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SprinklerAge

An American Fire Sprinkler Association Publication

Vol 35 / 06 NOV/DEC 2016

JONATHAN OFFORD Takes First in AFSA Apprentice Competition ___________________

NFPA 25


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SprinklerAge

Vol 35 / 6

Nov/Dec 2016

Features 10 | Offord Wins National Apprentice Competition

Pennsylvania Apprentice Takes First at AFSA’s 23rd Annual Apprentice Competition

16 | A Grand Ole Time!

AFSA Celebrates 35th Anniversary in Nashville

20 | Standpipe Hydrostatic Testing

Theory vs. Practice

26 | Flow Testing Standpipes

Seeking Solutions in NFPA 25 to Unusual Challenges

29 | Legislative Review 2016

Codes, Standards and Regulations in the U.S. and Canada

38 | Outstanding Chapter of the Year

Louisiana Fire Sprinkler Association Impresses with Events, Charity, Fellowship

40 | Out with the Oxygen; In with the Nitrogen

Extend the Life of Your Fire Protection System

42 | Meet Your 2016-2017 Board of Directors

Officers and Directors Lead AFSA

ON THE COVER Jonathan Offord, Commonwealth Fire Protection, Leola, Pennsylvania, is AFSA’s 2016 National Apprentice Competition winner. Read about Offord and the competition on page 10 of this issue.

46 | M/S Council Elects New Members

An Exemplary Committee Grows Even Stronger

48 | Quality Contractor Recognition Awarded

6

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

8

PRESIDENT’S REPORT

50 | DeCamara Scholarships Awarded for 2016

66 AHJ PERSPECTIVE

52 | Spot the Dot

68 CALENDAR

AFSA Recognizes Carolina Fire Protection and Southeast Fire Protection Chin, Doermann Recognized for Achievements Part 2: Continuing with the Z Dimension

56 | Held Receives Thomas S. Waller Scholarship

OSU Junior Named 2016 Recipient

57 | Scholarship Program Helps Students Succeed

Raising Awareness About Sprinklers

60 | Sprinkler Geeks are Everywhere!

NextGen or Not: Use #SprinklerGeek on Social Media

62 | Thank You for Your Support!

Members Celebrate Milestone Anniversaries

63 | AFSA Appoints New President

68 AFSA NEWS 70 CHAPTER & AFFILIATE NEWS 72 NEW MEMBERS 73

U.S. & CANADA CONSTRUCTION

74 INDUSTRY NEWS 76 PEOPLE IN THE NEWS 78 PRODUCT NEWS 78

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

Follow us on

Frank Mortl III, CAE to Succeed Steve Muncy, CAE

64 | AFSA Welcomes Ohio Chapter

Contractors Form Newest Chapter

SPRINKLER AGE, (ISSN 0896-2685) is published bimonthly for $33.95 per year by the American Fire Sprinkler Association, Inc., 12750 Merit Drive, Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75251. Periodicals postage paid at Dallas, Texas and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to SPRINKLER AGE, 12750 Merit Drive, Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75251. Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

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CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE EDITORIAL: 214 349 5965 BY MICHAEL F. MEEHAN AFSA Chairman of the Board

FRANK MORTL III, CAE, Publisher D’ARCY G. MONTALVO, Editor, ext. 115 dmontalvo@firesprinkler.org NICOLE DUVALL, Director of Communications, ext. 126; nduvall@firesprinkler.org

ADVERTISING: 214 349 5965 CHARLOTTE JOHNSON, Communications Coordinator, ext. 134; cjohnson@firesprinkler.org

CIRCULATION : 214 349 5965

A different way to measure. There are many ways to measure the health of a company or an industry. All the usual metrics of profits and losses, business cycles, competition, and employee morale, but there is another one that I think is often overlooked. It is people’s charitableness. And as I look around the country at our chapters, our companies, and our vendors, we measure up very well. Our chapters hold charity events every year that raise thousands of dollars for those less fortunate and for those who have been harmed by fire. It is an across-the-board effort and everyone chips in. Our manufacturers and suppliers always step up and help; fire departments, which are in the business of helping, find ways to help even more. Contractors who compete against each other every day become givers and join together to show amazing generosity to a worthy cause. And it is not just the generosity of money, it is the giving of perhaps a more important currency – it is the giving of one’s time.

CHARLOTTE JOHNSON, Communications Coordinator, ext. 134; cjohnson@firesprinkler.org

AFSA BOARD OF DIRECTORS MICHAEL F. MEEHAN, CHAIRMAN 757-213-3660 WAYNE WEISZ, FIRST VICE CHAIRMAN 209-334-9119 THEODORE C. WILLS, JR., SECOND VICE CHAIRMAN 610-754-7836 LINDA M. BIERNACKI, SECRETARY 318-841-0330 JACK A. MEDOVICH, TREASURER 410-787-0639 JOSEPH A. HEINRICH, IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIRMAN 785-825-7710 DONALD G. ALBARES, 504-837-0572 DWIGHT BATEMAN, 713-910-3242 PAUL DELORIE, 603-432-8221 ROD DIBONA, 605-348-2342 LYLE HALL, 858-513-4949 R. DONALD KAUFMAN, 505-884-2447

The effort of time it takes to put together a successful charitable event is far more than meets the eye. It is an undertaking that demands hundreds of man hours. The Virginia Chapter of AFSA puts together an annual golf tournament that now raises and gives away $80,000 per year. In differing levels, that effort is repeated throughout the country. Chapter after chapter has golf tournaments and events that support a local charity. Our national vendors contribute not just once nationally but time and again locally; they always answer the call and help out. Our volunteers organize, account, fundraise, buy gifts, cook, donate and clean up. People care and it is heartwarming to see and be a part of something that transcends our normal day to day.

THOMAS J. MCKINNON, 925-417-5550

Another important benefit to these events is that they allow for personal interaction, to see old friends and make new ones. In today’s social media world it is very easy to conduct business without ever seeing each other face to face. When we make the effort to see each other in a non-business setting we see each other in a different light. We all have assumptions and perceptions of each other that are often at odds with the truth, so perhaps we can come away with a better understanding and we all stand to gain. So, it turns out giving is getting and it’s so right on many levels.

MARLENE M. GARRETT, CMP, Senior Director of Convention & Meetings, ext. 118

We may not be the most glamorous industry but we sure are a good one, filled with amazing people who quietly go about their days and make a positive difference. When you pull into the parking lot at one of these events you will see a lot of work trucks and work vans. You will see people who aren’t afraid of sweat and work, people who are willing to share themselves, their time and their money. Such things speak to the character of our people, our companies and our industry, and we all have much to be proud of. n

6 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

JEFF PHIFER, 803-438-2994

AFSA MANAGEMENT: 214 349 5965 STEVE A. MUNCY, CAE, President FRANK MORTL III, CAE, Executive Vice President LESLIE CLOUNTS, Director of Education Services, ext. 130 NICOLE DUVALL, Director of Communications, ext. 126 BRADLEY ELLIOTT, Director of Member Services, ext. 135 MARILYN ELLIS, Director of Administrative Services, ext. 112

ROLAND J. HUGGINS, PE, Vice President of Engineering & Technical Services, ext. 121 Sprinkler Age is devoted to the professional development of the Fire Sprinkler Industry. Deadline is 1st of the month preceding publication. Published by American Fire Sprinkler Association, 12750 Merit Drive, Suite 350, Dallas, Texas 75251. Call (214) 349-5965, FAX (214) 343-8898, or email sprinklerage@firesprinkler.org for information. Copyright © American Fire Sprinkler Association, Inc. All rights reserved. PRINTED IN USA. Unless expressly stated otherwise, all editorial and advertising material published is the opinion of the respective authors and/or companies involved and should not be construed as official action by or approved by Publisher or the Association. Sprinkler Age is a membership benefit, provided free of charge to AFSA members. For information on non-member and/or foreign subscription rates, call (214) 349-5965. ABOUT AFSA MEMBERSHIP AFSA annual membership dues are a sliding scale for Contractors and Associates and a flat fee for Authorities Having Jurisdiction. (Members receive a free subscription to Sprinkler Age.) Write or call AFSA for membership information. See AFSA’s website at firesprinkler.org.


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PRESIDENT’S REPORT BY STEVE A. MUNCY AFSA President

This will be my final column in Sprinkler Age. Two years ago I notified the AFSA Board of Directors of my intention to retire on December 31, 2016. During the past two years we have planned for this transition, repositioning some staff to new responsibilities and adding new faces. In January 2015 we hired Executive Vice President Frank Mortl, III CAE who began training for the job of AFSA president. He will assume that role on January 1, 2017. The transition has gone better than anyone could have imagined. I joined AFSA as executive vice president in December 1988 and worked with then President Frank Riseden until he retired and I was selected to succeed him. I interviewed for a job in an industry I didn’t know much about. I had come from positions on a Congressional staff to the oil industry and then the construction industry – but I didn’t know anything about sprinklers. As I sat through that interview with Ed Smith, Willie Templin, Jack Viola and a few others, I had no idea that I was about to embark on a career that would be so rewarding, and in an industry that is so important. Past AFSA Chairman Tom Waller once said, “We knew you were a good association man. The question was could we make you a good sprinkler man.” In Tom’s opinion, I met that test, but you will have to make that decision on your own.

and committees had their eye on the future. We were not going to be satisfied to be as good as some other organizations. We wanted to be better. Every Board Chairman kept his eye on the goal, and every Board member put in extra hours to achieve our successes. Without this dedicated effort by volunteers, AFSA would not have succeeded. But without the wisdom to bring on a talented and dedicated staff, AFSA would not have succeeded. The Board and committees set the direction, and the staff delivered the quality programs and services that have established AFSA as the best. My management philosophy has always been to hire good people, give them guidance, and then get out of the way to let them work. Our staff is filled with people who are committed to excellence and who aren’t afraid to branch out and try new things. Sometimes that works, and sometimes it doesn’t – but you never achieve excellence without pushing the boundaries a bit. My job has been to provide the support and encouragement, and with our staff that has been easy to do.

I’ve rubbed shoulders with some real giants in this industry. People like Willie Templin, Ed Smith, Harold Black, Tom Waller, Don Becker and Jack Viola. As Treasurer and later Chairman, Don Becker laid the financial foundation of AFSA and insisted that strong reserves would someday be needed to keep this organization going, and he was right. Tom Waller, who prided himself on his glass always being half-empty, took care that this association needed to be strong financially and have a strong staff to maintain it. Bob McCullough looked into the looking glass and saw what we could be, and pushed new efforts to improve AFSA and the industry – the apprentice competition, expanded chapters, and scholarships. And Jack Viola. What do you say about a person who volunteers for everything and always follows through? Every chairman of AFSA has built on the successes of predecessors. And every one has been a teacher and a friend.

We will always be indebted to Janet Knowles, who retired last year after 26 years of service, for guiding our communication efforts and publishing the leading industry magazine, Sprinkler Age. For over 20 years AFSA’s Vice President of Engineering & Technical Services Roland Huggins, P.E. has built a first-class technical services department – second to none – and established AFSA’s reputation in technical services and standards development. AFSA’s convention and exhibition is the best in the industry and this is due to the experience (almost 20 years) and talent of Senior Director of Convention & Meetings Marlene Garrett as she guides our efforts in presenting a convention that is educational but also fun and entertaining. Starting as the receptionist and being promoted numerous times to her current position of director of education, Leslie Clounts has become a key player in our educational efforts and seems to always know the answer before the question is asked. Leslie has been with us 20 years. In marketing, promotions, and web services there is no better than Roger Gragg, who has been with AFSA slightly longer than I have, 28 years. For 20 years, D’Arcy Montalvo has been editing Sprinkler Age and Contractor Network and managing our public education and awareness scholarship programs. Space won’t permit me to talk about every staff member, but you should know that AFSA is truly blessed with a talented and dedicated staff. I am proud, very proud, to have had the opportunity to work with such a fine group of people. I’ll never forget them.

When I came to AFSA in December 1988, the organization had an idea of where we wanted to go, but didn’t quite know how to get there. AFSA was young and struggling with all of the problems that young organizations experience. But our officers, Board

And to all AFSA members, thank you so much for the opportunity to travel this road with you. It has been an honor. (And for Don Becker – yes, Don, I’ve got my AFSA watch on and will keep it forever.) n

It is easy to fall in love with this industry. It is not just that this industry is critically important in saving lives and property – and it is definitely that – but it is the people who represent this industry that make it truly great.

8 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


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Offord Wins National Apprentice Competition Pennsylvania Apprentice Takes First at AFSA’s 23rd Annual Apprentice Competition NICOLE DUVALL | American Fire Sprinkler Association

Membership in the winner’s circle of the American Fire Sprinkler Association’s (AFSA) 23rd Annual National Apprentice Competition has its privileges. Just look at this year’s champion, fire sprinkler fitter Jonathan Offord. Despite having a background in plumbing, Offord says he did not find the fire protection industry, rather it found him. In March 2015, the Baltimore, Maryland-native was contacted by a temp company about a job with Commonwealth Fire Protection in Leola, Pennsylvania. The 32-year-old father of five jumped at the opportunity. Offord had only been hanging sprinkler pipe for a year when he was encouraged to enter the competition. He explains, “[My superintendent] told us that the company would support anyone who would like to compete, so I thought, why not? What do I have to lose?” Despite being only the second employee from Commonwealth to compete and not fully knowing what to expect, Offord committed to his craft, studying all four levels of the

AFSA Apprenticeship Program books for the weeks leading up to the competition. He recalls with a laugh, “I lucked out. My wife quizzed me on the test, and Commonwealth had me practice by putting pipe in its training trailer. Our company is very supportive of training.” Accuracy, Craftsmanship and Safety The road to nationals started for all this year’s 140 apprentices with a two-hour proctored, written qualifying exam June 11 at a local testing facility. The top seven scoring apprentices advanced to the National Apprentice Competition, held during AFSA’s 35th Annual Convention & Exhibition, A Grand Ole Opportunity: AFSA in Nashville, September 14-17 in Nashville, Tennessee. Having recently earned a psychology degree from Argosy University, Offord is no stranger to studying, but he was surprised at the difficulty of the AFSA qualifying exam. “The test was very advanced and covered all four levels. When I found out I made it [to the national competition], it was an amazing feeling.”

AFSA’s 2016 National Apprentice Competition finalists gathered in Nashville to compete. Front Row (l to r): Apprentice Competition Chairman Don Kaufman, Kaufman Fire Protection, Albuquerque, New Mexico; John Cowger, Rapid Fire Protection, Inc., Rapid City, South Dakota; Logan Moser, Mutual Sprinklers, Tyler, Texas; Donald Stone, Western Fire Protection, Inc., Poway, California. Back Row (LtoR): Thomas Adams, J.G. Tate Fire Protection Systems, Poway, California; Joseph Mientkiewicz, Simplex Grinnell, Rochester, New York; Gregory Schneider, Superior Fire Protection, Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jonathan Offord, Commonwealth Fire Protection, Leola, Pennsylvania. 10 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


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Second-place winner Logan Moser with Mutual Sprinklers in Tyler, Texas.

Third-place winner Joseph Mientkiewicz with SimplexGrinnell in Rochester, New York.

At the national competition on Friday, September 16, the seven finalists took a second, more thorough written examination based on all four levels of AFSA/NCCER Contren® Learning Series Sprinkler Fitting curriculum.

The competition judges were: Dwight Bateman, Southeast Fire Protection, Houston, Texas; Don Kaufman, Kaufman Fire Protection, Albuquerque, New Mexico; Jack Medovich, Fire & Life Safety America, Hanover, Maryland; Bernie Parsons, Wayne Automatic Sprinklers, Inc., Charlotte, North Carolina; Jeff Phifer, Crawford Sprinkler Co. of S.C., Lugoff, South Carolina; Jack Viola, JFV Engineering, LLC, South Hadley, Massachusetts; and Meaghen Wills, Anchor Fire Protection, Perkiomenville, Pennsylvania. AFSA Vice President of Engineering & Technical Services Roland Huggins, P.E. assisted with the oversight of the competition.

For four hours the next day, the seven apprentice finalists, including Offord, constructed and pressure-tested a miniature sprinkler system in front of a jam-packed exhibition hall. Offord tried his best to block everything out. “My biggest concern was the crowd,” he recalls. “I had to try to block out the crowd, my wife, my coworkers, the judges, the photographer – everything. I told myself, this is what we do everyday.” In the practical portion of the competition, each competitor was given a drawing of the system and all the required materials to install it. Finalists then had to construct the system, comprised of five sprinklers onto a 9-ft tall metal frame structure. Competitors had to measure, cut, thread, and use fabricated materials for the installation per the drawing. This showed pipe threading, math, and pipe make-up skills to complete the mini-system within the four-hour time allotment.

Apprentices Honored at Country Music Hall of Fame At the Country Music Hall of Fame under the soaring 40-ft glass windows overlooking downtown Nashville, Apprentice Competition Chairman Don Kaufman recognized the seven national apprentice competition finalists and crowned its winner – Jonathan Offord. Recalling the moment when he heard his name called, Offord said, “I still start to tingle inside when I think back to hearing my name called out. I did the best I could and for it to pay off was amazing. It was an honor.”

The CPVC section of the system was joined using one-step solvent cement. After the entire system was installed and allowed to set, it was placed under a static water pressure test with points deducted for any leaks or pressure drop.

In addition to bragging rights, placing first in the competition earned Offord the $5,000 grand prize. Looking forward, Offord says he plans to “stay in the field” and he loves doing a job where he can “help [his] community and change lives on a daily basis.”

Collectively, all of his training helped Offord prepare for the physical and mental aspects of the competition. “It took everything I had, but I was confident in my measurements and that everything was plum.”

Logan Moser with Mutual Sprinklers in Tyler, Texas won second place and a $3,000 cash prize, and Joseph Mientkiewicz with SimplexGrinnell in Rochester, New York took third place and a $2,000 prize. Honorable mentions and $1,000 prizes were awarded to: Thomas Adams, J.G. Tate Fire Protection Systems, Poway, California; John Cowger, Rapid Fire Protection, Inc., Rapid City, South Dakota; Gregory Schneider, Superior Fire Protection, Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Donald Stone, Western Fire Protection, Inc., Poway, California.

During the mini-installation, the apprentices were judged in three areas – accuracy, craftsmanship and safety – to form their practical score, which was then combined with their written test score to determine the winner. 12 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


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Finalist Thomas Adams.

Finalist John Cowger.

Kaufman said, “AFSA’s Apprenticeship Competition is not only an amazing competition that involves both physical and mental abilities, but it also gives apprentices a chance to travel the country to compete against other top apprentices. Less than 10 percent of apprentices enrolled in the AFSA Apprenticeship training program participate in the National Competition, so these seven truly represent AFSA’s top apprentices.” Besides an expense-paid trip to Nashville, Tennessee to compete at the AFSA convention, each of the seven

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Finalist Gregory Schneider.

Finalist Donald Stone.

national finalists received a commemorative plaque, tools, cash prizes, and a complimentary convention registration for their employer to come cheer them on! Commonwealth Fire Protection Chief Operating Officer Dan Laird says, “I believe training is essential for the advancement of any organization. Commonwealth Fire Protection has adopted a company-wide policy requiring continuing education for all employees. Our goal is to offer opportunities for advancement from within our current staff – from fitter to designer, from shop helper to purchasing clerk. Without training and encouragement, none of this would be possible.” About the Competition Started in 1994 by the late Robert L. (Bob) McCullough, then chairman of the Education & Apprenticeship Committee, AFSA’s Annual National Apprentice Competition was created to promote apprentice training and give recognition to the apprentices who are actively enrolled in the AFSA Apprenticeship Program. Over 20 years later, the competition continues to bring fire sprinkler apprentices from AFSA local chapter and member training programs from all corners of United States together in the association’s foremost showcase of excellence in training among future industry leaders. Enrolling in AFSA’s apprentice training program not only offers an excellent education and a fulfilling career, it is also the gateway to competing in the AFSA National Apprentice Competition. Entry forms for next year’s competition at AFSA’s 36th Annual Convention & Exhibition at The Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas September 24-27 will be made available spring of 2017. For more information or to view photos of the apprentices in action as well as other convention activities, visit firesprinkler. org/apprentice. n


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A Grand Ole Time! AFSA Celebrates 35th Anniversary in Nashville Extraordinary things happen when the fire sprinkler industry comes together for North America’s largest – and we’d argue, best – convention and exhibition. That was evident throughout the American Fire Sprinkler Association’s (AFSA) 35th Annual Convention & Exhibition September 14-17 at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Conference Center in Nashville, Tennessee. More than 1,250 industry professionals from across the nation and around the globe gathered for A Grand Ole Opportunity: AFSA in Nashville to reflect on our successes and look to our bright future. At the 2016 show, we charted a course for the future, heard from some amazing speakers, and celebrated some of our industry’s best and brightest stars. The Henry S. Parmelee Award is the association’s highest honor and it is presented to an individual who has made significant contributions to the fire sprinkler industry through outstanding leadership and advancement of the industry. This year, the award was presented to AFSA President Steve Muncy, CAE, for his 28 years of service to AFSA and the industry. “I have loved my work at AFSA and love the people I work with,” said Muncy, who will retire at the end of 2016. “This is a critically important industry and our message of saving lives and property needs to be shouted from the mountaintops! I am proud, very proud, to have been a part of this effort.”

AFSA Legislative Chairman Ted Wills, Jr. (left) presented Ed Altizer with his 2016 Fire Sprinkler Advocate of the Year Award. 16 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

The Fire Sprinkler Advocate of the Year Award, which honors individuals not directly involved in the fire sprinkler industry whose efforts have significantly advanced the fire protection industry, was awarded to Ed Altizer, retired Virginia fire marshal. He served for 20 years on the Virginia Fire Services Board and on several other national and state committees responsible for developing the building and fire codes which are used as the basis for Virginia’s building and fire codes. Adding to excitement, AFSA awarded its first Young Professional of Year Award to AFSA’s Next Generation Initiative Chair Meaghen Wills of Anchor Fire Protection, Perkiomenville, Pennsylvania. The award seeks to highlight the efforts of a talented fire protection professional under 40. The convention committee, chaired by Linda Biernacki of Fire Tech Systems, Shreveport, Louisiana, welcomed a sold-out exhibition hall showcasing nearly 150 companies for a southern-inspired menu beginning with a reception for exhibitors. The cocktail hour was hosted by Chairman of the Board Michael Meehan of VSC Fire Security, Inc., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Guests mixed and mingled while browsing through hundreds of booths presenting the industry’s latest and greatest innovations. Also held during exhibits was the National Apprentice Competition, the largest fire sprinkler fitter contest for creative and ambitious apprentices in North America. This year’s winner Jonathan Offord with Commonwealth Fire Protection in Leola, Pennsylvania was announced at an

AFSA Chairman of the Board Mike Meehan (right) presented the Henry S. Parmelee Award to AFSA President Steve Muncy.


This page clockwise from top left: Meaghen Wills receives AFSA’s Young Professional of the Year Award from AFSA Director Joe Heinrich. AFSA Director Linda Biernacki presents a donation for the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition (HFSC) to HFSC Chairwoman Lorraine Carli with NFPA. Manufacturers and suppliers presented the latest products and services and visited with contractors during the Chairman’s Reception and official exhibit hours (photos 3-7). AFSA Director Lyle Hall talks about AFSA’s new Inspection, Testing & Maintenance program at the AFSA booth.

Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

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awards reception at the Country Music Hall of Fame, where over 500 people gathered to celebrate. Logan Moser with Mutual Sprinklers in Tyler, Texas won second place and Joseph Mientkiewicz with SimplexGrinnell in Rochester, New York took third place. Honorable mentions were awarded to: Thomas Adams, J.G. Tate Fire Protection Systems, Poway, California; John Cowger, Rapid Fire Protection, Inc., Rapid City, South Dakota; Gregory Schneider, Superior Fire Protection, Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Donald Stone, Western Fire Protection, Inc., Poway, California. Make plans now to join AFSA in Vegas! AFSA’s 36th Annual Convention & Exhibition will be held September 24-27, 2017 at The Bellagio Hotel in the heart of the world-famous Las Vegas strip. We hope to see you there! To view additional photos from this year’s event, visit the AFSA Flickr photo page at flickr.com/afsa to view and download your favorite moments. For more information about AFSA, visit firesprinkler.org, and follow us via our social media presences on Facebook (firesprinklerorg), Instagram (@firesprinklerorg), LinkedIn (American Fire Sprinkler Association), and Twitter (@AFSA). n

This page clockwise from top right: The top three apprentices celebrated at the Awards Party. AFSA’s Board of Directors and AFSA Executive Vice President Frank Mortl III, CAE helped Steve Muncy celebrate his last convention as AFSA president. Attendees listened to music and danced the night away at the final night party. The Country Music Hall of Fame was an entertaining venue for the final night Awards Party. Seminars were well attended and offered the latest technical and managerial information. The team of Joe Heinrich, Tate Hitzeman, John Vieweger, and David Stone won first place at AFSA’s golf tournament. 18 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


AFSA

CONVENTION & EXHIBIT

2 4 2 7 SEPTEMBER 2017


Standpipe Hydrostatic Testing Theory vs. Practice HOWARD CLAY | VSC Fire & Security, Inc.

Every industry has areas where theory and practice just don’t quite meet. The fire protection industry is no exception. If your firm is responsible for performing inspections on water-based fire protection systems, then you can relate to that statement. Honestly, trying to complete the various code inspections on a standpipe system can often times be challenging within certain jobsite conditions. Take for example, the five-year hydrostatic testing requirement. After reading the 2014 edition of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of WaterBased Fire Protection Systems, (section 6.3.2.1) we learn that “hydrostatic tests of not less than 200 psi pressure for two hours, or at 50 psi in excess of the maximum

pressure, where maximum pressure is in excess of 150 psi, shall be conducted every five years on manual standpipe systems and semiautomatic dry standpipe systems, including piping in the fire department connection.” Well, that sounds simple enough, right? Yet, we still see and hear so much confusion in the industry surrounding this particular test. So, what do we know for certain about this requirement? We are told the test has to be performed every five years; we have to achieve at least 200 psi of pressure; and we have to keep it on the system for two hours. We are also told in section 6.3.2.2 that we have to measure this pressure “at the low elevation point of the individual system or zone being tested.” If that’s all there is to the test then it shouldn’t be difficult to perform, but it’s often riddled with confusion and inaccurate results. Truthfully, the difficulty lies in multiple areas, but for this article we’ll mainly focus on the area of the test with respect to the wording from the standard, “including piping in the fire department connection.” Obviously, the purpose of performing the inspection is to notate what is seen and to document the current operational status of the system so that it can be properly maintained. In most cases the results correlate into a quantitative pass or fail criteria. So, wouldn’t it be nice to understand where a component passes and what constitutes a failure? Section 3.3.20 of NFPA 25 defines a hydrostatic test as being performed to “verify system integrity and leak rates.” We know from section 6.3.2.2 that we are supposed to check the pressure drop since we’re told to measure it at the “low elevation point.” Unfortunately, we are not given any guidance beyond that. The acceptance test criterion in NFPA 14, Standard for the Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems, uses similar text, whereas NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of

20 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Sprinkler Systems, states that it “shall maintain that pressure without loss.” The only criteria provided is in section 6.3.2.2.1: “The inside standpipe piping shall show no leakage.” That would seem to indicate that any drop in pressure is not allowed; however, before we make that assumption, A.6.3.2.1 states, “Minimum leakage existing only under test pressure is not cause for repair.” So, we are left with the understanding that some leakage is acceptable but without the quantitative value to define it. In addition, section 6.3.2.2.1 quoted above actually has two issues worth discussing. Firstly, 6.3.2.2.1 states “shall show no leakage.” This tells us that we have to walk down the system looking for visible signs of leakage. As discussed in the annex, the concern is more about the system retaining its integrity during fire conditions and less about a minor amount of water escaping the pipe. So how much is too much? Well, intuition would indicate any leaking is going to cause concerns with the owner, and certainly the larger the leakage, the larger the concern for all those involved. The second issue is the use of the reference to the “inside piping.” What does that mean since all piping is typically inside the footprint of the building, and the building code does not require walls for a structure to be a building? So does it mean inside the heated boundary? After all, a minor leak inside a parking garage causes less concern than inside an office. In the event there is ever a failure of the piping integrity, your judgment call allowing some leaking will be aggressively challenged. If the intent of the standard is to depict, through the inspection, the integrity of the piping for use by the fire department, then it really shouldn’t matter from the standpoint of NFPA where the leak is occurring. If the integrity of the pipe is poor, the potential to save the structure or the lives within is reduced. I wouldn’t be comfortable presuming that


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the owner of an empty warehouse thinks any less of his facility than the owner of a hotel; both spent their time and resources to create the structure. Now, let’s move on to the issue of what must be tested. The first step is to identify the types of standpipes that exist. After all, how can it be tested if it cannot be recognized? I conducted a small poll, not scientific in nature but interesting nonetheless, where I questioned various field techs and engineers about standpipes. In speaking with them, most were able to recall the automatic and manual styles. Fewer were able to identify that there are manual wet in addition to manual dry, and fewer still were able to recall the existence of the semiautomatic dry standpipe. The combined standpipe (either automatic or manual attached to the sprinkler system) was something most knew about, but was not in the thought process until it was mentioned. Although not part of this article, it is interesting to note that some confusion seemed to stem from the idea that most people thought “automatic” standpipes were those that automatically had water going to them without the need for human

intervention, when in fact, a standpipe is automatic when the water supply is “capable of supplying the system demand ... with no action other than opening a hose valve.” I mention that just to iterate the number of paths of discussion that standpipes can foster. So, the hurdle is to differentiate between the types of standpipes and then understand that stand alone manual wet standpipes, manual dry standpipes, and semiautomatic dry standpipes are all that apply the hydrostatic testing requirement. “Manual wet standpipes that are part of a combined sprinkler/standpipe system,” automatic wet standpipe systems, and automatic dry standpipe systems do not have to be tested under the hydrostatic requirement. The handbook would further explain the reasoning to be that these three are “supervised,” for lack of a better word, as they contain either water or air on them at all times to indicate a leak. I must confess that building owners and managers are likely to react if water is leaking, but suspect few would respond to having their compressor running more than usual unless someone complains about the noise.

The standard appears to specifically instruct the inspector to focus on three of the six types of standpipes. Or does it? What about that part of the standard that we are focused on for this article – the piping in the fire department connection (FDC)? That part of the piping in those three systems is not subjected to the continued operating pressures that exclude the systems themselves. Is it the intent to not test that portion of the piping on those three standpipes that are otherwise excluded in the standard? Apparently, the answer is yes; it is specific to just those three identified. That clause of the sentence in the code reference is not meant to be a global requirement for all systems, but is a reminder that the portion of pipe between the check valve and the FDC must also be checked. It is, however, a good question as to why we aren’t required to test this portion of piping in all system types. The potential for this section of piping to have integrity concerns reaches across all 6 types of standpipes, not just those three. To add confusion, section 6.3.2.1 may not intend for that portion of the standard to be global, but section 13.7.4 surely does. It plainly reads, “The piping from the fire department connection to the fire department check valve shall be hydrostatically tested at 150 psi (10 bar) for 2 hours at least once every 5 years.” So, a literal interpretation lands us back to testing all six types of standpipes from the check valve to the FDC. Let’s assume for the sake of this article that the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) elected to have the FDC piping hydrostatically tested in all six types of standpipe systems. Since three of them are most likely combined with an automatic sprinkler system, how exactly does one go about testing that piping? In cases where the piping is all exposed and connected to a wall FDC, the procedure can be completed with a few modifications to the piping. Remove the Siamese connection, replace it with a cap that has been tapped with a gauge and test rig connection, plug the ball drip, and either blank off the check valve or spin it around in place in the piping. Remember, working with the check valve requires shutting down the sprinkler system on three of the six types of standpipes, so the facility with those types of standpipes will be without fire protection for an indefi-

22 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


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nite amount of time. That procedure takes us one more step down an unintended path. Is it the intent of the standard to require disassembly of the piping? If so, what testing procedures would need to be performed after reassembly in order to meet the purpose of the hydrostatic test which is to confirm the integrity of the piping that you just disassembled? The reasonable answer is to use the system working pressure as identified in the Tables on Summary of Component Action Requirements. Taking the same example as above, but moving the FDC piping into a wall cavity or soffit significantly increases the difficulty in performing the test. Although the procedures are the same for anything exposed, some of the modifications that need to be made to the piping may not be accessible. The check valve and the ball drip may be inside the wall. In that case, is it the intent of the standard to pump up the entire standpipe system that was excluded in order to test the piping to the FDC? If not, what is expected of the inspection team with respect to dismantling walls and soffits? Remember, this discussion also

includes the piping to the FDC in the three systems that are most likely tied to sprinkler systems. Minimal leakage in these three systems becomes an issue for two reasons. Firstly, if the entire system is pumped up and the test gauge indicates a leak, how would inspectors make an assessment of whether the leakage is from the sprinkler system or the standpipe, since the FDC piping is not exposed? Secondly, NFPA 24, Standard for the Installation of Private Fire Service Mains and Their Appurtenances, does not speak to a value of leakage acceptable to above ground piping; only underground piping is given a quantitative measure as we’ll see in the next paragraph. Now, let’s turn our attention to yard FDCs and the associated underground piping and appurtenances. Herein lies another dimension of difficulty with this requirement. What is the intent of the test if not to “ascertain whether the system retains its integrity under fire conditions” as stated in A.6.3.2.1? NFPA 24 quantifies acceptable leakage for underground piping as +/- 5 psi over two hours during acceptance testing. Is it the intent of the committee to use that value as the definition of “minimal leakage”

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for existing underground piping in NFPA 25? If so, notice the same reference says that minimal leakage “under test pressures” is not cause for repair. So, if the leakage exceeds what is acceptable to the standard once defined, what course of action is reasonable to remedy the situation since the leak could be anywhere along the underground from the ball drip, to the check valve, couplings, or piping itself? As we have indicated, the phrase “including piping in the fire department connection” creates numerous questions and testing difficulties for an inspection team. Couple these questions with the additional issues of determining differences in standpipe types, system demands, and cross-referencing standards, and it isn’t a stretch to see why standpipes can be so difficult. This article is intended to highlight how confusion may lead to untested pieces of equipment or incorrect testing results. Additionally, a lack of understanding by inspection teams could lead to misdiagnosed problems and incorrect solutions offered to the customer at an unnecessary expense that may not resolve the true existing issues. As we can see from this article, hydrostatic standpipe testing is more involved than just pumping up some piping, letting it sit for two hours, and then reading a gauge. Like most codes, NFPA 25 is no different. Teams of qualified people deliberate in great length over these issues; there is no easy answer that covers all situations. The inspector will always have to use some educated judgments in order to perform the quality job expected. Through continual communication, education, and application, we can all come to understand the intent of the code and have a clearer vision for providing a safe environment in which to work, play, and relax. n ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Howard Clay is a native of Virginia and is employed by VSC Fire & Security, Inc. in its Inspection Division. Clay attended college at Hampden-Sydney where he received his B.A. in managerial economics. He is NICET certified in water-based fire protection systems, fire alarm systems, and fire alarm inspections and testing. Clay holds state backflow prevention testing licenses in both Virginia and North Carolina and carries the FS-IT-C inspection and testing certification in North Carolina. He has authored articles for magazines of local organizations, and has been asked to speak to local businesses, fire departments, and community associations to help them better understand fire protection. Clay is a member of NAFI and IAAI. He can be reached at hgclay@vscfs.com.


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Flow Testing Standpipes Seeking Solutions in NFPA 25 to Unusual Challenges BOB CAPUTO, C.F.P.S., C.E.T. | Fire & Life Safety America

Inspection, testing and maintenance service providers face many challenges, which we in the “training community” often espouse in articles and live seminars. All too often, we focus on the obvious issues associated with liability, contractual structure and responsibilities to meet requirements of NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems. Recently, I was challenged by a member who said something along the lines of, “Stop telling me what not to do and start helping me understand how to accomplish some of the specific tasks at hand.” When I asked what the specific problem was, he told me his current dilemma was related to flow testing standpipes, which NFPA 25, 2014 edition section 6.3.1.1.1 requires every five years. I was a little confused at what appeared to be a simple challenge so I relied on my ability to recite the aforementioned section from memory. I said, “It’s simple – the standard requires you to verify the required flow and pressure available at the most hydraulically remote hose valve outlets while flowing the standpipe demand.” I followed that verbal regurgitation of the code requirement with a smile and added the requirement is to flow 250 gpm from each of the top two fire hose connections (for a total of 500 gpm) from the furthest standpipe at 100 psi for newer buildings or at 65 psi if the building is older than that requirement. Additionally, you need to flow 250 gpm from the top of each additional standpipe up to a total of 1,000 gpm for a sprinklered building and 1250 gpm (max) 26 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

for a non-sprinklered building. I was feeling pretty good at this point for being able to provide accurate and immediate guidance right out of the standard until the member responded by saying, “I know how to read, Bob, but how do we physically accomplish this task?” Well, I started to explain how back when I was a contractor, we would take two 2.5-in. fire hoses up onto the roof and connect them to the fire hose valves and flow them using UL play pipes or Hose Monsters up on the roof. I went just a bit further to put a nail in the answer by stating he should use the tables provided in NFPA 291, Recommended Practice for Fire Flow Testing and Marking of Hydrants, to convert the velocity pressure into gpm flow, or he could just use the formula, which I rattled off from memory: Q = 29.84 x c x d2 x √p. I continued to explain that often times, we were required to close a downtown street and flow off the rooftop in the pre-dawn hours and sometimes we even had to have the police on site to shut down the street. My smile went away again when he told me he wasn’t permitted to flow onto or off of the rooftop and was actually looking for an alternate methodology to perform the test. Ahhh, now I understand the challenge! We need a solution to an unusual problem – something out of the normal condition – something that doesn’t fit neatly into the box. Well, the next obvious answer was to show him the next section (6.3.1.1.1), which provides the best answer. It states that where a flow test of the hydraulically most remote outlet(s) is not practical, the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) shall be consulted

for the appropriate location for the test. This seemed simple enough… we’re off the hook for a solution, right? It’s the AHJ’s problem to tell us what they want. WRONG! The AHJ kicked it back to the contractor and said they needed to provide suggestions, so we’re back to square one. So let’s break this down to a few obvious and simple solutions until we find the most practical approach that is safe, cost-effective and acceptable to accomplish the objective at hand, which is to ensure adequate flow and pressure where required. When discussing any site-specific problem, I like to consider the obvious and in the case of sprinklered buildings, it’s obvious that where the sprinkler system works as intended, the standpipe system is really a back up, which will hopefully only be needed for mop-up operations. Realistically, most high-rise buildings are light hazard or residential occupancies (at least on the higher floors) so the sprinkler demand will most often be less than the standpipe demand – and we are not required to add the two demands by either design standard (NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, and/ or NFPA 14, Standard for the Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems). For all practical purposes, the standpipe system in a vertical hydrant system which is provided in large and/ or tall buildings because it’s not practical to drive the fire engine into the elevator and push the button for an upper floor. Rather, we have to fight the fire and, in some cases,


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provide shelter in place for occupants when fire occurs. If the height of the buildings isn’t too tall, one option may be to run fire hoses all the way down to the ground level. The problem with this approach is the appliance loss in the extra lengths of hose when reading the pitot pressure at the point of discharge, not to mention the need to secure hoses and discharge nozzles to avoid the fire hose rodeo effect. My next thought was to propose using the opposing standpipe as the drain for the one being flowed. Where there are only two standpipes, this means we cannot flow both simultaneously to achieve the required 750 total gpm, but you could offer to flow three outlets on the first standpipe and repeat it for the second one. This plan doesn’t exactly meet the requirement of the code section, but remember, we’re proposing an alternate method to the AHJ in the

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hope of getting approval for something outside the box. Making suggestions that ensure functionality while ensuring safety for those conducting the test and limiting the potential for water damage in the process is likely to be acceptable as a reasonable alternate method.

friction loss using hydraulic calculation models should not be a challenge and should provide satisfactory evidence of the pressure we can expect at the top outlets of the standpipes. This is the basis of your conversation with the AHJ for their acceptance of an alternate testing location.

If you’re fortunate enough to be working in a building that is equipped with a 3-in. vertical drain riser, your problem is solved because that should be adequate to accept the flow, but if your drain riser is a 2-in. diameter pipe, that’s not going to work.

Another benefit of finding an acceptable way to accomplish this requirement to flow test the standpipes is that you get to perform the annual fire pump test at the same time.

Consider the benefit of using a flow meter that allows you to measure flow and pressure at the same time, at the fire hose valve point of discharge. Hose Monster, Croker and Elkhart Brass all sell devices that perform this function, thus eliminating the need to measure the flow at the discharge end of the drain arrangement. This methodology leaves the handling of the water flow at an acceptable point of discharge, which would or could lend itself to flowing two or more standpipes concurrently and eliminates the need to get an accurate flow reading at a lower level. Flowing from the lower level, whether with a flow meter through hoses, a fire pump connection, or piping arrangement readily shows the volume or Q portion of the test, but it still leaves an issue with showing acceptable pressure. After all, we’re supposed to be verifying the 100 psi (at flow) at the most remote hose outlets. All we have to do is increase the required available pressure to verify we have the pressure at this lower level that will provide the normal pressure at the higher level. Unfortunately, you probably will not have access to the original submittals showing the elevation and friction loss within the system. Defining the elevation pressure loss is pretty easy (height in feet x .433 psi = elevation pressure loss) and, fortunately, the piping arrangements are usually straightforward. So defining a reasonable estimate of the applicable

So, my suggestions in order of simplicity include: 1. Flow off of the roof in the middle of the night or pre-dawn. 2. Use hose connections or other piping arrangements on the lower level. 3. Use opposing standpipes as the drain riser. 4. Use flow test meter devices and run long lengths of fire hose down the stairs. 5. Run away from the job and let a competitor struggle with it. Have another idea? Let us know and we’ll share it in a future edition of Sprinkler Age. n ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Bob Caputo is the vice president of Technical Support & Training at Fire & Life Safety America based in Richmond, Virginia. IMPORTANT NOTICE: The article and its content is not a Formal Interpretation issued pursuant to NFPA Regulations. Any opinion expressed is the personal opinion of the author and presenter and does not necessarily present the official position of the NFPA and its Technical Committee.


Legislative Review 2016 Codes, Standards and Regulations in the U.S. and Canada This issue of Sprinkler Age features our 29th annual legislative review. This summary of legislation and codes offers a quick overview of regulations affecting the fire sprinkler industry in individual states and Canadian provinces. The information in these charts was gathered from a survey sent to the fire marshals of the 50 states, the District of Columbia and the provinces of Canada in September 2016. If a response was not received, information that appeared in the 2015 Legislative Review (November 2015 Sprinkler Age) has been reprinted, and the fact that the information is a repeat is denoted by an asterisk (*) after the state or province name in the left column of the chart. Survey Questions and Responses The 2016 AFSA Legislative Survey asked the following questions: 1. What, if any, national codes have been adopted by your state? 2a. In adopting the national codes, were any amendments or modifications made to the code or referenced standard (i.e., NFPA 13, 101, etc. or state supplemental rules) that affect fire sprinklers? 2b. If yes, what were the modifications? 3a. Which edition of NFPA 13 have you adopted, either directly or indirectly by code reference? 3b. If you haven’t adopted the latest edition of NFPA 13, do you allow local jurisdictions to use the latest edition? 4. Do the codes adopted by your state have a minimum base or a minimum/ maximum for enforcement purposes? 5. Is the scope of state code enforcement limited to the type of occupancy

and/or other requirements (i.e., public assembly over 100, business over 50 ft, etc.) or is it all encompassing? 6. If buildings are not included in the state jurisdiction, is there a recognized code adoption recommended for local authorities or is it on individual preference? 7. Are you in a code revision/adoption cycle now? If yes, what codes and years do you anticipate adopting? 8. Has your state adopted NFPA 25: Standard for the Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems?

and phone number for retrofitting information. 13. Does your state require a P.E. to do sprinkler design concepts (i.e., identify occupancies and water supply)? 14. Does the Office of the State Fire Marshal have authority over all projects in the state or only over state-owned or state-financed projects? 15. Are there any local jurisdictions that you know of in your state that have residential ordinances for the following occupancies? Single-family, multi-family, high-rise condo/apartment? Please list.

9. Does your state have any pending legislation regarding fire sprinklers, more restrictive or less restrictive, for: Hotels & Apartments, Dwellings & Lodging Housing, Health Care, High-Rise, Nursing Homes, Education, Public Assembly, Business Occupancies, Mercantile, Institutional, Other.

16. Please provide a telephone number that a person can call if he/ she has questions about jurisdiction in your state (i.e. State vs. Local Authorities) regarding fire sprinkler plan review/inspection.

10. Are you adopting the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC)? If yes, will it be adopted with the residential sprinkler requirement intact or modified/removed? If modified, please specify modifications.

18. Does your state require licensing for: Fire Sprinkler Contractors? Fire Sprinkler Fitters? Fire Sprinkler Designers?

11. Does your state have fire sprinkler retrofitting requirements for the following occupancies? Hotels & Apartments, Dwellings & Lodging Housing, High-Rise, Health Care, Nursing Homes, Education, Public Assembly, Business Occupancies, Mercantile, Institutional, College Dormitories, Other. 12. Are there any towns/cities that you are aware of that have retrofitting requirements in excess of the state requirement? List a contact person

17. Does your state require certification of Plan Reviewers? Inspectors?

19. Does your state require licensing for sprinkler drawings: P.E./Architect Seal? NICET Level III? NICET Level IV? 20. Does your state require any of the following for those who perform inspection, testing and maintenance of water-based fire protection systems? NICET Level II? NICET Level III? No Requirement? 21. Does your state require seismic protection on fire sprinkler systems? 22. Do you require a signed copy of the owner’s certification (see NFPA Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016 29


13, section 4.3) as part of the working plan submittal? The tables on pages 30 through 35 provide the answers to most of the survey questions. The table on page 36 provides licensing and certification information (questions 17-19). The tables on page 37 provide the telephone numbers requested in questions 12 and 16 and the answers to questions 20 and 21. Survey Findings Regarding pending sprinkler legislation (question 9), California has pending legislation for accessory dwelling units. Hawaii has pending legislation for dwelling and lodging housing that is less restrictive and pending legislation for healthcare that is more restrictive. Indiana indicated pending legislation for fire sprinklers “to transfer to the fire code from building code.” New Hampshire follows NFPA 101, Life Safety Code®, regarding fire sprinkler legislation. Question 10 concerns the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC). California has adopted it statewide (bsc.ca.gov) and Colorado has adopted

it for dwellings associated with public schools. Connecticut indicated it has adopted the code. Washington, D.C. is currently in a code cycle and plans to adopt it. Florida is adopting it for 2017-2018. Maryland has adopted it with no modifications. The 2015 Michigan Residential Code was to become effective in February 2016 and was to adopt by reference the 2015 edition of the IRC with amendments, deletions, and additions deemed necessary for use in the state. Minnesota adopted effective January 2015. Washington state adopted the 2015 IRC but did not adopt chapters 11-25 and notes residential sprinklers, if added, need to meet IRC P2904. West Virginia has also adopted the code but refers readers to section 87-4-5 of the state building code. Arkansas, Iowa, Maine, Mississippi, New Hampshire New Jersey, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Utah, and Virginia are adopting the IRC with the residential sprinkler requirement removed. Georgia House Bill 1196 (2010 legislative session) prohibits any residential sprinkler requirement, past or future. Nevada is “not permitted to adopt residential (single-family)

requirements at the state level.” Washington adopted Appendix R and S. In West Virginia, see Title 87, Series 4 87-4-5. Utah has legislation pending without the residential sprinkler requirement. Idaho has adopted the 2012 edition and covers the IBC, IFC and IRC. North Carolina modified the adopted code to only require sprinklers in townhouses. In Ohio, there are construction trade-offs for the adopted IRC. South Dakota is not adopting the 2012 IRC and indicated the state fire marshal has no authority in most residential occupancies, i.e., one- and two-family dwellings – only six stories or higher. Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, South Dakota, Utah, and Vermont indicated they are not adopting the IRC. Iowa had adopted with modifications. South Carolina has adopted it with modifications and directed readers to see 2012 ICC modifications at llr.state.sc.us.pol/bcc. In regard to states or local jurisdictions adopting the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC), which includes the requirement for fire

Province Province

Province Code Code Province Adoption Adoption

Additional NFPA NFPA Standards Standards Additional

NFPA 13 13 NFPA Edition Edition Adopted Adopted

Local Local Jurisdiction Jurisdiction Can Use Use Can Latest NFPA NFPA Latest 13 Ed. Ed. 13

Minimum Base Base Minimum or a a Min/Max Min/Max or for for Enforcement Enforcement

Alberta, Canada* Canada* Alberta,

2014 Alberta Alberta Building Building Code Code 2014 (amended 2010 2010 NBCC) NBCC) (amended

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2013 2013

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes,

Minimum Minimum

--

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Min/Max Min/Max

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2007 2007

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes,

Minimum Minimum

2010 NBCC NBCC 2010

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2010 2010

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes,

Minimum Minimum

Newfoundland, Canada* Canada* Newfoundland,

2010 NBCC NBCC & & NFPA NFPA 101 101 2010

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

Latest Latest

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Nova Scotia, Scotia, Canada* Canada* Nova

2010 NBCC NBCC 2010

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2013 2013

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes,

Minimum Minimum

Ontario, Canada* Canada* Ontario,

2012 Ontario Ontario Building Building Code Code 2012 (amended 2010 2010 NBCC) NBCC) (amended

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2013 2013

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes,

Minimum Minimum

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2013 2013

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes,

Minimum Minimum

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2007 2007

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes,

Minimum Minimum

NFPA 13D, 13D, 13R, 13R, 14, 14, 20 20 NFPA

2007 2007

Yes, w/AHJ w/AHJ Yes, approval approval

Minimum Minimum

British Columbia, Columbia, Canada* Canada* British Manitoba, Canada* Canada* Manitoba, New Brunswick, Brunswick, Canada* Canada* New

Prince Edward Edward Island, Island, Prince Canada* Canada* Quebec, Canada* Canada* Quebec,

Saskatchewan, Canada* Canada* Saskatchewan,

2012 BC BC Building Building Code Code 2012 (amended 2010 2010 NBCC) NBCC) (amended 2010 NBCC NBCC with with 2011 2011 2010 Manitoba Amended Amended Manitoba

2010 NBCC NBCC & & NFPA NFPA 1 1& & 101 101 2010 (NBCC Province Province not not Authority) Authority) (NBCC 2015 Quebec Quebec Construction Construction 2015 Code (amended (amended 2010 2010 NBCC) NBCC) Code

2010 NBCC NBCC with with 2013 2013 2010 Saskatchewan amended amended Saskatchewan

approval approval

approval approval approval approval

approval approval approval approval approval approval approval approval

*Thanks to Jason Ryckman, codes and technical services manager, Canadian Automatic Sprinkler Association who provided Canadian information in 2015. Abbreviations: BOCA/ National-Building Official and Code Administrators International; IBC-International Building Code; IFC-International Fire Code; IFGC-International Fuel Gas Code; (cont. on next page)

30 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


When asked about sprinkler retrofit requirements for occupancies (question 11), numerous states indicated they have requirements or requirements are pending. Regarding nursing homes, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Maine, Michigan Missouri, New Jersey, and Virginia have retrofit requirements. Minnesota noted requirements are for “nursing homes

Canada Inspection, Testing & Maintenance and Seismic Protection Requirements Seismic protection required on fire sprinkler systems:

No Requirement

N N N N N N N N N N

N N N N N N N N N N

No req. Prov. req. No req. No req. No req. No req. No req. Prov. req. No req.

Province Alberta* British Columbia* Manitoba* New Brunswick* Newfoundland* Nova Scotia* Ontario* Prince Edward Island* Quebec* Saskatchewan*

federal.” Retrofit requirements for healthcare can be found in Florida, Maine, Minnesota, and New Jersey. Virginia has requirements for hospitals and Connecticut for elderly occupancies. Georgia, New Jersey, Nevada have retrofit requirements for public assemblies (PAs). Georgia also has retrofitting for existing PAs as listed in 120-3-3.

Yes/No

NICET Level III

Required for those who perform inspection, testing and maintenance of water-based fire protection systems:

NICET Level II

sprinklers in new construction of one- and two-family homes, there has been a great deal of legislative activity in a number of states during the past couple of years. And, while the legislative charts in this issue indicate the most recent responses received from the individual states, some states did not provide updated information to this year’s survey. Therefore, Sprinkler Age recommends that our readers visit firesprinklerinitiative.org, the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) Fire Sprinkler Initiative website, on a regular basis. Click on the Legislation & Adoptions tab at that site to find the most up-to-date information on local and state adoption of residential fire sprinkler requirements, as well as anti-sprinkler legislation that has been introduced.

Only in active seismic areas Yes Only in active seismic areas Only in active seismic areas Only in active seismic areas Only in active seismic areas Only in active seismic areas Only in active seismic areas Only in active seismic areas Only in active seismic areas

For hotels and apartments, Florida and Virginia have retrofit requirements. Connecticut retrofits only hotels. Florida has requirements for dwellings and lodging housing. New Jersey retrofit institutional occupancies. New Jersey and Virginia have requirements for college dorms. Illinois and New Hampshire retrofit per NFPA 101, Iowa per Chapter 11

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

-

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

All

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

-

-

-

No

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, OBC

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

-

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption

Yes, 2015 NBCC

-

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes, federal projects follow NBC

High-rise Condo/apt

Office of State Fire Marshal Has Authority Over All Projects in State or Only Over State-Owned/ Financed Projects

MultiFamily

State Requires PE to do Sprinkler Design Concepts

SingleFamily

In a Code Revision Cycle Now? Codes & Years Anticipating Adoption

Locally

Recognized Code Adoption for Local Authorities or Individual Preference

Provincewide

Scope of Enforcement is Limited or All Encompassing

(cont. from previous page) IMC-International Mechanical Code; IRC-International Residential Code; LSC-Life Safety Code; NBC-National Building Code of Canada; NECNational Electric Code; NFPA 5000-Building Construction & Safety Code.

Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016 31


State State

State Code Code State Adoption Adoption

Additional NFPA NFPA Standards Standards Additional

NFPA 13 13 NFPA Edition Edition Adopted Adopted

Local Local Jurisdiction Jurisdiction Can Use Use Can Latest NFPA NFPA Latest 13 Ed. Ed. 13

Minimum Minimum Base or or aa Base Min/Max Min/Max for for Enforcement Enforcement

Alabama* Alabama*

2009 IBC IBC & & IFC IFC 2009

No No

2007 2007

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Alaska Alaska

2009 IBC, IBC, IFC, IFC, IMC IMC & & IFGC IFGC -2009 all amended amended all

No No

2010 2010

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Arizona* Arizona*

2003 IFC IFC 2003

Yes, view view at at dfbls.az.gov dfbls.az.gov under under Fire Fire Marshal Marshal Arizona Arizona State State Fire Fire Yes, Code. Amendments Amendments & & code code adopted adopted through through AZ AZ rule rule writing writing process process Code.

IFC, 2003 2003 IFC, NFPA 13, 13, 1999 1999 NFPA

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Arkansas* Arkansas*

2012 IBC, IBC, IRC IRC & & IFC IFC -- all all 2012 amended amended

Yes, requirement requirement for for sprinklers sprinklers in in one one and-two-family and-two-family dwellings dwellings Yes, deleted deleted

2010 2010

No No

Minimum Minimum

California California

2015 IBC IBC & & IFC, IFC, both both 2015 amended; numerous numerous others others amended;

Yes, bsc.ca.gov; bsc.ca.gov; osfm.fire.ca.gov osfm.fire.ca.gov Yes,

2016 2016

--

Minimum Minimum

Colorado Colorado

2015 IBC IBC & & IFC; IFC; 2015 2015 IRC; IRC; 2012 2012 2015 NFPA101 101 NFPA

No No

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Depends on on Depends

Connecticut Connecticut

2012 IBC, IBC, IFC IFC & & NFPA NFPA 101; 101; 2012 2012 NFPA NFPA 11 -- amended amended 2012

Yes, new new buildings buildings greater greater than than four four stories stories & & all all new new schools schools Yes,

2010 2010

No No

Min/Max Min/Max

Delaware* Delaware*

2012 NFPA NFPA 101 101 & & 2009 2009 NFPA NFPA 2012 1, both both amended amended 1,

Yes, regulations.delaware.gov/admincode/title1/700/index.shtml regulations.delaware.gov/admincode/title1/700/index.shtml Yes,

2010 2010

No No

Minimum Minimum

District of of Columbia Columbia District

2012 IBC IBC & & IFC, IFC, both both 2012 amended amended

Yes, visit visit dcra.dc/gov/page/permits_codes_zoning dcra.dc/gov/page/permits_codes_zoning to to see see applicable applicable Yes, codes codes

Ed. 2010. 2010. See See Ed. Ch 35, 35, IRC IRC 2012 2012 Ch for all all ref. ref. stds. stds. for

No No

Minimum Minimum

Florida Florida

2012 IBC, IBC, NFPA NFPA 11 & & NFPA NFPA 2012 101 -- all all amended amended 101

Yes, Florida Florida specific specific amendments amendments to: to: NFPA NFPA 101, 101, NFPA NFPA 11 & & IBC. IBC. Yes, myfloridacfo.com/division/sfm/bfp; http://codes.iccsafe.org/Florida.html http://codes.iccsafe.org/Florida.html myfloridacfo.com/division/sfm/bfp;

2010 2010

No No

Minimum Minimum

Georgia Georgia

2012 IBC, IBC, IFC IFC & & NFPA NFPA 101 101 -- all all 2012 amended amended

Yes, NFPA NFPA 101 101 -- sprinkler sprinkler req. req. baesd baesd on on occupancy occupancy is is primary primary reference reference Yes,

2013 2013

--

Minimum Minimum

Hawaii^ Hawaii^

2006 IBC, IBC, UPC UPC & & IECC; IECC; 2008 2008 2006 NEC; 2010 2010 ASME; ASME; 2012 2012 NFPA NFPA 11 -NEC; all amended amended all

Yes, NFPA NFPA 11 -- Act Act 83 83 deleted deleted the the sprinkler sprinkler req. req. in in 11 & & 22 family family occup.; occup.; Yes, ags.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/approved_state_fire_ ags.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/approved_state_fire_ code_2014.pdf code_2014.pdf

2010 2010

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Idaho Idaho

2012 IBC IBC & & IFC IFC -- both both amended amended 2012

No No

2013 by by ref. ref. 2013

No No

Minimum Minimum

Illinois Illinois

2006 or or later later IBC IBC (default (default code code in in 2006 those areas areas w/out w/out aa bldg bldg code); code); those 2000 NFPA NFPA11 -- amended amended 2000

n/a n/a

Ed. in in effect effect Ed. when sp sp sys sys when installed installed

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Indiana* Indiana*

2006 IBC IBC & & IFC, IFC, 2006 2006 IMC/IFG IMC/IFG 2006 all amended amended -- all

Yes. Indiana Indiana amendments amendments to to codes codes and and standards standards are are at at Yes. in.gov/legislative/iac/iac_title?iact=675 in.gov/legislative/iac/iac_title?iact=675

--

No No

Min/Max Min/Max

Iowa Iowa

2009 IBC IBC & & IFC, IFC, both both amended; amended; 2009 2000 NFPA NFPA 101; 101; 2012 2012 IMC, IMC, UPC, UPC, 2000 IECC -- all all amended; amended; 2010 2010 ADA; ADA; IECC 2015 NEC NEC NFPA NFPA 70 70 2015

Yes, bcinfo@dps.state.ia.us; bcinfo@dps.state.ia.us; fminfo@dps.state.ia.us fminfo@dps.state.ia.us Yes,

2007 2007

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Kansas Kansas

2006 IBC, IBC, IFC IFC & & NFPA NFPA 101 101 2006

No No

2007 2007

--

Minimum Minimum

Kentucky* Kentucky*

NFPA 11 & & 101 101 & & IBC, IBC, amended amended NFPA

No No

2000 2000

No No

Min/Max Min/Max

Louisiana Louisiana

2012 NFPA NFPA 11 & & 101; 101; 2012 2012 2012 IBC -- amended amended IBC

No No

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Maine Maine

2009 IBC; IBC; 2006 2006 NFPA NFPA11 & & 2009 2009 2009 101 -- all all amended amended 101

Yes, removal removal of of req. req. oneone- and and two-family two-family dwellings dwellings Yes,

2007 2007

No No

Minimum Minimum

Maryland Maryland

2012 IBC, IBC, NFPA NFPA 101 101 & & NFPA NFPA 2012 all amended amended 11 -- all

Yes, mdsp.org/sfpc; mdsp.org/sfpc; Melt Melt out out ceiling ceiling tiles tiles not not permitted; permitted; fire fire pumps pumps Yes, not permitted permitted in in vaults vaults or or pits pits not

2010 2010

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Massachusetts* Massachusetts*

2009 IBC IBC amended, amended, IFC IFC 2009 partial amended, amended, 2012 2012 NFPA NFPA 11 partial amended (1/1/15) (1/1/15) amended

Yes, reduced reduced sprinkler sprinkler thresholds thresholds Yes,

2010 2010

No No

Min/Max Min/Max

Michigan Michigan

2012 NPFA NPFA 101 101 & & 2006 2006 NFPA NFPA 2012 both amended amended 11 -- both

No No

2010 2010

No No

Min/Max Min/Max

Minnesota Minnesota

2000 NFPA NFPA 101, 101, 2012 2012 IBC IBC & & 2000 IFC -- all all amended amended IFC

Yes Yes

2010 2010

Not recomrecomNot mended mended

Minimum fire fire Minimum code; Min/Max Min/Max code; bldg. code code bldg.

occup. type type occup.

^Hawaii information is provided for Oahu only. +In Florida, systems <50 heads may be designed by contractor; shop drawings not required to be sealed by a P.E. Abbreviations: BOCA/National-Building Official and Code Administrators International; IBC-International Building Code; IFC-International Fire Code; IFGC-International Fuel Gas Code; IMC-International Mechanical Code; IRC-International Residential Code; LSC-Life Safety Code; NBC-National Building Code of Canada; NEC-National Electric Code; NFPA 5000-Building Construction & Safety Code.

32 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


Scope of Enforcement is Limited or All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption (RCA) for Local Authorities or Individual Preference (IP)

In a Code Revision Cycle Now? Codes & Years Anticipating Adoption

Signed copy of owner’s certificate as part of working submittal plan

State Requires PE to do Sprinkler Design Concepts

Office of State Fire Marshal Has Authority Over All Projects in State or Only Over State-Owned/ Financed Projects

All Encompassing

-

Yes, 2015 ICC, IFC

Y ‘08 ed

-

-

-

-

No

Yes

All

All Encompassing

-

Yes, 2012 IBC, IFC, IMC & IFGC

Y ‘08

-

-

-

-

No

No

All

Limited

RCA

Yes, IFC 2012

‘98

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

-

Yes

State Only

All Encompassing

RCA

No

2011

-

No

No

No

-

No

All

All Encompassing

-

Yes

Y ‘13

-

Yes

-

-

Yes

Yes

All

Limited

IP

No

Yes

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

NICET III or Above

All for suppression systems

All Encompassing

RCA

No

Yes ‘11

-

No

No

No

No

No

State Only

All Encompassing

-

No

Y, ‘08

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

-

No

All

All Encompassing

n/a

Yes, 2015 ICC ICodes amended

Yes

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

None; DCRA has authority over construction

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes, 2012 NFPA 1, NFPA 101

Yes, ‘11

-

-

-

-

Yes

Yes

State Only

All Encompassing except 1 & 2 family & individuallyowned residences

-

No

Yes

No

No

No

Georgia House Bill 1196

No

No

Juris. varies

Limited

RCA

Yes, 2015 NFPA 1; 2014 NEC; 2012 IBC, IRC & UPC

Yes ‘11

Yes ‘11

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No State Fire Marshal

LImited

RCA

Yes, 2015 IBC & IFC

Yes ‘11

-

No

No

No

No

No

State Only

All Encompassing except 1 & 2 family homes and public schools

IP, locals adopt their own codes

No

Yes, ed when sp sys installed

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

All

All Encompassing

-

Yes, 2012 IBC, IFC, IMC, IFGC - eff. 12/1/14

Yes, ‘11

-

No

No

No

-

No

All

All Encompassing

IP

No

Yes, ‘14

-

No

No

No

No

Yes

All

All Encompassing

IP

Yes, 2012 IBC, IFC, NFPA 101

Yes, ‘08

-

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

All

All Encompassing

RCA

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

-

No

N/A

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes

Yes ‘11

-

-

-

-

Yes

No

All

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes, 2015 NFPA 1 & NFPA 101

Yes, ‘14

-

Yes

-

-

No

No

All

All Encompassing

IP

No

Yes ‘14

-

No

No

No

Yes

No

All

All Encompassing

-

Yes, 2015 IBC & 2015 NFPA 1

Yes ‘11

-

Yes

-

-

-

No

-

Limited

RCA

No

Yes ‘11

No

No

No

No

No

No

State Only & other

All Encompassing

RCA

No

Yes ‘11

-

No

No

No

No req.

No

All

High-rise Condo/apt

MultiFamily

Local Jurisdiction With Residential Ordinances

SingleFamily

Locally

Statewide

Adopted NFPA 25

regulated facilities

Abbreviations: BOCA/National-Building Official and Code Administrators International; IBC-International Building Code; IFC-International Fire Code; IFGC-International Fuel Gas Code; IMC-International Mechanical Code; IRC-International Residential Code; LSC-Life Safety Code; NBC-National Building Code of Canada; NEC-National Electric Code; NFPA 5000-Building Construction & Safety Code.

Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016 33


State State

State StateCode Code Adoption Adoption

Additional AdditionalNFPA NFPAStandards Standards

NFPA NFPA13 13 Edition Edition Adopted Adopted

Local Local Jurisdiction Jurisdiction Can CanUse Use Latest LatestNFPA NFPA 13 13Ed. Ed.

Minimum MinimumBase Base or oraaMin/Max Min/Max for for Enforcement Enforcement

Mississippi Mississippi

2012 2012IBC IBC&&IFC IFC

No No

--

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Missouri* Missouri*

None None

No No

n/a n/a

Yes Yes

n/a n/a

Montana Montana

2012 2012IBC IBCand andIFC IFC

No No

2010 2010

Yes Yes

--

Nebraska Nebraska

2009 2009IBC; IBC;2003 2003NFPA NFPA1;1;2000 2000 NFPA NFPA101 101

No No

2003 2003

No No

Minimum Minimum

Nevada* Nevada*

2012 2012IBC, IBC,IFC, IFC,IWUIC IWUIC&&UMC UMC- - Yes, Yes,NAC NAC477.281 477.281&&477.283 477.283 all allamended; amended;2009 2009UPC UPC

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

New NewHampshire Hampshire

2009 2009IBC IBCamended; amended;2015 2015 NFPA NFPA11&&101 101- -both bothamended amended

2013 2013

Yes, Yes, w/variance w/variance

Minimum Minimum

New NewJersey Jersey

2015 No 2015NJ NJIBC IBCNew NewConstruction; Construction; No 2006 2006IFB IFBNJ NJas asmaintenance maintenancecode code - -both bothamended amended

2013 2013as asref. ref.by by 2015 2015IBC IBC

Yes Yesonly onlyby bythe the Min/Max Min/Max designer designerfor for specific issues specific issues not notinin2013 2013ed. ed.

New NewMexico* Mexico*

2009 2009IBC IBC&&2003 2003IFC IFC- -both both amended amended

1999, 1999,ref refby byIFC IFC 2003 2003

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

New NewYork* York*

2006 2006IBC IBC&&IFC, IFC,both bothamended amended - -

2007 2007

No No

Minimum Minimum

North NorthCarolina Carolina

2009 2009IBC IBC&&IFC, IFC,amended amended

--

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Min/Max Min/Max

North NorthDakota* Dakota*

2009 2009IBC, IBC,amended; amended;IRC, IRC,IMC IMC &&IFGC IFGCamended amended

Yes, Yes,legislative legislativeaction actionprevents preventsthe theinstallation installationofof fire firesprinklers sprinklersininnew newoneone-and andtwo-family two-familyhomes homes

n/a n/a

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Ohio* Ohio*

2009 2009IBC IBC&&IFC, IFC,both bothamended amended Yes, Yes,A-3 A-3sprinkler sprinklerreq., req.,RRsprinkler sprinklerreq. req.

2010 2010

No No

Minimum Minimum

Oklahoma* Oklahoma*

2006 2006IBC IBC&&IFC, IFC,2007 2007NFPA NFPA101, 101,allall amended amended

No No

2007 2007

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Oregon* Oregon*

2009 2009IBC IBC&&IFC, IFC,both bothamended amended No No

2007 2007

Yes Yes

Min/Max Min/Max

Pennsylvania* Pennsylvania*

2009 2009IBC IBC&&IFC IFC

No No

2007 2007

No No

Minimum Minimum

Rhode RhodeIsland* Island*

2012 2012IBC, IBC,NFPA NFPA11&&101 101- -all all amended amended

Yes, Yes,residential residentialdeleted deleted

2010 2010

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

South SouthCarolina Carolina

2015 2015IBC IBC&&IFC, IFC,both bothamended amended Yes, Yes,see seellr.state.sc.us/pol/bcc llr.state.sc.us/pol/bcc

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

South SouthDakota Dakota

2009 2009IBC IBC&&IFC IFC- -both both amended amended

Yes, Yes,threshold thresholdfor forsprinkler sprinklerprotection protectionmulti-family multi-family 2010 2010 dwellings dwellingsatatsix sixorormore moreunits units

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Tennessee Tennessee

2012 2012IBC IBCamended; amended;2012 2012IFC IFC&& NFPA NFPA101 101

Yes, Yes,eliminate eliminatesprinklers sprinklersfrom fromoneone-and andtwo-family two-family 2010 2010 dwellings dwellings&&townhomes townhomes

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Texas* Texas*

2012 2012NFPA NFPA101 101amended amended

No No

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Utah Utah

2015 2015IBC IBC&&IFC IFC- -both both amended; amended;2015 2015NFPA NFPA101 101

No No

2013 2013

No No

Minimum Minimum

Vermont Vermont

2015 2015IBC, IBC,NFPA NFPA11&&NFPA NFPA101 101 Yes, Yes,firesafety.vermont.gov firesafety.vermont.gov - -all allamended amended

2013 2013

No No

Minimum Minimum

Virginia Virginia

2012 2012IBC IBC&&IFC IFC- -both both amended amended

2010 2010per perref. ref. stds. stds.ofofIBC IBC&& IFC 2012 IFC 2012

Yes Yes

Min/Max Min/Max

Washington Washington

2015 Yes, 2015IBC, IBC,IFC IFC- -both bothamended; amended; Yes,IRC. IRC.Did Didnot notadopt adoptCh Ch11-25. 11-25.Residential Residential 2015 2015NFPA NFPA101; 101;2015 2015UPC, UPC,IRC, IRC, sprinklers sprinklersififadded addedneed needtotomeet meetIRC IRCP2904. P2904. IMC IMC- -allallamended amended

2013 2013

n/a n/a

Minimum Minimum

West WestVirginia Virginia

2015 2015IBC, IBC,NFPA NFPA11&&NFPA NFPA101 101 Yes, Yes,sprinklers sprinklersas asoption optioninin11&&22family familydwellings dwellings 2013 2013 - -all allamended amended

No No

Minimum Minimum

Wisconsin* Wisconsin*

2009 2009IBC IBC&&NFPA NFPA11- -both both amended amended

Yes, Yes,systems systemsreq. req.ininmost mostbldgs bldgsover over60 60ftftininheight. height. Different Differentsprinkler sprinklerthresholds thresholdsprotection protectionand andalternatives alternatives for forsmaller smallerapt aptbldgs bldgs&&townhouses, townhouses,Comm Comm6.2.09 6.2.09(5) (5) Wis. Wis.Section SectionCode Code

2007 2007

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Wyoming Wyoming

2015 2015IBC IBC&&IFC IFC

No No

2013 2013

Yes Yes

Minimum Minimum

Yes, Yes,no nosprinkler sprinklerreq. req.for for11&&22family family

Yes, Yes,903.2 903.2exception exceptiondoes doesnot notapply; apply;903.2.7 903.2.7does doesnot not apply applytotodetached detachedoneone-and andtwo-family two-familyhomes homes

Yes, Yes,IBC IBCCh Ch99modifications modificationsper perthe theVA VAUSBC USBCPar ParI;I; dhcd.virginia.gov/images/SBC/CodeBooks/ dhcd.virginia.gov/images/SBC/CodeBooks/ 2012%20Virginia%20Construction%20Code.pdf 2012%20Virginia%20Construction%20Code.pdf

Abbreviations: BOCA/National-Building Official and Code Administrators International; IBC-International Building Code; IFC-International Fire Code; IFGC-International Fuel Gas Code; IMC-International Mechanical Code; IRC-International Residential Code; LSC-Life Safety Code; NBC-National Building Code of Canada; NEC-National Electric Code; NFPA 5000-Building Construction & Safety Code; SBC-Standard Building Code; SFPC-Standard Fire Prevention Code; UBC-Uniform Building code; UFC-Uniform Fire Code.

34 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


Scope of Enforcement is Limited or All Encompassing

Recognized Code Adoption (RCA) for Local Authorities or Individual Preference (IP)

In a Code Revision Cycle Now? Codes & Years Anticipating Adoption

Limited

IP

Yes, 2015 IBC & IFC w/ammendments

n/a

IP

No

No

-

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

None

Limited

RCA

No

Yes ‘11

-

No

No

No

No

No

All

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes, 2012 NFPA 101

Yes ‘02

-

No

No

No

No

No

All

All Encompassing

IP

No

Yes, ‘11

-

Yes

Yes

-

Yes

No

State Only & rural counties

All Encompassing

-

Yes, 2015 NFPA 1 w/ ref.; 2015 IBC & IRC

-

-

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

State Only

All Encompassing

RCA

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Yes

State Only

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes, 2015 IFC

Yes, ‘98

-

No

No

No

-

Yes

All

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes, 2009 & 2012 ICC

Yes, ‘08

-

Yes

Yes

-

-

-

State Only

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes, 2015 IBC & IFC, both amended

Yes, ‘14

-

-

-

-

Yes

No

State Only

Limited

IP

Yes, 2012 IBC, IRC, IMC, IFGC

No

No

-

-

-

-

No

State Only

Limited

-

No

Yes, 2008

Yes, OH Fire Code

Yes

Yes

Yes

-

No

State Only

Limited

RCA

No

2002 ed

-

-

-

-

-

No

All

All Encompassing

IP

Yes, 2009 IRC 7/1/11

Yes, ‘08

-

No

No

No

-

Yes

All

All Encompassing

RCA

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

-

No

PA Fire Marshal has no code

All Encompassing

RCA

Yes, 2015

Yes, ‘11

-

No

Yes

Yes

-

Yes

All

See llr.state.sc.us/ pol/bcc

See llr.state.sc.us/ pol/bcc

No

Yes ‘14

-

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

All≠

Limited

RCA

No

No

-

No

Yes

Yes

-

Yes

Certain public bldgs outlined in statute

All Encompassing

IP

No

Yes, ‘11

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

State Only

Limited

IP

No

Yes

-

-

-

-

No

No

State Only

All Encompassing

RCA

No

Yes, ‘14

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

State Only

All Encompassing

RCA

No

Yes ‘14

No

No

No

No

Yes

No

All

-

RCA

Yes, 2015 IBC w/ ref. standards; 2015 IFC w/ref. standards; 2015 IRC w/ref. standards

Yes, ‘11

No

No

No

No

-

-

-

All Encompassing

RCA

No

Yes, ‘14

-

Yes

-

-

No

No

n/a

Limited

-

No

Yes ‘14

-

-

-

-

No

No

All

All Encompassing

IP

Yes, 2012 ed. of IBC, IECC, IMC, IFGC, IEBC & NFPA 1

Yes ‘08

-

-

-

-

-

Engineer, architect or sprinkler contractor

n/a

Limited

RCA

No

n/a

n/a

No

No

No

No

No

All

SingleFamily -

High-rise Condo/apt

-

Local Jurisdiction With Residential Ordinances

MultiFamily

-

Locally

Statewide

Adopted NFPA 25

Yes

Yes

Signed copy of owner’s certificate as part of working submittal plan

State Requires PE to do Sprinkler Design Concepts

Office of State Fire Marshal Has Authority Over All Projects in State or Only Over State-Owned/ Financed Projects

No

No

State Only

enforcement authority

≠ South Carolina has statewide authority to enforce state and local fire codes, but the requirement to use its free plan review services comes from the primary AHJ or AHJs that control permits, licenses, etc., and can involve AHJs who are state or local or may involve both.

Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016 35


of the 2015 IFC, and South Carolina per Section 1103.5 of the 2015 ICC.

N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N N Y N Y N Y N N Y N Y Y N Cert. N N Y Y N N Y N Y N Y Y N N Y N N N N N N Y Y Y Y N

N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y N Y Y N Y N Y N Y Y N Y N N PE N Y Y N N Y Y N Y Y N

Cert Only

Y Y Y Y N

Y Y N Y Y N N Y+ N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y -

Y Y N Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Either

Either

Depends

Depends

N N Y Y Y N

N N Y -

PE or

NICET II

Only

NICET II

Y

Y Y Y N N Y N Y -

-

N Y N N Y N N -

NICET Level IV

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Cert. N N Y Y Y N Y Y N Y N Y Y N N Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y N

NICET Level III

N Y Y N N Y Y N Y Y Y N Y N N N Y Y N Y Y N Y N N N N Y N N Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y N N Y Y

PE/Architect Seal

N Y Y N N Y Y N N Y N N N N N Y Y N Y Y N N N N N Y Y N N Y N N N Y N Y Y Y Y N N Y Y N Y N N Y Y

Requires for Sprinkler Drawings:

Designers

Fitters

Contact the respective AHJ for more detailed information for particular states. We thank the many individual state fire marshals, deputy state fire marshals, deputy chiefs, fire protection engineers, code specialists, and others who participated in this year’s survey. Some respondents did not provide a specific telephone number for questions regarding jurisdiction over fire sprinkler plan review/inspections. In those cases, we have listed the telephone number for the state fire marshal’s office, with the hope that a state representative can direct contractors to the appropriate authority. n

Alabama* Alaska Arizona* Arkansas* California Colorado Connecticut Delaware* District of Columbia Florida+ Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana* Iowa Kansas Kentucky* Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts* Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri* Montana Nebraska Nevada* New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico* New York* North Carolina North Dakota* Ohio* Oklahoma* Oregon* Pennsylvania* Rhode Island* South Carolina≠ South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin* Wyoming

Contractors

Conclusion The AFSA staff has made every effort to provide the most accurate and current information. Because of the time lapse between gathering the information and publication of these charts, changes may have occurred. Also, code adoption cycles/processes vary from state to state, but most statewide codes are updated once every three years. So states that are not listed as considering adoptions within the next year may in fact be initiating the process of reviewing all available codes.

State

Requires Licensing For:

Inspectors

When asked about towns or cities having retrofit requirements in excess of state requirements (question 12a), several states indicated “yes;” however, most did not provide a list of cities, towns and/or villages.

Requires Certification Of:

Plan Reviewers

High-rise retrofits are in place for California, Maine, New Jersey, and Nevada (all occupancy types). Massachusetts retrofits nightclubs. Arkansas has retrofit requirements for I-2 occupancies. Michigan has retrofit requirements pending for college dorms and correctional facilities.

State Licensing & Certification Requirements

Y N Y N N N Y Y Y Y Y N Y N

Depends

N

Preferred

Y N -

Req.

N N

Y & cert des

N N Y

Must be

sealed by

1 of the 3

State Fire

Marshal

Cert.

N Y

Y N Y -

or sp ctr

Y

Y Y

Y N Y Y N N

N -

N N N

Information not available for Canada. A “-” indicates no response was given. +In Florida, a contractor can design systems with less than 49 sprinkler heads. ≠In South Carolina, certification per Title 6, Chapter 8 of SC Code of Laws. The SC-specific design and shop drawings requirements can be found in Title 40, Ch 10 of the SC Code of Laws.

36 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana* Iowa Kansas Kentucky* Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts* Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri* Montana Nebraska Nevada* New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico* New York* North Carolina North Dakota* Ohio* Oklahoma* Oregon* Pennsylvania* Rhode Island* South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin* Wyoming

Numbers in ( ) are for retrofit questions. Phone numbers not available for Canada.

Y Y N N Y via waiver N Y or Y N Y Y Y State N N State cert. Per Y No Req N N N N Y Y N N Y

Y N N Minimum Y N Y or Y Y N N N N License N Y of recognized NFPA 1 & N No Req N N N N N -

N Y NICET I State -

N N Req. Registered -

State Alabama* Alaska Arizona* Arkansas* California Colorado Connecticut Delaware* District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana* Iowa Kansas Kentucky* Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts* Michigan+ Minnesota Mississippi Missouri* Montana Nebraska Nevada* New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico* New York* North Carolina North Dakota* Ohio* Oklahoma* Oregon* Pennsylvania* Rhode Island* South Carolina• South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia# Washington West Virginia Wisconsin* Wyoming

Yes, State

Fire Marshal Cert

No Req No Req No Req or union trained

No Req No Req No Req No Req req. NFPA 101 No Req Y state cert No Req -

Tester No Req

Seismic protection required on fire sprinkler systems:

Yes/No

California Colorado Connecticut Delaware* District of Columbia Florida

Required for those who perform inspection, testing and maintenance of water-based fire protection systems:

No Requirement

Alaska Arizona* Arkansas*

334-241-4166 (334-241-4166) 907-269-5491 602-364-1003 501-618-8624 (501-618-8624) 916-327-4998 303-239-4600 860-713-5750 302-739-4394 202-442-4589 850-413-3610 (850-413-3610) 404-617-8515 (404-617-8515) 808-723-7176 (808-723-7176) 208-334-4370 312-814-8960 317-232-1421 (317-233-1421) 515-725-6145 (515-725-6145) 785-296-3401 502-573-0365 x201 1-800-256-5452 (1-800-256-5452) 207-626-3889 (207-626-3889) 410-713-3780 (410-766-3881) 978-567-3375 (978-567-3375) 517-241-9371 (517-241-9371) 651-201-7204 601-359-1061 573-751-2930 (573-522-6207) 406-791-2710 402-471-2590 775-684-7510 (603-271-3294) 609-984-7609 (609-633-6741) 505-476-0080 518-474-4073 919-647-0011 701-328-5555 614-728-5460 (614-728-5460) 405-522-5006 503-934-8269 (503-934-8269) 717-346-2729 401-393-7717 803-896-9800 605-773-3562 615-741-6246 512-305-7909 801-284-6350 802-479-7566 804-371-7150 (804-371-7150) 360-596-3913 304-558-2191 608-266-0251 307-856-8214

NICET Level III

Alabama*

U.S. Inspection, Testing & Maintenance and Seismic Protection Requirements

NICET Level II

Local Jurisdictions and Retrofit Information

Y Y Y Y Y N Y N N N N Y Y Only as req by NFPA 13 Yes, dep on area of state Yes N Y N N N Yes, in some areas Y N N Y Y N Y Y Yes, some Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Yes, not all systems N Y N Y Y

A “-” indicates no response was given. + In Michigan, in regulated facilities they have to be Act 144 Certified • In South Carolina, the adopted bldg code determines when seismic protection is required.

Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016 37


Outstanding Chapter of the Year Louisiana Fire Sprinkler Association Impresses with Events, Charity, Fellowship CHARLOTTE JOHNSON | American Fire Sprinkler Association

At the American Fire Sprinkler Association’s (AFSA) 35th Annual Convention & Exhibition in Nashville in September, the Louisiana Fire Sprinkler Association (LFSA), a chapter of AFSA, was honored with the Outstanding Chapter of the Year Award. This award was created to recognize exceptional chapters that do excellent work representing AFSA across the country and promoting the fire sprinkler industry through regular meetings, events, and charity work. While many AFSA chapters are exemplary, this year LFSA truly exceeded all expectations and made a name for itself as the 2016 Outstanding Chapter of the Year. Selecting the Outstanding Chapter The other chapters that applied for the Outstanding Chapter of the Year honor included last year’s winner the Carolinas Chapter, the Greater Bay Area Chapter, and the Sacramento Valley Chapter. While each of those chapters is outstanding in its own right, the final decision was made by the Membership & Chapter Development Committee, chaired by Wayne Weisz of Cen-Cal Fire Systems, Inc. in Lodi, California. “All of the chapters that applied put a lot of time and effort into getting the application put together,” says Weisz. “Each one of them are winners in that

Seminars are an important part of LFSA’s quarterly meetings. 38 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

regard. As was the case last year, the scoring was very close. Each of the three groups that scored a particular section of the application realized through the process that final scoring would be close.” In the end, when the final tally was counted up, Louisiana came out the winner. “I was surprised but also very happy for Chapter Vice President Mark Taylor, Chapter President Linda Biernacki, and everybody with the Louisiana Chapter who contributed a lot of their time into applying for this award,” says Weisz. “Congratulations to them! I also want to compliment the Louisiana Chapter for the great job they do all year round.” What Makes a Winning Chapter LFSA was created on December 23, 1986. Past presidents include Don Albares of American Sprinkler Co. in Harahan; Alan Laguna of Merit Sprinkler in Kenner; and Eugene Dunavant of Mid South Fire Solutions in Shreveport. In 2007, Linda Biernacki, president of Fire Tech Systems, Inc. in Shreveport, became the chapter’s president, and the chapter became even more involved in local contractors’ lives. At every quarterly membership meeting, the chapter schedules AFSA national speakers to present half-day seminars on technical topics that are pertinent to its

AFSA At-Large Director Wayne Weisz presents the Outstanding Chapter Award to LFSA President Linda Biernacki.

members. The chapter also sponsors plan review seminars free of charge, where Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJs) can receive valuable information as well as Continuing Education Units (CEUs). In 2016 alone, the chapter has held multiple events of which it is extremely proud. Listed below are some of the activities that brought LFSA to the winner’s circle. In April 2016, the chapter hosted a successful vendor fair and jambalaya lunch. All seven vendor tables were filled, and the jambalaya lunch was

The association’s 2016 Vendor Fair was a big success, featuring exhibitors and lunch prepared by Louisiana State Fire Marshal Butch Browning.


LFSA’s 2015 golf tournament raised $20,000 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

prepared by Chief Butch Browning, the Louisiana state fire marshal. Last year, the chapter donated $5,000 to toward building the Memorial Stage at the Louisiana Fallen Firefighter’s Memorial in Baton Rouge. This year, it donated $2,500 to build a canopy over that stage. LFSA has been actively encouraging its members under the age of 40 to get involved in industry activities, and last year it held its first NextGen Mixer. At the mixer, professionals under 40 mingled with seasoned business professionals over hors d’oeuvres and cocktails, learning about the business and networking. The mixer was such a hit that it was held again this year in October in Baton Rouge, and a mixture of contractor and associate members were in attendance, along with AFSA representatives and several suppliers. On October 26, 2016, the chapter held its 10th Annual Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Golf Tournament in memory of Brad Bella, the son of former Louisiana State Fire Marshal V.J. Bella, who died at the age of 11 from Type 1 diabetes. Last year, the golf tournament raised $20,000 for this worthy cause. In 2015, the tournament had 86 players, and that number grows each year. In the 10 years that the golf tournament has been held, the chapter has raised over $160,000 for JDRF. Out of all of these wonderful events, Biernacki is most proud of the quarterly seminars that the chapter hosts. “It’s standing room only, and a great way to grow our membership,” says Biernacki, who also serves as secretary of the AFSA Board of Directors. “We offer a networking luncheon to meet and talk to the AHJs, suppliers and fellow members. It’s been very successful and rewarding.”

LFSA members have supported the Louisiana Fallen Firefighters Memorial with donations towards building its Memorial Stage and a canopy to cover the stage.

LFSA has started up its own NextGen group and sponsors mixers for this under 40 group.

Biernacki also notes that there are only 22 contractor members in the chapter, and she encourages smaller chapters to apply for the honor and stay engaged in the industry. Recognizing Greatness As a national association, AFSA has from the beginning recognized that many of the most important and significant achievements of the association are accomplished at the local chapter level. That is why AFSA is thrilled to be able to recognize the wonderful work that LFSA does for the industry, the community, and its members. Bradley Elliott, AFSA director of member services, has nothing but glowing praise for the chapter. “Congratulations to the members of the Louisiana Fire Sprinkler Association for this outstanding accomplishment,” says Elliott. “One of AFSA’s greatest strengths is our chapters, and we commend LFSA’s first-class commit-

ment to education, events, and membership.” Frank Mortl III, CAE, executive vice president of AFSA, echoes that sentiment. “Congratulations are in order for the tremendous volunteer leaders in Louisiana for winning AFSA’s Outstanding Chapter of the Year Award in 2016,” says Mortl. “Having personally witnessed their exceptional commitment to education, training, networking, next generation development, and a whole lotta fun, the Louisiana Fire Sprinkler Association is a shining example to all regional chapters and affiliates charged with helping merit shop fire sprinkler contractors succeed.” As the 2016 winner, the association was recognized at the Nashville convention and received a banner to display at meetings and other events. n Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

39


Out with the Oxygen; In with the Nitrogen Extend the Life of Your Fire Protection System GINO PIGOZZO & SCOTT MONROE | Ferguson Fire Fabrication

A storage facility in Minneapolis sits quietly one early morning in January. Without warning, and with no one around, water starts to gush from the ceiling. It goes undetected until the alarms sound and maintenance is called. It’s too late – the building and its contents have suffered hundreds of thousands of dollars in irreparable water damage. Just five years into the life of the 10-year building, the facility owner had made countless service calls to patch pinhole leaks. What he didn’t know was that those pinhole leaks were a minor symptom of a rotting system.

These holes cause the system to lose pressure and the air compressor kicks in. Eventually the compressor can’t keep up and the system trips, causing water to enter the pipe and leak through the holes – sometimes in a drip, and sometimes in a gush. To eliminate corrosion, the key is to strip oxygen from the pipe and push in 98 percent or greater pure nitrogen. Nitrogen is an inert gas, which means it prevents electrolysis from occurring by eliminating oxygen from the equation and rust does not occur.

Fire sprinkler systems are intended to last the life of a new building. Investments in high-quality pipe, fittings and sprinkler heads are made in the initial construction or remodel phase, but a repair budget is rare. Unfortunately, corrosion-causing pipe damage begins immediately after the system is installed, and often eventually costs building owners their fire protection system, lost property, thousands of dollars, or even worse, cause personal injury or loss of life.

How it Works Nitrogen generators use compressed air forced through a membrane to separate oxygen, argon, helium and water vapor. Only the pure nitrogen is captured and stored in a tank, which is connected directly to the fire sprinkler system’s air maintenance device. Installing a nitrogen generator is practically plug and play and is a relatively easy process. If a contractor can install an air compressor, they most likely have the knowledge they need to install a nitrogen generator.

Once a pipe is found to be corroded, building maintenance professionals may enlist the help of their fire protection contractor who puts on rubber patch “band aids” or replaces the pieces of failing pipe. It’s rare, however, that the one pinhole leak they repaired or the one section of pipe they replaced is the only issue. Often times, there’s much more going on in the ceiling that is only moments from erupting into total disaster. Stopping the Corrosion-Causing Culprit Three elements must be present in order for corrosion to occur: iron, water and oxygen. In combination, the elements work together to eat away at pipe in various places, creating holes the size of pins or pennies.

Dry systems and preaction systems are perfect candidates for nitrogen generators. Dry systems are common in colder climates and unheated buildings like parking garages. Pinhole leaks in dry systems can cause the dry pipe valve to open and release water. Preaction systems are common in data centers or other equipment-heavy areas where redundant events, like fire alarms, are required before the sprinkler actually activates. Leaks in preaction systems will cause alarms to sound but water isn’t released. Nitrogen generation systems work with both black steel and galvanized pipe, which makes them ideal for dry or preaction systems.

Figure 1. In order for corrosion to occur, three elements must be present: iron, water and oxygen.

Figure 2. When corrosion occurs, it eats away at pipe in various places, creating holes.

40 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


Figure 3. Engineers specify fire sprinkler systems intended to last the life of a new building – 50 years or more.

Figure 4. Nitrogen generators like this one from Potter prevent pipe from corroding by pushing oxygen out and replacing it with nitrogen. Reprinted with permission,

How to Choose the Right Nitrogen Generator When choosing the right nitrogen generator for a fire protection system, there are several factors to consider. • Is the system new or is it an older system with an existing air compressor? • Has the current air compressor gone bad or does it work well enough to meet NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, fill requirements along with keeping up with system changes? • How large is the system and how many systems are involved? • What is the supervisory air pressure, or the amount of air pressure in the piping system required to hold the valve closed? • What kind of fire protection system is it – preaction or dry? • What is the preferred monitoring method – automatic or manual?

had multiple problems with its fire system requiring maintenance every month for almost three years. Fed up with how much they were spending on service calls, the business owner did his own research and found nitrogen generation technology online. Needless to say, they felt their contractor had a responsibility to provide a reasonable solution to permanently fix the failing system.

Both the total system size and individual zone capacities will affect the size and number of nitrogen generators required. An automatic system continuously checks to ensure 98 percent or greater nitrogen at all times and a manual system simply requires someone to check the system on a weekly basis. Everyone Should Know About Nitrogen Generation The first line of defense when it comes to building a system that will last are the engineers and architects responsible for specifying fire sprinkler systems. Including a nitrogen generator in the original specifications extends the life of the fire protection system and creates an immediate return on investment by essentially guaranteeing a significant reduction in service calls. Fire protection contractors are trusted partners in building maintenance. Their expertise is invaluable, and they’re heavily relied on for their knowledge and ability to diagnose and solve problems. When a building owner or maintenance technician has hit their pain threshold for service calls and are tired of needing to constantly repair a faulty system, they’ll reach out to other service contractors who can offer a permanent solution. It benefits contractors to keep up with nitrogen generation technology and bring it to the attention of the end-user when it makes sense. Building owners are savvy and budget-conscious, so they’re especially critical of repeated service calls. One business recently

Nitrogen Generators are Worth the Investment Annual maintenance costs can be reduced by thousands of dollars each year by using nitrogen generation. The generator itself is low maintenance, and building owners or property maintenance technicians can monitor the system themselves. Nitrogen generation can extend the life of a sprinkler system by decades, whether it’s installed as a part of a new system or later in conjunction with the replacement of damaged pipe. As with any technology there are some hurdles to mass adoption. For instance, contractors aren’t all trained in nitrogen generation technology and therefore don’t always include it when they work with engineers on fire protection system design or when they go on customer service calls. Despite the technology being around for several years, it has only recently started to get the attention it deserves, and education opportunities are growing. Distributors like Ferguson Fire and Fabrication can assist contractors with getting the proper education and training on nitrogen systems and nitrogen generator manufacturers offer training and certification programs on the technology. While upfront costs for a nitrogen generation system may pose a challenge for building owners, the return on investment is worth it. The cost of a nitrogen generator for a standard 250- to 500-gallon sprinkler system can run on average less than $10,000. The nitrogen generator can save that much or more each year in maintenance calls to repair or replace corroded and leaking pipe. n ABOUT THE AUTHORS: Gino Pigozzo is engineered products manager with Ferguson Fire and Fabrication (fergusonfire.com). He has been with the company since 2004. Contact him at gino.pigozzo@ferguson.com. Scott Monroe is an engineered products specialist with Ferguson Fire and Fabrication. He has been with the company since 2002. Contact him at scott.monroe@ferguson.com. Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

41


The members of the 2016-2017 Executive Committee are (l to r): Chairman Mike Meehan, First Vice Chairman Wayne Weisz, Second Vice Chairman Ted Wills, Secretary Linda Biernacki, Treasurer Jack Medovich, and Immediate Past Chairman Joe Heinrich.

Meet Your 2016-2017 Board of Directors Officers and Directors Lead AFSA CHARLOTTE JOHNSON | American Fire Sprinkler Association

The American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) held its 2017 election of officers during the September 14, 2016 meeting of the Board at the 35th Annual AFSA Convention & Exhibition in Nashville. Michael F. Meehan, VSC Fire & Security, Virginia Beach, Virginia, will remain as Chairman of the Board. Also continuing to serve as officers of the 2016-2017 Board are: First Vice Chairman Wayne Weisz, Cen-Cal Fire Systems, Inc., Lodi, California; Second Vice Chairman Theodore C. Wills, Jr., Anchor Fire Protection Co., Perkiomenville, Pennsylvania; and Secretary Linda M. Biernacki, Fire Tech Systems, Inc., Shreveport, Louisiana. The newly elected Treasurer will be Jack A. Medovich, P.E., Fire and Life Safety America, Richmond, Virginia. 2017 Board of Directors Election AFSA’s Board consists of seven Regional Directors (one for each of the seven membership regions), At-Large Directors, and the Immediate Past Chairman. Each year, one-third of the Board is elected to a three-year term, providing continuity in the association’s governing body. The 2016 election process resulted in the re-election of four directors: R. Donald Kaufman of Kaufman Fire Protection, Albuquerque, New Mexico (Region 2); Jeff Phifer of Crawford Sprinkler Co. of South Carolina, Lugoff, South Carolina (Region 5); Michael F. Meehan of VSC Fire & Security, Virginia Beach, Virginia (Region 6); and Linda Biernacki of Fire Tech Systems, Inc., Shreveport, Louisiana (At-Large). Regional Directors Region 1 Director Thomas J. McKinnon is president/founder of Aegis Fire Systems, Inc., located in Pleasanton, California. McKinnon entered the fire protection industry in 1984 when he joined Stop Fire, Inc., a residential, commercial and special hazards fire protection contractor located in San Jose, California. In 1993, Grinnell Fire Protection acquired Stop Fire and McKinnon assumed the role of residential division manager for the Grinnell 42 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

San Francisco branch. In 1996, McKinnon founded Aegis Fire Systems, Inc., a full-service fire protection firm serving the San Francisco Greater Bay area. Today, Aegis is one of the largest and most recognized merit shop contractors in Northern California. McKinnon serves as AFSA Region 1 Director, chair of the Budget & Finance Committee, and a committee member of AFSA’s Apprenticeship & Education Committee. In addition to national involvement, McKinnon has and continues to serve on the California State Fire Marshal’s Automatic Extinguishing Systems (AES) Advisory Committee and work groups. Region 2 Director is R. Donald Kaufman, president of Kaufman Fire Protection, Albuquerque, New Mexico. With over 40 years in the sprinkler business, Kaufman was instrumental in starting AFSA’s New Mexico Chapter and is a past president of the chapter. On the national level, Kaufman served as 2009-2011 Chairman of the Board and has chaired several committees including the Apprentice & Education and Convention Committees. He also served as chairman of the New Mexico State Board for Professional Engineers and Surveyors, three terms as chairman of the New Mexico State Apprentice Council, and currently serves on the New Mexico Construction Industries Commission. He is an active member of Associated Builders & Contractors (ABC), past president of ABC’s New Mexico Chapter, member of the American Society of Professional Estimators, and past charter president of Albuquerque Rotary Del Sol. Region 3 Director Rod DiBona is the vice president and partowner of Rapid Fire Protection with their corporate offices in Rapid City, South Dakota. They currently have satellite offices in North Dakota, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. DiBona entered the fire protection industry in 1990 as a shop employee of Prairie Fire Protection. He then entered the AFSA apprenticeship


McKinnon

Kaufman

DiBona

program in 1991 and started working in the field. In October of 1993 he was asked by Marty Hammon to join him, his son and son-in-law to create Rapid Fire Protection. DiBona was a national finalist in the AFSA apprenticeship contest in 1995. DiBona started and has continued to grow Rapid Fire’s apprenticeship training into a highly recognized program. Rapid Fire has had 17 national finalists, three AFSA national winners and one ABC national apprentice winner. DiBona currently serves on the board of directors for Rapid Fire, and he also serves on the AFSA Apprenticeship & Education Committee, Membership Committee, Insurance and Safety Committee, and Contractors Support and Advisory Committee. He is a NICET Level III Certified Engineering Technician in Water-Based Systems Layout. Region 4 Director is Dwight E. Bateman, founder and president of Southeast Fire Protection, Inc. in Houston, and past chairman of the Board. Beginning his career as vice president of Semico International, Inc., a fire sprinkler contractor, Bateman has 40-plus years of experience in the industry. He opened Southeast Fire Protection in 1986 and joined AFSA in 1989. Bateman has served on and chaired a number of AFSA national committees. Region 5 Director Jeff Phifer is president of Crawford Sprinkler Co. of South Carolina, based in Lugoff, South Carolina, one of the oldest family-owned and continuously operated fire sprinkler contractors in the nation. Phifer has been working at Crawford for 40 years, working as a fitter, service technician, and in administration. In 1999, he became the third generation to be president and chairman of the board. Phifer was on the board of directors of the South Carolina Fire Sprinkler Association from 2000-2009, serving as president from 2003-2006. He is also a member of ABC and was a member of the board of directors for the ABC Carolinas Chapter from 2001-2004, vice-chairing the chapter in 2003. Region 6 Director and Chairman of the Board is Michael F. Meehan, senior vice president and a co-owner of VSC Fire & Security, Virginia Beach, Virginia. As Board chairman, Meehan also chairs the AFSA Executive Committee. A 1981 graduate from George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, Meehan began his fire sprinkler career working summers as a pipe fitter apprentice. He is a NICET Level IV Certified Engineering Technician in Water-Based (formerly Automatic Sprinkler) Systems Layout and has more than 35 years’ experience in sprinkler design engineering, estimating, project management and senior management. Meehan has served on

Bateman

Phifer

DeLorie

the AFSA Board of Directors since 2008, as the Region 6 Director. On January 1, 2017, Meehan will be named president of VSC Fire & Security. Region 7 Director Paul DeLorie is senior vice president of Hampshire Fire Protection Co., based in Londonderry, New Hampshire. Hampshire Fire Protection is one of the largest merit shop fire sprinkler companies in New England. DeLorie is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire. He has over 30 years’ experience in sprinkler design, estimating, sales, project management and senior management. He serves on the AFSA Contractor Support & Advisory Committee, Insurance & Safety Committee, and Legislative Committee. He is an active member of the ABC. He was a member of the board of directors of the ABC New Hampshire/Vermont Chapter from 2002-2012, serving as chapter chairman in 2007, and an ABC National board director from 2008-2012. At-Large Directors Donald G. Albares, vice president of American Sprinkler Co., Inc. in Harahan, Louisiana, started his career in the fabrication shop at the age of 13. After attending the University of South Alabama on a baseball scholarship, he began as an apprentice fitter. As past president of the Louisiana Fire Sprinkler Association and an active member of ABC, Albares worked jointly for two years with the state chapters of ABC and AFSA to get the AFSA apprenticeship program recognized by the state of Louisiana. He has served on several AFSA national committees including Contractor Support & Advisory, Convention, Legislative, and Membership. He also sits on the Louisiana ABC’s Legislative Review Committee, and was Chairman of the Insurance Committee for many years, ending his tenure with that committee in 2016. At-Large Director and Secretary Linda M. Biernacki is founder and president of Fire Tech Systems, Inc. in Shreveport, Louisiana. She has served on the AFSA Board of Directors since 2007, holding the office of secretary, and chaired the 2016 Convention Committee. With over 26 years of experience in all phases of business, she is certified by the Women’s Business Council Gulf Coast. She holds NICET Level IV, Senior Fire Protection Engineering Technology Water-Based Systems Layout and represents AFSA on the NFPA 232 Committee for Protection of Records. The Louisiana state fire marshal appointed Biernacki to the state’s Residential Task Force, and the mayor of Shreveport appointed her to the city’s Architectural and Engineering Selection Committee. Biernacki is president of the Louisiana Fire Sprinkler Association, which won the AFSA 2016 OutSprinkler Age | November/December 2016

43


standing Chapter of the Year award. The Governor of Louisiana appointed her to the Small Business Entrepreneurship Commission, and she has received numerous leadership awards from her community; the Greater Shreveport Chamber of Commerce Small Business of the Year Award 2015, 2014 and 2004, Better Business Bureau Torch Award, and Women in Construction Region 5 Crystal Vision Award. Fire Tech Systems, Inc. has earned the AFSA Quality Contractor designation and is one of the first to attain Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) Residential Fire Sprinkler Contractor Accreditation. At-Large Director Lyle Hall, vice president and co-owner of Western Fire Protection in Poway, California, has been in the fire sprinkler industry for 36 years, with the last 20 years at Western Fire. Prior to that he was a helicopter-based wildland firefighter for the U.S. Forest Service. He has a degree in fire science with continuing education at University of California San Diego. Hall started in the fire sprinkler industry as an apprentice pipe fitter and worked his way into design, project management, sales and eventually management. His past accomplishments include: past board of director for the San Diego Fire Protection Association; past chapter chairman of the San Diego Chapter of the AFSA; past chairman of the California American Fire Sprinkler Association – Unilateral Apprenticeship Committee; and past chairman of the California Fire Training Alliance. Hall currently serves on the California American Fire Sprinkler Association – Unilateral Apprenticeship Committee and the AFSA Legislation, Contractor Support and Convention Committees. He also co-chairs the Apprenticeship & Education Committee and is the chairman on the subcommittee to develop AFSA’s new Inspector Development Training program. At-Large Director and newly-elected Treasurer Jack A. Medovich, P.E., is senior vice president and founding partner of Fire & Life Safety America, formerly known as East Coast Fire Protection Inc., in Hanover, Maryland. A 1983 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Fire Protection Engineering, Medovich served three years as fire marshal of Fairfax County, Virginia, before joining the fire sprinkler industry 30 years ago. He has been active in AFSA since 1991, chairing its Chesapeake Bay Chapter from 1994 to 2002 and currently chairing the Virginia Chapter and its board of directors. He has served on several AFSA committees, including Apprenticeship & Education, Membership, Legislative, and Convention. He chaired the 2010 Convention Committee and has previously chaired the Fire Sprinkler Public Education & Awareness Committee. He represents AFSA on the Sprinkler System Discharge Committee of NFPA 13, and in the past he has served as a member of the following NFPA committees: NFPA 14, 20, 25, 101 and 750. At-Large Director and First Vice Chairman Wayne Weisz started his career as an apprentice in 1979 and worked his way up through the ranks to foreman and later general superintendent at American Fire Systems in Lodi, California. In 1986, Weisz and his brother Byron founded Cen-Cal Fire Systems, Inc. in Lodi, California, and in 1997 he established D-M Fabrication, an independent pipe fabricator serving the western U.S., which later sold to a national supplier. Cen-Cal Fire Systems became 44 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

an AFSA member in 1987, and Weisz has been on the AFSA national Board since 2005. He has twice served as chairman of the Convention Committee and Albares Hall has chaired the Membership/Chapter Development Committee since 2008. Weisz is actively involved in the AFSA Sacramento Valley Chapter, which he helped to establish in 1999. He has been very involved with apprenticeship issues in California and served on CAFSA’s California Apprenticeship Training Board for over 20 years, including two terms as its chairman. At-Large Director and Second Vice Chairman Ted Wills, Anchor Fire Protection Company, Perkiomenville, Pennsylvania, was an active member of AFSA in its early years. He previously served on the AFSA Board of Directors from 1987-1993 and chaired the Convention Committee in 1990 and 1991. He currently chairs the Legislative Committee. A graduate of Waynesburg College, Wills began his fire sprinkler industry career in 1978, when he started a fire protection division as part of his father’s mechanical company. The division flourished, and in 1981, Wills and his father incorporated that division into Anchor Fire Protection. Wills is an active member in ABC and a partner in G&T Properties, a real estate development company, and serves on the advisory board of QNB Corp., a regional banking concern. Immediate Past Chairman of the Board Joseph A. Heinrich, president of Bamford Fire Sprinkler Co., Salina and Shawnee Mission, Kansas, entered the industry as a fitter after college in 1972 and has nearly 40 years of experience in design, estimating, sales and administration. His company joined AFSA in 1982, and he has served on the AFSA Board since 2004. Heinrich has been involved in a number of AFSA committees and has served as chairman of the Bylaws, Legislative, and Contractors Support & Advisory committees. He has been actively involved in updates of the apprentice training modules and has served as a judge for the National Apprentice Competition for several years. Heinrich has also served on the Board of Directors and serves on the board of the Center for Life Safety Education (CLSE), a nonprofit 501(c)(3) educational affiliate of AFSA. In addition to his AFSA involvement, Heinrich is a longtime member of Associated Builders & Contractors (ABC) and served a term as president of its Kansas Sunflower Chapter. Conclusion AFSA’s Board of Directors is committed to the continuance of the merit shop philosophy, the promotion of property and life safety through the use of automatic fire protection, and the continued development of training for fire sprinkler fitters, layout technicians, inspectors and management. AFSA members are encouraged to voice any questions, concerns or suggestions with any member of the Board or staff. If you have a question or comment, please select the member you wish to contact from the list located in the front of every issue of Sprinkler Age or on the AFSA website, firesprinkler.org. n


STEVE A. MUNCY, CAE Thank you for your 28 years of service and dedication to AFSA.


M/S Council Elects New Members An Exemplary Committee Grows Even Stronger The American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) Manufacturers/Suppliers (M/S) Council recently made a few changes to its membership. Mike Dooley of FlexHead Industries in Holliston, Massachusetts was re-elected to serve a three-year term, and Ray Fremont, Jr. of General Air Products, Inc. in Exton, Pennsylvania will replace Debbie Bien of Quality Fabrication & Supply in Sanford, Florida. Bien was elected to the M/S Council in 1996, and is the only woman to have ever served on the Council. After serving 20 successful years on the Council, Bien is stepping down in December of 2016. “I have had the true honor of serving on the M/S Council for 20 years,” says Bien. “I have so enjoyed the networking with my fellow suppliers and manufacturers – relationships I will never forget. I will truly miss my involvement with AFSA; my committee work, my relationships, the conventions and the fact that this industry is just the best – saving lives and property!”

persons serving in these positions may represent any supplier or manufacturer company that includes, but is not limited to, suppliers, other manufacturers, or Debbie Bien is retiring from the M/S Council this year. manufacturer’s representatives as long as the company is an AFSA member in good standing. The Council, established in 1983, is a national council representing member companies who produce fire sprinkler system components and supply materials and services to the industry. The M/S Council was created to represent the interests of all associate members that make and supply products in the industry, and assist AFSA’s Board of Directors in meeting the goals of AFSA.

Ray Fremont, Jr. is more than thrilled to be stepping onto the M/S Council. “It’s an honor for me to be elected to the M/S Council,” says Fremont. “General Air Products has been a member of AFSA since the early 1980s. We fully recognize the important place this council holds in the industry. I hope, with the experience I’ve had, to be able contribute in a very positive way.”

The chairman of the M/S Council, Tim Freiner of Potter Electric Signal Company in St. Louis, Missouri, is excited for the changes that are coming to the council next year. “The commitment of the members has been tremendous and I couldn’t be more appreciative of their hard work,” says Freiner. “In particular, I would like to congratulate Mike Dooley of FlexHead on his re-election and welcome newly elected Ray Fremont, Jr. of General Air Products.

The M/S Council is comprised of both appointed and elected representatives. Each appointed individual device manufacturing company that holds AFSA membership at level A-6 or above is allowed one seat, with the representative to be appointed by the individual company. There are seven elected representatives, and

Freiner continues: “On behalf of the M/S Council, I would also like to congratulate Debbie Bien of Quality Fabrication on her retirement and thank her for her 20 years of service and dedication to the AFSA. Debbie has been a great colleague and an absolute joy to work with. She will be missed!”

46 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

The 2016/2017 M/S Council members are: Chairman Tim Freiner of Potter Electric Signal Company, St. Louis, Missouri; Vice Chairman Randy Lane of Globe Fire Sprinkler Corporation, Standish, Michigan; Derek Allen of HD Supply Fire Protection, Hayward, California; Mike Bosma of The Viking Corporation, Hastings, Michigan; Luke Connery of Tyco Building & Fire Products, Gem Sprinkler Company, Cranston, Rhode Island; Mike Dooley of Flexhead Industries, Holliston, Massachusetts; Michael Fee of Reliable Automatic Sprinkler Co., Elmsford, New York; Chuck Kitts of System Sensor, Lansdale, Pennsylvania; Michael Mottice of Tyco Building & Fire Products, Lansdale, Pennsylvania; Bill Phair of Ferguson Fire & Fabrication, Passaic, New Jersey; Ray Fremont, Jr. of General Air Products, Inc., Exton, Pennsylvania; Phil Schechinger of Anvil International, Exeter, New Jersey; Chris Stason of Victaulic Company, Temecula, California; and Joe Tieman of Tyco Building & Fire Products, Central Sprinkler Company, Hillard, Ohio. All association members are encouraged to contact M/S Council representatives if they have any questions or ideas about activities of the AFSA. If you are interested in becoming more involved with AFSA, the M/S Council greatly encourages you to do so! Consider investing in the future of your industry by getting more actively involved. Consider the time and financial commitment required to attend meetings and work on the programs of the Association. Association members interested in serving on the M/S Council, should contact AFSA Senior Director of Convention & Meetings Marlene Garrett, M/S Council staff liaison, at mgarrett@ firesprinkler.org or visit firesprinkler.org. n


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Quality Contractor Recognition Awarded AFSA Recognizes Carolina Fire Protection and Southeast Fire Protection The American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) has awarded Quality Contractor recognition to Carolina Fire Protection, Dunn, North Carolina and Southeast Fire Protection, Houston, Texas. The Quality Contractor (QC) program was launched to publicly recognize and honor fire sprinkler contracting firms that have documented their commitment in four key areas of corporate responsibility: safety, training, quality of life (employee benefits) and industry and community relations. A company that meets the criteria set forth in the program is formally designated a “Quality Contractor” by AFSA. “Congratulations to both Jeffery Dunn of Carolina Fire Protection and Dwight Bateman of Southeast Fire Protection for putting in the time and effort to receive Quality Contractor Recognition,” says AFSA’s Director of Member Services Bradley Elliott. “They and their employees have shown that they meet the highest industry standards as verified by AFSA.” In addition to national and local recognition and promotion, contractors that receive this designation are allowed to use the QC recognition logo in bid documents, letterhead, business cards, brochures and jobsite signs. Quality Contractor members may also use the program as a human resources tool by featuring the designation in job advertisements, including it as part of the employee handbook and using it to develop benchmarks in quality, safety, education, employee benefits, industry image and community 48 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

activities. Other benefits include improved company morale and productivity and proof of having met highest industry standards. The Quality Contractor Recognition Award remains in effect for three years from the date the recognition is awarded. Carolina Fire Protection, Inc. is a full-service fire sprinkler contracting company that sells, designs, installs, services, repairs, and inspects all types of fire sprinkler systems. The company is fully licensed for fire sprinkler system work in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. “We are really excited about the recognition by AFSA as a Quality Contractor,” says Jeffrey Dunn, owner of Carolina Fire Protection. “We plan to use this distinction as a marketing tool and to help set us apart from the competition when negotiating with customers to secure contracts. AFSA has high expectations for the Quality Contractors and we will maintain the level of commitment and attention to detail necessary to meet those expectations.” Southeast Fire Protection has been helping protect people and property in southeast Texas since 1986, offering a broad range of life-safety systems and service programs designed to meet the specific needs of each facility and its occupants.

“The Quality Contractor recognition is an acknowledgement of what Southeast Fire Protection has been able to do for our employees and the benefits we offer our employees,” says Dwight Bateman, founder and president of Southeast Fire Protection. “We’re proud that we’ve gotten this recognition and of what we’ve given back to the community.” AFSA’s QC recognition program is similar to programs developed by other industry trade groups that reward their members who pursue a higher level of professionalism and is not an accreditation or certification program. When you achieve AFSA QC recognition, your company is no longer just a contractor; your AFSA QC recognition gives you a tangible, marketable asset to grow your business. You can prove you have met the highest industry standards and have been verified by a leading national trade association. To learn more and to download the QC application, visit firesprinkler.org/qualitycontractor. n EDITOR’S NOTE: AFSA Quality Contractor recognition does not mean that the business’ products or services have been evaluated or endorsed by AFSA, or that AFSA has made a determination as to the business’ product quality or competency in performing services. Businesses are under no obligation to seek AFSA recognition.


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DeCamara Scholarships Awarded for 2016 Chin, Doermann Recognized for Achievements Each year, the Center for Life Safety Education (CLSE) and the American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) come together to award $7,000 in scholarship funds to two exceptional students studying fire protection engineering at the University of Maryland in College Park. For the 2016-2017 academic year, those winners are Selena Chin and Jessica Doermann. Selena Chin is the 2016 first-place winner, receiving a $4,000 scholarship. She is a member of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers (SFPE) and the Society of Women Engineers and finds these clubs provide good outreach and networking opportunities.

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“Because outreach was such an integral part of me declaring fire protection as my major, I have also volunteered as part of outreach for fire protection engineering. At my Chin high school, I volunteer on a panel for their Student Women Engineers Club where I talked about my major in particular, but also answered any questions on the engineer school or college life in general. I also help the fire protection department out for Maryland Day.” Chin studied abroad at the Danish Technical University in Denmark and

interned two summers at Northrop Grumman in its Environmental Health, Safety and Fire Protection sector. “Being ambitious is part of who I am; I take advantage of every opportunity I am presented with and am not satisfied unless I give 110 percent,” Chin says. Chin has also done research while at the university. “Taking up research was an easy decision for me because not only did it allow me to explore the different paths of fire protection, but it also ultimately allows me to make a valuable contribution to the fire protection community,” she states.

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Chin became interested in engineering in high school and chose the fire protection field once she visited the University of Maryland and the department’s informational table at Maryland Day. “ ... I really liked the life-safety aspect of the field because helping people was one of the reasons why I wanted to be an engineer. ... My experiences in research and internships have only increased my passion for studying fire protection.” Chin’s instructors describe her as being “intelligent” and “thoughtful,” and “extremely qualified.” Her professors comment she is always at the top of the class and that she is an excellent student, at times challenging herself with harder coursework than required.

passion for fire protection with prospective students, “encouraging them to become the next generation of fire protection innovators and life savers.” Doermann’s professors describe her as “energetic, well-spoken, and highly committed to fire protection engineering.” The American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) established the Philip L. DeCamara, Jr. Scholarship in 1984, to honor a man who used his creative talents during his lifetime to advance the goals of the fire sprinkler industry.

Today, the scholarship is sponsored jointly by AFSA and CLSE. The annual scholarship is awarded to students majoring in the fire protection engineering program at the University of Maryland, DeCamara’s alma mater. The DeCamara scholarship is funded through donations by individuals and companies. AFSA and CLSE thank those who have supported the Philip L. DeCamara Jr. Scholarship with their donations. To find out more about the scholarship programs, or to support these scholarships with your tax-deductible donation, visit CLSE.org. n

Second-place winner Jessica Doermann feels “lucky” to have found the fire protection engineering department. “ ... It has become my home. It has been through this department that I have met most of my friends, joined extracurricular activities and found my internships.” Doermann is an active member of SFPE, Alpha Omega Epsilon engineering sorority, A. James Clark School of Engineering ambassadors, and the College Doermann Park, Maryland Volunteer Fire Department. Serving as a volunteer EMT/firefighter at the fire department has allowed Doermann to learn about the “other side” of fire protection.

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Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

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Spot the Dot Part 2: Continuing With the Z Dimension STEVEN SCANDALIATO, S.E.T., C.F.P.S | SDG, LLC

That’s right… you read the last paragraph of my previous article in the September/October 2016 issue of Sprinkler Age correctly (see page 44 of that issue). Sensitivity and discharge are not equal in the eyes of the hazard. Oh sure, we use them together in our everyday conversations. Even Chapter 8 of NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinklers, starts off by saying that sprinklers shall be spaced with regard to sensitivity and distribution. Sure, these are both important characteristics of fire sprinkler systems. So, where is the rub? What’s the big deal? Why do I think we need to separate these two characteristics and prove their inequality? Well, to answer that let me ask you a question. Why do we consistently have issues with Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJs) and other approving entities when it comes to interpreting this chapter? Why does every sprinkler association and NFPA get hundreds, if not thousands, of questions every year from practitioners and AHJs alike, asking for informal and/or formal interpretations regarding where you put the dot? Why the constant struggle with interpreting the rules of Chapter 8? Well, I’ll tell you why… money! That’s right… money! I bet you thought it was going to be something deep and technical, even philosophical. But, alas, grandma was right! Money is the root of all [fire sprinkler] evil. Now, while I am incredibly tempted to dive into the entire subject of contracting at this point, I will exercise self-discipline, invoke every ounce of energy I have, and focus on the topic at hand. I told you that sensitivity and discharge are not equal. And I can prove it. But, more importantly, I want you to understand why this is such an important concept to grasp, especially when interpreting and applying these (sometimes ridiculous) rules. Almost always, when teaching a new class, I start off by asking the question, “What are the two things that fire sprinklers do?” After the brief pause that everyone takes to evaluate if this is a trick question, someone will speak up and say “spray water.” Good answer. Yes, fire sprinklers spray water. That’s one thing they do. But what else? What is the second thing they do? What else happens as a result of them spraying water? Is it just about water hitting the floor? Sure, the water spray will pre-wet areas around the fire helping prevent or retard its growth, but what else is happening? I would even argue that it is even more important than the water hitting the floor! Give up? Okay, I’ll tell you…cooling! Yes, cooling! And in our world of light and ordinary hazard occupancies, the act of cooling is more important than water hitting the floor. This is not obvious at first glance or even the one hundredth glance. You have to be looking for it to see it. 52 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Now, for some of you the idea of water not hitting the floor may be a new concept for you to consider or you may flat out disagree, which is okay because I am Sicilian and I learned at an early age that it takes some non-Sicilian people a little longer to catch on to new ideas sometimes. All I ask at this point is that you keep reading and hear me out before you decide to jump to the next article in this magazine. Let me break this down more. Proving my point begins in the building codes, not NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems. The majority of the occupied space in the United States is light and ordinary hazard. That being the case, proving the hierarchy of sensitivity over discharge begins with where or what we use to identify these hazard levels. While most of us “dot spotters” started in the business by being handed a red book and told to learn it, most of us rarely ventured out of this red book. Why would we? Everything we need with regard to spotting the dot is in NFPA 13, so reading any other code or standard would be a waste of time since the majority of those “other” standards reference NFPA 13 anyway. There are two major building codes in the United States now, those being NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code, and the International Building Code (IBC), published by International Code Council. While there are several jurisdictions in the world that use NFPA 5000, the most popular ascribed to here in the United States is the IBC. All buildings that require a permit to be built are going to fall under some type of minimum code or standard and, more often than not, it is IBC. Not to get any deeper into this code than necessary, realize that the use of this building code begins with defining the occupancy. Sound familiar? It should, because that is exactly the first step we take in fire suppression system design as well – defining the hazard. And once the occupancy is defined, you find that all of the rules regarding that occupancy are in the chapters to follow. Rules like construction type, occupancy limits for overall area and height, separation from other occupancy types, etc. As you go further in, you find rules and limits for egress and exiting, and fire protection systems as well. Now let me direct you to Chapter 3 of IBC which is the definitions chapter. Sound familiar? Yep, same as most every NFPA standard including 13… ironic for sure. You will see that each occupancy defined in this chapter is assigned a “Letter” designation. For example, the very first occupancy group defined is Assembly or “A” occupancy. There are several sub-categories for this occupancy (i.e., A1, A2, etc.). The next is “B” occupancies which represents “Business” occupancies and so on. Obviously,


TABLE 1004.1.2

MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA ALLOWANCES PER OCCUPANT reduced occupant load was permitted only through FUNCTION OF SPACE OCCUPANT LOAD FACTORa the variance process. With this exception, the buildthe letter designation coincides with the name of the occupancy ing official can make a determination if a design that Accessory storage areas, mechanical group for the most part. Once the user determines the occupancy, 300 gross would use chapters the actual occupant was permissible. equipment room the following outline the rules,load limitations and design The building official may want to create Agricultural building 300 gross guidelines allowed for each occupancy type. Therespecific are severalconditions for approval. For example, the building official Aircraft hangars 500 gross topics that could be written from this point on with regard to the could choose to permit the actual occupant load to be building code and fire sprinklers, but for the purpose of this Airport terminal utilized to determine the plumbing fixture count, but Baggage claim 20 gross article, I want to focusofonegress the occupancy load. Thatdesign; is to say, the not the means or sprinkler the Baggage handling 300 gross minimum number of people that the occupancy must be designed determination could be that the reduced occupant Concourse 100 gross toload or allowed in autilized given area specific occupancy group. may be in of a aspecific area, such as inThat’s the Waiting areas 15 gross right, sensitivity versus discharge has in everything to do with storage warehouse, but not the factory or how office Assembly many people are going to be the room.would be the potenareas. Another point to in consider Gaming floors (keno, slots, etc.) 11 gross tial of the space being utilized for different purposes Exhibit Gallery and Museum 30 net at different times, the potential of a future change Earlier, I said the codesorwould prove my point. This is where it Assembly with fixed seats See Section 1004.4 of tenancy theyou building happens. If youwithout look at knowledge Chapter 10 ofofIBC will finddepartthe Assembly without fixed seats ment.andAny special unique egress exiting rules ofconsiderations which occupancy for loadsuch is determined. Concentrated (chairs only-not fixed) 7 net uses must documented justified. Additionally, The egress andbe exiting systems areand designed and sized based in Standing space 5 net the owner must be aware that such special considerlarge part off the occupancy load (IBC 1004.1.2). There is a Unconcentrated (tables and chairs) 15 net ations will impact the future use of the building with minimum number of people that these systems must be respect to the means of egress and other protection Bowling centers, allow 5 persons for designed for of which can be augmented with the installation of features. each lane including 15 feet of runway, 7 net sprinklers of course. IBC Table 1004.1.2 displays the minimum and for additional areas TABLE 1004.1.1. See that nextmust column. square foot per person be used based on occupancy Business areas 100 gross ™type. Table establishes minimum occupant densiFor1004.1.2 example, for business areas the minimum is 100 ft2 per Courtrooms—other than fixed seating 40 net ties based the function actual of the person. But forona warehouse, it isor 500 ft2 peruse person. So, space what areas (notthis group thewemaxdoes haveclassification).The to do with sensitivity?table Well,presents this is where will Day care 35 net imum area allowance per find the floor disparity behind sensitivity andoccupant discharge. (i.e., occuDormitories 50 gross pant load factor) based on studies and counts of the Educational number of occupants in typical buildings. The use of Let’s start with a B or business occupancy for our example. What Classroom area this table, then, results in the minimum occupant load 20 net hazard level isrooms, a business occupancy NFPA 13? Formust most be Shops and other vocational room for which spaces andinthe building 50 net business occupancies, weassumed can say it isnormal considered a light hazard areas designed. While an occupancy may classification. That being the case, some of the rules by in Exercise rooms 50 gross be viewed as somewhat lesswhat thanare that determined NFPA 13 that are specific to the sprinklers we use in light the use of the table factors, such a normal occupant Group H-5 Fabrication and manufac200 gross hazard occupancies? Well, among several the onedesign I want you to turing areas load is not necessarily an appropriate criteget to isThe NFPA 13, section 8.3.3.1.toInthe general, sprinklersoccurs rion. greatest hazard occupants Industrial areas 100 gross when an unusually large crowdshall is be present. The code installed in light hazard occupancies fast response. Institutional areas does not we limit the occupant load response density but of an area, Commonly associate this with quick it can also 240 gross Inpatient treatment areas except as provided for in(control Section 1004.2, butapplicaonce mean residential, some CMSA mode sprinkler Outpatient areas 100 gross the and occupant load is established, thesprinklers. means of Sleeping areas tion) ESFR (early suppression fast response) 120 gross egress be designed for at least that capacity. What doesmust fast response mean? Un-technically speaking, it If Kitchens, commercial 200 gross it is intended that the occupant load will exceed that means that while you may have two sprinklers side by side – one Library calculated in accordance with the table, then the isoccupant fast response andisone is standard – and they are both Reading rooms 50 net load to be based response on the estimated actual 165°F temperature sprinklers, the fast response will activate Stack area 100 gross number of people, but not to exceed the maximum before the standard response. Or in other words, the fast — covered and open See Section 402.8.2 Mall buildings allowance in accordance with Section 1004.2. Thereresponse sprinkler will load “feel”of thethe heat fasteror than the standard fore, the occupant office business areas Mercantile response will. Another way to look at it: if youishave copper in a storage warehouse or nightclub to two be deter60 gross Areas on other floors pots and using fill one the full and one halfload full and put most them on the stove mined occupant factor appropriBasement and grade floor areas 30 gross ate the to same that space—one for which each one 100boils square Storage, stock, shipping areas with amount of heatperson under each, first? 300 gross feet (9 m2the ) ofone gross floorHence, area. the “skinny” red glass bulb Obviously, half full. Parking garages 200 gross The netSame and red gross floor areassame as temperature defined in versus theuse “fat”ofone. color, meaning Residential 200 gross Chapter intended to quicker provide a refinement in the rating, just 2 oneiswill see 165°F than the other. Again, the Skating rinks, swimming pools occupant loadmeaning determination. gross floor area book says “shall,” mandatory.The So light hazard occupanRink and pool 50 gross technique applied to a building only allows the deduccies shall be fast response sprinklers. Decks 15 gross tion of the plan area of the exterior walls, vent shafts Stages and platforms 15 net and interior courts from the plan area of the building. Okay, now that with an “S”the occupancy fromofthe Warehouses 500 gross The netcontrast floor area permits exclusion certain building storagebe orincluded warehouseinoccupancy. normally spacescode: that awould the grossWe floor area. For SI: 1 square foot = 0.0929 m2. associate warehouse occupancies with “special” or extra The net floor area is intended to apply to the hazard actual a. Floor area in square feet per occupant. classifications. If you look at the occupancy load factor for that Figure 1. Table 1004.12. Excerpted from the 2012 International Building Code, ® typeINTERNATIONAL in Table 1004.4.2BUILDING you find CODE the minimum load to be 500 ft2 Copyright 2011. Washington, D.C.: International Code Council. Reproduced with COMMENTARY 10-11 2012 All on rights reserved. www.ICCSAFE.org Copyright load © 2011 ICC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Thomas Wellen Jun 13, 2013 11:05:24 AM pursuant to License Agreement with ICC. No further reproduction or per person. This means a warehouse is significantly lower Accessed to bypermission. distribution authorized. ANY UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION OR DISTRIBUTION IS A VIOLATION OF THE FEDERAL COPYRIGHT ACT AND THE LICENSE AGREEMENT, AND SUBJECT TO CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES THEREUNDER. Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016 53


and extra hazard is less people with a lot of stuff. But, more importantly is look at the sprinkler requirements! Light hazard (lots of people) shall have fast response sprinklers and extra hazard (lots of stuff) shall not have fast response sprinklers. Get it? There it is, we want fast response sprinklers or a higher level of sensitivity when we have lots of people and we want a lower level or, more prudently, a more deliberate level of sensitivity when we have lots of stuff but not a lot of people.

Figure 1. Pattern development 3 times rule.

that of business occupancy. And what does NFPA 13 say about the type of sprinklers that shall be used in warehouses with this type of hazard classification? That’s right… you shall not use fast response sprinklers! So, think about this with the characteristics of both these types of occupancies. In fact, if you look at this table with the hazard definitions side by side, you’ll find the correlation between these two documents, even though they were not necessarily written to work with each other. What you’ll find is that the occupancies that coincide with NFPA 13 for light hazard are occupancies that have very high occupancy loads and vice versa. Those occupancies that are high hazard occupancies if much lower occupancy loads. Another way to say this would be light hazard is a lot of people without a lot of stuff

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Visit firesprinkler.org to find answers to your questions. 54 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

So, to bring this back around full circle… now you see that NFPA 13, while certainly looking for both sensitivity (sprinkler activating within an acceptable time frame) and discharge (a decent and as unobstructed spray pattern as possible) certainly is more concerned about the sprinkler going off when it comes to occupancies with lots of people, than water on the floor. Why?... cooling. We want to keep the space tenable for as long as necessary to give this higher occupancy load a chance to exit. To further prove my point regarding the weight of sensitivity versus discharge, let’s look at a few of the obstruction rules (obstruction to spray pattern not obstructed construction) that show this imbalance even more. First, let’s be very clear the what is about to be discussed is with regard to light and ordinary hazards only! Don’t go running off and applying this to extra or special hazards because it is a different mind set when you get into these higher hazard occupancies. Those who know me know that my most favorite rule in all NFPA 13 is the one associated with distribution obstructions, commonly and lovingly known as “the 4-ft rule.” Paraphrased, this rule says, “thou shalt put a sprinkler under ‘anything’ that is greater than 48 inches in width.” Now, I would love to expound on where this rule originated, and if you want to know and you have 30 minutes, call me. I’ll be happy to tell you the story. Save it to say, the rule has been around since the 19th century edition of this standard! So, obviously, it has survived only because no one has died and no buildings have burned down due to a fire under an obstruction less than or equal to 4 feet, even though the rule is being applied way outside of the scope to which it was originally intended to be used. Be that as it may, in the world of codes and standards, this means the rule must be a good rule. This is why codes and standards always get bigger and not smaller. Keeping this in mind, let’s review the rules associated with the pattern development obstructions, commonly referred to as the “3 times rule.” Paraphrased, this rule says that an obstruction that is below the plane of the deflector but within 18-in. down from the plane of the deflector is considered a pattern development obstruction and must be a minimum of 3 times the greater dimension of the obstruction away from the deflector in order not to be considered an obstruction. The interesting part of this rule is that it stops after 24 inches (except for vertical obstructions added in the 2016 edition). That’s right, after you are more than 24 inches away from the object measured directly from the closest edge of the obstruction to the sprinkler deflector the rule stops, meaning NFPA 13 does not consider it to be significant enough to hinder the formation or adequacy of the sprinkler discharge. I prefer you just say, “It’s


not there!” Think about that a moment. Seriously. This is huge for inspectors if you would just stop and think about it for a moment. What this means is that, as you walk around during your rough-in or final acceptance testing looking at sprinkler locations and you see ducts, fixtures, structural components, etc. that are located around a sprinkler, you simply ask yourself: 1. “Is the obstruction within the first 18 inches down from the plane of the deflectors or the sweet spot?” 2. “If yes, then is it more than 24 inches away?” 3. “If yes, then poof… it’s not there!” and go onto the next sprinkler. If it is less than 24 inches, then time to gear up and get your tape measure out or have the fitter get on a lift and spot check those for compliance with the 3 times rule. I think you’ll find that your degree of accuracy for these all-important inspections will step up tenfold just by memorizing this pattern development rule. (See Figure 1 on page 54.) But, now comes the best part. By combining the 4-ft rule (discharge obstruction) with the 3 times rule (pattern development) you will see the imbalance or weight of importance that is placed on these two sprinkler characteristics. If we have an HVAC duct that is 48-in. wide (not greater than 4 ft) and all or a portion of it penetrates our sweet zone or 18-in. sensitivity zone below the plane of the deflector, the top of which is not higher than the plane of the deflector, meaning we can throw water over the top and under the bottom of it and it is 25 in. away? That’s right, it is not there! Our own NFPA 13 rules are telling us to what degree or level of significance discharge or water on the floor is when it comes to light and ordinary hazard occupancies. Obviously, there is going to be a shadow on the floor. But, because it is (shall be) a fast response sprinkler, its sensitivity will be the life saver. Given this occupancy full of people has obstructions to spray patterns does not mean my life is at risk. As long as the sprinklers are installed in the Z dimension correctly, the mere activation of the sprinkler is going to begin the process of cooling and pre-wetting, whereby the fire growth is retarded, allowing the occupant-loaded space ample time for safely exiting as well as time for the fire department to arrive with their big, strong firemen carrying big hoses to actually extinguish the fire. This is why I am making the point that maybe we spend our time together passionately discussing the sensitivity of a sprinkler in a certain location rather than the whether or not water is going to make it to the floor. Again, light and ordinary hazards.

matter what capacity your involvement is with spotting the dot, make sure you can recognize the construction definition and sleep well knowing that you paid attention to the Z dimension, giving all of us the best possible chance for the sprinkler to activate when needed. n ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Steven Scandaliato is executive principal and managing director at SDG, LLC. He has over 35 years’ experience in fire protection engineering, design and project management covering all types of fire protection and life safety systems. He serves on the Technical Advisory Committee for the American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) and represents AFSA as a member of the NFPA 13, 101 and 5000 committees. Nationally recognized, Scandaliato has become one of the most popular and sought after speakers on fire and life safety systems in the United States. He is published in several periodicals including articles for the NFPA Journal, Fire Marshals Quarterly and American Society of Plumbing Engineers. He is also a contributing author to the text published by NFPA/ SFPE titled “A Designers Guide to Automatic Sprinkler Systems.” Over the last 18 years, he has presented seminars to thousands in contracting and professional associations including AFSA, the American Society of Plumbing Engineers, the American Institute of Architects, SFPE, the American Society of Sanitary Engineering and the International Fire Marshals Association. Scandaliato is a member of AFSA, NFPA, and SFPE. IMPORTANT NOTICE: The article and its content is not a Formal Interpretation issued pursuant to NFPA Regulations. Any opinion expressed is the personal opinion of the author and presenter and does not necessarily present the official position of the NFPA and its Technical Committee. EDITOR’S NOTE: Part 1 of this article appeared in the September/October 2016 issue of Sprinkler Age.

For sure, great care should be applied to obstructions to spray pattern in the higher hazards. In fact, many a test has been conducted proving the failure of sprinklers, even big bad K25s, etc., in warehouse hazards with the spray pattern of just one sprinkler being obstructed by the bottom chord of an open web bar joist, prompting special rules for storage and higher hazard sprinkler applications. So, again, here is the challenge. We all want to save lives and property. But recognize that those goals are weighted with guidance based on occupancy (determined by the building code) and associated hazard (determined by NFPA 13). Hence, no Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

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Held Receives Thomas S. Waller Scholarship OSU Junior Named 2016 Recipient Gregory Held, a junior majoring in Fire Protection & Safety Technology at Oklahoma State University (OSU), has received the $4,000 2016 Thomas S. Waller Memorial Scholarship from the Center for Life Safety Education (CLSE). Held has worked full-time in the fire protection field, learning the ins and outs of installation and design. He even attended AFSA’s Beginning Fire Sprinkler System Planning School in 2013! Held is currently maintaining a 4.0 major GPA and a 3.6 cumulative GPA. “I became interested in the fire protection industry after a friend of mine who worked in the industry told me of his job,” comments Held. “I was working various ‘jobs’ and was looking to begin a career. I began in the installation aspect of the industry, focusing on new construction. After about a year in that area, I switched to the service side. I enjoyed seeing and learning about different systems and their applications. Held continues: “I continued to change locations and companies to gain different insights and knowledge of the sprinkler industry. After injuring myself, I decided to seek out a pathway to continue in the industry without the physical aspect. I decided to enroll in the AFSA design school and to try to obtain a job in design. I had a difficult time obtaining a job in design due to my lack of secondary education, which led me to seek out a fire protection engineering degree. “Winning the Thomas S. Waller Scholarship means a great deal to me,” comments Held. “It will not only have a financial impact for my education, but it will have a lasting impact on my future career in the fire protection industry. Upon completing my degree, I hope to obtain a job with the U.S. National Park Service. I would like to help to protect our national treasures.” The scholarship was established in 2005 to honor the man who devoted more than 40 years to the fire protection industry. The scholarship is presented to juniors or seniors enrolled in the Fire Protection & Safety Technology (FPST) program in the College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology at OSU, which is the oldest fire and safety-related program in North America and is the nation’s only ABET-accredited FPST program. 56 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Dr. Sam Wang (right) presents the 2016 Thomas S. Waller Memorial Scholarship to Gregory Held.

“Greg has an excellent academic record and an intense interest in fire protection engineering,” comments Dr. Sam Wang, associate professor of fire protection and safety at OSU. “I found him to be responsible and more interested in what he can learn rather than looking for a way to do the minimum requirement.” The scholarship is funded through donations by individuals and companies. As CLSE is a 501(c)(3) educational affiliate of AFSA, all contributions made to this scholarship fund are tax-deductible. To find out more about the scholarship program, make a one-time donation, or become a regular donor, visit clse.org/scholarships.htm. n


Scholarship Program Helps Students Succeed Raising Awareness About Sprinklers D’ARCY MONTALVO | American Fire Sprinkler Association

The American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) is proud to offer financial assistance and public awareness of sprinklers through its online scholarship program, AFSAscholarship. org. A total of $25,000 is awarded through this public awareness campaign to 10 lucky graduating high school seniors and five college students as they pursue their higher education goals. Since its creation in 1996, the AFSA Scholarship Contest has sought to promote the scholarship outside of the fire sprinkler industry in the hope of reaching students who may otherwise never have recognized the importance of automatic fire protection. Now entering its 21st year, the AFSA scholarship continues to grow, attracting over 350,000 unique visitors to its website. “AFSA and its Public Education & Awareness Committee is pleased to offer these scholarships,” comments AFSA At-Large Region Director Jack Medovich, chairman of the committee. “We created this program to reach thousands with the message that fire sprinklers save lives and property and we are achieving that goal while helping students pursue their dreams.” Scholarships for Seniors For the high school senior contest, applicants must be a current high school senior planning to attend an accredited U.S. college, university or trade school in the coming fall. Applicants are required to read a passage about fire sprinklers – which describes their history, how they operate to save lives and property, and the types of careers that are available in the industry – and take a 10-question reading comprehension test. For each question answered correctly, the student receives one entry into a drawing for one of ten $2,000 scholarships. A total of 10 entries per applicant into the drawing are possible. The winners were randomly selected from 43,149 students who entered to receive a one-time $2,000 AFSA scholarship payable to their respective college, university or trade school. The 10 national winners for 2016 are: Ayo Dada, Houston, Texas; Travis Gylling, Cle Elum, Washington; Aribelys Hernandez, Brooklyn, New York; Brianne Hood, Omaha, Nebraska; Ihotu Ijaola, High Point, North Carolina; JoonBum Kim, Vancouver, Washington; Abigail Krafsig, Manassas Park, Virginia; Sydney Mercier, Wethersfield, Connecticut; Rachel Wei, West Hills, California; and Kendra Williams, East Lansdowne, Pennsylvania.

Winner Aribelys Hernandez is majoring in law at New York City College of Technology (CUNY) in Brooklyn, New York. “I did not know much about fire sprinklers before I entered this contest,” comments Hernandez. “Not many individuals know that they can save thousands of lives and billions of dollars that are lost to fire each year by installing sprinklers in homes.” Scholarship recipient Abigail Krafsig heard about AFSA’s contest from an interesting source: a previous AFSA scholarship contest winner who was her Government teacher. “My Government teacher had entered when she was in high school and she was telling us about random scholarships that people don’t really know about and she told us about this one, so when I got home that day I did it. When I got the email about winning the scholarship, I had actually forgotten about it so it was an awesome surprise,” Krafsig recalls. Krafsig’s government teacher was Kate Darlington and she was glad to hear that Krafsig had won. “Like so many high school seniors, I applied for every scholarship available, but this one has always stuck with me,” remembers Darlington. “While I unfortunately did not win, I remember my twin sister and I applying for it, and because of its simplicity I encouraged all of my seniors to apply. I am so glad that Abby won, she was my hardest worker and a strong leader in our class.” Krafsig is now majoring in bioengineering at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Before entering the contest, she knew a little about the history and use of fire sprinklers. Now she knows they are “more helpful than I thought and are actually life-saving things.” She also reports: “$2,000 is exactly what I needed to finish paying for this semester. My family really needs this and we are only able to take my payments semester by semester and this scholarship was a perfect fit. I am so grateful to your foundation.” Winner Travis Gylling is attending the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. He is majoring in commercial Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

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aviation with the goal of becoming an airline pilot. He heard about AFSA’s contest from his high school guidance counselor, and was happy to learn it was open to anyone pursuing a secondary education. “My prior knowledge [about fire sprinklers] was minimal. I was aware that many buildings are fitted with sprinkler systems, but I did not know to what extent. I knew some contained water and others were ‘dry’ until they were activated by a fire alarm,” says Gylling. “This scholarship has definitely shed light on this technology. Fire sprinkler systems are something we shouldn’t take for granted.” He continues: “Fire sprinklers are a crucial part of safety in our world. Safety isn’t just a slogan. I find myself looking for sprinklers in buildings whereas I would never have given them a second thought. I also hope that young people realize all of the different career paths that focus on or involve sprinklers. There are a lot of opportunities awaiting recent high school graduates.” While AFSA’s scholarship provides financial support to Gylling, he adds that it’s actually more than just that. “Since receiving your scholarship I have conversed with a handful of people about fire sprinklers’ importance. I have insight into fire protection because I applied for the AFSA scholarship,” he says. “Perhaps I will have input into plans for a new building at an airport someday – making certain sprinkler systems are integrated and carefully selected.” Sydney Mercier is attending the University of Hartford in West Hartford, Connecticut, majoring in elementary education. She heard about the contest through her mom’s Facebook page. “The only thing I knew about fire sprinklers before I entered this contest was that fire sprinklers go off when there is a fire,” Mercier comments. “Now that I know more about fire sprinklers I believe they are very important because they reduce the risk of death. I am so thankful for this scholarship from AFSA.” Winner Brianne Hood was searching online for scholarships and found AFSA’s high school contest. “I knew that fire sprinklers were very important in the process of alerting others of a fire in a building. I also knew that fire sprinklers help aide firefighters because the sprinklers can alleviate the strength and intensity of the fire,” says Hood. “Fire sprinklers are very important to have because it provides great proactive fire protection. I strongly believe that fire sprinklers are one way to save lives because they rapidly alert people about a fire in a building, which allows them to escape before it is too late.” She continues: “This scholarship will help me achieve my education and career goals by assisting in paying for my first year textbooks and tuition.” 58 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Second Chance Scholarships Applicants for the second chance contest must reside in the United States, hold a High School Diploma, GED or equivalent, and be enrolled at or accepted to a college/university or certified trade school. The winners of this scholarship were randomly selected from 38,518 students who entered to receive a one-time AFSA scholarship payable to their respective college, university or trade school. Second chance students follow the same rules and procedure as the high school senior students for entering. For each question answered correctly, the student receives one entry into a drawing for one of the scholarships. A total of 10 entries per applicant into the drawing are possible. The five “second chance” winners for the 2016 contest are: Tonae Collins, Cincinnati, Ohio; Diamoneek Green, Cairo, Illinois; Ivy Johnson, Liberty, South Carolina; Cecelia Lakpor, Trenton, New Jersey; and Alyssa Smith, Grants Pass, Oregon. Alyssa Smith is attending Brigham Young University in Idaho and majoring in political science. Her plans include serving in a public office and making a difference in her community. Smith says she knew sprinkler systems existed but didn’t know how they functioned or their importance. After reading the required essay and entering AFSA’s online contest, Smith’s awareness increased. “[Sprinklers] are crucial to people’s safety,” she comments. “People would be at so much higher risk of death by fire in their homes or anywhere else they go without fire sprinklers.” Smith is grateful for the scholarship AFSA provides and says, “My family has always struggled financially and this scholarship will assure that I can continue my education on to next semester because with it I will be able to afford college,” she says. Cecelia Lakpor is attending Mercer County Community College and plans to attain a master’s degree. She found the scholarship contest through a Google search. Lakpor didn’t know much about fire sprinklers until she entered the contest. “[AFSA] is a very generous organization that helps students achieve their goals,” Lakpor comments. “This scholarship will greatly help me by taking me a step closer to achieving my career dream.” Both contests are being offered in 2016-2017. The high school senior contest is currently open until April 7, 2017 and the second chance contest will run again in the summer of 2017. AFSA scholarships are open to U.S. citizens or legal residents and are not based on financial need. For details or to apply for either scholarship, visit afsascholarship.org. n


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Sprinkler Geeks are Everywhere! NextGen or Not: Use #SprinklerGeek on Social Media RAY FREMONT, JR. | General Air Products, Inc.

My favorite definition of the word geek is, “The people you pick on in high school and wind up working for as an adult.” Really though, the best way to define a geek is as a knowledgeable, borderline obsessive, enthusiast of a given subject – in our case, fire sprinklers. I’ve met a lot of sprinkler geeks in my travels through training presentations, trade shows, and sales calls – and I mean geek in the best way possible. As much as I love long talks about the weather (sarcasm), it is incredibly refreshing to speak to people who are passionate and knowledgeable about their profession. The sprinkler geeks whom I’ve met show their enthusiasm in all aspects of the fire sprinkler industry. I’ve listened on as a group of NICET IV designers argued and laughed about the complexities of the most obscure parts of fire code. There are displays of seemingly ancient sprinkler heads in the lobbies of contractor’s offices all over the country curated by a resident enthusiast who can tell you who manufactured each one and when. I’ve been handed phones by field technicians as they invited me to check out pictures of the installations they are most proud of, and I’ve listened to stories of service calls that are nothing short of astounding. All of these people are geeks of the highest order. My kind of geeks – sprinkler geeks. If you identify with what I just described, you are a sprinkler geek, too, and I’m calling you out. The NextGen group is starting a social media campaign around the hashtag #SprinklerGeek. It’s designed to be an opportunity to bring attention to the sprinkler industry by showing our friends and family what we are all about. This campaign is also a way for us to bridge the generational divide between Millennials, Gen-Xers and Boomers within the industry. Passion is genuine. Enthusiasm for your work is both contagious and timeless. People who are new to the industry can have just as much enthusiasm for sprinkler systems as veterans – but no one will know if we don’t tell our stories. If we all start talking about what makes us excited to be a part of this great industry you will see for yourself how much we all have in common. When you do talk about it, do it on social media and use #SprinklerGeek. To participate just answer the question – how am I a #SprinklerGeek? Post your response with a picture or video to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, or your social media outlet of choice. If you know someone with a great story or interest regarding the industry encourage them to post as well. If you want to participate but you aren’t sure how, send an email to nduvall@firesprinkler.org with #SprinklerGeek in the subject and you will get the direction you need. You can also ask the youngest person in your office for assistance – they will 60 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

appreciate being able to demonstrate something they know that is of value! If I’m going to challenge you to let your geek flag fly, it’s only fair that I take my turn. I’m a #SprinklerGeek when it comes to old machinery. I love to see old valves and heads pulled from various job sites. As a manufacturer it’s really interesting to see what aspects of these old units are the same and how they have been improved upon by several generations of engineers and technological advancements. Many contractors I know will keep these antiques in their offices or post pictures to social media (the next time they do I hope they use #SprinklerGeek). Well, I do the same, but being from a family that manufacturers fire protection air compressors, I have a bias for one type of machine in particular. The above picture shows me in our lobby with the oldest dry system air compressor we have found so far. The pump was built by the Rockwood Sprinkler Company in Worcester, Massachusetts during World War II and was servicing a dry system up until 2014. This beautiful machine is made of so much steel it could stop a train and keep running. As a matter of fact, we cleaned it up and ran it ourselves before we put it on display. So there’s my sprinkler geekiness for the world to see. If you’ve crossed the path of some distinctive old sprinkler machinery, especially an air compressor, let me know when you cross my path – I’m just the kind of geek you’ve been waiting to tell! n ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ray Fremont, Jr. is the national sales and marketing manager for General Air Products, Inc., Exton, Pennsylvania, and a member of AFSA’s M/S Council and NextGen Initiative. He can be reached via email at rmfjr@generalairproducts.com.


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Thank You for Your Support! Members Celebrate Milestone Anniversaries As the American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) celebrates its 35th anniversary, we recognize those members who are also celebrating milestone membership anniversaries. These member companies have belonged to AFSA for 15 or more years of continuous membership. “I congratulate our members celebrating membership anniversaries for the months of November and December,” comments AFSA Director of Member Services Bradley Elliott. “We appreciate their long-term commitment to AFSA. It has enabled us to provide education, training and advocacy for the open shop fire sprinkler industry.” This issue, eight contractors and one designer celebrate with AFSA, including Crawford Sprinkler Company of South Carolina, who joined in 1981 – the year AFSA was established! AFSA congratulates the members who celebrate membership anniversary milestones in November and December 2016 and looks forward to celebrating with more members in the future. Recognition in Sprinkler Age will be done in five-year anniversary increments and is available to all membership types. Happy Anniversary! n

AFSA Milestone Membership Anniversaries November and December 2016

35-Year Anniversary – 1981 Contractor Members Crawford Sprinkler Co. of S.C., Lugoff, South Carolina

30-Year Anniversary – 1986 Contractor Members Diamond Automatic Sprinklers, Mt. Holly Springs, Pennsylvania Bear Industries, Inc., Newark, Delaware

20-Year Anniversary – 1996 Contractor Members Rudd Contracting Company, Inc., Tyler, Texas William McDonough Plumbing, Inc., Sarasota, Florida Designer Members Adams Fire Protection, Tucson, Arizona

15-Year Anniversary – 2001 Contractor Members Extinguish Fire Corporation, Fredericksburg, Virginia J.G. Tate Fire Protection Systems, Poway, California Mountain Valley Sprinkler Systems, Williston, Vermont

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AFSA’s correspondence course, The Leadership Ladder, teaches the newly promoted fire sprinkler foreman to manage projects from beginning to end. This 24-lesson course, written specifically for the fire sprinkler industry, guides the new foreman through supervision of a fire sprinkler installation project and the other employees working that job. For details, visit www.firesprinkler.org or call 214-349-5965. Learn more. Earn more.

62 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


AFSA Appoints New President Frank Mortl III, CAE to Succeed Steve Muncy, CAE The American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA), the nation’s largest fire sprinkler industry organization, announces that Steve A. Muncy, CAE is retiring as president effective December 31, 2016, and the board of directors have unanimously voted to appoint Frank Mortl III, CAE as president. When Muncy notified the AFSA board of directors over two years ago about his plan to retire at the end of 2016, they immediately began a nationwide search for a potential replacement to bring on board as executive vice president. “Of the hundreds of resumes received, Frank Mortl III became a top contender,” says Muncy. “With 20 years of association management experience including work in the construction industry, Frank offered a youthful perspective while providing a lot of experience.” After concluding interviews with search committee representatives, the Board voted to offer Mortl the executive vice president position, effective January 2015. “Since that time I have worked closely with Frank to introduce him to the fire protection industry and he has learned quickly. I’m convinced that Frank is positioned to take AFSA to the next level in serving our members in the years ahead,” continues Muncy. The board of directors is extremely gratified that Mortl has accepted the president position. “The transition from Steve Muncy to Frank Mortl has been textbook smooth, and it is a tribute to the skills of both men,” states Michael Meehan, AFSA chairman of the board. “Steve has shown true grace and leadership throughout this two-year process. Frank knows trade association work very well but I have been more impressed with his knack for picking up the nuances of our world. His eagerness and desire to succeed are infectious and those skills are innate. Our future looks very bright.” Under Mortl’s leadership, AFSA has further strengthened its position as the voice of the fire protection community and has been a leader in bringing innovation to the industry. AFSA has invested heavily in upgrading member services and experiences, introduced new training programs to improve industry education, and built a world-class team to further the asociation’s mission. “It is quite an honor to be charged with the impactful and rewarding opportunities the world of the fire sprinkler advocacy offers, made somewhat daunting as the successor to an industry icon like Steve Muncy,” says Mortl. “Over the last two years, AFSA members have displayed to me a sincere desire to be properly trained, delivered support for their businesses, and offered services that will help contractors succeed. Based on the dynamic team of volunteer leaders and professional staff already assembled, my goals for organizational growth fall right in line with faithfully executing our mission while building upon the strong history of AFSA.”

AFSA President Steve Muncy, CAE (left) will retire at the end of 2016 and current AFSA Executive Vice President Frank Mortl III, CAE will become AFSA president.

In his two decades of association management, Mortl held a variety of leadership positions. He was the director of marketing with the Associated General Contractors of Michigan; director of business development with Sorensen Gross Construction Services; executive director of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy; chief executive officer of the Greater Kalamazoo Association of REALTORS®; as well as executive director of the Michigan Lupus Foundation. In 2015, Mortl was awarded the designation of Certified Association Executive (CAE), the highest professional credential in the association industry. Mortl is a proud alumnus of Michigan State University and Michigan State University College of Law in East Lansing. The succession will be effective January 1, 2017, when Muncy will step down and Mortl will assume the position as AFSA president. n

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AFSA Welcomes Ohio Chapter Contractors Form Newest Chapter Adding strength to numbers, the American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA), the nation’s leading fire sprinkler industry group, is pleased to announce the recent formation of its Ohio Chapter. “I am proud to welcome the Ohio Chapter into the AFSA family,” says AFSA Director of Member Services Bradley Elliott. “Many significant achievements of our association are accomplished at the local level. The addition of our Ohio Chapter will help members in that area access important technical and legislative information as well as open the door for great networking opportunities.” The chapter’s elected officers include: Chairman Bill Hausman, A-1 Sprinkler in Miamisburg, Ohio; Vice Chairman Tom Doty, Craynon Fire Protection in Dayton, Ohio; Secretary/Treasurer Doug Stoeckel, ABCO Eckert Fire Protection in Cincinnati, Ohio; and Executive Director Don Eckert, AFSA of Ohio Chapter in Cincinnati. Initial efforts were focused in the southwest region near Cincinnati, but Eckert says chapter leaders are hoping to rally the entire state. In attendance at the chapter’s October 25 meeting in Columbus were 11 people representing nine contractors, nine people representing seven suppliers/ manufacturers, one designer, and one Authority Having Jurisdic-

tion (AHJ). The program was a mixer with a open discussion about the future of AFSA in Ohio. “We are looking forward to developing our chapter,” says Eckert. “The chapter officers and I will meet soon to set our 2017 calendar and are planning four or five events for the year.” Don Eckert, AFSA Ohio Chapter executive director, Those interested in welcomes those who are interested in developing an joining should active chapter in the state. contact Eckert at via email: doneckert@outlook.com. AFSA has 22 chapters and is affiliated with four state associations. To find a local chapter or learn more, visit firesprinkler.org. n

CLSE’s Plan Review & Acceptance of Residential Fire Sprinkler Systems This two-part online audio program with downloadable handouts describes the review process of fire sprinkler systems for one- and two-family dwellings, in accordance with the NFPA 13D standard (2007 edition).

Fire Sprinklers 501–Part 1: Design & Installation Concepts

This seminar describes the history of NFPA 13D, and how it differs from NFPA 13 and NFPA 13R. It discusses the exceptions allowed by NFPA 13D in certain circumstances, and covers water supply requirements and how they are determined and evaluated.

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Designed in accordance with NFPA 13D, this seminar leads the student through the detailed step-by-step process of reviewing a fire sprinkler system plan designed for protection of a single-family home. The student will download plans and supporting documentation to follow in the plan review process.

Convenient, affordable education available at www.clse.org

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64 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016


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66 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Let’s talk for a moment about one of our glass houses – our fire stations. We don’t call them fire stations because we expect them to burn. The very term fire station should result in the building never being involved in a fire. But the harsh reality is that only a very small percentage of fire stations are adequately protected against fire by having a fire sprinkler system installed. I have never seen an inventory of fire stations that are on record as being currently occupied. But, I have seen a research document that points out a definite weakness. According to the U.S. Fire Administration Topical Fire Research Series we experience as many as 150 fire station fires every year. This report provides many clues as to how we could strengthen protection of fire stations from unwanted fire. Some of its basic findings are: • Fire station fires most often originate in fire station vehicles. • The leading cause is electrical distribution, while cooking is the leading cause of structural fires. • Electrical wire is the leading material ignited, most often short circuited. • Often fire stations have no damage insurance or are underinsured.2 If we look at the fire station fire as a possibility, 150 fires is not that many when held up against the loss in residential fires, but it does represent a traumatic experience to any community that has to rebuild a firehouse. This begs the question: what is the shelf life of a firehouse? If we assume that there are about 33,000 fire departments in the United States, and if we agree that we burn down approximately 150 each year, it is easy to see that in 50 years a total of 7,500 opportunities for fire protection to be negatively impacted by fire station fires.


One of the solutions that we should be bringing to bear on this issue is sprinkler technology. All fire stations should be adequately sprinklered during initial construction. Secondarily, fire stations that are rebuilt as a result of having a fire should always be retrofitted with fire sprinklers. It is not uncommon for political figures to question why we would sprinkler a fire station. These people often think it is humorous that a fire station needs to be protected against fire. Facts say otherwise. It is not uncommon for a fire station to be victimized by an accidental fire. Sometimes a fire station is burned to the ground with a fire truck still in it. This makes this a serious public policy discussion. The way to address this problem is to consider the question of: what will you do if you lose your firehouse? If you are a community with only one fire station, the consequences are severe. If you are a volunteer fire department that has limited financial resources, consequences are severe also.

In reality, this is also a public credibility issue. Many fire departments have expanded their support for built-in fire protection. When we advocate for residential sprinklers it is altogether appropriate that we put our own money where our mouth is. One of the ways of making sure that we are consistent with public policy is to put our efforts into sprinkling fire stations as examples of good public policy. Beginning with a community’s master plan or strategic plan, the idea can be advocated as part of the planning process. By sprinkling all firehouses, the community sets an excellent example as a matter of public policy. In any case, considering the possibility of sprinklers in all new buildings should be strongly advocated by the fire marshal and supported by the fire chief. In replacement of existing facilities, sprinklers should be a top priority. Frequently, a question of retrofit may be raised if you intend to extend a shelf life of a fire station. We need to remember that fire stations are in many ways a second home for our firefighters.

If we are suggesting that residences need to be protected, then it is logical that fire stations need to be also. In almost all cases, there needs to be an advocate whether this is the fire chief or fire marshal is a matter of local choice. Without an advocate, the fire stations will remain a potential vulnerability to fire. Summary Remember that sprinklering fire stations means never having to say “I’m sorry” to the community. n REFERENCES: 1. Fire Station Fires, U.S. Fire Administration Topical Fire Research Series, Volume 1, Issue 19, May 2001 (Revised December 2001) 2. ibid ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ronny J. Coleman is currently the president of Fireforceone. He is a past president of the IAFC and CFAI. Over his lifetime, he has received numerous awards including the AFSA’s 1989 Henry S. Parmelee Award, the 2011 Mason Lankford Award from the Congressional Fire Services Institute, and the Tom Brennan Lifetime Achievement Award from Fire Engineering in 2014. He continues as a contributor to the fire service in many ways.

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AFSA NEWS New General Counsel for AFSA The American Fire Sprinkler Association (AFSA) has free initial legal counsel available to contractor members from the law firm of Canterbury, Gooch, Surratt, Shapiro, Stein & Gaswirth, located in Dallas. Joe F. Canterbury has been members’ primary contact for consultation and has served members well. Canterbury announced his retirement effective September 30, 2016 and Daniel R.

Calendar December 8 Connecticut Chapter December Holiday Party Rocky Hill, CT firesprinkler.org

10 FSCATx Annual Christmas Party & Casino Night San Antonio, TX fscatx.org

January 9-20 Beginning Fire Sprinkler System Planning School AFSA Headquarters, Dallas, TX firesprinkler.org

February 27 - March 1 OSU Fire Sprinkler Inspection Training Certificate Program Stillwater, OK okstate.edu

27-March 10 Beginning Fire Sprinkler System Planning School AFSA Headquarters, Dallas, TX firesprinkler.org

April 17 ITM Inspector Development Program Live Webinar Kick-Off firesprinkler.org/itm Seminars subject to change. Call (214) 349-5965 or visit firesprinkler.org and click on “Training Calendar.”

68 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

McCabe is now AFSA’s primary contact. “Joe Canterbury has been a great friend and advisor to AFSA members,” says AFSA President Steve Muncy. “It is rare that you find such a great legal mind that truly understands contractors and their business operations. He has performed an invaluable service to many, many AFSA members in clarifying their rights and responsibilities under labor law. He will be greatly missed. “Joe is highly complimentary in his recommendations of Daniel McCabe to fill his shoes, and we look forward to working with Mr. McCabe,” Muncy adds. McCabe’s practice focuses primarily in the areas of labor and employment law, including litigation, and civil trial work, including construction litigation, commercial disputes and personal injury matters. In the area of labor and employment law, he has extensive experience defending employers in cases alleging unlawful employment discrimination as well as in wageand-hour and unpaid overtime claims. McCabe represents clients in matters before state and federal regulatory agencies, including the Texas Workforce Commission, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Department of Labor. He frequently is called upon to advise clients regarding the drafting or enforceability of employment covenants, including noncompetition, nonsolicitation, and confidentiality agreements, as well as the interplay between state and federal employment statutes and an employer’s policies and procedures. McCabe attended Boston College and obtained his law degree from Texas Tech University. He is a member of the State Bar of Texas, United States District Courts for the Northern and Eastern Districts of Texas, and United States Courts of Appeals for the Fifth and Tenth Circuits. McCabe will give initial advice, at no cost, to AFSA members on labor and employment issues, and if further assistance is deemed necessary, can assist members with finding counsel in their city. Questions should be directed to McCabe via phone 972-239-7493, fax 972-490-7739 or email at DMccabe@canterburylaw.com. ITM Enrolling for Spring Cycle AFSA’s (AFSA) Inspection, Testing and Maintenance (ITM) Inspector Development program is the industry’s first such program. The program prepares a “green” inspector trainee for NICET’s Level II Inspection and Testing of Water-Based Systems in less than two years! The program prepares can-

didates to pass NICET Level II exams in less than two years. Students grow in a blended-learning environment, including: on-demand online coursework; live, interactive web instruction; live in-class lecture; and hands-on field testing and inspections. The small class size (maximum 20 per session) allows for personalized instruction. Register now at firesprinkler.org/itm. Noble Joins AFSA Technical Services Department Tom Noble has joined the American Fire Sprinkler Association’s (AFSA) technical services department, filling the vacancy left by Phill Brown, who retired in July 2016. New to the Dallas area, Noble grew up in the Las Vegas area and is NICET II water-based systems layout certified. He has worked for various sprinkler contractors in the southern Nevada area as a designer, design manager or inspector since 1995. At AFSA, Noble’s title is technical programs specialist, and he is tasked with preparing any and all material for the Beginning Fire Sprinkler System Planning School, as well as co-teaching the school. Noble also writes informal interpretations on various fire codes and sits on several NFPA committees. Noble will report directly to Roland Huggins, P.E., AFSA’s vice president of engineering and technical services. “I’m excited about Tom joining our staff and bringing a contractor’s perspective to AFSA’s technical services department,” says Huggins. “His 18 years of design and installation experience enhances our ability to relate to the merit shop contractor, and nicely compliments the engineering experience of our technical team. I look forward to watching what he’ll bring to the table throughout his career with AFSA.” Noble can be contacted at tnoble@firesprinkler.org or 214-349-5965 x 125. AFSA Launches New Ultimate Fire Sprinkler Guide In 2009, AFSA set out to simplify the online search with the launch of its Ultimate Fire Sprinkler Guide. By using innovative search technology, the directory made it easier for members and industry professionals to find the products and services they need to manage their business. It was quickly declared a valuable resource – while eliminating the clutter that goes into the average Internet search. With its latest product release, the Ultimate Fire Sprinkler Guide has become even easier to use with smart functionality improvements and a major user interface redesign. We have not


only enhanced its existing features, but added several new key elements taking the user experience to a whole new level. The guide provides a platform for members and industry professionals to work smarter, not harder. With enhanced visual features, more intelligent search technology and marketing opportunities to fit companies of all sizes, there is no better way to connect industry professionals and businesses. Visit ultimatefiresprinklerguide.com. AFSA Promotes Matkin Wendy Matkin, who joined the AFSA staff in May of 2016 as its education programs coordinator, has been promoted to manager of education programs. Matkin will work directly with Leslie Clounts, the director of education services. “In the six short months she has been with us, she has exceeded every expectation, not only as an asset to the education services department, but assisting other departments and staff members as well,” says Leslie Clounts, director of education services. “Wendy’s professional demeanor enhances AFSA member services as she responds each and every day to member training inquiries. She has learned very quickly and what she doesn’t know, she pursues in earnest to find out.” In her new role, Matkin is responsible for the design and delivery of many AFSA education programs, including the ITM Inspector Development program and online eCampus courses. She will assist in the administration of AFSA’s online Learning Management System and correspondence training series, while applying her skills to additional projects of the education services department as it strives to serve AFSA’s growing membership. Matkin is a 2014 graduate of Southern Methodist University and holds a degree in communications and public relations. Matkin can be contacted at wmatkin@firesprinkler.org or 214-349-5965 x 117.

to be an invaluable resource for AFSA activities,” says Frank Mortl III, CAE, AFSA executive vice president. “Her eventual shift to joining [the convention & meetings] department is expected to allow for her professional growth while raising the level of our in-person events to members at a time when even more programming is being planned for 2017.” Sales attended NCTC Junior College, and worked in Customer Care Operations at Xerox for nine years before joining the AFSA team. Sales can be contacted at crsales@firesprinkler. org or 214-349-5965 x 113. Deadlines for 2017 Individual Health Insurance According to Mass Marketing INsurance Consultants (MMIC), an AFSA-endorsed business solution, the open enrollment period for 2017 individual health insurance has been official announced as November 1, 2016 to January 31, 2017. Critical deadlines are: • November 1, 2016: Open enrollment begins. Apply for or change your coverage. • December 15, 2016: Deadline in order to have coverage that begins on January 1, 2017. (If you apply on December 16 your

coverage will most likely not start until February 1.) • December 31, 2016: Coverage ends for 2015 plans and you will be auto-renewed if you don’t change your plan. • January 31, 2017: This is the last day you can apply for 2017 coverage before the end of open enrollment. If you miss this window you cannot enroll until the marketplace re-opens in November 2017 unless you have a special “life event” such as having a baby or losing your job. This is designed to prevent people from taking advantage of the system by enrolling and dropping insurance multiple times a year when they only get sick. If you don’t enroll for health insurance in 2017, you will be fined approximately 2.5 percent of your income or $695 per adult, whichever is higher. Official totals have yet to be announce for 2017 and will increase based on inflation. Individual and children living in poverty can enroll at any time in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). There is no enrollment period for these programs, but there are income restrictions and other qualifiers. AFSA members can obtain a free no obligation quote through MMIC. Call us 1-800-3491039 or email mmic@mmicinsurance.com. n

Sales Joins Convention & Meetings Department Christina Sales, who joined the AFSA staff in October of 2015 as an accounting administrative assistant, will be promoted to meeting planning specialist within the convention & meetings department. Sales will report directly to Marlene Garrett, senior director of convention & meetings. “It’s been evident over the last year that in addition to having a sincere ‘association mindset,’ Christina is a result-orientated producer of programs and initiatives that have proven Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

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CHAPTER NEWS Sacramento Valley This year, the AFSA’s Sacramento Valley Chapter celebrated its tenth year of its annual softball tournament to support the Firefighters Burn Institute. Twelve teams and over 180 players came out to Bartholomew Sports Park in Elk Grove, California to help raise funds Funkhouser for the invaluable services the Firefighters Burn Institute provides. The fundraiser included a raffle, picnic lunch, and a fun day of sportsmanship among chapter members and their families. Teams competed from 8 a.m. until the championship game in the afternoon. Alwest Fire’s team prevailed as this year’s champions. The team chose to dedicate this year’s win to Dale Funkhouser, a former employee of Alwest Fire Protection who was working for Foothill Fire Protection, and was tragically killed in a motorcycle accident that very afternoon. Visit sacvalleyafsa.org. Virginia The Virginia Chapter held a meeting on October 4 at the Four Points by Sheraton Hotel in Richmond, Virginia. Thirty-eight people were in attendance. Mike Meehan, AFSA Chairman of the Board, addressed the chapter. The theme for the meeting was “National AFSA Programs” and AFSA Executive Vice President Frank Mortl III, CAE and Director of Member Services Bradley Elliott also presented. The vendor presentation was given by Bruce Golden of Victaulic. The chapter and its Burn Survivors Foundation are proud to announce that it donated

Alwest Fire’s team won the Sacramento Valley’s annual softball tournament.

The Virginia Chapter and its Burn Survivors Foundation supported the Old Dominion Firefighters Burn Foundation (left photo) and the Central Virginia Burn Camp (right photo).

$80,000 again in 2016 to its charities, the Central Virginia Burn Camp, a free-of-charge, weeklong summer camp dedicated to providing a special, fun and safe experience for children with burn injuries, and the Old Dominion Firefighters Burn Foundation, whose main efforts

surround raising funds for programs that support burn survivors and prevent burns. Visit the chapter’s website at burnsurvivorsfoundation. org to see the activities of the Burn Survivors Foundation and to make a donation on its GOFUNDME account. Visit afsavirginia.com. n

Children. The event took place at the Bear Creek Golf Course in Dallas, Texas and was a huge success. AFSA would like to thank

all the sponsors, volunteers, and everyone who attended! Visit fscatx.org. n

AFFILIATE NEWS GFSA On October 11, the Georgia Fire Sprinkler Association (GFSA) meeting took place at SPP Pumps in Norcross, Georgia. The meeting consisted of discussions of the completion of the system at training center, including the fire pump, completion of piping and valves; ideas for using the cloud for time reporting; and follow up on discussions that took place at the August 2, 2016 board meeting. The meeting was two hours in length and took place over a catered lunch. Visit georgiafiresprinkler.org. FSCATx On October 10, the Fire Sprinkler Contractors Association of Texas (FSCATx) held its 27th Anniversary Golf Classic to benefit the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for 70 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

The FSCATx 27th Anniversary Golf Classic was a big success and benefited Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children.


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AFSA MEMBERSHIP New Members The following is a list of new members that have joined as of October 15, 2016.

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

AHJ Hilo Medical Center James Paapke Hilo, HI

AHJ City of Surprise Fire - Medical Department Peter Pervi Suprise, AZ

AHJ Axis Insurance Kevin Wick Chicago, IL

AHJ Reading Fire Department Jeremy Searfoss Reading, PA

Contractor Compliant Monitoring Solutions, Inc. Paul Udell Folsom, CA

Los Alamos National Laboratory Mark Summers Los Alamos, NM

Associate Eaton Margie Doll Highland, IL

AHJ SC LLR Div of Fire and Life Safety Bruce Kritz Columbia, SC

Minimax Fire Solutions, Inc. Layla Bohm Livermore, CA

Vail Fire & Emergency Services Michael Vaughan Vail, CO

Region 4

Designer Baja Design Engineering Juan Francisco Guzman Calexico, CA

Associate Code Unlimited Franklin Callfas Beaverton, OR

Contractor Delta Fire Protection Company, LLC John Calvo Tucker, GA

AHJ Reid Fire Code Consulting, LLC Jase Loveless Lubbock, TX Associate SBS Tanks USA, Inc. Brian Wilson Conroe, TX

Associate Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC Allan Strange Richmond, VA

E Corp Fire Protection, LLC Enrique Estrada Lake Worth, FL

Contractor DC Fire Protection, LLC Samuel Jones Washington, DC

Imperial Fire Protection Jeff Pickens Bonita, FL

Life Safety Systems, Inc. Derrick Mitchell Arbutus, MD

State Systems, Inc. Graham McBride Memphis, TN

Noels Fire Protection, LLC Melissa Noel Williamsport, MD WNY Fire Protection George Ward Tonawanda, NY

Contractor Brigade Fire Solutions Paul McKenna Cypress, TX

Designer Global Fire Protection Group, LLC John Campbell, P.E. Fenton, MO

International Contractor Frantic Fire, Ltd Cam Spicer Ardrossan, AB, Canada

AFSA Chapter Contacts Arkansas Coleman Farrar– Chair. 479-986-9090 Carolinas afsacarolinas.com Dean Bush – Chair. 704-732-3343 John Turnage – Exec. Dir. 919-624-3456 Chesapeake Bay afsachesapeakechapter.org Jay Strickland – Chair. 301-474-2441 Danielle Fowler – Exec. Dir. 410-964-0841 Connecticut afsact.org Rick Russo – Chair. 203-877-7983 Wendy Callahan – Exec. Dir. 978-855-6495 Florida afsafl.org Bart Trueblood – Chair. 813-662-9200 Carolyn Mohr – Exec. Dir. 239-771-3907

Greater Bay Area Dan Mendoza – Chair. 925-552-5870 Lorelei Upshaw – Exec. Dir. 925-913-0145 Greater Kansas City 2nd Wed. of each month Mark McKenzie – Chair. 913-432-6688 Cliff Becker – Exec. Dir. 816-221-1651 Louisiana Linda Biernacki – Chair. 318-688-8800 Mid-Atlantic afsamac.org Jay C. Stough – Chair. 215-345-8066 Meaghen Wills– Exec. Dir. 610-754-7836 New Jersey Thomas J. Bowlby Jr. – Chair. 908-229-9595 Robert K. Melofchik, Sr. – Exec. Dir. 201-741-0056

New Mexico 2nd Mon. of each month Pete Newsted – Chair. 505-980-1261 Dave Wilson – Exec. Dir. 505-573-6712

Rocky Mountain Brent Heiner – Chair. 801-540-3473 Adam Millward – Exec. Dir. 801-216-4545

North Central As called by Chair Michael Winiecki – Chair. 651-484-5903 Michelle Loren - Exec. Dir. 320-676-3771

Sacramento Valley sacvalleyafsa.org Bill Gray – Chair. 916-663-3582 Paulene Norwood – Exec. Dir. 916-296-0635

Northern New England Ryan Gadhue – Chair. 802-922-3236 Tim Stone – Exec. Dir. 802-434-2968

San Diego As called by Chair. Ron Aday – Chair. 858-513-4949 x 307 Rhonda Hill – Exec. Dir. 858-513-4949

Ohio Bill Hausman, Chair. Don Eckert– Exec. Dir. 513-310-9660 Pacific Northwest afsanw.org Tracy Moore – Chair. 425-271-5598 Ron Greenman – Exec. Dir. 253-576-9700

Southern California Jeff Bridges – Co-Chair. 888-523-4734 Terry Housholder– Co-Chair. 714-632-8646 Amber Barrios - Exec. Dir. 562-833-9492 Virginia afsavirginia.com Jack Medovich – Pres. 804-222-4393 George Wagner – Exec. Dir. 757-378-7212 Yankee Michael Payton – Chair. 508-378-7215 Josh Fitzgerald 617-594-6105

South Carolina scfsa.org Jason Strickland – Chair. 243-664-0077 Jule Buffington – Exec. Dir. 803-951-2800

AFSA Affiliate Contacts Alabama Affiliate alfiresprinkler.org Charles Bielair – Pres. 334-270-8571 Greg Willis – Exec. Dir. 334-546-4257

72 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Georgia Affiliate georgiafiresprinkler.org Ray Vance – Pres. 678-993-2054 Billy Wood – Exec. Dir. 404-226-8304

Oklahoma Affiliate ofsa.info Gary Field – President 918-266-2416

Texas Affiliate fscatx.org David Stone – Pres. 713-466-9899 Carol McCain – Exec. Dir. 281-361-8069


CONSTRUCTION REPORTS U.S. Construction...

U.S. Construction...

starts in August soared 21 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $711.2 billion. The August rise for total construction starts featured an especially elevated amount for nonresidential building, which was helped by the start of a $3 billion petrochemical plant in Louisiana, the $1.7 billion Wynn Casino in the Boston area, and a $508 million terminal upgrade at Sea-Tac Airport. The nonbuilding construction sector also experienced strong growth, with its public works segment lifted by the start of a $3 billion natural gas pipeline project in the states of AL, GA, and FL. In addition, residential building contributed with a moderate August gain, reflecting another advance for multifamily housing which included groundbreaking for the $900 million Wanda Vista Tower in Chicago. Through the first eight months of 2016, total construction starts on an unadjusted basis were $439.3 billion, down 7 percent from a year ago. If projects valued at $1 billion or more are excluded, total construction starts during the first eight months of 2016 would be down a slight 1 percent, or essentially even, with a year ago.

value of new construction starts in September decreased a slight 2 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $703.7 billion. This follows the 22 percent jump for total construction starts in August. Nonresidential building showed further strength in September. The lift for nonresidential building in September came from the start of two very large office towers in New York with a combined construction start cost of $3.5 billion, as well as eight large hospital projects that together summed to $2.2 billion. However, the housing sector lost momentum in September, pulling back from August which included groundbreaking for a number of very large multifamily projects. Nonbuilding construction also slipped in September, following its improved August volume that included the start of a $3.0 billion pipeline upgrade in the southeastern part of the nation. Through the first nine months of 2016, total construction starts on an unadjusted basis were $506.7 billion, trailing the same period a year ago by 3 percent.

August Construction Starts Jump 21 Percent New construction

Monthly Summary of Construction Contract Value

Construction Starts Ease Back 2 Percent in September The

Monthly Summary of Construction Contract Value Prepared by Dodge Data & Analytics

Prepared by Dodge Data & Analytics

MONTHLY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT VALUE Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rates, In Millions August 2016 July 2016 % Change Nonresidential Building $267,419 $187,693 +42 Residential Building $291,090 $276,184 +5 Nonbuilding Construction $152,705 $121,713 +25 Total Construction $711,214 $585,590 +21

MONTHLY CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT VALUE Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rates, In Millions September 2016 August 2016 % Change Nonresidential Building $282,270 $268,470 +5 Residential Building $271,120 $295,185 -8 Nonbuilding Construction $150,339 $152,668 -2 Total Construction $703,729 $716,323 -2

THE DODGE INDEX (Year 2000=100, Seasonally Adjusted) August 2016...............150 July 2016.....................124

THE DODGE INDEX (Year 2000=100, Seasonally Adjusted) September 2016...............149 August 2016.....................152

YEAR-TO-DATE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT VALUE Unadjusted Totals, In Millions 8 Mo. 2016 8 Mo. 2015 % Change Nonresidential Building $137,422 $152,439 -10 Residential Building $190,750 $184,336 +3 Nonbuilding Construction $111,103 $134,405 -17 Total Construction $439,275 $471,180 -7

YEAR-TO-DATE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT VALUE Unadjusted Totals, In Millions 9 Mo. 2016 9 Mo. 2015 % Change Nonresidential Building $164,530 $168,068 -2 Residential Building $215,319 $205,729 +5 Nonbuilding Construction $126,858 $147,088 -14 Total Construction $506,707 $520,885 -3

Canada Construction...

Canada Construction...

August CANADATA Y-T-D Figures on Construction Starts

September CANADATA Y-T-D Figures on Construction Starts

Types of Construction

Aug

Types of Construction

Sept

TOTAL CANADA ($ Millions) RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Major Sub-categories: Office Buildings Stores INSTITUTIONAL Major Sub-categories: Medical Education INDUSTRIAL Major Sub-categories: Plants ENGINEERING Major Sub-categories: Waterworks Roads Electric Power Oil and Gas ALL CONSTRUCTION

2016 2015

TOTAL CANADA ($ Millions) RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Major Sub-categories: Office Buildings Stores INSTITUTIONAL Major Sub-categories: Medical Education INDUSTRIAL Major Sub-categories: Plants ENGINEERING Major Sub-categories: Waterworks Roads Electric Power Oil and Gas ALL CONSTRUCTION

2016 2015

155,992 39,837

Aug

% Change

166,874 62,524

-7 -36

13,144 23,618 -44 7,175 8,729 -17 42,305 78,289 -46 10,323 22,378 2,257

23,166 37,811 5,008

-55 -40 -55

1,644 211,509

4,004 272,730

-58 -22

15,160 26,963 45,901 55,788 64,822 34,211 23,271 60,089 451,900 585,425

-43 -17 89 -61 -23

*Start figures are also available for many more categories of construction and according to provincial, city and county levels of regional detail. CanaData is a statistics-gathering and forecasting agency for the construction industry and is a part of CMD Canada, (416)-758-6400.

191,301 46,144

Sept

% Change

191,156 68,539

0 -33

14,229 26,335 -45 7,992 9,363 -14 48,567 90,798 -47 11,620 26,932 26,152 43,342 5,723 6,581 1,886 224,572

4,431 377,401

17,615 33,741 51,970 59,901 65,660 118,466 23,271 60,181 516,306 734,885

-56 -39 -13 -57 -40 -47 -13 -44 -61 -30

*Start figures are also available for many more categories of construction and according to provincial, city and county levels of regional detail. CanaData is a statistics-gathering and forecasting agency for the construction industry and is a part of CMD Canada, (416)-758-6400. Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

73


INDUSTRY NEWS Johnson Controls and Tyco Complete Merger With a vision to create a safe, comfortable and sustainable world, a newly formed Johnson Controls (NYSE: JCI) begins operations following the successful completion of its merger with Tyco, marking a historic turning point for both companies. With $30 billion in revenue and 117,000 employees (following the anticipated spinoff of the Adient automotive business in October), this powerful combination brings together bestin-class product, technology and service capabilities across controls, fire, security, HVAC and energy storage, to serve the full spectrum of end markets including large institutions, government, commercial buildings, retail, industrial, small business and residential. Tyco and Johnson Controlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; building platforms create immediate opportunities for growth through cross-selling, complementary branch and distribution channel networks, and expanded global reach for established businesses. As a result of the robust integration planning already in place, the company is on track to realize $1 billion of savings related to previously announced merger synergies and productivity initiatives. Visit johnsoncontrols.com. RIDGID Celebrates the Trades with Commemorative Limited Edition Calendar Join RIDGID in celebrating the trades with a 2017 commemorative limited edition calendar featuring original calendar art from popular tattoo artists and illustrators that can proudly be displayed anywhere. The calendar was launched on October 20 at CONNECT 2016 in San Antonio, Texas. Hosted by the Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association (PHCC), the tradeshow and conference included training opportunities for current and future professionals. Through tool donations and monetary support to trade schools, RIDGID has been an active advocate of the trades. In 2017, the company plans to announce additional initiatives designed to help drive awareness and combat the alarming trade shortage trends. Visit RIDGID.com.

74 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

alarm code NFPA 72 and discussed the synergies that must exist between these codes and building codes. Parrish offered the presentation three times throughout the conference, which sees an annual attendance of approximately 300 fire marshals. Parrish represents Telgian on several National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) technical committees and is a regular presenter at various industry conferences and meetings for Telgian. Visit telgian.com. Report: Construction Employment Rises; 24 States Add Jobs as Firms Struggle to Find Workers Thirty-six states added construction jobs between August 2015 and August 2016 while construction employment increased in only 24 states between July and August, according to analysis of Labor Department data released by the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC). Association officials said demand for construction appears to be cooling in some markets but added that many firms report they would be expanding their headcount if they could find qualified workers to hire. California added the most construction jobs (29,300 jobs, 4.0 percent) between August 2015 and August 2016. Other states adding a high number of new construction jobs for the past 12 months include Florida (22,000 jobs, 5.1 percent), Colorado (16,800 jobs, 11.3 percent) and Iowa (14,400 jobs, 18.7 percent). Iowa added the highest percentage of new construction jobs during the past year, followed by Hawaii (12.3 percent, 4,300 jobs), Colorado and Idaho (9.2 percent, 3,500 jobs). Visit agc.org.

Telgian Executive Tom Parrish Presents at Texas Fire Marshals Conference Fire, security, and life safety services provider Telgian Cor-

IAFC Foundation Announces 2016 Scholarship Awards The International Association of Fire Chiefs Foundation (IAFCF), committed to strengthening future leaders through higher education, has announced its 2016 scholarship award recipients. The Foundation is pleased to increase the number of scholarships awarded this year to 44, up from 39 awarded in 2015. This was made possible by an increase in the contributions and support of IAFC Foundation donors. The IAFC Foundation provides scholarships that make it possible for fire and EMS first responders to access the advanced learning opportunities they need in order to be pre-

porationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vice President of Integrated Systems Tom Parrish, SET, CFPS, PSP, presented on the various codes associated with proper fire alarm installations at the 2016 Texas Fire Marshals Conference October 16-21. The conference was held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Austin. Parrish provided detail on how electrical code NFPA 70 works in conjunction with fire

pared for the increasingly complex realities of the world today. The scholarship awards made by the IAFC Foundation impact the fire service and communities by providing first responders with the educational opportunities they need to lead the fire service and serve and protect our citizens. For a complete list of scholarship winners, visit iafc.org. n


What if...

BEGINNERS COULD BE PRODUCTIVE IN TWO WEEKS? AFSA Beginning Fire Sprinkler System Planning School The System Planning School presents a comprehensive, practical approach to preparing fire sprinkler system drawings. Students receive two full weeks of instruction, 60 percent of which is study and review of NFPA 13 (2016 edition). The other 40 percent is preparation of fire sprinkler system layout, shop drawings and hydraulic calculations. The school is designed to train a beginner to be productive immediately upon returning to work. This class is designed for those with no experience, or those who need assistance with design. The students learn by actually planning and drawing sprinkler systems while studying and applying NFPA 13. Visit firesprinkler.org/education-center/schools. 2017 SCHEDULE January 9-20 February 27-March 10 April 24-May 5 July 10-21 August 14-25 October 2-13 November 6-17 Enrollment is now open. Visit firesprinkler.org.

- TOM WELLEN, PE

AFSA Manager of Fire Protection Engineering In my role as lead instructor of AFSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beginning Fire Sprinkler System Planning School we introduce the beginning layout technician to the codes, hydraulic calculations and knowledge of system layout techniques. This combined with real world problem solving ability will help to develop the layout technician into a contributing member of your team. In just two short weeks, the school provides powerful knowledge that unleashes a new world of possibility.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

Bresnahan

AFSA Chairman Meehan Named VSC Fire & Security, Inc. President; McDonald, Chairman VSC Fire & Security, Inc. announces that effective January 1, 2017 Mike Meehan will be named president and John McDonald, chairman. Meehan currently serves as senior vice president of VSC Fire & Security and manages the district office located in Virginia Beach, Virginia. He also serves as chairman of the American Fire Sprinkler Association’s (AFSA) 20152017 Board of Directors. Meehan, who began his career with VSC Fire & Security, Inc. as a sprinkler fitter trainee in the early 1980s, has more than 35 years of service to the company in the areas of sprinkler system designer, estimating, project management and senior management. He graduated from George Mason University in 1981 and is a NICET Level IV Certified Engineering Technician in Water-Based Systems Layout. Meehan has served on the AFSA Board of Directors since 2008, as the Region 6 Director. He was named Chairman of the Board in 2014, and as Board chairman also chairs the AFSA Executive Committee. John McDonald also began his career at VSC Fire & Security, Inc. as a sprinkler fitter trainee in his early 20s, initially working during summer break(s) while attending George Mason University and after years of successful ascendancy became president in 2001. Visit vscfs.com. In Memoriam: Michael P. Maxwell AFSA members and staff were saddened to learn that Michael P. Maxwell, owner of Fire and Safety Systems Co., Ocean Township, New Jersey, and past AFSA New Jersey Chapter chairman, passed away suddenly on September 2, 2016. Maxwell was a proud graduate of New Jersey City University (formally known as Jersey 76 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Cauley

City State College) where he majored in fire protection, his long life passion. It was his tremendous focus on fire prevention and life safety that made him a lifelong member of both the Oakhurst and Deal Fire Departments, as well as his first place of employment in the fire industry at Lakehurst Naval Air Station. In 1981 Maxwell became the founder and president of Fire & Safety Systems Company. Maxwell was a member and past chief of the Oakhurst Independent Hose Company No. 1 as well as member and past president of the New Jersey Fire Prevention & Protection Association. He was also instrumental in forming the AFSA New Jersey Chapter. Condolences to the family can be sent through Buckleyfuneralhome.net. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Oakhurst Independent Hose Company No. 1, 72 Larkin Place, Oakhurst, NJ 07755, and/or St. Mary of the Assumption Church, 46 Richmond Avenue, Deal, NJ 07723. Reed Manufacturing Announces Promotion Tim Donohue has been promoted to National sales director for Reed Manufacturing Company of Erie, Pennsylvania. Donohue joined Reed in 2008 and served as director of key accounts and regional manager. Donohue’s 25 years in the industrial and construc­tion marketplace includes executive level experience at Milwaukee Electric Tool and Robert Bosch. Donohue will continue with all of his previous responsibilities as director of key accounts. Additionally, as national sales director, Donohue will oversee all USA regional managers and their manufacturer’s representative teams. He will continue his efforts of past years to further enhance new products/sales integration. Visit reedmfgco.com. Reliable Announces Promotion of Three Sales Team Members Reliable Automatic Sprinkler Company is proud to announce the promotion of three of its sales team members: Todd Bresnahan, Michael Cauley, and Damon Cook. Todd Bresnahan has been pro-

Cook

Donohue

moted to director of national accounts reporting to Kevin T. Fee, Jr. Michael Cauley has been promoted to New England regional sales manager reporting to Tom P. Field. Damon Cook has been promoted to Northwest regional sales manager reporting to Mark Connor. Visit reliablesprinkler.com. Paul Orzeske Named JENSEN HUGHES CEO JENSEN HUGHES has announced Paul Orzeske as their new chief executive officer (CEO). Orzeske brings more than 30 years of industry experience and will help lead the firm’s growth plan in conjunction with other key leadership and shareholders. Prior to this role, Orzeske served as the Chairman of the Board for JENSEN HUGHES while serving as president of Actus2, LLC and as a member of Gryphon Investors Executive Advisory Board. Orzeske worked for Honeywell for 26 years, holding senior executive roles in multiple geographies. Most recently he was president of Honeywell Building Solutions, a $3 billion business providing automated building solutions, including HVAC, fire and security systems. Visit jensenhughes.com. Winsupply Adds Two Executives to its Senior Management Team Winsupply Inc. has announced the hiring of Grady Collins as chief financial officer (CFO), and the promotion of Jeff Dice to vice president of shared services. Collins joins Winsupply from HA-International LLC (HAI), Westmont, Illinois, where he served as chief financial officer, vice president of finance, and treasurer. He will be responsible for managing the company’s accounting, finance, tax, and risk management departments. Dice’s position as vice president of shared services is a new role at Winsupply. Dice joined Winsupply as the president of Winsupply Group Services – Dayton in 2004. Most of the company’s back office service departments will fall to Dice, including accounts payable, credit, payroll and support. Visit winsupplyinc.com. n


Planning for your future just got a little easier.

introducing

If you are currently offering a retirement plan, American Fire Sprinkler Association has a better way to offer 401(k) to your employees. It’s called a Multiple Employer 401(k) Plan. This plan is sponsored by American Fire Sprinkler Association and managed through Transamerica Retirement Solutions (“Transamerica”), and the firm of Pinnacle Financial Services. A Multiple Employer Plan, also referred to as an MEP, is a retirement plan for businesses that typically have a common interest, but that are not commonly owned or affiliated. These businesses are referred to as “Adopting Employers” when they elect to join the Multiple Employer Plan. What are the Benefits? • Potential costs savings • Hours of Administrative time savings • Reduction of work for your staff • Shifting of plan responsibility • Reduction of fiduciary liability • No more plan audit (if applicable) • No more plan document or legal filings • Allows you to focus on your business • Flexibility to have maintain your own plan design and features To learn more about this new AFSA Retirement Plan benefit,

contact John.Hershenberg@pfslink-e.com or 817-300-5539.


PRODUCT NEWS.

Introducing New Plastic Universal Hose Valve Caps from FPPI FPPI announces the launch of its universal hose valve cap, the newest addition to its line of plastic hose valve caps. The new valve cap helps contractors save time as it is designed to fit most regional threads and can be installed on most 21/2-in. sized hose valves by simply push-

ing it onto the outlet. No tools are required, and the cap can be removed and put back in place several times without compromising the protection it provides the threads. The plastic caps have been introduced to meet the increasing demand for an alternative to brass and aluminum caps for hose valves with regional threads. This is particularly important in areas where metal parts are subject to theft. In these situations, contractors need a solution that is immediately identified as “low to no value,” to deter theft and vandalism. The new hose valve caps are made from red plastic, and are unlikely to be stolen. FPPI’s universal hose valve caps are equipped with a chain, and will fit most 21/2-in. sized hose valves with

Join AFSA

and get an immediate tax reduction

the exception of the Richmond regional thread hose valve (RCH). Visit fppi.com. Fire Sprinkler Installation Made Easy with Senju Wrenches Senju’s NR-H wrench is used for installing RC model heads and is now also available in plastic material, perfect for storing in cabinets. Other wrenches include ZN model heads and side wall sprinklers. No matter which heads you have in your projects, Senju wrenches will be able to help you be a step ahead! Visit senjusprinklers.com. New Training Curricula Available NCCER has released two new training programs. The Construction Workforce Development Professional program is the first of its kind in the construction industry and establishes a standard for the skills and knowledge a construction workforce development professional should possess. The Mentoring for Craft Professionals curriculum details the expectations and outcomes of a mentoring relationship, characteristics of effective mentors, phases of mentoring relationships, communication techniques, conflict resolution and elements of a formal mentoring program. Visit nccer.org. n

ADVERTISERS

In today’s competitive environment... it is more important than ever to strengthen your business by building your professional network. AFSA members work together to promote and improve our industry through training, information and technical services. AFSA membership dues are deductible as an ordinary and necessary business expense. To qualify for your 2016 tax deduction, your membership application must be postmarked by December 31, 2016. Apply online at firesprinkler.org or call (214) 349-5965.

78 Sprinkler Age | November/December 2016

Be a Member

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AFSA Virginia Chapter 25 Argco 22, 69 BlazeMaster Fire Sprinkler Systems 47 Blue River Underwriters 71 Building Reports 3 Bull Moose Industries 23 Center for Life Safety Education 64 Easyflex IBC Engineered Corrosion Solutions 11 FPC Magazine 66 Ferguson Fire & Fabrication, Inc. 59 Fire Protection Products, Inc. 13 Fire Sprinkler eCampus 65 FlexHead Industries, Inc. 4 GECCO, Inc. 74 Globe Fire Sprinkler Company 21 Metraflex 51 Raimondo Consultants, Inc. 20 Reed Manufacturing Company 24 Reliable Automatic Sprinkler Co. IFC South-Tek Systems 9 SprinkFlex, LLC 7 Tyco BC U.S. Tool 55 Victaulic 49 Viega/Reliable Automatic Sprinkler Co. 15 Viking Group 61 Watts Water Technologies 50 Wupperman, Inc. 27


Narrower Aisles. More Commodities. One Solution.

Maximize product per square foot by going higher and narrower. Tyco is leading the way with the highest ceiling-only protection (48 feet) for the narrowest aisles (5 feet) and the greatest flexibility of commodities and packaging. Tyco solutions include the highest ceiling-only protection with ESFR sprinklers, low install cost with EC sprinklers, and industry leading valves, all with pure performance. To find out how we can help future-proof your storage protection, contact your Tyco representative or visit www.tyco-fire.com/Storage

Copyright Š 2016 Tyco Fire Products LP. All rights reserved

Sprinkler Age Nov/Dec 2016  

The November/December 2016 issue of Sprinkler Age

Sprinkler Age Nov/Dec 2016  

The November/December 2016 issue of Sprinkler Age