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GUNS SPECIAL FEATURE

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Profile: Panthera Group Next issue: BIG GUNS 2021

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Introducing Westfield Plus Helping customers get more from every visit Available at selected centres For more information visit westfield.com.au/westfield-plus

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FEATURES

VOLUME 38, NUMBER 5, 2020

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CENTRE OPENING Westfield Doncaster unveils its $30m dining precinct in Melbourne's east

ROFILE 60 PWith an entirely new approach – Panthera Group is expanding

CONTENTS

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LITTLE GUNS 2020 The COVID factor has hit some centres, while others have shown gains

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A CHRISTMAS LIKE NO OTHER Shopping centres will play an important role this Christmas

SPECIAL FEATURE

2 From the publisher 4

Industry News

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Opening: Westfield Doncaster

10 Legal: Sneakerboy v Georges Properties 12 Research: Retail trends from 2020 13 Special Feature: Pop Up 14 Pop Up News 28 Design: Pop Up power 34 Design: The backfill dilemma 36 Design: Accelerating innovation 40 Special Feature: Little Guns 2020 42 Little Guns 2020: GLA 44 Little Guns 2020: MAT 44 Little Guns 2020: MAT/m2 46 Little Guns 2020: Specialty MAT/m2 60 Profile: Panthera Group 62 Opinion: A new normal 64 Opinion: Early data points to Christmas cheer 66 Marketing: A Christmas like no other 68 Research: Shopping for resilience in retail property 70 Technology: Next generation iconic screens engage shoppers 72 Food: How to maximise food and hospitality sales opportunities in a 1.5m economy 78 Industry Shuffles COPYRIGHT©

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13 Pop Ups Pop Ups are an integral part of our tenant mixes; they are a sophisticated form of modern retail and this special feature clearly illustrates the importance major shopping centre players accord the new phenomena. How long is the lease? What’s the best location? Are Pop Ups confined to internal malls only or can they appear ‘outside’? What are the design standards and who determines them? All these points – and more – are dealt with in this feature. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 1

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from the publisher

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COVID-19 vaccine is on the way. Nothing is absolutely sure as we go to press but the reports are promising – informed opinion is that most of the world’s population could be vaccinated by mid-2022 – perhaps great swathes of it prior to the end of 2021. So, what will the world be like ‘postpandemic’? An interesting thought because it will never be the same as before. Perhaps we’ll get used to wearing masks; not just for pandemics but for normal, everyday protection and prevention of a whole range of viruses from the common cold to COVID-19 mutants. Perhaps we’ll become more like Asians who commonly wear masks in their own countries, unlike the west where it used to be somewhat of a rarity. We’ll get accustomed to health checks at airports (just like we did with security procedures); online shopping in certain categories will increase dramatically and holidays at home will reach new dimensions in terms of demand. So what about shopping centres? More importantly, what about Australian and New Zealand shopping centres? Regular readers of this page will be well aware of my views on the expertise involved in the development and management of our centres; it’s not just best practice – it’s also leading edge – no other countries in the world reach our combined level. When such expertise is involved, its influence extends far beyond the actual centre. Throughout the years, our industry has contributed to responsible urban planning, meaning it has ultimately regulated and determined the siting of shopping centres across the two countries. Recommendations, involved discussions and joint working sessions with the shopping centre division of BOMA (Building Owners and Management Association), which then

morphed into the SCCA division of the Property Council of Australia, have always ensured that in terms of regional, sub-regional and neighbourhood shopping centres, responsible Urban Planning has always been of prime importance to the communities they serve. All of this has led to the incredibly organised and responsible positioning of our major centres. In all, whether Big, Little or (some of the larger) Mini Gun centres, Australia alone has about 250, serving a population of some 25 million. That’s one major centre per 100,000 people – and if you position them all on a demographic map of the country, you’ll find that they are relatively well positioned. In other words, we don’t have a situation where 200,000 people have no centre within easy reach, while an adjacent region with 200,000, has four! So, generally speaking, our centres are strategically located, have superb facilities such as major car parking, links to public transport and are within easy reach of their trade area population. They are community focal points, gathering places, public thoroughfares and major commercial centres; they are integral components of community infrastructure. And because of the expertise involved in their management, they are market driven and totally responsive to community demands. As such, and probably more so than any other commercial entity, they are reflective of societal change; they mirror community sentiment and provide an accurate measurement of the financial wellbeing of the population as a whole. The reality is that they are far too meaningful and simply too important to fail. Whatever happens after COVID-19, however we change, our shopping centres will continue to reflect that change and to change themselves

SCN wishe s all our readers, co ntributors and advertis ers a festive an d safe holiday sea son.

in order to stay relevant. And that is our challenge. To determine what is relevant, what the public want and in what forms they want to express themselves. Whatever COVID-19 does, whatever it accelerates – online shopping, ecommerce, home holidays, heightened health awareness, social distancing – what it will never do, is eradicate social interaction. Since the emergence of civilised man, irrespective of geographical location, race, religion or creed, retail (then in the form of markets) has always been the most common form of social interaction. Today, in terms of social interaction, the shopping centre is the modern form of retail. Our shopping centres will change dramatically during the next few years. This issue is full of new thoughts, new directions and new initiatives, all focusing on the new forms of retail and how our centres will incorporate the same. The special feature on ‘Pop Up’ retail is particularly informative. It shows the level of thought (and expertise) given to the topic by some of our major players. It’s great reading. SCN is hosting an ‘end of year’ lunch in Sydney that will incorporate a panel discussion looking at how our centres will change, post pandemic. The event will be streamed live, free-to-air for our Premium Subscribers; it’s not to be missed. As it’s the last issue of the year, let me wish you all a great Christmas, a wonderful New Year and a really exciting 2021! Michael Lloyd, SCN

NEXT ISSUE: BIG GUNS 2021 PUBLISHED BY RILLAGE PUBLISHING TOMLIK PTY LTD (ABN 11 142 880 834) 14 MULLENS STREET BALMAIN NSW 2041 AUSTRALIA P.O. BOX 363 ROZELLE NSW 2039 AUSTRALIA TELEPHONE 61 2 9555 7494 FAX 61 2 9810 4392

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KARRINYUP AMP Capital’s $800 million redevelopment will deliver the leading centre in WA

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VOL 38, NUMBER 1, 2020

Website E-newsletter Partner Content Business Directory

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Didn't catch all these stories online?

Industry NEWS

Don’t miss out on what’s happening in our dynamic shopping centre industry. Our popular weekly e-newsletter features development news, events, centre openings, as well as retailer interviews, people profiles and more! These pages are a preview of Industry News articles we've published recently – read the full story online... Stockland Green Hills wins award for Best Shopping Centre Development Stockland Green Hills has been awarded the esteemed Best Shopping Centre Development at Property Council of Australia’s 2020 Innovation & Excellence Awards. The award comes after the centre’s successful $421 million redevelopment...

$450 million Toowong Town Centre gets the green light Brisbane City Council has approved the $450 million Toowong Town Centre, an exciting new mixed-use precinct for Brisbane’s West, being developed by State Development Corporation in partnership with White & Partners Sydney...

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Revised plans submitted to transform Harbourside Shopping Centre Mirvac Group has submitted a revised development application for the redevelopment of its Harbourside Shopping Centre at Darling Harbour in Sydney, which will deliver a new public domain of more than 8,200m2 and generate more than 6,100 jobs...

Woodlea Town Centre set to become a destination for Melbourne’s west Due to launch in March 2021, the highly anticipated Woodlea Town Centre will become the heart and soul of Aintree, touted by its developers Victoria Investments and Properties (VIP) and Mirvac as a future destination for Melbourne’s west... COPYRIGHT©

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Didn't catch all these stories online?

Industry NEWS Erskineville’s Park Sydney announces grand opening The first stage of one of Sydney’s largest urban renewal projects, Park Sydney in Erskineville, has officially opened to residents and retailers, following a launch event hosted by joint venture developers Greenland Australia and GH Australia...

Caringbah Super Centre re-opens in style and on schedule The refreshed and refurbished Caringbah Super Centre has officially re-opened to the community with Sutherland Shire Mayor Steve Simpson undertaking the ribbon-cutting duties at a special COVIDsafe event on site..

Big brands shop for space at Burnside Village South Australia’s number one fashion and lifestyle shopping centre, owned by the Adelaide based Cohen Group, has added some big names to its tenancy list by signing several high-profile retailers including international brands Hugo Boss and Polo Ralph Lauren... 6 SCN

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View the full story online: shoppingcentrenews.com.au

Sylvia Park unveils its $277m expansion Sylvia Park launched its $277 million Level 1 expansion on Thursday 15th October. The staged launch by one of New Zealand’s largest listed property companies, Kiwi Property, included 50 exciting new international and local store openings...

Walker’s $3.2b Parramatta Square precinct opens Walker Corporation’s Parramatta Square outdoor dining precinct has opened, setting a new benchmark in dining for the growing CBD of Parramatta. The food and beverage precinct sees some of Sydney’s largest hospitality names make the move to Western Sydney for the very first time...

Fortius officially opens Acre Artarmon at Home HQ Fortius Funds Management has aimed to revitalise its Home HQ Homemaker Centre with the official opening of an urban farm-food inspired food and beverage (F&B) oasis, Acre Artarmon, which delivers a unique, modern and sustainable new dining and entertainment offering to Sydney’s lower north shore... COPYRIGHT©

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Centre opening

Westfield Doncaster Scentre Group, with its joint venture partners, ISPT and M&G Real Estate Asia, has officially opened its much anticipated $30 million Westfield Doncaster dining precinct in Melbourne’s east in time for summer. Opening in line with the easing of restrictions in Melbourne, the precinct features a curated mix of 14 dining and dessert venues, with 12 retailers now open and a further two as we go to print. Retailers include Betty’s Burgers, Sushi Jiro and the pink pretzel concept store, Pretzel. Sitting above the retail levels with expansive views of the city, the almost 5,000m2 ‘modern village’ style rooftop offers a new dining destination in Melbourne’s east, as restaurants and cafés welcome customers back. Scentre Group Regional Centre Experience Manager, Charlie Rimmer, said: “Our vision was to curate a complete dining experience in Melbourne’s east, as we know our local community is passionate about dining and eating out. The rooftop precinct offers an elevated dining experience with a mix of restaurants, allowing family and friends to come together and share a meal. “We’re pleased to be able to open in time to meet the demand of Melbourne locals looking to eat out again,” he said. “Together with our retailers, we remain focused on our COVID-safe protocols to ensure customers can continue to feel safe and confident each time they visit us. We look forward to welcoming our customers to the new space.” SCN

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legal matters One always gets the feeling that Robert Speirs writes with tongue in cheek. But he’s a lawyer so he’s serious! The ‘Sneakerboy’ verdict is in – the first superior court to consider the COVID regulations. We could be in for a lot of new Maseratis for lawyers!

Sneakerboy v Georges Properties

ROBERT SPEIRS Founding Partner Speirs Ryan

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ince the COVID-19 regulations took effect there have been a few sad muppets like me, locked in dark rooms, trying to apply the regulations on a national basis. I know allowances have to be made because we are dealing with an emergency, but remember that the regulations can be traced back to the single, universally endorsed, National Code. After endorsing the Code, each state and territory was tasked with enacting local legislation to give the Code teeth. It would have been easy for all jurisdictions to agree to simply enact the Code. Alternatively, if the Code was thought to be too informal, they could have said “Gladys (or Dan, Anna or whoever), why don’t you draft up the regulations, and we’ll all enact the same thing?” I mean, we are all in the 10 SCN

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same boat, solving the same problem. But no, we all went back to our bunkers, and imparted our own special magic. We gave the Code 6 different sets of choppers. And so instead of having a consistent set of rules to apply across the board, landlords have to work out whether, or how, the regulation applies 6 different times, before getting down to the real business of providing the statutory relief. No one really cares if the start date is 29 March or 30 March or 24 April, but they do care about having to scratch around to work out what it is. Guys, you don’t manage an emergency by creating chaos! So the judgment in Sneakerboy Retail Pty Ltd (t/as Sneakerboy) v Georges Properties Pty Ltd (No 2) [2020] NSWSC 1141 (‘Sneakerboy’) is valuable because it helps us muppets work out what to do.

Sneakerboy is the first superior court to consider the COVID-19 regulations and to answer some of the questions we have been batting around.

The decision is from NSW. In NSW, the regulations direct us to have regard to the leasing principles of the Code when renegotiating the rent payable by a pandemic-impacted tenant. Only NSW, South Australia and Tasmania take this approach. The other jurisdictions do not incorporate the Code by reference (although they copy and paste some content). While it is possible to distil from the case some conclusions of general application, the decision should be treated with care in jurisdictions other than NSW.

When can landlords enforce breach? Regulation 6 in NSW says (in summary) that a lessor must not take prescribed action [eg. re-enter and terminate the lease] on the grounds of a breach of the lease during the prescribed period, consisting of a failure to pay rent or outgoings. Sneakerboy is now authority for the proposition that if the breach (eg. failure to pay rent) occurs during the prescribed period, the landlord cannot take the usual enforcement action during or after the prescribed period [see paragraphs 65-67]. By the same token, it must also mean that landlords can take usual enforcement action during the prescribed period for breach that occurred before the prescribed period.

When does the entitlement to relief bite? In those jurisdictions that expressly adopt the Code, Sneakerboy is authority for the proposition that the entitlement to relief starts, at the latest, from COPYRIGHT©

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1 April 2020. In NSW, the regulation took effect on 24 April 2020, but the Court held it had retrospective effect to correspond with the “COVID-19 pandemic period”. This is because leasing principle 3 says that rent relief is to be offered for that period. The Court struggled to find a definition of this period, but ultimately held (by reference to the start date of the JobKeeper program) that the COVID-19 prescribed period commenced 1 April 2020. This might not be the last word on this issue, since the Court did not mention the last paragraph of the Code, which stated that the Code comes into effect “on a date following 3 April 2020… to be defined by each jurisdiction”. I guess tenants would argue that just as the NSW regulation can have retrospective operation so as to correspond with the JobKeeper start date, so too can the Code, no matter when it came into effect. The answer to this argument is that had this been intended, there would have been no need to express a commencement regime at all. No matter when the state legislation hit the deck, it would take retrospective effect. In my

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respectful opinion, it is better to give the statement of intention as to the start date in the Code some work to do. It is also worth noting that Victoria enacted a commencement date of 29 March; that is, before the JobKeeper program commenced. If one state can validly enact an earlier start date, it is hard to see why a different state cannot enact a later one. And while we are humping on this leg, it is hard to see why the vague process about start date teased out of leasing principle 3 should prevail over the clear and express statement in the Code about start date quoted above.

Meaning of 'tenant’s trade' Leasing principle 3 says that rent relief is to be provided “based on the reduction in the tenant’s trade”.

Does the reduction relate to the whole of the tenant’s turnover from all shops and locations (including internet sales) or just the reduction in turnover at the premises that are the subject of the particular lease? The Court held [at para 112] that this question does not always require the

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same answer, but that generally, it will require consideration of the whole of the tenant’s turnover [see paragraphs 114 and 116].

Subsequent recovery period Sneakerboy is authority for the statement that renegotiated lease terms will continue to take effect after repeal of the pandemic regulations. Sneakerboy was afforded a recovery period of 6 months following the (then) repeal date of the NSW regulations on 24 October 2020. That is, the reduced rent payments, and waiver and deferral arrangement during the period from 1 April to 24 October, was extended for a further six months.

Conclusion In practice, Sneakerboy just provides some more colour to the negotiation palette. It is a good, solid judgment, and provides a useful yardstick. I am seeing a lot of spirited negotiation between national landlords and tenants over COVID-19 relief packages, but also a lot of resolution. By and large, I am seeing the leasing principles in the Code being applied, and industr y participants getting on with the real business of trading out of the pandemic. SCN

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RESEARCH

This year has seen many economic records broken, with retail being one of the hardest hit sectors during the pandemic. With the focus now centred on recovery as Australian life begins to return to life pre-COVID, Colliers International looks at what trends have emerged from the retail sector as a result of the events of 2020.

Retail trends from 2020 Fashion retailers have fared well Colliers International’s most recent Retail Research and Forecast Report has found that, despite the initial disruptions to 2020, some retail categories have been profitable during the pandemic. The report found that even in challenging categories, such as fashion, retail was able to reach record profits as a result of the government assistance measures put in place. Online retailers such as Kogan saw sales up 110% on the prior year, and profits up 56%. Temple and Webster has seen sales up 74% and EBITA up 500%. Premier Investments, owner of Peter Alexander, Smiggle, Just Group, Dotti, Jay Jays, Just Jeans and Portmans, reported an increase in online sales (up to 18% of total sales) with a 29% increase in net profit, despite sales being down 4.3% for the financial year. Although many fashion retailers have seen significant falls in sales during the second quarter, many have pivoted to online retailing and have seen online penetration jump dramatically.

Total online market penetration has surged in the non-food categories, reaching more than 20% at the peak of the pandemic and 17.6% in August, according to the ABS online index recording. 12 SCN

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The COVID-19 crisis has required MICHAEL BATE KATE GRAY retailers to adapt rapidly to changing Director, Research consumer demands, with some having Head of Retail Colliers International to change business models overnight; Colliers International those retailers that are able to maintain domestic travel and is therefore likely a connection to their consumers and to be spent in other retail categories. create further loyalty through an engaged Categories such as cars, home and value-added experience, have renovations and large ticket purchases continued to thrive. are all expected to be beneficiaries of Shopper spending patterns this spend. As time goes on – and have changed restrictions ease further – increased spend on cafés, restaurants and The spending patterns of Australian entertainment is likely. shoppers have been highly disrupted throughout 2020, although some Consumer confidence returns normality is starting to return. Essential to pre-pandemic levels spending spiked at the beginning of the pandemic in March, as many stocked Australian consumer confidence took up on toilet paper, cleaning products a nosedive in April as the pandemic hit and pantry staples. Australian shores with the lowest level When JobKeeper and early of consumer confidence ever recorded superannuation withdrawals commenced, since the survey commenced in the discretionary spending took off. 1970s, according to Colliers’ Retail Throughout August and September, Research and Forecast report. spending started to show more normal Since then, consumer confidence patterns and spending is now slightly has recovered to sit above pre-pandemic below normal levels. levels. It is now in positive territory at There have been interesting dynamics 105.0 and there is much more positivity at play with consumers unable to spend surrounding consumers’ financial in certain categories; the most obvious positions in the coming 12 months, is overseas travel, which is off the cards which is 6.2% above levels as at this year and most likely will continue to October 2019. be for until at least mid-2021. Supporting consumers to feel Overseas travel accounted for confident and wanting to spend again $61 billion during 2019, which is almost is key to the economic recovery, with double the superannuation withdrawals about 60% of GDP derived from to date. Not all of the overseas travel household consumption. SCN spend is expected to be spent on COPYRIGHT©

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SCN special feature

Pop Ups are no longer ‘temporary shops’. The days of a ‘Pop Up’ consisting of a trestle table acting as a temporary counter are long gone. And so are the days when Pop Up shops were simply cute ways of filling vacancies until they were ‘properly leased’. Pop Ups are now an integral part of our tenant mixes; they are a sophisticated form of modern retail and the following special feature clearly illustrates the importance major shopping centre players accord the new phenomena. In the following pages, the sheer range of merchandise is shown. Pop Ups sell everything from homes to vodka; they are the province of luxury brands, automotive dealers and Michelin Star restaurants! This feature is required reading for all in our industry and many outside it who have never considered leasing space in a shopping centre. How long is the lease? What’s the best location? Are Pop Ups confined to the internal malls or can they appear ‘outside’? What are the design standards and who determines them? All these points – and more – are dealt with in this feature. COPYRIGHT©

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Scentre Group Nick Gray, Group Sales Manager, Scentre Group Neil Carrasco, Retail Sales Executive, Scentre Group

Brand building and beyond – new retail categories winning at Pop Up

Nick Gray is a retail futurist and thought leader who has worked for more than 20 years with innovative brands including Sneakerboy, Nike and adidas. Gray has a rich and diverse set of skills across strategy, omni-channel sales, brand management, marketing and consumer experience.

Neil Carrasco has accumulated almost 30 years’ experience working in the real estate and retail industry as a sales professional and as a franchisee. His first-hand experience as an owner/operator/ marketer enables Carrasco to provide genuine consultation and guidance to BrandSpace partners.

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Pop Up retail is no longer just about moving product – it’s about brand building, customer acquisition and marketing, and that creates a huge amount of opportunity for category growth. While the transactional relationships facilitated by conventional Pop Up activations may be convenient, they are less likely to inspire, educate, and build loyalty. The short-term, fastpaced, high sales volume benefits of Pop Ups are appealing for businesses selling frequent, low-investment purchases. This emphasis on conversion, however, limits the potential of Pop Ups to play a powerful role for higher involvement purchases, such as cars and homes. These businesses have traditionally relied on their own showrooms and dealerships as destinations for brand building, product display, customer education and engagement. With the acceleration of digital technology and platforms in recent years, consumers now have more information than ever in the palm of their hands, which means they have less of a need to visit these showrooms in person. For these organisations, shifting their entire marketing effort online is not realistic for such high involvement purchases. Customers still need to physically experience the product. So, if customers won’t come to them, how do business owners bring the showroom to the customer? Earlier this year, the BrandSpace team worked with Kaplan Homes to launch its first ever Pop Up store in Westfield Parramatta. The idea of bringing the showroom to the customer paid off for this home builder. By having a physical presence in-centre, Kaplan Homes has been able to increase consideration and become a leading expert in the home building space.

What Kaplan Homes did particularly well was to recognise that the design of the Pop Up store was an important consideration. Pop Up design should drive interest but also make people feel safe – a set that allows for non-confrontational, self-led discovery is a good start. Having an expert on set, available to respond to and answer questions, also really helps to establish that emotional connection and find true value for both brands and customers. Having the opportunity to commence an in-person customer relationship from the beginning of the client’s home building journey – rather than digitally or anonymously – meant that Kaplan was able to establish emotional ties in the process and was considered partners, having held the customer’s hand throughout the whole discovery-todelivery journey. The way that people build connections and relationships with friends and family is the same way we build relationships with brands. People expect to have an emotional two-way relationship, delivering both tangible and intangible moments of satisfaction. People enlist all of their senses to establish whether or not they feel comfortable and to decide whether they want to be a part of something. They want to be enticed and excited by a moment that impresses them enough that they want to share their experience with friends, family and followers. This gives the physical environment an advantage over online, as explained by Martin Lindstrom, whose multinational study entitled Broad Sensory Branding claims that physical environments provide the “greatest likelihood of

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SCN special feature

Kaplan Homes, Westfield Parramatta

forming emotional connections between consumers and their product”. (Source: Journal of Product and Brand Management, Vol.14. Issue 2). While online plays an important role in the research phase for products like cars and homes, Pop Up retail can also assist at this point in the customer journey. Extending the physical experience into Pop Up enables brands to attract customers who wouldn’t necessarily make a trip to a showroom, but may come across the activation in their local shopping centre, and feel inclined to take a look. Attempting to drive growth through online channels only while completely neglecting the offline strategy, results in a trade-off between engagement and effectiveness for scale and efficiency. Scentre Group believes there is a role for both and we need to have a balance, as brands and businesses realise that both online and offline are essential to each other but there isn’t a more manageable, tangible or measurable COPYRIGHT©

form of marketing than physical. In other words, forget about where the final purchase takes place – just make sure it does. Director of Strategic Analytics at Scentre Group, David Lamond and his team have found that there is a correlation between sales occurring online and physical stores.

“Exposure to physical stores leads customers to ‘see now and buy later’, so the impact of stores extends beyond the immediate sales in the store. In fact, roughly half of online transactions can be attributed to recent exposure to physical stores.” This was something that Kaplan Homes understood. Kaplan wasn’t just buying space – the company understood that there was a media value to its set and it could attribute spend in the

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surrounding area back to the Pop Up catchment or ‘halo’ around the set. It’s worth remembering that you can’t just measure success on the number of people who are ready to purchase. Sell-through is something that usually determines success in the store, however, it’s like tr ying to determine your overall health based on what you ate for breakfast. It’s so incomplete. Kaplan Homes is just one of the many non-traditional retail categories that is benefiting from the physical retail channel, using Pop Ups to proactively engage with potential customers in a place where they habitually visit and feel comfortable. More and more ‘showroom-based’ brands are discovering that inherent barriers or misconceptions can be removed and/or changed when a customer has an opportunity to view a brand or product unexpectedly in an environment that feels familiar. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 15

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AMP Capital Courtney Ross, General Manager, Commercial, Retail, AMP Capital

The evolution of retail and the changing face of Pop Up

Courtney Ross is responsible for the delivery and execution of commercialisation strategies across all AMP Capital retail assets within the Australia and New Zealand portfolio. In her current role as General Manager, Ross and her team are focused on connecting brands with audiences, delivering experiences designed to engage the customer across the retail portfolio while understanding the commercialisation expectation of all stakeholders to deliver investment returns for the business. Ross joined AMP Capital in 2016 as a Divisional Manager from Scentre Group where she grew her media and retail sales career from 2011.

Pop Up retail often comes with the historical stigma of short-term activity spanning anywhere from days to weeks and selling weird and wonder ful gadgets such as pots and pans and ever ything in between… With the client mix evolving now more than ever before, client needs and the various categories of spaces and locations available, in recent years, Pop Up has a far more interesting stor y to tell. There is a huge drive from all angles – landlord, retailer, client and customer – to shift the market perception of Pop Up retail and demonstrate the endless possibilities and benefits this strategy can provide to all parties. Towards the end of 2019, there was a willingness from both large and small brands and retailers to trial Pop Up retail, a categor y and offering that has been around for quite some time within shopping centres – it was finally starting to evolve again. Throughout recent months, this willingness and direction has remained consistent with a portion of online retailers continuing to look towards Pop Up sites to further develop their brand within the market.

Pop Up retail has traditionally been seen as a short-term option to potentially incubate new retail concepts and products, 2020 has seen us all adapt again with Pop Up proving to be a solid option for brands and retailers looking to respond to the current market and quickly. Experiential and key moments In response to the current market, some retailers are also considering how curated experiential programs can complement their current business strategy and support in sales driving activity. Landlords remain focused on offering unique products and experiences to customers, to provide a promising pipeline of brands with conversion potential for future leasing conversations. Pop Up retail remains successful, tried and tested strategy to launch first-to-market events, industr y leading events and activations. There is a common goal, to enhance opportunities to surprise and delight

Cheep Clothing Store, Indooroopilly

Chanel Fragrance & Beauty Boutique

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SCN special feature customers while in-centre. The event held by Grey Goose with the resort precinct in the summer of 19/20 was a per fect example of this. Dubbed the ‘Fountain of Goose’, the installation was decorated with bottles of Grey Goose’s current limited-edition release (a collaboration with Parisian fashion label Maison LaBiche) and was designed to bring a French-style escape to Pacific Fair customers.

supporting and adding to the Christmas moment in shopping centres. Not only an opportunity to surprise and delight, but an opportunity to provide something unique, offer a moment of relax and respite or something to make the moment a little easier will be key. As one of our most valuable client groups, retailers are often looking for ways to amplify their openings, relocations or in-store marketing

Grey Goose Pop Up, Pacific Fair

In addition to delivering a curated experiential program that’s aligned to a brand's objective, key moments of relevance also exist in our customer’s lives. This presents yet another exciting opportunity to deliver experiences to delight our customers across these moments throughout the year. In the world of Pop Up retail, key elements of collaboration, curation and creativity allow these partnerships to work seamlessly between landlords, retailers, brands and our customers. This year, more so than ever before, Pop Up retail will play a huge part in COPYRIGHT©

campaigns. The benefits of Pop Up retail are becoming more evident, with several existing retailers across our portfolio now exploring this option to promote their business and increase brand awareness. Pop Up opportunities are also becoming increasingly common across both large retail brands and sole traders, as the traditional retail landscape has dramatically changed during the past six months. Pop Up stores provide retailers with the desired level of flexibility at key moments, and the opportunity to retain a standalone physical presence in shopping centres or secure additional footprint in key times. Stop by Macquarie Centre this Christmas to visit the Chanel Fragrance & Beauty Boutique or as in previous years, pop into their Pop Up located adjacent to their boutique.

Pop Up stores While strong relationships externally are needed to deliver these exceptional experiences in all of our shopping centres, there are a number of internal

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relationships and partnerships teams need to develop and rely on that are vital in supporting and growing this retail strategy. Throughout the AMPCSC managed portfolio, key to this success is support from our Place & Design teams. The collaboration between teams allows for creative product displays within vacant stores, innovative and adaptable solutions for these stores in ver y short turnaround times, providing the best solution for Pop Up retailers. These benefits attract retailers who are looking for an established Pop Up site as an entr y point into the market. Over the years, we have seen a number of successful Pop Up stores utilise the space creatively to drive foot traffic, build a strong customer base and transition over to a stable lease. There are consistent themes across our most successful stores, where we can clearly see elements of creativity across impactful branding and product displays. We often see the best results across Pop Up retailers who push the boundaries, think outside the box and deliver an experience for customers who enter the space. Cheep Clothing is one of Australia’s largest private vintage resellers currently in the market. Cheep Clothing is an exciting and relatively new Australian Pop Up shop brand, known for its eccentric pink theme and merchandising, and operates out of both the WA and QLD markets. The company's strategy is simple and attracts crowds upon launch days right through. There is now more than ever a growing list of brands and new retailers that are unique, exciting and provide a point of difference to shopping centres ready to experiment and launch into the world of retail via Pop Up stores. Pop Up Retail, Short Term Leasing, CML – whatever we all choose to call it, offers an agile solution for brands and retailers to consider when launching a business, expanding a product line, testing and trailling a new market or providing an experience within the retail environment. We are anticipating this space will become increasingly popular, with brands and retailers leveraging sites across centres to remain agile and nimble, showcase creativity and innovation, setting themselves apart from competitors in the current market. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 17

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Lendlease Sally Harding, Lendlease General Manager, Pop Up & Commercialisation

T Sally Harding joined Lendlease in 2011 as a National Key Account Manager for Casual Leasing and was appointed General Manager, Pop Up & Commercialisation 18 months later. Harding is responsible for the delivery of innovative and unique revenue generating activations across physical and digital Pop Up platforms. These include short-term licences for new businesses, semi-permanent retail incubation, commercial alliances, experiential brand activations, promotional sampling, customer acquisitions and multimedia advertising channels. Harding has more than 14 years’ experience in the industry, having worked for Scentre Group and AMP Capital.

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he evolution of Pop Up has been rapid and immense. What once existed almost solely to add a little boost to shopping centres’ net operating income and asset valuations has become a critical part of the sector’s future. Lendlease expanded and adopted a new approach to its Pop Up offer six years ago, and continues to grow the opportunity for its communities and clients.

Pop Up expansion Back in 2014, Lendlease Retail restructured its single channel Casual Mall Leasing to Pop Up Retail. But it wasn’t just a name change – we transformed the service entirely and invested in its expansion.

Adding to our physical Pop Up sites, we launched an in-house media platform with the installation of our first ten screens in 2016, which has now grown to 22 screens across 11 centres. The media platform has delivered double-digit profit growth for Lendlease since its inception. We also transformed our approach to sales; where we used to sell space in the middle of our malls, we now work closely with clients to understand their business objectives and tailor a bespoke Pop Up program that helps meet their goals, using a combination of physical and digital channels. This has helped us to build relationships with key clients whom trust us to understand their business and meet their needs.

Bangarra Dance Company, Cairns Central

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SCN special feature We also developed a new suite of tools to showcase our services, including launching a new website and range of collateral. To reach new clients, advertisers and partners, we use a number of mostly digital channels, including Instagram, which has become our most power ful networking and lead generation tool. In the past five years, we’ve serviced more than 2,500 Pop Up retailers and worked with 620 direct clients.

customers coming to us off the back of that.” It’s not only Rockabeez – online florist, Cherry Blossom recently tried out a physical store at Lakeside Joondalup. Owner, Riana Bertolami, said: “My business has increased significantly outside of the social media platform I was using before. Having a physical store has allowed me to create an image and space my customers love. The foot traffic has made the biggest difference

Growth area: pure online players One of the most exciting growth areas for Pop Ups is supporting pure online players to experiment with bricks-andmortar retailing and, so far, we’ve had some incredible success stories. For example: high-end children’s toys and eco-friendly products retailer, and purely online retailer, Rockabeez, recently leased a physical Pop Up store at Southlands Boulevard. Owner, Marco Comina said: “Online is so competitive and advertising overheads are quite big if you want to be seen. With our retail store, we have the foot traffic and more options for people to try our products out of the box; this has helped our sales increase. We have also advertised the physical store on the website and are seeing

Riana Bertolami, Cherry Blossom to my turnaround. Having my shop – to be able to do physical displays – has also helped me develop and improve my craft.” Our success with pure online retailers can be attributed to our focus on ensuring these ‘first timers’ have the best experience possible when they work with us. We mandate same-day responses, create personalised proposals with tailored solutions, offer lots of flexibility and guide them step-by-step through the process of ‘setting up shop’. In the past two years, we’ve transitioned 57 retailers from pure online platforms to a physical Pop Up site. This is an important growth area for us as we’ve found that, in general, online businesses are at the forefront of innovation, bringing interesting and unique new products and services to the Australian consumer. Most of these retailers are also already digitally savvy, and hyper-aware of their target audience, which helps our team to prepare effective proposals.

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Supporting our communities Lendlease continues to strive for greater social and environmental sustainability. That’s why we’ve developed a Pop Up content strategy that’s aimed at not only driving engagement for our paying clients, but also supporting important community causes and organisations across Australia. Our content strategy has four pillars: Sustainability, Community Support, Safety and our Reconciliation Action Plan. In line with the strategy, we’ve embedded live data feeds into our digital screens network to let shoppers know about Lendlease shopping centres’ water and energy savings. Working with Lendlease’s EH&S team and centre-based operations managers, we’re broadcasting important safety messages to retailers and customers, which has been critical during the current global pandemic. Earlier this year, during the height of the bushfires on the east coast of Australia, we were able to use our Pop Up channels to drum up vital support for the Rural Fire Service and the Red Cross. To deliver on Lendlease’s Reconciliation Action Plan, we’ve developed strong partnerships with First Nations enterprises including Mainie, Derwang Art, Bangarra Dance Company and AIME Mentoring.

Through our Pop Up media platform, we’re enabling our partners to broadcast their powerful and important messages to millions of people who visit our shopping centres every day. We’ve supported our partners with more than $2.2 million of in-kind support during the past three years. On top of that, we’re opening each day of trade across our shopping centres with an acknowledgement of the local traditional owners. Expanding our suite of assets and connecting more meaningfully with our retailers, shoppers and communities has enabled our platform to thrive. We’re confident that although the retail industr y will remain challenged for some time, the Pop Up space still has great potential for growth. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 19

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QICGRE Dennis Michael, Head of Commercial – Brand iQ and New Business, QIC Global Real Estate

Q Dennis Michael is Head of Commercial – Brand iQ and New Business for QIC Global Real Estate. In 2019, his contribution to retail transformation was acknowledged with the Frank Lowy Fellowship. Before joining the shopping centre industry in 2015, he worked for prestige media brands including Vogue and GQ. Here, Michael shares a snapshot of the trends and technology shaping temporary retail experiences across 25 QIC Global Real Estate centres.

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ICGRE’s Brand iQ division specialises in co-creating, marketing and measuring Pop Up retail activations that resonate with our communities throughout Australia, and the creativity at work in this part of our industr y is propelling us to new levels of customer knowledge and a wider-than-ever array of leasing solutions. During the past five years, we’ve seen the concept of the Pop Up evolve in this countr y from a trestle tablebased operation to incorporate fullser vice, temporar y storefronts with slick visual merchandising and complementar y digital footprints. In addition to being an increasingly sophisticated and significant facet of our business, short-term leasing sites and ser vices are striking a particular Robina beauty chord right now because they enable businesses to quickly connect with post-lockdown consumers craving new experiences close to home. Pop Ups are far from a one-size-fits-all component of the tenant mix; agreements range from a single day to six months and we offer ever ything from casual mall leasing packages with display furniture inclusive to centre court activations that tour different properties, to small customisable kiosks to temporar y in-line shops in our most prestigious precincts. The common factor in all of these is direct conversation: regardless of budget or business objective or Pop Up duration, all of our collaborations come about through one-on-one dialogue between the operator and a QICGRE customer experience specialist.

On the road to growth Among the categories to have boomed in short-term formats across our network in recent years are homewares and automotive. The combination of flexibility and premium positioning has suited Artisan Home exceptionally well at Eastland, for example; the retailer having expanded from its original 70m2 six-month tenancy in 2018 to the adjoining retail spaces with brand extensions Artisan Grow and Artisan Kids. Car dealership offshoots such as Subaru Castle Hill’s ‘experience store’ at Castle Towers, meanwhile, have been enjoying strong sales within an environment where shoppers feel at ease browsing and buying. The kiosk

temporar y store’s popularity prompted Subaru to invest in refurbishments recently as well as host a complementary centre court activation. FMCG brands such as Heinz and Red Rock Deli continue to use the Pop Up format regularly to raise awareness about new products, while beauty kiosks remain a staple of this market. Homegrown fashion brands that would have traditionally gravitated towards outlet centres or store-within-a-store options have also started leveraging

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SCN special feature Grand Central automotive Pop Up

Design of the times The aesthetic standard of Pop Ups has soared in recent times. At QICGRE, we are fortunate to have a team of retail design and deliver y experts whom understand the unique constraints and opportunities associated with small and shortturnover spaces. We are also highly conscious of limiting the wastage involved, which is partly why we established our collection of ready-touse display furniture. Our experienced leasing and design teams can have you up and running in as little as 24 hours – it isn’t just the digital world that moves quickly.

Hyperdome food Pop Up our Pop Up portfolio to trial new territories and secure bigger bang for their buck. Education providers, real estate agents and other unconventional Pop Ups such as financial advisor y firms are also reaping great rewards in our centres.

Completing the puzzle for pureplay After inducting a number of digitalnative retailers into the physical realm via Pop Ups, we have bolstered both the information we provide upfront and the mentorship we offer throughout. Today, if someone requests a turnkey retail space for a short period, we have the processes and dedicated personnel in place to facilitate that and assist them in executing a 360-degree retail strategy that syncs online and offline success. When we collaborated with Runaway The Label on the brand’s first store at Robina Town Centre last year, for instance, we connected the team with COPYRIGHT©

trusted local suppliers of staff and retail display solutions, ran a centrewide media campaign to supercharge visitation and installed traffic counters to build out their data insights. Smart mirrors (facilitating virtual tr y-ons) helped to connect the physical experience to the digital one and the retailer reported significant boosts in both brand awareness and customer sentiment following the Pop Up. Small business growth is top of mind in QICGRE’s new partnership with a leading ecommerce management platform. The tie-up will connect a new generation of Australian pureplay retailers with Brand iQ Pop Up retail sites throughout the countr y, enabling platform users who have hit the ceiling of what they can achieve through online sales channels such as Amazon and Catch.com.au to access an entirely new pool of customers. By promoting shopping centres as the preferred physical extension for innovative and emerging brands, we all get closer to realising the true value of omnichannel retail.

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We are looking beyond the interior walls of our centres, too. Our carparks, rooftops and adjoining green spaces represent a valuable resource in an era of social distancing. In the past, we have hosted six-week circuses outside Hyperdome and this summer we are running Pop Up parks at our Victorian properties to support food operators with additional COVID-safe seating capacity. Going further outside the norm, we also expect to launch more unmanned Pop Ups in the next 12 months in light of this year’s acceleration of contactless innovation. Another shift is in the timing of Pop Ups. Whereas we used to see all the activity compressed into the Christmas trading period, more operators are cottoning on to the fact that QICGRE will help them create and harness major promotional events throughout the year. At Brand iQ, we see it as our mission to overcome perceptual barriers around bricks-and-mortar retail, because, in doing so, we can make the Australian shopping centre industr y more vibrant as a whole. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 21

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Stockland Lisa King, National Manager – S Connect, Commercial Property, Stockland

T Lisa King joined Stockland in 2018 and is responsible for Pop Up, vacant shop, media campaign, experiential, vending and telco commercial outcomes. King has eight years of experience in property and more than 20 years in media and advertising, working with luxury and FMCG brands. Prior to joining Stockland, King was Head of Commercial at Adshel, and previously Head of Brand & Retail Solutions at AMP Capital. She has held senior roles in media and advertising, in media planning/buying, radio, publishing, out-of-home, commercial and retail media. She has been responsible for revenues and teams across Australia, New Zealand and Asia.

his year has certainly been a challenging one in the Pop Up industry, however, it is inspiring to see many new opportunities rise in the wake of these challenges, proving that Pop Up is most definitely alive and well, and even more nimble, creatively executed and customer-centric. At Stockland, we’ve been working with regional show exhibitors to monetise their excess stock through show-themed activations across our portfolio. Selling ‘you deserve a treat’ show bags and enticing customers to purchase a ticket to their on-site show rides has been welcomed by those who missed out on this annual family event. Furthermore, the many food trucks at the show that provide us with delicious treats – from fairy floss to gozleme and everything in between – have been welcomed in-centre, which has helped to not only support their small businesses, but also surprise and delight our customers, whom feel positive memories and emotions connected to these experiences. This is a strong example of how Stockland continues to create and facilitate convenient and curated experiences for our customers that add value to their lives.

Fashion face masks, home office consumables, home entertaining and other items designed to make the increase in time spent at home more enjoyable, have also been at the fore of Pop Up recently. COVID-19 has seemingly prompted an influx of many new businesses, as those who may have lost their jobs or are simply looking for a change are trying their hands at a career in Pop Up retail. 22 SCN

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The flexibility and versatility that Pop Up offers has been a big attraction for small businesses and we’ve welcomed a range of start-ups, from new culinary offers, to beauty offers, ethical clothing and bespoke accessories. The results so far have been clear cut, with many of these start-ups acknowledging that it has been an advantageous opportunity for them

to learn the ropes of retail with minimal financial exposure. The ability to relocate, test and trial their businesses in distinctive trade areas – or extend the number of locations through organic growth – has been a central part of their journey. Small businesses have helped support retail centre vacancies, and their prosperity has allowed us to backfill those spaces quickly while still placing focus on the retail mix. A new small business – with its compelling presentation and variety – allows it to succeed above expectations, especially in terms of brilliant execution and impact. The marriage of commerce and curation is the perfect win-win for both small business owners and customers. Regrettably, Pop Up has still been impacted by COVID-19 – as most businesses have in some way – with

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Stockland Green Hills, NSW stock fulfilment delays, diminished asset travel ability (especially those located near state borders), lack of staffing opportunities and several other obstacles that come with restrictions and COVID safety. We’ve been questioned at times about how we’re adapting with the growth of online shopping, which we continue to consider in our retail strategies, with programs such as Click & Collect and Deliver On Demand

being offered to our customers for convenience. We understand that online shopping is and will continue to be of interest to our customers, but also know that bricks-and-mortar will remain equally important. We’re seeing success in sometimes blending these two realms, by creating curated, customer-centric experiences in-centre while also offering the option for convenient online shops. Call it ‘showrooming’ but customers may be compelled to ‘try’ something

Stockland Baringa, QLD

in-store before going home to buy, or may be inspired by something they’ve seen in their local retail centre that they then research online. It’s a great time to bring more local businesses and start-ups into centres to allow their customer base to interact with them, their brand and their products. We still see many differences between Pop Up in Australia compared to other countries overseas – for instance, it’s not uncommon for luxury and hero brands to use Pop Up in retail centres in America, the UK and Europe. The hope is that some of those brands may soon start to recognise that Australia’s population is also large enough to drive the commercial outcomes they’re looking for, and also deserving of being included as part of their global strategy. According to boomtown.media, regional Australia is actually one of the largest and fastest growing markets with nearly nine million consumers. Global brands should consider these community centres that dominate regional Australia as opportunities for growth.

For those looking at Pop Up as an opportunity, my top five recommendations are to: 1. Identify and harness a consumer want or need, and to specialise in your product/offer 2. Be confident to test and trial (and maybe even fail) – that’s one of the luxuries of Pop Up 3. Know your competitors and stay committed to steering ahead 4. Concentrate on less is more – think Melbourne High Street boutique, and don’t force too much product in, and 5. Focus on commerce and creation – engage your customers’ senses and feel confident that a compelling visual execution does not have to be executed at great expense. COPYRIGHT©

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Dexus Julie Gasper, Leasing Manager, Dexus

Brands must remain agile

Julie Gasper is a seasoned retail property leasing manager with more than 20 years’ experience including five years in leadership and management roles with Dexus and AMP Capital Shopping Centres. Driving retail strategy to attract and retain the best product mix, Gasper utilises her extensive engaged network to deliver sustainable mutual outcomes for both the business and the retailer. At Dexus, Gasper manages the leasing for several properties across New South Wales and Victoria, and also oversees the businesses' short-term Pop Up lease strategy known as Platform.

A great customer experience is essential to make a place come alive, as people visit places for the experiences and to interact with others. Shopping centres activate spaces to deliver engaging experiences that continue to excite customers and make the place popular. The role Pop Up leasing plays is key to providing new reasons for shoppers to visit retail destinations. Pop Up activations today can range from major brand takeovers to small niche products coming to market for the first time. Many emerging brands test the market through Pop Up leasing, and this can often lead to a growth trajectory for that business. Each week, millions of Australians

move through shopping centres around the country, presenting brands with a significant exposure opportunity to reach new customers. The interaction between a brand and a consumer within a live physical environment is far more engaging and valuable than many other advertising channels. Today, brands are more creative than ever before and are looking for innovative ways to stand out and connect with targeted consumers. Dexus manages a diverse portfolio of office, industrial and retail precincts across Australia. The retail portfolio aims to deliver experiences that are tailored to the local demographic of each location. With more than 70 million people movements in our CBD and retail destinations annually, and access to

The outdoor square at QV Melbourne

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Tiffany & Co launch party in a Sydney car park over 150,000 office workers across major cities in Australia, our short-term Pop Up leasing team (known as Platform) is well positioned to help businesses deliver a high-impact and effective brand-exposure campaign. A great example of an innovative use of the Pop Up concept was the unveiling

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of the Tiffany & Co Sydney flagship store at 175 Pitt Street. As part of the launch, the building’s car park was leased as a pop-up space to Tiffany & Co, turning the car park into a New York inspired underground party. On hand for the event were big names like Kendall Jenner and A$AP Ferg, along with wellknown personalities such as Lara Worthington, Jesinta Franklin, Victoria Lee, and Renell Medrano. The Tiffany & Co launch generated significant media exposure for the global jeweller, strengthening its brand reach and engagement within the Australian market. Another example of a brand using a shopping centre environment as a platform to engage with its desired market was the partnership between Lindt Chocolate and QV Melbourne. Activating the outdoor square at QV, the brand activation engaged with shoppers through a personalised Lindt gift offering for Christmas, resulting in a high impact brand exposure and product sales. Our strategically located city retail portfolio provides brands with high exposure opportunities ranging from food court tabletops to digital advertising that maximises the high turnover of shoppers within the busy dining precincts. Supersite digital billboard advertising, fronting on to some of the busiest city intersections,

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also showcases brands to thousands of pedestrians, commuters and motorists ever y day. Further afield, to mark its 73rd anniversary, Tupperware last year opened its first ever Pop Up location in New York City called TuppSoho. This temporary store was a one-stop-shop for all your kitchen organisation needs. The space was filled with colourful displays and installations, allowing the brand to be experienced in a new way and amplifying its reach through many Instragrammable moments.

The advantage of a Pop Up activation is that it creates new brand touchpoints with customers and engages with them in a new way without having to fully invest into a long-term lease or purchasing a property. Right now, brands need to be more agile than ever and Pop Ups provide the perfect platform to engage with their consumer base, by creating a sense of fear of missing out and increasing brand awareness in a highly connected, competitive landscape. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 25

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Pop Up News Preview recent Pop Up news here, and read the full story online at shoppingcentrenews.com.au Broadway Sydney elevates Indigenous artists and designers for NAIDOC Week In a year where many Indigenous businesses have been severely impacted by COVID, Broadway Sydney shifted its commercial strength to connect Indigenous designers from across the country with Sydneysiders during NAIDOC Week with an Indigenous designer Pop Up store. Centre Manager, Justine Saltmarsh, said partnering with Indigenous creatives during NAIDOC Week was a great opportunity to support Indigenous businesses and communities in a unique way. Twenty Indigenous designers from different regions have teamed up to host the Indigenous Collective Pop Up Store. The collection features art, ceramics, clothes, accessories, jewellery, textiles, homewares and much more. “The Indigenous Collective Pop Up is the first of its kind, providing First Nation designers with the opportunity to step out of the art fair, markets and festival scene,” said Teagan Cowlishaw, National Coordinator, First Nations Fashion Design. “This physical retail platform is instrumental in providing economic development within the Australian industry and allows shoppers to connect with Indigenous communities from across the country through our network of premium Indigenous brands.”

Retail incubator program a win-win for Ripley Town Centre and small business In a bid to identify retailers with aligned values and goals around sustainability, the team at Ripley Town Centre has focused on attracting local artisans and makers to the quarterly Ripley Providore Market hosted on-site, before incubating and transitioning them through to Pop Up tenancies and even longer-term leases within the centre. This strategy has seen the successful founding and expansion of EcoCentric, an eco-friendly co-operative stocking locally made sustainable, upcycled and natural products to help tackle the war on waste. Centre Manager, Andrew Quinert, said the retail incubator program was a win-win for 26 SCN

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not only the centre and its existing retailers, but also local small businesses like EcoCentric that are looking to get a feel for a larger, physical space in a growing community. “The impacts of COVID-19 have been felt right across the retail sector and we’re in a position to offer likeminded businesses that are local or from further afield the opportunity to re-establish themselves,” he said. “Our retail incubator program not only provides space at significantly reduced rates – we also offer substantial marketing support and facilitate regular check-in meetings to set them up for success. We’re passionate about supporting the community and local businesses in the area, and we will be exploring more Pop Up opportunities in the future as part of our retail incubator program.” SCN

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Pop-up shops are popping up more than ever. As architects and designers, we applaud the inventiveness and resilience of retail. hdrinc.com/au

All photos from Cbus Property’s 140 William Street, Perth

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Outdoor dining, New York

‘Pop Ups’ used to be temporary, inexpensive, amateurish. Not any more! Pop Ups are now mainstream, sophisticated and an established form of retail. They are the future and are being embraced by even the luxury brands.

POP UP power

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s bricks-and-mortar retail reopens around the world, Pop Up shops are popping up more than ever. The retail landscape is markedly different as COVID-19 has forced retailers to adjust their operations and rethink strategies. Consumers are still wary of going back to stores and, consequently, thousands of stores have been shutting their doors, creating a deluge of empty, often prime retail space that landlords will be scrambling to fill. And Pop Ups may just be a potential saviour.

SUSANNE PINI Head of Retail & Mixed Use, HDR

From shopping centres and airports to festivals, Pop Ups have long been an important element of the retail sector, and the concept has grown to become a billion-dollar industry. Short-term Pop Ups have primarily served as testing grounds for emerging brands as they make their first foray into physical retail; and while this may have originally been the strategy of start-ups, the concept is being heavily used by big-name brands, from Amazon to Louis Vuitton. With each Pop Up space being unique, Insta-friendly and tailored to the location, they are making the most of the benefits this setup can offer. 28 SCN

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Besides using empty spaces in a COVID-19 world, Pop Ups – often referred to as the ‘Airbnb of the retail world’ – have a host of other advantages working in their favour. Safety first, the blank canvas of a Pop Up store means that it is much easier for a tenant to provide and test new health and safety protocols, such as social distancing and contactless transactions, as opposed to reformatting an existing site. Then, there is an increasing respect for independent retailers, which are a dominant force in the Pop Up market, and since many

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design to host a group of socially distanced people, any place can be a Pop Up nowadays. With outdoor space deemed safer, Pop Up outdoor cafés and restaurants have been spilling into streets, sidewalks and parking lots, sometimes taking whole neighbourhoods all over the world. Rooftops are also being turned into clubs and cinemas, like The Greens in New York, where you can rent your own per fectly distanced mini-lawn with cabana-style lounge chairs and umbrellas while enjoying panoramic views of the Brooklyn Bridge. The Greens, New York

Dior in Capri

people are turning to entrepreneurship during the pandemic, Pop Up retail just may be the perfect way to promote a business. The concept of Pop Up also tends to be associated with exclusivity; there is a marketing buzz around an opening or the subsequent events, which in a time of very limited crowd sizes, can be turned into an unexpected advantage. As an illustration, The Secret Summer Festival in New York City (also known COPYRIGHT©

as Sundaze) typically had 1,000 people packed into one outdoor space for an evening, but in the era of the coronavirus, only 60 very expensive tickets were sold each night, creating a lot of hype and faux scarcity around the event.

Popping up everywhere The beauty of Pop Ups is that they can pop up almost anytime, anywhere! Streets, pavements, empty warehouses, rooftop gardens and parking lots, you name it – as long as the space is safe

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Closer to home, Sydney is planning to turn George Street and The Rocks area into an outdoor dining precinct, whereas Melbourne restaurants and cafés are expecting to spend up to $100,000 to get back to serving meals via Pop Up outdoor dining pods. Luxury fashion brands have always been great believers in Pop Ups, and the COVID-19 crisis only cemented that belief. During summer, cult jewellery brand Alighieri built a Florence-inspired Pop Up in London that served Italian meals alongside its jewellery collection. The pastel-hued Alighieri shop was complete with wooden shutters reminiscent of the jewellers in Florence, a tabaccheria (tobacconist) where you could buy postcards, and even a black cat that roamed around the mini-town. Founder Rosh Mahtani explained: “With travel being so restricted right now, we came up with the idea to create our own Italian old town, something dreamy and nostalgic.” Inspired by the idea of an Italian holiday, he wanted to create a space where people could give themselves a mini-break, see friends they hadn’t seen for some time, have some food and go home with a souvenir or two. Other luxury fashion retailers have followed their customers who were lucky SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 29

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design

Alighieri’s Florence-inspired Pop Up in London enough to find themselves at the real Italian Riviera or southern France. Across the Mediterranean, Dior launched several ‘Dioriviera’ Pop Ups, including the widely publicised Capri store, featuring an idyllic décor in the ephemeral setting nestled on a cliff, with breath-taking sea views. Dior in-house retail strategists suggest that Pop Up stores post-pandemic would be part of their future retail strategy that allows them to follow their clients and show up where it makes sense.

Westfield Valley Fair

Inside-out malls When COVID-19 forced the closure of indoor malls for a second time in California, mall owners launched a concept to essentially turn their malls inside out and bring the retailers outside into open-air Pop Up markets. Westfield Valley Fair in Santa Clara opened its Open-Air Market in July. The market concept came about after a brainstorming session by mall officials explored how they could not only help retailers but also create some kind of energy and excitement around the property for the wider community in these difficult times. The market features branded red and white Pop Up tents, where retailers can display their merchandise and shoppers can also grab food from one of the local food truck vendors. The concept was launched with seven retailers and has since grown to nearly 40 and continues to grow. It is available to any retailer ready to open an outdoor store, and participants range from Shoe Palace to Hugo Boss and Pottery Barn. Additionally, their newest program is The Cabanas at Westfield Valley Fair, an 30 SCN

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Lo

Prada Escape Corner Shop at Selfridges COPYRIGHT©

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Lancôme virtual Pop Up

Dior in Capri

Louis Vuitton, Harrods Pop Up

outdoor luxury shopping experience open daily by appointment only. Following all COVID-safe procedures, luxury brands, including Cartier, Tiffany & Co and Versace, offer viewings by appointment in private Pop Up cabanas on the mall’s outdoor terrace. In essence, they are using bookings-only and invitation-only Pop Ups for hygiene purposes to reward their biggest, most loyal fans. South Coast Plaza, the largest mall on the US West Coast, launched The Pavilion, consisting of open-air suites on the second level of one of the mall’s parking structures. Customers can shop by appointment only at participating boutiques like Cartier, Chanel and Alexander McQueen. Once you are escorted to a private suite, you can browse and try on items from a selection that the boutique has curated especially for you. Other mall operators such as Brookfield’s Glendale Galleria have also used their parking garages, but this time to help their restaurants expand their outdoor dining capacity. With many consumers worried about returning to enclosed shopping malls, this inside-out mall concept has been increasingly seen as a logical way of keeping business going and giving tenants an alternative option to sell their products. Plus, the research also shows that the experience offered by such Pop Up locations is novel and interesting for mall shoppers.

COVID-19 Essentials

Bottega Veneta, Shanghai COPYRIGHT©

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While there is a strong argument that Pop Ups are made for the pandemic, some are literally made by the pandemic. US-based aptly named COVID-19 Essentials may be the world’s first retail chain dedicated solely to products necessitated by an infectious disease. With many stores closing, especially SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 31

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design

Create & Cultivate Pop Up inside malls, the chain has seized on the empty space and the world’s growing acceptance that wearing masks is a reality that may last for quite a while. Masks have evolved from a utilitarian, makeshift product into a fashion accessory and another way to express one’s personality, political preference or sports fandom. Almost every shop, regardless of their main offerings, now sells masks, but COVID-19 Essentials also carries other accessories for the pandemic: beside rhinestone-studded masks are organic hand sanitisers, touchless thermometers, door-openers and other hard-to-find accessories to help people cope with the pandemic. The space, replicated in multiple malls all over the US, has a more established feel than an event Pop Up store, with permanent signage above its glass doors in the shape of the stylised image of a coronavirus particle. What’s unusual about this concept is that this business venture is doomed to fail, and that’s exactly the plan. Despite soaring sales, the chain’s founder does not want his products to be in demand forever. As he put it in a recent interview: “The sooner I go out of business, the better.”

Retail reimagined According to digital retail strategy experts from Accenture, coming out of COVID-19, we will see Pop Ups return, but how they use the spaces will be different. Like the rest of retail, there will be more digital components in the future, and during the pandemic we have already seen a lot of virtual Pop Ups, especially in the apparel and cosmetic brands, such as Ted Baker and Lancôme. As people opt not to shop in stores, we can expect to see more 32 SCN

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‘stores outside the store’, where brands use bricks-and-mortar more like a billboard to showcase product that customers buy online and pick up outside in the street or have delivered to their homes. A sign inside a glass window of a shop at the Platform shopping centre in Los Angeles says, ‘The Future of Shopping Is Here’, and by the looks of it, that certainly may well be the case. Platform, a former industrial site, was converted in 2016 into a very successful retail centre for trendy restaurants and niche and artisanal brands. However, like everything else, most stores shut down. Yet, in the midst of the pandemic, Create & Cultivate brand launched a Pop Up shop offering a solution for shopping in a new retail world order, one in which retailers can still have sales and exposure without compromising shoppers’ safety. The concept is allowing consumers to ‘window shop’ a curated selection of products from several small businesses, as well as their own collection of Vegan Leather Essentials, without actually setting foot in a physical store. Although the Platform Pop Up is housed in a 500ft2 space, shoppers can’t actually go inside the space for a look and browse around; instead, products on offer are featured in the windows. Owners described this shopping concept as being “like a website come to life”. Shoppers can order through an app or by scanning a QR code and have items either delivered or available for pick up from a small entryway on-site. The system was designed to make pandemic-style shopping a breeze in terms of being clean and contactless,

offering seamless, cash-free transactions. This unique retail experience is a new way of window shopping and although there is no way to touch and feel items before you buy, brand owners are hoping the products themselves might compensate for this less-than-immersive shopping experience.

Even before COVID-19, retail was already going through a renaissance and needed to find new ways to adapt to customers’ changing demands and behaviour. Going forward, predictions are that there will be no one-size-fits-all model, and we are likely to see a surge in the number of landlords offering more flexible, short-term leases. Brands will be wary of investing too much, and Pop Up shops can give them extremely cost-effective spaces to make mistakes, learn, evolve and test their business ventures. As businesses tighten their belts and bolster their online presence, many might decide they actually don’t need year-round stores and instead will adopt Pop Ups as a permanent strategy. In short, Pop Up shops, as a business model, are highly adaptable. They are fun, they support independent creatives and can provide a clean and safe shopping experience; as such, they are per fectly positioned to weather this storm and place themselves firmly into the future. SCN

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It wasn’t COVID-19 that started department store and DDS downsizing and closures, but it certainly has accelerated the trend. Everyone in our industry knows that creative leasing of vacant, larger spaces, will be a key to future shopping centre success. Tony Quinn looks at the opportunities…

design

The backfill dilemma TONY QUINN Principal Hames Sharley

W

ith the decline of both discount department stores and major department stores and the added hit from COVID-19, retail landlords are facing a huge quandary. David Jones, Myer and Target, among others, are currently going through a huge rationalisation that includes store closures and reduced floorspace requirements.

It is the inevitable cycle in the wheel of retailing where new ideas and opportunities need to be created as the old ways die. It is the retail circle of life. So what to do with the empty big box, or part thereof, and what opportunities are out there? Also, it’s not just big empty boxes that are concerning – it’s also about the surrounding speciality tenants that formed the precinct and relied on the foot traffic to the major. This can often require a whole rethink of a portion of a centre. The quick and easy fix is to get another discount retailer into the space. But the list is short. One relative new comer though on the up is TK Maxx out of the US with its simple buying philosophy of sourcing over produced or end-of-the-line items from top brands, swooping in, negotiating the lowest possible price and then passing the savings on. The company’s no-frills stores with no walls between departments allows it to expand or contract merchandise categories with ease. And of course minimal outlay is required from the landlord’s perspective. The other completely obvious solution 34 SCN

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is to also consider a second or third supermarket in the centre and refocus to a convenience food offer. But this is about changing the paradigm – thinking outside the square – as they say. The US has been undergoing this dilemma for some years now and my research shows some opportunities that could work here in Australia.

Opportunities include the likes of big brand sports stores like adidas, Nike or our Rebel, and these could be combined with fitness centres as they have an obvious synergy. The other opportunity that could also combine with the above are medical and wellness centres, combining all of these together could fill that large empty box and create that whole new destination experience. In some US malls, they’ve backfilled empty big boxes with entertainment-oriented offers like ten pin bowling and indoor trampoline centres and skate parks, combining these with a family restaurant offer. Funlab, the Australian operator of Strike Bowling, Holey Moley and Skyzone, falls into this category of delivering family

entertainment spaces. Other offerings include Red Herring, which is an escape room experience where you’re immersed in a real-life mystery, solving riddles, cracking clues all in 50 minutes to find the final exit and escape. They also have B Lucky & Sons, an arcade games and

bar offering, Jukes Karaoke Bar and Archie Brothers Cirque Electriq with dodgem cars, carousels and a virtual reality thrill ride. Combining these with a food offering is effectively what your local club offers. So why can’t a club take on the space, one would ask? Another alternative is to bring in bulky goods tenants like Spotlight, Harvey Norman, Freedom Furniture and the like, to create lifestyle precincts and include a cooking school that uses equipment and products from the adjacent retailers to build the story. Bulky goods tenants are now paying rents similar to DDSs, and the attraction is a shopping centre’s greater foot traffic, which can generate greater sales for these retailers.

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n

Other backfills to consider are co-working and education spaces. I believe that due to a large part of the workforce having grown accustomed to working from home and avoiding long commutes, an opportunity exists, post pandemic, for organisations to provide their staff with work options close to home. Working from the dining room table won’t cut it long-term but the ability to work closer to home certainly has become very appealing. Hot desking is

a no-no now in the workplace and with social distancing restrictions still in place, offices can fit fewer personnel per square metre. The days of satellite offices are here to stay, and what better location can you find than a shopping centre with all the services at your fingertips? Throw an Officeworks into the mix for all your scanning and printing, stationery needs and so on, and you can create a serious business centre. Other education possibilities go from childcare centres

up to colleges, Tafe and universities. Australian Catholic University, for example, has campuses in North Sydney and Strathfield in NSW and Ballarat in Victoria, so why not in a well-serviced retail centre location? Back to the US, Marriott International has joined with the Simon Property Group, the US’s largest mall owner, to develop hotels to anchor their retail in prime locations.

Taking the accommodation offer even further, consideration could be given to hiving off big box land for build-to-rent or even vertical retirement villages, student housing or strata residential development. Having shops and services with transport hubs below would certainly be convenient as a place to live. Top Ryde City centre in Sydney models this scenario exactly. Having multiple aspects of daily life connected is, after all, what we’re all striving to achieve. So this mixed-use model is now becoming the norm rather than the expectation. SCN

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design

West Elm neighbourhood stores in Brooklyn, NY

Proposed ‘solutions’ to the present crisis, what’s needed in the future and how best to deal with the ‘new normal’, are voiced daily. For some it’s a leasing matter, for others, new approaches to retail planning. The list goes on... How about ‘re-imagined spaces’?

Accelerating innovation HAROLD PERKS Director Hames Sharley

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othing accelerates innovation as fast as a significant necessity. As an industry and sector, we are currently working our way through and out of a once-in-a-lifetime event and must innovate effectively for the long term. A lot of commentary has been made about how long and how deep the effective impacts of COVID-19 will be, and nobody truly knows. In the pandemic aftermath, shopping centres have a monumental task ahead to reposition and support retail to navigate this unparalleled climb out of this sharp bricks-and-mortar decline, with Victoria being the last out of the starting blocks. Arguably, suburban centres may have been afforded a headstart, compared to CBD retail, as virus restrictions forced short-term changes to our behaviour, and encouraged the general populous to stay local. Without CBD workplaces back up and running,

customers are generally absent within city centres. Industry bodies, (such as the Property Council of Australia’s Retail Committees), recognise the challenges facing CBD retail due to public apprehension to fully re-engage with public transport and, once again, move freely through tightly organised city grids.

It is quite ironic that our beautiful city grids – once celebrated for their eclectic qualities, intrigue and draw – are now subject to density and social distancing scrutiny. They are all considerations that seem to be keeping the suburban mass at bay, for now, and will likely fall away over time. There is no question that our CBDs COPYRIGHT©

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Y

Marrickville Metro, Sydney

are a vital part of our society, but they are hurting. Unfortunately, we don’t see a silver-bullet solution at present, other than to continue to lobby local government to support CBD retail through safe, planned events; encouraging different modes of transport to supplement public transport; or, bringing activities into the public realm (such as dining and other retail experiences) to support these retailers and CBD shopping centres. Once confidence rebounds – in parallel with a firmer public health position – we will see our CBD retail centres return more fully. However, when looking more broadly at how our recent CBD-fringe and suburban customer behaviours have adapted in the short term, shopping COPYRIGHT©

more ‘local’, we might be witnessing a significant opportunity to engage, re-energise and revolutionise our shopping centre stock in these markets. Out with the old, in with the sensible and sustainable. Sure, it may not solve the holes and gaps left by exiting tenants. Still, it does allow us to address a few key fundamentals for sustainable retail environments such as customer experience, public realm enhancement and a celebration of place. We have seen several centres do experiential makeovers during recent times, mainly to stay relevant in the marketplace and ahead of their competition. Some retail assets have done exemplar work and set excellent benchmarks where others erred on the

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side of caution by holding back refurbishments. In fact, some of the larger landlords used the various Stage 3 and 4 pandemic lockdowns to fasttrack refurbishments for their centres. It is unfortunate that not ever y owner has the capacity to support a repositioning strategy, especially with the recent impact to bricks-and-mortar fashion retail, department store downscaling and discretionar y offers taking a big hit. Regardless of the appetite, demand, or ability to enact change, one thing is certain; the acceleration of change has never been greater for retail assets. Having said this, it’s not about the multi-milliondollar investments either – as we continue to see successful lowSHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 37

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Chelsea Market, New York

Mt Hawthorn, WA – before and after

intervention adaptations and light-touch repositioning projects bring about surprising results. Impact can be achieved in often small, but crucial moves such as; the celebration of important thresholds, creating new intimate nodes that never existed before, carefully re-skinning a dated entry statement, taking back redundant car park spaces to re-use for customer respite opportunities or a temporary retail moment.

In Mt Hawthorn, WA, for instance, Hames Sharley managed to closeoff an existing internal main-street within an existing retail asset and turned it into the communities’ ‘back yard’ by designing a costeffective landscape and invited 38 SCN

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the community in! This re-imagined space that was previously a convenient car-dominated space, now boasts family-focused dining, casual seating and respite, with the ability to transform into weekend markets. We have little room for complacency and should act in honesty so that we can fully embrace our local communities and keep them engaged for the long haul. Great examples of re-imagined spaces within existing built forms are often found in adaptive re-use projects where existing structures, established infrastructure, heritage constraints and memor y of place often set the parameters, limit inter vention and demand the creative reinterpretation of spaces. Generally,

Australia has a good stock of quality retail assets, relatively well-maintained, clean and polished, but they’re stuck in a safe, vanilla, time-capsule. We can draw parallels between retail assets and post-industrial adaptive-reuse typologies; retain the expensive infrastructure, builtform, and shell, but convert the internal spaces carefully into something surprising, delightful and engaging. Suburban centres are likely to lead the charge in the short-term and enact incremental place-augmenting changes to local destinations. I look forward to seeing many innovative adaptations as centres jostle to retain captive market share. Examples around the world, mainly in adaptive re-use projects: Chelsea Markets in New York, The Source in Denver's Rino neighbourhood, The Power Plant in the Baltimore Inner Harbor. SCN

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2020

LITTLE GUNS

MAT Moving Annual Turnover Total retail sales (August 1, 2019 to July 31, 2020) including GST. Excludes sales from casual tenants, ATMs, financial institutions, gaming venues, TAB and soft gambling.

MAT/m2 Total retail sales (August 1, 2019 to July 31, 2020) of the centre including GST divided by the retail area from which the retail sales were derived. Sales from casual tenants, financial institutions, soft gambling and cinemas excluded.

Specialty MAT/m2 Total retail sales (August 1, 2019 to July 31, 2020) including GST, for all trade-reporting tenants with a GLA below 400m2, divided by the retail area from which the retail sales were derived. Excludes sales from cinemas, entertainment venues, ATMs, financial institutions, health insurance, TAB/soft gambling, gaming venues, travel agencies, amusements (rides), professional services and suites, offices, casual mall tenants and storage tenants. (In accordance with SCCA definitions).

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annual feature

B

elmont Forum retains its Number 1 place on the MAT (Moving Annual Turnover) ladder with a creditable $386 million, a small improvement on last year which, in these times, shows the strength of the centre. These are turbulent times and of course, the COVID factor has hit some centres, while others have shown gains. The figures this year are reporting from August 1, 2019 to July 31, 2020 so they take in some five months of COVID affected period. Park Beach Plaza had a significant improvement – up some 8% on last year – to take second place with $316 million. There were three new entries into the MAT Top 10 table this year: Perron Group’s JLL managed, The Square Mirrabooka in Perth, came in at Number 8 with a 5.7% rise, reflecting WA’s resistance to the COVID factor; Charter Hall’s Bateau Bay Square took 9th spot and Vicinity’s Eastlands came in at Number 10.

There are 84 Little Gun centres ranked this year. If we treat MAT rises and falls of less than 1% as ‘static’, we see 34 centres showed a drop in MAT, 23 were up and 27 remained the same. In a pandemic year, a very creditable result showing the resilience of these centres. On the MAT/m2 table, Mir vac’s East Village retained its Number 1 ranking even after dropping by 4.6% on last year, with $14,748 – still well ahead of second placegetter Marrickville Metro (UniSuper and AMP Capital) at $12,538. The turbulent year saw four new entries into the Top 10: Vicinity’s Karratha City; AMP’s Casula Mall; SPH REIT’s Figtree Grove and Charter Hall’s Rockdale Plaza. In terms of Specialty MAT/m2, last year’s Number 1 and 2 switched places with Vicinity’s Mount Pleasant Centre (QLD) taking the honours with $14,262, just pipping Winston Hills Mall's $14,188. Stockland Bundaberg entered the Top 10 in 9th spot and Q Super Centre (also in QLD) was a new entr y taking out the 10th spot in the table. Analysis of figures this year has no validity. Early in the year, COVID struck and we were altogether in an unknown place. Some Little Gun centres suffered, while others did well out of the ‘convenience’ and ‘local’ factors. The real per formance tests are yet to come and will do so when some sort of normalcy, even if it emerges as a ‘new normal’, emerges. SCN COPYRIGHT©

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TOP 10 MAT (million) Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Management

MAT (million)

Change %

1

Belmont Forum, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$386.14

0.4%

2

Park Beach Plaza, NSW, H A Bachrach/BNG

$315.86

7.9%

3

Kawana Shoppingworld, QLD, Mirvac & ISPT/Mirvac

$313.34

-5.0%

4

Lake Haven Centre, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$296.79

-0.6%

5

Chirnside Park S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$290.67

-4.6%

6

Ocean Keys S/C, WA, AMP Capital S/C Fund, AMPCSC

$290.14

1.2%

7

Willows S/C, QLD, DWPF/Dexus

$279.95

-2.1%

8

The Square Mirrabooka, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$271.30

5.7%

9

Bateau Bay, NSW, CH Retail P.No.2/Charter Hall

$268.95

0.2%

10

Eastlands, TAS, Vicinity/ Vicinity Centres

$268.01

0.3%

TOP 10 MAT/m2 Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Management

MAT/m2

Change %

1

East Village, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

$14,748

-4.5%

2

Marrickville Metro, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

$12,538

0.7%

3

Nepean Village, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$11,639

2.2%

4

Winston Hills Mall, NSW, Private/TGC

$11,524

3.3%

5

Bateau Bay, NSW, CH Retail P.No.2/Charter Hall

$10,872

1.6%

6

Mount Pleasant Centre, QLD, CBGS/Vicinity Centres

$10,637

-1.9%

7

Karratha City, WA, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity Centres

$10,394

4.4%

8

Casula Mall, NSW, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

$10,106

-1.8%

9

Figtree Grove, NSW, SPH REIT & Moelis/RetPro Group

$9,904

-3.6%

10

Rockdale, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$9,723

3.9%

Centre name, State, Owner/Management

MAT (million)

Change %

1

Mount Pleasant Centre, QLD, CBGS/Vicinity Centres

$14,262

-0.4%

2

Winston Hills Mall, NSW, Private/TGC

$14,188

-4.3%

3

Whitsunday Plaza, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$12,733

-3.1%

4

Nepean Village, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$12,272

-2.7%

5

Rockdale, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$12,128

-4.9%

6

Victoria Gardens, VIC, Vicinity & Salta/Vicinity Centres

$11,616

-0.8%

7

Chirnside Park S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$11,243

-8.8%

8

Marrickville Metro, NSW, UniSuper/AMPCSC

$11,127

-7.4%

9

Stockland Bundaberg, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$10,695

-7.6%

10

Q Super Centre, QLD, Jen/Jen Mgt QLD

$10,596

-3.5%

TOP 10 Specialty MAT/m2 Rank

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LITTLE GUNS 2020

Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

GLA m2

Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

GLA m2

1 Stockland Cairns, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

48,856

45 CS Square, VIC, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

26,518

2 Belmont Forum, WA, Perron Group/JLL

47,643

46 Marketown Shopping Centre, NSW, Sunsuper/AMPCSC

26,280

3 Cranbourne Park, VIC, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

46,928

47 Stud Park S/C, VIC, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

26,213

4 Toombul, QLD, Mirvac/Mirvac

46,527

48 Altona Gate, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

26,117

5 Willows S/C, QLD, DWPF/Dexus

46,000

49 Stockland The Pines, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

25,107

6 Kawana Shoppingworld, QLD, Mirvac & ISPT/Mirvac

45,391

50 Ashfield Mall, NSW, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

24,977

7 Stockland Point Cook, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

44,120

51 Roxburgh Village, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

24,742

8 Ellenbrook Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

43,544

52 Winston Hills Mall, NSW, Private/TGC

24,525

9 Lake Haven Centre, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

43,175

53 The Oasis, QLD, Abacus & KKR/JLL

24,514

10 Runaway Bay Centre, QLD, Vicinity & Perron/Vicinity

42,975

54 Salamander, NSW, CH Retail REIT & CH PRF/Charter Hall

23,963

11 Campbelltown, NSW, CH Prime Retail Fund/Charter Hall

42,431

55 Rosebud, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

23,825

12 Park Beach Plaza, NSW, H A Bachrach/BNG

42,184

56 Box Hill Central (Sth), VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

23,733

13 Capalaba Central, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

42,110

57 Karratha City, WA, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity Centres

23,480

14 The Square Mirrabooka, WA, Perron Group/JLL

40,885

58 Stockland Bundaberg, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

23,382

15 Stockland Forster, NSW, Stockland/Stockland

38,978

59 Tweed Mall, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

23,262

16 Victoria Gardens, VIC, Vicinity & Salta/Vicinity Centres

37,656

60 Booval Fair S/C, QLD, YFG /Retail First

23,249

17 Chirnside Park S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

37,603

61 Lansell, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

23,128

18 Stockland Hervey Bay, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

37,070

62 Fairfield Central S/C, QLD, Landel & Fairfield Land/Lancini

23,092

19 Mid Valley S/C, VIC, Juilliard/Juilliard

37,000

63 Nepean Village, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

23,057

20 Ocean Keys S/C, WA, AMP Capital S/C Fund/AMPCSC

36,865

64 Castle Plaza, SA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

22,828

21 Parkmore S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

36,798

65 Taigum Square, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

22,821

22 Stockland Burleigh Heads, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

36,379

66 Mount Pleasant Centre, QLD, CBGS/Vicinity Centres

22,525

23 Stockland Baldivis*, WA, Stockland/Stockland

34,919

67 Whitsunday Plaza, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

22,358

24 Rhodes Waterside, NSW, Mirvac & Perron/Mirvac

34,849

68 Stockland Shellharbour Retail Park*, NSW, Stockland/Stockland 22,118

25 Smithfield Centre, QLD, SAS Trustee Corp./Lendlease

34,719

69 Market Central Lutwyche*, QLD, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

22,100

26 Sunshine Marketplace, VIC, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity

34,173

70 Figtree Grove, NSW, SPH REIT & Moelis/RetPro Group

21,986

27 Eastlands, TAS, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

33,318

71 Marrickville Metro, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

21,927

28 Carlingford Court, NSW, Vicinity & Telstra Super/Vicinity

33,296

72 Lilydale Marketplace, VIC, SCA/Colliers

21,737

29 The Pines Elanora, QLD, The Pines S/C/The Pines S/C (QLD) 33,160

73 Q Super Centre S/C, QLD, Jen/Jen Mgt QLD

21,687

30 Birkenhead Point B/Outlet, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

33,152

74 Bonnyrigg Plaza, NSW, BAEV-LaSalle BP/JLL

21,660

31 Kwinana Marketplace, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

32,952

75 Southlands Boulevarde S/C, WA, LL Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

21,621

32 East Village, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

32,941

76 Rockdale, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

21,620

33 Lidcombe S/C, NSW, Drivas Group/JLL

32,655

77 Riverside Plaza, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

21,533

34 Warwick Grove, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

32,250

78 Warnbro Centre, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

21,434

35 Armadale S/City, WA, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

31,916

79 Dapto Mall, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

21,413

36 Warriewood Square, NSW, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

30,277

80 Forest Lake Boulevard, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

21,059

37 Endeavour Hills S/C, VIC, Makris Group/JLL

30,000

81 Hinkler Central, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

20,872

38 Wynnum Plaza, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

29,340

82 Singleton Square, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

20,693

39 Stockland Gladstone, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

29,151

83 Mildura Central, VIC, VERF/Vicinity Centres

20,448

40 Bateau Bay, NSW, CH Retail P.No.2/Charter Hall

29,031

84 Jesmond Central, NSW, Jesmond Plaza Trust/Haben PF

20,341

41 Maddington Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

27,837

85 Lavington Square, NSW, SCA/Knight Frank

20,236

42 Stockland Wendouree, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

27,741

86 Casula Mall, NSW, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

20,040

43 Mt Gambier Marketplace, SA, SCA/Colliers

27,723

87 Stockland Traralgon, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

20,007

44 Kingsway City Shopping Centre, WA, Tah Land/Lease Equity

27,203

88 Halls Head Central, WA, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

20,000

42 SCN

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COPYRIGHT©

*DEVELOPMENT/UNSTABLE

GLAm2

GLAm2: Gross Lettable Area. Includes the trading area of all tenants located at the centre, whether currently leased or not leased. Includes non-retail such as medical suites, offices, cinemas and entertainment etc. Does not include storage areas or casual leasing sites.

2020 SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

16/11/20 10:17 am


200903-QD-SCN-Ad-Artwork-Outlines.indd 1

3/9/20 2:23 pm


LITTLE GUNS 2020

Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

MAT

Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

MAT

1 Belmont Forum, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$386.14

45 Maddington Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$188.05

2 Park Beach Plaza, NSW, H A Bachrach/BNG

$315.86

46 Armadale S/City, WA, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$187.75

3 Kawana Shoppingworld, QLD, Mirvac & ISPT/Mirvac

$313.34

47 Dapto Mall, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

$187.16

4 Lake Haven Centre, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$296.79

48 Marketown Shopping Centre, NSW, Sunsuper/AMPCSC

$185.09

5 Chirnside Park S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$290.67

49 Carlingford Court, NSW, Vicinity & Telstra Super/Vicinity

$182.57

6 Ocean Keys S/C, WA, AMP Capital S/C Fund/AMPCSC

$290.14

50 Hinkler Central, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

$181.83

7 Willows S/C, QLD, DWPF/Dexus

$279.95

51 Endeavour Hills S/C, VIC, Makris Group/JLL

$180.00

8 The Square Mirrabooka, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$271.30

52 Stockland Bundaberg, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$179.57

9 Bateau Bay, NSW, CH Retail P.No.2/Charter Hall

$268.95

53 CS Square, VIC, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$175.70

10 Eastlands, TAS, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$268.01

54 Kwinana Marketplace, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

$175.07

11 Parkmore S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$267.21

55 Stockland The Pines, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$173.39

12 Birkenhead Point B/Outlet, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

$264.35

56 Capalaba Central, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

$171.07

13 Runaway Bay Centre, QLD, Vicinity & Perron/Vicinity

$262.56

57 Forest Lake Boulevard, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

$167.66

14 Stockland Cairns, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$259.64

58 Lidcombe S/C, NSW, Drivas Group/JLL

$166.46

15 Winston Hills Mall, NSW, Private/TGC

$256.90

59 East Village, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

$163.14

16 The Pines Elanora, QLD, The Pines S/C/The Pines S/C (QLD) $251.45

60 Q Super Centre S/C, QLD, Jen/Jen Mgt QLD

$163.00

17 Smithfield Centre, QLD, SAS Trustee Corp/Lendlease

$251.15

61 Roxburgh Village, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$159.64

18 Nepean Village, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$250.73

62 Singleton Square, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$159.17

19 Ellenbrook Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$249.88

63 Jesmond Central, NSW, Jesmond Plaza Trust/Haben PF

$155.11

20 Cranbourne Park, VIC, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$249.81

64 Lilydale Marketplace, VIC, SCA/Colliers

$153.53

21 Marrickville Metro, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

$247.80

65 Castle Plaza, SA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$148.83

22 Stockland Baldivis*, WA, Stockland/Stockland

$246.63

66 Sunshine Marketplace, VIC, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity

$146.66

23 Stockland Point Cook, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$242.72

67 Altona Gate, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$146.08

24 Toombul, QLD, Mirvac/Mirvac

$242.15

68 Lansell, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$145.19

25 Warriewood Square, NSW, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$241.83

69 Stockland Traralgon, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$142.88

26 Campbelltown, NSW, CH Prime Retail Fund/Charter Hall

$241.68

70 Kingsway City Shopping Centre, WA, Tah Land/Lease Equity $142.82

27 Warwick Grove, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$228.96

71 Rosebud, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

28 Karratha City, WA, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity Centres

$226.96

72 Fairfield Central S/C, QLD, Landel & Fairfield Land/Lancini $140.91

29 Stockland Hervey Bay, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$226.39

73 Southlands Boulevarde S/C, WA, LL Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease $134.57

30 Stockland Forster, NSW, Stockland/Stockland

$219.97

74 Booval Fair S/C, QLD, YFG /Retail First

$133.00

31 Mount Pleasant Centre, QLD, CBGS/Vicinity Centres

$218.33

75 Warnbro Centre, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

$129.61

32 Victoria Gardens, VIC, Vicinity & Salta/Vicinity Centres

$213.26

76 Tweed Mall, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

$128.39

33 Stockland Burleigh Heads, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$212.11

77 Lavington Square, NSW, SCA/Knight Frank

$128.03

34 Stud Park S/C, VIC, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

$209.28

78 Halls Head Central, WA, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$128.02

35 Ashfield Mall, NSW, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

$208.77

79 Bonnyrigg Plaza, NSW, BAEV-LaSalle BP/JLL

$127.97

36 Rhodes Waterside, NSW, Mirvac & Perron/Mirvac

$208.17

80 Mid Valley S/C, VIC, Juilliard/Juilliard

$127.40

37 Salamander, NSW, CH Retail REIT & CH PRF/Charter Hall

$205.47

81 Whitsunday Plaza, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$126.23

38 Casula Mall, NSW, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

$197.67

82 Mildura Central, VIC, VERF/Vicinity Centres

$123.62

39 Wynnum Plaza, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

$197.50

83 The Oasis, QLD, Abacus & KKR/JLL

$115.28

40 Figtree Grove, NSW, SPH REIT & Moelis/RetPro Group

$197.28

84 Stockland Shellharbour Retail Park*, NSW, Stockland/Stockland $114.73

41 Rockdale, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$196.87

85 Taigum Square, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$108.75

42 Box Hill Central (Sth), VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$195.34

86 Riverside Plaza, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

$102.04

43 Stockland Wendouree, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$194.01

87 Mt Gambier Marketplace, SA, SCA/Colliers

$85.75

44 Stockland Gladstone, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$191.60

88 Market Central Lutwyche*, QLD, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

44 SCN

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COPYRIGHT©

$142.39

N/R

*DEVELOPMENT/UNSTABLE

MAT million

MAT: Moving Annual Turnover ($million). Total retail sales from 1 August 2019 to 31 July 2020 including GST. Includes trade from all tenants where the manager is provided with sales data (including cinemas, restaurants, travel & entertainment venues). Excludes sales from banks, ATMs, financial institutions, health insurance, TAB/soft gambling, gaming venues, amusements (rides), professional services & suites, offices, casual mall tenants & storage tenants.

2020 SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

16/11/20 10:17 am


FOOD & HOSPITALITY ADVISORS TO THE PROPERTY INDUSTRY Professional advice for retail, food & mixed-use environments Food Strategy - Sustainable F&B Volumes (GLA & $) - Retailer Support - EOI & Campaign Management Strategies - F&B Mix

Chadstone Shopping Centre, Melbourne

WATERFRONT PRECINCTS

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MIXED USE DEVELOPMENTS

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COUNCIL & TOWN CENTRES

MASTERPLANNING YOUR ASSET’S FOOD & HOSPITALITY STRATEGY futurefood.com.au

Contact Francis Loughran on +61 418 586 149 or Floughran@futurefood.com.au


LITTLE GUNS 2020

Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

MAT/m2

Rank

Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

MAT/m2

1 East Village, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

$14,748

45 Q Super Centre S/C, QLD, Jen/Jen Mgt QLD

$7,509

2

Marrickville Metro, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

$12,538

46 Willows S/C, QLD, DWPF/Dexus

$7,497

3

Nepean Village, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$11,639

47 Campbelltown, NSW, CH Prime Retail Fund/Charter Hall

$7,442

4

Winston Hills Mall, NSW, Private/TGC

$11,524

48 Stockland Point Cook, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$7,375

5

Bateau Bay, NSW, CH Retail P.No.2/Charter Hall

$10,872

49 Toombul, QLD, Mirvac/Mirvac

$7,305

6

Mount Pleasant Centre, QLD, CBGS/Vicinity Centres

$10,637

50 Stockland Wendouree, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$7,278

7

Karratha City, WA, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity Centres

$10,394

51 Bonnyrigg Plaza, NSW, BAEV-LaSalle BP/JLL

$7,264

8

Casula Mall, NSW, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

$10,106

52 Stockland Burleigh Heads, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$7,257

9

Figtree Grove, NSW, SPH REIT & Moelis/RetPro Group

$9,904

53 Stockland Traralgon, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$7,193

10 Rockdale, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$9,723

54 Wynnum Plaza, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

$7,178

11 Hinkler Central, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

$9,644

55 Castle Plaza, SA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$7,133

12 Salamander, NSW, CH Retail REIT & CH PRF/Charter Hall

$9,632

56 Lavington Square, NSW, SCA/Knight Frank

$7,132

13 Chirnside Park S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$9,506

57 CS Square, VIC, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$7,125

14 Smithfield Centre, QLD, SAS Trustee Corp./Lendlease

$9,445

58 Halls Head Central, WA, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$7,065

15 Dapto Mall, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

$9,439

59 Lansell, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$7,051

16 Rhodes Waterside, NSW, Mirvac & Perron/Mirvac

$9,291

60 Carlingford Court, NSW, Vicinity & Telstra Super/Vicinity

$7,045

17 Birkenhead Point B/Outlet, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

$9,283

61 Whitsunday Plaza, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$7,030

18 Box Hill Central (Sth), VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$9,116

62 Lilydale Marketplace, VIC, SCA/Colliers

$6,994

19 Stud Park S/C, VIC, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

$9,038

63 Kingsway City Shopping Centre, WA, Tah Land/Lease Equity $6,910

20 Lake Haven Centre, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$9,026

64 Altona Gate, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$6,894

21 The Pines Elanora, QLD, The Pines S/C/The Pines S/C (QLD) $9,020

65 Warnbro Centre, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

$6,893

22 Riverside Plaza, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

$8,968

66 Stockland Hervey Bay, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$6,857

23 Warwick Grove, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$8,961

67 Stockland Gladstone, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$6,786

24 Forest Lake Boulevard, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

$8,831

68 Kwinana Marketplace, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

$6,773

25 Warriewood Square, NSW, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$8,796

69 Mildura Central, VIC, VERF/Vicinity Centres

$6,507

26 Ellenbrook Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$8,480

70 The Square Mirrabooka, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$6,488

27 Ocean Keys S/C, WA, AMP Capital S/C Fund/AMPCSC

$8,478

71 Stockland Cairns, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$6,431

28 Eastlands, TAS, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$8,450

72 Rosebud, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$6,407

29 Ashfield Mall, NSW, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

$8,403

73 Taigum Square, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$6,379

30 Roxburgh Village, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$8,303

74 Cranbourne Park, VIC, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$6,320

31 Kawana Shoppingworld, QLD, Mirvac & ISPT/Mirvac

$8,291

75 Booval Fair S/C, QLD, YFG /Retail First

$6,302

32 Marketown Shopping Centre, NSW, Sunsuper/AMPCSC

$8,290

76 Armadale S/City, WA, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$6,288

33 Stockland Bundaberg, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$8,277

77 Fairfield Central S/C, QLD, Landel & Fairfield Land/Lancini

$6,191

34 Jesmond Central, NSW, Jesmond Plaza Trust/Haben PF

$8,223

78 Endeavour Hills S/C, VIC, Makris Group/JLL

$6,020

35 Belmont Forum, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$8,105

79 Stockland Forster, NSW, Stockland/Stockland

$5,964

36 Singleton Square, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$8,001

80 Tweed Mall, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

$5,519

37 Park Beach Plaza, NSW, H A Bachrach/BNG

$7,909

81 Mt Gambier Marketplace, SA, SCA/Colliers

$5,237

38 Parkmore S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$7,874

82 Lidcombe S/C, NSW, Drivas Group/JLL

$5,097

39 Maddington Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$7,803

83 The Oasis, QLD, Abacus & KKR/JLL

$5,046

40 Sunshine Marketplace, VIC, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity

$7,690

84 Capalaba Central, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

$4,691

41 Victoria Gardens, VIC, Vicinity & Salta/Vicinity Centres

$7,604

85 Mid Valley S/C, VIC, Juilliard/Juilliard

$3,644

42 Stockland The Pines, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$7,589

86 Market Central Lutwyche*, QLD, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

N/R

43 Southlands Boulevarde S/C, WA, LL Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$7,580

87 Stockland Baldivis*, WA, Stockland/Stockland

N/R

44 Runaway Bay Centre, QLD, Vicinity & Perron/Vicinity

$7,576

88 Stockland Shellharbour Retail Park*, NSW, Stockland/Stockland

N/R

46 SCN

42-48-Little Guns_Tables_2020_FINAL.indd 46

COPYRIGHT©

*DEVELOPMENT/UNSTABLE

MAT/m2

MAT/m2: Total retail sales from 1 August 2019 to 31 July 2020 including GST, divided by the retail area from which the retail sales were derived. Includes trade from all tenants where the manager is provided with sales data, excluding cinemas & entertainment venues. Excludes sales from banks, ATMs, financial institutions, health insurance, TAB/soft gambling, gaming venues, amusements (rides), professional services and suites, offices, casual mall tenants & storage tenants.

2020 SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

16/11/20 10:17 am


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The only retail media company to offer free Wi-Fi & centre by centre analytics Contact us today: www.shoppermedia.com.au SMG- Print ads-210x276mm-5mm Bleeding.indd 1

4/11/20 3:44 pm


Total retail sales from 1 August 2019 to 31 July 2020 including GST for all trade-reporting tenants with a GLA below 400m2, divided by the retail area from which the retail sales were derived. Excludes sales from cinemas, entertainment venues (such as ice skating rinks or ten pin bowling centres), banks, ATMs, financial institutions, health insurance, TAB/ soft gambling, gaming venues, amusements (rides), professional services & suites, offices, casual mall tenants & storage tenants. Travel agencies are excluded from Specialty MAT/m2. (In keeping with SCCA standards).

LITTLE GUNS 2020

Rank Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

Spec.MAT/m2

Rank Centre name, State, Owner/Manager

Spec.MAT/m2

1

Mount Pleasant Centre, QLD, CBGS/Vicinity Centres

$14,262

45 Ashfield Mall, NSW, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

$8,155

2

Winston Hills Mall, NSW, Private/TGC

$14,188

46 Eastlands, TAS, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$8,134

3

Whitsunday Plaza, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$12,733

47 Wynnum Plaza, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

$8,103

4

Nepean Village, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$12,272

48 Castle Plaza, SA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$8,084

5

Rockdale, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$12,128

49 Smithfield Centre, QLD, SAS Trustee Corp./Lendlease

$8,038

6

Victoria Gardens, VIC, Vicinity & Salta/Vicinity Centres

$11,616

50 Kwinana Marketplace, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

$8,002

7

Chirnside Park S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$11,243

51 Stockland Wendouree, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$7,929

8

Marrickville Metro, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

$11,127

52 Rhodes Waterside, NSW, Mirvac & Perron/Mirvac

$7,855

9

Stockland Bundaberg, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$10,695

53 Armadale S/City, WA, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$7,759

10 Q Super Centre S/C, QLD, Jen/Jen Mgt QLD

$10,596

54 Kawana Shoppingworld, QLD, Mirvac & ISPT/Mirvac

$7,738

11 Bateau Bay, NSW, CH Retail P.No.2/Charter Hall

$10,552

55 Altona Gate, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$7,732

12 Karratha City, WA, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity Centres

$10,495

56 Stockland Forster, NSW, Stockland/Stockland

$7,699

13 Stockland Gladstone, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$10,436

57 Warwick Grove, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$7,629

14 Lake Haven Centre, NSW, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$10,261

58 Singleton Square, NSW, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$7,603

15 Dapto Mall, NSW, Unisuper/AMPCSC

$10,138

59 Kingsway City Shopping Centre, WA, Tah Land/Lease Equity

$7,519

16 East Village, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

$10,069

60 Lidcombe S/C, NSW, Drivas Group/JLL

$7,491

17 Box Hill Central (Sth), VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$10,058

61 Stockland Traralgon, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$7,483

18 Carlingford Court, NSW, Vicinity & Telstra Super/Vicinity

$9,405

62 Warnbro Centre, WA, SCA/Knight Frank

$7,457

19 Runaway Bay Centre, QLD, Vicinity & Perron/Vicinity

$9,180

63 Cranbourne Park, VIC, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$7,325

20 Ellenbrook Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$9,137

64 Bonnyrigg Plaza, NSW, BAEV-LaSalle BP/JLL

$7,177

21 Stud Park S/C, VIC, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

$9,137

65 Maddington Central, WA, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$7,116

22 Birkenhead Point B/Outlet, NSW, Mirvac/Mirvac

$8,985

66 Capalaba Central, QLD, Shayher/Wynnum Retail Mgt

$7,004

23 Ocean Keys S/C, WA, AMP Capital S/C Fund/AMPCSC

$8,926

67 Halls Head Central, WA, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$6,737

24 Warriewood Square, NSW, Vicinity & ISPT/Vicinity Centres

$8,922

68 Mildura Central, VIC, VERF/Vicinity Centres

$6,718

25 Park Beach Plaza, NSW, H A Bachrach/BNG

$8,890

69 Marketown Shopping Centre, NSW, Sunsuper/AMPCSC

$6,676

26 Parkmore S/C, VIC, GWSCF/GPT

$8,868

70 Campbelltown, NSW, CH Prime Retail Fund/Charter Hall

$6,586

27 The Pines Elanora, QLD, The Pines S/C/The Pines S/C (QLD) $8,855

71 Sunshine Marketplace, VIC, Vicinity & Challenger/Vicinity

$6,504

28 Stockland Hervey Bay, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$8,759

72 Mt Gambier Marketplace, SA, SCA/Colliers

$6,501

29 Jesmond Central, NSW, Jesmond Plaza Trust/Haben PF

$8,753

73 The Square Mirrabooka, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$6,497

30 Salamander, NSW, CH Retail REIT & CH PRF/Charter Hall

$8,725

74 Stockland Point Cook, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$6,472

31 Casula Mall, NSW, Wholesale Australian PF/AMPCSC

$8,572

75 Taigum Square, QLD, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$6,403

32 Figtree Grove, NSW, SPH REIT & Moelis/RetPro Group

$8,566

76 Lansell, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$6,201

33 Fairfield Central S/C, QLD, Landel & Fairfield Land/Lancini $8,518

77 Stockland The Pines, VIC, Stockland/Stockland

$5,942

34 Toombul, QLD, Mirvac/Mirvac

$8,488

78 Southlands Boulevarde S/C, WA, LL Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$5,924

35 Belmont Forum, WA, Perron Group/JLL

$8,463

79 Roxburgh Village, VIC, Vicinity/Vicinity Centres

$5,695

36 Stockland Burleigh Heads, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$8,433

80 Endeavour Hills S/C, VIC, Makris Group/JLL

$5,636

37 Stockland Cairns, QLD, Stockland/Stockland

$8,400

81 CS Square, VIC, Lendlease Sub-Reg RF/Lendlease

$5,629

38 Willows S/C, QLD, DWPF/Dexus

$8,396

82 Lilydale Marketplace, VIC, SCA/Colliers

$5,327

39 Hinkler Central, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

$8,354

83 Mid Valley S/C, VIC, Juilliard/Juilliard

$5,012

40 Rosebud, VIC, CH Retail REIT/Charter Hall

$8,353

84 Booval Fair S/C, QLD, YFG /Retail First

$4,762

41 Lavington Square, NSW, SCA/Knight Frank

$8,230

85 Tweed Mall, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

$3,162

42 The Oasis, QLD, Abacus & KKR/JLL

$8,221

86 Market Central Lutwyche*, QLD, Abacus & ISPT/JLL

N/R

43 Riverside Plaza, NSW, Elanor/RetPro Group

$8,219

87 Stockland Baldivis*, WA, Stockland/Stockland

N/R

44 Forest Lake Boulevard, QLD, QICGRE/QICGRE

$8,163

88 Stockland Shellharbour Retail Park*, NSW, Stockland/Stockland

N/R

48 SCN

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*DEVELOPMENT/UNSTABLE

Specialty MAT/m2

2020 SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

16/11/20 10:17 am


To engage Hames Sharley is to harness unparalleled demonstrable experience and gain access to a formidable bank of knowledge that translates into functional, memorable and innovative places. Hames Sharley’s steadfast commitment to world’s best practice has positioned the practice at the forefront of retail innovation for over four decades.

hamessharley.com.au ADELAIDE | BRISBANE | DARWIN | MELBOURNE | PERTH | SYDNEY


2020

LITTLE GUNS Centres with a GLA of more than 20,000m2 and under 50,000m2

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Altona Gate, VIC Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 03 9316 2222 26,117 $100 4 $36.40 KM, A, C 5 45 1,622 Anna Hickling Nichola Wilson Brayden Norris

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Armadale Shopping City, WA Lendlease Sub-Reg Retail Fund Lendlease Property Management 08 9399 3933 31,916 15 Oct SOLD to Giuliana Properties 4.16 $45.12 A, C, KM, T 6 68 1,506 Quentin Dennis Anne Pesic Sally Lewis & Mark Guttridge

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Ashfield Mall, NSW Abacus & ISPT JLL 02 9799 8488 24,977 - 7.5 $27.96 A, C, K, W 2 79 1,070 Linda Lord Houaida Susnig  Scott Bollard & David Fairbairn

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Bateau Bay, NSW CH Retail Partnership No.2 Charter Hall 02 4332 2255 29,031 $216 - - 4 2 114 1,300 Monica Morlin Dana Irving Francois George & Logan Mead

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Belmont Forum S/Centre, WA Perron Group JLL 08 9277 6544 47,643 $366.7 7.62 $50.66 A, BW, C, KM, W 7 109 2,600 Shane McLean Julie Elliott Gabriel Payne

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Birkenhead Point Brand Outlet, NSW Mirvac Mirvac Real Estate 02 9812 8800 33,152 $367 2.72 $97.20 A, C 14 142 1,351 Rosemary Antonios Marina Ross Sepideh Vahdat

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Bonnyrigg Plaza, NSW BAEVLaSalle Bonnyrigg Plaza JLL 02 9610 2000 21,660 - 4.14 $30.90 BW, W 1 52 873 Helen Koppman Nicole Alhinn Faye Hedayatian

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Booval Fair Shopping Centre, QLD YFG Shopping Centres Pty Ltd Retail First  07 3281 0655 23,249 $40 3.25 $42.05 BW, W 2 50 1,257 Craig Moffatt Anastasia Young Craig Moffatt

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Box Hill Central (Sth Precinct), VIC Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 03 9843 3900 23,733 $219.5 18.5 $10.54 BW, W 4 94 1,511 - Ebony Evangelista Kali Hamilton & Nici Sprawling

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16/11/20 1:09 pm


Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Campbelltown, NSW CH Prime Retail Fund Charter Hall 02 4629 9200 42,431 $195 - - 5 10 127 1,700 Michael Roumieh Rhys Simonds Nathan Lumb & Karina White

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Capalaba Central, QLD Shayher Group Wynnum Retail Management 07 3245 8888 42,110 - 3.53 $48.45 BW, C, HN, W, BCC Cinema 3 54 1,582 Kristy Pascoe Teresa Gomez Katherine Pederson

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Carlingford Court, NSW 50% Vicinity / 50% Telstra Super Vicinity Centres 02 8845 8200 33,296 $210 6.3 $29.05 T, C, W 7 73 1,472 Kelli Shoesmith - Tanya Prince

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Castle Plaza, SA Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 08 8277 6733 22,828 $151.4 3.4 $44.22 T, C, FL - 53 1,288 Glenn Hanson Melissa Graham Tom March

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Casula Mall, NSW Wholesale Aust. Property Fund AMP Capital Shopping Centres 02 9821 1033 20,040 - 5.93 $33.32 A, C, KM 2 58 830 Jacqueline Common Eden Canceri Mende Gelevski

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Chirnside Park S/Centre, VIC GPT Wholesale S/Centre Fund The GPT Group 03 9798 9494 37,603 $259.7 6.89 $81.00 A, C, KM, T, W, Reading Cinemas 1 82 2,088 Louise Martin Charise Spooner & Samantha Carr Andrew Field

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Cranbourne Park, VIC 50% Vicinity / 50% ISPT Vicinity Centres 03 5996 3166 46,928 $260 6 $41.98 KM, T, C, HS, W 5 105 1,700 Andrew Gibson Allison Bailey Fergus Evans

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

CS Square, VIC Lendlease Sub-Reg. Retail Fund Lendlease Property Management 03 8390 0764 26,518 - 5.28 $33.27 A, C, T, W 4 73 980 Rodney Kennedy Matt Dworakowski Chenila Pangly

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Dapto Mall, NSW Unisuper AMP Capital Shopping Centres 02 4261 8148 21,413 - 4.14 $46.63 BW, C, W 2 58 1,102 Glenn Cochrane Julia Davidson Mende Gelevski

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

East Village, NSW Mirvac Mirvac Real Estate 02 8398 5658 32,941 $306 5.77 $28.26 C, A 3 53 671 Alex Perryman Katey Young Sepideh Vahdat & Scott Smith

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Eastlands, TAS Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 03 6244 5222 33,318 $156.8 6.5 $41.22 BW, KM, C, W, Village Cinemas 4 72 1,446 Luke Jamieson - Danica Reeves

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Key Majors A ALDI B BUNNINGS

HN HARVEY NORMAN

BW BIG W

KM KMART

C COLES

M MYER

DJ DAVID JONES

S SAFEWAY

FL FOODLAND

SIGA SUPER IGA

FFL FOOD FOR LESS HS HARRIS SCARFE

T TARGET W WOOLWORTHS

SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 51

16/11/20 1:09 pm


2020

LITTLE GUNS

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Ellenbrook Central, WA Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 08 9297 0300 43,544 $242 4.6 $53.91 BW, A, C, W 3 69 2,018 Roisin McDonagh Kylie Janney Matt Wells & Tom Parker

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Endeavour Hills S/Centre, VIC Makris Group of Companies JLL 03 9700 2374 30,000 - 5 - A, C, KM, W 4 74 2,003 Tim Chanter Lauren Pascale -

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Fairfield Central S/Centre, QLD Landel Pty Ltd and Fairfield Land Lancini Property Group 07 4759 8249 23,092 $113.5 2.7 $50.95 C, KM, W - 52 874 Debbie Gelling Danelle Parker  Adam Martin 

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Figtree Grove, NSW SPH REIT & Moelis Australia RetPro Group 02 4298 9600 21,986 - 4.63 $42.64 C, KM, W 2 84 940 Kristy Miglionico Rhianna Quirk Mardi Alatini

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Forest Lake Boulevard, QLD QICGRE QICGRE 07 3278 8999 21,059 - 4.17 $40.17 A, C, W, T 2 48 1,147 Rebecca McKeown Indra McKauge Joshua Aylett-Jeans

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Halls Head Central, WA 50% Vicinity / 50% ISPT Vicinity Centres 08 9535 7407 20,000 $80 2.6 $50.09 KM, A, C 1 46 982 Amanda Betteridge Taryn Macdonald Liam Pardini

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Hinkler Central, QLD QICGRE QICGRE 07 4152 9888 20,872 - 4.79 $37.93 C, W, KM 1 53 1,043 Sherry Stone Kaitlyn Harnell Trisha Wamelink

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Jesmond Central, NSW Jesmond Plaza Trust Haben Property Fund 02 4955 9249 20,341 - 5.98 $25.92 A, BW, W 1 63 910 Trina Pywell Karla Bucoy Simon Johnson

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Karratha City, WA 50% Vicinity / 50% Challenger Vicinity Centres 08 9185 4288 23,480 $80 4 $56.61 KM, C, W 4 38 1,275 Melanie Tan-Garbin - David Hart

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Kawana Shoppingworld, QLD Mirvac & ISPT Mirvac Real Estate 07 5444 1944 45,391 $375 6.6 $47.47 A, BW, C, W, Event Cinema 6 155 1,990 Robert Smith Hannah Petsalis Ashlee Hill

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Kingsway City S/Centre, WA Tah Land Pty Ltd Lease Equity Pty Ltd 08 9409 2222 27,203 - 3.35 $42.68 A, BW, W - 76 1,437 Lease Equity - James Hopkins

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16/11/20 1:09 pm


Retail Property Specialists

Elevating Retail Take your centre to the next level with the experts in retail management and leasing.

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With retail leasing, centre management, development, financial and marketing services, we deliver custom solutions to enhance your centre. Expect exceptional service and a hands-on approach from our customer-focussed and results-orientated team. Contact us to discuss your project retprogroup.com.au Graham Terry 0419 558 409

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2020 SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

30/10/20 12:44 pm

$3.5B RETAIL PROJECTS COMPLETED

OVER 1500 RETAIL PROJECTS COMPLETED

SYDNEY, BRISBANE, MELBOURNE

SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 53

16/11/20 4:21 pm


2020

LITTLE GUNS

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Kwinana Marketplace, WA SCA Property Group Knight Frank 08 9439 1233 32,952 $130.6 - - 4 4 76 1,606 Glenn Page Julia Beaton Colin Pang

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Lake Haven Centre, NSW Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 02 4394 8804 43,175 $283.9 6 $49.44 KM, A, C, W 7 76 1,660 Mike Cochrane Kian West Jade Kennedy

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Lansell, VIC CH Retail REIT Charter Hall 03 5911 8900 23,128 $95 - - 3 3 77 980 Annette Cotter Hannah Kuhlmann Martin James

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Lavington Square, NSW SCA Property Group Knight Frank Wagga Wagga 02 6075 9100 20,236 $57.4 - - 2 3 57 1,036 Kane Harding Nicole Singh Jill Toohey

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Lidcombe Shopping Centre, NSW Drivas Group JLL 02 9648 3451 32,655 $150 6.4 $25.99 A, KM, W 5 64 1,050 Geordie Bunting Jennifer Dunne Nicholas Cole

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Lilydale Marketplace, VIC SCA Property Group Colliers International 03 9735 2833 21,737 $110 - - 3 2 60 1,100 Jessica Humphris Lidia Agosta Dominic Monaco

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Maddington Central, WA Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 08 9459 8333 27,837 $93 4.6 $41.04 KM, C, W 3 57 2,136 Aaron Bennett Nara Juliana Martins De Souza Maresce Ryan

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Market Central Lutwyche* QLD Abacus & ISPT JLL 07 3857 5035 22,100 *DEVELOPMENT 3.5 - A, C, W 1 53 766 David Smith Katherine Tainsh Scott Bollard

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Marketown Shopping Centre, NSW Sunsuper AMP Capital Shopping Centres 02 4929 4448 26,280 - 4.19 $44.20 BW, C, W 5 50 936 Jenna Corcoran Jessica Doak Dean Seeto

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Marrickville Metro, NSW Unisuper AMP Capital Shopping Centres 02 9519 1066 21,927 - 5.77 $43.00 A, KM, W 2 93 1,110 Dean Young Amalia Collins Stuart Norman

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Mid Valley Shopping Centre, VIC Juilliard Group of Companies Juilliard Group of Companies  03 5133 7022 37,000 - 2.26 $57.00 B, BW, W, Village Cinemas 3 60 1,500 Sjaala Harbridge Bianca Ferrante Sjaala Harbridge

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16/11/20 1:09 pm


Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Mildura Central, VIC VERF Vicinity Centres 03 5023 7177 20,448 $82 - - T, W 2 58 1,038 Leigh Fuller Lexi Golding Scott Mann

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Mount Pleasant Centre, QLD CBGS Vicinity Centres 07 4969 2400 22,525 $137 4 $53.96 KM, C, W 3 53 1,258 Cathy Sullivan Holly Moore Shaun Powell

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Mt Gambier Marketplace, SA SCA Property Group Colliers International 08 8724 8798 27,723 $71.3 - - 3 1 37 1,000 Karen Cunningham Paula Creasy Wayne Hancock

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Nepean Village, NSW Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 02 4721 0112 23,057 $204 5.7 $43.91 K, C 2 51 861 Sonia Davis - Tanya Prince

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Ocean Keys S/Centre, WA AMP Capital Shopping Centre Fund AMP Capital Shopping Centres 08 9407 2400 36,865 - 5.33 $54.47 C, KM, T, W 2 113 1,579 Sandi Swan Giselle Posilero Jackie Turner

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Park Beach Plaza, NSW H A Bachrach (NOM) Pty Ltd Bachrach Naumburger Group 02 6652 4366 42,184 - 5.03 $62.79 A, BW, SIGA, T, W 4 118 2,266 Lorenz Beckett Caroline Laine Karen Hickey

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Parkmore Shopping Centre, VIC GPT Wholesale S/Centre Fund The GPT Group 03 9727 9001 36,798 $253.9 7.44 $62.00 BW, C, KM, W 4 96 2,519 Elizabeth Gale Tanya Ryder & Sally Curtis Chloe Zafaranic

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Q Super Centre, QLD Jen Management QLD Pty Ltd Jen Management QLD Pty Ltd 07 5563 4888 21,687 - 1.37 $109.00 A, B, C, W 3 72 1,006 Simeon Clerke Karen Wibberley Simeon Clerke

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Rhodes Waterside, NSW Mirvac & Perron Investments Mirvac Real Estate 02 8754 1111 34,849 $375 8.53 $24.39 A, C, T, Reading Cinema 6 128 2,414 Tanya Coert - Kerry Wilckens

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Riverside Plaza, NSW Elanor Investor Group RetPro Group 02 6299 2466 21,533 $60 2.6 $40.15 C 3 37 562 Jodee Marques - Rebekah Mattner

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Rockdale, NSW CH Retail REIT Charter Hall 02 9553 1277 21,620 $151 - - 3 7 62 907 Brett Worne Rhys Simonds Adam D'Annolfo

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Rosebud, VIC CH Retail REIT Charter Hall 03 4435 0100 23,825 $126 - - 3 1 66 1,070 Jodie Pearce Hannah Kuhlmann Martin James

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2020

LITTLE GUNS

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Roxburgh Village, VIC Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 03 9308 6811 24,742 $95.7 5.4 $29.78 A, C, W 3 43 1,096 Jeroam Whittington Ilhan Uysal Silvia Lorenc

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Runaway Bay Centre, QLD 50% Vicinity / 50% Perron Vicinity Centres 07 5537 2566 42,975 $225 4.5 $57.84 BW, T, A, C, W 3 73 2,160 Sharon Gambrill Madeleine West -

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Salamander, NSW CH Retail REIT/CH Prime Retail Fund Charter Hall 02 4982 0066 23,963 $164 - - 5 - 88 1,060 Joanna Dunn Kate Ward Amy Jamieson

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Singleton Square, NSW CH Retail REIT Charter Hall 02 5504 4300 20,693 $111 - - 3 1 60 700 Mitch Phelps Dana Irving Amy Jamieson

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Smithfield Centre, QLD SAS Trustee Corporation Lendlease Property Management 07 4281 3800 34,719 - 4.06 $61.84 C, KM, W, Event Cinemas 6 78 1,519 John Cooper Louise Montafia Charles Nott

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Southlands Boulevarde S/C, WA Lendlease Sub-Reg Retail Fund Lendlease Property Management 08 9310 0600 21,621 - 3.58 $37.59 C, W, HOYTS Cinemas 4 60 1,250 Quentin Dennis Samantha Ferraz Sally Lewis

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Baldivis, WA Stockland Stockland 08 6141 8381 34,919 $182 4.37 $56.48 A, C, KM, W 4 67 1,466 Clare Riley Samara Anderson Bernie Canning

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Bundaberg, QLD Stockland Stockland 07 4152 5788 23,382 $136.5 3.9 $45.95 BW, W 4 50 1,281 Paul Davis Chantelle Clark Cassandra Button

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Burleigh Heads, QLD Stockland Stockland 07 5535 9666 36,379 $178.8 4.27 $49.67 A, BW, W 8 78 1,688 - Chantelle Clark Kim Hawkins

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Cairns, QLD Stockland Stockland 07 4054 3066 48,856 $162 4.42 $58.74 BW, C, T, W, BCC Cinemas 6 77 2,375 Malcolm Miller Wendy Mulligan Aaron Stephenson

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Forster, NSW Stockland Stockland 02 6554 5044 38,978 $178 4.26 $51.64 A, B, C, KM, W 6 56 1,409 Alexander Walichnowski Wendy Mulligan Douglas Stewart

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2020

LITTLE GUNS

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Gladstone, QLD Stockland Stockland 07 4978 1944 29,151 $127.1 4.56 $42.01 BW, C, KM, W 2 44 1,280 Diana Mitchell Chantelle Clark Sonya Mitchell

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Hervey Bay, QLD Stockland Stockland 07 4124 5422 37,070 $164.5 4.13 $54.82 C, KM, T 8 81 1,772 Paul Davis Chantelle Clark Cassandra Button

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Point Cook, VIC Stockland Stockland 03 9395 4722 44,120 $210 8.87 $27.36 A, C, T, W 6 90 1,721 Frank Pizi Samara Anderson  Bernie Canning 

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Shellharbour RP, NSW Stockland Stockland 02 4296 8266 22,118 $68 W 9 3 789 Daniel Buchanan Wendy Mulligan Danni-Elle George

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland The Pines, VIC Stockland Stockland 03 9842 9000 25,107 $148.6 4.78 $36.25 A, C, KM, W 1 80 1,298 Ingrid Vanin Samara Anderson Sally Nutbean

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Traralgon, VIC Stockland Stockland 03 5174 9477 20,007 $83 3.18 $44.91 C, KM 3 50 750 Jeff Andrews Samara Anderson Sally Nutbean

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stockland Wendouree, VIC Stockland Stockland 03 5339 5131 27,741 $158 5 $38.74 C, KM, W 4 84 1,238 Stevie Wright Samara Anderson Lachlan Smith

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Stud Park Shopping Centre, VIC Wholesale Aust. Property Fund AMP Capital Shopping Centres 03 9764 1218 26,213 - 6.32 $33.10 C, KM, W 4 49 1,512 Michael Degering Fiona Murray Danny Belyuga

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Sunshine Marketplace, VIC 50% Vicinity / 50% Challenger Vicinity Centres 03 9312 0566 34,173 $120.1 5.9 $25.04 BW, W, Village Cinemas 3 51 1,741 Anna Hickling Nichola Wilson Silvia Lorenc

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Taigum Square, QLD Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 07 3265 2800 22,821 $85 2.9 $37.55 BW, W 3 46 1,054 Jenine Rogers Helena Racic Kylie Curtis

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

The Oasis, QLD Abacus PG/Kohlberg Kravis Roberts JLL 07 5592 3900 24,514 - 4.94 $23.35 W 3 84 1,182 Tim Grigg Peta Downie Scott Bollaard

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2020 SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

The Pines Elanora, QLD The Pines S/C (QLD) Pty Ltd The Pines S/C (QLD) Pty Ltd 07 5534 6722 33,160 - 4.96 $47.90 A, C, KM, W, Petbarn 2 90 1,500 Hilary Jacobs HiIary Jacobs Stuart Breen

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

The Square Mirrabooka, WA Perron Group JLL 08 9344 1822 40,885 - 6.57 $41.29 A, BW, C, KM, W 6 103 2,157 Allana Edwards Toria Daniel Gabriel Payne

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Toombul Shopping Centre, QLD Mirvac Mirvac Real Estate 07 3266 7122 46,527 $295 5.97 $40.54 A, B, C, KM, T, BCC Cinema 7 148 1,917 Melanie Hodge Chloe Nevin Michelle Pearson

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Tweed Mall, NSW Elanor Investors Group RetPro Group 07 5536 4066 23,262 $84.5 4.23 $30.35 A, C, T, W 1 70 942 John Weaver Ciara Howell Chris McKinnon

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Victoria Gardens, VIC 50% Vicinity / 50% Salta Vicinity Centres 03 8420 1400 37,656 $294.1 6.7 $31.70 KM, C, HOYTS 5 51 2,127 Robyn Madeley Mariana Gonzalez Franco Kali Hamilton/Lachlan Healy

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Warnbro Centre, WA SCA Property Group Knight Frank 08 9593 6782 21,434 $90.9 - - 3 - 63 1,014 Terri Swed Eryn Leanard Renee Mahony

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Warriewood Square, NSW 50% Vicinity / 50% ISPT Vicinity Centres 02 9913 4444 30,277 $275 4.6 $52.21 KM, A, C, W 4 83 1,450 Danita De Vault Natalie Guy Adam Bordonaro

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Warwick Grove, WA Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 08 9447 4800 32,250 $150 4.9 $47.02 KM, A, C, W, Grand Cinemas 1 64 1,560 Tim Rankin Alex Rogerson David Hart

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Whitsunday Plaza, QLD Vicinity Centres Vicinity Centres 07 4946 1505 22,358 $61.6 2 $64.52 BW, HN, W 3 23 1,148 Cathy Sullivan Holly Moore Shaun Powell

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Willows Shopping Centre, QLD Dexus Wholesale Property Fund Dexus  07 4799 9100 46,000 - - - BW, C, T, W 6 140 2,700 Ian Spackman Donna Schifilliti Nick Xavier

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Winston Hills Mall, NSW Private TGC 02 9838 7822 24,525 - 5.15 $49.92 A, BW, C, W 2 72 1,269 Frazer Dowling Nicole Galea Frazer Dowling

Centre name Owner Manager Telephone GLA m2 Asset value mil Traffic/yr mil Av.spend/visit Majors Mini majors Specialties Carparks Centre Mgr Marketing Mgr Leasing Mgr

Wynnum Plaza, QLD Shayher Properties Wynnum Retail Management 07 3396 0000 29,340 - 3.37 $58.57 C, KM, W 8 63 1,366 Michael Belfield Emma Seng Katherine Pedersen

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PANTHERA GROUP It’s a new approach. Traditionally we think of our centres in terms of bricks-and-mortar, leasing of the GLA and the creation of spaces. The new world – one of social media, ecommerce, online retail, data collection and usage et al – all ‘affect’ our centres, and of course, we incorporate them in our thinking and they influence our actions. But for the Panthera Group, the new world is the starting point; the centre is simply a part of it…

A

t a time when most of us in our industr y are battening down the hatches and weathering the storm, one outfit – one with an entirely new approach – is expanding and looking to buy centres. Panthera Group is a vertically integrated property, hospitality, technology management and investment group, established by Mario Evangelo and Chakyl Camal. They cut their teeth in re-working retail centres in Ganellen – a construction company co-founded in 1998 by Evangelo. During a five-year period, they bought and sold three sub-regional/neighbourhood centres: Kiama Village, Warners Bay Village (Newcastle) and Ropes Crossing in Western Sydney – achieving a weighted IRR of 44.2% over the period. But Evangelo and Camal saw a changing retail landscape – digital retail sales were in growth mode and the pair determined a need to re-think their business approach to bricks-and-mortar centres. SCN inter viewed Camal, who told us that digital technology, retail and property, were the core capabilities within the group that would drive their vision for the ‘Mall of the Future’. Camal, a former Olympic swimmer at the Beijing and London Olympics, is a passionate individual, who believes the role of digital technology will shape the centre of the future. He’s interesting because for him (and the Panthera Group), they are embracing the digital world, as distinct from most of us in our industry, whose major focus is on the material. 60 SCN

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For the past three years, Panthera Group has been developing its own omnichannel platform with its roll-out modules being continually trialled, tested and improved as the overall functionality grows and is embedded into its ‘Mall of the Future’ eco-system.

Panthera Group's omni-channel ecommerce ordering technology RiverShop Camal has a different mindset to the traditional shopping centre owner/ reduce fixed costs such as bricks-andmanager. He talks about mortar lease payments. Other retailers, the digital world constantly, using words many already operating shops in and phrases such as ‘digital natives’, centres, are less attuned to digital/ ‘omni-channel platforms’, ‘shopping online platforms and do not have the centre eco-systems’ and ‘integrating understanding, the time or capital to physical and digital’. He’s got the digital embrace this new form of retail. In and ecommerce world at the forefront, such cases, they simply ‘plug-in’ to rather than as an additive to bricks-andthe centres’ omnichannel platforms, mortar. assuming these are available. He gives “Take leasing, for example,” he says. examples: “Look at food and F&B. The “Any new retailer today is likely to have Panthera RiverShop platform is being come from an ecommerce world. rolled out for our specialty food and They’ll have a website, an ecommerce small goods retail with order and platform; by the time they come to deliver y, unified check-out, loyalty, be talking about a physical store, booking and community pages. We they will already have a business work in partnership with our retailers history from online sales.” to ‘on-board’ them on to the platform These new retailers, he says, are and assist them in transforming their moving to embrace digital/online retail business into an omni-channel offering.” as a way to access shoppers and to COPYRIGHT©

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PROFILE

What differentiates this 'new approach' entry from the traditional players, is simply its emphasis on the centre’s digital power. Whereas a food court operator may have a website and/or an ordering platform (such as Uber Eats or Menulog), Panthera sees the opportunity of the centre itself making the offering through its own channels as local distribution hubs; taking the order, managing the logistics, delivering, then storing the data and even using AI analytics to understand shopper behaviour. Using that information, Panthera can then structure focused promotions to drive shopper pedestrian traffic on ‘slow’ days and create community loyalties by working in partnership with the retailers. In this way, says Camal, they prevent cannibalisation of their retailers’ margins by the excessive charges of the standalone retail platforms and other ‘outside’ operators.

Panthera Group is in growth mode; it’s looking for centres. Its platforms and systems are not confined to its own centres; they see a future in which their group may take over the digital operations of centres they do not own. They’re ‘young bloods’ right now, but they’re worth watching. We’ll follow them; watch this space! SCN COPYRIGHT©

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OPINION Dan Holdsworth discusses the rising tide risk to shopping centres from online sales and how the 'new normal' postpandemic is going to require a new flexibility in relation to their dealings and arrangements with retailers.

A new normal DAN HOLDSWORTH Director BlueRock Law

I

t's fair to say that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to the greatest challenge for both landlords and tenants across Australia in more than a generation. The reality is, though, that cracks had already begun to emerge in the context of the Australian retail scene. For as long as I can remember, the threat of online sales to bricks-andmortar locations has been raised as a potential risk for centre landlords. Each year, the risk would creep forward, but the continual growth of the Australian economy and rampant consumerism meant that there was a growing pie to spend and enough for all to share. Unlike what has been seen in the US, occupancy rates at centres continued to remain exceptionally strong and shopping centres remained highly attractive to both retail tenants and their customers. The high streets of Australia had a far more mixed performance but, by and large, that could be put down to their failure to invest in a cohesive way in capital improvements and the retail ‘experience’ – something that Australia’s shopping centre landlords have been incredibly good at. While the barriers to entry into shopping centres remained high for newcomers (predominantly because of local planning requirements), the existing key players have largely gone from strength to strength (ignoring of course the significant blip that was felt as a result of the GFC). This year, however, had already started as a difficult one. A number of high profile collapses had seen the closure of a significant number of premises. In an ordinary year, those would typically be able to be blown off largely as the failure of a retailer to understand their customer or poor 62 SCN

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taken into account. So too will centres that rely predominantly on convenience, at least for those retailers that operate in that space. I expect that the greatest concern will be around medium sized centres – the sub regionals, not a bright enough light to pull a crowd but too big to make any trip frictionless.

Northland shoppers financial management – or both. That is undoubtedly true in many cases, but the model that some of these retailers have pursued is one that is inextricably linked to the centres themselves, ie. put your shop into a place that is well maintained, well managed and one that attracts high traffic, and the punters will spend their money in-store. But what if the COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally affected the equation or hastened a systemic change in the buying habits of Australian consumers? We will know the answer to that fairly shortly as the country attempts to get back to its new normal. If that includes a consumer trained to value instant purchase gratification online rather than the experience of a centre, the essential foot traffic numbers may permanently be affected. If that occurs, retailers are going to have to make difficult decisions regarding their mix of bricks-and-mortar and online presence. The costs of operating and staffing those sites will be considered more on an opportunity cost basis (where else could I place this money?) rather than whether or not the numbers simply stack for a particular site. Flagship sites are more likely to withstand the pressure as the intangible benefits of brand awareness will be

In an uncertain world, the key to the mutual success of landlords and tenants is going to be about flexibility. Tenants are often referred to as ‘partners’ of the landlord but the reality is that the nature of the relationship has remained pretty static, and so too have the contractual agreements between them. Given the vast sums expended by centre owners and the volume of tenants to deal with, consistency and certainty around the basics at least (rent, term, security) is (or has been) fundamental to success. But in a changing economy, any inflexibility is going to make it harder for retailers to commit to sites. The quandary for centre owners is whether the adoption of greater flexibility in the terms of their leases is going to significantly alter their own risk profiles and whether that risk is worth the potential reward. SCN

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16/11/20 11:26 am


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4/11/2020 2:41:38 PM


OPINION

oOh!media's Chief believes Christmas 2020 is going to be good for retailers – at least a lot better than previously expected. The data he’s collected backs up the theory (and his name lends credibility to his opinion!)

Early data points to Christmas cheer

W

hat could well be one of the most unusual Christmases in living memory is approaching, and many in the retail industry will be eagerly looking forward to the holiday season and the advent of a more prosperous 2021. But after a strange and challenging year, what will Christmas look like? Will we see cautious consumers feeling the effects of 2020 stubbornly refusing to open their wallets? Or will it be a much happier occasion, with people realising the state of our nation managing COVID is improving and therefore spending with renewed optimism? There are arguments on both sides at a time of many challenges and unpredictable events both here and overseas, but there are signs, backed by data, that the shopping season could be better than expected.

What the numbers say As a leading Out of Home media owner, we have a deep and abiding interest in what people are doing and where they are spending their time. To that end, we frequently collect and analyse numerous data streams, keeping a close eye on audience movements across retail centres and offices, roads and transport hubs, cafés and universities, among many other public spaces. 64 SCN

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At the time of writing this article, markets across Australia are in a positive position. From a retail perspective, our latest findings have given us a look into how Australians are feeling and behaving. National audiences at local and medium shopping centres have been recovering consistently, and are now over 90% of where they were pre-COVID.1 Home-maker centres are also doing well, at almost 90% of 2019 levels, while in regional areas, audiences have actually surpassed last year by almost 10% – a promising sign of normality returning and a look into just what the summer holidays might look like for Australian travel.1 Consumer confidence also increased across the country, presumably driven by successful COVID containment strategies in most areas, plus tax cuts and a mooted interest rate cut on the near horizon, courtesy of the RBA. Despite the conditions in Victoria, and many people still working from home, we can confidently say that shoppers across the nation are out

NOEL COOK Chief Commercial and Operations Officer oOh!media

and about again. This is confirmed by recent research released by Vamp Australia in October showing that 84% of respondents expect they’ll spend the same or more on Christmas this year, compared to last year.2 Along with the extensive government support packages, one additional and intriguing factor helping drive this may be the current absence of international travel. Australians who usually spend thousands of dollars holidaying overseas will be staying in country, presumably with money available that they would have previously spent in far-flung locations.

Christmas shopping starting early With the data pointing to a better than expected end to the year, it’s an

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17/11/20 2:29 pm


opportune time to take a closer look at some of the themes around Christmas this year. In many ways, the pandemic has encouraged people to reflect more than usual on their own lives and the world around them. That is not a great surprise at such a trying time, but what is interesting is how many Australians have seen the economic damage wreaked by COVID and decided to help in whatever way they can.

Tellingly, our ongoing consumer survey series shows that 90% of Australians say they will be making an effort to support local in the build up to Christmas, which clearly has implications for centre owners and retailers looking to tailor their product mix to prevailing attitudes.3 When it comes to what Australians expect from brands this Christmas, 80% said they would be looking for COPYRIGHT©

different brand offerings compared to what they would typically go for, highlighting products within budget that are a quality brand, from small/local businesses and are Australian made.3 When it comes to shopping strategies, consumers are planning ahead. Two in five are thinking about Christmas earlier than usual, while a third will be purchasing products and services earlier.3 Demonstrating awareness of lingering health concerns, half of respondents intend to visit shopping centres earlier in the morning or later in the afternoon to avoid crowds, while 45% intend to wear a face mask or covering so they can shop at their own pace and with peace of mind. Somewhat surprisingly, just over half expect the same level of ser vice in centres as previous years, for example, help with gift ideas.3 This could well be acknowledgement of the damage done by COVID during the past few months.

Be prepared From all of this data and consumer

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insight, Christmas this year looks set to be one characterised by shoppers exercising caution in their shopping habits, while preparing to spend early and positively. This suggests retailers and centre owners should be making moves earlier than usual to pull people in as they consider their purchasing options. Team Australia will be the order of the day, with consumers feeling patriotic and supportive of businesses doing it tough. Local centres highlighting local products and services should do well, and while anything can happen in these volatile times, there seems to be a real opportunity for centre owners and their retailers to make up some lost revenues over the previous months – a good way to set the stage for a better year ahead. SCN Sources: 1. Dspark data, 500+ Retail locations nationally, week ending Oct 12th 2020 vs same week 2019. 2. Adnews, Five reasons COVID Christmas marketing needs influencers, 9th October 2020 3. oOh!media Pulse Report | Timing 1st – 4th & 18th – 19th May, 1st – 3rd June, 24th – 28th July, 2nd – 9th October 2020 | Research Panel: Dynata | Australians aged 6+, n=4,479. Wave 5 results displayed above n=753.

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MARKETING It’s going to be a COVID Christmas this year. That’s never happened before and it’s going to affect our centres – how they trade, what they promote and how they are marketed. Ben Hughes sees opportunities; he thinks ‘centre Christmases’ 2020 could be better than ever!

A Christmas like no other BEN HUGHES National Marketing and Business Manager, Dexus

QV

C

Consumer Sentiment Index hristmas is a time of great joy and celebration for many and the season usually marks the biggest retail spending opportunity for retailers on the annual calendar. To put this into perspective, last year, consumers spent more than $27 billion on retail products and services nationally in December alone. Yet 2020 ushered in a different experience, with the community having to deal with everything from bushfires and floods to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the Australian economy has been significantly impacted on two fronts – Sources: Westpac Economics, Melbourne Institute by a health crisis and an economic crisis. Christmas this year will be like no other. For many, the importance of spending time with family and friends The recent Federal Budget has delivered might not be possible and the emotional and $28.3 billion worth of tax cuts for this financial mental impact is of great concern. That special year. There are significant stimulus measures now family holiday might not look the same; the work in place and the country has low levels of COVID-19 Christmas party is on hold, and the annual community transmissions occurring. Consumer community carols events may not be held at all. confidence has rebounded to 105.0, according to The usual time for celebration will be a very the October Westpac-Melbourne Institute Index of low-key affair. Consumer Confidence. The Index has now lifted by More than ever, this Christmas, the community 32% during the past two months to the highest level since July 2018. The springboard for a shopping centre will play an important role in successful Christmas is set. sparking joy and celebration for Australians. Another positive factor is that many Australians will holiday locally this summer and this should It’s incumbent on us as landlords to work with drive spending across the many coastal and our retailers to deliver the positive experiences that countr y towns, resulting in a much welcome sales will give consumers hope. With the retail industry boost for the tourism and hospitality sectors. being almost brought to a standstill during the Local communities need tourists to bring their shutdowns, we need to make up lost ground. empty Eskies to their townships to fill them up A strong performing Christmas trade is good for with purchases and thereby stimulate the local jobs, good for retailers, good for landlords, good for economies. manufacturers and wholesalers, good for logistics, This Christmas, shoppers will ‘shop with good for the national economy and – most purpose’ with many looking to limit their time in importantly – good for consumers. 66 SCN

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16/11/20 11:48 am


QV Melbourne's giant Christmas tree

busy shopping centres as physical distancing remains a priority. The challenge for retailers is to increase the customer basket size with fewer shopping trips expected. Christmas shopping is likely to have commenced in November and carr y into December as consumers look to get in early and avoid the last-minute rush and Christmas crowds. While consumer behaviour may differ this year, the one thing that will remain the same is the memorable experiences that our shopping centres deliver at Christmas. From magical decorations and live music to ‘surprise and delight’ moments that deliver that unexpected reward, shopping centres will help to bring Christmas to life. Santa photos will look a little different this year with COVID-safe Santa photo experiences implemented and, in some markets, Zoom technology will be deployed to enable a virtual Santa experience to bring a smile to children’s faces this Christmas.

In our Victorian portfolio, QV Melbourne will transform its outdoor square with one of the biggest Christmas trees in the country. Standing at more than 15 metres tall, the stunning tree is covered in thousands of lights, providing the ultimate light show experience and a very Instagramable moment. The Dexus-managed shopping centre portfolio this year will also ‘Share the Joy’ with a gift giving community campaign. Hundreds of gifts will be given away to community members most in need, spreading the joy to those in our communities whom are struggling. Christmas 2020 will be like no other, yet the small things will matter more than ever. The traditions of coming together with loved ones (where physical distancing measures allow), helping those in need, gift giving and seeing children celebrate the spirit of the season will endure. Shopping centres throughout the countr y have an incredible opportunity to make this Christmas matter. SCN COPYRIGHT©

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RESEARCH The recent CBRE research report interrogates the resilience of retail assets, assesses growth areas and advises how landlords can future-proof their assets to ensure they remain resilient, despite changing consumer demands and broader economic challenges.

RETAIL THERAPY: Shopping for resilience in retail property

L

ast mile retailing, showroom style shopping, Click & Collect, customer analytics technology, food deliver y offerings and flexible leases are set to become the hallmarks of resilient retail assets. This is a key takeaway of CBRE Research’s new report: Retail Therapy – Shopping for Resilience in Retail Property, which looks at how landlords can future-proof their assets to ensure they remain resilient despite changing consumer demands and broader economic challenges. The report provides an overview of retailers that are expected to experience growth in floorspace requirements, the potential uplift to MAT (Moving Annual Total) by incorporating mixed-use development in traditional retail assets and what practical measures landlords can implement to ensure they remain relevant to changing consumer needs. As retailers in larger centres reduced department store and large-specialty store floor space – conserving costs and catering for increasing ecommerce demand – the opportunity existed for centre owners to reinforce the original retail recipe with the introduction of mixed-use offerings. Incorporating mixed-use into a precinct can help drive spending with office and education offerings providing the greatest increase in centre MAT growth. 68 SCN

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MEAGAN WAKEFIELD Regional Director of Retail Services, CBRE

KATE BAILEY Head of Retail Research, CBRE

Figure 1: Selected A-REIT cap rate compression and cumulative impact on value since June 2015 Source: CBRE Research

According to the report, a 10,000m2 office space could provide an additional $3 million per annum in centre MAT, while a 10,000m2 education facility could see an additional $2.2 million per annum in MAT.

A strategic floorplate reconfiguration, converting underutilised retail space into an attached ecommerce-driven distribution centre could benefit not just the store in reducing its footprint, but also other stores in the centre. Online retailing and the growth of ecommerce is fuelling an overall net increase in commercial property space. Landlords can capitalise on this demand

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for industrial space by repurposing redundant loading bays or back of house space into last mile warehouse space. The analysis shows that discount department stores in centres that had a catchment with a higher population density, younger population and higher average household income were more resilient and less likely to close as part of network optimisation projects. Looking at how the retail sector has per formed in recent years, the report highlighted that smaller neighbourhood

shopping centres had proved more resilient in terms of capital value preser vation than their regional and sub-regional counterparts. Since 2015, neighbourhood shopping centres have experienced the highest cap rate compression at 96bps, generating 13% capital value growth (see figure 1), and outper forming sub-regional (45bps compression and 6.3% growth) and regional shopping centres (43bps and 7.2% growth). The report also reveals that the re-pricing of retail assets, relative to other sectors, means that future total returns for the retail sector should be higher than for other lower yielding property sectors, such as office and industrial. Our view is that the widening retail yield spread, relative to office and industrial, will be exacerbated by the COVID19 pandemic’s impact on retail trade. COVID-19 has also driven the increase in online retail penetration sharply to an estimated 13.3%, a number originally not expected to be reached until 2024, and we’re now expecting to see department store selling space decrease to 2.6% annually by the end of the same year – the largest forecast decline of all retail categories.

What retail sectors will see growth going forward?

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Conversely, grocery stores are slated to see the strongest growth, followed by health and beauty, while home furnishing stores are forecast to record the strongest growth in floorspace. CBD and regional shopping centre assets have the greatest amount of apparel selling space and will be most impacted by shrinking demand . SCN

Next issue: BIG GUNS Ranking shopping centres with a GLA of more than 50,000m2. Survey deadline: 8 February, 2021

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TECHNOLOGY

VMO has just launched its latest flagship project which incorporates the most up-to-date and advanced screens ever; it’s the company's largest capex investment in a single retail asset. World Square is the venue, in the heart of downtown Sydney.

Next generation iconic screens engage shoppers

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ANTHONY DEEBLE Chief Commercial Officer The HOYTS Group

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cting on its belief that the shopping experience plays a critical part in customer buying behaviour, HOYTS owned Val Morgan Outdoor (VMO) has invested heavily in creating the largest, 100% digital pathto-purchase network in Australia. Now, VMO has unveiled its jewel in the crown – a suite of seven newly installed, large format iconic LED screens in Sydney’s World Square – one of Australia’s busiest retail and commuter precincts that’s renowned for its annual footfall of some 29 million visits during a regular trading year. The world-class, next generation screens will see on average 2.4 million consumer visits in a typical month

engaging consumers with live, dynamic content. Using best-in-market technology, World Square shoppers will now find themselves among the ultimate immersive experience in the form of curved internal LED screens and a hero screen that spans eight metres by two metres that can be seen from Sydney’s busy George Street. Designed for attention, the screens are up to five times greater in quality alone than most digital LED shopping centre screens and have been positioned to maximise audience impact, offering advertisers and retailers a premium opportunity to reach customers who are already within the retail environment and are in close proximity to their products.

With some form of advertising screens now standard in major shopping centres, VMO contends that it’s not just about the size or number of screens deployed. It is also about the screen quality, screen intelligence, considered positioning and the value proposition they bring to each individual consumer’s shopping experience.

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Screens that have the capacity to rise above any clutter and deliver clear lines of sight, by being placed above thoroughfares, in main walkways, escalators and on the retail path-topurchase, are the most recalled by shoppers. This has all been factored into the strategic placement of the World Square screens, capturing traffic flow through major entry and exit points as well as escalators leading to key retailers, all of which offer the best possible points to connect with shoppers in the right moment and engage them to take action. Adding to the modern retail experience, a wide range of engaging content that is relevant, entertaining, and informs and inspires, will seamlessly connect screens and brands to audiences at a deeper level, further enhancing the premium nature of the World Square shopping environment. As consumer attention increasingly becomes a key measure of advertising success, the outdoor advertising industry has seen an evolution of digital screen capabilities. VMO has now taken this to a new level with next generation digital LED screens with real intelligence, crystal COPYRIGHT©

clear resolution (five times that of existing LED formats) and, importantly, greater meaningful data capabilities.

With data being key to successful retail advertising, the company recently launched DART R&F, which fuses VMO’s real-time audience measurement platform, DART, with accredited third-party consumer data and machine learning to determine hourly audiences down to a unique screen level. This further builds on VMO’s ability to measure the number of consumers whom are viewing content – based on their age, gender, when they viewed and how many viewed – thereby providing more insights and analytics of real-time audience viewing habits. Now, DART R&F provides gamechanging technology for advertisers and retailers alike, by not only providing the most robust audience reach measurement but also offering the

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best possible ways to target shoppers on the path-to-purchase. This provides valuable audience and traffic movement information to better inform shopper insights that can lead to improved overall retailer placement and help attract retailer brands whom seek greater shopper intel. Audiences are constantly being measured so that advertisers can be specific with targeting and delivering contextually relevant ads or optimise their campaigns’ ROI screen by screen. As VMO’s largest capex investment across a single retail asset, these truly intelligent, next generation screens not only deliver the perfect space for an immersive consumer experience but also offer state-of-the-art opportunities to engage shoppers with impact. Despite the challenges of 2020, VMO is investing in new iconic large LED digital formats with premium placements and integrating best-inmarket new technology to enhance the advertiser and audience experience. This in turn will give brands access to the best locations, while also delivering consumer engagement opportunities at scale. SCN SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 71

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FOOD FOCUS

COVID-19 has affected the hospitality industry massively. F&B outlets, whether take-away cafés or Michelin star restaurants, have all been savaged by closure, restrictions in operations or huge reductions in capacity. Francis Loughran believes a move to alfresco eating and drinking will be a way of the future.

EXPERIENCE THE INSIDE OUTSIDE – How to maximise food and hospitality sales opportunities in a 1.5m economy

FRANCIS LOUGHRAN Managing Director Future Food

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ith no finishing line in sight for COVID-19 and with the food and beverage (F&B) industr y haemorrhaging, outdoor dining and drinking is one new acceptable way for ward for F&B across all industry sectors to kickstart recovery. Across the world, from Dubai to Denver, alfresco dining is the new-normal and is the easiest way to reassure customers of a level of safety. From picnics to Pop Ups, and tents to terraces, the outdoors is the new indoors. From Shopping Centres to RSL Clubs, safety and emotional wellbeing will be the number one consideration for people, especially the older demographic. Across Australia and the world, cleanliness and hygiene will play a greater role in securing business as discerning customers slowly, but surely, venture back to their local and favourite cafés, bars and restaurants. As ever, sales is the only vehicle to save food operators and pay rents. We all know that food and hospitality is one of life’s pleasures and while eating is enjoyable, it is even more enjoyable if we eat outdoors. With this in mind, F&B operators around the world have focused their creative energy to developing a range of safe and comfortable alfresco food and 72 SCN

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Igloo Domes, Melbourne

(Image: Timeout)

beverage spaces. These creative outdoor environments aim to do one thing – drive sales – and thereby secure customers to save small and medium businesses operating in a 1.5m economy. However, it cannot be left to operators alone to make their own venues safe. The reason why cafés and restaurants weren’t able to open up as early as they

would have liked post-lockdown is that these venues do not operate in a vacuum – they are, in one form or another, part of a precinct. It is this holistic environment that also has to change and the owners and overall stakeholders must accept their role in creating the ‘next-normal’. Not only will malls, airports, cinemas and clubs

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Craft, Birmingham

Toronto

(Image: Design my night)

have to demonstrate and visually communicate cleanliness and hygiene at their cost, but complete suburbs and precincts must also ensure that they communicate confidence to potential customers. Without this overarching and comprehensive commitment to the post-COVID world from mall owners, local and state governments and individual landlords, F&B operators will have difficulty in regaining their vibrancy and their profitability. In addition to increased safety measures and the newfound scrutiny of wages, F&B businesses must also contend with reduced internal seating numbers, increased technology costs (QR codes) and restricted trading hours.

(Image: Daniel Lipton)

Igloo Domes, Melbourne

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(Image: The Wharf Hotel)

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The imperative for mall owners to act has never been stronger. Their tenants’ turnover is at stake and, therefore, so is their own revenue. While smaller neighbourhood and sub-regional malls have both an external focus and a lower reliance on F&B for their income, all malls have to do more to provide a precinct-wide commitment to the next-normal and one of the best proven ways to do so is to take the inside outside. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 73

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FOOD FOCUS

Christchurch Harbour Hotel

(image: Diazhub)

Outdoor dining in Rome The economics of dining in the 1.5m economy means that operators need the extra space that outdoor dining can provide. The required internal restrictions have meant that many venues are either trying to make up for lost time and revenue, or they have fixed costs that must be spread over fewer covers or both. Whatever the case, the price of dining is too high – dishes are now being priced at $50 that at the beginning of the year were $35. This is lousy value for money and is not sustainable. Customers will pay for the initial buzz of eating out, but with incomes being significantly affected during the past six months, there is a heightened need for F&B outlets to provide value for money – it is the only way that operators can get back to a sustainable business model.

The post-COVID world is going to be design-led In conversations with property owners, we are asked often: how is it possible to have alfresco dining in a place like Melbourne? The answer, of course, is that – with the right design – anything is possible. Too many people think that alfresco dining is about putting a table and a couple of chairs outside and then hoping that the wind doesn’t blow things away. This is looking at the issue with a static and onedimensional point of view. Alfresco is not just for the beach. We have done considerable work in looking at both pre-COVID and current solutions to dining outside. The domes that have popped up are but one solution, but they're not necessarily a good match with good hospitality and hygiene. Moreover, diners don’t want to keep themselves cocooned from the 74 SCN

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(Image: The Telegraph)

Harbord Diggers (Image: Harbord Diggers)

elements. There are all-year venues in Chicago, Toronto and London – none of whom are renowned for their balmy yearround climates. Parisian cafés stay open all year and adapt to conditions by providing blankets to their patrons. There are starred, outdoor restaurants mid-mountain in ski areas throughout Switzerland, France and Colorado. The next-normal business of food is all about re-building sales, so that rents and operating costs can be paid. Government support for small business will continue to be reduced, so it is all about the individual business identifying an opportunity that they can capitalise upon. Victoria’s second lockdown limited all F&B operations to takeaway only; this, coupled with a prolonged shutdown has compounded the problem of many smaller food businesses not reopening due to a number of factors, including cash flow and the lack of ability to make the changes required to pivot to new product and service platforms. Eating outside presents venues with

challenges, but the creativity that has been shown by the hospitality industry has got to be matched by local governments and landlords everywhere. Some examples of recent initiatives that have rethought operations of all sizes and their relationship with the public realm are in Domaine Road, South Yarra. Entrecote, The Botanical Hotel and Gilson took full advantage of their street frontage and proximity to the Botanical Gardens complete with green grass, a mature tree canopy and wideopen spaces less than ten metres from their front door. A simple picnic menu, complete with a table and two chairs per booking delivered an instant outdoor restaurant, but as a takeaway – no wait staff, no service costs and a welcome relief for lockdown weary Melburnians. The simple concept of ‘alfresco dining storefront’ has been rolled out across Melbourne’s parks, nature strips and domains. They are visually eye catching to passers-by. One obvious advantage of the alfresco spaces is to communicate

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Four Seasons Doha Recess Chicago

(Image: Rose Travel)

(Image: Choose Chicago)

Reducing seating is certainly one way of addressing these concerns, but, by itself, this solution only puts considerable strain on a venue’s operations and profits. The best and fastest way to increase seating safely is to expand outside of the four walls.

From Pop Ups to picnics – fresh ideas in the fresh air

the message: we are open for business, we welcome you back and it is a pleasant and much more enjoyable experience than ordering take-away. People are social animals and we yearn for social connections, whether it be at our local pub, café or a private club on Bondi Beach. Shopping centres large and small need to work closely with and lead their F&B operators so as to rethink their approach to welcoming customers back. Again, this is going to be a design-led recovery, because hoping for a return to pre-COVID habits is not going to happen soon enough for many operators to stay in business. COPYRIGHT©

A recent McKinsey survey of US consumers found that 80% of respondents were anxious about dining inside F&B outlets. The survey went deeper to discern the issues that caused the most concern. The not surprising conclusions were that consumers feared being in close proximity to other patrons while dining and while entering and exiting the building.

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Across the globe, as well as in Australia and New Zealand, food and hospitality has moved outdoors in varying degrees and will continue to do so in the future as developers, owners and property managers find ways to offer their customers an alfresco option, one that is safe and capable of generating sales and re-connection with their beloved customers. Pop Up venues include Pop Up food stalls, food trucks, open air cinemas, cafés, restaurants, BBQs/sausage sizzles, farmers’ markets, rooftop bars, wine stalls and small event spaces, as well as open-air fashion, jeweller y and dr y retail stalls etc. Kerb-side dining, car park space dining, gardens and plazas, and laneways are ‘in’, because they’re ‘out’. SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS 75

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FOOD FOCUS

The keys to success in pivoting to an alfresco offer are the design of the space and the fact that operators and landlords can’t just set and forget. In terms of design, the spaces do not have to be glitzy, just practical. Weather-proofing is, and always has been, the key element of any outdoor dining space. The other key is that someone needs to take control of the outdoors. Just setting up an umbrella and a few tables is not enough: They must be managed in relation to noise, litter, food scraps, closing time, and considerations for neighbours. Bad experiences will quickly kill sales and defeat the objective. In Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania and one of the first cities to embrace F&B venues to expand on to the street, their experience has shown that an active – not passive – management of the outdoor areas is necessar y. The reports from Vilnius show that physical distancing was hard to maintain, which was exacerbated by a lack of government planning and communication. In Manhattan, the local authorities were often extremely strict about venues following all regulations about their outdoor spaces. Now, New York City recognises the benefits that accrue to restaurants, their patrons and the city, and are taking a more holistic view of operations. Furthermore, cities such as New York, Rome, Montreal and Tel Aviv have implemented a pedestrianisation policy that is proving very successful. While most Australian suburbs and cities are not as densely packed as these three metropolitan areas, the lessons are completely transferable: Outdoor dining works, and more is better than less. COVID-19 has brought forward significant changes to the hospitality industry. Some of the learnings that we can take from this pandemic can be of significant value to the industry. Coupled with an inevitable purge of food and hospitality operators (for a number of reasons) provides good forward-thinking operators and developers with an optimistic future, if it can be strategically considered and executed to the highest standard. For example, we have seen an almost ubiquitous acceptance of cashless operations across most businesses. For years, ‘cash-only 76 SCN

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Parklet

(Image: Projects for Public Spaces)

Outdoor dining, Vilnius

(Image: Vilnius)

operators’ have provided the industry with a negative connotation; yet almost overnight this problem has disappeared. Alfresco dining is another, and it is time that we embrace what the Europeans have been doing for well over a century. There is another reason for property owners to take the lead in helping their F&B tenants bring the inside outside. If F&B tenants aren’t given the scope to expand outside of their box, then they will have to rethink their operations and, more importantly, rethink their need for space and the type of space that they require. McKinsey again has delved into this area and its conclusions are sobering: A ver y high proportion [of food operators] are planning changes to their restaurant layouts for the long term. So we’re expecting that – because even if we got to a post-COVID-19 world where people don’t have the same level of anxiety about dining in, I think we’ll see stickiness of drive-through, stickiness of carryout, stickiness of delivery. That has implications on the size of the indoor space that you need. We already saw that with Starbucks, for example:

they’ve announced pickup-only locations, particularly in high-traffic urban places where they get a lot of foot traffic anyway. In our lifetime, it has never been more crucial that food and hospitality operators maximise sales by being ultracreative and applying the first principles of hospitality. Image is everything when it comes to communicating safety and cleanliness as a means to attract customers and to maximise spend. COVID-19 has also changed the ‘value’ system of customers, so food and hospitality operators need to work even harder to secure spend and repeat patronage. And let’s not forget about jobs, it’s ‘profit for purpose’, to create badly needed jobs across Australia. Throughout history, as a result of disasters and their aftermath, people have always turned to food, friends and social gatherings to make them feel secure. The goal now for all food operators is all about people making people feel welcome, safe and relaxed to spend time and money and to return time and time again. SCN

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LENDLEASE David McNamara has been appointed to the role of Head of Retail, Asset Management, where he will support Lendlease’s broad retail focus and oversee the management of 19 shopping centres and urban retail precincts across Australia. With more than 30 years’ experience in the retail sector, David has held senior roles in funds management, asset management, property management, leasing, development and capital transactions, in both Australia and the US. He served as Fund Manager for Lendlease’s core retail fund, APPF Retail, for the past eight years. Anne MacSporran has been appointed Fund Manager for APPF Retail. She was previously Deputy Fund Manager for the past two

years and played an integral role in developing the Fund’s Urban Growth Centre strategy. Anne has more than 25 years’ experience in real estate and funds management, including being Regional Asset Manager for Lendlease where she was responsible for developing and overseeing the execution of asset strategies. Peter St Clair has re-joined Lendlease in the newly created role of Head of Retail, Funds Management, which will be responsible for retail funds and mandates. Peter will also be responsible for looking at new opportunities in the rapidly evolving retail sector. He has more than 27 years’ experience in the property industry, covering all areas of real estate management. Jordon Aylward has commenced at Tweed City as Pop Up Executive. Jordon

Dexus Property Group and Westpac.

was previously in a leasing role with CBRE looking after a number of retail outlets on the Gold Coast. Sam Moerke has been promoted to the role of National Marketing Executive – Retail, Commercial and Industrial. Prior to this appointment, Sam worked on the Barangaroo and Darling Square urban retail precincts as Marketing Executive. Stephanie Parker has been appointed National Marketing Manager, Retail and Urban Retail. Stephanie has extensive retail experience having held senior marketing roles at Aventus, Lederer Group and QIC. Andrew Macmillan has commenced as Portfolio Manager. Andrew has been with Lendlease since 2014 as Valuation and Investment Manager, Retail Assets and has previously worked at

Chris Barton has been appointed Regional General Manager. Chris has more than 20 years’ experience across property, retail and franchising. Most recently, he held the role of Scentre Group Regional Manager where he oversaw seven centres in WA and SA. Hadley Missell has started as Leasing Executive for Southlands Boulevarde and Northgate in WA. Hadley has previously worked for Vicinity, Hawaiian Investments and Scentre Group. Charles Nott has been appointed Leasing Executive for Smithfield Shopping Centre in Cairns. He joins Lendlease with many years of retail property experience, most recently with QIC and McConaghy Group. Lachie Asprey has started

Need to reach the industry decision-makers? NEXT ISSUE: BIG GUNS 2021 Book your advertising now! kym@shoppingcentrenews.com.au 78 SCN

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MOVED OR PROMOTED? EMAIL: EDITORIAL@SHOPPINGCENTRENEWS.COM.AU

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DEXUS Maria Taifalos joins as Centre Administrator based at Willows Townsville. Melanie Vale has been appointed Centre Manager for the MLC Centre and Gateway Sydney. Chris Varrica has been appointed Asset Manager. Jonathan Forsyth has been appointed Asset Manager. Michelle Foong has been appointed Asset Manager.

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hip A new relations with landlords. Moving from l’ iona ‘transact to ‘partnership’

Rachel Marinucci has joined as Leasing Executive for NSW assets. Rachel brings more than eight years’ experience in leasing across the retail sector having worked in leasing roles for companies including Westfield, The GPT Group and Ipoh.

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Lauren Braid has joined the Retail team as National Communications Manager.

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Alexandra Chomley has joined Mirvac Retail as Commercial Manager – Media and Partnerships.

Gary Jones joins as General Manager – Portfolio Management (Retail), responsible for the management and overall performance of the retail portfolio across Australia, including management of investment returns, strategic positioning of the assets and customer experience and engagement. Gary has a passion for driving customer and retailer experience and leading curious, growth minded teams. Gary has more than 25 years in property industry, most recently as the Head of Asset Management for Aventus for the past nine years, helping grow the business from six centres to 20 and part of their IPO. Prior to that, Gary worked with Westfield and QIC managing some of Australia’s premier retail shopping centres.

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Timothy Snape joins the team as National Manager Customer Engagement, overseeing all of the retail digital strategy.

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Kelly Miller has been appointed GM of Retail.

Melissa Schulz has been appointed as General Manager, Sustainability. Reporting to Director Australian Investment Management, Daryl Stubbings, Melissa will be part of the GRE Executive Committee. In her role, she will provide leadership across all GRE functions on ESG strategy and execution at both a fund and asset level. She will also report to the QICGRE Sustainability Committee, chaired by Managing Director of Global Real Estate, Michael O’Brien. Melissa has spent almost six years leading the sustainability function for

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Natacha Saba has joined the team in the role of Retail Sales Manager – Brands and Experiences.

Clare Riley has joined as the new Centre Manager for Stockland Baldivis. She arrives after 13 years at Garden City with AMP Capital. Prior to that, Clare worked as a Centre Manager and Portfolio Manager across multiple assets in the UK for Capital Shopping Centres and Workman Retail UK.

Vicinity Centres as General Manager, Sustainability, and has also worked at companies such as ANZ and Transurban Group in senior positions.

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Vanessa Di Mauro has been appointed Leasing Executive. She has extensive leasing experience having worked for Vicinity Centres, Charter Hall, Savills, Frasers Property Australia and most recently, Woolworths.

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as Leasing Executive for Tweed City. He has more than 15 years’ experience in leasing and capital transactions, most recently working at Dexus and prior to that, Australia Post.

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JLL Kelvin Fung joins the team at Top Ryde City as Assistant Centre Manager. Kelvin joins us from Scentre Group where he held the role of Finance and Administration Manager for the past seven years on a range of shopping centre. Ross McKay commenced as Centre Manager at Central Square Ballarat and Thompsons Parkway. Ross brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise with almost 30 years’ experience in management and leasing roles. Jamie Wilmott joins the team at Belmont Forum as Head of Operations. Jamie joins from Vicinity Centres where he has held operations roles across several centres, including most recently Warwick Grove and Victoria Park Central. Alyssa Paul joins the Perron Group portfolio as Digital Marketing Executive. Alyssa joins from Stockland where she most recently held the role of Customer Experience Executive. Ahmad Khan commenced as Assistant Operations Manager for Pentridge and Armstrong Creek Town Centre having previously worked in a variety of facilities and security management roles for Wilsons. Michael Kodye joins the team at Melbourne GPO Hub as Operations Manager. Michael brings with him more than 11 years of facilities management experience from previous roles at HOYTS Cinemas, Hallmark and Colonial First State. Chris Huang commenced as Retail Leasing Executive for Victoria. Chris brings with him a wealth of leasing experience having previously worked as National Leasing Manager for Schnitz. 80 SCN

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Muhammad Waseem joins the team at Bonnyrigg Plaza as Operations Manager. Muhammad has spent the last nine years in Shopping Centres, his previous roles include Security and Assistant Operations. Tatiana Garrido has transferred to the team at Ashfield Mall as Administration Manager. Tatiana brings with her a wealth of administration experience having worked previously as Administration Manager at North Rocks.

CBRE Marcus Patty has been promoted to Associate Portfolio Manager within the Shopping Centre Australasia (SCA) portfolio. Ryan Chiesa joined as Centre Manager within the Shopping Centre Australasia (SCA) portfolio in Queensland. Jason Grocott has been appointed as Senior Centre Manager in QLD. Mel Reitano has been appointed as Centre Manager at Caddens Corner Shopping Centre in Sydney. Mandy Ceresa joined as Assistant Centre Manager for the Harvey Norman portfolio in Western Australia. Warren Zerna has commenced as Senior Operations Manager at Myer Centre, Adelaide. Lee Lawler has returned from maternity leave to her role as Director of Retail Property Management in Western Australia. Amy Barber joins as Property Manager in WA to cover Alyce Jarrett who commenced maternity leave for six months. Jarrod Whitwell has been appointed as Facilities Manager at Como Centre, VIC.

Nish Gamage commenced as Finance Manager on the Newmark Capital Portfolio, Victoria. Jamie Lee joined as Lease Administrator for Brandon Park and Tooronga Village, Victoria. Malcolm Reed has completed a ten-month maternity cover role as Director of Retail Property Management in WA and has moved to the QV1 management team in Perth.

Wes Viti has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Senior Facilities Manager at Waurn Ponds Shopping Centre, VIC.

Claudia Brace joins as a PPT Finance Administration Assistant at Myer Centre, Adelaide.

Penny Clarke has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Retail Manager at Cameron Park Plaza, NSW.

COLLIERS

Melro Allas has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Finance Manager for the Woolworths Portfolio.

Paul Daly has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Senior Facilities Manager for the ISPT/IRAPT Portfolio. Lidia Agosta has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Marketing Manager for the SCA Portfolio, VIC. Chris O’Campo has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Senior Facilities Manager for the Woolworths Portfolio, NSW. Ian Archer has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Senior Facilities Manager at Bluewater Square, in Queensland. Christine Zentner has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Administration Manager for the SCA Portfolio, VIC. Lynden Courtney has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Centre Manager at Bendigo Marketplace, VIC.

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Glecy Baesa has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Retail Manager at Clemton Park Shopping Centre, NSW. Rhonda Green has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Retail Manager at Northside Plaza, Queensland.

Govin Govindasamy has been appointed as Duty Manager at Myer Centre, Adelaide.

Mary Kapetis has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Retail Manager at Keysborough South Shopping Centre, VIC.

Jaime Lualhati has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Facilities Manager at Fairfield Forum, NSW.

Doreen Liversage has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Administration Manager at Emerton Village Shopping Centre, NSW. Richard Aindow has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Retail Manager at Dakabin Shopping Centre, Queensland. Jessica Ta has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Administration Manager at Norton Plaza, NSW. Craig Tache has joined the Colliers Retail Management team as Centre Manager at Norwest Marketown, NSW Vivek Varma has moved across to the SCA Portfolio as Centre Manager. Nina Sanders has moved across to the ISPT/ IRAPT Portfolio as Senior Centre Manager. Stephanie Pawlowski has joined the Colliers International Retail Investment Services team as an Analyst. SCN

2020 SHOPPING CENTRE NEWS – ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

16/11/20 12:57 pm


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Physical retail still the preference this festive season According to a recent study of customers from across AMP Capital-managed shopping centres, behaviours are evolving but our centres are still their preferred shopping destination. Over 70% of customers intending to shop Black Friday plan to do so in store (compared to 59% online) and 96% plan to shop at our centres over Christmas. While it may look a little different to normal, we’re committed to safely delivering exceptional customer service and inspiring retail experiences this Christmas.

www.ampcapital.com/retail AMP Capital Retail October Customer Sentiment and Black Friday / Christmas Surveys, 2020.

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Shopping Centre News No. 5, 2020 | Little Guns Report | Pop up feature