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campus resource centers

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s you made your way down M Street to campus for the first time, you probably imagined spending every day grabbing lunch at Sweetgreen, buying groceries at Dean & DeLuca and dining in style at Cafe Milano. But soon enough, your bank account will be drained and you’ll have to return to closer and cheaper pastures to keep yourself fuelled. Make the best of your on-campus options with this handy guide.

ACCEPTS MEAL

O’Donovan Hall ✔✔✔

O’Donovan Hall, lovingly (or, at least, commonly) known as Leo’s, is Georgetown’s only dedicated dining hall, boasting a range of options for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Extensively renovated just last year, Leo’s is now split into two distinct floors: The bottom floor is all-you-can-eat, and the top includes a range of vendors offering set meals in exchange for meal swipes. On the lower level, you’ll find hot food, vegetarian and vegan options, meals accommodating students with gluten, nut or other allergies and many other options including fruit, cereal and desserts. Lower Leo’s is renowned for its weekend brunch, offering not only a range of food choices but also the opportunity to debrief your friends on the previous night. If you’re looking for a more distinctive flavor, you’d better aim for Upstairs Leo’s. The top floor includes six separate vendors with rotating menu selections. Whisk, a bakery and coffee shop, is a popular option for a quick breakfast before class. 5Spice offers Asian-inspired fare emulating a range of regional recipes. Launch Test Kitchen, the most eclectic of the bunch, plays host to a variety of menus, from Indian food one week to traditional American chicken and waffles the next. Bodega offers pre-made sandwiches and groceries, as well as hot homestyle meals until as late as 11 p.m. Olive Branch cooks up Mediterranean food, to include Italian personal pizzas and Greek and Spanish cuisine. Finally, Sazón, a Latin-inspired option, tantalizes with customizable salsa, guacamole and a healthy helping of chips. No matter what’s on your plate, Leo’s will undoubtedly become the social hub of your freshman year, a place where you will share countless meals and conversations with your classmates. When you go home for break, you might even miss it.

Bulldog Tavern ✔✔✔

Located in the Healey Family Student Center below New South, Bulldog Tavern has a cozy restaurant and bar atmosphere that will make you feel like you are dining out without ever having to leave campus. Partly staffed by students, the tavern features a menu full of pub fare such as nachos, burgers, bread-bowl soups, wings and

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ACCEPTS DEBIT DOLLARS

a signature Nutella shake. Wednesday’s Bulldog trivia nights are a student favorite, and the takeout window provides a bountiful supply of cheesy fries to hit the spot during study breaks.

The Hilltoss ✔✔

Students of Georgetown, Inc. — better known as The Corp — opened Hilltoss in 2014 to meet the ever-expanding demand for avocado toast, salads, smoothies and acai bowls. In 2018, The Corp replaced Hilltoss’ smoothie and acai bowl offerings with Grounded, an espresso bar with an expanded breakfast menu that finally provides the Healey Family Student Center with an easily accessible coffee shop. Students can now find their espresso, bagel sandwiches, parfaits, made-to-order salads — and, yes, avocado toast — all in the same place.

ACCEPTS FLEX DOLLARS

come in, conveniently dispersed throughout campus so that you’re never far from a cup of coffee or tea to keep you going. Midnight MUG, located in Lauinger Library, is an indispensable study savior open as late as 2 a.m. on Sunday through Wednesday. The ICC’s More Uncommon Grounds coffee stand will fuel your pre-class needs, and Uncommon Grounds, located on the second floor of the Georgetown University Bookstore, combines The Corp’s signature blends and breakfast options with convenient access to the serene Leavey Esplanade.

Epicurean and Co. ✔✔

Sometimes, you might not have time to sit down and grab a full meal in between classes. Never fear, Georgetown has you covered. Down the hall from Hoya Court inside the Leavey Center, the Grab ‘n’ Go Market Place Express offers a selection of hot meals as well as sandwiches, salads, wraps, bagels, chips, fruit or yogurt for a single meal swipe.

Your freshman year will not be complete without many trips to Epicurean and Company. Epi boasts fully stocked sushi, noodle and salad bars, a large buffet and a range of made-toorder sandwiches and pizzas. But the true stars of the menu are the quesadillas and onion rings — late-night staples of the Georgetown social scene, especially on the weekends. Epi is located adjacent to Darnall Hall and open nearly all hours, only closing briefly between late Sunday night and early Monday morning, making it ideal for midnight snacks and postgame gorging.

Vital Vittles/Hoya Snaxa ✔✔

Hoya Court ✔✔✔

Grab 'n’ Go ✔

If you live in Village C or Darnall Hall, Hoya Snaxa and Vital Vittles will soon become your goto stops for dorm room snacks and groceries. The Corp-run stores could sustain you for an entire semester: Snaxa, located under the archway in the Southwest Quadrangle complex, will satisfy your chip, popcorn and slushie needs. Vittles, located inside the Leavey Center, is stocked full of groceries, microwaveable meals and pharmacy products to save you the trip to Safeway or CVS.

The Midnight MUG, Uncommon Grounds, and More Uncommon GroundS ✔✔

Although you may have survived high school caffeine-free, you might soon find yourself desperate for a pick-me-up before a long night of studying or your 9 a.m. class. This is where The Corp’s trio of coffee shops

The newly revamped Hoya Court is wellsuited to those who spend long hours in the Leavey Center or have classes in Regents Hall or the Intercultural Center. The Chick-fil-A fastfood joint and Crop Chop salad and smoothie spot are dominant forces on the Georgetown dining scene. While these two stellar options are sure to grab your eye, don’t forget to look around the corner to Royal Jacket Deli for creative sandwiches.

Einstein Bros. Bagels ✔✔✔

Located on the second floor of the Car Barn on the easternmost edge of campus is Einstein Bros. Bagels, the hidden gem of Georgetown dining. Einstein’s is fully stocked with bagels, sandwiches, smoothies, coffee and shmears of all kinds. A meal swipe at Einstein’s can get you a warm bagel sandwich, coffee and a snack, which may be just what you need before you start your day.


From the Editor’s Desk Dear Readers, If your first days on campus are anything like mine were, they’ll be filled with both incredible excitement and nearconstant confusion. The magazine in your hands is your cheat sheet: a guide to navigating your first days and months at Georgetown, from how to furnish your dorm room to how to find your first parties. Every year our almost 300 staff members produce this magazine to help you transition to life at Georgetown. Hopefully, your first few days on campus have led you to see all that makes us love this place. But if you’re feeling a bit stressed and overwhelmed by the to-dos, the icebreakers, and the info sessions, rest assured — we know how it feels. This guide is designed to help reduce the anxieties of the first few days of college and show you all the reasons why we love Georgetown. See this as your guide to making Georgetown feel like home. Questions abound: “How do I find food at Leo’s? Where do I send my prescriptions? What is ‘Club Lau’?” We’ve got you covered. Generations of mistakes made and fortunate discoveries fill the pages before you. I speak for the entire staff when I say I hope my freshman self asking what DFMO means proves helpful to you. I also speak for the entire staff when I say I hope to meet you soon. I hope that reading even just one of the articles one of our amazing staff members has put together will inspire you to get to know us more, whether by visiting us at thehoya.com, picking up one of our weekly print editions, or better yet, meeting all of us at the Council of Advisory Boards Fair or our information session. For even more advice to guide you through your first days at Georgetown, visit us at newstudent.thehoya.com. Welcome to Georgetown, and Hoya Saxa.

Ian Scoville Editor-in-Chief

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ABOUT THE HOYA The Hoya is the oldest and largest student newspaper of Georgetown University, serving as the university’s newspaper of record since 1920. It is published online daily and in print every Friday during the school year, and each issue also includes a weekly lifestyle magazine, The Guide. The Hoya also publishes a blog: The Fourth Edition. It distributes free copies to various locations across campus and the Georgetown neighborhood during the academic year, and continues to publish online during summers and between print issues. The Hoya has been a central part of the university community since its first publication in 1920. Although not financially independent from the university, The Hoya is produced, managed and edited entirely by students. Over 250 students are involved in the publication of the paper as reporters, photographers, designers, editors and business staff. To find out more about our publication, check out our Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.


table of contents Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Four Houses . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Residence Halls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 On-Campus Dining . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Campus Resource Centers . . . . . . . . . 9 DORM ESSENTIALS . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Errands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Study Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Social Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Part-Time Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Hoya Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 EATING IN D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 SHOPPING IN D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 MUSEUMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Getting Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 District Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Nature Outings . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Hoya History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 News to Know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Student Clubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Georgetown Dictionary . . . . . . . . . . 30 Bucket List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Follow @thehoya on Twitter and Instagram, and find us on Facebook for updates on special issues, contests and breaking news.

PRODUCTION STAFF Ian scoville

anna kooken

kathryn baker

cat kendall

anna kovacevich

caroline pappas

Editor-in-Chief

Executive Editor

Managing Editor

Design Editor

Copy Chief

Photo Editor

SHEEL PATEL/THE HOYA

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS Susanna Blount, Madeline Charbonneau, Ethan Cohn, Erin Doherty, Sarah Donofrio, Mac Dressman, Maya Gandhi, Amber Gillette, Juliette Leader, Subul Malik, Sheel Patel, Christian Paz, Kate Rose, Will Simon, Robert Treval, Amanda Van Orden

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map (you’ll Dining in dcneed it) 14

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Copley Lawn

Healy Beach

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P St. NW

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N St. NW

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Prospect St. NW

M St. NW

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Georgetown University

Shaw Field

est. 1789

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1. Healy Hall 2. Lauinger Library 3. Village A 4. Healey Family Student Center, New South Hall 5. O'Donovan Hall 6. Southwest Quad 7. Village C East 8. Village C West 9. Harbin Hall 10. Maguire Hall 11. Isaac Hawkins Hall 12. Wolfington Hall 13. John R. Thompson Jr. Intercollegiate Athletic Center

14. McDonough Arena 15. Heating and Cooling Plant 16. Francis J. Heyden Observatory 17. Yates Field House 18. Rafik B. Hariri Building/ McDonough School of Business 19. Leavey Center 20. Regents Hall 21. Intercultural Center 22. Red Square 23. Copley Hall 24. Gonda Theatre 25. New North

26. Old North 27. Dahlgren Quad 28. Dahlgren Chapel 29. Jesuit Graveyard 30. White-Gravenor Hall 31. Reiss Science Building 32. Pedro Arrupe, S.J. Hall 33. Henle Village 34. Darnall Hall, Epicurian and Co., Student Health Center 35. St. Mary's Hall 36. Alumni Square/ Village B 37. Poulton Hall

38. Walsh Building, LXR, Nevils 39. Car Barn Neighborhood Roads Car-Accessible Route Walking Paths

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The four houses

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or the majority of incoming Hoyas who grew up reading Harry Potter, one of the most #basic Instagram choices during those first weeks on campus is a picture of Healy Hall with a caption alluding to Hogwarts. Beyond the visual resemblance to Hogwarts, there is another striking similarity Georgetown has in common with the magical world: the four schools that act as Muggle versions of the four houses.

ALEXANDER BROWN/THE HOYA

COL

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MCDONOUGH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

MSB

MICHELLE LUBERTO/THE HOYA

SFS

STEPHANIE YUAN/THE HOYA

nhs

Gryffindor

Slytherin

Ravenclaw

Hufflepuff

Much like Gryffindor, which stole the show as the obvious star of the series, the College is the most popular of the four schools. Healy Hall, with its neo-Medieval architecture most resembling the towering battlements of Hogwarts, is home to many classrooms for the College. From philosophy to physics and everything in between, the College encompasses the widest range of students and represents the greatest variety of Georgetown. With a diverse set of requirements, the College encourages its students to be well-rounded in all subjects and skills. Freshmen often enter the College undecided on a major, displaying the courage of a Gryffindor in facing the unknown.

Known for its pristine building and “MSBros” in suits, the business students are living in style in the pursuit of money. As the Slytherins of campus, though, these Hoyas sometimes draw jealousy from students of the other three schools for notoriously having no class on Fridays. To truly thrive in the MSB, one needs to be especially smart and cunning. Students need to beat the curve and survive accounting requirements, along with copious amounts of group projects. Business students are ambitious, driven and often the epitome of professional success in the cutthroat, dog-eat-dog world of finance.

Clearly the Ravenclaws of the university, students in the SFS earn degrees from one of the most prestigious schools in the world for international affairs. The school is home to eight majors and 18 certificates, many having complicated, long titles with a worldly air. Students pride themselves on their academics, surviving a 17-course core curriculum, achieving language proficiency and passing the infamous “Map of the Modern World” exam. SFS students are also given the chance to be taught by famous professors, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. Classes in the SFS are where you are most likely to be seated next to a future world leader — as in the case of former President Bill Clinton (SFS ’68).

With an overall focus on health and bettering lives, whether or not they pursue nursing, NHS students are caring and kind. They are quintessential Hufflepuffs. The smallest of the four schools, the NHS includes four majors and six general courses all students complete. While it is sometimes referred to as “the nursing school” to the chagrin of many, the three other majors include global health, human science and health care management and policy. Due to the small size of the school, it is known for fostering the closest sense of community, especially as its students attend classes in the far-off St. Mary’s Hall.


residence halls

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ou’re moving onto Georgetown University’s campus. Questions abound: Will you have a cool roommate? Are the bathrooms really as bad as people keep saying? Where will you store your archived copies of The Hoya? Unfortunately, we can’t guarantee a cool roommate, but we can happily assure varying degrees of satisfaction on all other fronts. One of four freshman dorms — Village C, Harbin Hall, New South Hall or Darnall Hall — will be the new home to your bins, suitcases and that one weird reading lamp you’re not quite sure where to put. Whichever dorm you move into, you’re sure to enjoy the comfort of a new home and the lasting friendships of a new community. All four freshman residence halls have at least one chaplain-in-residence, one resident assistant on each floor and convenient (read: existent and usually-but-not-always operating correctly) laundry facilities. However, each dorm has its own unique layouts, amenities and floor culture. Here’s a rundown of what to expect.

village c

FILE PHOTO: IAN TICE/THE HOYA

Georgetown’s newest freshman dorm, completed in 1986, is split into two separate wings. The west wing (don’t forget to take the classic “Look! I live in the West Wing! In Washington, D.C.!” photo) houses only freshmen, and the east wing includes freshmen, transfer students and upperclassmen. Village C is the only freshman hall with private bathrooms — an attractive feature for the particularly germophobic among us, for whom the thought of using a communal shower roils the stomach. The trade-off is that Village C rooms — mostly doubles, with a few scattered singles — run smaller than small; you might want to leave that extra “just in case” bin of clothes in the car. The floors are moderately sized, with around 30 to 40 students each, and the tight hallways and easily accessible common rooms lend themselves to meeting people quickly and often. Nearby, you’ll enjoy convenient access to O’Donovan Hall (better known as Leo’s), the Healey Family Student Center and the sidewalk/wind tunnel leading to Cooper Field. Life in Village C can feel secluded compared to life in other dorms, given its relatively small floors and rooms, but this often fosters tight-knit floor friendships. The dorm’s convenient location and private bathrooms make it one of the more coveted first-year residences on campus.

IAN TICE/THE HOYA

A few decades older than Village C, Harbin is best known as the one-time digs of former President Bill Clinton (SFS ’68). Harbin residents live in double rooms arranged according to gender in clusters, which are groups of eight same-gender rooms centered around bathrooms. Harbin also houses an all-girls floor, an option that incoming students can request during the housing process. Its student-to-floor ratio is slightly higher than that of Village C, and its location puts it about halfway between the Leavey Center and the front lawn, a relatively convenient location for most trips on campus. A tip from past Harbin residents: The discrete staircase leading up from the building’s patio to New North will almost certainly shave minutes off your travel time crossing campus.

ISABEL BINAMIRA/THE HOYA

new south

FILE PHOTO: IAN TICE/THE HOYA

You’ll find Georgetown’s most state school-esque dorm room in New South. With never-ending hallways, almost 100 students per floor and a party dorm reputation, New South is a polarizing option. It is often loud and, depending on your proximity to the communal bathrooms, prone to cause some unfortunate encounters, like running into a group of kids you’ve never seen before on the other side of the building wearing only your towel. New South rooms also feature a sink, mirror and medicine cabinet, which make for a relatively easy before-bed routine. With such populous floors, the residence hall’s social culture can be overwhelming to some. But don’t be discouraged: For every impossibly outgoing social butterfly on your floor, there are five other pleasantly awkward students trying to weather the tumultuous first weeks of college alongside you.

harbin

darnall

Let’s address the elephant in the room: Darnall gets a bad rap. Yes, it’s the only freshman residence hall on the far north side of campus. Yes, it’s closer to the medical school and the hospital than the dining hall or the student center. But alumni of Darnall remember the building’s hidden luxuries: easy access to the Leavey Center (Starbucks? Check. Meal swipe options? Check. Study spaces? Throw a textbook and it’s bound to land on a convenient table with a great view of campus.); a short stumble to upperclassman social hub Henle Village; and near-dangerous access to 24-hour quesadillas at Epicurean and Company. Darnall is also the only dorm with twin beds instead of twin XL, so plan your Bed, Bath & Beyond shopping spree accordingly. Its floors are slightly larger than those in Harbin and they boast large hallways with a spacious, central common room fit for cooking and conversation. Its rooms are also fitted with full-length mirrors, so you can ensure both your classroom and late-night outfits are always on point. Darnall has some of the closest communities in every freshman class, created perhaps by its isolation from the rest of campus and the opportunity to take late-night conversation downstairs to Epi.

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on-campus dining

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s you made your way down M Street to campus for the first time, you probably imagined spending every day grabbing lunch at Sweetgreen, buying groceries at Dean & DeLuca and dining in style at Cafe Milano. But soon enough, your bank account will be drained and you’ll have to return to closer and cheaper pastures to keep yourself fuelled. Make the best of your on-campus options with this handy guide.

ACCEPTS MEAL SWIPES

O’Donovan Hall ✔✔✔

O’Donovan Hall, lovingly (or, at least, commonly) known as Leo’s, is Georgetown’s only dedicated dining hall, boasting a range of options for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Extensively renovated just last year, Leo’s is now split into two distinct floors: The bottom floor is all-you-can-eat, and the top includes a range of vendors offering set meals in exchange for meal swipes. On the lower level, you’ll find hot food, vegetarian and vegan options, meals accommodating students with gluten, nut or other allergies and many other options including fruit, cereal and desserts. Lower Leo’s is renowned for its weekend brunch, offering not only a range of food choices, but also the opportunity to debrief your friends on the previous night. If you’re looking for a more distinctive flavor, you’d better aim for upstairs Leo’s. The top floor includes six separate vendors with rotating menu selections. Whisk, a bakery and coffee shop, is a popular option for a quick breakfast before class. 5Spice offers Asian-inspired fare emulating a range of regional recipes. Launch Test Kitchen, the most eclectic of the bunch, plays host to a variety of menus, from Indian food one week to traditional American chicken and waffles the next. Bodega offers pre-made sandwiches and groceries, as well as hot home-style meals until as late as 11 p.m. Olive Branch cooks up Mediterranean food, to include Italian personal pizzas and Greek and Spanish cuisine. Finally, Sazón, a Latininspired option, tantalizes with customizable salsa, guacamole and a healthy helping of chips. No matter what’s on your plate, Leo’s will undoubtedly become the social hub of your freshman year, a place where you will share countless meals and conversations with your classmates. When you go home for break, you might even miss it.

Bulldog Tavern ✔✔✔

Located in the Healey Family Student Center below New South, Bulldog Tavern has a cozy restaurant and bar atmosphere that will make you feel like you are dining

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out without ever having to leave campus. Partly staffed by students, the tavern features a menu full of pub fare such as nachos, burgers, bread-bowl soups, wings and a signature Nutella shake. Thursday’s Bulldog trivia nights are a student favorite, and the takeout window provides a bountiful supply of cheesy fries to hit the spot during study breaks.

The Hilltoss ✔✔

Students of Georgetown, Inc. — better known as The Corp — opened Hilltoss in 2014 to meet the ever-expanding demand for avocado toast, salads, smoothies and acai bowls. In 2018, The Corp replaced Hilltoss’ smoothie and acai bowl offerings with Grounded, an espresso bar with an expanded breakfast menu that finally provides the Healey Family Student Center with an easily accessible coffee shop. Students can now find their espresso, bagel sandwiches, parfaits, made-to-order salads — and, yes, avocado toast — all in the same place.

Vital Vittles/Hoya Snaxa ✔✔

If you live in Village C or Darnall Hall, Hoya Snaxa and Vital Vittles will soon become your go-to stops for dorm room snacks and groceries. The Corp-run stores could sustain you for an entire semester: Snaxa, located under the archway in the Southwest Quadrangle complex, will satisfy your chip, popcorn and slushie needs. Vittles, located inside the Leavey Center, is stocked full of groceries, microwaveable meals and pharmacy products to save you the trip to Safeway or CVS.

The Midnight MUG, Uncommon Grounds and More Uncommon Grounds ✔✔

Although you may have survived high school caffeine-free, you might soon find yourself desperate for a pick-me-up before a long night of studying or your 9 a.m. class. This is where The Corp’s trio of coffee shops come in, conveniently dispersed throughout campus so that you’re never far from a cup of coffee or tea to keep you going. Midnight

ACCEPTS FLEX DOLLARS

MUG, located in Lauinger Library, is an indispensable study savior open as late as 2 a.m. on Sunday through Wednesday. The ICC’s More Uncommon Grounds coffee stand will fuel your pre-class needs, and Uncommon Grounds, located on the second floor of the Georgetown University Bookstore, combines The Corp’s signature blends and breakfast options with convenient access to the serene Leavey Esplanade.

Epicurean and Co. ✔✔

Your freshman year will not be complete without many trips to Epicurean and Company. Epi boasts fully stocked sushi, noodle and salad bars, a large buffet and a range of made-to-order sandwiches and pizzas. But the true stars of the menu are the quesadillas and onion rings — late-night staples of the Georgetown social scene, especially on the weekends. Epi is located adjacent to Darnall Hall and is open nearly all hours, only closing briefly between late Sunday night and early Monday morning, making it ideal for midnight snacks and postgame gorging.

Hoya Court ✔✔✔

The newly revamped Hoya Court is wellsuited to those who spend long hours in the Leavey Center or have classes in Regents Hall or the Intercultural Center. The Chickfil-A fast-food joint and Crop Chop salad and smoothie spot are dominant forces on the Georgetown dining scene. While these two stellar options are sure to grab your eye, don’t forget to look around the corner to Royal Jacket Deli for creative sandwiches.

Einstein Bros. Bagels ✔✔✔

Located on the second floor of the Car Barn on the easternmost edge of campus is Einstein Bros. Bagels, the hidden gem of Georgetown dining. Einstein’s is fully stocked with bagels, sandwiches, smoothies, coffee and shmears of all kinds. A meal swipe at Einstein’s can get you a warm bagel sandwich, coffee and a snack, which may be just what you need before you start your day.


campus resource centers Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service : (202) 687-4357 Georgetown University Police Department: (202) 687-4343 SafeRides: (202) 784-7433 Student Health Center:

For appointments: (202) 687-2200 After-hours emergencies: (202) 444-7243 ask for the Student Health Center clinician on call

Counseling and Psychiatric Services*: (202) 687-6985

After-hours emergencies: (202) 444-7243 ask for the CAPS clinician on call

Project Lighthouse, a peer-to-peer online support service: www.projectlighthousegu.com

D.C. Rape Crisis Center hotline: (202) 333-7273 Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence hotline: (202) 687-0323 Emergency Facilities Service Requests: (202) 687-3432

After-hours emergencies: Call GU Department of Public Safety at (202) 687-4343

Chaplains-in-Residence: (202) 687-4300

After-hours: (202) 677-0361

FILE PHOTO: THEO SYMONDS FOR THE HOYA

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Dorm essentials: The average dorm room for a Georgetown freshman runs just under 200 square feet — and that’s if you’re not shacked up in the friendly confines of Village C. But a few smart investments can go a long way toward making effective use of the space you have. Before you head out shopping, add these to your dorm essentials list and make the most of your new, modestly sized abode.

A FRESHMAN’S GUIDE TO CAMPUS LIVING

Command Hooks and Command Strips

Mirror

Under-Bed Storage

Dishes

Command strips and hooks are a college student’s best friend. The easy-to-use, removable adhesive strips are perfect for hanging up posters to give your sparsely decorated dorm a personal touch. The convenient hooks also allow you to take advantage of every bit of space: Consider investing in several hooks to hang your shower caddy — yes, you’ll need one — towels, jackets and even accessories like belts and purses.

This one’s a must. Under-bed storage — even if it’s just the spare suitcase you used to move in — is key to fitting all of your prized possessions into your new home. It’s also perfect for storing things you’ll rarely use but probably need, like your winter coat for that one snow day a year or the philosophy textbook you reluctantly bought but probably won’t open. Pro tip: Check out your room before you buy storage. It’ll help you get a sense of the amount of space you’re working with and what types of storage will work best in your new digs.

Spare Bedding

Every college student — and, probably, every functioning adult — needs a spare set of sheets. Your mom probably told you so already, and you may have scoffed, but she was right: Bring spare sheets. You will eventually spill an entire cup of coffee on your sheets at 4 a.m. during finals; plan ahead, rather than being the kid doing laundry in the middle of the night just so they can get those four hours of sleep.

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Small, desktop mirrors and full-length mirrors alike are good additions to your new pad, especially if you don’t have your own bathroom. If you’re thinking about a full-length mirror, coordinate with your new roomie to make sure they’re not already bringing one — one is enough! Save some space by hanging it on your door or closet. Or, if you’d prefer something more compact, desk mirrors are perfect for helping you get ready in the morning.

You won’t have your own kitchen in your freshman dorm, so you might think you won’t need any dishes. Nevertheless, having just a few dishes can be all the difference when it’s pouring rain outside and you’d rather not trek to O’Donovan Hall. Consider stocking up with a bowl and plate, some utensils and a quirky mug. That way, you’ll be able to cook for yourself in the common room when Leo’s is closed over Easter break, or when you just really want to try that mug cake recipe that you keep seeing on BuzzFeed.

Vacuum

Though the Resident Hall Offices do carry vacuum cleaners, you’ll be competing with hundreds of other residents to get a hold of one. Even then, they can often be unreliable. Having your own vacuum can come in handy when your friends spill popcorn all over your floor or if you break something fragile. Be warned though: You might end up as the only one of your friends with a vacuum, in which case, be prepared to loan it out. For the especially fastidious, buy a vacuum with a detachable, handheld component to help you clean hard-to-reach spaces.


Errands Groceries Safeway If you’re looking for food essentials beyond what Vital Vittles can offer, this is the place to stock up on groceries. Whether you’re craving some fresh fruit or looking for your favorite study snacks, Safeway has a great selection and also boasts an extensive deli counter, a pharmacy and a Starbucks. The walk is a bit lengthy and coming back with all your groceries can be tough, so it’s a good idea to hop on the Wisconsin Avenue Georgetown University Transportation Shuttle, which you can board in front of Epicurean and Company. Or, if you’re feeling lazy, you can also sign up on safeway.com for deliveries to your dorm and get your first one free. 1855 Wisconsin Ave. NW Trader Joe’s Take a walk down M Street, turn onto Pennsylvania Avenue and you’ll find yourself in Foggy Bottom, right near Trader Joe’s. With its emphasis on easy-to-prepare and inexpensive products, Trader Joe’s is an ideal place for college students to shop. The extensive selection of fresh produce and healthy microwavable meals are great if you aren’t in the mood for O’Donovan Hall and don’t want to order take-out. To avoid the trek, you can hop on the Washington, D.C. Circulator bus heading to Dupont Circle or Union Station and use the 30N or 30S buses on the way back. Alternatively, take advantage of the Saturday stops at Trader Joe’s on the GUTS bus line to Dupont. 1101 25th St. NW

Household/Dorm Essentials T.J. Maxx Is your dorm room looking a little bare? Head a short ways down M Street past Dean & DeLuca to find T.J. Maxx. It’s a reliable source for the unexpected essentials you’ll need in your dorm room, all at discounted prices. Whether

it’s an extra pillow, a decorative blanket to keep you warm or those string lights your aesthetic so urgently requires, T.J. Maxx has it all — and it’s ideal for a college student’s budget. 3222 M St. NW Target Express Just a short walk over the Key Bridge or a free GUTS bus ride away, the Target Express in Rosslyn, Va., is a great place to get everything you knew you’d need but forgot at home. The Rosslyn Target is perfect for picking up cleaning supplies, toiletries, groceries and other home essentials at a cheaper price than most locations in the District. Moreover, it’s easily accessible from campus and is located just across the street from a Safeway, so you can kill two birds with one stone. 1500 Wilson Blvd. Rosslyn, Va. 22209

Pharmacy CVS When the cold inevitably starts to spread across campus, walk down O Street to CVS Pharmacy to stock up on everything you need to stay healthy. Whether it’s some tissues, Advil or Vitamin C, CVS has it all, as well as all of your essential toiletries. Stop by for shampoo, soap, candy or anything else you might need in a pinch. It’s open 24 hours, though if you’re picking up prescriptions, the pharmacy closes at 9 p.m. during the week and 5 p.m. on weekends. 1403 Wisconsin Ave. NW

Dry Cleaning GT Quality Cleaners With its quick and inexpensive service, GT Quality Cleaners is a convenient way to avoid burning your favorite shirt on your dorm ironing board. If your suit isn’t fitting as well as you’d like before that big interview, you can also bring it to GT for alterations. 3345 Prospect St. NW

Shipping and Office UPS Store Located just a few blocks down N Street, the UPS Store is a handy place for all your shipping needs. No matter how big the box or how much packing tape, if you need to ship something — especially during move out — this is your go-to store. 3220 N St. NW FedEx Office Print & Ship Center If you’re looking for services beyond just standard printing, FedEx has you covered. Whether you need flyers, posters, banners or any other special materials for presentations or student groups, it has the supplies and staff to help you. 3329 M St. NW

Haircuts Georgetown Hairstyling This quintessential men’s barber shop can be found just two blocks from the front gates. A basic cut is $26, and it accepts both appointments and walk-ins. It’s one of the few places in Georgetown where residents and students interact, and the barber makes a point of trying to learn your name. 1329 35th St. NW Aveda Salon and Spa The Aveda salon is the perfect spot for a more luxurious experience, though at a cost: Women’s haircuts start at $77, and men’s at $52. Aveda products are made from all-natural plant extracts and thus minimize damage to your hair. Moreover, this full-service salon offers manicures, pedicures and waxing. 1325 Wisconsin Ave. NW O Salon You may not expect to find a high-quality hair salon right across the street from Wingo’s, but that’s exactly what you’ll get from O Salon. If you only trust the person who cuts your hair at home, this could be the place that finally causes you to cut ties with your local salon. It may be pricey, but for unbeatable care and a variety of treatment options and services, O Salon is your best bet. 3212 O St. NW

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study spots

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eorgetown University’s campus and the wider Washington, D.C. area have a plethora of prime study spots where Hoyas can hit the books. Whether you’re looking for an on-campus alternative to Lauinger Library and Sellinger Lounge during finals week or trying to get outside the Georgetown bubble, here are some top picks for relatively off-the-beaten-path study spots.

ON CAMPUS

Bioethics Research Library The Bioethics Research Library, located on the first floor of Healy Hall, offers a beautiful space that’s quiet enough to get some work done. The library houses the Kennedy Institute of Ethics’ extensive collection of research material, making it a popular draw for researchers both on and off campus. The space also has plenty of tables and couches for students seeking an alternative to Lauinger Library. However, be sure to check the hours before you head over, as the library often closes early and has limited hours on weekends. White-Gravenor Hall We’re almost reluctant to give up this one: With floors full of spacious, empty classrooms, White-Gravenor Hall is a perfect place to study for finals. Whether you’re studying by yourself or working with a group, the seminar-style classrooms let you spread out your study materials and take advantage of wall-sized chalkboards. The natural light through the windows also gives White-Gravenor an edge over the Intercultural Center, whose many empty classrooms are relatively cramped and generally windowless. While the light might not seem like a huge added perk, it can in fact be helpful to keep track of time when you’re cramming overnight. Starbucks in the Leavey Center When coffee shops run by Students of Georgetown, Inc., (commonly known as The Corp) are already packed, the Leavey Center Starbucks is a great alternative. The inside boasts plenty of space and a warm, coffee-shop ambience. While not as quiet as a library cubicle, the hum of noise stays low enough to foster a surprisingly pleasant environment. If you’re lucky enough to find yourself stocked with Starbucks gift cards after the holidays, there are few better places to spend an afternoon than the far hallway of the Leavey Center. Be sure to check the hours online before you head over, as it can often close early in the day — especially on weekends. Leavey Esplanade When the weather is nice and Healy Lawn starts to fill up with students during spring finals, the Leavey Esplanade is a great place to stretch out on a blanket and get some sun while you’re studying. There’s always plenty of open green space, and some time outdoors is a great way to break up those long days of studying and paper-writing when the trials of early May roll around. The esplanade also conveniently offers an entrance to Uncommon Grounds, one of The Corp’s coffee shops, for a caffeine fix.

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OFF CAMPUS

Library of Congress Location: 101 Independence Ave. SE The Library of Congress is a remarkable space to get some work done off campus. You can apply in the Madison Building for a free reader card to access the famous Main Reading Room of the Thomas Jefferson Building across the street. Whether you’re there to take advantage of the library’s massive collection for research or just to do some homework, the reading room is unbeatable. Cavernous, beautiful and quiet, it’s perfect for productivity — and for a picturesque Instagram shot. Keep in mind that some larger bags are not allowed in the reading rooms and will have to be checked in one of the library’s cloakrooms. Check online for specific restrictions. Kogod Courtyard Location: Eighth Street NW and F Street NW The Kogod Courtyard, which connects the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery, is a beautiful open space for enjoying the sights of the District and doing some work on the weekends. With its huge overhead glass canopy, the courtyard allows visitors to enjoy the sunshine without having to bear the heat. You can also get a bite to eat at the Courtyard Cafe and enjoy free Wi-Fi while you sit, making it a perfect spot to catch up on work, enjoy some prime people-watching and take inspirational study breaks wandering through the galleries of the adjoining museums. A Local Coffee Shop For those of you who need caffeine constantly within arm’s reach to focus on your work, get yourself off campus and snag a table at a local coffee shop. If you don’t feel like taking a long trek, Saxbys is a good bet — though it’s often loud and crowded, and tables are hard to find. Peet’s Coffee on M Street is bright and pleasant, with a spacious second level perfect for settling in to study for the day. If you don’t have any work that requires internet access — or can’t get any work done without opening Facebook — Grace Street Coffee is an airy, cozy spot and conveniently close to South Block Juice Co. and SundeVich if you need to get a snack.


The Social Scene Is it legal for me to drink? Unless you took three gap years after high school, sorry, but no. OK, so it’s illegal, but where can I do it anyway?

If you’re like the thousands of new students who have come before you, you’re likely more than a little curious about the party scene here on the Hilltop. Does everyone drink? How can I sneak a keg into New South? Should I buy a toga? Luckily, we have the answers for those of you thirsty for this bit of knowledge.

If you do choose to drink in your dorm room with friends, history suggests that it’s unlikely that you will get caught; resident assistants are not known to do random room checks. But simply minding your own business is not a defense for underage drinking if you are caught. If you’re making a lot of noise, if people keep coming and going or if an accident happens, the RA on duty will notice, and you will get in trouble. What happens if I do get caught? How much trouble am I in? If you are written up by your RA, he or she will document the situation and forward it to the hall director, who will decide what disciplinary measures to take. Assuming your transgression was limited to drinking in your dorm and being disruptive, your punishment will likely not include anything more than sanction hours, a fine and/or taking AlcoholEdu (again). Repeated violations, however, can end up on your transcript and jeopardize your ability to study abroad or secure on-campus housing. But drinking in my double in VCW is pretty lame. Where can I go to partay? Especially in the beginning of the semester, freshmen tend to walk (or stumble) in packs around West Georgetown and on-campus apartment complexes, listening for the faint sound of a tapped keg. For freshmen this is generally acceptable behavior, and if your group is not too big, upperclassmen will usually graciously let you crash their party. Later in the year, this tactic doesn’t work as well, so find someone on your floor with an upperclassman friend willing to hook you up at the door. If you’re envisioning scenes from “Animal House,” Georgetown’s lack of a

Greek system may disappoint you. Don’t worry, though, because that doesn’t mean people off campus don’t throw their fair share of ragers. An added bonus: Unlike at many other college parties, you likely won’t have to pay for a cup when out at Georgetown. My friend has had way too much to drink. What do I do? If someone seems seriously ill, call Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service (202-687-4357). Georgetown’s student-run EMT service arrives faster to the scene than D.C. Fire and Rescue, and the ride to the hospital is free. Does everyone have a fake ID? No. Some do; some don’t. The social scene on campus is lively enough that you don’t need to venture out to bars. I’ve got one! I’ve got one! Where can I use it? First, The Hoya cautions you against using a fake ID by stating the obvious: It’s illegal. Penalties for using a fake ID are stiff — you could even get arrested. Honestly, all fake IDs are pretty much just varying levels of bad, and any experienced bouncer will be able to tell it’s not real. If your heart is set on drinking, however, it’s best to have an upperclassman buy alcohol for you. If you have an ID and want to try it, there are a number of places to avoid, but above all, DON’T go to The Tombs; getting your forehead stamped at The Tombs on your 21st birthday is practically a rite of passage at Georgetown. Don’t let your impatience ruin it. Do I have to drink? Of course not! Plenty of Georgetown students don’t. Seriously, we’re not just being politically correct. Some choose to opt out of drinking and partying, and that’s cool. Others choose not to drink but party with their friends anyway, and no one notices the difference. Do whatever makes you feel comfortable.

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part-time jobs College can be expensive, and Georgetown University is no exception. After a few months of weekend restaurant dinners with friends, Uber rides, late-night snack cravings and the unexpected day-to-day expenses of living away from home, many students find that their wallets are a lot lighter than they would prefer. Other Hoyas may want to get a head start on bringing in income or help their families contribute to the cost of attendance. Luckily, there are plenty of part-time job opportunities and resources available to students both on and off campus. Student Employment Office Website The easiest way to start your job hunt is by checking out the Georgetown Student Employment Office website: seo.georgetown.edu. After logging in with your NetID, you can gain access to HoyaWorks, the SEO’s job board. Many on- and off-campus employers advertise job openings through this website. HoyaWorks directs you to narrow down your search by funding source: Off-Campus Federal Work Study, Off-Campus Private Sector, On-Campus Federal Work Study and On-Campus Non-Work Study Jobs. Then, you can filter by the date the job was posted, hours per week and wage. If you have included off-campus jobs in your search, make sure to click the “I agree” button on the off-campus job disclaimer on the following page to see the postings. Some on-campus departments and offices only grant employment to students with workstudy, and students with work-study must still go through the application process and be hired by an on-campus employer to earn their award amount. All students employed on campus are paid the Washington, D.C. minimum wage, which increased to $13.25 per hour July 1, 2018. For most on-campus jobs, you can apply through the site, though some on-campus and off-campus jobs will require you to apply through other specified means. The site is full of great opportunities for new students and is particularly active during August, so it may benefit you to start looking for a job before you even step foot on the Hilltop. If you intend to work straight away, it may work best to find a job on campus, at least for the first semester or two. Finding jobs on campus eases the transition into balancing work and school. On-campus employers tend to be accommodating and understanding of students’ responsibilities outside of work. You may also have more flexibility in scheduling your work hours, as run-

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ning across campus to your job after a class or a club meeting is much easier than budgeting in time to walk or commute to an off-campus job. Popular and common on-campus jobs include working at Yates Fieldhouse, in Lauinger Library and as a student guard — swiping students’ GOCards — at the front desk of buildings around campus. Student guard job postings can be found at police.georgetown.edu. Students can also apply to work for the student-run corporation Students of Georgetown, Inc., more commonly known as The Corp, which offers a variety of jobs at its various storefronts, as well as in accounting, marketing, catering and IT. The Corp hires new employees every fall and spring. Off-Campus One of the handiest functions of the SEO website is the off-campus postings: You can find off-campus tutoring, housework, pet-sitting and babysitting opportunities there. Of course, not all potential off-campus employers post on the SEO website. The Georgetown area has a vast number of job opportunities available for students interested in working at restaurants or in retail. Georgetown Cupcake, Saxbys and The Tombs are just a few of the many businesses near campus known for employing Georgetown students on a regular basis. Most of the stores and restaurants in the area make applications available on their websites or in person. You can also find opportunities posted on bulletin boards in Saxbys and around campus. Center for Social Justice The Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching and Service is another fantastic resource for students with work-study awards, as well as those looking to serve the greater D.C. community through volunteering. The CSJ runs a variety of tutoring, mentoring and advocacy programs dedicated to the common good and the welfare of all. Popular programs include the D.C. Schools Project, which provides English-language tutoring for immigrants of all ages in the District; D.C. Reads, which assists elementary school students who are a level or more behind in literacy skills; After School Kids Program, which provides mentoring and tutoring to youth in the D.C. metropolitan area who have had interactions with the court system; and the HOME Program, which partners with the Georgetown Ministry Center to provide individuals experiencing homeless-

ness with resources, outreach and a safe environment. You can register your interest and be placed on the mailing list for these programs on the CSJ’s website now. Besides being popular, well-organized programs, the programs run by the CSJ are a wonderful way for you to leave the Georgetown bubble and interact with the greater D.C. community. Internships and the Cawley Career Center Jumping into an internship is probably an unwise decision during your first semester, or even your first year: They often require commutes and can have stricter requirements on the minimum number of hours you have to work per week. However, it is never too early to start considering which internship opportunities you may want to pursue later, either during a semester or over the summer. The Cawley Career Education Center offers plenty of resources, including counseling appointments, to answer your internship inquiries. The center is a completely free resource that many Hoyas never take advantage of. The career counseling, resume workshops and cover letter advice are informative and reassuring for students a little overwhelmed by the job process or hoping to plan ahead for graduate school or careers after graduation. The online database Hoya Career Connections also offers students a plethora of internship, job and volunteer opportunities in a variety of cities in many fields. International Students If you are an international student studying at Georgetown on a student visa, make sure you talk to your international student adviser to discuss the restrictions on your permission to work. Some international students are eligible for on-campus employment and some off-campus opportunities, but the Office of Global Services advises international students not to plan to meet their educational or personal living expenses through employment earnings. International students should never apply, accept or engage in any off-campus employment, fellowships or paid or unpaid job training without the prior authorization of the Office of Global Services. OGS does hold employment workshops throughout the semester that are extremely helpful for international students interested in off-campus employment. For more information, check out the resources in the short list or go to internationalservices.georgetown.edu.


Public service is a good thing. Politics can be, too.

Left to right: 1) Speaker of the House Paul Ryan answers student questions during a town hall-style event; 2) 42nd President Bill Clinton (SFS '68) delivers a keynote address in Gaston Hall during the Clinton 25 Symposium; 3) A team of GU Politics students travels to Mexico to witness firsthand the political strategy, tactics, and energy of Mexico's 2018 general election ; 4) Georgetown students gather in the Baker Living Room for Fall '17 Fellow Marie Harf's discussion group on foreign policy

Like politics? Hate politics? Want to figure out how to make it work better? So do we! Founded in 2015, the Georgetown Institute of Politics and Public Service (GU Politics) at the McCourt School connects students with some of the biggest names in politics. Our goal? To figure out how to make politics work better for the public good. We believe Washington doesn't have to be what's wrong with politics—together we can make it part of the solution. Through events, discussion groups, workshops, and field trips, we'll give you the access you came to D.C. for. Want to learn more? Visit our website at politics.georgetown.edu, follow us on social media @GUPolitics, and stop by our offices in Healy G-18!


hoya sports

Sports are deeply rooted in Georgetown University’s culture. Whether it is men’s basketball or club boxing, Hoya sports bring the Hilltop together. In the 201718 season, Georgetown earned five conference titles in the historically competitive Big East Conference. For the first time in school history, both the men’s and women’s soccer teams won the Big East title, while the men’s and women’s golf teams and the men’s lacrosse team all earned conference titles. At home games, Georgetown students support the school’s 23 varsity teams at four venues both on and off campus. Georgetown’s soccer teams play their home matches on Shaw Field, while women’s basketball and women’s volleyball call McDonough Arena home. Cooper Field, located in the center of Georgetown’s campus, hosts Georgetown’s football team in the fall and lacrosse games in the spring.

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Shaw Field At Shaw Field, located next to Yates Field House, Georgetown fans’ loud cheers and heckles give the Hoyas an important home-field advantage. This past fall, the women’s soccer team celebrated its second consecutive Big East title on Shaw Field on Nov. 5, with a 3-0 victory over Butler. One week later, Hoya fans cheered on the men’s soccer team to its double-overtime victory in the Big East tournament final over Xavier. Shaw Field serves as an exciting venue for Georgetown fans to watch the Hoyas, who hope to find further success in the Big East this upcoming fall. The Georgetown women’s soccer team will open its slate of home matches for the 2018 season Aug. 23 against NCAA tournament semifinalists Duke. The team will welcome Big East foe DePaul on Sept. 27 and will rematch Butler — whom the Hoyas defeated in the Big East championship final last year — on Oct. 21. The men’s soccer team will play its first Big East Conference game of the season against Xavier on Sept. 15, in another Big East Conference final rematch. Students can get tickets to soccer games at Shaw Field for free by showing their student IDs and can support both teams as they aim for more postseason success. McDonough Arena McDonough Arena, located on the southern perimeter of campus next to the recently constructed Thompson Center, has hosted basketball and volleyball games for over 60 years. Today, it is home to two of Georgetown’s most popular sports: women’s basketball and women’s volleyball. The women’s volleyball team improved on its 2016 record this past season and recently hired Jackie Granger to the assistant head coach position. Granger ranks 14th in kills in Division 1 history and has Big East volleyball experience, as she played at St. John’s for four seasons. The women’s basketball team thrilled fans both at McDonough Arena and away from home last season. The Hoyas advanced to the Big East tournament semifinals for the first time in 19 years and played in the second round of the Women’s National Invitation Tournament for the first time since 2009. Capital One Arena The Georgetown men’s basketball team, perhaps the university’s proudest sports treasure even in disappointing seasons, plays its home games at Capital One Arena, also home to the Washington Wizards and Stanley Cup Champions the Washington Capitals. Patrick Ewing, a Georgetown basketball legend who twice won Big East

Player of the Year in his four-year career with the Hoyas, earned the prestigious Naismith Award in the 1984-85 season and led the Hoyas to a national championship win in the 1983-84 season, enters his second season as head coach of the men’s basketball team. Georgetown toppled the University of Houston and future NBA Hall-of-Famer Hakeem Olajuwon in the 1984 final, and Ewing was named the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player. Ewing will look to sustain the team’s upward trajectory, fill the 18,277-seat Capital One Arena and re-establish Georgetown as a Big East contender next season. Three four-star recruits, point guard James Akinjo, forward Josh LeBlanc and center Grayson Carter, will make their Georgetown debuts at the Capital One Arena this upcoming winter. Three-star recruit and Virginia native Matt McClung will also join the Georgetown basketball team. Center Jessie Govan, the Hoyas’ leading scorer and rebounder from last season, will be welcomed back to the Hilltop for his senior season next winter. Ewing and the Hoya fans will have reason for optimism this coming fall with the strong recruiting class and the return of Georgetown’s star center. Cooper Field Cooper Field, the bright green artificial turf expanse in the heart of campus, hosts games for the football team, as well as the men’s and women’s lacrosse teams. The women’s lacrosse team made its first-ever NCAA tournament appearance since the team’s founding in 1977 this past spring, losing a close contest to Virginia Tech in the first round. The men’s lacrosse team defeated Denver to win its first Big East Conference championship. Lacrosse is a can’t-miss event on Cooper Field, with conference play beginning in the spring. The football team will open its 2018 home schedule on Cooper Field on Sept. 8 against Campbell University. Homecoming weekend will bring Columbia to the Hilltop on Sept. 22 and the Hoyas will face Lehigh on Parent and Family Weekend on Oct. 20. Been to all those games and still can’t get enough? Georgetown has many other varsity and club sports for avid fans: The men’s and women’s track and field, swimming and diving, tennis and rowing teams all found success this past year, with steadfast encouragement from Hoya fans. The baseball and softball teams also competed in exciting contests throughout the spring. Whether you attend a club Ultimate Frisbee game on Cooper Field or a volleyball game in McDonough Arena, Georgetown sports provide a truly unique experience for Hoya fans, electrifying the Hilltop and inspiring passion in students that will continue well beyond your four years here.


7+( *(25*(72:1 2)),&( 2) )(//2:6+,36 $:$5'6 $1' 5(6285&(6 *2)$5

CONGRATULATES GEORGETOWN’S

&203(7,7,9( 6&+2/$56+,3 :,11(56 Boren Scholarship Zachary Gallin, SFS’20 Maya James, COL’20 Michael Mullaney, COL’19 Maria Strunjas, SFS’20 Gates Cambridge Scholarship Ayan Mandal, COL’18 James C. Gaither Jr. Fellows Program Garrett Hinck, SFS’18 Gilman International Scholarship Eman Ali, NHS’19 Mayte Alonso, COL’20 Gueinah Blaise, COL’20 Bailey Bradford, COL’19 Gabrial Brault, SFS’21 Johnsenia Brooks, COL’20 Ana Covo, COL’19 Sophia Griffith, COL’19 Stacie Hartman, COL’21 Lavinia Hess, NHS’20 Jessica Ho, SFS’19 William Hockaday, COL’20 Olivia Jenkins, COL’20 Ridwan Meah, SFS’20 William Nguyen, SFS’20 Munir Pavez, SFS’20 Khalida Saalim, NHS’19 Hiba Said, COL’20 Carolina Sosa, SFS’19 May Teng, COL’20 Caleb Yip, SFS’21 Goldwater Scholarship Patrick Mulcahey, COL’19 Jane Donnelly, COL’19: HM Matthew Park, COL’19: HM Marshall Scholarship Benjamin Johnson, NHS’17 Rebecca Kuang, COL’18 Annee Lyons, COL’18

Princeton in Africa Emma Grace Housman, NHS’18 Walter Lohmann, SFS’18 Anthea Piong, GRD’15 Princeton in Asia Hiromi Oka, SFS‘15 Bardia Rahmani, SFS‘16 Daniel Zager, COL‘18 Princeton in Latin America Amelia De Paola, COL’17 Mia Lopez-Zubiri, COL’18 Thomas R. Pickering Fellowship Stephanie Arzate, SFS’15 Anastasia Burnett, COL’15 Anna Jozwik, GRD’17 Yassitoungou Tamdji, SFS’11 Charles B. Rangel Fellowship Marta Aparicio, COL’14 Kala Deterville, COL’18 Sofia Gomez, SFS’18 Rhodes Scholarship Deirdre Collins, COL’17 Schwarzman Scholars Program Zezhou Cai, GRD’18 Truman Scholarship Amanda Scott, COL’19 Shakera Vaughan, COL’19 Udall Scholarship Ingalise Kindstedt, SFS’19: HM UK Fulbright Summer Institutes Michael Blank, COL’20 David Gomez, SFS’21 Trevor O’Connor, COL’20 Yenching Scholarship Kangkyu David Lee, GRD’17


Dining in d.c. While you’re at Georgetown, do remember that you don’t live in a bubble: Washington, D.C.’s food and dining scene is a burgeoning giant — and there are plenty of options for you once you get tired of crusty Leo’s burgers and sad salad bar spinach. Venture off campus for a quick bite in the Georgetown neighborhood with trips to Wisconsin Avenue and down to M Street — and remember to Instagram your D.C. food explorations with #DCFoodPorn or #DCEats. Quick Bites in Georgetown Just about every Georgetown student swears by a Hot Chick or Chicken Madness sandwich from Wisemiller’s Grocery & Deli (1236 36th St. NW) — better known as Wisey’s. These classics feature chopped spicy chicken tenders, cheese and spicy mayo in the Hot Chick and provolone, peppers and diced grilled chicken in the Chicken Madness. Pick up a bagel or cookie on your way out, and don’t forget to sign your receipt! On Wisconsin, take a stroll to Boulangerie Christophe (1422 Wisconsin Ave. NW) for a Parisian flair: This cafe offers a range of salmon, ham and vegetarian sandwiches, as well as quiche and classic baguettes. Grab an iced coffee and idle in the open-air patio with views of a faux French town painted on the walls. While on Wisconsin Avenue, venture into Kung Fu Tea (1529 Wisconsin Ave. NW) for reasonably priced milk or fruit teas — with a boba topping as well. This spot is the go-to place for tasty bubble tea and offers a range of size, ice and sugar options, as well as flavored slushies and warm teas. Our recommendation: the classic milk tea with boba, light ice and regular sweetness. For a more adventurous taste, try the Italian Mocha slush with boba. If you’re looking for the go-to cheap eat, you must stop at Falafel, Inc. (1210 Potomac St. NW): Its $3 falafel sandwiches cannot be beat this side of Rock Creek. Plus, you’re contributing to a good cause with every purchase: The shop was founded to contribute aid to the refugee crisis in the Middle East and donates a day’s worth of food to a refugee for every $10 of profit. For a cup of coffee, stop by Baked & Wired (1052 Thomas Jefferson St. NW), where you can also grab a monstrous cupcake — or as they call it, a “cake cup” —, biscotti or a range of baked goods. We recommend these cupcakes the most but do visit Georgetown Cupcake (3301 M St. NW) for an adorable Instagram. For more cheap eats, check out Eater D.C. or Washingtonian’s Cheap Eats 2018 list for delicious and affordable options.

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Healthier Options South of the Canal So you want a lighter bite and want to do some walking? Venture down to Grace Street under the C&O Canal for a mecca of health foods. Just 10 minutes from campus at a faster walking pace, Grace Street features healthy-eating spots like vegetarian taco joint Chaia (3207 Grace St. NW), acai and smoothie fixture South Block Juice Co., artisanal coffee shop Grace Street Coffee Roasters and globally inspired sandwich company SUNdeVICH (3210 Grace St. NW). If you’re going up or down Wisconsin, you might also consider a stop in the biggest Sweetgreen (1044 Wisconsin Ave. NW) salad shop in the District. This two-story storefront is the latest Georgetown iteration of the national chain founded by Hoyas. Classic Georgetown Destinations Share a pitcher and a sandwich with friends at Booeymonger (3265 Prospect St. NW) — or Booey’s for short — once you’re 21. Beer pitchers start at around $6 during happy hour and the breakfast sandwich — Chicken Little — is a filling option with bacon, egg and cheese on your choice of a bagel. No other Georgetown tradition compares to a dinner or drink at The Tombs (1226 36th St. NW). An underground college bar featuring classic pub food and a delicious Sunday brunch, this space underneath its classier sister restaurant 1789 Restaurant is the place to go at midnight for your 21st birthday, and tradition holds that a Georgetown student’s first official drink be conducted here. Pro tip: Call it “Tombs” and never “The Tombs.” So you want cheap drinks and acceptable Thai food? Mai Thai (3251 Prospect St. NW) is the Asian fusion joint for you. Affordable, filling and a boisterous social scene for freshmen, Mai Thai is a great restaurant to grab dinner with friends and still have leftovers for lunch the next day. You can’t go wrong with the Red Curry, and don’t forget happy hour for the $4 sushi rolls and $15 cocktail pitchers. Tip: Come for your birthday and receive a hefty discount on any dinner entree. Have a hunger for spice and rice? Visit Curry & Pie (1204 34th St. NW) for a flavorful, inventive combination of Indian and Italian cuisine. Traditional Indian dishes are served in one of two ways: on a pizza pie or presented with a side or rice. Definitely get the flaky samosas while you’re here, and top it off with a Mango Lassi, a sweet, rich and creamy mango-yogurt drink. Of course, for the authentic Italian experience, you must slip into Il Canale (1065 31st St.

NW), a classic Italian restaurant with delicious pizzas. Stop by for a margherita pizza or tasty lasagna while looking out for possible Hoya love interests — it’s a popular date spot — or the Clintons. Treat-Yourself Brunch So you got a little extra money or your parents are in town? Take a trip to the classic D.C. restaurant: Le Diplomate (1601 14th St. NW) for a French-American taste unique to D.C. The city’s best French onion soup can be found here, as well as the best omelet and Eggs Norwegian in the D.C. metro area. “Le Dip,” as the locals call it, is also a great dinner spot. Farmers Fishers Bakers (3000 K St. NW) by the Georgetown waterfront is the most popular spot for brunch. The all-you-can-eat weekend and holiday brunches are pricey ($32.50 per person) but worth it on a special occasion. The name says it all: plenty of poultry, plenty of seafood and plenty of starch — this place has it all, including a long wait, so make a reservation using the application OpenTable well in advance The Sovereign (1206 Wisconsin Ave. NW), tucked into an alley at the crossroads of M Street and Wisconsin Avenue, is a Belgian bar and bistro that also boasts a mouth-watering weekend brunch menu. A range of delicious meals can be topped off with a Belgian waffle and two bubbly or savory brunch cocktails for an additional $10. Making a Day of It Appreciate the street vendors and yummy brunch spots that line the streets of Seventh Street in Southeast with an afternoon trip to Eastern Market (225 Seventh St. SE), an old school indoor market building surrounded by outdoor stalls and fresh fruit and vegetables from local farmers. After a morning of shopping, the best place to grab a bite is at Market Lunch (225 Seventh St. SE), a small vendor inside the market’s building. Its weekend shrimp and grits are popular, as are its blueberry buckwheat pancakes. For cheaper bites while still out in the city, swing by Union Market (1305 5th St. NE) for the essential indoor food hall/market experience. Artisanal vendors can prepare you Venezuelan arepas, Ethiopian fast-casual, jerk chicken empanadas and so much more. Grab a bite and swing by the new Politics & Prose bookstore or watch a movie at Angelika Pop Up, all within walking distance of a Metro station.


Shopping in D.C. Just about every name-brand style outlet has a storefront in the Georgetown neighborhood. Wallet-friendly options like H&M, Forever 21 and T.J. Maxx (all located at 3222 M St. NW) cater to your basic needs and party favorites without draining your bank account or your walking energy. Slightly pricier shops like Urban Outfitters (3111 M St. NW), Free People (3009 M St. NW) and Francesca’s (3128 M St. NW) also provide everyday attire options for the average Hoya. West Coast staples like Madewell (1237 Wisconsin Ave. NW), Brandy Melville (3307-B M St. NW) and new arrival Chubbies (3025 M St. NW) offer a taste of home for those in need of a little sun or denim, while classic northeast prep shops like Vineyard Vines (1225 Wisconsin Ave. NW), Ralph Lauren (1245 Wisconsin Ave. NW) and Lilly Pulitzer (1079 Wisconsin Ave. NW) offer just about any pastel polo or floral frill you’ll need to immerse yourself in classic Georgetown attire. At some point in your Georgetown career, you may find yourself a guest at a sports team semi-formal, a club gala or the School of Foreign Service’s Diplomatic Ball while lacking the proper attire. In these cases, shops like Brooks Brothers (3077 M St. NW), Rent the Runway (3336 M St. NW) and Alice + Olivia (3303 M St. NW) are your best bets for a quick stitch or ball gown. In a similar sense, you may expect to find your dream internship or job during your four years at Georgetown, and you may have to restock your professional wardrobe. Banana Republic (3200 M St. NW), J. Crew (3222 M St. NW), LOFT (1239 Wisconsin Ave. NW) and COS (1200 Wisconsin Ave. NW) can suit you up for the perfect interview. For matching shoes, DSW (3222 M St. NW) provides the sole selection for which you are looking. D.C. is also ranked among the most active cities in the United States, and Georgetown students’ love for runs, hikes and SoulCycle (1042 Wisconsin Ave, NW) backs that up. Embrace your sporty side with a trip to Nike (3040 M St. NW), Athleta (3229 M St. NW), North Face (3333 M St. NW) or Lululemon (3265 M St. NW) for yoga pants, gym shorts or whatever else you fancy. And of course, the fashionista in you may from time to time drive you to look beyond the intersection of M Street and Wisconsin Avenue. No need to worry: A quick GUTS bus ride across the Key Bridge to the Metro’s Rosslyn, Va., station grants you access to the Blue line ride to the Fashion Centre at Pentagon City and the Silver line ride to Tysons Corner Center, both fantastic malls with Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s and Nordstroms galore. Happy shopping!

At some point during your time at Georgetown or perhaps even as you arrive in Washington, D.C., you may realize that your favorite high school hoodie or go-to yoga pants need some replacing. Lucky for you, being on the Hilltop puts you in the perfect location to access some of the best shopping scenes in the DMV area. Ranging from urban fashion to highend classics, prep school-style to athleisure, you are sure to find whatever suits your style needs within walking distance, a quick bus trip with the GU Transportation Shuttle or even a Metro ride away.

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D.C. MUSEUMS Smithsonian Institution

Price: Free Location: 11 museums on the National Mall, six others across Washington, D.C. Completely free of charge and open every day of the week, the Smithsonian Institution provides its visitors with a wonderful way to learn more about the city. The best place to start exploring is the National Mall, home to 11 Smithsonian museums and galleries. Here you can see the Hope Diamond and an impressive collection of dinosaur fossils at the National Museum of Natural History, or the ruby slippers from “The Wizard of Oz” at the National Museum of American History. The National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened in fall 2016, is the newest addition to the National Mall and a must-see for visitors and residents of the District. Beyond the mall, check out the six other Smithsonian locations across D.C. Next to the Verizon Center are the American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery, which features the largest collection of presidential portraiture outside of the White House. Another popular Smithsonian attraction is the world-famous National Zoo, home to the beloved pandas Tian Tian, Mei Xiang and Bei Bei and 1,800 other animals. Also be sure to check out the Renwick Gallery, which houses American craft and decorative arts. The Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, which showcase the Smithsonian’s Asian art collections, are also well worth a visit.

National Gallery

Price: Free Location: Sixth Street and Constitution Ave. NW Separate from the Smithsonian but also located along the National Mall is the National Gallery of Art. Also free of charge, the National Gallery is composed of the East and West Buildings and the Sculpture Garden. The East Building, which showcases modern and contemporary art, reopened in September 2016 after major renovations and now features a brand-new roof terrace and two tower galleries. The West Building houses the gallery’s European and American collection and includes works by Van Gogh and Rembrandt, as well as the only Da Vinci painting in the Americas. In addition to artwork, the National Gallery also offers free concerts throughout the year, most of which take place on Sundays. During the winter, tourists and students alike can go and enjoy the ice rink in the Sculpture Garden.

National Museum of Women in the Arts

Price: $8 for students with ID Location: 1250 New York Ave. NW Just a few blocks away from the White House is the only major museum in the world dedicated solely to women in the arts. The National Museum of Women in the Arts has more than 4,500 works dating from the 16th century up to the present, and features various media: paintings, photos, ceramics, videos and more. Admission for students is $8, but on its Community Day — the first Sunday of every month — admission is free. In addition to its showcasing a variety of artworks, the museum hosts lectures, gallery talks, workshops, film screenings and performances.

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Newseum

Price: $22.46 + tax for students with ID Location: 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW One of the most popular destinations in the District, the Newseum is an interactive, seven-level museum with 30 galleries and theaters. Some of its most moving and compelling exhibits are those on 9/11, the First Amendment and the Berlin Wall, which features the largest display of the wall outside Germany. The Newseum also features a fun exhibit on the presidents and their pets titled “First Dogs,” as well as “1967: Civil Rights at 50,” an exhibit that explores the civil rights movement of the 1960s. The Newseum also has an interactive newsroom in which visitors can pretend to be a television reporter working on a news story, as well as the popular “Today’s Front Pages” gallery, which features 80 current-day newspaper covers from around the world. Although its cost of admission is quite high relative to other museums in D.C., the Newseum has enough to keep visitors busy for the two-day period during which the pass is valid.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Price: Free Location: 100 Raoul Wallenberg Pl. SW The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum was established to honor the victims of the Holocaust and promote human dignity while denouncing genocide. It is perhaps most well-known for its permanent exhibition, which spans all three floors of the building and presents a narrative history of the Holocaust through photos, video, eyewitness testimonies and other artifacts. The museum’s emphasis on preventing further genocide is seen in additional exhibits that examine the genocides of Rwanda, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Darfur. The museum’s scope and depth mean that visitors can spend multiple hours exploring all it has to offer. Entry to the museum is free, and it is located right off the National Mall, roughly between the Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial.

The Phillips Collection

Price: By donation Tuesday through Friday, $8 for students with ID on weekends Location: 1600 21st St. NW Set in the home of founder Duncan Phillips in Dupont Circle, this art museum — the first modern art museum in the United States — showcases a vast collection of European and American modernist, impressionist and contemporary artists. The Phillips Collection features well-recognized names like El Greco, Matisse, Renoir, Monet and O’Keefe, and any art lover should make sure to check it out. Unlike larger art museums, the Phillips Collection has a more intimate setting, making it the perfect venue for special events, like “Phillips after 5.” The museum hosts this event on the first Thursday of each month; mixing art and entertainment, the event typically features speakers, live jazz, food and drinks. The Phillips Collection also hosts classical chamber music concerts every Sunday, from October through May — a tradition that dates back more than 75 years.


GETTING AROUND Visiting Washington, D.C., and getting familiar with Georgetown can be a struggle even for veterans of the Hilltop, so don’t worry too much about getting around D.C. Whether this is your first time visiting Georgetown or your family’s Hoya ties go back to the 1800s, here are some tips and pointers on navigating Our Nation’s Capital™ . Georgetown University Transportation Shuttle service: Did you know Georgetown is gracious enough to pay for five free shuttle bus services with two access points to the Metro? Hop on the GUTS bus to Rosslyn, Va., for access to the Blue, Silver and Orange lines that take you into Virginia or to the U.S. Capitol Building, or ride the GUTS bus to Dupont Circle for access to the Red line, which takes you through the heart of central D.C. into Maryland. These two services run every 10 minutes from the bus turnaround near McDonough Gym during weekday peak hours (6 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.). Two other lines to the Georgetown University Law Center and Arlington, Va., depart from McDonough, and a fifth line to Georgetown’s offices on Wisconsin Avenue departs near St. Mary’s Hall. Each line has different schedules and frequency, so check the GUTS website before hopping on. Car: We don’t recommend you rent a car for more than your move-in day. Permit rules in Georgetown limit parking space in the neighborhood for non-residents, the university lacks enough space for every freshman and their family to park on campus, and D.C.’s streets are already congested enough. If you want a quick rental, however, use Zipcar and Car2Go: They offer rentals that charge your fare based on how long you use the car. Zipcar maintains rental locations on Tondorf Road between McCarthy Hall and Village C West and at the Medical Center. Ride-sharing services like Uber or Lyft present your fare at the beginning of the trip, and rides from campus start at around $8. These drivers pick up passengers at the front gates, at the intersections of 37th St. NW and Prospect Street NW, at 37th St. and N Street NW, or at 37th St. and P Street NW. You can also hail a taxi at the front gates or across from the Walsh Building on 36th St. NW between N Street and Prospect Street. D.C. law requires taxis to take your credit card as payment, so you don’t have to worry about cash. Metro: Important note: We are always fans of using public transportation, but using public transportation is not your best bet during the days

leading up to new student move-in. Major sections of the Blue, Orange and Silver lines will be closed until Aug. 26, and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, or Metro, urges you not to use these lines at all. This means the closest working station and line will be the Red line at Dupont Circle, though service past Union Station is disrupted due to the closing of two stations. Plan ahead if you’re trying to take the Metro into Maryland. But, as some background, WMATA operates six color-coded rail lines: Red, Orange, Silver, Blue, Yellow and Green. Though none of them offer service directly to the Georgetown neighborhood, the two closest stations are located at Dupont Circle for the Red line and at Rosslyn for the Blue, Orange and Silver lines. Metrorail service begins at 5 a.m. Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. on Saturday and 8 a.m. on Sunday. Service ends at 11:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, and 11 p.m. on Sunday. You’ll need a SmarTrip card — a permanent, reloadable card that pays your fare — to ride, and you can order one from home so you’re set to explore D.C. when you arrive. Your card will cost $10 and come with $8 of stored fare; you can only get it from WMATA vendors. Fares start at $2.25 and vary depending on the time of day and distance of your trip. The maximum fare is $6 for a trip, and you can reload money online or at a farebox in any Metro station. Bus: WMATA’s Metrobus service puts its rail service to shame, giving Hoyas access to the entire city for a flat rate and free transfers to other buses within a two-hour period if you pay with a SmarTrip card. Fares start at $2 per ride on a regular bus and $4.25 for express bus lines with limited stops. The G2 bus connects Georgetown to Dupont Circle and Le Droit Park and stops right outside the front gates. This bus is fairly reliable and runs about every 20 to 25 minutes. A seven-minute walk to 34th Street NW and Q Street NW gets you to the D2 bus, which runs from Glover Park through Georgetown and into Dupont Circle. The D2 and D6 lines share the same route when they get to Wisconsin Ave, but the D6 goes past Dupont and into the city center. To explore M Street and Foggy Bottom, consider any of the 30-series bus lines that run up and down Wisconsin Avenue. The closest stop is on Wisconsin between Dumbarton Street NW and N Street

NW. For the most up-to-date information, consult wmata.com; for updates on WMATA in general, check The Hoya’s coverage. The D.C. Circulator also offers bus services on select routes, with two lines serving Georgetown. Circulator buses provide service to high-profile sites for a flat rate of $1 — cash and SmarTrip card accepted. Hop on the Union Station-bound line at the stop across from &pizza on Wisconsin Avenue to see D.C.’s downtown sights. Bike: By the time you get to campus, you’ll have missed D.C.’s dockless bike-sharing bubble. Of the five services, only Spin and Jump remain, with Lime Bike moving to cement its Lime Scooters. The safest bet with biking is to rent a Capital Bikeshare bike, found right outside the front gates. Rent a bike for 30 minutes at a $2 fare, but make sure to read the instructions carefully: You want a single-trip ride in most cases, because if you don’t return your bike before the 30 minutes are up, CaBi will add fees to your ride based on 30-minute increments, meaning you can end up spending more than $10 for an hour and a half-long trip. Getting Home for Holidays: Whenever you decide to go home or take a vacation, you’re sure to have many options to travel. Living on the East Coast? Use a train or bus. Union Station is a hub for Amtrak, Megabus and BoltBus, all providing service to most major cities along the East Coast. For those flying home, Reagan National Airport, Dulles International Airport and Baltimore/Washington International Airport all offer flights from the D.C. metro area to all major cities. Reagan (DCA) is the closest air hub to campus — read The Hoya for the low-down on the neighborhood’s fight to redirect those noisy planes. An Uber or taxi to the airport will cost you under $20, while WMATA’s Blue line will take you right up to the check-in level. Just hop on the GUTS bus or take the Circulator across the bridge to the Rosslyn Metro station. Dulles (IAD) and BWI are much further, however. A trip into Northern Virginia will cost you about $60 for a taxi or Uber, while WMATA operates the 5A bus from the Rosslyn Metro station to Dulles for $7.50. A taxi or Uber to BWI will cost you upwards of $100, but Amtrak or the MARC rail service can get you there for as little as $7 for MARC or $12 for Amtrak if you are willing to get to Union Station.

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district neighborhoods

WASHINGTON.ORG

WASHINGTON.ORG

DUPONT CIRCLE Just a quick 30-minute walk from the front gates or a 15-minute bus ride, Dupont Circle combines the hustle and bustle of downtown Washington, D.C., with the stately architecture found in the neighborhood you now call home. Filled with restaurants, retail stores and office buildings — as well as a Red line Metro station — Dupont, even as its cachet has faded over the years, is still one of the most exciting places in the District. The park-like circle itself, while perilous for drivers and pedestrians alike, is often filled with people looking for a bit of fresh air or a place to grab lunch. Just off the circle, you can find one of the city's most storied farmers markets on Sunday mornings, which offers everything from organic produce to ice pops from more than 50 different vendors. Located in Dupont Circle, Kramerbooks & Afterwords Cafe, open until 1 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and until 3 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, combines an independent bookstore with a cozy cafe. If you're looking for a book that may be a little harder to find, the nearby Second Story Books specializes in out-of-print, used and rare works. Dupont Circle is filled with restaurants of all types, whether you’d like to grab a quick bite to eat at chicken chain Nando's PERiPERi and DGS Delicatessen or celebrate after a tough week of midterms at Banana Leaves, Bistrot Du Coin and Sette Osteria. If you're a hamburger fan, there's nowhere in D.C. like Dupont, which can fill your taste for both classics like Shake Shack and the gourmet at Black & Orange or BGR The Burger Joint. If you’re willing to walk a few blocks for your food, check out the newly opened Momofuku CCDC Milk Bar. An offshoot of the hit New York restaurant, Momofuku specializes in grown-up versions of milk-based treats, including its acclaimed cereal milk ice cream.

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CAROLINE PAPPAS/THE HOYA

KEENAN SAMWAY/THE HOYA

14TH STREET CORRIDOR/LOGAN CIRCLE No area in D.C. has grown quite like the 14th Street Corridor, which just 25 years ago was the city's main red-light district and is now the site of a culinary boom. Nearly 30 new eateries opened in this area just in 2013, and the number is only growing as construction on residential and commercial properties continues at a dizzying pace. The star of the revival is French bistro Le Diplomate, which, after being open for just a few years, has already taken a spot among the most popular restaurants in the city. The atmosphere is nearly as impressive as the food, with the airy yet comfortable interior — complete with an authentic zinc bar — supplemented by generous, cafe-like outdoor seating. Its reputation as both a culinary delight and political hot spot, however, means that reservations need to be made weeks in advance. On 14th Street, quantity has not come at the cost of quality. Pearl Dive Oyster Palace specializes in catfish sandwiches, gumbo and, of course, oysters, while The Pig's menu focuses nearly exclusively on pork. Birch & Barley has an unbelievable 555 beers on tap to go along with its understated New American cuisine, while its sister restaurant, ChurchKey, offers an even larger selection of brews in a more casual setting. Between Q and R Streets is the trendy restaurant and wine bar Barcelona, which has a no-reservations policy, making it tricky to get a table. Show up early, grab a drink and prepare to be patient while enjoying the Spanish-style cuisine. Logan Circle is the unofficial center of D.C.'s LGBTQ community. You'd be hard-pressed to find a local business that doesn't have a pride flag draped outside, and there are a host of gay and lesbian clubs nearby, including Town Danceboutique, Cobalt, Number Nine and Nellie's Sports Bar, which is also considered the best sports bar in the District. Culturally, the Studio Theatre is the city's premier des-

U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

tination for modern theater and is featuring nine different plays in the upcoming season, including Skeleton Crew and The Wolves. U STREET Located just north of Logan Circle is U Street, a rapidly growing area that is arguably the center of the District’s cultural life. A good time on a weekend night, however, is nowhere near all this area has to offer. The most famous institution on U Street is Ben's Chili Bowl. The only business in the area to survive the 1968 riots that devastated the city, Ben's and its famous half-smokes — a sausage/hot dog combo topped with chili and cheese — are a throwback to a different era. That doesn't mean Ben's hasn't changed with the times as well; a more upscale sister restaurant, Ben's Next Door, opened in 2009. U Street is equally well-known for its high concentration of live music venues. The one you'll most likely head to is the 9:30 Club, which will host popular acts such as Car Seat Headrest, The Growlers and St. Lucia this fall. Another popular venue is the Black Cat, known for featuring lesser-known alternative acts and for its Red Room Bar. Other venues in the area include the venerable jazz club Bohemian Caverns, U Street Music Hall, DC9 Nightclub and the recently reopened Lincoln Theatre. The Howard Theatre is also located nearby. Restaurant, bookstore and event space Busboys and Poets is another U Street highlight. This unclassifiable institution, which frequently holds book signings and poetry readings, is also a center for progressive politics and discussion; its founder, Andy Shallal, ran for mayor in the 2013 Democratic primary. The restaurant’s food is fresh but casual, and it offers a number of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. U Street is a hotbed of D.C.’s noted Ethiopian cuisine — with Selam Restaurant being especially delicious — but its culinary


options are far from one-dimensional. Other highlights include The Brixton, which focuses on British-style pub fare, and Marvin, named for D.C. native Marvin Gaye, which is known for its delectable chicken and waffles. ADAMS MORGAN Adams Morgan is the tried-and-true home of late-night D.C., less stuffy than the occasionally buttoned-up Dupont Circle and more worn in than what you'll find on U Street. As the murals that line the neighborhood's buildings show, Adams Morgan is culturally vibrant. Although soaring rent prices over the past 20 years have caused what was once the city's most diverse neighborhood to become somewhat gentrified, Adams Morgan nevertheless retains an aura of multiculturalism and artistry that's hard to find anywhere else in the city. Late-night eating options are plentiful: Pizza Mart provides the prototypical jumbo slice for which the District is known, open until at least 3 a.m. every night; Amsterdam Falafelshop is one of the best places to get falafel in the city, staying open until 4 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays; and The Diner, which offers typical, if refined, diner-style food, is open 24/7. If you’re feeling more adventurous, you can stand in line for a table at Bad Saint, a high-end Filipino restaurant located close to Columbia Heights with an average wait time of several hours. Bad Saint opens every day at 5:30 p.m. for dinner, but people start lining up sometimes as early as 3 p.m. If you just want to take a walk on a weekend afternoon, Adams Morgan is a solid destination. In the northern area of the neighborhood, Meridian Hill Park contains many statues, including a memorial for President James Buchanan, and a fountain with a striking 13-basin waterfall. There are also a number of record stores in the area: Smash! Records specializes in rock n’ roll albums, Red Onion Records on U Street is known for its wide variety of records and Hill and Dale, in Georgetown, is recognizable for its sleek interior. The nightlife options in Adams Morgan are extensive as well. The main corridor of 18th Street is lined almost entirely with bars, so there will always be somewhere to go. H STREET NE A proposed streetcar line from Georgetown to Union Station has been in the works for a long time, and it won't be completed until long after you've graduated. But the most exciting prospect of this plan isn't that it will be easier to take the train home — it is

how easy it will become to get to H Street NE, one of the fastest developing areas of D.C. Like the U Street Corridor, H Street, damaged heavily during the 1968 riots, was once a cultural hub of the District. And like U Street, H Street is now the home of new businesses and rapid apartment construction, not to mention a front-row view of the positives and negatives of D.C.'s rapid gentrification. While H Street is similar to U Street in that most of its establishments are relatively new and cater to a younger crowd, the locations here are a little more playful and bohemian. Take, for example, the H Street Country Club, which, in addition to serving Mexican food, is home to an indoor miniature golf course. This doesn't mean that H Street completely values style over substance. Sidamo may just be the best coffee shop in the District, with standard black coffee as impressive as its lattes. And Toki Underground, although small and often crowded, serves unbeatable ramen. If you're looking for a place to grab dinner with friends or relatives, Smith Commons is delicious and reasonably priced and has an excellent brunch, too. As far as nightlife goes, there are plenty of options, but Little Miss Whiskey's Golden Dollar stands out as the most fun. The area isn't as music-focused as is U Street, but the arts played a central role in H Street's revitalization and continue to define it today. Another name for the area, the Atlas District, comes from the Atlas Performing Arts Center, which reopened in 2001. It offers a full array of theater, music and dance productions, from symphonies to mind readers, and the center was home to more events in this summer's annual Capital Fringe Festival than any other venue. The Rock & Roll Hotel boasts a lounge, a rooftop deck and a concert hall with an impressive lineup of independent bands. CAPITOL HILL Despite a name that suggests a monolithic governmental presence, the neighborhood of Capitol Hill is the city's largest and presents a more diverse visiting experience than its name would suggest. That doesn't mean, however, that the building for which the neighborhood is named isn't worth a visit. The U.S. Capitol building is the home of Congress, and the architecture and aura of importance are awe-inspiring even for the less politically inclined. For those more interested in how our government works, many hearings are open to the public, and you can even score a tour of the Capitol complex — not just the rotunda

itself but the myriad office buildings that surround it — by getting in contact with the office of your hometown representative. The Supreme Court building and Library of Congress are also close by if your interest extends beyond the operations of the legislative branch; the latter is a great excursion if you want to give studying for that important midterm an extra sense of gravitas. Eastern Market, located a few blocks east of the Capitol complex, is the hub of the neighborhood’s residential area. On weekdays, vendors offering everything from filets to flowers sell their wares in the South Hall Market. The area really comes alive on weekends, however, when hundreds of local farmers and artisans set up stands around the market and create an atmosphere unlike anywhere else in the District. If you're looking for a casual bite to eat, deli Mangialardo & Sons, located in the heart of the neighborhood, has been around for over 50 years and is famous for the “G-man,” its take on the classic Italian sub. Ted's Bulletin is a comfortable diner-style eatery specializing in burgers and milkshakes, while Ambar offers bottomless Balkan food and drinks if you're especially hungry. To eat next to a senator or representative, Charlie Palmer Steak is your best bet, though Johnny's Half Shell is also an option if you want to watch your wallet. LAFAYETTE SQUARE As a new resident of D.C., you will definitely find yourself in this area at some point during your year, whether for an internship or a protest: This neighborhood houses the White House and other historic buildings. After you snap that selfie with the president’s residence and the ever-present fence around it, grab a bite to eat at any of the fast, casual restaurants nearby. A few favorites include GCDC, a grilled cheese-centered restaurant on Pennsylvania Avenue a block from the White House and District Taco, a Mexican restaurant that began as a food truck but now has locations throughout D.C. Many of the eateries in the area are open relatively late, which is convenient as I Street is also home to Eden, a venue that occasionally hosts formals for many campus organizations. If politics isn’t necessarily your thing, check out the Renwick Gallery located across the street from the back end of the White House. Although the exhibitions change frequently, admission to this small art museum is free as it is part of the Smithsonian Institution’s museum complex.

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nature outings

Four years is a long time to stay anywhere, even in a city as vibrant as Washington, D.C. When classes are a bit too stressful, campus can feel a bit claustrophobic, and the urban setting may not be exactly what you’re looking for. Nature can be the perfect escape; luckily, Georgetown is situated near many idyllic nature escapes. While many of them may seem utterly forbidding during the winter, the gorgeous color change of the leaves in autumn and the rebirth of life in spring are perfect opportunities to breathe in some fresh crisp air.

Harpers Ferry If you follow the Potomac River inland, you will eventually hit the serene little village of Harpers Ferry, located right across the West Virginia border at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers. Historically famous for its seizure by John Brown in 1859 and later its role in the Civil War when it swapped hands eight times between the Union and the Confederacy, the town now features plenty of historical shops along its main thoroughfare, while hiking through the nearby national park offers breathtaking views of a cleaner Potomac and superb greenery. Transportation: One hour and 20 minutes by car. For the vehicle-less (i.e., everyone), a public MARC train runs directly from Union Station to Harpers Ferry. Shenandoah National Park Best visited in the fall, when the array of colors is breathtaking, Shenandoah offers hikes up the mountains and down into the waterfalls. Following the 105-mile Skyline Drive, the park is enough of a journey that you may want to devote more than one day to the experience by taking advantage of its lodging or camping options. Spend enough time here, and you won’t be able to stop humming John Denver: “Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah River … country roads, take me home.” Entrance to the park costs $30 per vehicle or $15 per individual without a car. Transportation: One hour and 30 minutes to the north entrance by car. Great Falls Park Far closer to Georgetown is this small National Park Service site located near the end of the George Washington Memorial Parkway. Several viewpoints along an array of hiking trails offer panoramic views of the Potomac as it bounds and cascades along a drop of 76 feet over less than a mile; for the truly adventurous, whitewa-

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ter kayaking is available. Entrance to the park costs $10 per vehicle or $5 per person without a car. Transportation: Thirty minutes by car. Cut down the price of an Uber by taking the metro to Tysons Corner or Spring Hill on the Silver line and taking an Uber from there. Theodore Roosevelt Island Although located in the Potomac right between downtown D.C. and Rosslyn, Va., the quiet and forested escape of Roosevelt Island drowns out the bustle of the surrounding metropolis. The central monument dedicated to the 26th president captures his love for the outdoors, while the trails throughout the island offer stunning views of Healy Hall and the Georgetown waterfront. Transportation: A 30-minute walk across the Key Bridge and through Rosslyn. Sandy Point State Park Swimming in the Potomac is generally ill-advised, and D.C. is far enough inland that beaches are not easily accessible. The closest one to Georgetown is this state park along the Chesapeake Bay, which features lengthy beaches ideal for a bit of relaxation. Entrance to the park costs $3 per vehicle or $4 to $7 per person. Transportation: One hour by car. Mount Vernon Once you’ve seen the monuments a few times and want to find some other historical landmarks, take a trip to George Washington’s plantation house, which was finished in 1778 and where he lived until his death. The history is palpable and the surrounding scenery is gorgeous. Entrance to the grounds costs $20 per person. Transportation: Thirty minutes by car. On the metro, take the Yellow line to Huntington Station and catch the Fairfax Connector Bus 101.


hoya history When you walked through the front gates for the first time, your eyes were drawn to a giant, climbable-looking statue of a man sitting commandingly in a chair. You didn’t know who it was at first, but soon enough your chipper tour guide told you that the statue overlooking the front gates is John Carroll, the founder of Georgetown. Depending on whether your tour guide was a history major, you might have learned a little more about the archbishop of Baltimore who secured 60 acres of land to found the nation’s first Jesuit school in 1789. But after John Carroll, you were probably more interested in learning about the food in O’Donovan Hall (called Leo’s in Hoya parlance), the best freshman dorm (answer: there is none) or what Brown House actually is, rather than knowing more about Georgetown’s history. Answers to the above questions can be found in this guide too, but Georgetown’s 225-year history has more of an impact on our present than one would expect. We consider 1789 the university’s official founding year, but we can trace our roots back to a school in St. Mary’s, Md., founded by Frs. Andrew White, S.J., and John Gravenor, S.J., in the year 1634 when they were involved in the founding of the Maryland colony. Carroll founded Georgetown in 1789, with classes commencing in 1792. The university’s 700seat Gaston Hall is named for the first student, 13-year-old William Gaston. After receiving the first federal university charter from Congress, the College — then the university’s only school — granted its first two bachelor’s degrees in 1817. Throughout the next two centuries, Georgetown expanded its educational offerings beginning with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1820, the School of Medicine in 1851, the Law School in 1870, the School of Nursing in 1903, the School of Foreign Service in 1919, the School of Continuing Studies in 1956 and the School of Business Administration in 1957 (with its name changed to the McDonough School of Business in 1998). The university further grew with the establishment of the School of Foreign Service’s Qatar campus in 2005 and, most recently, the McCourt

School of Public Policy in 2013. In the 1800s, Georgetown ran into challenges — namely, dealing with slavery and the Civil War. Throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries, slaves worked the campus grounds and contributed to the university’s day-to-day functioning. In 1838, after suffering financial setbacks, the university benefitted from the sale of 272 slaves to a plantation in Louisiana, an event that our community today is still attempting to come to terms with and memorialize. Because of the school’s location in Washington, D.C., students dropped out to serve in both the Union and Confederate forces. Enrollment fell to only 17 students between 1859 and 1861, and university buildings served as temporary hospitals and lodging for soldiers. President Abraham Lincoln spoke to Union troops from the steps of Old North in 1861 — one of 14 presidents, including Barack Obama, to speak from the venue — and at the end of the war, Georgetown chose blue and gray as its colors to signify unity between Union and Confederate soldiers returning to campus. Fr. Patrick Healy, S.J., served as the first black president of Georgetown or any major university in the United States from 1873 to 1882, though his mixed-race ancestry only came to light in the 1960s. During World War II, Georgetown housed the Army Specialized Training Program, a federal effort to recruit junior officers from universities. In 1969, Georgetown became fully coeducational when the College began admitting women, who until then had only been allowed to enroll in the School of Nursing. Current university President John J. DeGioia became the first layperson to lead Georgetown in 2001, becoming the university’s longest-serving president in 2015. Under his leadership and that of his predecessors, Georgetown has grown from an all-white, all-male and all-Catholic local school to the diverse, competitive and internationally recognized university you are entering today. By no means is this a perfect account of Georgetown’s history, yet we hope this chronicle serves as a welcome introduction to the rich and dynamic heritage we all have the privilege to contribute to every day.

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news to know QUICK SUMMER HITS Harriette Hemmasi will now lead all branches of the Georgetown University library system, according to a June 19 news release. Hemmasi previously served as the Joukowsky family university librarian at Brown University where she raised over $50 million for the university’s library and assisted in bringing the library to the digital age. At Georgetown she will oversee and direct all branches of the university library, including Lauinger Library and Blommer Science Library, which includes 3.5 million volumes, manuscripts and books. Former Dean Artemis Kirk retired in the fall after 16 years at the university. A fire ripped through the beloved Georgetown eatery Wingo’s on June 26, leaving the store closed indefinitely. When Wingo’s was established in 2002, it attracted customers for its extensive list of wings and dozens of sauces. Wingo’s acquired a new location at 2218 Wisconsin Avenue in Glover Park, and it is expected to be open sometime in August. As for the Georgetown Wingo’s location, workers are trying to reopen as soon as possible. “We promise to come back stronger than ever before!” read a post on the Wingo’s Facebook page in late June.

A Glimpse Into Speakers Who Visited Campus Last Year U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), former Vice President Al Gore, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus all came to campus during the academic year, touching on a variety of topics in their speeches. Pelosi emphasized the importance of unified political parties, Gore addressed the future of the environment, Albright talked about her new book and Priebus analyzed President Donald Trump’s unconventional governing style.

University Confronts Instances Of Anti-Semitic Vandalism In September, painted swastikas were found in two different resident halls on campus on three different occasions. First, in early September, a swastika was found carved into an elevator of Village C West. Shortly after, swastikas were found painted in a LXR Hall elevator and women’s restroom. In response to the incidents, the Georgetown University Police Department launched an investigation that included interviews to determine the person responsible, but in an interview with The Hoya in December, GUPD Police Chief Jay Gruber said the investigation was still ongoing and a suspect was not identified. After the incidents, GUPD increased secu-

rity and installed cameras in the LXR Hall, but some students felt that the university could have done more to combat the anti-Semitic actions that occurred in September. Jessica Keller (COL ’20), the president of J Street U Georgetown, a pro-Israeli student group, thought the university should have taken stronger action. “It appears that actions of anti-Semitism and misogyny have only been bolstered by the inability of our society to condemn this hateful rhetoric, and I believe that more must be done, both by the administration and by other student organizations, to combat this threat,” Keller wrote in an email to The Hoya in December.

Community Seeks to Address Georgetown’s History With Slavery

FILE PHOTO: ANNA KOVACEVICH/THE HOYA

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Beginning in 2015 with the establishment of Georgetown’s Working Group on Slavery, Memory and Reconciliation, the university has worked to reconcile with its association with slavery, after it benefitted from the sale of 272 slaves to a Louisiana plantation in 1838. Measures have included granting legacy status in admissions consideration to descendants of the 272 and renaming two residence halls previously named for Jesuits involved in the 1838 sale to Isaac Hawkins Hall, after the first enslaved person listed on the record of sale, and Anne Marie Becraft Hall, after a free black educator in the Georgetown area.

Descendants of Isaac Hawkins, represented by the GU272 Isaac Hawkins Legacy group, proposed in January that the university should provide financial reparations to the descendants. The Legacy of the GU272 Alliance is also pushing for financial reparations in the form of a scholarship fund to be used by descendants to pay for Georgetown or a state university of the student’s choosing. University spokespeople have stated that Georgetown will continue to work with descendants in reconciliation efforts but have not stated what those efforts will include.


New GUSA Executives Emphasize Role Of Students’ Voices on Campus Georgetown University Student Association President Sahil Nair (SFS ’19) and Vice President Naba Rahman (SFS ’19) won the Feb. 22 GUSA executive election by a razor-thin margin of 36 votes. Results from a poll conducted by The Hoya days before the election showed Nair and Rahman narrowly leading the race, over the second-place presidential and vice presidential candidates, Josh Sirois (SFS ’20) and Casey Doherty (COL ’20). Nair and Rahman, who met their senior year of high school at a national debate competition, are the third consecutive nonwhite GUSA executive pair. Though the pair had less GUSA experi-

ence than Sirois and Doherty, their platform relied heavily on ensuring that every student’s voice is heard, evident in their platform “Because Every Voice Matters.” Thirty-five senior leadership and cabinet positions, which are made up of students who applied and were chosen by Nair and Rahman to help support the administration’s policy goals, complete Nair and Rahman’s team. In addition to the 35 senior leadership positions, 18 senate members were elected in April. This year was the first year senators were elected in April, rather than in the fall, which is a result of the passage of a set of referendums that upended the voting policy.

University to Divest From Tar Sand Extraction Companies The university will divest from companies that support the extraction of tar sands, as it violates Georgetown’s Socially Responsible Investing Policy, university administrators announced at a meeting in early June following proposals from university student group Georgetown University Fossil Free. The committee of university administrators decided that investing in companies that support tar sand extraction violates the investment policy due to the harmful environmental and community effects tar sand extraction can pose. Tar sands are a mix of

different substances, including sand, water and clay; tar sand extraction is similar to coal mining. The activity also violates the university’s principle of “protection of human life and dignity,” as extraction disproportionately affects “indigenous people from First Nations communities,” according to the press release. Georgetown’s decision to divest from tar sand extraction joins other universities that have divested, such as the University of Oxford and the University of California system.

Task Force Increases Assault Prevention Programming A number of new policies to prevent sexual assault were put in place in fall 2017 after the university’s Sexual Assault and Misconduct Task Force finalized its set of 11 recommendations. Among the new changes were the establishment of “Bringing in the Bystander,” a training program for all first-year students training them in sexual misconduct prevention, and the creation of an online resource center and misconduct reporting form. Health Education Services also hired a new staff clinician and sexual assault specialist to expand the number of available resources to assist survivors. Other recommendations included expanding sexual assault response training for all Georgetown University Police Department officers and encouraging a more open club culture on campus. The spring 2016 creation of the task force and the group’s subsequent recommendations came in response to the January 2016 Sexual Assault and Misconduct Climate Survey, which revealed that one in three women, one in three transgender, genderqueer and non-conforming students and one in nine men reported experiencing non-consensual sexual contact as a result of physical force or incapacitation.

Students, Administrators Stand With DACA Recipients After President Donald Trump rescinded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program last September, Georgetown University President John J. DeGioia reaffirmed that Georgetown would continue to protect students without documentation, commonly referred to as “Dreamers.” Throughout the 2017-18 academic year, students and university administrators demonstrated their dedication to uphold-

ing this promise, starting a letter-writing campaign called “Friends of Dreamers” to encourage members of Congress to support permanent legislation to replace DACA. The Georgetown University Student Association sponsored a weeklong campaign to support DACA recipients called #GUHereToStay, which included a letter-writing campaign, phone bank and other advocacy efforts aiming to engage students.

After Congress did not pass permanent legislation by DACA’s March 5 expiration date, the university maintained that it would continue to support students without documentation. April’s UndocuWeek continued the efforts to support those students at Georgetown, with events including movie screenings and discussions meant to dispel stereotypes about immigrants.

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Academic

Campus Media

College Academic Council (by election) Georgetown Parliamentary Debate Team GU Quiz Bowl GU Mock Trial and Law Team International Relations Club (includes Model UN) MSB Academic Council (by election) NHS Academic Council (by election) Philodemic Society SFS Academic Council (by election) The Tocqueville Forum Student Fellows Undergraduate Bioethics Society

Bossier Magazine Georgetown Journal of International Affairs GU Journal of Health Sciences GU Television (GUTV) Her Campus Spoon University Georgetown (food publication) The Anthem (literary magazine) The Caravel (international affairs) The Georgetown Independent (contemporary arts and cultural trends) The Georgetown Review (politics and international affairs) The Georgetown Voice The Hoya The Triple Helix Thirty Seventh (fashion and lifestyle blog) WGTB Georgetown Radio Ye Domesday Booke

Advocacy Active Minds Amnesty International Animalia Georgetown Breast Cancer Outreach Educating Students About Social Equality (ERASE) Georgetown Israel Alliance Georgetown Renewable Energy and Environmental Network (GREEN) Grassroot Hoyas GU Pride (LGBTQ group) GU Queer People of Color GU Student/Farmworker Alliance GU Student Veterans Association GU Women of Color H*yas for Choice Hoyas for Troops J Street U Georgetown Love Saxa NAACP Georgetown No Lost Generation at Georgetown University Project Lighthouse GU Relay for Life Right to Life Students for Justice in Palestine Students Stopping the Trafficking of People (SSTOP) Take Back the Night Truth and Human Rights in North Korea (THINK) United Feminists

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Cultural African Society of Georgetown Asian American Student Association Asian-Pacific Islander Leadership Forum Black Leadership Forum Black Student Alliance Caribbean Culture Circle Chinese Students and Scholars Association Club Filipino Club Singapore French Cultural Association Georgetown Arab Society Georgetown Chinese Student Alliance Georgetown German Club Georgetown Irish American Society Georgetown PorColombia GU Brazilian Club GU European Club GU Hawai'i Club GU Hellenic Association GU Mexican Student Association GU Riqueza Dominicana GU Russian Association GU Signs GU Turkish Student Association

GU Vietnamese Student Association Hong Kong Student Association Il Circolo Italiano International Students Association Iranian Cultural Society Japan Network Korean Student Association Latin American Student Association LatinX Leadership Forum Lebanese Student Association Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Atzlán Native American Student Council South Asian Society Spectrum (multiethnic identity) Taiwanese American Student Association The Spanish Club of Georgetown

Greek Life

(none are officially recognized by the university) Alpha Epsilon Pi (fraternity) Alpha Kappa Psi (co-ed business fraternity) Alpha Phi Omega* (co-ed community service fraternity) Delta Phi Epsilon (fraternity and sorority) Kappa Alpha Theta (sorority) Kappa Kappa Gamma (sorority) Sigma Alpha Epsilon (fraternity) Sigma Phi Epsilon (fraternity) Zeta Psi (fraternity) *Recognized through the CSJ

Performing Arts (Most require audition)

A Cappella The Capitol G’s (all-male) The Chimes (all-male) GraceNotes (all-female) GU Harmony (co-ed, international music) Resonant Essence Live (coed, R&B) Superfood (co-ed) The Georgetown Phantoms (co-ed) The Georgetown Saxatones (co-ed, community service)

student Dance

Ballet Folklórico Mexicano de Georgetown Ballroom Dance Team Black Movement Dance Theatre (for credit) Groove Theory (hip-hop) GU Dance Company (for credit) GU Jawani (South Asian dance) Hoya Break Squad Impulse GU (student-led dance classes) Lu'au (annual dance show, through GU Hawai'i) Rangila (annual dance show, through the South Asian Society) Ritmo y Sabor (Latin dance) Tappin’ Jacks (tap dance)

Theater Black Theatre Ensemble Children’s Theater Georgetown Improv Association GUerrilla Improv Mask and Bauble Dramatic Society Nomadic Theatre

Music Chamber Singers (for credit) Chapel Choir (performs for 9:30 p.m. Sunday Dahlgren Mass, for credit) Choir, 7:30 p.m. Mass Concert Choir (for credit) Gospel Choir (performs for 7 p.m. Sunday service, for credit) Jazz Ensemble (for credit) Lombardi Ensemble Association for Patients Orchestra (for credit) Pep Band Wind Ensemble (for credit) World Percussion Ensemble

Other Arts Corpus (spoken word/poetry) Georgetown Independent Film Society GU Anime Club GU Art Aficionados Hoyawood (documentary films) Performing Arts Advisory Council (oversight group for performing arts)


clubs Political

Religious

Alexander Hamilton Society Georgetown Bipartisan Coalition GU Club of the American Civil Liberties Union GU College Democrats GU College Republicans GU Roosevelt Institute GU Student Association (student government, by election) Turning Point USA Young Americans for Liberty

Campus Ministry Campus Ministry Student Forum Catholic Chaplaincy Catholic Women at Georgetown Catholic Retreats Georgetown Buddhist Meditations Sangha Georgetown Chi Alpha Georgetown Orthodox Christian Fellowship GU Brothers for Christ GU Catholic GU Christian Athletes GU Sisters for Christ Hindu Students Association Ignatian Retreats Interfaith Student Council Jewish Chaplaincy Jewish Student Association Knights of Columbus Latter-day Saints Student Association (LDSSA) Muslim Chaplaincy Muslim Students Association Orthodox Christian Chaplaincy Protestant Chaplaincy

Pre-Professional AcademyHealth Compass Fellowship (social entrepreneurship) Georgetown Accounting Society Georgetown Aspiring Minority Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs Georgetown Consulting Club Georgetown Marketing Association Georgetown Opportunities for Leadership Development Georgetown Pre-Law Society Georgetown Retail and Luxury Association Georgetown Speechwriting Advisory Group GU Minority Association of Pre-Health Students GU Pre-Medical Society GU Pre-Dental Society GU Real Estate Club GU Student Investment Fund Hilltop Consultants Innovo Consulting McDonough Alliance (for LGBTQ students) McDonough Global Student Association McDonough Women Minority Pre-Law Association Net Impact OPIM Majors Group Startup Hoyas Student Nurses Association of Georgetown Stemme (Women in STEM)

Club Sports Advisory Board for Club Sports Badminton (co-ed) Baseball (men’s) Basketball (men’s and women’s) Boxing (co-ed) Cricket Equestrian (co-ed) Fencing (co-ed) Field Hockey (co-ed) Figure Skating (co-ed) Golf (co-ed) Ice Hockey (men’s) Lacrosse (men’s and women’s) Polo (co-ed) Rock Climbing (co-ed) Rugby (men’s and women’s) Running (co-ed) Soccer (men’s and women’s) Softball (women’s) Squash (men’s and women’s) Swimming (co-ed) Tae Kwon Do (co-ed) Tennis (co-ed) Triathlon Team (co-ed) Ultimate Frisbee (men’s and women’s)

Volleyball (men’s and women’s) Water Polo (men’s and women’s)

Other Sports Aikikai (martial art) Georgetown Gaming Georgetown University Chess Club International Hoya Blue Intramural Sports Outdoor Education

Social Justice Actively Moving Forward After School Kids Program Alternative Breaks Program Best Buddies Georgetown Caring for Children With Cancer Center for Social Justice Advisory Board for Student Organizations Cristo Rey Tutoring D.C. Reads D.C. Schools Project First-Year Orientation to Community Involvement Georgetown Development Initiative Georgetown Global Medical Brigades Georgetown Individuals Vocal and Energetic for Service (GIVES) Georgetown Period Empowerment Project Georgetown Solidarity Committee (workers’ rights) GirlTalk GlobeMed at Georgetown GU Circle of Women GU Math and Science Hands-On Enrichment (GUMSHOE) GU Oncology Patient Support (GU OPS) GU Urban Debate League Habitat for Humanity Hoya Blood Donors Hoya Helpers Hoya Outreach Programs and Education Hoya Taxa Hoyas for Immigrant Rights Hoyas Global Initiative Hoyas Rescuing Leftover Cuisine Leaders in Education About Diversity

Male Development Association (Guy Talk) Moneythink One World Youth Project Operation Smile Prison Outreach Project Sunshine St. Elizabeth’s Hospital Outreach Stride for College Sursum Corda Literacy Program UNICEF-Georgetown Young Diplomats of Seaton Elementary (tutoring)

Other Big Hunt Blue & Gray Tour Guides Breaking the Bubble Creative Writing Club Community Garden Club Georgetown Computer and Electronics Club ESCAPE (retreats) European Horizons (think tank) Falun Dafa Club (meditation) Fundraisr Georgetown Admissions Ambassador Program (GAAP) Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service (GERMS) Georgetown Gastronomes Georgetown Medieval Club Georgetown Program Board Georgetown Sports Analysis, Business and Research Group GU Alumni and Student Federal Credit Union (GUAFSCU) GU Astronomical Society GU Classics Club GU Grilling Society (GUGS) GU Juggling Club GU Lecture Fund GU Technology and Engineering Club GU Women in Leadership (GUWIL) Hilltop Tacos Hoya Teahouse Hoyasana InterHall Council New Student Orientation Residential Judicial Council Social Innovation and Public Service Fund Student Activities Commission (oversight group for clubs)

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ABP n. Alternative Breaks Program, in which students spend their vacation on service-oriented trips run through the Center for Social Justice; used to be called Alternative Spring Break, and many still refer to it as ASB, which does not stand for Associated Student Body, you student government nerds. Bill Clinton n. Best known for losing his campaign for presidency of Georgetown’s student body, the School of Foreign Service ’68 grad and former president of the United States of America returns to campus pretty often and is sometimes spotted by students at The Tombs or Dahlgren. Booey’s (also known as Booeymongers) n. A delicatessen on Prospect Street that serves a variety of sandwiches and pitchers of beer, making it a popular eatery among students. Bradley Cooper n. Georgetown Class of ’97 alumnus who sometimes returns to campus to give speeches, photobomb weddings and reject starstruck undergraduate suitors; also an Academy Award-winning actor in hit films like “The Hangover” and “American Sniper.” Brown House n. A student house that is brown on N Street, notorious for throwing huge parties. It escaped being taken over by Georgetown faculty in 2016. Burleith n. The neighborhood to the north of Georgetown’s campus, located near the hospital and the medical school. Home to many upperclassmen in off-campus housing, a fair share of townhouses and cranky neighbors. CAPS n. Georgetown University Counseling and Psychiatric Services, a mental health clinic on the north side of campus behind Darnall Hall. CAPS provides services like evaluations; consultations; indi-

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vidual, couples or group psychotherapy; and referral services to students. It gives free evaluations and consultations to those using CAPS for the first time. Cherry Tree Massacre n. The largest intercollegiate a cappella festival on the East Coast, put on by the Georgetown Chimes annually in February and featuring performances from the hosts as well as groups from Georgetown and other schools. The Corp n. Students of Georgetown, Inc., the student-run business that operates coffee and snack shops throughout campus; locations include The Midnight MUG in the library, Uncommon Grounds and Vital Vittles in the Leavey Center, More Uncommon Grounds in the ICC, The Hilltoss in the Healey Family Student Center and Hoya Snaxa in the Southwest Quadrangle, among other services. ’Cuse n. Short for Syracuse University, Georgetown’s old Big East rival, whom we will once again face in the 2017-18 season. We still hate the Orange. Juice ’Cuse.

georgetown

dorms, the Walsh Building and the Car Barn. Its Residence Hall Office now services Village B in addition to Nevils and LXR. Epi n. Epicurean & Co. The buffet-style restaurant and sushi bar in the basement of Darnall Hall that is open almost 24/7. Quesadillas and the buffet are student favorites. It sometimes moonlights as a nightclub and hosts private events. It also opened a noodle bar this year. The Esplanade n. Located on the second floor of the Leavey Center, the outdoor area and popular study spot offers good views and seating areas. A great spot for picnics and a good shortcut to Yates Field House.

Exorcist Steps n. The stairs next to Car Barn that connect M Street and Prospect Street, made famous by the climax of the film “The Exorcist.” Frequented by runners looking for an extreme workout.

ing severe alcohol-related issues. Grab ‘n’ Go n. A theoretically wonderful part of a meal plan under which students can get food to go as one of their weekly meals. There are two locations: Leo’s and the Leavey Center. The Einstein Bros. Bagels location in Car Barn also functions as a Grab ‘n’ Go with meal exchange. GUASFCU n. Possibly the most complicated of Georgetown acronyms, the Georgetown University Alumni and Student Federal Credit Union, a student-run bank, is most commonly referred to as simply “the credit union.” Pronounced “GUAFskoo” or “GUAS-ff-koo.” GUGS n. Pronounced “jugs,” this abbreviation stands for the Georgetown University Grilling Society. Can be found grilling its signature burgers in Red Square on Fridays throughout the school year.

The Dirty D n. An affectionate term for Darnall, one of the four freshman dorms.

Foggy Bottom n. The neighborhood in which The George Washington University is located, about a 20-minute walk from Georgetown. Home of good food, fun bars and the nearest Trader Joe’s.

GUSA n. This acronym stands for Georgetown University Student Association, pronounced “guss-uh” or “goose-uh.” GUSA is Georgetown’s student-run political body, whose members are elected every year by other students to fix Georgetown’s problems. GUTS Bus n. Georgetown University Transportation Shuttle. Its most popular routes run to the Dupont Circle and Rosslyn Metro stops. Other routes go to Wisconsin Avenue, Arlington and the Georgetown University Law Center.

DMV n. Region comprising Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia. DPS (also DoPS) n. The popular nickname for the Georgetown University Police Department, which formerly went by the dystopian moniker Department of Public Safety. East Campus n. The area composed of the Nevils apartment complex, the LXR

Georgetown Day n. A campuswide celebration that takes place on the last Friday of spring classes. The front lawn is transformed into a giant party with free food, inflatables, an outdoor concert and much revelry. GERMS n. The student-run Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service acts as the ambulance system on campus. Call when you sprain an ankle, break a bone or are hav-

ICC n. Officially the Edward J. Bunn Intercultural Center, the brick building in Red Square where most language, government and economics classes take place. Also notorious for its confusing layout. JTIII n. The nickname for former men’s basketball Head Coach John Thompson III, who was fired and replaced with Patrick Ewing last season. The new Thompson

DCAF n. D.C. A Capella Festival, annually co-hosted by the Phantoms and the GraceNotes each November, featuring a capella groups from Georgetown University, Virginia Tech, New York University and The George Washington University.

Farmers Market n. Georgetown University Farmers Market. A student-organized afternoon market held in Red Square on fall and spring Wednesday afternoons. Popular treats include wood-fired pizzas, fresh empanadas, crepes and boba tea.


dictionary

Athletic Center displays the name of his father, a legendary former Georgetown basketball head coach. Lau n. 1. Joseph Mark Lauinger Memorial Library, the main library on campus. An ugly building where fun goes to die. derivatives: Club Lau, n. The quiet room on the third floor of Lauinger Library transforms into a freshman-filled “nightclub” at the beginning of first semester for a scarring night of debauchery. Lau 2, n. The second floor of Lau and the only floor on which talking is allowed. While theoretically perfect for group projects, productivity is elusive here. Also home to The Midnight MUG, one of The Corp’s coffee shops. Leo’s n. Short for Leo J. O’Donovan Hall, the on-campus dining hall. Say its full name, and you’ll sound like a high schooler touring campus. derivatives: O’Donovan’s on the Waterfront, n. the technical name for the upper floor of Leo’s. Use when feeling #fancy.

Map n. Nickname for “Map of the Modern World,” a pass-fail course that every SFS-er must pass to graduate. You’ll learn every country and every capital in the world, in addition to a surprising amount of plate tectonics. Sporcle quizzes make for great study tools. Meme Page n. Officially titled “georgetown memes for non-comforming jesuit teens,” this Facebook group is filled with #relatable Georgetown-themed meme content created by procrastinating students like you. MSBro n. A male undergraduate student in the McDonough School of Business who fits the stereotypes associated with the school. Often doesn’t have class on Fridays and gets the most out of three-day weekends. Spotted in button-downs, polos or bro tanks.

Prospect Crawl n. The act of traveling up and down Prospect Street in search of parties. Most frequently performed by hordes of freshmen.

they escort you to The Tombs where you can have your forehead stamped by the bouncer and enjoy your first (legal) sip of alcohol.

Rangila n. A uniquely Georgetown tradition, this annual show organized by the South Asian Society brings together more than 500 Hoyas for a weekend of dancing in Gaston Hall.

Waterfront n. The area on K Street down by the Potomac. Good for runs and romantic walks. Adjacent to the movie theater.

RHO n. Residence Hall Office. Place where all your packages will be delivered and where you can go if you're locked out or need to rent a blue cart, vacuum or other helpful room-cleaning appliances. Usually serves multiple residence halls. Rooftops n. The term used to describe the topmost Village A apartments that enjoy large rooftop balconies. They’re a frequent spot for parties in warmer weather. Saferides n. Georgetown’s van service that picks students up in West Georgetown and Burleith from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Sunday through Wednesday and to 3 a.m. Thursday through Saturday. Be warned: The service is safe but slow. SNAPS n. Student Neighborhood Assistance Program. A volunteer group of university officials and private security officers who patrol the neighborhoods surrounding campus on weekends, breaking up revelry and loud noises. SWQ n. The area known as “Southwest Quad,” where the McCarthy, Kennedy and Reynolds dorms house most of Georgetown’s sophomore population. A popular spot for beach volleyball, grilling and hammocking. Tombs Night n. The night before your 21st birthday on which friends gather to toast your existence up until the stroke of midnight, at which point

Wisey’s n. 1. What most students call Wisey’s is actually Wisemiller’s Grocery & Deli, the deli and convenience store on 36th Street. 2. Its second location, actually called D.C. Wisey’s, is on Wisconsin Avenue and is usually referred to as “Healthy Wisey’s.” Yates n. Yates Field House, the campus gym, is located at the top of a hill, providing students with a small pre-workout workout.

GENERAL COLLEGE TERMINOLOGY André n. Cheap champagne popular for making mimosas for brunch. Beerlympics n. A drinking event often hosted by a club or organization during which members split up into “countries” and hold their own in a series of drinking games. Often features fantastic costumes. Burnett’s n. Cheap vodka available in a mind-blowing number of flavors, from cucumber lime to hot cinnamon. Darty n. A day party. A party during the day. Fairly self-explanatory. DFMO n. Dance floor makeout, a makeout session that occurs at a party in the middle of a dance floor rather than in a private room. Typically, the participants are not dating, and they may even be strangers. Whether or not this constitutes a “hookup” is subject to contentious debate.

Floorcest n. A pejorative term for a hookup between two floormates, making floor meetings awkward and tension-filled for both parties. Due to the close-knit nature of most freshman dorms, these relationships are typically fodder for floor gossip. Jungle Juice n. A homemade fruit-flavored punch with questionable ingredients, usually served in a plastic bin. A batch can be deceptively strong, causing you to become drunk without realizing it. Kegger n. A party where (cheap) beer is served from kegs. These tend to “tap out” early, sending droves of freshmen off to the next “kegger.” Kegs & Eggs n. A morning party at which beer is served with breakfast. These gatherings are most common as pregames before basketball games. Natty n. Colloquial for Natural Light, a low-cost beer of exceptional quality. Postgame n. To hang around with your friends after the party and continue to drink. May include cheap pizza. Pregame n. To drink before you go out, ensuring a baseline level of drunkenness. Sexiled adj. The state of being exiled from your room due to its being occupied. “Sexiling” is usually signaled via a late-night text from your roommate asking if the dorm will be free that night. TAs n. Teaching assistants. Graduate students, or sometimes undergraduates, who assist professors by grading papers and leading discussion sections. It’s in your best interest to get on their good side.

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dictionary

letic Center displays the name of his father, a legendary former Georgetown basketball head coach. Lau n. 1. Joseph Mark Lauinger Memorial Library, the main library on campus. An ugly building where fun goes to die. derivatives: Club Lau, n. The quiet room on the third floor of Lauinger Library transforms into a freshman-filled “nightclub” at the beginning of first semester for a scarring night of debauchery. Lau 2, n. The second floor of Lau and the only floor on which talking is allowed. While theoretically perfect for group projects, productivity is elusive here. Also home to The Midnight MUG, one of The Corp’s coffee shops.

's Official Bucket List

Prospect Crawl n. The act of traveling up and down Prospect Street in search of parties. Most frequently performed by hordes of freshmen.

where you can have your forehead stamped by the bouncer and enjoy your first (legal) sip of alcohol.

Floorcest n. A pejorative term for a hookup between two floormates, making floor meetings awkward and tension-filled for both parties. Due to the close-knit nature of most freshman dorms, these relationships are typically fodder for floor gossip. Jungle Juice n. A homemade fruit-flavored punch with questionable ingredients, usually served in a plastic bin. A batch can be deceptively strong, causing you to become drunk without realizing it.

Line up for a guest speaker at 4 a.m. Tailgate and root for the Hoyas at Homecoming. Waterfront Get your head onareayour 21st down birthday. RHO stamped at The Tombs n. The on K Street by n. Residence Hall Office. Place the Potomac. Good for runs and Eat at Ben’s Chili Bowl. where all your packages will be romantic walks. Adjacent to the delivered and where you can go if movie theater. Learn the fight song. you're locked out or need to rent a blue cart, vacuum or other helpful Wisey’s Get drenched in the fountain in Dahlgren Quadrangle. room-cleaning appliances. Usually n. 1. What most students call serves multiple residence halls. Wisey’s is actually Wisemiller’s Go to the monuments at night. Grocery and Deli, the deli and Rooftops convenience Black store on Catch concerts at the 9:30 Club, Echostage, Cat 36th and Merriweather n. The term used to describe the Street. 2. Its second location, Post Pavilion. topmost Village A apartments actually called D.C. Wisey’s, is that enjoy large rooftop balconies. on Wisconsin Avenue and is Kegger Order a Chicken or for a Hot sandwich Wisemiller’s &(cheap) deli. beer is They’reMadness a frequent spot partiesChick usually referred at to as “Healthy n. Agrocery party where in warmer weather. served from kegs. These tend to Take a course taught by a Jesuit. Wisey’s.” “tap out” early, sending droves of Rangila House on electionYates freshmen off to the next “kegger.” Go to the White night and attend the inauguration n. A uniquely Georgetown tradi- n. Yates Field House, the cam- Leo’s tion, this annual on the National Mall.show organized pus gym, is located at the top of Kegs & Eggs n. Short for Leo J. O’Donovan Hall, by the South Asian Society brings a hill, providing students with a n. A morning party at which beer Watch Exorcist” on500Halloween. the on-campus dining hall. Say“The its together more than Hoyas for small pre-workout workout. is served with breakfast. These full name, and you’llOrganize sound like a a ahuge weekend of dancing in Gaston gatherings are most common snowball fight with your friends or floormates. high schooler touring campus. Hall. as pregames before basketball GENERAL COLLEGE derivatives: O’Donovan’s on games. Get involved with the Center for TERMINOLOGY Social Justice: tutor with D.C. Reads or the Waterfront, n. the techni- Saferides D.C. or go onvanan Alternative cal name for the upper floorSchools of n. Georgetown’s service that André Breaks Program trip. Natty Leo’s. Use when feeling #fancy. picks students up in West Georgen. Cheap champagne popular n. Colloquial for Natural Light, a Trick-or-treat on Embassy Row. town and Burleith from 8 p.m. to 2 for making mimosas for brunch. low-cost beer of exceptional qualMap a.m.aSunday throughor Wednesday ity. Go to Get to know chaplain one of the faculty-in-residence. n. Nickname for “Map of the and to 3 a.m. Thursday through Beerlympics events — The if service only for the free food! Modern World,” a their pass-failweekly Saturday. Be warned: n. A drinking event often hosted Pregame course that every Stargaze SFS-er must at is safe but slow.Observatory. by a club or organization during n. To drink before you go out, enHeyden pass to graduate. You’ll learn which members split up into suring a baseline level of drunkevery country andVisit every an capi-exhibit SNAPS at the National Gallery enness. Portrait the own National “countries”of andArt, hold their tal in the world, in addition to a n. Student Neighborhood Assis- in a series of drinking games. OfGallery or another D.C. art gallery or museum. surprising amount of plate tec- tance Program. A volunteer group ten features fantastic costumes. Postgame tonics. Sporcle quizzes make for of university officials and private n. To hang around with your Write a viewpoint for The Hoya. great study tools. security officers who patrol the Burnett’s friends after the party and neighborhoods surrounding cam- Identification Get a Library of Congress Reader Card.in a continue to drink. May include n. Cheap vodka available Meme Page pus on weekends, breaking up mind-blowing number of fla- cheap pizza. on a tour ofandthe n. Officially titled Go “georgetown revelry loudWhite noises. House. vors, from cucumber lime to hot memes for non-comforming jeSexiled Take a selfie with a politician. cinnamon. suit teens,” this Facebook group SWQ adj. The state of being exiled is filled with #relatable n. The area known “Southwest See Georgea production put onasby one of Darty Georgetown’s many from your room due to its betown-themed meme content Quad,” where the McCarthy, Ken- n. A day party. A party during ing occupied. “Sexiling” is usualperforming arts groups. created by procrastinating stu- nedy and Reynolds dorms house the day. Fairly self-explanatory. ly signaled via a late-night text dents like you. most of Georgetown’s sophomore from your roommate asking if Find your way into the (worst-kept) secret tunnels. population. A popular spot for DFMO the dorm will be free that night. MSBro volleyball, lap. grilling and ham- n. Dance floor makeout, a make- Sit on Johnbeach Carroll’s n. A male undergraduate stu- mocking. out session that occurs at a par- TAs Vote in ofa Georgetown University Student Association election. dent in the McDonough School ty in the middle of a dance floor n. Teaching assistants. GraduBusiness who fits the rather than in a private room. ate students, or sometimes unGostereotypes kayakingTombs on Night the Potomac. associated with the school. Of- n. The night before your 21st Typically, the participants are dergraduates, who assist proten doesn’t have class on Fridays birthday on friends gatherHall fessors by grading papers and Enjoy the finest ofwhich O’Donovan Chicken not on dating, and theyFinger may evenThursday. and gets the most out of three- to toast your existence up until the be strangers. Whether or not leading discussion sections. It’s Watch the men’s basketball playconstitutes at Capital One Arena. day weekends. Spotted in butstroke of midnight, at which team point this a “hookup” is in your best interest to get on ton-downs, polos orLounge bro tanks. outthey escort you to The Tombs contentious on Healy Beach with a subject booktoand somedebate. friends.their good side.

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