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CRAFTS

®

KNITTING Vogue® Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book is an invaluable reference for every stage of a knitter’s career. From casting on the first stitch to the details of sleeve construction, there has never been a knitting book as accessible, as beautifully illustrated, and as easy to use and understand as Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book.

VOGUE KNITTING

®

www.sixthandspring.com Follow Vogue® Knitting and Sixth&Spring Books

— MEG SWANSEN

“This book does for knitters what a book on delicious ingredients does for aspiring cooks. As I perused the pages, my mind danced with inspiration for future garments.” — KAFFE FASSETT

“Jam-packed with information for today’s curious knitter—so much useful knowledge is concentrated in these pages! A must-have no matter where you are in your knitting journey.” — NORAH GAUGHAN

“Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book not only lives up to its title, but surpasses it by far with an incredible, extensive amount of knitting information. Bravo to the Vogue Knitting editors!“ — NICKY EPSTEIN

“The new edition of Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book is just that—ultimate help for both beginners and experienced knitters! All the technical basics are here in the clear and concise manner of previous editions, with new material on designing, how to understand sweater shapes, and helpful sections to clarify the details of your favorite knitting projects, including shawls and all kinds of accessories.” — DEBORAH NEWTON

“Loaded with clear ‘how-to’ illustrations and explanatory photos, this book is packed with information on any knitting question you might have. I was fortunate enough to have been part of the original 1989 edition and have worn out my copy, so I can’t wait to get this revised and updated version.”

US $39.95 ■ CANADA $53.95

VOGUE

®

KNITTING THE ULTIMATE KNITTING BOOK Completely revised and updated with more than 70 additional pages of techniques, tips, design fundamentals, 1,600 photos and illustrations, and extensive indexing and cross-referencing, Vogue® Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book is bigger and better than ever before. Crafted by the editors of Vogue Knitting magazine to be the ideal reference for every knitter, from beginner to expert, this indispensable volume includes:

$39.95 US

$53.95 CANADA

■ In-depth discussion of yarns, needles, and other knitting tools

VOGUE

KNITTING

®

THE ULTIMATE KNITTING BOOK

■ Dozens of cast ons, increases, decreases, and bind offs with illustrated step-by-step instruction ■ Every aspect of designing pullovers and cardigans, from proper fit and shaping to choosing design elements ■

Correcting errors across various techniques

■ Professional blocking, assembling, and finishing techniques ■ Embellishments, embroidery, beading, sequins, tassels, and more ■

Knitwear cleaning, care, and storage

NEW COMPREHENSIVE SECTIONS ON:

■ Hat, glove, mitten, and sock design and construction ■

Shawl shapes, design, and construction

Cables

Lace knitting

Mosaic knitting

Brioche

Entrelac

Directional knitting

Double knitting

COMPLETELY REVISED & UPDATED

Filled with thorough yet concise information on virtually every aspect of knitting imaginable, Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book will be the most beloved and used book in any personal knitting library.

— NANCY MARCHANT

VogueUltimateKnittingBook_COVER_FINAL 1

ISBN: 978-1-942021-69-8

THE ULTIMATE KNITTING BOOK

“This updated version of The Ultimate Knitting Book is truly a must for any knitter to have on their coffee table and in their library. Packed with easy-on-the-eye color diagrams, making those enviable techniques that bit more doable. This really is the ultimate knitting book for all levels.” — BRANDON MABLY

“I do not use the word ‘comprehensive’ lightly, but it is applicable to this newly updated publication, which maintains its place as the reference volume for hand-knitting techniques.”

COMPLETELY REVISED & UPDATED

MORE PRAISE FOR VOGUE KNITTING: THE ULTIMATE KNITTING BOOK “The original versions of the Vogue Knitting Book have been my stalwart companions for decades, always within reach for when I’ve forgotten how to do Kitchener stitch (for the hundredth time), need to look up that one cast on that is perfect for an edging, or myriad other knitting questions. It’s my most-recommended volume for any knitter, hands-down. Each new section is given the same clear, comprehensive treatment I’ve relied upon for years and come to expect from Vogue Knitting. This update is a must-have for any knitter—whether you have the original or not!” — AMY HERZOG

1,600+ photographs and illustrations ■ Over 80 helpful sidebars ■ 120 pages on designing sweaters, shawls, socks, hats, mittens, & gloves ■ New, comprehensive sections on entrelac, brioche, mosaic knitting, and more ■

C O M P L E T E LY R E V I S E D & U P D AT E D

®

THE ULTIMATE KNITTING BOOK

Cover design by Diane Lamphron Photography by Jack Deutsch Cover yarn by Purl Soho Needles by Brittany

KNITTING

LOVED FOR A GENERATION, UPDATED FOR TODAY

VOGUE

Vogue® Knitting magazine is the world’s most celebrated fashion knitting magazine.

VOGUEKNITTING

COMPLETELY REVISED & UPDATED

THE BEST-SELLING KNITTING GUIDE FOR MORE THAN 25 YEARS

THE EDITORS OF VOGUE KNIT TING MAGAZINE 9/26/17 3:50 PM


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THE EDITORS OF VOGUE KNIT TING MAGAZINE

VOGUE

KNITTING

®

THE ULTIMATE KNITTING BOOK COMPLETELY REVISED & UPDATED NEW YORK

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Copyright © 2018 by SOHO Publishing LLC / Sixth&Spring Books All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means—graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage-and-retrieval systems—without written permission of the publisher. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Title: Vogue Knitting. The Ultimate Knitting Book / by the Editors of Vogue Knitting Magazine. Other titles: Vogue Knitting International. Description: First edition. | New York : Sixth&Spring Books, [2018] | Includes bibliographical references and index. Identifiers: LCCN 2017033626 | ISBN 9781942021698 (hardcover : alk. paper) Subjects: LCSH: Knitting. Classification: LCC TT820 .V6267 2018 | DDC 746.43/2—dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2017033626 Book and cover design by Diane Lamphron Cover photography by Jack Deutsch Yarn: Purl Soho Needles: Brittany FIRST EDITION, FIRST PRINTING

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“I feel strongly that the great folk art tradition we value so deeply has surfaced again in the humble art of knitting. Long may it continue giving all us knitters that thrill of creation!” —KAFFE FASSETT Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book by the Editors of Vogue Knitting Magazine 1989 4

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Table of Contents 1 YARNS AND SUPPLIES 9

2 BASIC TECHNIQUES 29

3 CABLES 67

4 COLOR KNITTING 79 5 LACE KNITTING 99

6 CIRCULAR KNITTING 113

7 DIRECTIONAL KNITTING 123

8 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES 141

9 KNITTING INSTRUCTIONS 153

10 CORRECTING ERRORS 177 11 FINISHING 183

12 DESIGNING SWEATERS 203 ● 13 DESIGNING SHAWLS 279 ● 14 DESIGNING ACCESSORIES 295 ● 15 EMBELLISHMENTS 325 ● 16 CARING FOR KNITWEAR 333 ● Index 337 Bibliography and Credits 346 Knitters' Graph Paper 348

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THE ORIGINAL VOGUE KNITTING BOOK (1989) The editors of Vogue Knitting magazine worked tirelessly for three years to create the original book, which was first published in 1989. In a meticulous process, each illustration was knit, then pre-sketched, and finally hand drawn and colored, and swatches were knit and mounted for photography. With very early computers not yet able to illustrate, all the graphs and charts were hand drawn and colored, and mechanical boards were laid out by hand for each and every page for printing. The book was well planned, and all the basic techniques for designing and knitting sweaters were thoroughly explored and expounded upon. The goal was to create the ultimate knitting reference, one that would cover every aspect of knitting in clear, concise language with accurate step-by-step visuals. The original book has stood the test of time. It is still a bestseller and the essential reference for today’s knitters. In 2002 there were several updates made for the second version. Fashion pages were replaced, outdated material was dropped, and a new cover was designed.  Many people were involved in the making of the book, including the following tireless editors and contributors.

1989

2002

THE TEAM LOLA EHRLICH

Lola was editor in chief of the magazine at the time the book was editorially conceptualized and led her team as they developed the manuscript and materials. Lola eventually left the magazine and founded Lola Hats. NANCY J. THOMAS

Nancy contributed to the technical writing and directed the knitting for the garments and swatches. Nancy went on to have a successful career as editor in chief of Knitters Magazine. She worked for several yarn companies as well. CARLA PATRICK

ART DIRECTION & DESIGN

Karen Salsgiver

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Martha K. Moran BOOK EDITOR

Cheri Gillette

ILLUSTRATIONS

Kate Simunek, Chapman Bounford & Associates (UK) COPY EDITORS

Debbie Conn, Liza Wolsky

Carla invented the computer-generated symbolcraft library for the book that is still being used throughout the industry. She acted as the primary technical writer and supervised photography. Carla is still with the magazine today.

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

JONI CONIGLIO

Kaffe Fassett Barbara Walker Elizabeth Zimmermann Margaret Bruzelius Mari Lynn Patrick Civelek

Joni wrote and edited technical copy and painstakingly directed the development of the hundreds of illustrations in the book. Joni currently works for Interweave/F&W overseeing technical aspects of their publications.

Catherine Quartulli DESIGN ASSISTANT

Susan Carabetta

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jack Deutsch Torkil Gudnason (fashion)

CHARTS & SCHEMATICS

Roberta Frauwirth Timothy McGrath Marie Schoeff CONSULTANTS

Mike Brecher Michael Harkarvy Mike Shatzkin CONTRIBUTORS

Trevor Bounford Berta Carla-Harkavy Ann Clue Carol Covington Sandy Daniels Roger Eaton Lillian Esposito Mary Ann Esposito Elsie Faulconer Maureen Fitzpatrick David Frederickson Joe Marc Freedman Norah Gaughan Kathy Grasso Ilisha Helferman Chris Jones Silvia Jorrin Teri Leve Hugh MacDonald Elizabeth Malament Nancy Marchant Margarita Mejia

Annie Modesitt Deborah Newton Kay Niederlitz Susan Olsen Lisa Paul Rose Ann Pollani Dorothy Radigan Mick Rivers Cindy Rose Emma Scott Jessica Shatan Karen Sisti Joe Vior DIRECTOR OF BUTTERICK PUBLICATIONS

Art Joinnides

SPECIAL THANKS TO

Barbara Walker, Elizabeth Zimmermann, Meg Swansen, Corinne Shields, Claudia Manley, Montse Stanley, Mary Thomas, Sally Harding, Margery Winter

2002 VERSION COVER DESIGN

Ben Ostasiewski

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY

eye4media, NYC

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THE NEW VOLUME (2018) Our current editors have spent the past two years thoroughly revising and updating the entire reference. The knitting boom of the 2000s, coupled with the early and voracious adoption of the Internet by knitters, caused an explosion of knitting knowledge being shared globally. This opened our world up to new influences in technical execution and to many new designers. Knitters, while still making sweaters, went through frenetic phases of knitting other items as well—hence the scarf, sock, and shawl crazes. Couple all that with the revolution that has taken place in fiber sourcing and development, new technologies in yarn construction, and the invention of new and improved needles and tools, and we are at a pivotal moment in the history of knitting. The goal of our book is to mark that special milestone and present as much new material as possible. Many illustrations and much of the photography from the original book were still in our archives and as relevant today as they were in the 1980s. Many pages of the book are new, though, and our team worked very hard to create material that blends perfectly with the old. The updated design marries them both. Many people contributed to this new volume, and to all of them we are especially grateful. We think you will find it an asset to your knitting now and well into the future.

THE TEAM ART JOINNIDES

It was Art’s original vision to relaunch Condé Nast's shuttered Vogue Knitting magazine in 1982. That vision extended to the creation of the original Vogue Knitting book, and now to this fully updated volume. Art has been at the helm of the magazine since 1982. TRISHA MALCOLM

Trisha is currently the editorial director of the magazine and worked with the team to determine the content of the new volume. She directed the planning for each individual page. CARLA PATRICK SCOTT

Carla is now the executive editor of the magazine. She oversaw the technical aspects of the book, including checking the accuracy of the photos, illustrations, and manuscript. Carla has further refined her original symbols, and consults with the industry on setting global yarn and sizing standards.

LORI STEINBERG

Lori filled the roles Nancy, Carla, and Joni played in the original edition. As well as consulting on the content direction and planning, she wrote the technical instructions and all new captions, supervised and styled the photography, and managed the knitters and illustrators, creating hundreds of swatches and detailed instructions for them herself. She is an expert knitter and designer who has a parallel career directing plays and musicals. MARJORIE ANDERSON

Marjorie contributed to the planning of the new content for the book and did exhaustive research on knitting history, as well as on each of the techniques presented throughout. She wrote all the introductions and new text and created the substantial and detailed bibliography, providing all the sources of her broad and painstaking study. Marjorie is a professional writer, editor, and copy editor and an expert knitter.

ART DIRECTION & DESIGN

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Diane Lamphron

Daryl Brower Jacob Seifert

MANAGING EDITOR

PROOFREADER

PHOTOGRAPHY

TRANSCRIBER

KNITTERS

PRODUCTION MANAGERS

Martha K. Moran Jack Deutsch

Christina Behnke Lisa Buccellato Claudia Conrad Loretta Dachman Melissa McGill Jaclene Sini Erin Slonaker Lori Steinberg Hannah Wallace ILLUSTRATORS

Sherry Berger Glee Barre Kate Francis /Brown Bird Design Kathie Kelleher Carol Ruzicka Linda Schmidt TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

Loretta Dachman Linda Schmidt YARN EDITORS

Matthew Schrank Jaclene Sini INDEX

Carol Roberts

Erin Slonaker

Catherine Quartulli Franklin David Joinnides Joan Krellenstein

MARKETING MANAGER

Beth Ritter

PUBLISHER

Caroline Kilmer PRESIDENT

Art Joinnides CHAIRMAN

Jay Stein

SPECIAL THANKS TO

The Craft Yarn Council, Laura Bryant, Rosemary Drysdale, Nancy Marchant, Deborah Newton, Erin Slonaker and Karin Strom. Also to Debbie Bliss/Knitting Fever, Jim Bryson/Bryson Distributing, Cascade Yarns, Classic Elite Yarns, CocoKnits, DMC, Istex, Plymouth Yarn, Sirdar, and Universal Yarn for providing all yarns and knitting tools.

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Special Features of This Book This book was written with careful attention to its content and the arrangement of topics. You will find the book most useful if you understand its features and organization. The Table of Contents is color coded, just like the chapters in the body of the text. For example, the color bar for Chapter 12 on Designing Sweaters is blue, which coordinates with the tabs on the side of each page as well as the photos and how-to illustrations within that chapter. Simply look for the section of the book that matches the color coding of the table of contents, and you will find the correct chapter immediately. The Chapter-Opening Pages have a listing of each topic within a chapter and the page on which that topic begins. Most pages have Running Cross-References to help you find background information on techniques described within the text. You do not have to search through the book to find them or refer to the index. Tip Boxes within the chapters offer advice on improving your knitting. Technique Boxes take you beyond the text description by providing examples or more detailed discussions of garment or accessory construction. This edition has expanded coverage of Charts. There are detailed discussions of working with cable charts, lace charts, color knitting charts, and mosaic knitting charts. There is a detailed discussion of the symbols used for charting, in addition to the listing in Chapter 9 on pages 173 to 176. Chart symbols also appear in the headings next to various increases or decreases (as on page 50). Chapter 9, on Understanding Instructions, has a comprehensive glossary of Knitting Abbreviations (pages 169 to 173) and Abbreviations Explained (pages 164 to 168). This edition of Vogue Knitting:The Ultimate Knitting Book continues to have a thorough explanation of knitting and Designing Sweaters (Chapter 12), with an updated Design Worksheet ( pages 212 to 213) that you can use to organize every detail of your design. This chapter now includes Circular Design from the Top Down (pages 236 to 241). There are new chapters (Chapters 13 and 14) on constructing and Designing Accessories—hats, gloves and mittens, socks, and shawls. Vogue Knitting is a reference for knitters of all skill levels. The book is arranged by subject, not by advancement of technique. Whether you are a beginning knitter, someone who has knitted for some time, or a professional, you will find in each chapter explanations of knitting techniques and practices that will improve your work. Skip around to see what is of interest to you. It is not necessary to learn all the techniques. Begin with the simple techniques and advance as your needs change or become more specific. Vogue Knitting will be by your side to provide advice and guidance as you work on a project or begin something new.

T E CH NIQU E

3 CAB LES

4 C O LO R KNI TTI NG

knit two together (k2tog) 55 make one (M1) increase 52

86

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slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over (SKP) 56

Lower edge with flare

Lower edge no flare

Top edge with flare

Top edge no flare

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1 Color coded pages

4 TIP and TECHNIQUE Boxes

2 Photo of completed technique

5 Running Cross References

17 Wrist to Arm

= 1"(1 cm)

17 Sleeve to Undearm (Minus Rib)

12 Waist to Underarm

10 Back Neck to Waist

9 Hip

LENGTHS/DEPTHS

6 Upper Arm

8 Waist

5 Shoulder

7 Wrist

4 Neck

3 Crossback

1 Bust/Chest

212

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Sts to 4"(10 cm)

[

= 1"(1 cm)

Rows to 4"(10 cm)

[

= 1"(1 cm)

Over

18 Cap Depth

16 Sleeve Cuff Rib

15 Neck Drop

14 Shoulder Depth

13 Armhole Depth

12 Body to Underarm (Minus Rib)

10 Total Length

11 Rib at Lower Edge of Body

LENGTHS/DEPTHS

9 One-half Hip

8 One-half Waist

7 Sleeve Above Rib

Over

18 Cap Depth

17 Sleeve to Underarm (Minus Rib)

16 Sleeve Cuff Rib

15 Neck Drop

13 Armhole Depth

14 Shoulder Depth

12 Body to Underarm (Minus Rib)

10 Total Length

11 Rib at Lower Edge of Body

9 One-half Hip

8 One-half Waist

7 Sleeve Above Rib

6 Sleeve at Upper Arm

5 Shoulder

Equal =

SKETCH

CABLE FLARE

Cable flare occurs because the crossed part of a cable pulls in more than the rest of the cable. The splayed fabric may produce ripples or pleats above the last cable or below the first cable you work. Changing the number of stitches within the cable or below it will help you get a smooth top and bottom edge. If you begin the cable stitch pattern right after casting on, reduce the number of cast-on stitches by 1 or 2. After working a few rows, but before the cable cross, increase within the cable to restore those stitches. Larger cables may require 2 increased stitches, whereas smaller cables may need only 1 increased stitch. Add the increased stitch or stitches in the middle of the cable, near the column where the cable will cross. To avoid flare at the top of your piece when binding off, decrease 1 or 2 stitches across the top of the cable. You can do this by knitting 1 or 2 stitches together within the cable a few rows before you bind off. Alternatively, you can also knit 2 stitches together (each k2tog eliminates one stitch) once or twice within the cable as you bind off. In your swatch, you can test the number of stitches to decrease to make a smooth top and bottom edge.

Accessories:

3 Knit 1 from cn, insert cable needle under the strand between the last stitch worked and the next stitch on cable needle and knit it through the back loop (M1), knit remaining 2 stitches from cable needle.

LENGTHS/DEPTHS

2 Knit 3 stitches from left-hand needle.

GAUGE SWATCH

1 2 D E SI G NING SWE ATE RS

1 Slip 3 stitches to cable needle and hold to the front, insert left-hand needle under the strand between last stitch on cable needle and next stitch on left-hand needle, with right-hand needle, knit this stitch through the back loop (M1).

WIDTHS

Needles:

6-st LC becomes an 8-st LC

= 1"(1 cm)

[

CALCULATIONS

Number of Balls:

3 Pull the unknotted end of the strand to release the yarn as needed.

[

Rows to 4"(10 cm)

SCHEMATIC AND PATTERN GRID

4 Neck

Yarn Content:

2 Cut the yarn, leaving about an 8-inch (20-cm) tail. Remove the yarn from your fingers, wrap the tail several times around the center, and tie a knot as shown.

Sts to 4"(10 cm)

Yarn Weight and Yardage:

Color and Dye Lot#:

1 Hold the end of the yarn with your thumb. Bring the yarn around your forefinger and middle finger. Wrap it in the opposite direction around your ring finger and little finger. Continue wrapping the yarn in a figure eight until you have enough.

6 Sleeve at Upper Arm

Yarn Name:

5 Shoulder

INCREASING CABLE

WIDTHS

Name: Date:

PATTERN NOTES

GAUGE

SWEATER MEASUREMENTS

4 Neck

PROJECT

3 Knit next stitch from cable needle.

WIDTHS

2 Slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over the first 2 stitches on the cable needle.

3 Crossback

HAND-WOUND BOBBIN OR BUTTERFLY

1 Slip 3 stitches to cable needle and hold to front, k2tog as shown, then knit 1.

3 Crossback

6-st LC becomes a 4-st LC

BODY MEASUREMENTS

2 One-half Bust/Chest

of color, it is better to use short, manageable pieces of yarn, usually one or two yards (meters) long. The bobbin should accommodate an adequate supply of yarn, be lightweight, and release the yarn easily as needed. It shouldn’t have any rough ends that could catch on your work.

1 Total Bust/Chest

Vogue Knitting Design Worksheet

DIMINISHING CABLE

own, as described below. The type of bobbin you use will depend on your pattern or motif, the weight of the yarn, and your own preference. If you’re using a heavy yarn, a large bobbin will accommodate the extra bulk. Use a bobbin if you are working with only one or two colors at a time, but for numerous small areas

2 One-half Bust/Chest

When you knit with more than one color, whether you prefer the stranded or intarsia method, bobbins will help to keep the yarns from tangling. You can purchase ready-made plastic bobbins in several sizes, or you can make your own out of cardboard. You can also wind your

1 Total Bust/Chest

Bobbins

Place your 4 x 4" (10 x 10 cm) swatch here.

Using the body illustrations on page 209, make your sketch and attach it here

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3 Step by step how-to illustrations 6 Vogue Knitting Design Worksheet 8 VK Ultimate knitting book worksheet grid

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1 YARNS

10

TOOLS

19

ACCESSORIES

24

GET TING ORGANIZED

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1 YAR NS & SUPP LIE S

Yarns & Supplies 28

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Accessories There are many other tools that can make your knitting life easier. Some, such as stitch and needle gauges, are necessities; while others are knitter's choice.

1 YARN S & SUPP LIE S

STITCH GAUGE A stitch gauge is a flat piece of metal or plastic with a ruler marked on one side and cutout windows that make it easy to measure stitch and row gauge. To use it, place your swatch or work in progress on a flat surface and place the stitch gauge on top, lining up the bottom of the window evenly with one row of stitches. Count the number of stitches and rows revealed by the opening and divide by the number of inches marked on the side of the window to calculate the number of stitches in one inch (2.5 cm).

CROCHET HOOK SIZES Millimeters

U.S. Size*

2.25 mm

B-1

2.75 mm

C-2

3.25 mm

D-3

3.5 mm

E-4

3.75 mm

F-5

4 mm

G-6

4.5 mm

7

5 mm

H-8

5.5 mm

I-9

6 mm

J-10

6.5 mm

K-10½

8 mm

L-11

9 mm

M/N-13

10 mm

N/P-15

15 mm

P/Q

16 mm

Q

19 mm

S

NEEDLE GAUGE This handy tool helps you to identify the size of unmarked needles. Needle gauges are available as either flat metal or plastic sheets with holes punched for corresponding needle sizes or metal or plastic rings of different sizes strung on a connector similar to a key chain. To size the needle, simply slip it into one of the holes; the smallest hole that allows both the tip and shaft to slide easily back and forth is the size of your needle. There are also a number of apps that allow you to align the shaft of the needle with an image on the screen of your device to determine the needle size. Some companies have combined a needle gauge with a stitch and row gauge in one tool.

*Letter or number may vary. Rely on the millimeter (mm) sizing. Note about steel hooks: Steel crochet hooks are generally used with lace-weight yarns and crochet threads. They are sized differently than regular hooks: The higher the number, the smaller the hook, which is the reverse of regular hook sizing. The smallest steel hook is a #14 or .9 mm.

CROCHET HOOKS Like knitting needles, crochet hooks are available in a variety of sizes and materials. Knitters will find them useful for picking up dropped stitches and working decorative edgings. Steel hooks, which are the smallest, are sized using numbers from 14 to 5 in the United States, with the largest number being the smallest hook. Larger hooks are sized by both letter and number, with B/1 being the smallest; in this case the larger the number, the bigger the hook. European hooks are sized in millimeters.

STITCH MARKERS Available in a range of styles, stitch markers are used to keep track of increases, decreases, pattern repeats, or the beginning and ends of rounds of knitting. They’re available in solid and split-ring styles in everything from purely functional plastic to sterling silver and beaded designs that rival jewelry in appearance. Solid-ring markers are slipped over the needle as you stitch; split-ring styles are a bit more versatile as they allow you slip markers into

stitches previously knit. Take care when using decorative styles, as rough edges, wire joins, or beads may snag delicate yarns. If you have no markers handy you can use a simple loop of yarn in a contrasting color. STITCH HOLDERS Stitch holders are tools used to hold stitches that will be bound off or worked at a later time (necklines, for example). Some styles resemble oversized safety pins; others are similar to a circular needle and have a cap on one end into which you insert the needle tip to create a closed circle. They’re available in a wide variety of sizes, but you will likely find the smaller ones most useful. Longer circular-style holders are best for large numbers of stitches. If you don’t have a stitch holder available, you can place your live stitches on a spare knitting needle or a length of yarn. ROW COUNTERS These little gadgets help you keep track of the number of rows or rounds you have knit. Styles and operating methods vary, but in most cases you click a lever or turn a dial to keep count as you complete each row or round. Some counters are designed to slip over the needle itself. If you choose this type, make sure it’s sized to fit the needle sizes you use most often. Some resemble tiny cribbage boards with moveable pegs to keep track of shaping and stitch patterns at once, others include a push button to click each number forward, still others resemble stopwatches and can track multiple counters simultaneously. For the more tech minded, there are also myriad apps that will keep careful count for you. POINT PROTECTORS Point protectors are little rubber caps that slip over the pointed ends of needles to cushion them from bumps, dings, and scratches. They’re also useful for keeping stitches from slipping off the pointed end of the needle. You’ll find them in multiple sizes and styles, from the basic to the sophisticated or the whimsical.

SE WING NEEDLES Rounded-tip tapestry or yarn needles are a must for stitching project pieces together, weaving in loose yarn ends, darning, and adding embroidery or decorative duplicate stitches. You’ll find them in metal, plastic, and wood in a variety of sizes. Some feature a ball rather than a blunt point at the end; these can be useful for bulky yarns because they’re less likely to split stitches. The needle eye should be large enough to easily accommodate the yarn. PINS AND CLIPS Every knitter needs a supply of rustproof straight pins, T-pins, and safety pins. Straight pins are used to hold pieces together as you sew. Those designed for knitting are longer than traditional sewing pins, with blunted points and colorful plastic heads to keep them from getting lost in stitches. Newer to the market are bamboo marking pins, which hold heavier pieces together during seaming without danger of splitting or snagging yarns. T-pins, named for their T-shaped head, are good for holding heavier knits; you can also purchase specially designed finishing clips for the same purpose. Blocking pins are long, flexible T-pins specifically designed to hold project pieces in place on a blocking or ironing board as you let them dry or steam them into shape. Coil-less safety pins are another helpful tool. Use them to hold small numbers of extra stitches or for a dropped stitch discovered too late to hook up. They can also be used to mark the right or wrong side of a piece or as stitch markers to indicate your place in a row. Forked pins and blocking combs are other options that will pin and hold pieces evenly to blocking surfaces as the pieces dry. BLOCKING BOARDS Blocking boards offer a large, firm, padded surface for pinning wet-blocked knitted pieces to dry or steaming knits into shape. Many are marked with a grid pattern and a ruler showing inches and centimeters so you can shape

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STR AIGHT PINS

NEEDLE GAUGE

BAMBOO MARKING PINS

STITCH HOLDERS

T- PINS

CROCHET HOOKS

ROW COUNTER

POINT PROTECTORS FINISHING CLIPS SE WING NEEDLES

TAPESTRY NEEDLES / YARN NEEDLES

STITCH MARKERS

FORKED BLOCKING PINS

COIL- LESS SAFET Y PINS 25

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2

Basic Techniques THE STRUCTURE OF KNIT TING

30

HOLDING YARN AND NEEDLES

31

THE BASIC KNIT STITCH

42

THE BASIC PURL STITCH

44

BASIC STITCH PAT TERNS JOINING YARNS INCRE ASES

50

DECRE ASES

55

BINDING OFF

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2 BASIC TEC HNI QUE S

32

CASTING ON

46

48

61

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TUBULAR-CHAIN CAST ON

This cast on is similar to the tubular cast on version A on page 35, but uses a crochet chain to begin.

With contrasting yarn, crochet a chain that has half the desired number of stitches, plus 1. Cut the yarn and draw it through the last loop. With knitting needles smaller than the needles for your project and main yarn, *knit 1 stitch through the back bump of the next stitch in the chain, yo; repeat from * to the last chain stitch, and k1—the number of stitches to cast on is now on the needle.

Row 1 Knit the yarn overs, as shown.

Slip the purl stitches with yarn in front, as shown. Repeat row 1 three times more. Change to the needles for your project and continue in knit 1, purl 1 rib to the desired length. Remove the scrap-yarn chain.

1 Make a slip knot and place it on the needle. Holding the yarn in the left hand as for long-tail or double cast on, with the tail end around the thumb and the end coming from the ball around the index finger, bring the right-hand needle under both thumb strands.

2 Bring the needle over the top of the inside thumb strand, through the middle of the loop and under the outside strand to form a twist in the thumb loop.

3 Catch the strand around the index finger with the needle and bring it through the twisted part of the loop (nearest the needle), drop the loop from the thumb, and tighten the strands. Repeat from step 1 until the required number of stitches has been cast on.

GERMAN-TWISTED CAST ON

This cast on forms a decorative edge.

2 BASIC TEC HNI QUE S

T IP

IMPROVING YOUR CAST ON

• A cast-on edge should be firm, but not tight. If the cast on is too tight, it will eventually snap and unravel.

• If you tend to cast on too tightly, use a larger needle than the suggested size, or use two needles held together. After casting on, remember to switch back to the correct needle size.

• The cast on should not be too loose, or the edge will flare out unattractively. • To create a firmer edge, cast on with a double strand of yarn. • A firmer cast on should be used with yarns that have less resilience, such as cottons and silks. You can also use smaller needles or cast

on fewer stitches (increasing to required number after the last row of ribbing or edging) when using these yarns. • It is best to use longer needles when casting on a large number of stitches.

• Leave a 12–16-inch (30–40-cm) tail to use for sewing seams. To keep it out of the way, bundle up the tail while working on your piece.

• Use a stitch marker after every tenth stitch to help in counting.

contrasting color yarn/CC 158, 165

main color yarn/MC 158

stitch markers 24–25

crochet chain 258

slip knot 32

yarn overs 101, 168

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I-CORD CAST ON

2 Drawing the yarn across the back, bind off the I-cord, but do not fasten off—one stitch remains on the needle.

3 Insert the needle tip through a stitch in the next row of the I-cord, wrap yarn knitwise around needle, and draw strand through the I-cord stitch. Continue in this way until the desired number of stitches is on the needle. Work through the same stitch in each I-cord row for a neat cast on.

With scrap yarn, make an I-cord with the number of stitches to cast on for your project. Work a few rows of I-cord on these stitches. With double-pointed needles, knit 1 row in the main yarn for the project and divide the stitches evenly on double-pointed needles.

After several rounds have been worked in pattern, the scrap yarn can be removed. First, thread the tail of the main yarn in a yarn needle and weave the tail through the stitches of the first round of the main yarn.

To remove the scrap yarn, carefully snip 1 stitch in the last round of the scrap yarn and unpick it with a yarn needle. Tighten the opening in the first round of the piece by gently pulling the woven-in tail.

Place a temporary slip knot on the bottom (pink) needle. Wrap the yarn around both needles the number of times that is equal to half the number of stitches to cast on in your round.

Pull the bottom (pink) needle so that the stitches are on the cable. Knit the loops on the top (silver) needle with the other end of the same circular needle.

Turn and slide the stitches to the pink needle, and pull the silver needle so the stitches are on the cable of that needle. Knit the stitches on the light pink needle with the other end of the pink circular needle.

center-out knitting 135–140

two circular needles 117

knitwise 170

working yarn 172

circular needles 19, 21–22, 115

I-cord 331

slip knot 32

This cast on creates a finished edge that looks like piping.

1 Make a 3-stitch I-cord with the number of rows equaling the number of stitches to cast on.

I-CORD PROVISIONAL CAST ON FOR CIRCULAR KNITTING

This cast on is ideal for knitting medallions from the center out.

TURKISH CAST ON

This cast on is worked on two circular needles and creates a tube with a closed lower edge. It is good for socks, pouches, or projects worked on two circular needles. Working on two different-color needles helps to keep track of the rounds.

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3 INTRODUCTION TO CABLES T YPES OF CABLES

68

69

UNDERSTANDING CABLE SYMBOLS RE ADING CABLE CHARTS

69

70

CABLE STITCHES AND SYMBOLS

72

CABLING WITHOUT A CABLE NEEDLE

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3 CA BLE S

Cables 78

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DIMINISHING CABLE

6-st LC becomes a 4-st LC

1 Slip 3 stitches to cable needle and hold to front, k2tog as shown, then knit 1.

2 Slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over the first 2 stitches on the cable needle.

3 Knit next stitch from cable needle.

1 Slip 3 stitches to cable needle and hold to the front, insert left-hand needle under the strand between last stitch on cable needle and next stitch on left-hand needle, with right-hand needle, knit this stitch through the back loop (M1).

2 Knit 3 stitches from left-hand needle.

3 Knit 1 from cn, insert cable needle under the strand between the last stitch worked and the next stitch on cable needle and knit it through the back loop (M1), knit remaining 2 stitches from cable needle.

INCREASING CABLE

6-st LC becomes an 8-st LC

T E CHNI Q UE

3 C ABL ES

CABLE FLARE

Cable flare occurs because the crossed part of a cable pulls in more than the rest of the cable. The splayed fabric may produce ripples or pleats above the last cable or below the first cable you work. Changing the number of stitches within the cable or below it will help you get a smooth top and bottom edge. If you begin the cable stitch pattern right after casting on, reduce the number of cast-on stitches by 1 or 2. After working a few rows, but before the cable cross, increase within the cable to restore those stitches. Larger cables may require 2 increased stitches, whereas smaller cables may need only 1 increased stitch. Add the increased stitch or stitches in the middle of the cable, near the column where the cable will cross. To avoid flare at the top of your piece when binding off, decrease 1 or 2 stitches across the top of the cable. You can do this by knitting 1 or 2 stitches together within the cable a few rows before you bind off. Alternatively, you can also knit 2 stitches together (each k2tog eliminates one stitch) once or twice within the cable as you bind off. In your swatch, you can test the number of stitches to decrease to make a smooth top and bottom edge.

knit two together (k2tog) 55

Lower edge with flare

Lower edge no flare

Top edge with flare

Top edge no flare

slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over (SKP) 56

make one (M1) increase 52

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TWO-COLOR RIGHT CABLE

Two-color 6-st cable

1 Slip 3 main color stitches to cable needle and hold to the back.

2 Being sure sure to twist the 2 strands of yarn to prevent a hole in the work, knit 3 stitches with contrasting color.

3 Knit 3 stitches with main color from cable needle, being sure to twist the strands as before.

1 Slip 4 sts to cable needle and hold to the front.

2 Being sure sure to twist the 2 strands of yarn to prevent a hole in the work, [k1 CC, k1 MC] twice.

3 [K1 MC, k1 CC] twice from cable needle, being sure to twist the strands as before.

8-ST LEFT CABLE

Two-color 8-st ribbed cable

T E CHNI Q UE

USING CABLES HORIZONTALLY Cables are knit vertically or constructed so that they travel either to the right or left. In some garments, however, placing cables horizontally adds interest to the design. A hat brim, sleeve cuff, or mitten cuff can feature a cable placed horizontally. Cables can be used as horizontal edgings on sweaters or shawls. To use cables in this way, knit a cable panel as a separate piece. You can cast on using a conventional method, such as the long-tail cast on, or start with a provisional cast on that you will graft to the live stitches at the end of the piece to form a tube. If you are seaming the sides of

your garment, a conventional cast on is satisfactory. If you are knitting your item in the round, as for a hat or mittens, then use a provisional cast-on so that the grafted seam will not be visible. It is less conspicuous to cast on in the middle of the cable, rather than at the point where the cable crosses, for a smooth seam or graft. Once the cable is knit, you can pick up stitches on either side and then work vertically. If the cable is to be positioned in the middle of your piece, as for the waistline of a sweater, you will be picking up stitches on both sides of the cable panel.

You can add some additional stitches on the sides of the cable panel to set up the pick-up row or to form an edge that doesn’t curl. For example, if the cable is on a background of reverse stockinette, a garter-stitch edge on the sides of the cable panel will provide a foundation for the picked-up stitches or a smooth bottom edge. It is useful to swatch and block your cable panel to determine how many stitches to pick up. You can test this by picking up stitches on your blocked cable swatch. Because the pieces are oriented differently, they will stretch differently. You may find that

Cable with picked up stitches changing needle sizes for either the cable or the work above or below the cable insertion piece will give you a smoother fabric. Some sweaters that are knit side to side also may feature horizontal cables.

blocking 184–187

grafting 192–193

picking up stitches 171, 196–198

shawls 279–294

contrasting color yarn/CC 158, 165

hats 296–303

provisional cast on 36, 37

swatch 159–162

garter stitch 30, 46

long-tail cast on 33

reverse stockinette stitch 46

sweaters 203–278

gloves and mittens 304–312

main color yarn/MC 158, 166

seaming 188–195

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4 Color Knitting STR ANDED KNIT TING 85

BOBBINS

86

CHARTS

88

HORIZONTAL STRIPES

SLIP STITCHES

91

92

VERTICAL STRIPES

93

MOSAIC KNIT TING

94

SHORT-ROW COLOR KNIT TING PL AID KNIT TING

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4 C OLO R KNITTING

INTARSIA

80

96

97

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Bobbins When you knit with more than one color, whether you prefer the stranded or intarsia method, bobbins will help to keep the yarns from tangling. You can purchase ready-made plastic bobbins in several sizes, or you can make your own out of cardboard. You can also wind your

own, as described below. The type of bobbin you use will depend on your pattern or motif, the weight of the yarn, and your own preference. If you’re using a heavy yarn, a large bobbin will accommodate the extra bulk. Use a bobbin if you are working with only one or two colors at a time, but for numerous small areas

of color, it is better to use short, manageable pieces of yarn, usually one or two yards (meters) long. The bobbin should accommodate an adequate supply of yarn, be lightweight, and release the yarn easily as needed. It shouldn’t have any rough ends that could catch on your work.

HAND-WOUND BOBBIN OR BUTTERFLY

2 Cut the yarn, leaving about an 8-inch (20-cm) tail. Remove the yarn from your fingers, wrap the tail several times around the center, and tie a knot as shown.

3 Pull the unknotted end of the strand to release the yarn as needed.

4 COL OR KN ITTI NG

1 Hold the end of the yarn with your thumb. Bring the yarn around your forefinger and middle finger. Wrap it in the opposite direction around your ring finger and little finger. Continue wrapping the yarn in a figure eight until you have enough.

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JOINING A NEW COLOR: VERSION A

1 Wrap first the old and then the new yarn knitwise and work the first stitch with both yarns.

2 Drop the old yarn. Work the next 2 stitches with both ends of the new yarn.

3 Drop the short end of the new color and continue working with the single strand. On the following row, work the 3 double stitches as single stitches.

JOINING A NEW COLOR: VERSION B

1 Cut the old yarn, leaving about 4 inches (10 cm). Purl the first 2 stitches with the new yarn. *Insert the needle purlwise into the next stitch, lay the short ends of both the old and new colors over the top of the needle and purl the next stitch under the short ends.

2 Leave the short ends hanging and purl the next stitch over them.

3 Repeat from the * until you have woven the short ends into the wrong side of the piece.

JOINING A NEW COLOR: VERSION C

1 Work to 3 stitches before the place where you want to join the new yarn. Work these stitches with the yarn folded double, making sure you have just enough to work 3 stitches.

2 Loop the new yarn into the loop of the old yarn, leaving the new yarn doubled for approximately 8 inches (20 cm). Knit the next 3 stitches with the doubled yarn. Let the short end of the new yarn hang and continue knitting with 1 strand.

3 On the next row, carry the first yarn across the back of the work from the place where it was dropped on the previous row and twist it together with the second yarn. Work the doubled stitches as single stitches.

knitwise 170 purlwise 171

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8 BRIOCHE KNIT TING DOUBLE KNIT TING TUCKS

142

144

147

LOOP STITCH

148

ELONGATED AND DROP STITCHES FELTING

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8 ADVANCE D TEC HNIQU ES

Advanced Techniques 149

152

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Double Knitting

Two sides of one double knit piece.

Double knitting is a method of knitting in which you create a fabric with two public sides using two balls of yarn knit on one set of needles. Double-knit fabrics can be knit flat on straight needles or in the round on circular needles or double-pointed needles. The technique is excellent for making very warm blankets, hats, or cowls. When both sides of the work are knit in stockinette, the double thickness of the fabric prevents it from curling. When planning

CASTING ON WITH 2 COLORS

8 A DVANC ED TE CHNIQ UES

1 Holding 1 strand of each color (A and B) together, cast on the number of stitches for 1 side using preferred cast-on method. *With both strands held to the back, knit 1 with A (facing side stitch).

your project, keep in mind that you need twice as much yarn as in single-face knitting. Double knitting is often used with two different color yarns, and the resulting fabric is reversible. Because there is no right or wrong side in double knitting, the side you are working on is described as the facing side and the side away from you is the opposite side. In each row or round, you alternate knitting stitches from each ball of yarn.

Double-knitting charts show only the facing side of the fabric. For each square, you knit two stitches—one for the facing side and one for the opposite side. Get started by casting on using one of the methods shown. You need to cast on twice as many stitches as you would for a single fabric. To knit circularly, use any standard method for joining in the round.

CASTING ON WITH 1 COLOR

2 Move both strands to the front between the needles and with B, p1 (opposite side stitch), move both strands to the back between the needles. Repeat from the * in step 1 until all stitches have been worked.

1 Using preferred cast-on method, cast on the number of stitches needed for one side. *With both strands held to the back, knit 1 with A but don’t drop stitch from needle (facing side stitch).

2 Move both strands to front of work between the needles and with B, purl 1 (opposite side stitch). Move both strands to back of work between the needles. Repeat from * in step 1 until all the stitches have been worked.

KNIT (SHOWING KNIT ON BOTH SIDES OF FABRIC)

PURL (SHOWING PURL ON BOTH SIDES OF FABRIC)

1 Knit on facing side. With both strands held to back, insert needle knitwise in next stitch, wrap yarn for facing side to knit stitch.

2 Purl on opposite side (RS facing). Holding both yarns to front, insert needle purlwise in next stitch, wrap with opposite color and purl.

1 Purl on facing side. Holding color for facing side to front and color for opposite side to back, insert needle purlwise in next stitch, wrap with facing color and purl.

2 Knit on opposite side (WS facing to show purl on RS). Holding color for facing side to front and color for opposite side to back, insert needle knitwise in next stitch, wrap with opposite color and knit.

cast ons 32–41

hats 296–303

knitwise/purlwise 170, 171

yarn in front/back 47

circular knitting 113–122

joining in the round 115–117

stockinette stitch 30, 46

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DECREASING

1 With both strands at back of work, slip next (facing) stitch purlwise to the RH needle, place next (opposite) stitch on cable needle, slip next facing stitch purlwise to RH needle.

2 Return stitch from cable needle to LH needle, return the 2 slipped stitches one at a time to the LH needle. Take care not to twist the stitches while returning them to the LH needle.

INCREASING

3 With both strands at back, decrease the facing stitch (k2tog shown).

BINDING OFF: TWO METHODS

2 M1 with the color on the opposite side: Insert LH needle from front to back under the strand between the last opposite stitch worked and the next opposite stitch and knit or purl through the back loop with the color indicated in the instructions.

Double Stranded With two colors held together, knit the first facing stitch together with the first opposite stitch, *knit the next facing and opposite stitches together in the same way, pass the first stitch over the second stitch; repeat from the * until all stitches are bound off.

cable needle 19, 22, 68

knit/purl through the back loops 50

p2tog 55

k2tog 55

make-one increase (M1) 52

1 M1 with the color on the facing side: Insert LH needle from front to back under the strand between the last facing stitch worked and the next facing stitch and knit or purl through the back loop with the color indicated in the instructions.

4 Move both strands to front of work between the needles and decrease the opposite color stitch (p2tog shown).

Single Stranded With the facing color, knit the first facing stitch together with the first opposite stitch, *knit the next facing and opposite stitches together in the same way, pass the first stitch over the second stitch; repeat from the * until all stitches are bound off.

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13 Designing Shawls INTRODUCTION TO SHAWLS

280

281

DESIGNING SHAWLS

SQUARE AND RECTANGUL AR SHAWLS

TRIANGUL AR SHAWLS

285

286

CIRCUL AR AND HALF- CIRCUL AR SHAWLS

288

CIRCUL AR AND HALF- CIRCUL AR SPIR AL SHAWLS CRESCENT AND SHORT-ROW SHAPED SHAWLS FAROESE SHAWL CONSTRUCTION NUPPS AND BE ADS RUANAS

1 3 DESIGN ING SHAWLS

SHETL AND CONSTRUCTION

283

289

290

292

293

294

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Circle Shawl

Shetland Shawl

1 3 DESIG NING SHAWL S

Asymmetric Shawl

BEGINNING YOUR DESIGN In addition to yarn and stitch patterns, the size, shape, and type of edgings and/or borders must be considered when planning a shawl. To begin, make a large swatch using the yarn and main stitch pattern of your choice. Block the swatch and determine the gauge over stitches and rows. This information is needed to plan placement of patterns and shaping. For a style that doesn’t require any shaping, the gauge will determine how many stitches to cast on for the width or depth of the shawl. You might want the center of a pattern to fall at the center of the shawl. If the pattern has an odd number of stitches, cast on an

odd number of stitches and use an odd number of repeats in order to center the pattern in the shawl. Alternatively, stitch patterns can be arranged symmetrically. If the shawl is shaped with increases, add patterns when there are enough stitches to incorporate them. Patterns can be arranged symmetrically within the sections of the shawl defined by the increases or decreases. The top edge of the shawl can be worked along with the main piece when working from the neck to the point, or added later by picking up stitches, or worked separately and sewn on. If the edge is worked at the same time as the main section, cast on enough

stitches each side of the center to accommodate full repeats of the edge pattern, and work the increases between the edges and the main shawl. If stitches are picked up for edges and borders when the main shawl is complete, be sure to pick up and knit the appropriate number of stitches for the stitch multiple in the pattern. If an edging is knit on perpendicular to the shawl, you must work a pattern that fits the number of rows in the body of the shawl. If the border is worked around the entire edge of the shawl, work more than once into each corner stitch. Use your swatch to determine if joining to the corner stitch 2 or 3 times is best.

blocking 184–187

borders and edging 255–259

increases 50–54

measuring gauge for lace 110

blocking lace 110–111

gauge swatch 159–162

lace borders and edging 108–109

Stole

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Square and Rectangular Shawls Square and rectangular shawls can be constructed very simply by casting on the desired number of stitches and knitting in one direction until the shawl is large enough or you have run out of yarn. This procedure also is used for making basic scarves, and a simple shawl need not be more complicated to be warm and cozy.

For square or rectangular shawls with more complex stitch motifs or patterning, other construction methods are used. For example, for stitch motifs with a particular direction, it is possible to construct the shawl in two parts, either by knitting from the edges to the center or from the center to the edges. The center can be joined or grafted

invisibly so that the two ends of the shawl point in opposite directions. Some square shawls are constructed as if they were two triangles joined in the center. Others use a center-out cast on and are constructed like the medallions on page 137. A similar method can be used to construct a rectangular shawl circularly,

SQUARE SHAWLS

although in this case the shawl is begun by casting on a row of stitches and then joining to work in the round. Most often, square shawls are folded in half and worn over the shoulders, but squares can be constructed with openings so that they can drape over the front as well as the wearer’s back.

RECTANGULAR SHAWLS A stitch pattern based on garter stitch works best when designing a square shawl worked diagonally. Cast on 1–5 stitches. Increase 1 stitch on each side on every right-side row and work even on wrong-side rows. When the diameter of the square is the width desired, decrease 1 stitch each side on every other row. The increases and decreases can be positioned a few stitches from the edge of the square to create a border.

To make a shawl knit from the outer edge to the center, For matching edges For Shawl worked in with a circular needle, cast on on a rectangular shawl, one direction, 4 times the number of stitches work it in twoVogue parts the desired Rev 7/7/2017 lt mauve c25 m40 y10 k10 Rev 7/7/2017 lt mauve c25 m40 y10 deter-mine k10 Knitting Ultimate Knitting Book Vogue Knitting Ultimate Knitting Book needed for each side of the from the edges to width length of the created 5/23/2017 #283a2 createdand 5/23/2017 #283a1 square. Place a marker for the the center. Cast on shawl. Choose a stitch of the round and the correct number of pattern. Make a gauge Rev 7/7/2017 lt mauve c25 m40 y10 k10 Vogue Knitting Ultimate Knittingbeginning Book stitches and work until swatch in the desired created 5/23/2017 #283a3 place 3 additional markers to divide the stitches into 4 equal the piece is half the stitch pattern. Cast on sections. Join, being careful not desired length. Place the number of stitches to twist the stitches. Decrease the stitches on scrap equal to the desired before and after each marker yarn or a stitch holder. width, considering the in every other round, until 8 Work the second part multiple in the pattern stitches remain. Change to to match the first, and stitch and any border double-pointed needles when graft the two halves. stitches. Work in rows there are too few stitches to Alternatively, work to the desired length. fit comfortably on the circular from the center to the Bind off. needle. Cut the yarn, leaving edges, starting with a long tail, and thread the tail a provisional cast on. through the open stitches. Knit to half the desired Paired directional decreases, length and bind off. such as a k2tog and a SKP, Place the cast-on give the diagonal lines a stitches on the needle pleasing appearance. and work the second half of the shawl.

decreases 55–60, 102–103 192-193 Rev 7/7/2017 lt mauve grafting c25 m40 y10 k10

increases 50–54

joining for circular knitting Vogue Knitting Ultimate Knitting Book115–117 created 5/23/2017 #283a4

knit two together 55

skp 56

provisional cast on 36–37, 39

stitch markers 24–25

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Faroese Shawl Construction Faroese shawls are constructed from two triangular side panels, a trapezoidal back panel, edging, and shaping at the shoulders to keep the shawl from slipping off. The overall shawl looks somewhat like a pair of butterfly wings. Traditional Faroese shawls are knit from the bottom up in

garter stitch and are shaped by closed increases in solid fabric or yarn overs in lace motifs and by decreases along the sides and center panel. Typically one stitch would be decreased on each side of the shawl every other row. The decreases are made inside the vertical border. Stitches

also are decreased gradually to shape the center panel. When the triangular sections of the shawl are decreased and worked to the top 3 or 4 inches (8 to 10 cm) of the shawl, the shawls are shaped at the shoulders using a separate series of decreases. The bottom of the shawl can be

embellished with fringes, or a lace motif can be knit as a wide border along the bottom. In addition, an allover lace pattern can be used in this style shawl. When you are knitting a Faroese shawl, be sure to cast on loosely so that the bottom edge is elastic.

13 DE SIG NING SHAWLS

The Faroese shawl is worked from the lower edge to the neck edge and shaped with decreases. Cast on the total number of stitches for the bottom of the shawl. Decrease 1 stitch each side every other row. These decreases can be positioned a few stitches away from the edge to form a border for the top edge of the shawl. The gusset is decreased more gradually. Place markers to mark the center stitches for the lower edge of the gusset and work the decreases inside the markers. Use the row gauge to calculate how frequently to work the gusset decreases for a 2- or 3-inch (5-or 7.5-cm) gusset at the neck edge. When the shawl measures approximately 6 inches (15cm) less than the desired depth of the shawl to the back neck, begin to shape the shoulders, decreasing every other row in the center of the triangular sections so that the triangular sections end with stitches measuring 1 inch (2.5cm) or less at the top.

casting on/binding off for lace 107

fringe 332

increases 50–54

decreases 55–60, 102–103

garter stitch 30, 46

lace edging 108–109

yarn overs 101, 168

292

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Nupps and Beads One way to add texture to lace shawls is to place nupps within a lace motif. This technique originated in Estonian lace knitting. A nupp, pronounced “noop,” is the Estonian word for bud or knob and is related to a bobble. Most nupps have five to nine stitches. The extra stitches are added on the right side of the work and purled together on the wrong side, as shown below. Be sure to knit the extra stitches loosely so that they can be purled together easily and use needles with very pointy tips. In addition,

try to work the new stitches and yarn overs so that they are the same size in order to make a nupp with a uniform shape. Another way to embellish your shawl is to add beads. There are several ways to incorporate beads into your work. You may string them on the yarn before knitting, as described on page 330, or you can insert them using a crochet hook as you knit. The crochet hook method is shown below. Note that you can add the bead before or after knitting the stitch. In the first method, slide the bead from the

crochet hook to the stitch, then either slip that stitch to the right needle or knit it. In the second method, knit the stitch and return it to the left needle. Then place the bead on the crochet hook and slip it on that stitch. Be sure to use a crochet hook that is small enough to fit through the hole in the bead. Beads are most often added to lace shawls knit in laceweight or fingering-weight yarn, but larger beads can be added to shawls knit from heavier yarns. Beads are often added within sections of plain knitting or above double decreases.

1 On the right-side row, make 7 stitches from 1 stitch. For example: ([K1, yo] 3 times, k1) all into the same stitch.

2 In the next row, purl the 7 stitches together.

Purling 7 stitches together in the usual way can be difficult—, it is possible to use a crochet hook to complete the nupp more easily.

2 Place the hook in the completed stitch and slide the bead onto the stitch.

3 Return the stitch to the right needle.

NUPPS

ADD BEAD WITH CROCHET HOOK

1 Work the stitch on which to add the bead. Slide the bead onto the crochet hook.

bead sizes 328

right/wrong sides 171, 173

bobble 166

yarn overs 101, 168

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14 Designing Accessories 296

CAPS AND HATS

297

ANATOMY OF A HAT

298

T YPES OF HATS

300

DESIGNING HATS

303

BLOCKING HATS

304

MIT TENS AND GLOVES

ANATOMY OF MIT TENS AND GLOVES

305

ME ASURING THE HAND FOR MIT TENS AND GLOVES 306 DESIGNING MIT TENS AND GLOVES

307

MAKING FINGERLESS GLOVES AND MIT TENS MIT TENS

310

312

SOCKS AND STOCKINGS

313

316

ANATOMY OF A SOCK

317

DESIGNING SOCKS

CUFF-DOWN SOCKS TOE-UP SOCKS

1 4 DESI GNING ACC ESSORIE S

GLOVES

309

318

319

TOES AND HEELS

320

KNIT TING KNEE-HIGH AND OVER-THE-KNEE SOCKS BLOCKING AND CARING FOR SOCKS

323

324

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JUDY BECKER’S CAST ON

1 With two double-pointed needles held parallel, make a slip knot leaving a long tail and place on back needle. Holding yarn as for the longtail cast on, *bring the index finger yarn from back to front over the front needle and under the back needle close to the slip knot.

2 Bring the thumb yarn from back to front over the back needle and under the front needle.

3 Repeat from the * in step 1 until the desired number of stitches has been cast on.

4 Turn needles so that working yarn is coming from back needle ready to work. With a 3rd double-pointed needle, knit half the sts from back needle and with 4th needle, knit 2nd half, cont around, knitting remaining sts onto 2 needles. Place a marker for the beginning of the round and begin to increase to shape the toe.

2 Insert the yarn needle knitwise in the first stitch on the back knitting needle. Draw the yarn through, and leave the stitch on the knitting needle.

3 Insert the yarn needle knitwise in the first stitch on the front needle, draw the yarn through, and slip the stitch off the knitting needle. Insert the yarn needle purlwise through the next stitch on the front needle. Draw the yarn through, leaving the stitch on the knitting needle.

4 Insert the yarn needle purlwise in the first stitch on the back needle, draw the yarn through, and slip the stitch off the knitting needle. Insert the needle knitwise in the next stitch on the back needle. Draw the yarn through, and leave the stitch on the needle

KITCHENER STITCH

1 4 DESIG NI NG A CCE SSOR IE S

1 To graft a sock toe using Kitchener stitch, divide the stitches evenly on two double-pointed needles, being sure that the center of the heel lines up with the center of the needles. With the working yarn coming from the back needle, thread a yarn needle. Insert the yarn needle purlwise in the first stitch of the front needle and draw the yarn through, leaving the stitch on the knitting needle.

TIP

SOCK KNITTING

• To tighten the join between a heel flap and gusset, pick up stitches through the back loop of the chain edge along the heel flap. By doing so, you twist the stitches and make them tighter. • To avoid the small hole that sometimes appears over the gusset, pick up an extra stitch or two. Then decrease the extra stitches on the next round.

• If you are working with doublepointed needles, it is often easier to knit with sets of five needles rather than four. In that way, you can divide your stitches so that the instep is on two needles and the foot is on two needles. When knitting with two circular needles, place the instep on one needle and the foot on the other. • To avoid ladders, adjust the

tension at the point where you switch to a new needle, whether you are using double-pointed needles or two circular needles, or using the magic loop method. • To be sure you have enough yarn for both socks, weigh the skein before you wind it. Then weigh the wound ball or cake as you wind it, and when it is equal to half the weight of the skein, break the yarn

and wind the second half. If the yarn has a pattern, such as self-striping yarn, you can start each skein with the same color or part of the pattern. In this way, the two socks will look identical. • For a rounder toe on cuff-down socks, decrease on every round on the last four decrease rounds.

avoiding ladders 116

double-pointed needles (dpns) 19–20, 136

magic loop 118

slip knot 32

two circular needles 117

decreases 55–60, 102–103

grafting (Kitchener stitch) 322

purlwise/knitwise 59

stitch markers 24–25

yarn (tapestry) needle 24–25

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Knitting Knee-High and Over-the-Knee Socks Most sock pattern instructions are for crew socks and have a leg circumference that is the same as the foot circumference. If your ankles and calves are thinner or larger than this measure, changing the number of stitches in the circumference of the leg will provide a better fit. All that is needed are a few additional measurements and calculations. Start by measuring your leg. Use your gauge swatch to determine the number of stitches per inch or centimeter. Then multiply this number by the circumference of your ankle or calf. Use increases or decreases, as necessary. To make socks that are higher than crew socks, refer to your row gauge as well as your stitch gauge. The average crew sock is around 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm). Knee-high socks are about 13 to 14 inches (33 to 35 cm) from heel to cuff, and thigh-high socks can be more than 20 inches (50 cm) from heel to cuff.

To decide where to place the extra stitches on knee-high socks, measure your calf and measure the circumference just under your knee. Also measure your leg vertically as shown in the schematic. If you are knitting toe-up socks, the circumference from the ankle to the bottom of the calf should be the same circumference as for ankle-length socks. At the base of the calf, begin to increase stitches until you have enough stitches to accommodate the larger measure needed for your calf. At the widest part of the calf, begin to decrease until you achieve the circumference needed for the base of your knee. Reverse the shaping for top-down socks. Instead of increasing at intervals within a round, you can also add a gusset at the back of the leg and increase along a center stitch. The stitches needed for the calf can be added using mirrored increases or subtracted using mirrored decreases. The additional stitches

can also be placed at the sides of a decorative stitch. That is, the back of the calf can have a separate pattern that acts as a V-shaped gusset with stitches added or reduced along the edges of that pattern. For a thigh-high sock, you need an additional measurement around the part of your thigh where the sock will end. Adjust the circumference as you would for knee-high socks. The spacing of the increases or decreases determines the accuracy of the fit. Closely spaced increases or decreases add or remove a lot of fabric in a few rounds, and more widely spaced increases or decreases have more gradual shaping. Using ribbing at the tops of knee-high and thigh-high socks helps keep the socks from falling down.

1

4 2

5

6 MEASURING LEG FOR LONG SOCKS AND STOCKINGS

1 STOCKING LENGTH 2 KNEE-HIGH LENGTH 3 CREW LENGTH 4 THIGH CIRCUMFERENCE 5 UNDER KNEE CIRCUMFERENCE 6 CALF CIRCUMFERENCE 7 ANKLE CIRCUMFERENCE

decreases 55–60, 102–103

gusset 316

gauge swatch 159–162

increases 50–54

3 7

ribbing 46–47, 214–215

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Index A

Abbreviations, explanation of, 164–168 Accessories. See Tools and Supplies, knitting Acrylic, 17 Advanced techniques brioche knitting, 142–143 double knitting, 144–146 elongated and dropped stitches, 149–151 felting, 152 loop stitch, 148 tucks, 147 Afghan yarn, 12, 13 Alpaca, 14, 15 American knitting. See English knitting Andean knitting, 81 Angora blocking, 187 properties of, 14 Animal fibers, 14–16. See also specific fibers Aran knitting, 68 Aran yarn, 12. 13 Armholes and garment design, 206 raglan, 219 shaping, 218–219 types of, 200 See also Sewing in a sleeve Arm measurements, 154–156, 208–209, 223 Assembling a knitted garment, 199–202. See also Grafting; Seaming Attaching, how to, 201–202

B

Baby yarn, 11, 12, 13 Back loop, working into, 46, 50 Back measurements, 154–156, 208–209 Backstitch, 191 Back stitch (embroidery), 326 Backwards knitting, 124, 127 Bags, storage, 28 Ball band, 13 Balls of yarn, 12–13 Ball winders, 26–27 Bamboo  yarn, 16 needles, 19–23  Bands on hats, 297 knitted-in, 202 miscellaneous, 257 open chain cast on for, 257 ribbed, 255 stockinette stitch, 256 waistbands, 273–274 Baskets, storage, 28 Basting, 190 Bavarian knitting, 68 Beads, knitting with, 293, 328–329

Bias knitting, 132–134 Binding off bind-off row, 30 collars, 249 crochet-edge, 108 decrease, 62 double crochet, 63 double knitting, 145 hats, 300 knit, basic, 61 knit one, purl one, 65 knit two, purl two, 65 in lace, 107 last loop, neatening of, 66 mittens and gloves, 307 one-over-two, 62 overview of, 61 in pattern, 63 picot, 64 for pleats, 269 purl, basic, 61 seam, bind-off, 195 sewn, 65 sewn Italian, 143 single crochet, 63 sloped, 64 socks, 317 suspended, 62 three-needle, 66 tips for, 63 two pieces together, 66 two-row, 66 yarn over, 64 Biosynthetic fibers, 14–16. See also specific fibers Blanket/buttonhole stitch (embroidery), 326 Blocking hats, 303 introduction to, 184 lace, 100, 110–111 laying out and pinning pieces, 186 preparation, 185 of shawls, 281 socks, 324 steam pressing, 187 stranded knitting, 80 tools/materials, 24–27, 184–185, 324 after washing and drying, 335 wet blocking, 187 Bobbins, 26–27, 86 Bobbles, 166, 174, Body shaping, 216–217 Bohus Stickning, 80 Borders and edgings crochet edges, 108, 258–259 garter stitch, with corners, 257 knit-in, 256 lace, 108–109 picot edge, 259 for pockets, 267 and sweater design, 206 Bouclé yarns, 10, 12 Brioche knitting, 142–143 Bulky yarn, 12, 13 Bullion stitch (embroidery), 327

Bust measurement, 154–155, 208–209 Buttonholes contrasting-yarn, 253 eyelet, 253 finishing/reinforcing, 254 horizontal, one-row, 252 horizontal, two-row, 252 loops, 254 overview of, 251 spacing, 251 vertical, 253 Buttons, 275

C

Cable needles, 19, 22, 68 Cables in Aran knitting, 68 back (right), 73 in Bavarian knitting, 68 without a cable needle, 78 chart reading, 70–71 correcting errors in, 181 definition of, 68 diminishing, 76 double knitting, 146 flare, 76 front (left), 73 gauge over, measuring, 78 in guernseys, 68 horizontal, 77 increasing, 76 needles for, 68 overview of, 68 plait, 74 purl cross, left, 74 purl cross, right, 74 ribbed, 75 symbolcraft for, 69, 72 twisted stitch, 75 two-color, 77 uneven, 73 using two cable needles, 75 yarns for, 68 Camel hair, 14 Caps, knitted. See Hats Caps, sleeve. See Sleeve cap shaping Cardigans Fana, 80 shaping, 226 Carding fibers, 10 Care of knitwear care symbols, 18 drying and blocking, 335 folding and storing, 336 tips for, 334 washing, 17, 334 Cashmere, 14 Casting on adjustable ring cast on, 135–136 backwards-loop (single) cast on, 33 braided cast on, three-color, 40 braided cast on, two-color, 40 cable cast on, 34 cable cast on, alternative, 34

cast on row, 30 chain cast on for knit 1, purl 1 rib, 37 circular, top down sweaters, 236 on circular needles, 115, 117–118 collars, 249 crochet-chain cast on, 37 double knitting, 144 on double-pointed needles, 116 Emily Ocker's cast on, 135 garter tab cast on, 286 German-twisted cast on, 38 guernsey (Channel Islands) cast on, 36 hats, 300 I-cord cast on, 39 I-cord provisional cast on, 39, 136 invisible cast on, 35 invisible circular cast on, 136 Italian cast on, two-color, 40 Judy Becker’s cast on, 322 for knit 2, purl 2 rib, 41 knit-on cast on, 34 in lace, 107 left-handed cast on, 32 long-tail (double) cast on, 33 mittens and gloves, 307 open chain cast on, 257 overview of, 32 picot cast on, 36 provisional (open) cast on, 36, 37 for ribbing, 37, 41 with slip knot, 32 without slip knot, 41 socks, 317, 322 tips for, 38 tubular cast on, 35 tubular-chain cast on, 38 Turkish cast on, 39 for vertical stripes, 92 Center-out knitting casting on, 135–136 circles, 138 geometric shapes, 139 shawls, 284, 288–289 spirals in, 137, 289 squares, 137, 284 stars, 140 uses, 135 Chain stitch (embroidery), 327 Charts and graphs for color knitting, 88–90, 93–95 graph paper, 27, 30, 216 increases, charting into patterns, 54 for lace knitting, 104–105 for mosaic knitting 94–95 multiple chart knitting, 90 size of repeats, 89 sizing lines, 89 slip stitch, 93 tips for managing, 105 See also Symbols Chenille yarn, 10, 12 Chest measurement, 155–157, 208 Chevrons, 132, 134 Chullos, 81, 298 Chunky yarn, 11 337

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I NDE X

Index Circles, center-out, 135, 138 Circular design drop shoulders or fitted sleeves, 238 measuring a circular piece, 232 mock seams, 232 overview of, 232 steek or tube, cutting,240 swatching, 233 top-down, 236–241 with yoke, 234–235 without yoke, 233 Circular knitting, 30 casting on, 115–118 circular needles, 114–115 circular needles, casting on, 115, 117–118 circular needles, using two, 21, 117 double-pointed needles, 114, 116 entrelac in the round, 128 gauge swatches, 162 I-cord provisional cast on, 39 jogless joins, 119 joining, 115–117 ladders, avoiding, 116 magic loop, 114, 118 moebius, 122 overview and history, 114 steeking, 120–121, 240 Coat lining, 277 Collars, 206, 249 binding off, 249 for cardigans, 247–248 casting on, 249 midi, 248 notched with lapels, 248 picked up, 246 picked up polo, 246 shaping, 249 shawl, square neck, 247 shawl, V-neck, 247–248 wrapped, for round neck, 247 Color and design, 205 Color charts, 88–90, 93–95 Colorfastness, 184 Color knitting bobbins for, 86 brioche, two-color, 143 charts for, 88–90 intarsia, 85–87 joining a new color, 87 mosaic, 94–95 plaid, 97–98 short-row, 96 slip stitches, 93 stripes, horizontal, 91, 119 stripes, vertical, 92 See also Stranded knitting Colors of yarns, 12 Combing fibers, 10 Condo knitting, 150 Cones of yarn, 13 Construction type and design, 206 Continental knitting holding yarn and needles for, 31, 42–45 knit stitch, 42–43

purl stitch, 44–45 Cords, 331. See also I-cord Corn, 16 Corrugated ribbing, 92, 302 Cotton blocking, 187 finish on, 11, 12, 13, 15 properties of, 15 Couching (embroidery), 326 Counterpanes, 135 Cowichan knitting, 80–81 Craft yarn, 12, 13 Crewneck, 221–222, 244 Crochet bind offs, 63, 108 crochet-chain cast on, 37 crocheted steek, 120–121 edges, 108, 258–259 for plaid, 97 seaming, 195 Crochet hooks, 24–25 Crossback measurement, 208 Crossed stitches. See Cables Cross stitch (embroidery), 326 Cuffs gathers for, 270 for hats, 297 for mittens and gloves, 305 for socks, 316

D

Darning, 182 Darning eggs, 23 Dart shaping, 227 Decreases brioche, 143 center, multiple, 60 double knitting, 145 hats, 300 knit side, double, 58 in lace knitting, 101–103, 106 left-slanting, double, 57–58 left-slanting, multiple, 60 left-slanting, single, 55–56 mittens and gloves, 307 overview of, 55 purl side, double, 58 right-slanting, multiple, 60 right-slanting, single, 55, 57 socks, 317 vertical, double, 59 Delsbø jacket, 80 Designing. See Shawls, designing; Sweater design Diagonal fabric, 132–133 Directional knitting bias, 132–134 center-out circles, 138 center-out geometric shapes, 139 center-out knitting, 135–136 center-out squares, 137 center-out stars, 140 entrelac, 124–128 knitting backwards, 124, 127 modular, 129–131 DK (double knitting) yarn, 11, 12, 13

Domino knitting, 129–131 Double knitting, 144–146 Double-pointed knitting needles (dpns), 19–20, 22, 114, 116 Dropped stitch patterns, 149–151 Drop spindle, 10 Duplicate stitch, 97, 327 Dye lot, 12 Dyes and dying yarn, 12

E

Ease and fit, 156 Edgings. See Borders and edgings Elastic thread, 18 Elastic used in finishing, 273–274 Elongated and dropped stitches, 149–151 Embellishments beads, 293, 328–329 cords, 331 embroidery, 326–327 fringe, 331 on hats, 300 pompoms, 331 sequins, 330 tassels, 331 Embroidery, 326–327 Emstat, Marit, 304 English knitting holding yarn and needles for, 31, 42–45 knit stitch, 42–43 purl stitch, 44–45 Entrelac, 124–128 Errors, correcting cables, 181 darning, 182 dropping individual stitches above the error, 178 extra stitch at the edge, 180 incomplete stitches, 179 lace, 112 lifelines, 181 mending a hole, 182 picking up dropped knit stitch, 178 picking up dropped purl stitch, 179 picking up running stitch, 179, 182 twisted stitches, 178 unraveling rows, 178, 180 unraveling stitch by stitch, 180 Estonian shawls, 280 Eyelets and lace stitches. See Lace

F

Facings curved, 261 mitered, 261 ribbon, 271 vertical, 261 Fair Isle knitting, 80 Fana cardigan, 80 Faroese knitting, 80 Faroese shawls, 280–281, 292 Fastening off, 61 Felted join, 49

Felting, 14, 152 Fibers animal, 14 biosynthetic, 14–16  carding and combing, 10 organic, 16 – 17  other, 18 plant, 10, 15 staple, 10 synthetic, 14, 17 See also specific fibers Filaments, 10 Fingering yarn, 10–11, 13  Finishing a knitted garment attaching separate pieces, 201–202 buttons, 275 elastic, using, 273–274 facings, 261 gathers, ruching, and flares, 270 hemming, 201–202, 260–261 linings, 277–278 pleats, 268–269 ribbon facings, 271 sewing in a sleeve, 199–200 shoulder pads, 272 taping a seam, 271 tucks, 268 zippers, 276 See also Blocking; Grafting; Picking up stitches; Pockets; Seaming Fit and design, 205 Fit and ease, 156 Flares, 76, 270 Floats (stranded knitting), 80, 84 Foot measurement, 315 French knots (embroidery), 327 Fringe, 331 Fulling, 152

G

Garter ridge stitch, 46 Garter stitch, 30, 46 with beads, 329 correcting errors in, 181 elongated cross, 149 grafting on, 192 mattress stitch on, 189 for plaid, 97–98 for selvages, 242 with sequins, 330 Garter tab cast on, 286 Gathers, 270 Gauge cables, 78 factors affecting, 159 for hats, 300 lace knitting, 100, 110 measuring, 161 for mittens and gloves, 307 needle size and, 159 pattern stitch and, 159 ribbing, 214 row gauge, 161, 231 for socks, 317 stitches vs. rows per inch, 30

338

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stranded knitting, 80 swatching for, 18, 160–161 Geometric shapes, 129–131, 137–139 German knitting. See Continental knitting Gloves. See Mittens and gloves Grafting on garter stitch, 192 open to bound-off stitches, 194 open to edge, 194 overview of, 192 on ribbing, 192–193 sock toe, 322 on stockinette stitch, 192 Graph paper, 27, 30, 216 Guernseys, 68

H

Hand measurements, 306 Hanks of yarn, 12–13 Hats band, 297 bill/visor, 297 binding off, 300 blocking, 303 brim, 297 casting on, 300 closing top of, 302 construction, 300 crown, 297 cuff, 297 earflaps, 297 embellishments, 300 gauge, 300 history and overview of, 296 I-cord finishing, 302 increases and decreases, 300 measuring a head, 301 ribbed, 302 types of, 298–299 yarn choice, 300 Head measurements, 301 Hemming, 201–202, 260–261 Hemp, 15 Herringbone elastic casing, 273 Herringbone stitch (embroidery), 326 Hips measurement, 154–156 Holding yarn and needles Continental method, 31, 42–45 English method, 31, 42–45 for stranded knitting, 82–83 yarn at back vs. at front, 47 Holes, mending, 182

I

Icelandic knitting, 80 Icelandic yarn (Lopi), 14, 80 I-cord hat finished with, 302 how to make, 330 I-cord cast on, 39, 136 I-cord gloves, 307 I-cord provisional cast on, 39, 136 Increases

above ribbing, 215 bar (KFB), 50 brioche, 143 double knitting, 145 hats, 300 increasing into a pattern, 53–54 in lace knitting, 107 left-hand edge, 54 left-leaning, 52, 54 lifted, 51 make one (open), 52 make one left (M1 or M1L), 52 make one right (M1R), 52 median, 53 mittens and gloves, 307 multiple, 51 overview of, 50 right-hand edge, 54 right-leaning, 50–54 socks, 317 working in front and back loops, 50 Indian cross stitch, 149 Instructions, understanding counting rows, 163 fit and ease, 156 knitted measurements, 154–156 materials, 158 project level (difficulty), 160 schematics, 157–158 sizes, 154 See also Gauge Intarsia bobbins, 86 changing colors, 85, 87 Interchangeable needles, 19, 22, 112, 114–115

J

Jacket lining, 277 Jacobsson, Emma, 80 Joining circular knitting, 115–117, 119 jogless, 119 joining yarns, 48–49 new color, 87, 119 ribbing, knit one, purl one, 194 Jumbo yarn, 11, 12, 13 Jute, 15

K

Kitchener stitch. See Grafting Knit and purl stitches, 30, 46 Knit stitch Continental method, 42–43 English method, 42–43 for left-handers, 42–43 overview of, 30 shape of, 30 with yarn at back, 47 Knitting, benefits of, 30 Knitting, circular. See Circular knitting Knitting, double-pointed. See Double-pointed knitting Knitting, mosaic, 94–95 Knitting guilds, 313

Knitting in the round. See Circular knitting; Double-pointed knitting Knitting machines, 13, 314 Knitting spools, 26–27, 331 Knitting with color. See Color knitting Knots and bobbles, 166, 174, 327

L

Lace binding off, 107 blocking, 100, 110–111 borders and edgings, 108–109 casting on, 107 charts, 104–105 correcting mistakes, 112 decreasing, 101–103, 106 double knitting, 146 eyelet chevron, 134 gauge, 100, 110 increasing, 107 lifelines, 112 nupps and beads added to, 293 shaping, 106–107 stitches, 100 traditional, 100 types of, 100 yarn and needles for, 100 yarn overs, 101 Ladders, avoiding, 116 Ladders stitches, 151 Lambswool, 14 Lazy daisy stitch (embroidery), 327 Lee, William, 314 Left-handed knitters knit stitch for, 42–43 purl stitch for, 44–45 Leg measurements, 323 Lifelines, 112, 181 Linen blocking, 187 properties of, 15 Linings, 277–278 Llama, 7 Loop stitch, 148 Lopapeysa sweaters, 80 Lopi. See Icelandic yarn

M

Machine knitting, 13, 314 Magic knot, 49 Magic loop, 114, 118 Marchant, Nancy, 142 Mattress stitch, 189 Measurements knitted, 154–156 and sweater design, 205, 208–209 Medallions, 135 Mercerization, 12, 15 Merino wool, 14 Metallic fibers blocking, 187 properties of, 17 Metal yarn, 18 Milk (casein), 10 Mistakes. See Errors, correcting

Mitered squares, 129–131 Mittens and gloves binding off, 307 Canadian, 304 casting on, 307 construction, 307 cuff, 305 Estonian mittens, 304 Fair Isle, 304 fingerless, 309 gauge, 307 glove fingers, 305 hand, 305 history and overview of, 304 increases and decreases, 307 intro to gloves, 312 intro to mittens, 310 Komi mittens, 304 Latvian mittens, 304 Lithuanian mittens, 304 measuring the hand, 306 mitten top, 305 Sanquhar gloves, 304 Selbu mittens, 304 shaping mitten tops, 310 sizing of mittens, 310 thrummed mittens, 311 thumb, 305, 308–309 tips for making, 311 wrist, 305 yarn choice, 307 Modular knitting, 129–131 Moebius knitting, 122 Mohair blocking, 187 finish on, 12 properties of, 14, 16 Mosaic knitting, 94–95 Motif knitting. See Intarsia

N

Neckbands attaching, 201, 234 crewneck, 244 square, 245 V-neck, 245 on yoked sweaters, 235 Neckline crewneck, 221 crewneck with placket, 222 and garment design, 206 V-neck, 222 Neck measurements, 208–209 Needle gauge, 20 Needles, knitting bamboo, 20, 23 cable, 19, 22, 68 carbon-fiber, 20, 23 casein, 23 cases, 28 circular, 19, 21–22, 114–115, 117 double-pointed straight, 19, 20–22, 114, 116 gauge and needle size, 159 glass, 23 holding, Continental method, 339

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Index 31, 42–45 holding, English method, 31, 42–45 interchangeable, 19, 22, 112, 114–115 for lace knitting, 100 lengths, 21 metal, 20–21 plastic, 20–22 for shawls, 281 single-pointed straight, 19, 20 sizes, 19, 21  tips, 21 wood, 20, 23 Needles, sewing, 24–25  Norwegian knitting, 80 Notebook for record-keeping, 28 Novelty yarns blocking, 187 structure of, 10, 17 Nubbed yarns, 10 Nupps, 293 Nylon (polyamide), 17

linings for, 267 patch, 201, 262–263 pouch, 266 side-seam, 266 size and placement of, 262 Point protectors, 24–25 Polyester, 17 Polypropylene, 17 Pompom makers, 26–27 Pompoms, 331 Pooling, 12 Possum, 14 Pressing, 187 Purl stitch Continental method, 44–45 English method, 44–45 for left-handers, 44–45 overview of, 30 with yarn at front, 47 Purl turning ridge, 260

O

Qiviut, 14

Orenburg shawls, 280 Organic and other fibers, 16–17 . See also specific fibers Overcasting, 120, 191

IN DEX

P

Paper yarn, 18 Parallelograms, 132–133 Patchwork knitting, 129–131 Patterns increasing into, 53–54 luskofte, 80 modular knitting, 129–131 stitch patterns. See Stitches Perle yarn, 10 Picking up stitches with crochet hook, 198 horizontal edge, 197 with knitting needle, 197 marking edge for, 196 number to pick up, 198 overview of, 196 shaped edge, 197 vertical edge, 197 V-neckline, 198 Picot bind off, 64 cast on, 36 edge, 259 Pins, 24–25, 110, 185 Plackets, 222, 250 Plaid, 97–98 Plant fibers, 14, 15–17. See also specific fibers Pleats, 268–269 Ply, 10 Pockets cut-in, 266 edges/borders for, 267 flaps for, 263 inset, 264–265

Q R

Raffia, 15 Raglan sweaters armholes, 219 sleeves, 225 Ramie, 15 Rayon, 16 Recycled yarn, 18 Reverse stockinette stitch, 46 with beads, 329 mattress stitch on, 189 with sequins, 330 Ribbing corrugated, 92 differences in, 215 elastic added to, 273 gauge, measuring, 214 grafting on, 192–193 for hats, 302 increasing above ribbing, 215 knit 1, purl 1, 46 knit 1, purl 1, chain cast on for, 37 knit 1, purl 1, joining, 194 knit 1, purl 1, twisted, 47 knit 2, purl 2 rib, 46 knit 2, purl 2 rib, cast on for, 41 knit 2, purl 2 rib, tubular-chain cast on for, 41 knit 2, purl 5, 47 knit 5, purl 2, 47 length, measuring, 215 overview of, 214 twisted, 46–47 Ribbon facings, 271 Ribbon yarns, 10 Right side (RS), 30 Roving, 11, 12, 13 Row counters, 24–25 Rows counting, 163 unraveling, 178, 180

See also Short rows Ruanas, 294 Ruching, 270 Russian join, 49

S

Satin stitch (embroidery), 327 Scarves. See Shawls, designing Schematic drawings, 157–158 Scissors, 26–27 Seafoam pattern, 149 Seaming backstitch, 191 basting, 190 beginning, 188 bind-off seam, 195 crochet, 195 edge-to-edge, 191 invisible, 190 joining ribbing, 194 mattress stitch, 189 mock seams, 232 overcasting, 191 overview of, 188 taping a seam, 271 See also Grafting Seaweed, 16 Seed stitch, 46 Selvages, 242–243 Sequins, knitting with, 330 Set-in sleeves, 218, 239–241 Sewing in a sleeve, 199–200 Sewing seams. See Seaming Shaping armholes, 218–219 body, 216–217 cardigans, 226 collars, 249 dart, 227 in lace, 106–107 mitten tops, 310 shawls, 281 shoulder, 220 sleeves, 223 waist, 217, 270 See also Short-row shaping Shawls, designing asymmetrical, 282, 291 blocking, 281 circular and half-circular, 281–282, 288–289, 291 crescent, 281, 290 diamond-shaped, 284 Faroese shawls, 280–281, 292 heart-shaped, 291 history and types of shawls, 280 needle choice, 281 nupps and beads, 293 pattern stitch, selecting, 281 pi shawls, 288 planning/beginning the design, 281–282 ruanas, 294 shaping, 281 Shetland shawls, 280, 285 short-row shaping, 290–291 square and rectangular, 282–283 stoles, 282

triangular, 281, 286–287, 291 yarn choice, 281 zig-zag edge, 291 Shells, 131 Shetland shawls, 280, 285 Shetland yarn, 10, 14 Short rows bias knitting, 132 circles, 138 color knitting, 96 double stitch, 230 Japanese, 229 row gauges, 231 top-down, short-row, set-in sleeves, 239–241 wrapping stitches, 228 yarn over, 229–230 Short-row shaping collars, 249 shawls, 290–291 socks, 317 sweaters, 228–231 Shoulder pads, 272 Shoulder shaping, 220 Silhouette, 205 Silk, 14–15 Sisal, 15 Sizes in knitting patterns, 154 Skeins of yarn, 12–13  Skirt lining, 278 Sleeve cap shaping gathers, 270 raglan, 225 set-in, 224 Sleeves and garment design, 206, 238–240 raglan, 219 set-in, 218, 239–241 sewing in, 199–200 shaping, 223 types of, 200 Slip knot, 32 Slip knot and chain, 258 Slip stitches with beads, 329 with color knitting, 93 for plaid, 97–98 slipping a stitch knitwise or purlwise, 59 slip-stitch edge, 258 Smocking (embroidery), 327 Socks and stockings bind offs, 317 blocking and caring for, 324 British knitting of, 314 cast ons, 317, 322 construction, 317 cuff, 316 cuff-down, 318, 320 foot, 316 gauge, 317 gusset, 316 heel flap, 316, 321 heel replacement, 324 heel types, 321 history and overview of, 313–315 increases and decreases, 317

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knee-high and over-the-knee, 323 leg, 316, 323 measurements, 315, 323 North American knitting of, 314 short-row shaping, 317 tips for, 322 toe, grafting, 322 toe replacement, 324 toe types, 316, 320 toe-up, 319–321 traditional, 315 turned heel, 316 wartime knitting of, 314 yarn choice, 317 Sock yarn, 10 –11 Soy, 16 Spinning, 10 Spit splice, 49 Splicing yarns, 48 Spools of yarn, 12–13  Sport weight yarn, 11 Squares center-out, 137 mitered, 129–131 Staple fibers, 10 Steeks, 80, 120 –121, 240 Stem stitch (embroidery), 326 Stitches basic, 46–47 chevrons, 132, 134 design and, 205 duplicate stitch, 97 elongated and dropped, 149–151 garter ridge stitch, 46 garter stitch, 30, 46 gauge and, 159 loop stitch, 148 picking up. See Picking up stitches reverse stockinette stitch, 46 ribbed. See Ribbing seed stitch, 46 for shawls, 281 stockinette stitch, 30, 46 See also specific stitches Stitch gauge, 24 Stitch holders, 24–25  Stitch markers, 24–25 Stockinette stitch, 30, 46 with beads, 329 grafting on, 192 mattress stitch on, 189 with sequins, 330 Stockings. See Socks and stockings Stocking stitch. See Stockinette stitch Stranded knitting, 80–84 Andean, 81 in the Baltics, 81 color dominance, 84 Cowichan, 80–81 Fair Isle, 80 Faroese, 80 floats, 80, 84 Icelandic, 80 keeping colors from tangling, 83 Norwegian, 80 one-handed, 82–83 steeking, 120

Swedish, 80 tension, 80, 82 twisting yarns, 84 two-handed, 82 Stripes horizontal, 91, 119 self-striping yarns, 12 vertical, 92 S-twist yarns, 10 Substituting yarns, 18 Superwash yarn, 12 Swatches for cables, 78 circular and flat in same garment, 233 gauge, 160–161 for lace, 110 for measuring/planning yarn amounts, 207 for substituted yarns, 18 Sweater design armhole shaping, 218–219 bands, borders, and edges, 206, 255–257 body shaping, 216–217 buttonholes, 251–254 cardigan shaping, 226 conceptual process, 205 construction type, 206 dart shaping, 227 garment type, 205 introduction to, 204 measurements and fit, 205 neckbands, 244–245 necklines and collars, 206 plackets, 222, 250 planning yarn amounts, 207 ribbing, 214–215 selvages, 242–243 short-row shaping, 228–231 shoulder shaping, 220 silhouette, 205 sleeve cap shaping, 224–225 sleeves and armholes, 206 sleeve shaping, 223 stitch patterns, yarn, and color, 205 trims, 206 Vogue Knitting Design Worksheet, 210–213. See also Circular design; Collars; Neckline Sweaters, caring for, 334, 336 Swedish knitting, 80 Symbols cables, 69, 72, 174–175 common, 173–174 overview of, 173 unusual/alternative, 176 Synthetic fibers, 14, 17. See also specific fibers Synthetic yarns, blocking, 187

T

Tape measures and rulers, 26–27 Tassels, 331 Tension, 80, 82. See also Gauge Terminology, knitting, 169–173

Tools and supplies, knitting ball winders, 26–27 blocking boards/mats/wires, 25–27, 110 bobbins, 26–27, 86 crochet hooks, 24–25 graph paper, 27, 30, 216 knitting spools, 26–27, 331 needle gauge, 24–25 pins and clips, 24–25, 110, 185 point protectors, 24–25 pompom makers, 26–27  row counters, 24–25 scissors, 26–27 sewing needles, 24–25 stitch gauge, 24 stitch holders, 24–25 stitch markers, 24–25 tape measures and rulers, 26–27 T-pins, 24–25, 110, 185 wool brushes, 27 yarn swifts, 26–27 See also Needles, knitting T-pins, 24–25, 110, 185 Trims and garment design, 206 Tubular fabric. See Circular knitting Tucks, 147, 268 Turning ridges, 260

U

Ullared jersey, 80 Underarm measurements. See Armholes; Arm measurements Unraveling knitted work, 178, 180

V

Vicuña, 14 V-neck, 222, 245 Vogue Knitting Worksheet,210–213

W

Waistband elastic, 273–274 Waist measurement, 154–156, 208–209 Waist shaping, 217, 270 Weaving of cloth, 30 ends, weaving in, 48, 184 of floats (stranded knitting), 80 Whip stitch, 201 Wool blocking, 187 finish on, 12, 14 properties of, 14 Superwash, 12 woolen vs. worsted yarns, 10 See also Felting Wool blends, blocking, 187 Wool brushes, 27 Woolen yarns, 10, 14 Woolwash, 27 Working in rounds. See Circular knitting Worsted yarns, 10

Wrapping stitches, 228 Wraps. See Shawls, designing Wrist measurements, 208–209, 223 Wrong side (WS), 30

Y

Yarn bowls, 28 Yarn bras, 28 Yarn holding at back, 47 Continental method, 31, 42–45 English method, 31, 42–45 at front, 47 for stranded knitting, 82–83 Yarn over bind off, 64 Yarn overs (yo), 101 Yarn over short rows, 229–230 Yarns ball band on, 18 blocking, by yarn type, 187 for cables, 68 colors, 12 and design, 205 filaments, 10 finishes, 12 in hanks, balls, and skeins (put-up), 12–13 for hats, 300 joining, 48–49, 87 for lace knitting, 100 lopi, 80 measuring and weighing, 10–12, 18, 207 for mittens and gloves, 307 planning amounts, in garment design, 207 plied, 10 recycling of, 335 scented, 12 self-striping, 12 for shawls, 281 for socks, 317 staple fibers, 10 structure of, 10 substituting, 18 weight, 10–13 weights, for beads, 328 woolen, 10 worsted, 10 See also Fibers Yarn swifts, 26–27 Yokes, 233–236

Z

Zimmermann, Elizabeth, 288, 296 Zippers, 276 Z-twist yarns, 10

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Bibliography Barbara Abbey, Knitting Lace, Viking Press, New York, 1974, penguin.com. Judy Becker, “Magic Cast-On for Toe-Up Socks,” Knitty, Spring 2006, http://www. knitty.com/ISSUEspring06/FEATmagiccaston.html. -------, “Persistent Illusion: Knitting and the Search for Reality,” Judy’s Magic Cast On Blog, http:// www.persistentillusion.com/blogblog/techniques/magic-cast-on/ magic-cast-on-2 Beth Brown-Reinsel, Knitting Ganseys, Interweave Press, Loveland, Colorado, 1993, interweave.com. Nancy Bush, Knitted Lace of Estonia, Interweave Press, Loveland, Colorado, 2008, interweave.com. -------, Folk Socks: The History and Techniques of Hand Knitted Footwear, Interweave Press, Loveland, Colorado, 1994, interweave.com. Rosemary Drysdale, Entrelac: The Essential Guide to Interlace Knitting, Sixth & Spring Books, New York, 2010, sixthandspring.com. -------, Entrelac 2: New Techniques for Interlace Knitting, Sixth & Spring Books, New York, 2014, sixthandspring.com.

BIB LIO G RAPHY AND C REDI TS

Nicky Epstein, Knitting Never Felt Better: The Definitive Guide to Fabulous Felting, Sixth & Spring Books, New York, 2007, sixthandspring.com. Margaret Radcliffe, Circular Knitting Workshop: Essential Techniques to Master Knitting in the Round, Storey Publishing, North Adams, Massachusetts, 2012, storey.com. Priscilla A. Gibson-Roberts and Deborah Robson, Knitting in the Old Way, Expanded Edition, Nomad Press, Ft. Collins, Colorado, 2004, nomad-press.com. Priscilla A. Gibson-Roberts, Ethnic Socks and Stockings: A Compendium of Eastern Design and Technique, Knitter’s Magazine Books, Sioux Falls, SD, 1995, knittinguniverse.com/xrx_books.

June Hemmons Hiatt, The Principles of Knitting: Methods and Techniques of Hand Knitting, Revised and Updated, Touchstone Book, Simon and Schuster, New York, 2012, simonandschuster.com. Galina Khmeleva, and Carol R. Noble, Gossamer Webs: This History and Techniques of Orenburg Lace Shawls, Interweave Press, Loveland, Colorado, 1998, interweave.com. Elizabeth Lovick, Magical Shetland Lace Shawls to Knit, St. Martin’s Griffin, New York, 2015, us.macmillan.com. Cynthia Gravelle LeCount, Andean Folk Knitting, Dos Tejedoras Fiber Arts Publications, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1993. Anne L. Macdonald, No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting, Ballantine Books, New York, 1988, randomhousebooks.com. Sheila McGregor, The Complete Book of Traditional Scandinavian Knitting, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 1984, us.macmillan.com. Nancy Marchant, Knitting Brioche, North Light Books, Cincinnati, Ohio, 2009, northlightshop.com. -------, Knitting Fresh Brioche, Sixth & Spring Books, New York, 2014, sixthandspring.com. Sharon Miller, Heirloom Lace, The Shetland Times Ltd., Lerwick, Shetland, 2002. Lela Nargi, Knitting Around the World: A Multistranded History of a TimeHonored Tradition, Voyageur Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2011, quartoknows.com/voyager=press Susanne Pagoldh, Nordic Knitting, Interweave Press, Loveland, Colorado, 1991, interweave.com.

Myrna A. I. Stahman, Stahman’s Shawls and Scarves, Rocking Chair Press, Boise, Idaho, 2000. Alasdair Post-Quinn, Extreme Double-Knitting, Cooperative Press, Cleveland, Ohio, 2011, cooperativepress.com. Terri Shea, Selbuvotter: Biography of a Knitting Tradition, Spinningwheel L.L.C., Seattle, Washington, 2007. Richard Rutt, A History of Hand Knitting, Interweave Press, Loveland, Colorado, 1987, interweave.com. Alice Starmore, Aran Knitting, New and Expanded Edition, Dover Publications, Mineola, New York, 2010, doverpublications.com. -------, Alice Starmore’s Book of Fair Isle Knitting, Dover Publications, 2009, doverpublications.com. Shirley A. Scott, Canada Knits: Craft and Comfort in a Northern Land, McGraw-Hill Ryerson, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada, 1990. Susan M. Strawn, Knitting America: A Glorious Heritage from Warm Socks to High Art, Voyageur Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2011, quartoknows.com/voyager=press Mary Thomas, Mary Thomas’s Book of Knitting Patterns, Dover Publications, New York, 1972, doverpublications.com. Irena Turnau, The Knitting Crafts in Europe from the Thirteenth to the Eighteenth Century, www2.cs.arizona.edu/pat-terns/ weaving/articles/nb82_knt.pdf.

Barbara G. Walker, A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, Reprint Edition, Schoolhouse Press, Pittsville, Wisconsin, 1998, schoolhousepress.com. -------, Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, Reprint Edition, Schoolhouse Press, Pittsville, Wisconsin, 1998, schoolhousepress.com. -------, Charted Knitting Designs: A Third Treasury of Knitting Patterns, Reprint, Edition, Schoolhouse Press, Pittsville, Wisconsin, 1998, schoolhousepress.com. -------, A Fourth Treasury of Knitting Patterns, Reprint Edition, Schoolhouse Press, Pittsville, Wisconsin, 2000, schoolhousepress.com. -------, Mosaic Knitting, Reprint Edition, Schoolhouse Press, Pittsville, Wisconsin, 1997, schoolhousepress.com. -------, Knitting from the Top, Reprint Edition, Schoolhouse Press, Pittsville, Wisconsin, 1996, schoolhousepress.com. Martha Waterman, Traditional Knitted Lace Shawls, Interweave Press, Loveland, Colorado, 1998, interweave.com. Elizabeth Zimmermann, Knitter’s Almanac: The Commemorative Edition, Dover Publications, New York, 1981, doverpublications.com. -------, Knitting Around, Schoolhouse Press, Pittsville, Wisconsin, 1989, schoolhousepress.com. Vogue Knitting, The Ultimate Hat Book: History, Technique, Design, Sixth & Spring Books, New York, 2012, sixthandspring.com.. Vogue Knitting, The Ultimate Sock Book: History, Technique, Design, Sixth & Spring Books, New York, 2007, sixthandspring.com. The Best of Vogue Knitting: 25 Years of Articles, Techniques and Expert Advice, Sixth & Spring Books, New York, 2007, sixthandspring.com.

Deborah Pulliam, “Traveling Stitches: Origins of Fair Isle Knitting,” 2004. Textile Society of America Proceedings, Paper\467.

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Credits Yarn Weight Charts, page 13, courtesy of the Craft Yarn Council, yarnstandards.com. Toe-Up Socks Cast-on Method, page 322, based on “Judy’s Magic Cast-On,” developed by Judy Becker, author of Beyond Toes: Knitting Adventures with Judy’s Magic Cast-On. Yarn Weight vs Bead Size, page 330, courtesy Laura Nelkin of Nelkin Designs, www.nelkindesigns.com. PHOTO CREDITS FOR PAGE 81

Edward VII in Fair Isle Vest: Photo courtesy Leeds Museums and Galleries (Lotherton Hall) U.K./Bridgeman Images Faroe Islands sweater: Photo courtesy Norðoya Fornminnasavn (via Klakvik Museum)

Icleandic Lopapeysa sweater: Photo courtesy Istex Yarn Company Chullo hats: from the collection of Deborah Newton. Photo by Jack Deutsch. Norwegian Fana sweater: Fana Sweater1987.027.001, Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum, Decorah, Iowa Norwegian sweater with Lice pattern: 1920s Norwegian Sweater with lice pattern, 2008.009.001, Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum, Decorah, Iowa Swedish Ullared sweater: Photo courtesy of Beth Brown-Reinsel, Photographer: Coni Richards
 ©2010 Beth Brown-Reinsel

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Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book, Completely Revised and Updated  

With updated, revised, and new material throughout, 65 additional pages, and more than 1,600 photos and hand-drawn step-by-step illustration...

Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book, Completely Revised and Updated  

With updated, revised, and new material throughout, 65 additional pages, and more than 1,600 photos and hand-drawn step-by-step illustration...

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