151.

9

Ebd.

10 Benjamin Wihstutz: „Nichtkönnen. Nichtverstehen. Zur politischen Bedeutung einer Disability Aesthetics in den Darstellenden Künsten“, in: Friedemann Kreuder, Ellen Koban, Hanna Voss (Hg.): Re/produktionsmaschine Kunst. Kategorisierungen des Körpers in den Darstellenden Künsten, Bielefeld 2017, S. 61–74. 11 Weiterführende Literatur: Sandra Umathum, Benjamin Wihstutz: Disabled Theater, Zürich, Berlin 2015. 12 Philipp Schulte: „Das Auffällige muss das Moment des Natürlichen bekommen. Ein Statement zur Darstellung alternativer Körperbilder“, in: Imanuel Schipper (Hg.): Ästhetik vs. Authentizität. Reflexionen über die Darstellung von und mit Behinderung, Berlin 2012, S. 130–136.

127


Claus Michael Six

FIELD RESEARCH AS PERFORMANCE – PERFORMANCE AS FIELD RESEARCH An Interview with Flinn Works, Junges Ensemble Stuttgart (JES) and the Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (CKK)

With Global Belly (fig. 1) and Girls Boys Love Cash (fig. 2), two performance pieces based on comprehensive and intensive research were shown at the IETM Festival 2018 in Munich. After conducting in-depth research, Flinn Works (Berlin/Kassel) created Global Belly, which thematizes the subject of “globalized surrogacy”, while Junges Ensemble Stuttgart (JES) and Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (Stuttgart) theatrically present their two years of field research on the topic of “sex work” in the Stuttgart area and in Bucharest, Romania. Performances preceded by intensive and time-consuming preparatory work are almost inconceivable at institutional theatres, but the independent scene strives to secure financial support beyond shortterm project funding. The following text is the transcript of an interview with the makers of Global Belly and Girls Boys Love Cash: Sophia Stepf (Flinn Works; director), Lucia Kramer (Junges Ensemble Stuttgart; dramaturgy) and the Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (Stuttgart):

How did Global Belly and Girls Boys Love Cash manage their comprehensive and research-intensive production processes: from team building and work planning to travel, evaluation of results and development of the performances? Flinn Works: We worked closely with the ethnologist Anika König (University of Lucerne). While conceiving the project, we quickly realized that we needed to travel to India, the USA and the Ukraine. Some of our team members already knew one another and understood how such research is conducted. It’s obvious for us that people with a relationship to the country are the ones who should do the research there. Sonata (the following individuals are performers in the play – Editor’s note) is as an Indian and speaks Hindi, so she was predestined to do research in India. Lea Whitcher

128


is half American, so she undertook our research in the USA. Philine Rinnert (stage design) speaks Russian and knows Kiev, so she travelled to Kiev with a team. Sonata and I (Sophia Stepf, director) were together in India; Lisa Stepf (dramaturgy) was part of the team in the Ukraine; and Lea Whitcher, with whom we are collaborating for the third time and who was also familiar with our research methods, was in the USA on her own. Anika König and I attended a conference on surrogacy in Paris, where I met almost all the academics who are working and publishing on this subject. The material was extensive and complex. We started our rehearsal phase by spending two weeks poring over research papers and reading basic texts. From this reading, we distilled the most important positions, which we formed into subjective monologues/scenes and discursive parts (introduction, feminism debate, and timeline at the end). Our research is almost always extensive: 1. We read academic texts and books on the subject. 2. We meet and interview people who are directly affected by the issue. 3. And the performers conduct their own field research. This field research can be quite personal and can take diverse forms. For example, some of us went to surrogacy clinics and introduced ourselves as potential surrogate mothers. Sonata interviewed circa 72 surrogate mothers in India to find answers to her question: Is surrogacy exploitation or emancipation? Lea Whitcher met a surrogate mother in order to be able to portray her in greater depth and detail. Matthias Renger met numerous gay couples in Berlin and built his role from interviews with them. JES/Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Fewer than 200 metres separate the JES in Stuttgart from the local red light district. This was both the incentive for our intensive grappling with the topic of “sex work” and the source of our idea for Girls Boys Love Cash. We were stimulated by the close but not direct encounter between these two parallel worlds: on the one hand, we have the world of the teenagers who meet in the JES; and on the other hand, there’s the world of the sex workers, who earn their living in central Stuttgart and are more less the same age as the young people in the JES. The initial idea was provided by the play’s director, Christian Müller, who had previously worked as part of the CKK at the JES, where he collaborated with young people to develop the Hardcore Research 14+ theatre production, which explores the themes of pornography and sexuality. It was also important for the participants not to make a play about prostitution per se, but to grapple with the issue of the human being as a commodity in order to find answers to a more fundamental question: What

129


Field Research as Performance – Performance as Field Research

“Global Belly�, Flinn Works. Photo: Alexander Barta

is a human being in a neoliberal society? This necessarily requires shedding light on the narrative from a meta-level. During the first year, the JES, the Kollektiv and twelve youths and young adults researched the Stuttgart region and came into contact with various individuals ranging from social workers to sex workers and brothel owners from the Leonhard district who were willing to talk with us. Two performances were created at the end of the first year: one performance at a table dance nightclub in Stuttgart and another theatre piece (Unterm Strich) that led its audience through several performance venues. In the second part of the production, the participants (seven artists from the collective, nine young people and two employees of the JES) travelled to Bucharest for a week to get firsthand impressions of the situation there. We consulted national institutions for AIDS prevention and we accompanied streetworkers on a tour of the affected neighbourhoods. It was especially intense for us to come into direct contact with the living conditions of marginalized groups in Bucharest and in Roma villages, where we conducted some very personal interviews, e.g. with a sex worker, whom we later gave the opportunity to speak for herself as part of the video installation in Girls Boys Love Cash. We are extremely grateful to our video artist Cinty Ionescu, who accompanied us as an interpreter in Romania: without her, we would certainly not have achieved such close contacts with the people there.

130


Claus Michael Six

“Girls Boys Love Cash”, Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv. Photo: Alex Wunsch

So we collected ample material for the upcoming theatre performance. The development of the play and the rehearsals took place outside the approach of a “classical” play. We let the play evolve through various suggestions and ideas and via much improvisation and many intensive discussions.

Project realization in the independent scene always goes hand in hand with the issue of whether and to what extent funding was made available for the project. What was the situation for this production? Flinn Works: Production is the be-all and end-all. The project’s funds could only partially finance long-term research because funding periods always refer only to the current year. It is a major shortcoming of the current funding landscape that funding doesn’t take longer-lasting research periods into account, but this situation is gradually changing. The state of Berlin, for example, awards research grants; and the Fonds Darstellende Künste [Performing Arts Fund] has newly introduced the “Initialförderung” [“initial grant”]. In our case, we began rehearsals in June 2017, but it was not until March/April 2017 that we got the green light from the Hessian ministry. This meant that our research travel had to be billed differently.

131


Field Research as Performance – Performance as Field Research

JES/Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Collaboration between the JES and the collective was undertaken as part of the two-year “Doppelpass Projekt” [“Give-and-Go Project”] funded by the German Federal Cultural Foundation. The “Fond Doppelpass” [“Give-and-Go Fund”] promotes longterm cooperation between an established theatre and an independent group. Other sponsors are the Ott-Goebel-Jugendstiftung and the Martin-Schmälzle-Stiftung.

Do independent performance groups such as Flinn Works and the Citizen. KANE.Kollektiv see their possibilities for artistic design, i.e. their “artistic freedom” as more independent, freer and broader than, for example, the corresponding possibilities at an institutional theatre? Flinn Works: Yes. Although we produce more precariously and with much less money, we have more freedom, which we really like and appreciate. But financing for the independent scene must improve and become comparable to the budgets of the municipal theatres. We really felt the impact of this in Global Belly: one of our actresses became pregnant during the year of production and, because she had earned so little money working with us, her parental allowance for the following year was correspondingly small. That’s really unacceptable and it makes me angry at the political structures which caused it. JES: Of course, a house like the JES, with 30 permanent employees and a repertoire operation, needs longer planning processes and more structure. It is precisely here that cooperation with an independent group, the Kollektiv in this instance, creates “points of friction” in the organization. Communication is essential. We have to show understanding for each other and always stay on the ball so neither side will feel as though they are being ignored or overruled. We are nevertheless very open toward cooperative models like “Doppelpass” because we strongly appreciate artistic input from independent groups, which undertake theatre productions from totally different approaches.1 Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: “Classic” productions with six to eight weeks of rehearsals are typical at the JES. But the collective’s work is less product- and solution-oriented and more research-oriented. The CKK also has a different architecture with regard to structural processes and the partially hierarchical “pecking orders” in theatre productions. For example, our director Christian Müller is not the “boss” in CKK productions, but plays

132


Claus Michael Six

more of a moderator’s role. We found a good way to work together in our coproduction with the JES. Maybe we were more “cautious” than in our usual approach (laughs). Mutual trust is especially important for us: it is an essential point and it is explicitly stated in our “Manifesto”.

Beyond quantifiable financial wherewithal, how much “self”, that is, how much energy and heart’s blood, did you invest in Global Belly and Girls Boys Love Cash? Flinn Works: Very, very much. JES/Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: After two years of research and collaboration, the premiere was accompanied by a huge feeling of relief and satisfaction. Our courageous approach and the unusual topic will be rewarded next year: we have been invited to participate in the “Augenblick mal!” theatre meeting in Berlin. Everyone involved is very pleased about that.

How do the production teams regard their theatre pieces from the aesthetics (of reception) point of view, i.e. in this instance, the connection between academic research and art? Both productions use the medium of participation: what added value did that contribute? Flinn Works: Multiperspectivity is our most important criterion. We want to reveal a complex topic to our spectators and encourage them to think, but without prejudicing them with a prefabricated opinion. Important discussions and serious thinking do not arise solely from cognitive grappling, but also from emotional impressions. Participation in Global Belly starts with the ethnological “participant observation” method and transfers it into the theatrical situation. JES: The JES stands for a theatre that deals with current social discourses for a young audience, always guided by the question: “How does this topic affect the reality of young people’s lives?” Our grappling with the academic aspects of the theme gives us valuable impulses for the process of creating our pieces, which often evolve in the rehearsal process and together with the ensemble. Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: That’s why we clearly separated the several parts of the play: the first part is theatre, portraying the thoughts and envi-

133


Field Research as Performance – Performance as Field Research

ronment of a young man in contemporary society; afterwards, in part two, we present a performance that communicates the results of our research during the past two years. JES/ Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Our production Girls Boys Love Cash directly contacts its (youthful) audience through participative elements which, of course, have long been known and used in youth theatre. Our play raises questions in its spectators’ minds – questions that these young people probably wouldn’t ask themselves in everyday life. Many thanks to Flinn Works, the JES and the Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv.

References: Philippe Adair/Oksana Nezhyvenko (2017): “Assessing How Large Is the Market for Prostitution in the European Union” in: Éthique et Économique/Ethics and Economics 14 (2017), Issue 2, pp. 116–136, online at: http://ethique-economique.net/Volume-14-Issue-2.html [30 November 2018]. Thomas Fabian Eder/EAIPA (The European Association of Independent Performing Arts) (eds.) (2018): Introduction to the Independent Performing Arts in Europe: Eight European Performing Arts Structures at a Glance, Berlin. Jen Harvie (2013): Fair Play: Art, Performance and Neoliberalism, Basingstocke: Palgrave Macmillan. Heather Jacobson (2016): Labor of Love: Gestational Surrogacy and the Work of Making Babies, New Brunswick/New Jersey/London: Rutgers University Press. Wolfgang Schneider (2016): “Auf dem Weg zu einer Theaterlandschaft” in: Manfred Brauneck/ ITI Zentrum Deutschland (eds.): Das Freie Theater im Europa der Gegenwart. Strukturen – Ästhetik – Kulturpolitik. Bielefeld: transcript, pp. 612–642.

Websites of the participants: Flinn Works: Flinn Works.de [30 November 2018] Junges Ensemble Stuttgart: www.jes-stuttgart.de [30 November 2018] Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: citizenkane.de [30 November 2018]

1

Doppelpass is a programme established by the Federal Cultural Foundation to support joint projects between independent groups in all artistic disciplines and established dance companies and theatres.

134


Claus Michael Six

FELDFORSCHUNG ALS PERFORMANCE – PERFORMANCE ALS FELDFORSCHUNG Ein Interview mit Flinn Works, dem Jungen Ensemble Stuttgart (JES) und dem Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (CKK)

Mit Global Belly und Girls Boys Love Cash waren zwei Stücke auf dem IETM-Festival 2018 in München vertreten, die ihre Performances auf umfassende und intensive Recherchen fußen. In Global Belly bereitet Flinn Works (Berlin/Kassel) nach eingehenden Forschungen das Thema „globalisierte Leihmutterschaft“ auf, das Junge Ensemble Stuttgart (JES) präsentiert zusammen mit dem Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (Stuttgart) seine zweijährige Feldforschung zum Thema „sex work“ im Raum Stuttgart und in Bukarest/Rumänien. Performances mit einer derart intensiven und Zeit beanspruchenden Vorarbeit wären an institutionellen Theatern kaum denkbar, die freie Szene aber kämpft um finanzielle Unterstützung jenseits von Kurzförderprojekten. Ein Interview mit den Machern von Global Belly und Girls Boys Love Cash: Sophia Stepf (Flinn Works; Regie) sowie Lucia Kramer (Junges Ensemble Stuttgart; Dramaturgie) und dem Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv (Stuttgart):

Wie gestaltete sich für Global Belly und Girls Boys Love Cash der umfängliche und rechercheintensive Produktionsprozess: von der Teambildung, der Arbeitsplanung bis hin zu den Reisen, dem Auswerten der Ergebnisse und der Erarbeitung der Performance? Flinn Works: Wir haben eng mit der Ethnologin Anika König (Universität Luzern) zusammengearbeitet und bereits bei der Konzeption gemerkt, dass wir nach Indien, in die USA und die Ukraine müssen. Das Team kannte sich teilweise schon und wusste, wie so eine Recherche verläuft. Grundsätzlich ist uns klar, dass Personen mit Beziehung zum Land dort recherchieren müssen. Sonata (die folgenden Genannten sind die Performer*innen des Stücks, Anm. d. Verf.) als Inderin, die Hindi spricht, konnte also nur Indien erforschen, Lea Whitcher ist Halbamerikanerin und war

135


Feldforschung als Performance – Performance als Feldforschung

deshalb für die USA zuständig, Philine Rinnert (Bühne) spricht Russisch und kennt Kiew und ist mit einem Team nach Kiew gereist. Sonata und ich (Sophia Stepf, Regie) waren zusammen in Indien, Lisa Stepf (Dramaturgie) war mit in der Ukraine, Lea Whitcher, mit der wir zum dritten Mal zusammengearbeitet haben und die auch die Recherchemethoden kannte, war privat und alleine in den USA. Ich war mit Anika König bei einer Konferenz in Paris zu Leihmutterschaft und habe dort fast alle Wissenschaftler*innen getroffen, die zu dem Thema arbeiten und publizieren. Das Material war ausufernd und komplex – wir haben zu Probenbeginn zwei Wochen mit Referaten von den jeweiligen Recherchen verbracht und mit dem Lesen grundlegender Texte. Daraus destillieren wir die wichtigsten Positionen, die wir dann in subjektive Monologe/Szenen und diskursive Teile (Beginn, Feminismus-Debatte und Zeitstrahl am Ende) formen. Wir recherchieren fast immer ausgiebig: 1. Wir lesen wissenschaftliche Texte und Bücher zum Thema. 2. Wir treffen betroffene Personen und führen Interviews mit ihnen. 3. Die Performer*innen betreiben eigene Feldforschung. Die Feldforschung kann ganz persönlich und sehr unterschiedlich aussehen – z. B. haben sich einige von uns als echte Fälle in den Kliniken für Leihmutterschaft vorgestellt. Sonata hat in Indien circa 72 Leihmütter interviewt, um für sich die Frage zu beantworten: Ist Leihmutterschaft Ausbeutung oder auch Emanzipation? Lea Whitcher hat eine Leihmutter getroffen, um sie genauer porträtieren zu können. Matthias Renger hat sich mit schwulen Paaren in Berlin getroffen und aus unterschiedlichen Interviews seine Rolle zusammengebaut. JES/Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Keine 200 Meter trennt das JES in Stuttgart von dem hiesigen Rotlichtmilieu. Das war unser Anreiz für die intensive Auseinandersetzung zum Thema „sex work“ und die Idee für Girls Boys Love Cash. Wir fanden das enge, aber nicht unmittelbare Aufeinandertreffen zweier Parallelwelten spannend – die Welt der Jugendlichen, die sich im JES treffen, und die Welt der quasi gleichaltrigen Sex-Arbeiter*innen, die in Stuttgart mitten in der Stadt ihren Lebensunterhalt bestreiten. Die Initialidee ging dabei vom Regisseur des Stücks aus, Christian Müller, der als Teil des CKK zuvor auch im JES gearbeitet hat und dort mit der Produktion Hardcore Research 14+ das Thema „Pornographie und Sexualität“ mit Jugendlichen erarbeitet hat. Wichtig war es für die Beteiligten darüber hinaus, kein Stück über Prostitution per se zu machen, sondern das Thema „Mensch als Ware“ aufzugreifen, um Antworten auf die Frage „Was ist der

136


Claus Michael Six

Mensch in der neoliberalen Gesellschaft?“ zu finden, die Erzählung also eher von einer Metaebene aus zu beleuchten. Im ersten Jahr erforschten das JES und das Kollektiv gemeinsam mit zwölf Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen den Raum Stuttgart und traten dabei mit unterschiedlichen Personen in Kontakt, von Sozialarbeiter*innen, Sex-Arbeiter*innen bis hin zum gesprächsbereiten Bordellbesitzer aus dem Leonhardsviertel. Am Ende des ersten Jahres entstanden zwei Aufführungen, eine Werkschau in einem Stuttgarter Tabledance-Etablissement und ein Stationen-Theater (Unterm Strich). Im zweiten Teil der Produktion reisten die Beteiligten (sieben Künstler*innen des Kollektivs, neun Jugendliche und zwei Mitarbeiter*innen des JES) für eine Woche nach Bukarest, um sich vor Ort ein Bild zu machen. Dabei konsultierten wir nationale Institutionen der AIDS-Prävention oder machten uns mit einer begleiteten „street work tour“ in die entsprechenden Viertel auf. Besonders intensiv war der Kontakt mit den Lebensumständen marginalisierter Gruppen in Bukarest und in den Roma-Dörfern, wo wir einige sehr persönliche Interviews führten, beispielsweise mit einer Sex-Arbeiterin, die wir später per Video-Installation in Girls Boys Love Cash zu Wort kommen ließen. Großer Dank gilt hier unserer Videokünstlerin Cinty Ionescu, die uns in Rumänien auch als Dolmetscherin begleitet hat, ohne sie hätten wir sicher nicht den gleichen Zugang zu den Menschen bekommen. Für die anstehende Theateraufführung hatten wir also reichlich Material gesammelt. Die Erarbeitung des Stücks und die Proben liefen dabei außerhalb der Herangehensweise eines „klassischen“ Theaterstücks ab: Wir ließen das Stück sich durch unsere unterschiedlichen Vorschläge und Ideen und durch viel Improvisation und intensive Diskussionen entwickeln.

Die Realisierung von Projekten in der freien Szene geht auch immer mit der Frage einher, ob und in welchem Umfang Fördergelder für das Projekt bereitgestellt wurden. Wie verhielt es sich bei der jeweiligen Produktion? Flinn Works: Produktion ist das A und O. Die langfristige Recherche konnte nur teilweise durch die Projektgelder realisiert werden, da die Förderzeiträume sich immer nur auf das aktuelle Jahr beziehen. Es ist ein großes Manko der aktuellen Förderlandschaft, dass lange Recherche-Zeiten in den Förderinstrumenten nicht bedacht werden, aber das ändert sich langsam. So vergibt z. B. das Land Berlin Recherchestipendien, und der Fonds Darstellende Künste hat die „Initialförderung“ eingeführt. So haben wir im Juni 2017 begonnen zu proben, aber erst im März/April 2017

137


Feldforschung als Performance – Performance als Feldforschung

die Zusage des Hessischen Ministeriums gehabt, d. h. die Recherchereisen mussten daher anders abgerechnet werden. JES/Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Umgesetzt wurde die Zusammenarbeit zwischen dem JES und dem Kollektiv im Rahmen eines zweijährigen „Doppelpass-Projekts“, gefördert durch die Kulturstiftung des Bundes. Beim „Fonds Doppelpass“ handelt es sich um die Förderung von länger angelegten Kooperationen zwischen einem festen Haus und einer freien Gruppe. Weitere Förderer: die Ott-Goebel-Jugendstiftung und die Martin-Schmälzle-Stiftung.

Sehen „Freie Performancegruppen“ – wie Flinn Works oder das Citizen. KANE.Kollektiv – ihre Möglichkeiten der künstlerischen Gestaltung, der „künstlerischen Freiheit“, als unabhängiger/freier/breiter an als beispielsweise die eines institutionellen Theaters? Flinn Works: Ja – wir produzieren prekärer, mit viel weniger Geld, dafür haben wir mehr Freiheiten, die wir mögen und zu schätzen wissen. Die Finanzierung für die freie Szene muss sich aber verbessern und an die Budgets der Stadttheater angeglichen werden. Besonders hart war das im Fall von Global Belly zu spüren, da eine der Schauspielerinnen in dem Jahr der Produktion schwanger wurde und dadurch, dass sie bei uns so schlecht verdient hat, auch ihr Elterngeld entsprechend niedrig ausgefallen ist im Folgejahr. Sowas ist eigentlich nicht tragbar und bereitet mir politische Bauchschmerzen. JES: Natürlich erfordert ein Haus wie das JES, mit dreißig festen Mitarbeiter*innen und einem Repertoire-Betrieb, längere Planungsabläufe und mehr Struktur. Gerade hier ist die Zusammenarbeit mit einer freien Gruppe, in diesem Fall dem Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv, mit gewissen „Reibungspunkten“ in der Organisation verbunden. Kommunikation ist hier das A und O. Man muss Verständnis füreinander aufbringen und immer am Ball bleiben, sodass bei keiner Seite das Gefühl entsteht, übergangen zu werden. Und trotzdem sind wir für Kooperationsmodelle wie den „Doppelpass“ sehr offen, weil wir den künstlerischen Input von freien Gruppen, die mit ganz anderen Ansätzen an eine Theater-Produktion herangehen, sehr schätzen. Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Am JES sind „klassische“ Produktionen von sechs bis acht Wochen Probezeit die Regel. Das Kollektiv hingegen ar-

138


Claus Michael Six

beitet weniger produkt- bzw. lösungsorientiert, sondern rechercheorientiert. Auch was die strukturellen Abläufe und die zum Teil hierarchischen Gefälle in den Produktionen angeht, ist es beim CKK anders gestaltet: So übernimmt unser Regisseur Christian Müller bei Produktionen des CKK nicht die Rolle des „Chefs“, sondern eher eine Moderationsrolle. Bei der Koproduktion mit dem JES haben wir aber einen guten Weg gefunden, zusammenzuarbeiten. Vielleicht waren wir etwas „vorsichtiger“ als in unserer gewöhnlichen Herangehensweise (lacht). Ganz besonders wichtig ist für uns gegenseitiges Vertrauen – ein essenzieller Punkt, der auch in unserem „Manifest“ niedergeschrieben ist.

Wie viel Eigen-Investition, Kraft, Herz, jenseits von finanziellen Mitteln, steckt in Gobal Belly und Girls Boys Love Cash? Flinn Works: Sehr, sehr viel. JES/Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Mit der Premiere ging nach zwei Jahren Recherche und Zusammenarbeit ein großes Gefühl der Erleichterung und der Zufriedenheit einher. Der mutige Ansatz und das ungewöhnliche Thema werden im nächsten Jahr mit einer Einladung zum Theatertreffen „Augenblick mal!“ in Berlin belohnt, worüber sich alle Beteiligten sehr freuen.

Wie sieht das jeweilige Produktionsteam seine Stücke aus (rezeptions)ästhetischer Sicht, also hier die Verbindung aus wissenschaftlicher Forschung und Kunst? Welchem Mehrwert dient das Medium der Partizipation, dessen sich beide Produktionen bedienen? Flinn Works: Unser wichtigstes Kriterium ist die Multiperspektivität. Wir möchten den Zuschauer*innen ein komplexes Thema eröffnen und sie zum Nachdenken anregen, ohne ihnen eine Meinung vorzusetzen. Wichtige Debatten und ernsthaftes Nachdenken entstehen aber nicht durch rein kognitive Auseinandersetzungen, sondern auch durch emotionale Eindrücke. Die Partizipation in Global Belly nimmt die ethnologische Methode der „Teilnehmenden Beobachtung“ als Ausgangspunkt und transferiert sie in die Theatersituation. JES: Das JES steht für ein Theater, das aktuelle gesellschaftliche Diskurse für ein junges Publikum behandelt, immer geleitet von der Frage: „Wie wirkt sich dieses Thema auf die Lebensrealität junger Menschen aus?“ Die

139


Feldforschung als Performance – Performance als Feldforschung

Auseinandersetzung mit Wissenschaft kann uns wichtige Impulse für den Entstehungsprozess unserer Stücke geben, die oft erst im Probenprozess und mit dem Ensemble entwickelt werden. Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Deshalb haben wir die Teile des Stücks auch klar getrennt: Im 1. Teil Theater – die Gedanken und Lebenswelt eines jungen Mannes in der heutigen Gesellschaft – und im 2. Teil erzählen wir von den Recherchen der vergangenen zwei Jahre, in die Form einer Performance gepackt. JES/Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: Mit partizipativen Elementen in unserer Produktion Girls Boys Love Cash, die natürlich im Jugendtheater schon länger bekannt sind, lässt sich ein direkter Kontakt zum (jungen) Publikum herstellen. Während des Zuguckens sollen Fragen bei den Jugendlichen angeregt und reflektiert werden, die sie sich wohl im Alltag nicht stellen würden.

Vielen Dank an Flinn Works, das JES und das Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv.

Literaturhinweise: Philippe Adair/Oksana Nezhyvenko: „Assessing How Large Is The Market For Prostitution In The European Union“, in: Éthique et Économique/Ethics and Economics 14 (2017), Issue 2, pp. 116–136, online unter: ethique-economique.net/Volume-14-Issue-2.html [letzter Zugriff 30.11.2018] Thomas Fabian Eder/EAIPA (The European Association of Independent Performing Arts) (Hg.): Introduction To The Independent Performing Arts In Europe. Eight European Performing Arts Stuctures At A Glance, Berlin 2018 Jen Harvie: Fair Play. Art, Performance And Neoliberalism, Basingstoke 2013 Heather Jacobson: Labor Of Love. Gestational Surrogacy And The Work Of Making Babies, New Brunswick/New Jersey/London 2016 Wolfgang Schneider: „Auf dem Weg zu einer Theaterlandschaft“, in: Manfred Brauneck/ITI Zentrum Deutschland (Hg.): Das Freie Theater im Europa der Gegenwart. Strukturen – Ästhetik – Kulturpolitik, Bielefeld 2016, S. 612–642

Internetauftritte der Beteiligten: Flinn Works: flinnworks.de Junges Ensemble Stuttgart: www.jes-stuttgart.de Citizen.KANE.Kollektiv: citizenkane.de

140


TALKS OF THE DAY

Fabio Tolledi, Italy / Italien and / und Nora Amin, Egypt/Ägypten

Liwaa Yazji, Syria / Syrien and / und Ramzi Maqdisi, Palestine / Palästina


Fabio Tolledi and Nora Amin

EUROCENTRISM IS THE NEW COLONIAL

Fabio Tolledi: My name is Fabio Tolledi, I am a director and also the president of the Italian Centre of International Theatre Institute (ITI) and the secretary of the ITI Committee Theatre in Conflict Zones. Nora Amin: My name is Nora Amin. I am Egyptian and have been living in Berlin for three years. I am a performer, theatre director, choreographer and writer. Fabio Tolledi: The topic of the meeting today is: Eurocentrism is the new colonial. This title is also a provocation − we live in a global conflict, and we are not able to recognize that the conflict is global. Everything is connected. Especially in the European Union. This is very essential for my sensibility. Also, the conflict is based always on some crucial elements. The first one is the idea of the supremacy of one culture over others. The conflict always exists when we have an idea of supremacy. This aspect of the supremacy of culture is very clear in the political and public speech in the United States, and in many other very official levels − unfortunately also in Italy. Especially in recent times this idea of cultural supremacy is becoming stronger and stronger. Nora Amin: Thank you for mentioning global conflict. We also share the effect with other conflict zones. I started my first project on theatre in conflict zones with Germany, it happened in Sudan. Then I started the Egyptian nationwide project for the Theatre of the Oppressed in 2011. It expanded into an Arab and regional network of 700 activists and practitioners of theatre. My own relation to conflict now is not so much about managing conflict via theatres and performance. It is about the healing aspects that performance can have towards traumatic experiences. Whether it is connected to the performance, the spectators or to the society in general. Due to the last two years of work in Berlin, and in between, I think that this area of working with dance and trauma performance could be one organic field with which to explore our similarities and our somehow universal shared pain that also transcends the idea of war zones. In each

142


society, there is internal war and violence and aggression, even within Europe, which can be looked upon as a colonizer of war zones, and also as colonised by its own internal history of colonisation. Fabio Tolledi: This is a complex topic. I want to come back to the problem of the new colonialism and what it means. The enhancement of cultural diversity is an important part of the Charter of UNESCO, which was established 70 years ago after the destruction caused by the Second World War. A main goal of UNESCO Charter is to foster mutual understanding in order to overcome conflict. We have to consider how this has changed until now. Another important aspect is linguistic diversity. We know that the official languages of UNESCO are not enough to represent the world. The work of theatre is always connected with an awareness of language and languages. What is the problem of the languages? We will work in Burkina Faso next month. What is the language of Burkina Faso? The official theatrical language remains French. When I was in Ivory Coast I saw that the Ministry of Culture is called the Ministry of Culture and Francophonie. The global conflict is not an abstract concept. It is very concrete and is connected with the dimension of military intervention of countries of the European Union – also Germany and Italy – not only of the US. Within this framework, it is very important to consider that we are connected with our heritage, which in the European culture continues to be very strong. When I say to my university colleagues that I will conduct a workshop in Paris and Berlin, they answer: “very interesting.” If I say: “I will conduct another workshop in Tunis”, then people ask: “Is it dangerous?”. This attitude is still present in our daily life. Nora Amin: Going back to the supremacy of language. I think I have a struggle with the supremacy of Western aesthetics and performance. For me, this is the most important challenge I have to face as an artist. On the one hand, this kind of aesthetic Western colonisation of the stage was present when I was in Egypt, where the ideal for the stage is the Western and probably European form of performance. We create with the idea of the colonisers, and the internal feeling of being inferior. We struggle to act like the French, and the Italians. And then we look at our own forms of theatre as folkloric, not modern and not available for the modern, international market. Then we struggle and try to make some contemporary forms with dance, that is another struggle with colonising Egyptian bodies by a technique and Western vocabulary that was born out of a history, out of a specific aesthetic. We have a perspective of denying our own physical-

143


Eurocentrism is the new colonial

ity, our daily life struggles. Out of this comes the necessity of liberating the aesthetics of the stage by creating performances that, on the one hand, are not to be labelled exotic or with an expectation of oriental dance on stage, or with an expectation of: “what kind of theatre are they presenting from this semi-retarded part of the world?� Genuine equality in looking at creativity and artistic work is very rare. Fabio Tolledi: I want to use a very interesting example. It is connected with the economic condition in Europe. Especially in Italy, we have an explosion of monodrama performances. This diffusion of monodrama performances is connected with the very difficult economic situation of theatre companies. In this way, we start to develop a very strong label, storytelling. Since I started theatre studies, I read many important books that state that in many countries, in many areas, and on many continents theatre does not exist. But we know, for instance, that the storytellers are present in many cultures. It is a typical dimension of theatrical expression. But we have transformed it. Also, in the political sense a storytelling dimension started to be used in a very relevant way. We have a new proposal for the new stage. We have forgotten that storytelling is connected with an ancient practice, made in a room or a courtyard, where we started to tell or to hear a story and we started to make theatre for the community. The second aspect is strongly connected with the dimension of the audience. All the current policies on cultural affairs are connected with the concept of audience development, which is a concept of theatre as a commercial event. The audience is the public that pays a ticket to watch a show. This is entertainment. While the audience should be considered as the community. In this sense, to discuss the new forms of colonialism is a way to find a new exit strategy. The first answer for IETM and ITI activity is the network. The network is the real dimension to avoid separations and colonisation of a huge number of people. Nora Amin: Going back to the audience: the spectators are maybe the best solution to focus on change through creating by trying to create a human bonding with each other. Among the performers, among the spectators, and to try human bonding through connection. To overcome prejudice and political histories, and the shared pain. My experience with this human bonding is very strong. I want to mention two examples, if that is possible? One example is related to creating a one-on-one performance, Earthport (co-directed with Eva Balzer), created in Berlin. The ensemble is made up

144


Fabio Tolledi and Nora Amin

of Germans and Egyptians. The scenes are designed as encounters between a single spectator and a single actor, and then rotations according to a certain calculation. In this, there is an extensive possibility of exchange and of seeing, looking, recognising the spectator as a human, as a person with a history, with emotions, with a presence. A person who is able to shape the encounter with the actor. And there are also other possibilities, the actor becomes human. Not an object, not a puppet, not a fictional character. If we can include in this topic of change the little intimate, personal, momentary changes that happen to us during this one-and-a-half hour performance, then I believe it is possible through performance to de-colonise our knowledge of each other. Another example is a solo performance, going back to the monodrama. It is called Resurrection and is a dance ritual giving tribute to theatre artists who died in a fire in Egypt in 2005. This ritual expands to embrace all the survivors and victims of oppressive systems. And in the end, we have the chance to put the oppressive systems away and just recognise that we are alive and together. As equal human beings. Fabio Tolledi: I want to advance two proposals. The first one is connected with the importance of networks that can be a very effective instrument and channel for the mobility of the artists. This is an important aspect of it. It is a matter of fact that unfortunately globalization created the free passage of goods but not the free movements of artists. We have to launch a campaign for artists to move freely from one country to another. This is essential. The network can work in this direction. The other point is connected with the artistic aspect, the mother tongue experience. The meeting with different cultures can be very enriching also through the practice of mother tongue that can occur every day in each place. It is very essential to enhance the importance of mother tongue, to practice and exchange on an artistic level. It is the full dignity of this expression. We have to continue to increase our efforts in this direction. Nora Amin: For me, the big hope is friendship. I think, even with the biggest projects of cooperation and networking, if they do not include a basis of friendship and mutual understanding, they will just recycle the same system again. Maybe! And I hope what we get out of the IETM meeting is friends with a new basis of equality. Maybe this will be the change that we can do among us 100 or 200 people. Thank you. Fabio Tolledi: Thank you very much!

145


Liwaa Yazji and Ramzi Maqdisi

THEY CALL ME AN ARTIST

Liwaa Yazji: I have this question about what does it mean to be an artist in these conflicting times? Starting from 2011, I became a Syrian artist instead of just being an artist. This is kind of a mission and a burden at the same time. And the next step was that I became a female Syrian artist in exile. One can turn from just being concerned with the content of his/her own work to being an ambassador of a cause no matter what he/she tackled otherwise. This is the main transformation that I guess is relevant to our talk about politics and art. What transformations happen to one‘s career and reception? For the moment, the definition of what it means to be an artist is questioned in the light of so many factors. My identification; how people perceived me, the reception, and production … all were affected by politics in a severe way. That brought to the table a bunch of other questions about the content, identity, to whom I am writing, for whom I am making art and why. Which language I am using and what is the target audience etc. I used to work in the Arab world, addressing the Syrian cultural scene, which, for those who don‘t know, was a closed one because of the dictatorship. Yet with the revolution in 2011 and the war afterwards, I turned from being an artist to a representative. I don‘t have answers concerning the transformation. If you want to ask me what I have it is the debate within the experience I am still living. Added to that are the expectations from others: Am I allowed to talk about love stories or am I always representing a cause? What to do with this transformation into: a female Syrian artist living in exile!? I accept the mission of being a representative, but what to do with the other terms attached to the way I am perceived? We don‘t have enough experience to talk about the hosting community we are living in. The chances Syrian artists are getting are also to be questioned; is it a matter of sympathy or quality or even equality? It is all coming from good will, but what is better for the Syrian art scene and even for the European one? I would like to start a discussion to see what is expected from Syrian artists here.

146


I am changing my location, my audience and the language I use: does that mean I am changing the purpose? Maybe, as we exchanged in the notes before, I still believe it is too early to come back with answers. It is a human experience we all will go through to get to the answers. I believe that what is happening is challenging and raises questions and conflicts. Conflict is a very healthy situation. Reaching a neutral and dull zone is not what we are looking for. I am looking for innovative answers that are worth the experience, not ready ones concerning the meaning and effects of change I underwent. Ramzi Maqdisi: Good morning. When you ask someone from the socalled ‘Middle East’ they‘ll tell you that this is a huge subject – about how you present yourself, or who you are. From my point of view, I think the problem is that as artists, we are not seen first of all as artists. We are seen with our colour or with our history. As a filmmaker and actor, I start the discussion from here. I currently have no projects. When I was in Europe or in the US, they did not call me because of who I am as an artist. They called me because I‘m Palestinian and I look how you see me. And I have a very serious face. But even though I look serious I can tell you honestly that I just finished a comedy film! Actors and actresses, their job is to adapt themselves according to the character, people ask you to do that. In my experience, unfortunately, as a Palestinian actor, I am not given the opportunity often to really change and adapt to a character − I will tell you about when I played Martin Luther King in a theatre production. They tried to convince me that I look like him. I didn’t believe them. But finally, when I put on 15 kg more, okay − I had a resemblance to him. After watching the hours of videos on YouTube, I could see that. We are under a long occupation, and since 2011 I have been all the time, and my father and my brothers, in the same situation. As an actor, I never had the chance to not have this stigma on me, that people want to talk with me as Palestinian, or because they don‘t want to talk to me because I am Palestinian. This second one happens more often. When we did the production of Martin Luther King in Palestine The American Cultural Office wanted to do it in a Palestinian theatre with Palestinian artists. One day we were improvising, exploring when they assassinated Kennedy, some of us acted on an idea we had that we should raise the American flag – you can imagine – for some of us this is a complete ‘no’. It‘s improvisation. But when the show opened the Palestinian director said we would not raise the flag.

147


They call me an artist

This didn’t go down very well with the American Cultural Office and now, in order to get any funding from them, you have to put the image of the US flag on any documentation associated with your project – you can google it! Art and artists and whatever, we should be the most frank and honest people, out of every one. But this is not true, it is not how it is happening in the world. This is relating as to my experience, how art everywhere is becoming − I work in Europe, the US, Palestine, I think, we are at the same point. We are trying to produce art according to what we are watching on TV. And here we are failing. I have seen a lot of things about Syria. But it was not enough at least to express what are people living there. This is the question: What is the need or the reason we want to produce stories about this topic, and if we just have to take all the stories of tragedy that are happening each time, rather than something else, another dimension? I think, there is the question. I can talk a lot. Much more. But I would like to share with you, because this is my point of view – talking about all this stuff. Because I am an actor I can tell you about what happens when I go to castings. I have a very cold minimalist style. I don‘t have this way of shouting or raising my voice. I normally do castings with Europeans and they are surprised: Oh, you can raise up your voice, you can shout! This is how they start. My latest film was in Morocco. And I had to shout. And I found it really difficult. Even like the Americans who said, “You are doing well, why can‘t you shout?” And I said: I cannot see it, I‘m thinking about the stereotype, about the angry person. I don‘t want to fall into the trap of the stereotype. Just think about how they present Arabs. They wear white, and they have head-dresses on their head. Do you know that in most of the Middle East, hardly anybody dresses like this? You can watch a film called ‘The Body’, for example. Watch it. Everybody dresses the same. This is the market behind many projects, the stereotype. How we can just see the society in one colour or dimension. The funny thing is with how I look, and because I talk Spanish, when I work in Paris, a lot of people there think I am Spanish. And in Spain, because I have an accent, they think I‘m something else. You can’t recognise where I am from when you hear me talking, maybe you will just accept that I am Spanish. I don‘t know whether I can reach the point: we should be more specific about how to create a character and to be open to alternative, artistic and more honest ways to create characters and tell stories. Especially if you decide to do a story which is not about your country. That is very risky.

148


Liwaa Yazji and Ramzi Maqdisi

One of the best films I participated in was a French film, the first feature film of the young director. I am Palestinian, he is French. The story is about the First World War. The idea was: a refugee from Palestine goes to France and he tries to make his life there. You never learn where he comes from, but during the film, when hearing the dialogue between my character and a puppet he always carried with him, you can come to understand that this person comes from a hard place. My question was: Why don‘t you want to say where I come from? I was surprised, everybody wants that, it‘s so sexy to be Palestinian! For 70 years we‘ve been under occupation, but there are new stories and other people in the future. So, I want to do a film so that everybody can face this situation. This is great! I will tell you something: in Palestine, we have absolutely no money for art. All we do is co-productions with Europe, and that is the truth. Just try, if you really want to produce any piece, in any part of the world, let‘s forget what we hear on the TV. They try to manipulate us. I ask you to please try to think about and look at a specific subject, at specific characters that move beyond stereotypes. Ask yourself how you can tell the story. You know, there are so many talented people and forms of art in the Middle East. So many people who are capable of things that perhaps in Europe or the US people aren’t capable of, but they get forgotten or they don’t have the opportunity and the funding to make art how they want. Last year, the award for best actor at the Venice Film Festival went to the Palestinian actor Kamel El Basha. He acted in a Lebanese film about Lebanese-Palestinian relationships post-civil war. Kamel had a career acting, relatively unknown outside of Palestine, in theatres for 40 years. Until he won this award – it was his first film. This is an example of how there is always somebody who can do more than what we expect and also of how and where we get our information about a society or country.

149


AUTHORS / AUTORINNEN UND AUTOREN

Christopher Balme holds the chair in theatre studies at LMU Munich. His publications include Decolonizing the Stage: Theatrical syncretism and postcolonial drama, (Clarendon Press 1999); Pacific Performances: Theatricality and Cross-Cultural Encounter in the South Seas (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007);  Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies  (CUP 2008);  The theatrical public sphere  (CUP 2014). He is principal investigator of the ERC Advanced Grant “Developing Theatre: Building Expert Networks for Theatre in Emerging Countries after 1945”. Christopher Balme ist Professor für Theaterwissenschaft an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Veröffentlichungen zum interkulturellen und postkolonialen Theater sowie zur Propädeutik des Fachs: Decolonizing the Stage: Theatrical syncretism and postcolonial drama, (Clarendon Press 1999);  Einführung in die Theaterwissenschaft, 2014;  Pacific Performances: Theatricality and Cross-Cultural Encounter in the South Seas (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007); Cambridge Introduction to Theatre Studies  (2008):  The theatrical public sphere  (CUP 2014). Er leitet das ERC Advanced Grant “Developing Theatre: Building Expert Networks for Theatre in Emerging Countries after 1945”. Since 2017 Miriam Bornhak has been studying for her MA in Theatre Studies at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. She completed her Bachelor of Arts in Communication & Cultural Management at Zeppelin University in Friedrichshafen. Miriam Bornhak ist seit 2017 Masterstudentin der Theaterwissenschaft an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Ihr Bachelorstudium absolvierte sie in den Fächern Communication & Cultural Management an der Zeppelin Universität in Friedrichshafen. Marion Geiger, trained bookseller, studied Theatre studies and German in Leipzig and Munich. Before starting her master’s program at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, she worked as festival director of the 23rd Baden-Württembergische Theatertage at the Theater Ulm. Pub-

150


lications: “Hugo Ball’s Quest for Paradise. Relationship between the leitmotifs of life reform and the theater reform in the life and work of Hugo Balls”, in: Hugo Ball Almanac 2019. Studies and texts on Dada, edited by the city of Pirmasens, Munich 2019. Marion Geiger, ausgebildete Buchhändlerin, studierte Theaterwissenschaft und Germanistik in Leipzig und München. Vor Beginn des Masterstudiums an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in München war sie als Festivalleitung der 23. Baden-Württembergischen Theatertage am Theater Ulm tätig. Veröffentlichungen: „Hugo Balls Suche nach dem Paradies. Bezüge zwischen den Leitmotiven der Lebensreform und der Theaterreform im Leben und Wirken Hugo Balls“, in: Hugo-Ball-Almanach 2019. Studien und Texte zu Dada, hrsg. von der Stadt Pirmasens, München 2019. Ulrike Guérot, political scientist, founder and director of the European Democracy Lab at the European School of Governance (EUSG), in Berlin and since spring 2016 Professor and Head of the Department for European Policy and Democracy Research at Danube University Krems / Austria. She has worked for 20 years in think tanks in Paris, Brussels, London, Washington and Berlin on issues of European integration and Europe in the world and knows EU-Europe, its institutions and weaknesses like no other. Ulrike Guérot, Politikwissenschaftlerin, Gründerin und Direktorin des European Democracy Labs an der European School of Governance (EUSG) in Berlin und seit Frühjahr 2016 Professorin und Leiterin des Departments für Europapolitik und Demokratieforschung an der Donau-Universität Krems/Österreich. Sie hat zwanzig Jahre in Thinktanks in Paris, Brüssel, London, Washington und Berlin zu Fragen der europäischen Integration und Europas in der Welt gearbeitet und kennt EU-Europa, seine Institutionen und Schwächen wie kein(e) zweite(r). Lisa Haselbauer was born in Fürstenfeldbruck near Munich, where she studies Theatre studies at Ludwig-Maximilians-University. Her research focus is costume design, which she examines beyond its exteriority in conjunction with other sign systems. In addition, she has worked as a costume designer since 2016 both in the independent scene and for the Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz. Lisa Haselbauer wurde in Fürstenfeldbruck in der Nähe von München geboren und studiert dort an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Thea-

151


Authors / Autorinnen und Autoren

terwissenschaft. Ihren Forschungsschwerpunkt bildet das Kostümwesen, das sie über den Schauwert hinaus in Verbindung mit anderen Zeichensystemen untersucht. Daneben arbeitet sie seit 2016 als Kostümbildnerin und war sowohl in der freien Szene als auch für das Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz tätig. Klaudia Laś is a student of Theatre studies at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich as part of the Erasmus+ program. She completed her bachelor’s degree in theatre studies and German at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. Klaudia Laś ist Studentin der Theaterwissenschaft an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München im Rahmen des Erasmus+-Programms. Ihren Bachelorabschluss absolvierte sie in den Fächern Theaterwissenschaft und Germanistik an der Jagiellonen Universität in Krakau, Polen. Elisabeth Luft is a masters student of theatre studies at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. She completed her bachelor’s degree in German Language and Literature as well as Media Cultural studies at the University of Cologne. Elisabeth Luft ist Masterstudentin der Theaterwissenschaft an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Ihr Bachelorstudium absolvierte sie in den Fächern Deutsche Sprache und Literatur sowie Medienkulturwissenschaft an der Universität zu Köln.  Ursula Maier studied theatre studies and law at Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. Furthermore she also holds a diploma in forestry from Ludwig-Maximilians-University and the Technical University of Munich. Ursula Maier studierte Theaterwissenschaft und Rechtswissenschaft an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in München. Außerdem hat sie ein Diplom-Studium in Forstwissenschaft an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität und der Technischen Universität München absolviert. Robert Menasse studied German, Philosophy and Political Science in Vienna, Salzburg and Messina, and received his doctorate in 1980 with a thesis on the character of the outsider in literature. Menasse then spent six years at the University of São Paulo, first as a lecturer for Austrian literature, then as a guest lecturer at the Institute for Literary Theory. There he held lectures on philosophical and aesthetic theories, including on Hegel,

152


Authors / Autorinnen und Autoren

Lukács, Benjamin and Adorno. Since his return from Brazil in 1988, Robert Menasse has been a writer and essayist based mainly in Vienna. Robert Menasse studierte Germanistik, Philosophie sowie Politikwissenschaft in Wien, Salzburg und Messina und promovierte im Jahr 1980 mit einer Arbeit über den „Typus des Außenseiters im Literaturbetrieb“. Menasse lehrte anschließend sechs Jahre – zunächst als Lektor für österreichische Literatur, dann als Gastdozent am Institut für Literaturtheorie – an der Universität São Paulo. Dort hielt er vor allem Lehrveranstaltungen über philosophische und ästhetische Theorien ab, u. a. über Hegel, Lukács, Benjamin und Adorno. Seit seiner Rückkehr aus Brasilien 1988 lebt Robert Menasse als Literat und kulturkritischer Essayist hauptsächlich in Wien. Luisa Reisinger is currently studying theatre studies and philosophy at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University. She completed her bachelor’s degree in theater studies and musicology at the University of Bayreuth. In addition to her studies, she works as a freelance journalist for the theatre magazine Die Deutsche Bühne. Luisa Reisinger studiert derzeit Theaterwissenschaft und Philosophie an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität. Ihren Bachelor hat sie im Fach Musiktheaterwissenschaft an der Universität Bayreuth absolviert. Neben ihrem Studium arbeitet sie als freie Journalistin u. a. für das Theaterfachmagazin Die Deutsche Bühne. Kathrin Röggla lives as a writer in Berlin. She has published many volumes of prose, most recently Late Night Show: Uncanny Stories (2016), essays such as The wrong question: on theatre, politics and the art not to forget how to fear (2015) and numerous plays, most recently Normal earners (2017), as well as radio plays and a documentary film (ZDF). She has received numerous awards for her work, including the Arthur Schnitzler Prize (2012) or the „Nestroy“ for the best play (2011). Between 2001 and 2011 she travelled extensively including to Georgia, Iran, Central Asia, USA, Japan, Yemen, India and China. Kathrin Röggla is a member of the Darmstadt Academy for Language and Literature as well as the Academy of Arts in Berlin where she has been vice president since 2015. Her website is www.kathrin-roeggla.de. Kathrin Röggla lebt als Schriftstellerin in Berlin. Sie veröffentlichte viele Bände an Prosa, zuletzt Nachtsendung. Unheimliche Geschichten (2016), Essays wie Die falsche Frage. Über Theater, Politik und die Kunst, das

153


Authors / Autorinnen und Autoren

Fürchten nicht zu verlernen (2015) und zahlreiche Theatertexte, zuletzt Normalverdiener (2017), sowie Hörspiele und einen Dokumentarfilm (ZDF). Für ihre literarischen Arbeiten wurde sie mit zahlreichen Literaturpreisen ausgezeichnet, u. a. mit dem Arthur-Schnitzler-Preis (2012) oder dem „Nestroy“ für das beste Theaterstück (2011). In den Jahren 2001 bis 2011 unternahm sie zahlreiche Reisen, u. a. nach Georgien, dem Iran, Zentralasien, USA, Japan, Jemen, Indien, China. Kathrin Röggla ist Mitglied der Darmstädter Akademie für Sprache und Dichtung sowie der Akademie der Künste in Berlin, deren Vizepräsidentin sie seit 2015 ist. Ihre Website ist www.kathrin-roeggla.de. Claus Michael Six, B.A. in Art History (2018) with a thesis on the history cycle of Wilhelm IV. at the Munich court of the 16th century; Currently Master’s Degree in theater studies at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich and in parallel preparation of the State Teaching Examination in the subjects of Classical Philology and German. Claus Michael Six, B.A. in Kunstgeschichte (2018) mit einer Arbeit über den Historienzyklus von Wilhelm IV. am Münchner Hof des 16. Jahrhunderts; derzeit Master-Studium Theaterwissenschaft an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München und parallel Vorbereitung des Staatsexamens in den Fächern Altphilologie und Germanistik. After starting his career as an architect, Axel Tangerding founded the Meta Theater in Munich in 1980, where he works as artistic director. Here, the exchange with non-European artists plays an important role. Under his direction, the Music Theater NOW Award-winning piece Musicophilia, based on Oliver Sack’s bestselling brain and music, has garnered international acclaim, both in Europe and China, Finland, Ukraine, Canada and the United States. He has received numerous awards for his intercultural, international artistic commitment and his contribution to cultural mediation. Among them, 2002 the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, 2012, the Tassilo Culture Prize of the Süddeutsche Zeitung and 2016, the Wilhelm Hausenstein award of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts in the section theatre. Axel Tangerding gründete nach beruflichen Anfängen als Architekt 1980 das Meta Theater in München, wo er als künstlerischer Leiter tätig ist. Dabei spielt der Austausch mit außereuropäischen Künstlern eine bedeutende Rolle. Unter seiner Regie entstand das mit dem Music Theatre NOW Award ausgezeichnete Stück Musicophilia nach Oliver Sacks’ Bestseller

154


Authors / Autorinnen und Autoren

über Gehirn und Musik, das international Beachtung fand, sowohl in Europa als auch in China, Finnland, der Ukraine, Kanada und den USA. Für sein interkulturelles, international künstlerisches Engagement und seine Verdienste um kulturelle Vermittlung erhielt er zahlreiche Auszeichnungen. Darunter 2002 das Bundesverdienstkreuz, 2012 den Tassilo Kulturpreis der Süddeutschen Zeitung und 2016 die Wilhelm Hausenstein Ehrung der Bayerischen Akademie der Schönen Künste in der Sektion Theater.

155


RECHERCHEN 140 Thomas Wieck . Regie: Herbert König 139 Florian Evers . Theater der Selektion 137 Jost Hermand . Die aufhaltsame Wirkungslosigkeit eines Klassikers Brecht-Studien 135 Flucht und Szene Perspektiven und Formen eines Theaters der Fliehenden 134 Willkommen Anderswo – sich spielend begegnen Theaterarbeiten mit Einheimischen und Geflüchteten 133 Clemens Risi . Oper in performance 132 Helmar Schramm . Das verschüttete Schweigen Texte für und wider das Theater, die Kunst und die Gesellschaft 131 Vorstellung Europa – Performing Europe Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven auf Europa im Theater der Gegenwart 130 Günther Heeg . Das Transkulturelle Theater 129 Applied Theatre . Rahmen und Positionen 128 Torben Ibs . Umbrüche und Aufbrüche 127 Günter Jeschonnek. Darstellende Künste im öffentlichen Raum 126 Christoph Nix . Theater_Macht_Politik 125 Henning Fülle . Freies Theater 124 Du weißt ja nicht, was die Zukunft bringt . Die Expertengespräche zu „Die Schutzflehenden / Die Schutzbefohlenen“ am Schauspiel Leipzig 123 Hans-Thies Lehmann . Brecht lesen 121 Theater als Intervention . Politiken ästhetischer Praxis 120 Vorwärts zu Goethe? . Faust-Aufführungen im DDR-Theater 119 Infame Perspektiven . Grenzen und Möglichkeiten von Performativität 118 Italienisches Theater . Geschichte und Gattungen von 1480 bis 1890 117 Momentaufnahme Theaterwissenschaft Leipziger Vorlesungen 116 Kathrin Röggla . Die falsche Frage Vorlesungen über Dramatik 115 Auftreten . Wege auf die Bühne 114 FIEBACH . Theater. Wissen. Machen 113 Die Zukunft der Oper zwischen Hermeneutik und Performativität 112 Parallele Leben . Ein Dokumentartheaterprojekt 110 Dokument, Fälschung, Wirklichkeit Dokumentarisches Theater 109 Reenacting History: Theater & Geschichte 108 Horst Hawemann . Leben üben – Improvisationen und Notate 107 Roland Schimmelpfennig . Ja und Nein Vorlesungen über Dramatik 106 Theater in Afrika – Zwischen Kunst und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit


RECHERCHEN 105 Wie? Wofür? Wie weiter? Ausbildung für das Theater von morgen 104 Theater im arabischen Sprachraum 103 Ernst Schumacher . Tagebücher 1992 – 2011 102 Lorenz Aggermann . Der offene Mund 101 Rainer Simon . Labor oder Fließband? 100 Rimini Protokoll . ABCD 99

Dirk Baecker . Wozu Theater?

98

Das Melodram . Ein Medienbastard

97

Magic Fonds – Berichte über die magische Kraft des Kapitals

96

Heiner Goebbels . Ästhetik der Abwesenheit Texte zum Theater

95

Wolfgang Engler . Verspielt Essays und Gespräche

93

Adolf Dresen . Der Einzelne und das Ganze Dokumentation

91

Die andere Szene . Theaterarbeit und Theaterproben im Dokumentarfilm

84

B. K. Tragelehn . Der fröhliche Sisyphos

83

Die neue Freiheit . Perspektiven des bulgarischen Theaters Essays

82

Working for Paradise . Der Lohndrücker. Heiner Müller Werkbuch

81

Die Kunst der Bühne – Positionen des zeitgenössischen Theaters Essays

79

Woodstock of Political Thinking . Zwischen Kunst und Wissenschaft Essays

76

Falk Richter . TRUST Inszenierungsdokumentation

75

Müller Brecht Theater . Brecht-Tage 2009 Diskussionen

74

Frank Raddatz . Der Demetriusplan Essay

72

Radikal weiblich? Theaterautorinnen heute Aufsätze

71

per.SPICE! . Wirklichkeit und Relativität des Ästhetischen Essays

70

Reality Strikes Back II – Tod der Repräsentation Aufsätze und Diskussionen

67

Go West . Theater in Flandern und den Niederlanden Aufsätze

66

Das Angesicht der Erde . Brechts Ästhetik der Natur Brecht-Tage 2008

65

Sabine Kebir . „Ich wohne fast so hoch wie er“ Steffin und Brecht

64

Theater in Japan Aufsätze

63

Vasco Boenisch . Krise der Kritik?

62

Anja Klöck . Heiße West- und kalte Ost-Schauspieler?

61

Theaterlandschaften in Mittel-, Ost- und Südosteuropa Essays

60

Elisabeth Schweeger . Täuschung ist kein Spiel mehr Aufsätze

58

Helene Varopoulou . Passagen . Reflexionen zum zeitgenössischen Theater

57

Kleist oder die Ordnung der Welt

56

Im Labyrinth . Theodoros Terzopoulos begegnet Heiner Müller Essay und Gespräch


RECHERCHEN 55

Martin Maurach . Betrachtungen über den Weltlauf . Kleist 1933 – 1945

54

Strahlkräfte . Festschrift für Erika Fischer-Lichte Essays

52

Angst vor der Zerstörung Tagungsbericht

49

Joachim Fiebach . Inszenierte Wirklichkeit

48

Die Zukunft der Nachgeborenen . Brecht-Tage 2007 Vorträge und Diskussion

46

Sabine Schouten . Sinnliches Spüren

42

Sire, das war ich – Zu Heiner Müllers Stück Leben Gundlings Friedrich von Preußen Werkbuch

41

Friedrich Dieckmann . Bilder aus Bayreuth Essays

40

Durchbrochene Linien . Zeitgenössisches Theater in der Slowakei Aufsätze

39

Stefanie Carp . Berlin – Zürich – Hamburg Essays

37

Das Analoge sträubt sich gegen das Digitale? Tagungsdokumentation

36

Politik der Vorstellung . Theater und Theorie

32

Theater in Polen . 1990 – 2005 Aufsätze

31

Brecht und der Sport . Brecht-Tage 2005 Vorträge und Diskussionen

30

VOLKSPALAST . Zwischen Aktivismus und Kunst Aufsätze

28

Carl Hegemann . Plädoyer für die unglückliche Liebe Aufsätze

27

Johannes Odenthal . Tanz Körper Politik Aufsätze

26

Gabriele Brandstetter . BILD-SPRUNG Aufsätze

23

Brecht und der Krieg . Brecht-Tage 2004 Vorträge und Diskussionen

22

Falk Richter – Das System Materialien Gespräche Textfassungen zu „Unter Eis“

19

Die Insel vor Augen . Festschrift für Frank Hörnigk

15

Szenarien von Theater (und) Wissenschaft Aufsätze

14

Jeans, Rock & Vietnam . Amerikanische Kultur in der DDR

13

Manifeste europäischen Theaters Theatertexte von Grotowski bis Schleef

12

Hans-Thies Lehmann . Das Politische Schreiben Essays

11

Brechts Glaube . Brecht-Tage 2002 Vorträge und Diskussionen

10

Friedrich Dieckmann . Die Freiheit ein Augenblick Aufsätze

9

Gerz . Berliner Ermittlung Inszenierungsbericht

8

Jost Hermand . Brecht-Aufsätze

7

Martin Linzer . „Ich war immer ein Opportunist…“ Gespräche

6

Zersammelt – Die inoffizielle Literaturszene der DDR Vorträge und Diskussionen

4

Rot gleich Braun . Brecht-Tage 2000 Vorträge und Diskussionen

3

Adolf Dresen . Wieviel Freiheit braucht die Kunst? Aufsätze

1

Maßnehmen . Zu Brechts Stück „Die Maßnahme“ Vorträge und Diskussionen

Erhältlich in Ihrer Buchhandlung oder unter www.theaterderzeit.de


Quo vadis Europa? Wohin die freie Szene? Welche Tragkraft haben in einem von Euroskepsis geprägten Klima die unabhängigen darstellenden Künste, deren Arbeitsbegriff sich auf Werte wie Toleranz und Offenheit stützt? Sind diese Werte konstituierend für Europa, wie können sie gestärkt werden? Diese Fragen standen im Mittelpunkt des Treffens des International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts (IETM) in München, das in diesem zweisprachigen Buch dokumentiert wird. Im Zentrum der Reflexionen rund um die Rolle der darstellenden Kunst in Europa stehen Postkolonialismus, Diversität sowie Visionen für die Zukunft. Mit Beiträgen von Ulrike Guérot, Robert Menasse und Kathrin Röggla.

ISBN 978-3-95749-201-2

www.theaterderzeit.de

Res publica Europa – Networking the performing arts in a future Europe

Quo vadis Europa? And where are the independent performing arts heading? Driven by values such as tolerance and openness, what power do the independent performing arts possess in a climate dominated by Euroscepticism? Are those values essential for Europe and if so, how can they be strengthened? These were the questions focussed on at the IETM’s Plenary Meeting Munich (International Network for Contemporary Performing Arts) which is documented in this bi-lingual book. Central to the reflexions around the role of the performing arts in Europe were the topics “Post-colonialism”, “Diversity” and “Visions for the Future”. Including contributions by Ulrike Guérot, Robert Menasse and Kathrin Röggla.

9,5mm

Recherchen 147

Rücken – 14025.04.19 mm TdZ_Rech_147_IETM München_2019_Cover_fin2.qxp__ 14:19 Seite 1

Titel – 140 mm

Res publica Europa Networking the performing arts in a future Europe Christopher Balme, Axel Tangerding (Hg./Ed.)

Profile for Theater der Zeit

Res publica Europa. Networking the performing arts in a future Europe  

Quo vadis Europa? And where are the independent performing arts heading? Driven by values such as tolerance and openness, what power do the...

Res publica Europa. Networking the performing arts in a future Europe  

Quo vadis Europa? And where are the independent performing arts heading? Driven by values such as tolerance and openness, what power do the...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded