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C E L E B R A T I N G L I F E & C U L T U R E O N T H E C E N T R A L C O A S T | summer

Secret Santa Barbara

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Find Your Aloha. Where the spirit of exploration meets the sweetness of homecoming, you’ll find Montage Residences Kapalua Bay. A modern take on resort living, free of pretense, alive with fun. Signature services and amenities are infused with the essence of a beloved place. Make the Montage experience your own, and reclaim the luxury of delight.

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Summer FEATURES 48 Secret Santa Barbara By Nancy Ransohoff

56 Coastal Histories

Morro Bay, Cayucos and Cambria By Cheryl Crabtree

62 Running on Empty

Outdoor Adventures on the Carrizo Plain Written and Photographed By Chuck Graham

PHOTOS, TOP-BOTTOM: AN AERIAL VIEW OF KNAPP ’S CASTLE BY CHUCK PLACE; FIREWORKS IN MORRO BAY OVER THE SAN DIEGO MARITIME MUSEUM’S REPLICA OF SAN SALVADOR, SAILED BY JUAN RODRIGUES CABRILLO IN 1542, PHOTO BY MARVIN HARMS PHOTOGRAPHY, COURTESY MB MARITIME MUSEUM; AND OVERLOOKING THE CUYAMA VALLEY BY CHUCK GR AHAM.


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00 46 DEPARTMENTS

43 Poetry “Plein Air”

16 Editor’s Letter 18 Contributors 20 Local Lowdown Resort Report, Cool Vibes + New Retail, The Art of Natural History, Electric Bikes, New Restaurants, Art & Wine Tour, Summer Reading, Distilleries, Cool New Apps and More!

36 Datebook and Cultural Calendar: Performing and Visual Arts and Other Favorite Events for Summer

37 On Exhibit Featured Artists at Local Galleries 12

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BY GUDRON BORTMAN

44 First Person Whale Whisperer Vince Shay BY CHUCK GR AHAM

46 Legacies MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation BY LESLIE DINABERG

68 Wine Country Central Coast Wine News BY WENDY THIES SELL

Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County Wine Maps

74 Tee it up! Golf in Santa Barbara County

44

76 Explore Santa Barbara County 40 great things to do in Santa Barbara, Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria, Goleta, Back Country, Santa Ynez, Solvang and Los Olivos

78 Santa Barbara Urban Wineries 82 Explore San Luis Obispo County 25 great things to do in San Luis Obispo, Edna Valley, Arroyo Grande Valley, Pismo Beach, Oceano, Grover Beach, Shell Beach, Avila Beach, Los Osos, Baywood Park, Morro Bay, Cayucos, Cambria Paso Robles, Atascadero, Templeton and Santa Margarita

86 Santa Barbara Restaurant Report BY NANCY R ANSOHOFF

88 Our Dining Out Guide to Favorite Area Restaurants in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties

96 Publisher’s Letter

ON THE COVER SANTA BARBAR A SEASONS: KNAPP’S CASTLE, PHOTO BY CHUCK PLACE COASTAL SEASONS: CAYUCOS, PHOTO BY ANDY BOWLIN

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) COURTESY INN AT THE PIER; JULIA IDIART; VINCE SHAY; COURTESY MOXI

Photos, clockwise from left: The Levinson Family Sky Garden at MOXI; Inn at the Pier; West Coast Ballet dancers at Santa Barbara French Festival; a whale’s tail in Pismo Beach.


S U M M E R 2 018 • VO LU M E L I X • N U M B E R 2 PUBLISHER & EDITOR IN CHIEF

David W. Fritzen M ANAGING EDITOR

Leslie Dinaberg A R T  D I R E C T O R

Dan Levin A S S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R

Brian Kramer DISTRIBUTION M ANAGER

Raymond Rangel COPY EDITOR

Laurie Jervis CONTRIBUTING EDITORS FOOD

Nancy Ransohoff

POETRY

David Starkey

TRAVEL/SLO COUNTY STYLE

Cheryl Crabtree

Judy Foreman

CALENDAR EDITOR

Michelle Jarrard CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Gudron Bortman, Bonnie Carroll, Cheryl Crabtree, Leslie Dinaberg, Judy Foreman, David Fritzen, Chuck Graham, Jessica Morelli, Nancy Ransohoff, Hana-Lee Sedgwick, Wendy Thies Sell, Nancy A. Shobe CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGR APHERS

Chuck Graham Chuck Place EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ashley Killion Jessica Morelli Ali Rank Copyright 2018, Tiger Oak Media, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from the publisher. F O R E V E R S U B S C R I P T I O N Santa Barbara Seasons and Coastal Seasons offer an annual subscription for $15 for four quarterly issues. To subscribe, send check or money order for $15; email subscribe@ sbseasons.com; or visit sbseasons.com/subscribe. Your subscription will automatically begin with the SUMMER 2018 edition.

For advertising information, please contact the publisher.

Margie Grace, Principal at Grace Design was named 2018 Designer of the Year by APLD for this world class garden.

Editorial and advertising offices: 829 De la Vina Street, Suite 210, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Telephone 805/564-8804. Fax 805/564-8802. Printed in the USA. sbseasons.com

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P L A N YO U R N E X T E V E N T W I T H V I VA Viva is the quintessential Santa Barbara gem, located in the heart of downtown in the historic La Arcada Plaza, within walking distance of the majestic Santa Barbara courthouse. Viva offers four uniquely beautiful event spaces that create the perfect atmosphere for your perfect celebration. Whether you are hosting a small gathering, large party, corporate event or a lavish wedding, Viva has just the space for you. We are one of the largest, non-hotel event spaces in Santa Barbara with the ability to accommodate any size group up to 400 guests. Our on-site coordinators and gourmet chefs look forward to treating you and your guests to an unforgettable event.

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SUMMER EDITOR’S LETTER

The three happiest words in the English language (after “I love you”) could be “June,” “July” and “August.” — FR ANCESCA CASTAGNOLI

SUMMER IS THE SEASON full of endless possibilities. And in Santa Barbara, those joyful moments usually start outside. Whether it’s hiking in the vast Los Padres National Forest, gliding over Santa Ynez Valley, dipping your toes into a breathtaking pool at one of our gorgeous resorts, taking a sunset beach stroll, exploring an abandoned castle, dining al fresco or biking up hills on an electric stead, we’ve got something in these pages for just about everyone.

Leslie Dinaberg MANAGING EDITOR

leslie@sbseasons.com

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PHOTO: AMY BARNARD

As Nancy Ransohoff writes, “It’s no secret that Santa Barbara County is a dream of a destination, with spectacular scenery and weather, a rich history and culture, beautiful architecture and awardwinning wine and cuisine.” Our “Secret Santa Barbara” feature on page 48 offers the skinny on a few of the lesser-known places and things to explore this summer. Writer/photographer Chuck Graham shares his unique adventures—and gorgeous photos—hiking from Los Padres National Forest in Santa Barbara County to the last of California’s grasslands on the Carrizo Plain National Monument in San Luis Obispo County, in “Running on Empty” (page 62). Cheryl Crabtree takes us on a seaside journey back in time, with the “Coastal Histories” of Morro Bay, Cambria and Cayucos, on page 56. Summer is also the season for some of my favorite annual local events. High on that list is the Santa Barbara Food and Wine Festival on June 30. A fundraiser for the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, this is always a lovely day to see old friends, as well as swirl, sip and savor wines from more than 50 Central Coast premier wineries, complemented with delicious edibles in the beautiful museum setting. I always look forward to the frivolity of the Summer Solstice Parade on June 23. This year’s theme is “Heroes,” which is sure to inspire loads of creative fun. I’m also excited about UCSB Arts & Lectures’ annual summer movies series, with free movies outside at the Courthouse every Friday night in July and August (excluding Fiesta). This year’s series highlights animation, with an eclectic line-up of films including The Triplets of Belleville, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Ratatouille, The Iron Giant and more. And of course, it wouldn’t be summer in Santa Barbara without the many celebrations that make up Old Spanish Days (August 1-5). My personal favorites are the dozens of dance performances that pop up on stages all over town, including just a few steps away from our office at Paseo Nuevo and De la Guerra Plaza in downtown Santa Barbara. Cheers to a summer full of memorable adventures!


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Cheryl Crabtree | Writer

Chuck Place | Photographer

Cheryl Crabtree has penned many a word for regional and national travel books, magazines and websites. She co-authored the very first edition of The Insider’s Guide to Santa Barbara, and her other credits include Hometown Santa Barbara, California Directory of Fine Wineries: Central Coast, Fodor’s California and Fodor’s The Complete Guide to National Parks of the West. She also covers the Central Coast region for Bindu Trips, a worldwide itinerary-based travel website.

Chuck Place has worked as an editorial photographer for more than 30 years. His degree is in biology, but his passion is photography. Although his subjects have changed, from large format landscapes to travel and now aerials, food and people, his fascination with images has never wavered. His assignment clients range from National Geographic Traveler, Sunset, Islands, Time and Smithsonian Books to Timberline Clothes and IBM. Place is the sole photographer of six books and teaches photography at Santa Barbara City College.

Chuck Graham | Photographer, Writer

Nancy Ransohoff | Writer

Chuck Graham has lived in Santa Barbara County since 1973, and has always appreciated the unique diversity of islands, ocean, coastal ranges, backcountry and grasslands the region possesses. It has afforded him a quality of life that includes lifeguarding on the beach in Carpinteria, leading kayak tours at the Channel Islands National Park and as a freelance writer and photographer.

Nancy Ransohoff is a Rhode Island native who’s lived in Santa Barbara with her family for 25 years. A former editor for Bon Appetit and Architectural Digest, she writes for a number of regional magazines and covers Santa Barbara area restaurants for Westways. Her other credits include co-authoring Hometown Santa Barbara, and writing for Frommer’s guidebooks and Bindu Trips, a worldwide itinerary-based travel website.

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829 De la Vina Street, Ste. 210, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 | 805/564-8804 | subscribe@sbseasons.com

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PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) CAM CRABTREE, NATALIE COSTELLO, STEPHANIE BAKER, CHUCK GRAHAM

SUMMER CONTRIBUTORS


GREEN BUILDING FEATURE

SAVE OUR STARS

W

e are referring to saving the Central Coast’s star-studded night skies. To us, it is a key aspect Lorem ipsum of building more environmentally friendly homes as well as protecting views of starlight and dark skies. The challenge is that people today have a love affair with lighting. Many homeowners think outdoor lights are synonymous with safety and security...and the more light the better. The International Dark Sky Association is leading a movement to stop light pollution and protect the night skies for present and future generations. In fact, millions of children across the globe will never see the Milky Way from their own homes. Every April since 2003, they have "Turned on the Night" during Dark Sky Week. One way that homeowners and building professionals can achieve a goal of a night sky brimming with visible stars is through wise use of outdoor lighting. An added plus beyond eliminating light pollution cast from your home onto your neighbors’ properties is mitigating its negative impact on the ecosystems of our local nocturnal animals. Here are some techniques that can help you “fade to black” around your residence, while still providing the safety and security we all value:  Use fully shielded exterior light fixtures—or angle them downward—so that light only shines down and eliminates neighbor “light trespass”.  Look for dark sky lighting fixtures with the light source in the cap. Honey or opal opaque glass is needed to control light if bulb is not in the cap.  As much as possible, locate fixtures under porches and overhangs.  Use motion sensors and/or timers on exterior light fixtures, so that lights are on only when triggered and for the length of time needed.  Use only enough light to get the job done—meaning the fewest number of fixtures, minimum height, and low wattage.  Avoid blue white lights wherever possible. Instead, try to select warm/soft white LED lamps or light bulbs. Long wavelength light with a red or yellow tint will minimize impact. For more information, call, click or visit Allen Construction. Santa Barbara | San Luis Obispo | Ventura 805.884.8777 | buildallen.com The Central Coast’s leading green building experts since 1983.


NEW & NOTEWORTHY ON THE CENTR AL COAST

LOCAL LOWDOWN

SANTA BARBAR A

Fess Parker is Now BY BONNIE CARROLL

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“WE ARE THRILLED to be a part of the legacy of the Fess Parker family and this magical seaside

property,” says Joe Berger, area president, Americas, Hilton. The Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort team and entire community now have an opportunity to experience the exquisite renovation transformations included in the long-awaited hotel re-branding. “What I am most enthused about is the opportunity for the team to connect with Hilton customers, who may not have identified with us in the past,” says General Manager Neil Poisson. “Our lobby rug became ‘the day at the beach’ and is an homage to the waterfront. The lobby is set up as a casual, elegant gathering space that allows you to enjoy the beautiful view, have a casual meeting or simply sip a cold glass or chardonnay,” says project Interior Designer Stina Funch, of Atwater Inc. Studio. Rodney’s Grill has been updated, offering an authentic taste of Santa Barbara with exciting culinary inspirations created from all-natural hormone-free beef and the highest quality aged USDA prime steaks and chops from coastal cattle ranches, along with healthy, sustainable seafood sourced from local fisheries. The culinary team, led by Executive Chef Kirk DeLong, has devised specials that pay homage to early California cuisine with culinary inspiration derived from Native American and Spanish cooking styles, herbs and spices. 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Santa Barbara, 805/564-4333, hiltonsantabarbararesort.com.

PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, COURTESY HILTON (2), OPPOSITE COURTESY INN AT THE PIER (3)

The Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort


RESORT REPORT

Inn at the Pier PISMO BEACH

BY C HERY L C R ABTREE PERCHED JUST STEPS FROM THE SAND, the brand-new

Inn at the Pier (opened winter 2017) offers a great car-free getaway option for Central Coast visitors. The luxe hotel occupies a prime block across from the iconic pier, at the end of Pomeroy Avenue. Leave your car with the 24-hour valet service (included in the daily resort fee) and take full advantage of the enviable location, which embodies the classic California beach town lifestyle. Walk to the beach and downtown shops, take a dip in the rooftop pool, order an appetizer and cocktail from the rooftop bar and watch the sunset, then head down to the onsite restaurant, Blonde, for dinner. The hotel’s 104 rooms include private balconies; most offer ocean views. 601 Cypress St., Pismo Beach, 805/295-5565, theinnatthepier.com.

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Reopens BY BONNIE CARROLL

We invest in the Central Coast.

OUTREACH

NEW DINING

482 Nonprofits (Annually)

Z NE

VAL

W Y NE S LE

SANTA Y

13 Best Bank Awards in the Last 5 Years

BEST OF THE VALLEY 2017 SINCE 1925

2013 – 2017

2014 – 2017

2014 – 2017

2017 Bank of the Year Western Independent Bankers

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with our prime summer season.” During the closure, “we were focused on supporting our team, our community and helping those whose homes and places of business did not fare as well. We are forever grateful to the hundreds of volunteers and search and rescue teams who put their lives on the line each day,” says Earp. Hotel team members have volunteered in both the immediate area and at Four Seasons properties around the world. More than 45 employees volunteered to serve as a “task force” within the company to share their expertise with other properties. Local volunteers have

EXPERIENCES at Montecito Inn BY BONNIE CARROLL

FRANKLAND’S CRAB & CO. in the Montecito Inn, created by Scratch Restaurant Group in Encino, opened along with the reopening of the Montecito Inn, following the January mudslide closure. The upfront venue with a sunny storefront appeal has already created a loyal patronage of seafood lovers who give a solid thumbs up to the Scratch chowder, which features a rich stock made from a variety of shellfish, kissed with house-cured bacon, crab, lobster and prawn. The chowder pairs perfectly with a house-baked lobster brioche sandwich. Whole steamed crabs with corn on the cob brushed with lobster butter are an ideal twosome for the

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, COURTESY THE BILTMORE (2); YASMIN ALISHAV, JAKOB LAYMAN, COURTESY FRANKLAND’S

$912 Million

(Balances in 2017)

THE REOPENING of The Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore on June 1 follows nearly a fivemonth closure due to mudslides. A team of restoration experts worked diligently to restore the resort’s 22 acres of oceanfront land back to its original radiance, which included extensive landscaping and restoration of some back-ofhouse areas and guest rooms. “On behalf of our 600 passionate and dedicated employees, I am thrilled to announce that our iconic resort is back–and better than ever,” says Karen Earp, general manager. “We look forward to welcoming our guests ‘home’ to experience the best of the American Riviera, beginning

PHOTO:

LOANS & LENDING

MONTEC ITO


RESORT REPORT been closely tied to community efforts in Montecito, participating in fundraising, cleanup efforts and working with United Way and the American Red Cross. Originally built in 1927 by architect Reginald Johnson, The Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore is known for its authentic Spanish Colonial splendor, picturesque oceanside location and exemplary service. New this summer is the Anacapa Suite, opening in July and offering guests 2,500 square feet of livable luxury overlooking the Pacific Ocean and Butterfly Beach.

The Anacapa Suite features a 15” x 17” plunge pool, fire pit and private driveway, and includes complimentary access to the private-membership Coral Casino Beach and Cabana Club. Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara’s popular Summer Tasting Series returns this season with a new lineup of the best local purveyors, distillers and winemakers. In addition, new culinary and spa offerings are being introduced, further enhancing the guest experiences already available. The Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore, 1260 Channel Dr., Montecito, 805/969-2261, fourseasons.com/santabarbara.

Where does your bank invest? VOLUNTEERING

5,200 Hours (Annually)

DONATIONS

beachcomber and wine tasting picnic baskets are also available to grab-and-go and enjoy. Phillip Frankland Lee and Margarita Kallas-Lee are the husbandand-wife duo at the helm, with Margarita baking and creating desserts while Phillip sets the savory menu agenda. The atmosphere has earthy appeal and features an overview of wood with pops of eye-catching red throughout. Late summer brings the next Scratch phases to the Montecito Inn, says Chef Phillip Frankland Lee. The additions include Margarita’s Snacks and the sit-down restaurant Monarch’s wood-hearth ode to the Central Coast, with the world-class

$1.4 million (Annually)

Personal. Business. Nonprofit. Wealth.

Silver Bough fine-dining venue slated to follow in Winter 2018. Currently, Frankland’s Crab & Co. is open from 11 a.m.-10 p.m. franklandscrabandcompany. com, Montecito Inn, 1295 Coast Village Rd., Montecito, 805/969-7854, montecitoinn.com.

montecito.bank

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Clockwise from top left: the Museum of Natural History exhibit includes artwork by Alexander Wilson, Henry Seebolm, Francois-Nicolas Martinet and Jean Baptiste, among others.

The Art of Natural SEE HOW UNLIKELY TEAMS of artists and scientists observed the natural world when science and art come together this summer at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History’s new exhibition of pieces from a collection of natural history art spanning 300 years. Natural history art came about as a way of assisting scientists in identifying, describing, classifying and naming species. Naturalists would detail what they themselves had seen in nature—plants,

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History

birds, insects, mammals and the like. During the Age of Discovery, these skilled artists were hired to depict the plants and animals scientists had found in the New World. As the sciences developed and became more advanced, so too did these representations of nature. What had begun as a fundamental aid to scientific inquiry became priceless detailed works of art, often incomparable in their craftsmanship and beauty. These works on paper were originally produced by means of copperplate

BY JESSIC A MORELLI

engravings, but by the mid-19th century, lithography had replaced engraving as the primary means of reproducing images in multiples. Numerous examples of which, drawn from the museum’s collection of more than 3,500 engravings and lithographs, can be seen displayed in the gallery. The Art of Natural History is on view at Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History (2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara, 805/682-4711, sbnature.org) from June 22 to September 3.

PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, COURTESY SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY (4), OPPOSITE, COURTESY PEDEGO (2)

LOCAL LOWDOWN


Ped-E-Go-Go

BY NANC Y A . SHOBE WHAT DOES A NEW JERSEY SHORE BOY DO

to come to Santa Barbara? Why, he purchases a Pedego electric bike store, of course. Prompted by the success of his friend Adam Levine’s Pedego store in New Jersey, 32-year-old Pat Briody asked Pedego founder Don DiCostanzo what city would make a good location for a new bike store. Santa Barbara, he suggested. Although Briody had never even been to Santa Barbara, he bought a “#1 U.S. Electric Bike” store, along with co-owner Levine, and put “the pedal to the metal” to the American Riviera. Locals know how easy it is to coast along Santa Barbara’s shoreline, but cycling the town’s hills or into Ventura can be wee bit more challenging. Pedego electric bikes make it affordable, effortless and fun, whether renting for the day or purchasing one for transportation. Never before has there been a way to easily roam the town and in such swashbuckling style. Plus, the Pedego ‘s electric batteries hold a 30-60 mile charge, ensuring a full day of gas-free touring. Pedego SB, 100 E. Haley St., Santa Barbara, 805/201-0654, PedegoSB.com. Additional local stores can be found at 2948 San Marcos Ave., Ste. E, Los Olivos, 805/691-3045; and 425 First St., Avila Beach, 805/627-1414.


LOCAL LOWDOWN

Cool Vibes

NewRetail BY JUDY FOREM AN

ISL A IS A GORGEOUS SHOP IN THE

a long, cold, sad and soggy winter, which packed a meteorological wallop, but now we are all happy to say hello to longer days and warmer temps that allow us to leave that heaviness behind and rise up and come out into the light. Support our local stores and look good at the same time by visiting some of our newest retailers. Summer encourages you to slide into cool, slip-on tennies at retro-chic SeaVees Showroom & Guide Bar, or dive

Y ES, IT WAS

into Ambiance’s collection of T-shirts, jean shorts, dresses and open toe slip-on Frye’s with fun tassels. Catch the breeze with coolto-the-touch cotton dresses and resort wear at Isla, the boutique in the chic new Hotel Californian, or visit Jake & Jones for classic Wranglers, cool sunnies, bathing suits, magenta suede slides, aromatic candles, jean jackets and colorful playsuits. Whatever your summer mood, our newest merchants have got you covered.

Isla Boutique in The Hotel Californian

(that’s her real name) has been a retail wiz kid since 2004. With Ambiance boutiques in San Luis Obispo, Paso Robles and Mill Valley (Branded is the store name there), and loyal fans up and down the coast, she now brings that experience and panache to good use on fashion row on Coast Village Road. January had been looking for a Santa Barbara location, so when the former Blanka boutique became available in early spring, she found a perfect home for her vision of the fashion conscious but fun West Coast woman. Montecito’s store is a go to-place for fun gifts, shoes, jewelry, handbags, hats and a variety of sizes and selection of everything from basics to fashion-forward merchandise. While a bit young and whimsical, the store’s layout broadcasts an easygoing vibe, where one can hang out and browse, or relax with a beverage in the outdoor living room. January will provide an ever-changing inventory from other locations, so Ambiance will always be new, fresh and fun.

K ANN Y N JANUARY

Ambiance 1266 Coast Village Rd., Montecito, 805/969-1811, shopambiance.com.

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PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, TOP-BOTTOM, COURTESY ISLA (2); JUDY FOREMAN (2); OPPOSITE, KELLY SWEDA PHOTOGRAPHY

HOTEL C ALIFORNIAN: Sitting mere steps from Stearns Wharf, it’s a great reason to check out lower State 36 State St., Street’s urban gentrification at its best. Santa Barbara, The Moroccan architecture of the 805/882-0100. hotel carries over to the 1,700 sq. ft. store, which has entrances from both inside the hotel and from State Street. It feels a bit like a Marrakesh market, with ceramic tiles, wood floors, sexy lighting and cool, sophisticated fabrics on banquets and draperies that are as inviting as the merchandise. I wanted everything in there, which was good for them, but not my pocket book. Isla is well prepared to meet clients’ needs for familiar basics, sophisticated ready-to-wear and event looks from emerging designers. It features fine jewelry, artisanal accessories and resort and swim collections for men and women. In store pop-up shops featuring different designers will rotate though out the year in one of the beautiful in-store enclaves.


Jake & Jones 136 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/770-7763, jakeandjones.com. WITH A STORE NAMED after her two kids,

Jennifer Steinwurtzel has curated one of the best-looking new boutiques in town. Located in the historic district of downtown Santa Barbara, the store’s vibe is light, fresh and modern. Steinwurtzel’s creative and business skills come together to create a concept shop that is an experience as well as a retail store, and feels like Soho in New York City or Abbot Kinney in Venice, CA. Steinwurtzel’s intention was to create a space that was not just for clothing, but home like, and more about the things that she feels help us to be our truest selves—whether that is an item of clothing, a shoe, a book, a card, a planter or pillow—it’s a lifestyle and a feeling she is trying to foster. Steinwurtzel is reaching out to the curious woman (and soon to be man), with items for every age and stage of life, including a super cute tot section. Pushing the envelope a bit, Jake & Jones tends to be adventurous, with small sophisticated brands, and takes a bit more of a forward push for a customer looking for a special pieces to add to the already unique and treasured items in her closet. Steinwurtzel’s origins are in the East Coast big cities, where people are bold in what they wear, and there is a lot more variety, choices and tastes. “The SB woman is one to dress so that any moment they could go to a yoga class or go to an upscale restaurant,” she says.


Cool Vibes

NewRetail

SeaVees Showroom & Guide Bar 118 E. Ortega St., Santa Barbara, 805/774-1964, seavees.com.

THIS UNIQUE AND CONTEMPORARY shoe manufac-

turer has its roots in retro cool ‘60s, now rebranded and brought back into the present by CEO and designer of SeaVees, Steven Tiller. A 25-year veteran in the footwear business, Tiller stumbled upon a used pair of SeaVees at a thrift store in Japan. He researched the history of the shoe line only to learn that B.F. Goodrich, the tire company, which like many used its rubber in footwear, founded the original brand in 1964. Back in the ‘60s, SeaVees were a featured advertiser in Playboy and Sports Illustrated as the first-ever crossover sneaker—the idea that the sneaker was no longer simply a gym staple but a casual shoe that could be worn to social affairs. Hence the SeaVees tagline: “The original way to go casual.” Every shoe Tiller designs today, batch-made in small production lots, is equally inspired by Steve McQueen’s hot-rod culture, Jack Kerouac’s San Francisco Beat scene and Richard Neutra’s Desert Modernism—styles that embodied the theme of all things California. Sold in more than 300 stores

worldwide with 35-40 women’s, men’s and now children’s styles offered each season, “SeaVees honors its origin by making modern amendments to retro-inspired styling, resulting in a timeless, sophisticated sneaker.” The brand continues to preserve the California lifestyle, while also preserving the California Coast. As a member of 1% for the Planet, Tiller donates 1% of all sales to the Gaviota Coast Conservancy. Following the devastating fire and mudslide debris flow, SeaVees handed out brand new SeaVees to anyone who was displaced or had lost a home and belongings, giving out more than 300 pairs. While it welcomes walkins, the showroom displays only its current line and does not carry inventory. The shopper is guided to go online and create a profile for his or her size and style. This profile is sent to the store and an appointment made after shoes have arrived for customers to stop by and retrieve them. Forward thinking SeaVees footwear continues to redefine casual and cool for all ages.

Mizza Artisan Pizza and Italian Cuisine Opens in La Arcada

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“OUR GOAL IS TO BE AN ITALIAN PUB , no white linen, but a white linen level Italian dining experience without the white linen,” is how owner Brendan Searls (of Viva!, Dargan’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, and Pizza Mizza fame) describes his newest restaurant venture. He and his wife Kourtney decided to open Mizza Artisan Pizza and Italian Cuisine (“Mizza”) when a prime location with a State Street front patio became available in the historic La Arcada Plaza, which is also home to their Mexican restaurant Viva! “This part of town is going through a renaissance, and this was a unique opportunity that doesn’t come up very often,” says Searls. The newly renovated restaurant space—formerly home to La Arcada Bistro and Barcliff and Bair before that—features handmade artisan pizzas, handmade pastas, salads and a selection of carefully selected house specialties using local fresh produce, locally caught fresh fish, free range

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT, COURTESY SEEVEES, JUDY FOREMAN, COURTESY MIZZA

BY LESLIE DINABERG


Rare Coins & Precious Metals | Foreign Exchange Largest collection of Estate Jewelry in Santa Barbara 3000 State Street Santa Barbara CA 93105 805.687.3641 | pbrombal.com

chicken and Harris Ranch CAB meats. Mizza is “ideally situated in the 1100 block of State Street, with beautiful patios on both sides of the restaurant,” says Searls. “We will be striving to provide Santa Barbara with a reasonably priced but a casually excellent dining experience.” With 80 outdoor patio seats and full bar service available, Mizza is sure to be a popular spot on warm summer afternoons and evenings. The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner service daily, with brunch service on Saturdays and Sundays. Mizza Artisan Pizza and Italian Cuisine is expected to open on June 1, and plans for a wine bar are also in the works for later in the summer. Mizza Artisan Pizza and Italian Cuisine, 1112 State St., Santa Barbara, at the entrance to the beautiful La Arcada Plaza. 

We can all do good. But together we can #dobetter.

Join the Santa Barbara Foundation at SBFoundation.org/dobetter.


LOCAL LOWDOWN

Local Dish:

Bibi Ji BY LESLIE DINABERG

S A N TA B A R B A R A K N OW-I T-A LL

S AN TA BA RB AR A

CERVIN

A G U I D E TO E V E R Y T H I N G T H AT M AT T E RS

MICHAEL CERVIN

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The Santa Barbara Scoop WHO DOESN’T PICK UP a travel book when visiting a new city? And, truth be told, most travel books are informative but blah, blah, blah…boring. Not so, with local travel writer Michael Cervin’s new book, Santa Barbara Know-ItAll: A Guide to Everything that Matters (Reedy Press, 2018). His 208-page tome about Santa Barbara is honest, forthright, entertaining and

BY NANC Y A . SHOBE

downright maddening if one is into hyperbole. “Just the facts, ma’am” is what Cervin presents. And, the facts are local secrets that even some locals don’t know—like the stone wall frog niche on Santa Barbara’s Riviera or the Carpinteria chocolate factory tour. Everything in Santa Barbara Know-It-All has been personally vetted, tasted, experienced or consumed by Cervin. “It’s my

eighth book, fifth travel book, and it’s the book I’ve always wanted to write,” says Cervin. “When my first travel book came out, my mom read it coverto-cover. And, I thought why shouldn’t you read a travel book cover-to-cover? It should read like a regular book,” says Cervin. If a light-hearted odyssey of Santa Barbara sounds fun, then look no further than the Santa Barbara Know-It-All.

SUMMER READING

PHOTOS: TOP-BOTTOM, COLLIN DEWELL, COURTESY BIBI JI (3); COURTESY REEDY PRESS; OPPOSITE COURTESY PAM KRAUSS BOOKS/AVERY

THE NEW RESTAURANT from James Beard Award-winning sommelier and winemaker Rajat Parr and acclaimed Chef Jessi Singh (of the popular Babu Ji restaurants in San Francisco, Manhattan and Melbourne), Bibi Ji, takes its name from an Indian term of endearment for women in the family, and pays tribute to the formative women in both Singh and Parr’s lives who cultivated their love for food and hospitality. This innovative take on Indian food paired with locally made wines and locally sourced seafood with Australian influences all adds up to what is easily one of the most exciting new restaurants to hit downtown Santa Barbara in a long time!   Drawing from his Australian and Indian roots, Chef Singh (who now lives in Santa Barbara) has created a menu featuring his self-proclaimed “unauthentic take” on many traditional American seafood dishes, with a strong focus on using local Santa Barbara purveyors. Currently on the menu are SB UNI biryani, made with local sea urchin and fried rice; local oysters with green mango pickle butter; delicious Hope Ranch black mussels in a curry broth; and melt-in-your-mouth Aussie lamb chops with mint and dill raita and apricot chutney; as well as a zesty array of “unauthentic curries.” The Chef’s Tasting Menu—offering a variety of favorite appetizers, curries, naan, rice and dessert for $50 per person—is an excellent way to savor a variety of these exciting flavors. Bibi Ji, 734 State St., bibijisb.com, 805/560-6845.


Healthy Gut – Healthy Life

BY NANC Y A . SHOBE

IT WAS IN BALLARD CANYON that Stella Metsovas, CCN, drafted the “Living Wild” chapter of her first book, Wild Mediterranean: The Age-old Science-new Plan for a Healthy Gut, With Food You Can Trust (Pam Krauss Books/Avery, imprint of Penguin Random House, 2017). “I’ve been inspired by the area because if I take a nap under a tree, I think I’m in the Mediterranean,” she says. Metsovas’s many childhood trips to Greece gave her firsthand knowledge of the plantbased Mediterranean lifestyle and how it offers simplicity—simple foods and a simple lifestyle. “The magic truly is in simplicity,” says Metsovas, who has spent 10-plus years in private practice as a clinical nutritionist, “and, the magic bullet of health is your digestive tract.” “Ultimately, I created the Wild Mediterranean program because I wanted to protect people from the inaccuracies that are so pervasive in the health and diet world and give my clients the tools for long-term success. I was tired of seeing my clients, who after months of hard work on calorie-centric diets or juice cleanses, would end up at their starting weight, if not heavier,” writes Metsovas. Through pre-tox and detox protocols, delicious plant-based recipes and lifestyle suggestions, Metsovas takes readers on a Mediterranean journey of foods and lifestyle that are vital to creating and maintaining a healthy gut microbiome. A healthy gut means healthy life is Metsovas’ motto.

Rare Treasures from our Antique Print Collection

June 22–September 3, 2018 John and Peggy Maximus Gallery Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara 805.682.4711 sbnature.org


LOCAL LOWDOWN

BY NANC Y A . SHOBE

“AMAYZING” ITALIAN

Root 246 BY NANC Y R ANSOHOFF

Pink” DeLongpre continues the Root 246 commitment to farm-to-table cuisine while putting her personal stamp of deliciousness on the menu. Chef Pink is well known both regionally and nationally after her appearances on Food Network’s Cutthroat Kitchen and Spike TV’s Bar Rescue. Her passion for local and sustainable ingredients comes through in dishes like locally harvested mussels with ginger, fennel and Serrano chilies. Regulars come back for

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strip mall in Buellton is a culinary gem of the Valley—the bellissimo La Botte Bistro & Catering, owned and operated by the equally bellissima Francesca Agate. Red vintage candles, whitelinen draped tables, purple velvet curtains and a playful, hand-painted piano evoke an ambiance that’s as equally quaint and romantic as it is eclectic and fun. The Sicily-born Agate greets customers with a brilliant smile and a soft word of gratitude for coming. Her calm manner belies her many

the soul-satisfying buttermilk fried chicken with whipped Yukon gold potatoes and house-made dill pickles, and Wagyu beef burger with sharp cheddar cheese on a potato roll with fries. An extensive wine list spotlights the bounty of Santa Barbara County. Comfortable and sophisticated, the dining room is a perfect spot after a day on the wine trails. Root 246 offers weekend brunch, dinner and lateafternoon small bites in the lounge. Located adjacent to Solvang’s Hotel Corque at 420 Alisal Rd., Solvang, 805/686-8681, root-246.com.

Gets New Chef

NEW CHEF DE CUISINE Crystal “Chef

TUCKED AWAY INTO A nondescript

hours spent each day in the kitchen alongside her chef, David Berroteran, whipping up organic fresh sauces and farm fresh cuisine. “I only make enough of the sauces for the day,” says Agate, “I don’t want food to sit around.” Hailing from a lineage of Italian restaurateurs, including her father, Nicolo, who owns La Botte in Lompoc, Agate’s deep love for her family is showcased in her private wine labels. She pays tribute to her mother, Caterina, and her father as well as her daughter, Amayzing. In addition to the bistro that is open five days a week, Agate caters fresh Italian dishes throughout Santa Barbara County. When desiring an unforgettable Italian dining experience served with the heart and soul of Italy, La Botte Bistro & Catering is the place to be. La Botte Bistro & Catering is located at 225 McMurray Rd., Suite A, Buellton. Open Wed.Sun, 5-9 p.m. For reservations, catering, private parties or more information, call 805/693-2154 or visit https://labottebistro.com.


Look for our newest location in Oxnard at The Collection!

Adventure Aide App

BY C HERY L C R ABTREE

PHOTOS: TOP-BOTTOM, THIS PAGE, COURTESY LA BOTTE (2); COURTESY ROOT 246; OPPOSITE, COURTESY ADVENTURE AIDE

HANKERING FOR OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

but don’t want to go it alone? Download the Adventure Aide app, a one-stop shop for booking an array of guided outdoor experiences scheduled in the vicinity. Choices run the gamut, from trail hikes, kayak tours and surf lessons to yoga sessions, photography workshops and multiday excursions. A group of millennial outdoor enthusiasts started the app in San Luis Obispo in 2014. The latest version includes the Santa Barbara region and allows adventure seekers to browse and book with one click. It also allows users to communicate with the carefully vetted guides (called Aides) and fellow adventurers. The app partners with established groups like the Santa Barbara Adventure Company and CalCoast Adventures, as well as local outdoor enthusiasts who don’t have their own company, but want to share their expertise with others. CEO Connor Woolpert says he and his cofounders created the app to encourage people to get outdoors, unplug and connect with others. “Our primary goal is to get people outside and having fun, so seeing the numbers of people of people booking adventures grow and grow—that’s the really cool part.” Adventure Aide offers dozens of active adventures throughout the Central Coast and plans to continue expansion in other Southern California coastal destinations in the coming year. FOR MORE INFORMATION,

visit AdventureAide.com.

Los Agaves is a family owned Mexican restaurant serving traditional handcrafted recipes from the finest ingredients… Always.

r e s t a u r a n t

Santa Barbara | Goleta | Westlake Village | Oxnard www.los-agaves.com


LOCAL LOWDOWN

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY

ALLEGRETTO VINEYARD Resort Art and Wine Tours

FINE ART AND FINE WINE go hand in hand at

Allegretto Vineyard Resort in Paso Robles, and now the public can indulge in both during docent-led tours at the property. Its proprietor, Doug Ayres, carefully chose hundreds of museum-quality artworks, antiques and artifacts to place on view at Allegretto. Treasures include impressionist paintings by artists from Russia and California, ancient statues and stones from India, and a massive cross-section of a giant Sequoia tree that dates back to 214 BC. “It is my hope that this collection I’ve curated from around this world, set in this atmosphere of intention and creativity, will inspire all who visit to contemplate, dream or imagine new heights in their own lives,” says Ayres. Tours start at 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday and last about an hour. The $25 fee includes samples of Allegretto estate wines.

BY CHERYL CR ABTREE

HEALTHY

Grab anINdSLOGo BY C HERY L C R ABTREE

ACTIVE LOCALS AND VISITORS are

discovering fast food that’s also healthful from eateries located on city streets and area beaches. A number of small takeout restaurants have opened in the last year, serving flavor-packed dishes made with farm-fresh produce and sustainably sourced local ingredients, with price tags that won’t break the bank. A handful of tables are available if you’d like to dine on site, but most patrons prefer to savor their tasty meals and snacks—and SLO’s glorious summer weather—in a park, garden, or other scenic spot in the great outdoors. Here are a few top summer take-away picks.

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Nourish

visit allegrettovineyardresort.com.

THIS COZY, CONTEMPORARY

SPACE , open for breakfast and lunch, is attached

to the Granada Bistro in downtown SLO. Global flavors infuse the diverse menu items, which are designed to accommodate various dietary preferences, from gluten-free and vegan to paleo. In the morning, pick up a smoothie or an espresso, plus baked goods or bowls such as the Green Eggs and Grain, made

with kale, arugula, avocado and farm fresh eggs. Lunch faves include the Nourish Bowl (red lentils, spinach, yams, chutney, quinoa and spicy sauce), Moroccan eggs, noodle salad with shrimp, and special soups, sandwiches and salads. Not a vegetarian? Add roasted and braised local meat options from the Carvery menu. Call in or order online for even speedier service. Open 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday, 1126 Morro St., San Luis Obispo, 805/548-8860, nourishslo.com.

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP, COURTESY ALLEGRETTO (3), LESLIE DINABERG, CORY O’KEEFE, HUMBL. STUDIO (2), COURTESY NOURISH

FOR MORE INFORMATION,


SLO County Distillery Trail BY C HERY L C R ABTREE AFTER WINEMAKERS DE-STEM , crush and begin to ferment grapes, what happens to the “leftovers” like skins, seeds and unused juice that float to the top of the tanks? Some folks toss out the residue, while others repurpose it in landscaping. But a number of SLO County entrepreneurs have found creative ways to sustainably distill those grape leftovers into excellent quality spirits, from brandy and gin to grappa and liqueurs. Distilleries are popping up all over the county, producing traditional spirits such as whiskey, bourbon and rye, along with inventive potions like pomegranate-infused brandy, barrel-aged gin and apple cider vodka. Many distilleries cluster in and near Paso Robles. To find them, download a map from the Paso Robles Distillery Trail website, pasoroblesdistillerytrail.com. The trail loops around West Paso Robles along Adelaida Road, Vineyard Drive and Highway 46 West. If you’d really like to immerse yourself in the “spirit world,” splurge on a Distillery Tour and Mixology Class at Allegretto Vineyard Resort in Paso Robles. The three-day, two-night curated package begins with behindthe-scenes tours of three Central Coast distilleries (lunch included), a cocktail mixing class and a four-course dinner. For details, visit AllegrettoResort. com, 805/369-2500, pasoroblesdistillerytrail.com.

Grab and Go

Goddess Goods

SUMMER MOTE AND SIERRA MACE , both 23,

Paul Quinn at the Distillery at Opolo Vineyards, 7110 Vineyard Dr., Paso Robles, opolo.com.

grew up in Morro Bay and have been hanging out together since before they were born. In March, they opened Goddess Goods, a tiny take-out café across from the Morro Bay Harbor, to provide fast, fresh and healthful made-to-order goodies for locals and tourists alike. All menu items are vegetarian; most are vegan and as local and organic as possible; gluten-free options are available on request. Pick up an espresso and baked goods and watch the otters play offshore. Or cool off after a bike ride to Morro Rock with fresh-pressed juices like the Melonjito (watermelon, lime, cucumber, mint), or a Just Peachy smoothie (banana, spinach, peaches, matcha, cinnamon, almond milk). You can also order a quinoa kale protein salad, hummus wrap, sun-dried almond burger and other sammies and salads, and buy locally made goods. Open 6 a.m. to 3 p.m., with plans to extend to 5 p.m. Phone orders are encouraged. 1124 Front St., Morro Bay, 805/225-5001, goddessgoodsmb.com.

S U M M ER 2018

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SummerDatebook Seasonal events, happenings and things to do for June, July and August

Old Spanish Days Fiesta (Aug. 1-5) offers a bevy of beautiful dance performances, including those by 2018 Spirit of Fiesta Jesalyn Contreras-McCollum (in blue) and Gilda Sahagun and Jennifer Sanchez (in orange). Photos by Fritz Olenberger, courtesy Old Spanish Days.


SANTA BARBARA COUNTY SUMMER DATEBOOK

Find updated information and additional events at sbseasons.com/datebook.

Ongoing Through Jun. 24 The Loyal League: Images from Japan’s Enduring Tale of Samurai Honor and Revenge The Loyal League of 47 samurai, commonly known in Japan as “Chushingura” (literally “The Treasury of Loyal Retainers”), is the most significant samurai loyalty-revenge story. This exhibition examines the wide-ranging pictorial representations of the drama “Chushingura” in the flourishing “ukiyo” (floating-world) woodblock prints and illustrated books, and paintings from the late 18th through the 19th centuries. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Santa Barbara, 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

Through Oct. 14 Nam June Paik: “TV Clock” Korean-born, American artist Nam June Paik (1932–2006) blazed a trail with video art that remains influential to this day. Paik’s “TV Clock,” one of Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s most important media art works, is on view for the first time in nearly a decade. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

June

Polo & Racquet Club, 3300 Via Real, Carpinteria, sbpolo.com.

7–24 Cookin’ at the Cookery Ensemble Theatre Company closes out its season with Cookin’ at the Cookery, a two-woman musical that brings jazz and blues legend Alberta Hunter’s extraordinary and improbable life story to the stage. | New Vic Theatre, 33 W. Victoria St., Santa Barbara, 805/965-5400, etcsb.org.

9 Los Olivos Jazz and Olive Festival The pairing of these two very different things–jazz music and olives– may be unexpected, but it certainly is delightful. Enjoy wine tastings and 30 different olive-themed dishes while listening to world-class jazz music. | 1-4 p.m., Laviana Campbell Park, 2398 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805/325-9280, jazzandolivefestival.org.

10–Sep. 23 Summer Nocturne This exhibition demonstrates a variety of experimental practices during the 1970s and represents images and issues relevant to contemporary art and culture. Included are works by 10 artists: Robert Beauchamp, Huguette Caland, Richard Dunlap, Dane Goodman, Luchita Hurtado, Tom Marioni, Marie Schoeff, Michelle Stuart, Joan Tanner and John M. White. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., Santa

3–Oct. 14

Polo Matches Sundays are fundays at Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club this summer. Sunday polo matches are open to the public with a variety of seating options, including grandstand seating as well as luxury cabanas. The after party begins immediately following most matches, and takes place in the main clubhouse, as well as on the field, where guests can dance the night away and enjoy drinks for purchase at the bar. The Vic Graber Cup kicks off on Jun. 3. Additional events take place every Sunday through Oct. 14. | 3 p.m. Sundays, Santa Barbara

Barbara, 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

12 Sugarland Since the band’s inception in 2002, Sugarland has sold nearly 10 million albums domestically, making them one of the most popular Country music duos of all time. | 6:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

On Exhibit Now

Hank Pitcher (b. 1949) Wild Radish, 2018 Oil on Canvas Over Board, 36” x 48” Overview: Grounded in a particular sense of place, Hank Pitcher’s paintings represent a 40-year search for an authentic vocabulary to describe life in Southern California. Pitcher was born in Pasadena, and when he was just two years old, his family relocated to the small beach town of Isla Vista, near Santa Barbara. He graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara’s College of Creative Studies program in 1971, for which he now teaches painting. In every work, Pitcher aims to compose a picture so that it seems “effortless” or even “obvious.” His works’ flattened shapes and unmodulated colors resemble the realism of Edward Hopper and the gestural qualities of David Park or Paul Wonner. In his iconic surfboard paintings, one can almost hear the echo of Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans. A major monograph on Pitcher will be published by the end of the year. Gallery: Sullivan Goss – An American Gallery 11 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara 805/730-1460, sullivangoss.com  SBADA MEMBER

14–Jul. 8 The Hunchback of Notre Dame Two of the biggest names in American musical theatre, Alan Menken (Beauty k SUMMER 2018

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SUMMER DATEBOOK and the Beast) and Stephen Schwartz (Wicked), have teamed up to deliver an emotionally sweeping score and powerful story, making Disney’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame the musical an unforgettable instant classic. | Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St, Solvang, 805/922-8313, pcpa.org.

15–17 Live Oak Music Festival Blues, jazz, bluegrass, rock, folk, gospel and Latino musicians generate three exciting days of guitar riffs and bellowing voices. | Live Oak Camp, Hwy. 154,

Edward Borein (1872 - 1945) The Bell Mare, c. 1930 Etching and Drypoint on Paper, 10” x 11-7/8”

Gallery: James Main Fine Art 27 E. De la Guerra St., Santa Barbara 805/962-8347, jamesmainfineart.com

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805/969-4726, musicacademy.org.

17–22

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1111 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Santa Barbara, 805/568-1516, sbwriters.com.

Overview: Born and raised in San Leandro, CA, Edward Borein became one of the most popular artists in Western painting. At the age of 17, Borein worked on a ranch near Oakland, then drifted and sketched as a working cowboy throughout the Southwest and Mexico. At age 19, he attended the San Francisco Art Institute and later worked for Charles Lummis, editor of The Land of Sunshine magazine. He became close friends with Charles Russell, actor Will Rogers, Will James, Walt Disney, and President Theodore Roosevelt—all key figures of the Western aesthetic. In 1907, Borein enrolled at the Art Students League of New York, where he studied etching and perfected his watercolor technique. He and his wife moved to Santa Barbara in 1921 and built a Hopi-style home. Throughout the 1920s, Borein taught etching and watercolor at the Santa Barbara School of the Arts. He also illustrated a number of books, among them: The Pinto Horse and The Phantom Bull by Charles Perkins. Borein maintained a studio in the Oreña Adobe and in El Paseo where he produced etchings and watercolors. His works are in the permanent collections of the Santa Barbara Historical Museum and other esteemed galleries nationwide.

SBADA MEMBER

West, 1070 Fairway Rd., Santa Barbara,

Santa Barbara, liveoakfest.org.

Santa Barbara Writer’s Conference Since 1972, writers from around the world have gathered each June at the Santa Barbara Writers Conference to rub elbows with fellow storytellers, celebrate well-known authors and network with publishing professionals. Nightly speakers include Pico Iyer, Steven J. Ross, Eric Puchner, Simon Van Booy, Starshine Roshell, Janet Fitch and Dara Horn. | Hyatt Santa Barbara,

On Exhibit Now

Master Chorale in a special Community Concert of Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony under the leadership of Mosher Guest Artist Gustavo Dudamel; a Composer-in Residence program features six composers and five premieres; plus Academy Festival Orchestra concerts with Larry Rachleff, Stéphane Denève and the LSO’s Elim Chan; a new production of Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro that marks the festival debut of James Conlon; recitals by Jeremy Denk, David Fray, Simon Keenlyside, the Takács Quartet, and others; and the return of the Academy’s Classical Evolution/Revolution Conference. | Music Academy of the

18 John Butler Trio The Australian roots and jams band, John Butler Trio, enchants and endears audiences worldwide with high-energy performances that never disappoint. Join musicians as they jam out on stage at the Granada Theatre this summer. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theater, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara,

Presqu’ile Winery Presents: LED ZEPAGAIN The #1 Led Zeppelin tribute band headlines the summer concert series at Presqu’ile. Concerts at the winery combine stunning ambiance, good wine, ocean views and spectacular sunsets in an incredible venue for experiencing musical artists in an intimate setting. | 5:30 p.m., Presqu’ile Winery, 5391 Presquile Dr., Santa Maria, ticketfly.com/event/1641197led-zepagain-1-led-santa-maria/.

22–24 Summer Solstice Celebration Celebrate the longest day of the year with thousands of other locals and visitors at the Summer Solstice Celebration festival and parade. The festival is held at Alameda Park throughout the weekend. | Noon, parade starts at State and Cota streets, concludes at Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St.,

805/ 899-2222, granadasb.org.

Santa Barbara, solsticeparade.com.

18–Aug. 12

24

Music Academy of the West Summer Festival The Music Academy of the Music Academy of the West’s 71st Annual Summer School and Festival presents 139 talented fellows and more than 70 outstanding faculty members in 200 concerts, recitals and masterclasses on its picturesque Miraflores campus and throughout Santa Barbara. Highlights include the launch of a major new partnership with the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) that sees key LSO conductors and principals in residence this summer; the Academy Festival Orchestra and the Los Angeles

Slightly Stoopid Slightly Stoopid, now in their second decade of making music, continues to manufacture an energizing and multifaceted sound that has been described as “a spiritual bath of positive party energy.” Special guests are Stick Figure and Pepper. | 5:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

28–Jul. 7 & Jul. 12–22 Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike


In Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, playwright Christopher Durang puts dysfunction to hilarious effect when three siblings reunite in the family’s Bucks County, PA, home. This giddy, Tony-winning farce on Chekhovian themes is the perfect summer tonic. | Jun. 28–Jul. 7, Marian Theatre, 800 S. College Dr., Santa Maria; Jul. 12–22, Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St, Solvang, 805/922-8313, pcpa.org.

30 Santa Barbara Food and Wine Festival Swirl, sip and savor wines from more than 50 Central Coast premier wineries, complemented with savory and sweet edibles in the beautiful setting of Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. This is the original Santa Barbara County wine festival, and a not-to-be missed event for locals and visitors alike. | 2–5 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta Del Sol, Santa Barbara, 805/682-4711 ext. 181, sbnature.org.

July t

4 Fourth of July Parade Find unity and community in all things patriotic at the annual Fourth of July parade. The parade begins at Micheltorena and State Streets, concluding at Cota Street. | 1 p.m., State Street, Santa Barbara,

11 East Anapamu St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 730-1460

www.sullivangoss.com

805/284-5245.

4 Stearns Wharf July 4th Celebration Stearns Wharf celebrates Independence Day with the best view of the annual fireworks show. The Wharf offers many attractions including live music, face painting, festive treats, arts and crafts, wine tasting, palm reading, harbor tours and more. | 11 a.m. –10 p.m., Stearns Wharf, Santa Barbara, 805/564-5530, stearnswharf.org.

4 Fourth of July Fireworks After the parade, bring a picnic blanket and set up for a fun day at the beach, complete with food and beverage vendors, musical entertainment and, after the sun sets, a brilliant firework show. | 9 p.m., Cabrillo Boulevard at West Beach, Santa Barbara, 805/963-1873.

6–Aug. 24 UCSB Arts & Lectures Summer Film Series See a different free film each week this summer with the UCSB Arts & Lectures Film Series. This year’s series highlights animation and includes films like The Triplets of Belleville, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Ratatouille, The Iron Giant and more. | 7:30 p.m., Wednesdays at UCSB Campbell Hall, Building 538, Mesa Rd.; Fridays at Santa Barbara County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

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SUMMER DATEBOOK

8 Lotusfest! LotusFest is a celebration of the spectacular lotus flower. July is peak blooming season, and guests have the opportunity to view these beautiful flowers while enjoying wine tastings from Santa Barbara County’s premier vintners, craft beer, delectable hors d’oeuvres, live music and more. | 2 p.m., Ganna Walska Lotusland, 695 Ashley Rd., Montecito, 805/969-3767 ext. 109, lotusland.org.

Jul. 14 Presqu’ile Winery Presents: Journey Unauthorized Journey Unauthorized is an international pro-concert tribute show that provides an amazing rendition of the 1980s Journey. | 5:30 p.m., Presqu’ile Winery, 5391 Presquile Dr., Santa Maria, ticketfly.com/event/1684512-journeyunauthorized-1-santa-maria/.

On Exhibit Now

14–15

Thomas Lorraine Hunt (1882-1938) Fishing Boats in Harbor, c. 1930 Framed Oil on Canvas, 20” x 24” Overview: Thomas L. Hunt was born in London, Ontario, Canada. His father is artist John Powell Hunt, with whom he studied. Early in his life he moved to the U.S. where he studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, but continued to work in construction, and only paint part time.  He moved to California in 1924, and built a studio in Laguna Beach, where he taught, and exhibited his paintings. He was a founding member of the Laguna Beach Museum.  Hunt specialized in painting harbor scenes, landscapes, and coastal views up and down the California coastline, using bold bright colors and a modern technique. His paintings are in the collections of Bowers Museum, Kansas City Museum and Orange County Museum. In addition, his work was exhibited widely, including at California State Fair, 1923 (1st prize); Penn Academy of Fine Arts, 1924; San Francisco Art Association, 1924, 1927; Painters of the West (Los Angeles), 1925; Painters & Sculptors of Los Angeles, 1926; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1927; Laguna Beach Art Association, 1927-1935 (1st prizes); California Art Club, 1932-1933; Pasadena Art Institute, 1933 (award); and San Diego Fine Art Guild, 1933 (prize). Gallery: Stewart Fine Art 215 W. Mission St., Santa Barbara 805/845-0255, dianestewartfineart.com

SBADA MEMBER

Santa Barbara French Festival The French Festival returns for its 30th year with delicious Parisian delicacies, beaucoup de breads and pastries, an array of other French cuisine and wine, live performances, international jazz, classical French music and much more. | 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Oak Park, 300 W. Alamar Ave., Santa Barbara, 805/963-8198, frenchfestival.com.

18–21 & 27– Aug. 26

SBSEASONS.COM

http://californiawinefestival.com.

21 The Marriage of Figaro Music Academy fellows perform and Giuseppe Mentuccia conducts Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro with piano. | 1 p.m., Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd., Santa Barbara, 805/969-4726, musicacademy.org.

28 Lotusland Celebrates: 25 Years! Lotusland’s signature event, Lotusland Celebrates: 25 years!, the annual fundraising gala, is one of the hottest tickets of Santa Barbara’s summer social scene and is always a sold-out affair. | 3:30–8 p.m., Ganna Walska Lotusland, 695 Ashley Rd., Montecito, 805/969-3767 ext. 109, lotusland.org.

28–29 Santa Barbara Greek Festival Indulge in baklava, gyros and moussaka to your heart’s content at this delicious annual event showcasing the best bounty of Greece and the sights, sounds and tastes of the Mediterranean land. | 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Oak Park, 300 W. Alamar Ave., Santa Barbara, 805/9638198, santabarbaragreekfestival.org.

August 1 Conor Hanick Pianist Conor Hanick is one of his generation’s most inquisitive interpreters of music, both old and new. With a unique adeptness for contemporary music, Hanick’s interpretations demonstrate a technical refinement, color, crispness and articulation that benefit works by any master. | 7:30 p.m., Music

Mamma Mia! The sunny and funny Mamma Mia! spins and sparkles into the ultimate feel-good smash hit musical for summer. Past and present collide under Mediterranean breezes as the charm and energy of ABBA’s songs propel this enchanting tale of love and family. | Jul. 18-21, Marian Theatre, 800 S.

Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway

College Dr., Santa Maria; Jul. 27-Aug.

Rd., Santa Barbara, 805/969-4726,

26, Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd

musicacademy.org.

St, Solvang, 805/922-8313, pcpa.org.

19–21 California Wine Festival Sample pours of hundreds of California’s finest vintage–some entirely new, some old favorites– while enjoying gourmet appetizers, live music and an ocean view at the 15th annual California Wine Festival. | 6:30–9 p.m., various locations around Santa Barbara,

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800/936-3126,

1–Aug. 5 94th Annual Old Spanish Days Fiesta This year’s theme for the annual Old Spanish Days festivities is “Celebra Nuestras Tradiciones” (Celebrate Traditions), chosen by Denise Sanford, La Presidenta 2018. A celebration of Santa Barbara’s unique history and culture, Fiesta brings locals and tourists alike to the streets of Santa Barbara for traditional Spanish and Mexican-


American foods at the Mercados. Listening to live music and enjoying vibrant dance performances–plus all entertainment is free! Favorite Fiesta traditions include a rodeo, El Desfile Des Los Ninos (children’s parade) and El Desfile Historica (historical parade), as well as Los Noches de Ronda (Nights of Gaiety) held in the Sunken Gardens at the beautiful Santa Barbara County Courthouse. | Various locations around Santa

Academy presents a special Community Concert, at which trailblazing conductor Gustavo Dudamel leads the Los Angeles Master Chorale and the Academy Festival Orchestra in Mahler’s Symphony No. 2, the “Resurrection.” Music Academy of the West offers its community the symphony’s redemptive message of hope, as expressed by more than 200 musicians live at the Santa Barbara Bowl. | 7 p.m. Santa Barbara Bowl,

Barbara, oldspanishdaysfiesta.org.

1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, musicacademy.org.

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Jackson Browne Singer-songwriter Jackson Browne performs with his long time band mates Bob Glaub (bass), Mauricio Lewak (drums), Val McCallum (guitar), Alethea Mills (Vocals), Chavonne Stewart (vocals), Jeff Young (keyboards), and the acclaimed multi-instrumentalist Greg Leisz (guitar, lap steel, pedal steel). | 7 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

Steve Miller Band & Peter Frampton The iconic Steve Miller Band has been performing inspired versions of Miller’s incomparable songbook to legions of fans across the globe for 50 years. This year, Miller aficionados are regaled not only with powerful sets from both the Steve Miller Band and Peter Frampton’s band, but also by the highlight of Miller bringing Frampton onstage mid-set to create some of the most compelling jamming of the season. | 6:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N.

4

Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

Festival Gala Concert The Music Academy’s annual benefit concert, the Festival Gala, offers a celebration of distinguished alumni artists. Anchored by the Academy Chamber Orchestra under Nicholas McGegan, this year’s edition features alumni soprano Brenda Rae, bass-baritone Brandon Cedel, violinist Frank Huang, violist Cynthia Phelps and pianist Micah McLaurin in a program ranging from Baroque to Broadway. Guests will dine al fresco in the Academy’s gorgeous grounds prior to the concert in Hahn Hall. Proceeds from the gala benefit the Academy’s full-scholarship program. | 4:30 - 7:30 p.m., Music Academy of the

16–25 & 30–Sep. 9

West, 1070 Fairway Rd., Santa Barbara, 805/969-4726, musicacademy.org.

6

Arcadia Arcadia is a romantic mystery set in the elegant Coverly estate that takes place in both 1809 and the present. Tom Stoppard’s brilliant play traverses the centuries, exploring the nature

of truth and time and the difference between Classical and Romantic temperaments. | Aug. 16-25, Marian Theatre, 800 S. College Dr. Santa Maria; Aug. 30-Sep. 9, Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St, Solvang, 805/922-8313, pcpa.org.

19 Jack White Boarding House Reach sees Jack White expanding his musical palate with perhaps his most ambitious work thus far, a collection of songs that are simultaneously timeless and modern. The album explores a remarkable range of sonic terrain—crunching rock ‘n’ roll, electro and hard funk, proto punk, hip hop, gospel blues, and even country—all remapped and born anew to fit White’s matchless vision and sense of restless experimentation. | 7 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

24 David Byrne David Byrne performs with a 12-piece band for a choreographed concert that he calls, “the most ambitious show I’ve done since the shows that were filmed for Stop Making Sense.” | 7 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

STEWART FINE ART

David Fray David Fray thrills audiences worldwide as a recitalist, soloist and chamber musician. Fray made his United States debut in 2009 with The Cleveland Orchestra, which was followed by performances with the Boston Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. | 7:30 p.m. Music Academy of

Established 1986 Diane Warren Stewart

the West, 1070 Fairway Rd., Santa Barbara, 805/9694726, musicacademy.org.

Open from 11 to 5:30, closed Thursday and Sunday, available by appointment.

8 Bon Iver Grammy winning American indie folk band Bon Iver comes to town, performing a mix of old and new songs under the stars. | Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

11 Community Concert When Santa Barbara suffered successive disasters this winter, the local response was prompt, effective, and heartwarming. To honor this achievement, the Music

215 W. MISSION STREE T WILLIAM G. PURVIS (1870-1924) SANTA BARBAR A, CIRCA 1920 FR AMED OIL ON BOARD 12” HIGH X 14” WIDE

SANTA BARBAR A, CA 9 3101 805-8 45-0255 PARKING IN BACK

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SUMMER DATEBOOK

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY EVENTS June

and Paella Festival. | 2-5 p.m., Templeton Community Park, 550 Crocker St., Templeton, pinotandpaella.com.

2 Margarita Taco Festival Quench your thirst with a variety of Margarita tastings and Lagunitas beer, and satisfy your tummy with mouth-watering tacos at the Margarita Taco Festival in San Luis Obispo. The festival benefits the Welcome Home Soldier Foundation, which provides sleeping bags to homeless Veterans. | Noon-5 p.m., El Chorro Regional Park, Hwy. 1, San Luis Obispo, whsfnow.org.

3 Pinot and Paella Festival Join the Paso Robles pinot producers and talented local chefs for an afternoon of great wine, creative Paella dishes, and the live dance-inducing Latin guitar fusion beats of Incendio at the annual Pinot

8-Jul. 2 Annie Leapin’ Lizards! The world’s most-beloved musical, Annie, is the fabulous finale for the inaugural season of SLO REP! | San Luis Obispo Repertory Theatre, 888 Morro St., San Luis Obispo, 805/786-2440, slorep.org.

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7th Annual Mac and Cheese Festival Enjoy a variety of mac and cheeses, wine, beer and spirits, plus live music and breathtaking scenery at the 7th annual Macaroni and Cheese Festival. Proceeds go to Woods Humane Society. | 2-6 p.m., Avila Beach Golf Resort, 6464 Ana Bay Rd, Avila Beach, americangeneralmedia.com.

21-23 28th Annual Roll out the Barrels Kick off the summer in San Luis Obispo’s Wine Country at the 28th Annual Roll Out the Barrels Weekend. Your getaway to this coastal wine mecca begins Thursday at Barrels in the Plaza, with more than 50 wineries and local chefs dishing out delicious food and wine. Then on Friday and Saturday, sip your way through San Luis Obispo tasting rooms with the Passport to Wine Country. | Various locations around San Luis Obispo, slowine.com.

23 Atascadero Lakeside Wine Festival Enjoy wine, beer and cider tastings featuring Central Coast wineries, breweries and ciders, art and culinary vendors. VIP entrance also includes early entrance, a wine-tasting class and custom food pairing. | 4–8 p.m., Atascadero Lake Park, Atascadero, 805/466-2044, atascaderochamber.org/wine-festival.

23-24 Seven Sisters Quilt Show The Seven Sisters Quilt Show is a volunteer show comprising six quilt guilds from the Central Coast. Features a display of hundreds of quilts and garments. | 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd., San Luis Obispo, 805/543-3000, madonnainn.com.

29-Aug. 19 Flora and Fauna: Beth Van Hoesen Prints Staff at the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art (SLOMA) often remark, “Every day can be like Christmas morning” because gifts to SLOMA have a way of coming at random times, from unexpected places, by previously unknown benefactors. “It’s a kind of magic—making it fun to answer the phone and open the mail,” laughs Ruta Saliklis, curator and director of exhibitions. One such morning happened in November 2016. Out of the blue, an executor of the E. Mark Adams and Beth Van Hoesen Adams Trust sent an email offering SLOMA a selection of Beth Van Hoesen prints and drawings as a donation. This is the first opportunity to view the artwork gifted to SLOMA almost two years ago. Beth Van Hoesen (1926–2010) was a major figure in 20th century printmaking, and a masterful draftsman and close observer of nature. Van Hoesen’s soft-spoken but evocative imagery received vast critical acclaim, with some of her most beloved drawings and prints featuring animals. | San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo, sloma.org.

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PLEIN AIR BY GUDRUN BORTMAN

July 4

Paso Pops Enjoy live music, family-friendly activities and fireworks at the annual Paderewski Festival-sponsored patriotic concert and Independence Day celebration. The San Luis Obispo Symphony and Youth Symphony members perform a patriotic “Pops” program with a fireworks finale. Young families enjoy interactive arts, games, painting activities and new kiddie rides. Purchase culinary fare from various food trucks and vendors. Cass Winery wines and Firestone Walker Brewing Company are also be available for purchase. | 4–10 p.m., Paso Robles Event Center, 2198 Riverside Ave., Paso Robles, 805/239-0873, paderewskifest.com.

12-15 & 26-28 Central Coast Shakespeare Festival: As You Like It Full of love, lust, cross-dressing and debauchery, As You Like it is one of William Shakespeare’s most romantic comedies. Flee into the forest of Arden and witness Rosalind disguise herself as a man and delight in the hilarity that ensues. Enjoy food from Beda’s Biergarten or Piemonte’s Deli and wine from Filipponi Ranch Cellars. Each Friday evening performance also features live music before the show. | 7:30 p.m., Filipponi Ranch, 1850 Calle Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, 805/9033567, centralcoastshakespeare.org.

17-29 Festival Mozaic Music Director Scott Yoo leads a group of more than 50 visiting artists gathered from top orchestras and chamber ensembles from the U.S. and abroad in curated performances in scenic venues all over San Luis Obispo County. Yoo, conductor and violinist, also serves as Artistic Director of the Mexico City Philharmonic and the host of a PBS travel/music show in development called Now Hear This. Yoo curates and

designs the festival’s programming, which this year focuses on the theme “Music Without Borders,” with an in-depth examination of composers who wrote music away from their native countries. The Festival’s programming is made up of 30 events in 19 different venues. The music of Mozart, Bach and Beethoven will be played alongside Vivaldi, Mendelssohn, Elgar, and many more. Listeners can also enjoy Barber, Jennifer Higdon, Guillaume Connesson, and a host of other musical masters in charismatic venues such as Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, Serra Chapel in wine country, and the state-of-the-art Cuesta College Cultural and Performing Arts Center and more. | Various venues in San Luis Obispo

A robin-egg sky spans the indigo sea, the islands a smudge blocking the view to beyond. A pod of blue whales ploughs the channel. Jacarandas’ last livid blooms speckle the sidewalks. Bougainvillea riots the walls. After day’s relentless sun, evening’s soft light sifts through the strong-limbed oaks. Blue shadows the rim of my meadow. A feathering breeze. Strands of bright lanterns, veridian, saffron and cobalt, a burble of voices, the clack of bocce at summer’s feast nights.

County, 805/781-3009, 877/881-8899, festivalmozaic.com.

19-21 & Aug. 2-4 Central Coast Shakespeare Festival: The Three Musketeers The Three Musketeers is an actionpacked, timeless tale of love, honor and friendship. This adaptation promises to deliver plenty of swordplay, romance and perhaps a food fight or two! Enjoy food from Beda’s Biergarten or Piemonte’s Deli and wine from Filipponi Ranch Cellars. Each Friday evening performance will also feature live music before the show. | 7:30 p.m., Filipponi Ranch, 1850 Calle Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, 805/9033567, centralcoastshakespeare.org.

August 4

Harmony Wine and Beer Festival Grab a glass and taste your way through the tiny town of Harmony! Enjoy SLO County’s finest wines and craft brews, grab a snack from a local food truck and groove to live music by Bear Market Riot, with proceeds benefitting Cambria-based nonprofit Infant Essentials. | 1- 4 p.m., 2177 Old Creamery Rd., Harmony, harmonycellars.com.

But there is this too— craving for rain as the earth hardens, the lush grasses of spring flatten to ochre, thirst for a cloud-burst to break the monotony of months’ cerulean air.

20 Craft in America: Landscape The San Luis Obispo Museum of Art recognizes that film is a visual art form and presents a series of outstanding documentaries inspired by its current exhibitions. Films screen the third Monday of each month. This installment looks at the sublime and complex relationship between craft artists and their environment. The work these artists create often embodies the power, beauty and fragility of the natural world. Landscape highlights artists Jan Yager, Kit Carson, Arroyo Grande artist David Gurney, Richard Notkin, George Nakashima and Mira Nakashima. Their art is both a reflection of and commentary on the environment in which they live. This film is shown in

conjunction with the exhibition Earth, Fire, Water featuring artworks from the Museum’s Craftmakers group and on view in the McMeen Gallery Aug. 3–Sep. 30. | 7 p.m. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo, sloma.org.

21 Brandi Carlile American folk and Americana singer Brandi Carlile tours in support of her new album, By the Way, I Forgive You. Carlile says of her style, “I’ve gone through all sorts of vocal phases, from pop to blues to R&B, but no matter what I do, I just can’t get the country and western out of my voice.” | 7 p.m., Fremont Theater, 1035 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo, fremontslo.com.

SUMMER 2018

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FIRST PERSON

with Vince Shay

BY CHUCK GR AHA M

BEFORE PHOTOGR APHER and kayak guide Vince Shay and I paddled out to a pod of lunge feeding humpback whales, we walked out the front door of Shay’s home in Shell Beach along the Central California Coast. The early morning view, where the Pacific Ocean opens up to the south across to Pismo Beach, all the way to Point Sal, was stunning. “Oh, there they are right there,” says an ebullient Shay, pointing to a pod of hungry humpbacks. “See the bait ball at least a mile out? They’re feeding right now.” We jumped in Shay’s truck and quickly drove down to the bluff and wrestled two kayaks down to the craggy shoreline. We each had camera gear, and if you’re on

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Instagram, Shay (@vincentshayphotography) has some of the best images of humpbacks taken from a kayak I’ve ever seen. After we paddled about two miles off the coast in a pesky east wind, we saw that the bait ball of fish was hopping with energy, rippling in dark, cobalt blue water. In hot pursuit was the local food chain—a procession of harbor porpoises, California sea lions, black-vented shearwaters and Heermann’s gulls. Reaping the biggest benefits, however, were five humpback whales. Several hundred tons of Cetacea circled us in a broad circumference of tail flukes and rainbow-filled spouts. “They’re coming back around again,” hollers Shay, who works with Canon

cameras and lenses. “It will go quiet, and then they always come back. You just have to show some patience.” Shay would certainly know. He and his wife, Emily, have owned Avila Beach Paddlesports (3915 Avila Beach Dr., Avila Beach, 805/704-6902, avilabeachpaddlesports.com) since 2010. The humpbacks first arrived in local waters in 2012, but the animated marine mammals went on hiatus for two years before returning in greater numbers in 2015 and 2016, splitting time between Avila and Pismo Beach. Shay is a long-time, award-winning photographer. Today his shop doubles as a gallery, filled with some of Shay’s best imagery of marine mammals captured from the seat of

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: VINCENT SHAY (2); PHOTO OF VINCE SHAY BY CHUCK GRAHAM

Getting Over the Hump


his kayak. Surprisingly, he didn’t take a single shot of the four humpbacks that fed just 50 feet from the Avila Pier in 2012. However, since the summer of 2015, when 17 humpbacks fed just 50 yards from shore, Shay has spent countless hours photographing these animated whales. “I truly believe these animals are intelligent enough to know exactly where a boat or a kayaker is,” he says. That’s not to say Shay hasn’t had his fair share of close encounters. He’s had humpbacks so close he could touch them, even smell them. He recalled one memorable encounter where a school of anchovies rose beneath his boat. He had only a few seconds to put his gear away. “I drew my feet in and my lens,” says Shay. “I got ready for impact because I knew the whale was going to lunge feed really close to me. It did! I could have touched it! It wasn’t as violent as it seems. The feeding is relatively gentle, creating a vortex of water down and not out.”

Shay considered using a motorboat to approach the humpbacks to get his shots, but he opted for more intimate encounters from a kayak. Keeping the Marine Mammal Protection Act in mind, he opted not to pursue humpbacks; Shay doesn’t want to alter their behavior, so he sits and waits, letting patience be his guide. He studies the wildlife and their tendencies when a bait ball develops. It’s a strategy already familiar to Shay from his time leading beginning paddlers on sit-on-top-kayak tours, where encounters are frequent with

harbor seals, sea lions, southern sea otters and dolphins just north of the Avila Pier. “I look for signs,” says Shay, who is also an excellent standup paddler. “It’s all about the bait and the birds for me. I stay in one central location and hope to get lucky. The biggest challenge is being in the right place at the right time.” Then, without warning, the lunge feeding commenced and several humpbacks exploded out of the water simultaneously. All I could hear was our shutters going off. Then it was silent again and the ocean was calm. 

S U M M ER 2018

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LEGACIES

MOXI

MOXI Marks Leap Into Year Two With New CEO, Expanded Programs BY LESLIE DINABERG

MOXI is located at 125 State Street adjacent to the popular Funk Zone neighborhood and just two blocks up from Stearns Wharf and the beach. The building was designed by the late Barry Berkus and AB Design Studio, and is LEED Gold Certified.

first year for MOXI … and we’ve just gotten started,” says Robin Gose, president and CEO. Gose began her tenure at MOXI late last year, after serving as director of education at the Thinkery in Austin, TX, where she oversaw all programming, exhibits and facilities at what was once Austin Children’s Museum. MOXI’s attendance its first year has far exceeded expectations (175,000 guests versus approximately 120,000 estimated) and Gose says, “Attendance continues to be strong. The feedback that we’re hearing from members of the community, from donors, from tourists that come up, is that everybody is really excited by what they see at the museum.” MOXI specializes in STEAM (ScienceTechnology-Engineering-Art-Math) learning through interactive experiences outside the traditional classroom environment. Because of the interactive elements, and individual children’s continued growth and development, MOXI is designed so that it will be different each time you visit, with new challenges to solve and new discoveries to uncover throughout the 17,000 square-feet of interactive exhibits across three floors (including an incredible 360 degree view rooftop). The award winning, LEED gold certified

building—which had the design challenge of fitting into the Spanish style neighborhood while creating both a high tech and kid-friendly vibe and was designed by the late Barry Berkus + AB Design Studio—has played an important role in the revitalization of lower State Street as a destination for both tourists and locals. “We have about 75% local, and 25% nonlocal visitors,” says Gose, adding that school visits include many students from Santa Barbara County, as well as Ventura County, San Luis Obispo County and beyond. Last year, 10,000 school children visited MOXI on field trips, and nearly 50% were from Title I schools. Adults are also big fans of the venue. MOXI’s quarterly Afterparty events have all been sell-out affairs, and include live entertainment, demonstrations, games and local food and cocktails. Also popular are the popup Twilight Time evening hours for guests 18 and up who want to explore the museum kids-free. These are advertised primarily via social media, Gose says. The theme for 2018 is “Making,” with monthly spotlights on subjects like cardboard engineering and digital creativity. These themes extend to summer camp

“IT HAS BEEN A REALLY INCREDIBLE

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activities, as well as new weekly projects in the Innovation Workshop makerspace. Also new are an exhibit design partnership with the Dos Pueblos High School Engineering Academy and Toddler Tuesdays, a volunteerrun program where the youngest guests can have special story time and other activities and explore the exhibits without visiting school groups onsite. With 44 full and part-time staff and nearly 100 volunteers, ranging in age from 13 to 75 years old, MOXI has quickly become an important part of the community. In fact, earlier this year the museum provided alternative classroom space to Montecito students and teachers displaced by disaster and opened its doors free of charge to Thomas Fire and Montecito mudflow evacuees as well as first responders and their families. Upcoming fundraising events for the nonprofit museum include an intimate rooftop concert with Jackson Browne on August 10 and the annual gala fundraiser MOXI@Night on September 22. For information or to purchase tickets, email development@moxi.org or call 805/770-5003.  MOXI , 125 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/770-5000, moxi.org.

PHOTO: JASON RICK

THE WOLF MUSEUM OF EXPLORATION + INNOVATION


Photo: Nell Campbell

Education is the first step. The SBCC Promise removes financial barriers to ensure that all local high school graduates have access to an outstanding and affordable education at Santa Barbara City College.

Your gift makes the SBCC Promise possible.

sbccpromise.org | (805) 730- 4416


T E R C E SSANTA BARBARA


BY NANCY RANSOHOFF

It’s no secret that Santa Barbara County is a dream of a destination, with spectacular scenery and weather, a rich history and culture, beautiful architecture and award-winning wine and cuisine. But here we offer a dozen lesser known places and things to do that may not be on the top of the guidebook list. You know, like those insider tips from your cool, in-the-know local friend.

KNAPP’S CASTLE view-seekers have meandered off the beaten path in the Santa Ynez Mountains above Santa Barbara to what’s known as Knapp’s Castle, the stone ruins of a palatial hunting lodge originally built around 1916 and later destroyed by fire. The mansion was built for George Knapp, cofounder of Union Carbide, and what remains are sandstone foundations, fireplace pillars and partial walls of the original seven structures. The ridge-top site’s panoramic views of Lake Cachuma, the Santa Ynez Valley and the Santa Ynez and San Rafael mountain ranges are

spectacular, especially at sunset. The ruins are on a private carve-out within the Los Padres National Forest and although no restrictions have been placed on the area in the past, the owner has the right to close public access at any time. So pay attention to all posted signs and be a respectful non-litterbug visitor. The kid-friendly walk to the ruins and back is about 0.9-mile with about 50 feet of elevation gain. To get to the trailhead, take Highway 154 west for 10 miles. Turn right on East Camino Cielo and drive three miles east to a small turnout on the right opposite a gated dirt road on the left, which is the trailhead.

SSSHHH…

PHOTO: HERMAN AU PHOTOGRAPHY

FOR DECADES, history buffs, photographers and

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CONDOR EXPRESS

GETTING OUT ON THE SPARKLING PACIFIC along Santa Barbara’s spectacular

coastline is a must. One of the best ways to go is on the Condor Express (condorexpress.com), a beautifully appointed high-speed catamaran. The state-of-the-art boat boasts a smooth ride and a friendly, knowledgeable crew, and offers whale watching, Channel Islands excursions, dinner cruises, party cruises and private charters. The Santa Barbara Channel is home to more than 30 species of whales, dolphins and seals and sea lions that visit throughout the year, making these waters among the best anywhere to view a variety of marine mammals. Check condorexpress.com for updated whale watch reports. Get close to the action and snag a seat on the upper sundeck for unobstructed animal viewing and sightseeing.

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PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, BOB PERRY, COURTESY CONDOR EXPRESS (2); OPPOSITE, ALEXANDRA FRACCHIA, COURTESY CAT HOUSE (2)

RA SECRET SANTA BARBA


EL THE CAT HOUSE HOT NOW IN ITS 18TH YEAR, The Cat House Hotel in downtown Santa Barbara (cathousehotel.com) is the go-to place for locals who wouldn’t think of boarding their feline friends anywhere else. They know that Fluffy will be well cared for by a kind, knowledgeable staff of mostly UCSB science students who go the extra mile to make sure each kitty has a purrfect experience. The feline-exclusive boutique hotel specializes in extended stays and premium care for special-needs cats, including those with diabetes or mobility challenges. Special services from baths with all-natural products and brushing to nail clipping are available for an additional charge. There is even a kitty chauffeur for transportation to and from the veterinarian. Fresh catnip, room service and loving attention are free. 

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N R E V A T G N I R P S D COL

FOR A STEP BACK IN TIME, take a 15-minute drive from Santa Barbara on San Marcos Pass (Highway 154) and turn off on Stagecoach Road for a one-mile oak-draped drive into the mountains and the rustic Cold Spring Tavern (coldspringtavern.com). Established as a stagecoach stop in 1886, this is a popular spot on weekend afternoons as folks enjoy barbecued tri-tip sandwiches and live music under the oaks. Or sit in romantic wood-paneled rooms near one of four stone fireplaces and dine by lamplight. The tavern is famous for its Texas-style chili but you’ll find other hearty fare including a buffalo burger and charbroiled venison steak, along with breakfast on the weekends. You won’t see any stagecoaches, but motorcyclists from far and wide converge on weekends.

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PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, CHUCK PLACE. OPPOSITE, COURTESY CLOUD 9 GLIDER RIDES (3)

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GLIDING AT THEORT P R I A Z E N Y A T N A S GET A HAWK-EYE VIEW of the Central Coast, from the beaches

of Santa Barbara to the vineyards of the Santa Ynez Valley. Cloud Nine Glider Rides (cloud9gliderrides.com) offers several options for silent soaring. The Scenic Flight Tour takes you to 2,500 feet above sea level with views of rolling vineyards, Lake Cachuma and Solvang. The Mountain Adventure Tour provides views of Rancho del Cielo (the Reagan Ranch), Pacific Ocean, some of the Channel Islands and the entire Santa Ynez Valley. Panoramas of the Central Coast, including the Channel Islands, Santa Barbara, UCSB and Point Conception are highlights of the Mile High Tour. Take your pick for the 50-minute Star Tour: Michael Jackson’s Neverland Ranch plus views of the San Rafael Mountains, or the Santa Barbara Harbor and the bluffs of Montecito.

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S D N I F G N I N I D E FIN

A second secret is THE CLUB & GUEST HOUSE AT UCSB (theclub.ucsb.edu), a fine-dining restaurant that serves lunch with lovely views of the UCSB lagoon. The made-from-scratch seasonal menu offers a diverse array of farm-to-table dishes, including vegetarian, gluten-free and vegan options.

Above: Chef Charles Fredericks and SBCC Culinary Arts Students. Left: A salmon dish from The Club & Guest House at UCSB.

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PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, TOP-BOTTOM, CHUCK PLACE, TONY MASTRES; OPPOSITE: COURTESY JALAMA BEACH STORE (2), COURTESY VISIT LOMPOC

THE JOHN DUNN GOURMET DINING ROOM AT SANTA BARBARA CITY COLLEGE

(sbcc.edu) is one of the best-kept culinary secrets and dining deals in town. The restaurant, perched high above Santa Barbara Harbor on the college’s main campus, offers fine luncheons and four-course dinners (check schedule online; reservations are strongly recommended) prepared and served by students in the nationally recognized Culinary Arts program. The dinner courses are expertly paired with wine.


S R E G R U B D N A H C A JALAMA BE EVEN THOUGH IT’S ONLY AN HOUR’S DRIVE north of Santa Barbara, you’ll feel

worlds away at this remote sandy stretch, part of Jalama Beach County Park (countyofsb.org) in Lompoc. The often windy Jalama Beach, tucked in between points Conception and Arguello, exudes a quintessentially Californian wild beauty. Outdoorsy folks head here for beach walks, surfing, windsailing, whale watching, bird watching, nature photography and fishing the surf or rock outcroppings. The spot is also popular with campers, who stock up on supplies at the Jalama Beach Store. And visitors from all over the planet swear by the Jalama Grill’s World Famous Jalama Burger. For more than 35 years, they’ve flocked here for the simple but supremely satisfying stack of lean beef, fresh-cut veggies and pickle chips slathered with secret sauce. 


Coastal

Histories

Morro Bay, Cayucos and Cambria

BY CHERYL CRABTREE

Think all things historical are ho hum?

N

ot along San Luis Obispo County’s north coast, where signs of history greet you at every glance. What’s the story behind Morro Rock, Cayucos Pier and Leffingwell Landing? What’s with all the cows grazing on grassy slopes above the sea? And why are there so many old buildings along the main streets of towns, looking as if their walls could talk? The walls, as well as the beaches, bays and boardwalks, do have many tales to tell. But many visitors (and some residents) pass by the sights without knowing the fascinating backstories that accompany them. To enlighten you and thus enhance your experiences, we give you this abridged version of the histories of Morro Bay, Cayucos and Cambria.

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Alma, a tugboat based in Morro Bay, rescued nearly 30 crew members of the SS Montebello, which was torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine in 1941.

The San Diego Maritime Museum’s replica of San Salvador, sailed by Juan Rodrigues Cabrillo in 1542, welcomed visitors in Morro Bay’s harbor in October 2016 as part of the Pacific Heritage Tour.


PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, COURTESY LARRY NEWLAND, MORRO BAY MARITIME MUSEUM; JUDY SALAMACHA; JUDY ANN CROSS

Morro Bay The tales begin with the area’s most unusual natural setting—the dramatic geography of Morro Bay. About 23 million years ago, a chain of nine volcanic plugs rose from the earth, stretching from the mountains to the sea. The last in the string of peaks was perched at the edge of a natural estuary, protected by a long sandbar. The massive monolith dominates the landscape to this day, serving as an important navigational reference point for everyone traveling within visual range. The earliest coastal residents include the Salinan and Chumash Indian tribes, who lived in the region for thousands of years. They built sturdy canoes and traveled up and down the coast, fishing and harvesting abalone and other seafood. When Juan Rodrigues Cabrillo sailed by in 1542, he named the monolith “El Morro,” as it resembled the headdress of the Moors who invaded Spain. Morro Rock, as it’s now known, later became a landfall for Spanish galleons. (It was an island at high tide but connected to land at low tide.) During the mission era from the late 1700s to 1820s, Spanish soldiers and settlers hunted,

fished and farmed in the region. When the missions were secularized in the 1830s, much of the coastal land was divided into vast Mexican land grants—where ranchers raised cattle for hide and tallow trade. Later, the land was parceled off into somewhat smaller (but still relatively large) ranches, devoted first to dairy and later to beef production. In the mid-1800s, Morro Bay’s harbor was a busy one. Nearly everyone owned at least a rowboat, if not a larger vessel, as locals preferred to travel up and down the coast by boat rather than stagecoaches, which were sometimes robbed. Local life centered around the waterfront Embarcadero, where boats moored and fish, seafood and other wares were loaded and unloaded, bought and sold. Starting in the late 1800s, people began to quarry the sides of Morro Rock to get material to build breakwaters at nearby ports. In 1933 the WPA blasted Morro Rock to build a jetty to connect it to the mainland. This closed the north entrance to the harbor, leaving a southern entry point to the estuary on the south side of the rock. The WPA dredged the channel and built a breakwater to protect the entrance. The Army Corps of Engineers and the Navy developed much of the harbor in the late 1930s and early 1940s. During World War II the area became a training base for Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel boats (aka Higgins

Salinan tribal members paddled out in three replica tule canoes to greet the San Salvador in September 2016.

Boats). Amphibious landing craft staged “invasions” on beaches north of Morro Rock. By the 1930s, Morro Bay had campsites and a nine-hole golf course at Morro Bay State Park. (The Morro Bay Golf Course expanded to 18 holes by 1951.) In 1939 the town counted 400 residents. Between 1930 and 1970, Morro Bay was a major hub for commercial abalone businesses. After 1970 wild abalone populations fell sharply for several reasons: overfishing, an increasing population of protected otters (they love to feast on the mollusks) and disease. Wild abalone industries are currently banned. In Cayucos, however, a few miles north of Morro Bay, The Abalone Farm produces about half the abalone sold at restaurants and shops across the nation. In 1953 PG&E broke ground on a new power plant and built three 450-foot smoke stacks, which became another set of Morro Bay icons alongside Morro Rock. A fabulous Museum of Natural History opened in 1963, and Morro Bay became an official city in 1964. Morro Rock—often called the “Gibraltar of the Pacific”—was designated a State Historical Landmark in 1968. The years of rampant quarrying had reduced its size significantly, but it still encompasses 50 acres at its base. People can walk near the rock, but no one is allowed to climb it except members of the Salinan tribe during biannual ceremonies.

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Cayucos In the 1700s, native Aleutian islanders came south to hunt otters along the coast, and the name Cayucos relates to the Spanish, Chumash and Aleut terms for kayak or canoe. John Bains arrived in the Cayucos area in 1852 and opened the first local establishment, a store on Old Creek. The 30-acre Old Creek community and stage stop soon included a post office, a general store, a saloon, an eatery and overnight lodgings. In 1867, English immigrant Captain

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Cass House, photo circa 1895. In 1876, Captain James Cass built a home for his family across from the beach, pier and warehouses.

James Cass moved to a 320-acre portion of the 8,845-acre Rancho Moro Y Cayucos land grant, about two miles north of the Old Creek settlement. According to legend, Cass was hauling goods between San Luis Obispo and San Simeon and stopped to rest at Cayucos Creek. Gazing at the ocean from his perch, Cass could easily visualize the area’s great potential as a shipping port. Cass began a shipping business at what became known as Cass’s Landing. They shipped

goods from the bay by hand-carrying the merchandise, wading out into the water guided by ropes to a small flat-bottomed vessel that Cass invented. The vessel would then carry the goods to the ship. The business thrived and in 1871, Cass built the first portion of the wharf. In 1876 he began the extension, with the help of investors, and completed it in 1877. Schooners soon switched their docking plans from Morro Bay to the Cayucos pier, just four miles north, because it was safer than


PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: COURTESY THE CAYUCOS HISTORICAL SOCIETY (2), LINDSEY HAHN, COURTESY CASS HOUSE

Above, the Cass warehouse on Butter Day, circa 1885. This area was renowned for its butter shipments, and regional farmers would bring their goods to Cayucos the day before the steamer was scheduled to arrive. Right, Cass House was completely restored in 2008 and is now an upscale bed-and-breakfast.Â

plying through treacherous surf entrances near Morro Rock. This caused a steep decline in shipping-related business in Morro Bay, but spelled fortune for the tiny town of Cayucos. In 1876 Cass and Company built a spacious warehouse to complement the three smaller buildings. That same year, Captain Cass built a residence for his family across from the pier—a home that today has been fully restored and operates as an upscale bed-andbreakfast inn.

By the early 1900s, Cayucos had about five hotels and seven saloons, four banks, a school and two churches, as well as blacksmiths, general stores and numerous other businesses. A number of these buildings still exist and line the quaint streets at the center of town. The advent of train travel in California

caused a quick decline in the shipping industry in Cayucos. James Cass lived at his home until his death in March 1917, at age 93. In the ensuing decades, tourists discovered Cayucos and began to flock there for long summer sojourns. Today the tiny, well-preserved town continues to attract scores of visitors.

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Cambria

Cambria’s history is entwined with San Simeon Bay, which was the site of a whaling station that operated in the mid1800s, just a few miles north. Settlers began to congregate along the coast a few miles south of the bay. During the Gold Rush (1848 to 1855), there was great demand for cinnabar (quicksilver, or mercury), which was used to refine gold and silver. The Bianchini family, immigrants from Italian Switzerland, opened a cinnabar mine in Cambria, which attracted numerous workers to the area. The mine closed after Gold Rush, and remained dormant until it opened to supply cinnabar for munitions during World War II. Cambria’s first resident was I. Jeremiah Johnson from Ohio, a rough-cut character who came to California during the Gold Rush but failed to strike it rich. He worked as a stockman for a judge in Adelaida, at a ranch called Dry Bones. In 1859, he left Adelaida and established a settlement by squatting at the intersection of two “major” country roads: Main and Santa Rosa. He set up a livery for donkeys, horses and other stock, which became very successful. Then he proceeded to build

several hotels and saloons using the abundant Cambria and Monterey pine trees in the vicinity. A number of other entrepreneurs planted roots during the “land rush” that came on the heels of the Gold Rush. They bought property around Santa Rosa Creek and developed and sold lots. These include Adam Leffingwell, who had a sawmill and shipped lumber from Leffingwell Landing, at the north end of Moonstone Beach. George Lull opened the first store and built what is now the oldest house in Cambria, on Main Street across from the Olallieberry Inn. The Bianchinis built a home in the village center around 1870. Today the historic residence houses Cambria’s Historical Museum. The town was established in 1866. Peter Aloysius Forrester, who taught school in San Simeon, was also a mining consultant and a mapmaker who mapped the town and helped choose its name. The area’s topography reminded him of a mining town, Cambria (the Roman name for Wales), that he fondly remembered back in Pennsylvania. Cambria was a bustling hub from 1889 through the 1890s.

PHOTO:

Cambria was the center for major celebrations on the coast, especially Swiss Independence Day in August. Many of Cambria’s early settlers came from Italian Switzerland, as well as Italy, Portugal and the Azores.

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Left, Sarah Guthrie on the porch of the home she bought in her own name with her own money. Her husband Samuel stands on the left and her sisters on the right. Right, The Guthrie/Bianchini house is now home to the Cambria Historical Society, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year as a museum this year. The society raised funds to restore and rebuild the 1870s house at the corner of Center and Burton streets. It is the town’s center for community events and historical research.

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM OPPOSITE LEFT, CAMBRIA HISTORIAL SOCIETY ARCHIVES (3), CONSUELO MACEDO

The early Monterey pines lumber industry supported Cambria and other towns during their construction. Cambria did not have a pier and was not a port, so lumber was sent out to ships from Leffingwell Landing at the far end of town.

It was the second largest town in the county, next to San Luis Obispo. It was a center of industry, social life, farming and ranching. A ranch at Harmony (today a tiny collection of enterprises, with a post office and population of 18) was the region’s main dairy center. They made butter and cheese, packed them in ice and straw, and hauled them up to Leffingwell Landing to ship to San Francisco. Thousands of people would come to Cambria for Fourth of July and other celebrations, rodeos, car races, fancy dances and other events. Hundreds joined in holiday picnics under the rare stand of Monterey pines at Phelan Ranch, in the hills above the village. A number of Chinese immigrants lived in Cambria. They settled on the present day Greenspace Preserve property located across Center Street from what currently is the Cambria Historical Museum. They farmed and harvested “sea lettuce” for sale in San Francisco and China, and were allowed to live on the property owned by the Gans family for about 40 years. There were houses, a laundry by the creek, and a red assembly hall which Greenspace has outfitted as a temple to memorialize that group

of immigrants who lived harmoniously with all the other ethnic groups who settled there. In 1889, the three-story Proctor Hotel and much of the surrounding business district burned down. This gave Cambria a major setback. Also, the new railroad was meant to travel through Cambria, promising new jobs and an influx of travelers and residents, but plans changed and the train tracks went through inland San Miguel instead. Scores of residents left Cambria to seek work elsewhere. While Cambria no longer served as a major hub, it maintained its strong spirit of community and continued to provide plenty of opportunity for ranchers, farmers and other business people. Its rich history, quaint downtown, abundant pine forests and stunning coastal scenery also began to attract tourists and those seeking peaceful respite from busy urban centers—a trend that continues today. The town’s name has always been pronounced CAM-bria. But in 1928 the Cambria Pines Development Company began to subdivide areas in the hills west of the main village. When they advertised the lot sales on the radio, they used an incorrect pronunciation of the

town: CAME-bria. This has caused confusion among visitors ever since. The late local historian Paul Squibb advised, “Say CAM-bria as in Camelot, not CAME-bria as in came and went.” Quiet Cambria became a major international news item in 1941. Just two weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the SS Montebello was heading up the coast to San Francisco. A Japanese submarine torpedoed the ship, which sank offshore near Cambria. A nearby tugboat, the Alma, chugged at full speed to rescue the 28 or so crewmembers that were ducking Japanese artillery while floating in lifeboats. The Alma is on view in the Morro Bay waterfront, next to the new Maritime Museum (scheduled to open in fall 2018). For a deeper dive into local history, visit the Cambria Historical Museum (cambriahistoricalsociety.com) in the restored Guthrie/ Bianchini House, built around 1869.  Many thanks to those who provided historical resources and assistance, including: Jesse Arnold, Jane Bailey, Melody A. Coe, Dawn Dunlap, Dorothy L. Gates, Geneva Hamilton, Laila Kollmann, Shirley Lyon, Consuelo Macedo, Larry Newland, Louisa Anne Smith and Charlie Yeats.

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RUNNING

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ON EMPTY STORY AND PHOTOS BY CHUCK GRAHAM

PHOTO:

Tickseed Coreopsis in bloom on the Carrizo Plain.

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Clockwise from left: Chumash rock art; tule elk; Writer/Photographer Chuck Graham at Camp South Fork; Great Valley Phacelia in bloom.

I finished off my last water bottle a while ago. The Sisquoc River was in my rear view mirror and the sweeping Salisbury Potrero beckoned; its rolling meadows and sandstone pinnacles were a dreamscape amongst the living. I was in the midst of connecting the Los Padres National Forest in Santa Barbara County to the last of California’s grasslands on the Carrizo Plain National Monument in San Luis Obispo County. I had two mountain ranges down and one to go. I desperately needed water and the available springs weren’t proving fruitful. Fortunately it had snowed the week before my trip, and while walking west toward the Montgomery Potrero, I found some shade along the Sierra Madre Ridge with patches of frozen, crunchy snow.

A NO-NAME TRAIL For a long time I was curious about the squiggly, nondescript line on the visitor’s map available at the Goodwin Education Center in the Carrizo Plain. It barely marked a trail off Highway 166, heading northeast, but it quickly vanished, maybe only a mile off the east side of that busy highway toward the Caliente Mountains. I tried the Forest Service but came up empty. I finally tracked someone down at the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) office. “It’s an old BLM trail built in 1968,” says Ryan Cooper, outdoor recreation planner for the BLM in Bakersfield. “It hasn’t been maintained for a long time.”

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The name of the trail is the Caliente Mountain Access Trail. It’s part of the Chimineas-Carrizo Plain Ecological Reserve. During the year seasonal permitted hunting of dove, quail, wild pigs and rabbits is allowed. “The trailhead is difficult to see. It’s not next to the highway,” explains Cooper. “It’s tucked back in a draw.” He was right. Anyone driving along Highway 166 at 50 mph or faster—which most people do traveling back and forth between Bakersfield and Santa Maria— would miss it.

SANTA BARBARA TO CARRIZO PLAIN It was February, and after getting dropped off at Nira Camp in the Los Padres National Forest, I was ready to trek to the Carrizo Plain and its breathtaking grasslands. With a bounce in my stride and four days of food stuffed in my backpack, I would eventually be picked up at the Selby Campground in the Caliente Mountains gazing across the plain to the daunting Temblor Mountains. As I followed the sounds of cool water spilling over cobbled rock along the Manzana Creek, it wasn’t long before I was up and over the San Rafael Mountains, where towering sandstone monoliths, pinnacles and sheer cliffs dominated the arid, rugged landscape. By nightfall I converged with the South Fork of the wild and scenic Sisquoc River, where the empty


PHOTO:

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Above: Carrizo Plain in all its vastness. (L-R): Chuck Graham hikes and camps; New Cuyama population sign.

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Forest Service cabin welcomed me inside. A wood-burning stove quelled the icy air. It was a rewarding pit stop to rest and warm up, eat, sleep and recharge with the rush of the steady runnel lulling me to sleep beneath sturdy, swaying oaks. Before the sun beamed on the craggy ridge-tops, I was awake, rested and closing up the cozy cabin. After filling water bottles and rock hopping across the Sisquoc, I took the Sweetwater Trail, ascending the Sierra Madre Mountains. However, the trail was anything but sweet. It was a long haul before I reached the first of the potreros. It felt even longer when I couldn’t locate any water, so when I rounded the backside of the Montgomery Potrero, the snow proved to be a pleasant surprise. The east side of the potrero never sees any sun and fortunately kept those remnant patches of snow frozen for more than a week. The snow rejuvenated me. I scraped as much as I could into whatever I could and hauled it over near the Rocky Ridge Trail. It felt way too hot for February. During the day it was at least 70 degrees atop the Sierra Madre and I needed more water. I went over to the Montgomery Spring, which has always been a trickle, yet is a reliable water source. I discovered a plastic jug full of water, drank it down, and positioned the jug to catch more spring-fed water by morning. When I returned the next morning I discovered an animal had knocked the jug over. No water. I quickly packed up my gear and descended past Lion Canyon, the Rocky Ridge Trail my gateway to New Cuyama and sustenance.

AMONGST TUMBLEWEEDS After a long slog down the cattle-rutted Rocky Ridge Trail, it felt good to walk along the flat, lonely road leading to New Cuyama. I bought plenty of water at the local corner market. As sunset approached, I dodged several tumbleweeds while searching for a concealed place to pitch my tent. Conveniently, I placed it in a small, circular, ready-made tumbleweed corral on the southwest side of Highway 166. There I slept fitfully for the night. I had a long, 13-mile walk on Highway 166 to the Caliente Access Trail. Walking west along the narrow shoulder I came to the conclusion that this was the toughest part of the trip; walking along a highway frenetic with speeding big rigs and their accompanying wind shear constantly played on my mind. After about eight miles I’d had enough and hitchhiked the remaining five miles to the trailhead. The Caliente Access Trail meanders through low-lying brush before vanishing from the highway after about a mile and a half. Route finding wasn’t an issue, though—there’s no denying the Caliente Mountains. I located a route that led to the rolling ridgeline, and by sunset I stared across the grasslands where shadows crept across the stunning Carrizo Plain to the desolate Temblor Mountains. That view was my reward following four days in the Los Padres National Forest. That and a huge herd of tule elk grazing on new-growth grasses that swept across the east side of the snow-dusted Calientes. Watching one of the fastestgrowing tule elk herds in California was the opportune time for me to drop my pack and simply soak in all the natural wonders unfolding before me. 

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WINE COUNTRY SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County vineyards grow exceptional grapes, and now, after decades of experimentation with an incredible diversity of microclimates and soil types, growers and winemakers know a lot about what to plant and where those vines thrive best—and a

host of talented vintners transform those grapes into world-class wines. The best way to explore these authentic wine-producing and wine grape growing regions is by visiting the vineyards and speaking directly to the people who grow and produce these exceptional vintages.

Central Coast Wine News

BY WENDY THIES SELL

To make your experience as complete and enjoyable as possible, of the 200+ wineries where you can taste in Santa Barbara County, we recommend the following 20 based on their significance historically, visually and their quality of wine and hospitality.

Buellton

Santa Maria

1 Lafond Winery

11 Presqu’ile Winery & Vineyards

& Vineyards

6855 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/688-7921

5391 Presquile Dr. 805/937-8110

2 Mosby Winery

12 Rancho Sisquoc Winery

9496 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/688-2415

6600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/934-4332

Lompoc

Santa Ynez

3 Babcock Winery & Vineyards

13 Bridlewood Estate Winery

5175 Hwy. 246 805/736-1455

3555 Roblar Ave. 805/688-9000

4 Foley Estates

Vineyard & Winery

Zaca Mesa Winery and Vineyards.

14 Gainey Vineyard

6121 E. Hwy. 246 805/737–6222

3950 E. Hwy. 246 805/688-0558

5 Sanford Winery & Vineyards

15 Roblar Winery & Vineyards

5010 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/735-5900

3010 Roblar Ave, 805/686-2603

Los Olivos

16 Sunstone Vineyards & Winery

125 N. Refugio Rd. 805/688-9463

6 Andrew Murray

Vineyards

PHOTO: GEORGE ROSE, COURTESY ZACA MESA

SUMMER MIGHT BE THE BEST SEASON

to visit wine country; grape clusters hang heavy on the vines, the sun-filled days are long, and wineries hold special events before the busy harvest kicks into high gear. One such Santa Ynez Valley winery is commemorating 45 years of winemaking with a chance to visit its historic vineyards. Zaca Mesa Winery and Vineyards, planted in 1973, celebrates the anniversary with an invitation to tour the scenic 750acre property along Foxen Canyon Road.

Zaca Mesa planted the first syrah vines in Santa Barbara County in 1978. Those massive old cordons in the legendary Black Bear Block are extraordinary and still produce outstanding wine. “By going on a guided tour through the vineyard and winery you not only get to learn about our history, climate, soils and grape varieties, but also the history of the Santa Barbara County wine-growing region,” says winemaker Kristin Bryden. “It is an opportunity for guests to experience (continued on page 72)

5249 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/686-9604 7 Fess Parker

Solvang 17 Buttonwood Farm Winery

Winery & Vineyard

6200 Foxen Canyon Rd. 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/688-1545 805/688-3032 8 Firestone Vineyard

5017 Zaca Station Rd. 805/688-3940 9 Koehler Winery

18 Lincourt Vineyards

1711 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/688-8554 19 Rideau Vineyards

5360 Foxen Canyon Rd. 1562 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/693-8384 805/688-0717 10 Zaca Mesa Winery

6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/688-9339

20 Rusack Vineyards

1819 Ballard Canyon Rd. 805/688-1278

S U M M ER 2018

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PASO ROBLES

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SBSEASONS.COM

Santa Barbara


WINE COUNTRY SA N LUIS OBISPO COUNT Y

To make your experience as complete and enjoyable as possible, of the 250+ wineries where you can taste in San Luis Obispo County, we recommend the following 40 based on their significance historically, visually and their quality of wine and hospitality.

San Luis Obispo 1 Baileyana, Tangent & True Myth Tasting Room

5828 Orcutt Rd., 805/269-8200 2 Biddle Ranch Vineyard

2050 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/543-2399 3 Chamisal Vineyards

7525 Orcutt Rd., 805/541-9463 4 Claiborne & Churchill Vintners

2649 Carpenter Canyon Rd., 805/544-4066 5 Edna Valley Vineyards

2585 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/544-5855 6 Kelsey See Canyon Vineyards

1947 See Canyon Rd., 805/595-9700 7 Saucelito Canyon

3080 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/543-2111 8 Tolosa Winery

4910 Edna Rd., 805/782-0500 9 Wolff Vineyards

6238 Orcutt Rd., 805/781-0448

Arroyo Grande

14 Adelaida Vineyards & Winery

5805 Adelaida Rd., 805/676-1232 15 Brecon Estate

7450 Vineyard Dr., 805/239-2200 16 Caliza Winery

2570 Anderson Rd., 805/237-1480 17 Clos Solène Winery

2040 Niderer Rd., 805/239-7769 18 Daou Vineyards & Winery

2777 Hidden Mountain Rd., 805/226-5460 19 Eberle Winery

3810 Hwy. 46 E., 805/238-9607 20 Halter Ranch Vineyard

8910 Adelaida Rd., 805/226-9455 21 J Dusi Wines

1401 Hwy. 46 W., 805/226-2034 22 J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines

10 Laetitia Vineyard & Winery

6169 Airport Rd., 805/239-8900

11 Talley Vineyards & Bishops Peak

11680 Chimney Rock Rd., 805/238-6932

453 Laetitia Vineyard Dr., 805/481-1772 3031 Lopez Dr., 805/489-0446 PHOTO: MATT WALLACE, COURTESY ANCIENT PEAKS

Paso Robles

23 JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery

24 L’Aventure

2815 Live Oak Rd., 805/227-1588

San Simeon 12 Hearst Ranch Winery

442 SLO San Simeon Rd., 805/927-4100

25 Niner Wine Estates

2400 Hwy. 46 W., 805/239-2233 26 Opolo Vineyards

7110 Vineyard Dr., 805/238-9593

Ancient Peaks Winery Margarita Vineyard. 29 Tablas Creek Vineyard

9339 Adelaida Rd., 805/237-1231 30 Tobin James Cellars

8950 Union Rd., 805/239-2204 31 Treana and Hope Family Wines

1585 Live Oak Rd., 805/238-4112 32 Villa Creek Cellars

5995 Peachy Canyon Rd., 805/238-7145 33 Vina Robles Vineyards & Winery

3700 Mill Rd., 805/227-4812 34 Windward Vineyard

1380 Live Oak Rd., 805/239-2565

Templeton 35 Castoro Cellars

1315 N. Bethel Rd., 805/238-0725 36 Epoch Estate Wines

7505 York Mountain Rd., 805/237-7575 37 Peachy Canyon Winery

1480 N. Bethel Rd., 805/239-1918 38 Turley Wine Cellars

2900 Vineyard Dr., 805/434-1030 39 Wild Horse Winery & Vineyards

1437 Wild Horse Winery Ct., 805/788-6310

Santa Margarita

27 Robert Hall Winery

San Miguel

3443 Mill Rd., 805/239-1616

13 Ancient Peaks Winery

28 SummerWood Winery

40 Four Sisters Ranch Vineyards & Winery

22720 El Camino Real, 805/365-7045

2175 Arbor Rd., 805/227-1365

2995 Pleasant Rd., 805/467-2417

S U M M ER 2018

71


WINE COUNTRY

(continued from page 69)

WINE ENTHUSIASTS GATHER EACH SUMMER FOR THE POPULAR SANTA BARBARA WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL , under the oak and redwood trees at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. Fifty local winemakers pour current releases alongside 30 food vendors, on Saturday, June 30, from 2 to 5 p.m. VIP ticket holders get in an hour early, enjoy an exclusive lounge, and sip and savor special wine and food selections. Proceeds benefit the museum’s nature and science education programs at both the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History and the Sea Center. For tickets, visit sbnature.org. SANTA BARBARA HAS THE FUNK ZONE, LOMPOC HAS THE WINE GHETTO AND NOW PASO ROBLES HAS TIN CITY. The commercial warehouse district known as Tin City, located on the southern edge of the city, just off

Roll Out the Barrels

Highway 101, is the hottest place in town. And it just keeps getting hotter! Each weekend, hundreds of people flock to the intersections of Marquita Avenue, Limestone Way and Blue Rock Road, described by the developer as “an evolving industrial makers market.” Tin City is made up of 20 wineries, BarrelHouse Brewing Co., Tin City Cider, Wine Shine distillery, Etto Pastificio pasta factory, and Negranti Creamery−handcrafting and scooping sheep’s milk ice cream. Nicora Winery was the first wine tasting room to open at Tin City five years ago. Owner/winemaker Nick Elliott handcrafts high-end Rhône blends under the same roof, which is part of the appeal. “You can walk into a tasting room and most of the time you’re going to see the winemaker; you get to chat with the winemaker,” says Elliott. “These people are making killer wine down here. We have a whole spread of wines from wine in the can to $60 bottles of wine. This is obviously the spot to be!” Developer Mike English says more food options are coming to Tin City this year: a commercial bakery, coffee roaster and two restaurants: Tin Canteen and Six Test Kitchen. Chef Ricky Odbert is moving his Arroyo

Grande sensation, Six Test Kitchen, to Paso Robles. He is expanding to 12 seats (two seatings; 6 and 8 p.m.), keeping his unique tasting menu format, and adding wine pairings by Sommelier Sally Dalke. “We chose Tin City because it is an upand-coming area of very talented and creative individuals. It has also created its own buzz, so piggybacking off of that just seems to make sense,” says Odbert. “Unlike being in a downtown setting, Tin City is made up of only food and beverage, so the people coming to the area aren’t going there for any other reason than to eat and drink.” tincitypaso.com. THE VILLAGE OF ARROYO GRANDE IS NOW ON WINE TRAIL MAPS. Three Santa Barbara

County wineries recently opened tasting rooms. Wine pioneer Bob Lindquist’s Qupé winery opened a shared tasting room with Louisa Sawyer Lindquist’s Verdad Wines at 134-A W. Branch St., Arroyo Grande. Sommelier turned winemaker Joshua Klapper renovated a 100-year old bungalow at 225 E. Branch St. for his new tasting room. He retooled his La Fenêtre label and rebranded under the label, Timbre Winery. Phantom Rivers tasting room is also a few doors down. 

BY LESLIE DINABERG

ONE OF SAN LUIS OBISPO’S WINE COUNTRY’S most exciting

summer events kicks off June 21-23 with the 28th Annual Roll Out the Barrels Weekend. The festivities begin on Thursday at Barrels in the Plaza, when more than 50 wineries and local chefs gather for a street party and grand tasting adjacent to the historic Mission in downtown San Luis Obispo. Sip and savor and tap your toes to live music by The Cimo Brothers! Then watch a special demonstration of the art of the barrel by expert cooper Salvador Canchola, who shows the audience the timeless craft of building, shaping and toasting a wine barrel using three-year seasoned oak harvested from the region of Allier in Central France. On Friday and Saturday guests can wind their way through SLO County with a special Passport to Wine Country. With 15 wineries to choose from, guests can walk the vineyards, barrel sample the new vintages, and enjoy open houses, wine tastings and festivities all weekend long. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit slowine.com. PHOTO:

72 S B S E A S O N S . C O M

PHOTO: BARRY GOYETTE, COURTESY SLO WINE COUNTRY

Zaca Mesa from our perspective, and understand why we value our heritage and continue our unwavering dedication to growing and producing Rhône grape varieties.” Choose between a winery tour and tasting ($30/person) or a vineyard experience and lunch ($100/person). Reservations are required: Zacamesa.com.


HARVEST DINNER & GRAPE STOMP Join the best Harvest Party in Paso Robles FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19TH & SATURDAY OCTOBER 20TH

Roll up your pant legs and get ready to stomp! In between grape stomping, folk dancing and of course, fabulous Opolo wine, we will be treating you to some of Opoloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest delicacies. This event sells out every year, reserve your tickets today! For tickets and more information visit: opolo.com or call 805.238.9593

Opolo | 7110 Vineyard Drive, Paso Robles CA 93446 | 805.238.9593


Golf

Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara County is one of America’s most desirable golf destinations, with splendid courses designed to maximize enjoyment of the region’s splendor and moderate climate.

Glen Annie Golf Club

GOLETA

Rancho San Marcos

SANTA YNEZ MOUNTAINS

In the rolling foothills of Goleta, 15 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara, this meticulously maintained and challenging layout offers panoramic ocean, Channel Island and mountain views from nearly every hole. The tee shot from #16, for example, decends 150 ft. in elevation to land softly on a manicured landscape near an adjacent lake with a cascading stream. The clubhouse complex includes Frog Bar & Grill and scenic patios with excellent facilities for gatherings of up to 300. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 71.1; slope rating, 122. 405 Glen Annie Rd., 805/968-6400, glenanniegolf.com.

Twelve miles from Santa Barbara, up scenic Hwy 154—the historic road winding off State Street into the Santa Ynez Mountains that leads to the charming Santa Ynez Valley wineries—“Rancho” has been acclaimed as one of the finest experiences in Southern California. This historic land challenges with sand, lakes, the Santa Ynez River, fields of native grasses, oak tree-lined chaparral and changes in elevation. A comfortable clubhouse has a grill with food to go or to enjoy at tables inside or outside on scenic patios. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 4600 Hwy. 154, 805/683-6334, rsm1804.com.

River Course at the Alisal

La Purisima Golf Course

SOLVANG

Opened for public play in 1992 on land owned by and adjacent to the renowned Alisal Guest Ranch, River Course provides a layout to be enjoyed by golfers of all levels of skill. Set along the Santa Ynez River, the course features panoramic views, mostly wide fairways and accessible greens. Several holes, however, will challenge even the low handicap golfer, especially any of the river holes. The clubhouse has an excellent restaurant with comfortable, inside seating and a vieworiented patio. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 150 Alisal Rd., 805/688-6042, rivercourse.com. 74

SBSEASONS.COM

LOMPOC

Near the Santa Ynez Valley Wine Country, “La P” is challenging, pure golf with long, twisting fairways bordered at times by oak and eucalyptus groves and protected by sand, water and out-of-bounds stakes, finishing with big, lightning-fast greens. In the afternoon, wind often becomes a factor, making the closing holes our own “Amen Corner.” Designed by world-renowned architect Robert Muir Graves, a round at La Purisima will not soon be forgotten, and is worth the drive. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.9; slope rating, 143. 3455 E. Hwy. 246, 805/735-8395, lapurisimagolf.com.


FEATURED GOLF COURSES

FEATURED FOR SUM MER

Sandpiper Golf Club

GOLETA

as Santa Barbara County’s first resort course open to the public, Sandpiper is an inspiring 18 holes of seaside golf on an extraordinary, natural terrain of rolling flatland, steep barrancas thick with chaparral, chalky bluffs and dramatic cliffs offering spectacular views of white sand beaches and the Pacific Ocean below. The acclaimed links-style layout, designed by renowned architect William F. Bell and named by Golf Digest as one of the top 100 public golf courses in the United States, features closely cut fairways leading to enormous greens that can be lightning-fast. The stretch of holes 10 through 14 is one of the most memorable golf experiences of any golfer’s life— alone, worth the trip. Just beyond the lake at #18, Sandpiper Grill has high-quality food for breakfast and lunch indoors or on the patios with spectacular views.

ESTABLISHE D IN 1972

Par 72. Yardage and stroke ratings: Black (7,159 yards, 75.1/136); Gold (6,646 yards, 72.8/131); Silver (6,196 yards, 70.4/127); Copper (5,602 yards, 68.4/121). 7925 Hollister Ave., 805/968-1541, sandpipergolf.com.

SUMMER 2018

75


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Santa Barbara Urban Wine Tasting Although you won’t find any vineyards in this area, these unique and eclectic wineries and tasting rooms are a great way to begin your wine-tasting journey through the area on foot, as an introduction to local wines. Many of the urban wineries have northern Santa Barbara County vineyards that are also open to visitors. 1 Area 5.1 137 Anacapa St. 2 Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St.

Vineyard 30 El Paseo

16 Jaffurs Wine

3 August Ridge Vineyards 5 E. Figueroa St

Cellars 819 E. Montecito St

4 Armada Wine &

Wines 23 E. De La Guerra St.

Beer Merchant 1129-A State St.

5 AVA Santa Barbara 116 E. Yananoli St.

17 Jamie Slone

18 Kunin Wines

Tasting Room 28 Anacapa St.

6 Carr Vineyards

19 LaFond Winery

7 Cebada Vineyard & Winery 8 E. De La Guerra St.

20 Laplace Wine Bar

8 Corks & Crowns 32 Anacapa St.

21 Margerum Tasting Room 813 Anacapa St.

414 N. Salsipuedes St.

9 Corktree Cellars

Wine & Bar 910 Linden Ave., Carpinteria 10 Deep Sea

111 E. Yanonali St.

& Shop 205 Santa Barbara St.

22 Municipal

Winemakers 22 Anacapa St.

Wine Tasting 217 Stearns Wharf

23 MWC32

11 DV8 Cellars

24 Oreana Winery

28 Anacapa St.

205 Anacapa St.

12 FFWS Bacara Tasting Room 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta

25 Pali Wine Company 116 E. Yanonali St.

13 Fox Wine Co. and

210 State St.

Blair Fox Cellars 120 Santa Barbara St. 14 Grassini Family

Vineyards 24 El Paseo

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15 Happy Canyon

813 Anacapa St.

26 Paradise Springs 27 Potek Winery 406 E. Haley St. 28 Riverbench

137 Anacapa St.

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29 Sanford Winery 1114 State St. 30 Sanguis Wines 8 Ashley Ave. 31 Santa Barbara

Winery 202 Anacapa St.

32 Santa Barbara

Wine Collective 131 Anacapa St.

33 Santa Barbara

Wine Therapy 732 State St.

34 Screaming Eagle

7 W Figueroa St.

35 Silver Wines

724 Reddick St.

36 Skyenna Wine

Lounge 12 Helena Ave.

37 Summerland

Winery 2330 Lillie Ave., Summerland

38 The Bodega Standing Sun 15 E. De La Guerra St. 39 Villa Wine Bar

and Kitchen 618 Anacapa St.

40 Whitcraft Winery 36-A S. Calle Cesar Chavez 41 Vogelzang Vineyard 1129 State St.

DOWNTOWN STATE STREET defines the city’s center—and its heart. The intersection of State and Carrillo streets is where Captain Salisbury Haley hammered an iron stake in 1850 to designate the future midtown area. The self-guided Red Tile Walking Tour is a great way to get your bearings (map is available at Santa Barbara Visitor Center, 1 Garden St.). Don’t miss the historic Arlington Theatre, a notable example of both Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival architectural styles. Also worth visiting is the beautiful Alice Keck Park Memorial Garden, named after the benefactor who donated the prime property.

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Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a National Historic Landmark in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, was dedicated in 1929. Its immense landscaped courtyard and sunken garden are the site of public celebrations year round. | 1100 Anacapa St. Docent tours Mon.–Fri. 10:30 a.m.; Daily 2 p.m. 805/962-6464, santabarbaracourthouse.org.

a black box venue showcasing live performances, and MCA Santa Barbara, a museum dedicated to exhibiting the highest quality of contemporary art while recognizing the artists of tomorrow with innovative exhibitions. | 651 & 653 Paseo Nuevo. paseonuevoshopping.com, mcasantabarbara.org.

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Santa Barbara Public Market offers foodies an impressive collection of purveyors focused on handcrafted, regionally sourced and sustainably made foods. The LEED-certified space also has a commissary kitchen, featuring cooking classes, winemaker dinners, pop-up chefs and more! | 38 W. Victoria St. at Chapala, Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–10 p.m., sbpublicmarket.com.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s outstanding permanent and special collections, housed in a stately building constructed in 1914 as the city’s first federally funded post office, include the only remaining intact mural by Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros, Portrait of Mexico Today. | 1130 State St. Tues.–Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

PRESIDIO NEIGHBORHOOD is a vibrant section developed around the historic site of the last remaining Spanish fortresses built in California, called presidios. In addition to being Santa Barbara’s birthplace, El Presidio de Santa Barbara, the neighborhood is also home to the historic Lobero Theatre, one of the city’s architectural jewels, as well as Casa de la Guerra historic house museum. El Paseo, a charming adobe plaza built in the 1820s, houses several nice shops and restaurants, along with The Wine Collection of El Paseo, an upscale array of six excellent wine tasting rooms open daily from noon to 6 p.m. (located off of the 800 block of State Street).

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La Arcada, designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1926, is home to a wealth of galleries, shops and restaurants. Dotted along the way are historical curios and sculptures, with all roads leading to the much-loved central fountain inhabited by turtles and fish. | 1100 block of State Street. Paseo Nuevo is a charming outdoor destination to shop, dine, relax, stroll and people watch. Featuring Spanish-style architecture, Paseo Nuevo is also home to Center Stage Theater,

Santa Barbara Historical Museum exhibits fine art and artifacts from local history. Visit Gledhill Library and the new Edward Borein Gallery, which memorializes the artist’s work. | 136 E. De la Guerra St. Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/966-1601, santabarbaramuseum.com. El Presidio de Santa Barbara was founded in 1782 to offer protection to the mission and settlers, provide a seat of government and guard


against foreign invasion, and is now a state historic park. | 123 E. Canon Perdido St. 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily. 805/965-0093, sbthp.org. MISSION DISTRICT, identified by Mission Santa Barbara, is among the oldest residential neighborhoods in the city. Characterized by revival-style architecture, it is also home to the Mission Historical Park and rose garden.

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Santa Barbara Botanic Garden’s 78 acres, accessed by five and a half miles of trails, record the history of the state’s rare and indigenous plants. From the dramatic opening view through the meadows, chaparral and forest to the sweeping ridge-top views of the Channel Islands, the garden is a skillful display of California’s natural bounty. | 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Mar.–Oct. 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Nov.– Feb. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/682-4726, sbbg.org.

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Mission Santa Barbara was dedicated in 1786 by Father Fermin Lasuén. Known as “Queen of the Missions” for its twin belltowers, it remains the only California mission to be continuously occupied by the Franciscans. | 2201 Laguna St. Daily tours 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 805/682-4713, sbmission.org; santabarbaramission.org.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, open since 1916, provides science and nature education to generations of visitors. The museum, located along Mission Creek, reconnects more than 100,000 people each year—including 5,700 members—to nature indoors and outdoors. | 2559 Puesta del Sol Rd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/682-4711, sbnature.org.

WATERFRONT, running the length of Cabrillo Boulevard from East Beach to the harbor, is a feast for outdoor enthusiasts. A paved pathway runs the full distance.

Santa Barbara’s Best Wine Experience Walk Up Tastings and Appointment Only Wine Experiences

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Andree Clark Bird Refuge— an artificial freshwater lake and marsh pond adjacent to the zoo —provides one of the best biking/jogging/skating paths in the area. | 1400 E. Cabrillo Blvd. 805/564-5418.

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Santa Barbara Harbor and Breakwater is a working harbor, home to fishing boats, private yachts and nearly 1,200 excursion and sightseeing boats. It is always a busy and interesting place to walk, skate, bike, eat and purchase fresh catch at Fisherman’s Market every Saturday morning. | Off Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, situated on the harbor’s historic breakwater, presents the region’s rich local maritime history. From ancient seafaring Chumash to modern-day deep-sea research, the emphasis is on human interaction with the sea. k

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In the heart of Downtown Santa Barbara’s Historic Presidio Neighborhood

23 E. De La Guerra Street | 805.560.6555 jamieslonewines.com SPRING 2018

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E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

| 113 Harbor Way. Open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily, except Saturdays 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., and closed Wednesdays. 805/962-8404, sbmm.org.

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Stearns Wharf, a Santa Barbara icon, was built by a Vermont native in 1876 to accommodate ocean-going vessels. Once owned by Jimmy Cagney, its dramatic views of the city and the hills beyond, as well as its mix of shops and restaurants, have charmed visitors for more than a century. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Sea Center on Stearns Wharf engages visitors of all ages with interactive exhibits, opportunities to work like scientists, a theater showcasing the wonders of Santa Barbara Channel, a live shark touch pool and a 1,500-gallon tide pool tank. Discover the fun in science and the wonders of the natural world. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/962-2526, sbnature.org.

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Santa Barbara Arts & Crafts Show is the longest-running public weekly art show in the country, with more than 250 exhibitors, all there in person and carefully screened to ensure originality of work. | Cabrillo Blvd. between State and Calle Puerta Vallarta streets. Sun. 10 a.m. to dusk. 805/897-2519, santabarbaraca.gov.

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The Mill is a distinctively modern spin on the original feed mill constructed in 1904, which is now an artisan marketplace, featuring a production winery, craft brewery and farm-to-table barbecue restaurant, as well as some unique retail offerings. | 406 E. Haley St., 10 a.m.–10 p.m., 805/965-9555, themillsb.com.

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Santa Barbara Zoo opened to the public in 1963 with only seven residents. Now more than 500 animals live here, and 30 acres of lush gardens spread across a knoll overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Committed to conservation, species survival and education, the zoo is an enlightening and entertaining place to visit. | 500 Niños Dr. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/962-5339, sbzoo.org.

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MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, is an awe-inspiring experience to motivate a new generation of innovators and problem-solvers, with 17,000 square feet of interactive educational exhibits focused on science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). | 805/708-2282, moxi.org.

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Funk Zone is a hotbed of homegrown artistic production known for its eclectic wall murals, ateliers, galleries, 80

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alternative exhibition spaces, trendy artist shops and the lively Urban Wine Trail. Half the fun is each surprise that awaits you down the alley or painted on the wall in front of you! | funkzone.net.

Montecito and Points South Montecito’s densely wooded, unique and beautiful area between Santa Barbara and Summerland has been home to Indians, Spanish and Yankee settlers, agricultural pioneers and eastern millionaires in search of the perfect climate. Though it has attracted the privileged for more than a century, its genesis was agrarian. Many of the historic estates incorporate the farms and ranches that had originally settled the area. Other remnants of this rich heritage include the 500-acre property on which Harleigh Johnston grew citrus trees until 1893, which later became San Ysidro Ranch, completed in 1935.

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Casa del Herrero is a splendid example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, designed by George Washington Smith, the house—and the gardens—are National Historic Landmarks. The gardens, covering 11 acres, were designed by noted landscape architects Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest and horticulturist Frances T. Underhill. | 1387 E. Valley R. Tours Wed. and Sat. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations required. 805/565-5653, casadelherrero.com.

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Ganna Walska Lotusland is a 37acre garden estate, prized for its rare and exotic plants and providing new perspectives on sustainability of nature’s offerings. Themed gardens include topiary, bromeliad, succulent, cycad, cactus, fern, Japanese, Australian, water and a blue garden, among others. | Reservations required. Tours Wed.–Sat. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. between Feb. 18 and Nov. 15., 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

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Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art educates students and the community about the power and value of the visual arts through physical, critical and spiritual engagement with the creative process and its results. | Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Mon.–Fri. 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/565-6162, westmontmuseum.org.

SUMMERLAND is just a stone’s throw off Hwy. 101 and two minutes south of Montecito, and offers the rural charm of an earlier California beach town while maintaining the spirit of an artists’ colony via plentiful antique, home and garden shops, art galleries, boutiques and unpretentious eateries.

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Lookout County Park, off Lillie Avenue at Evans Avenue, is on the bluffs above the beautiful Summerland Beach. From this vantage point, where full picnic facilities await, there are spectacular views of the Channel Islands. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Evans Ave. CARPINTERIA is five minutes south of Montecito and Summerland. Although the city advertises itself as home to the “world’s safest beach,” visitors also come to roam the avocado-laden hills in search of the orchid fields and hothouses, for which Carpinteria is well known.

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Salt Marsh Nature Reserve, a 230-acre salt marsh, is home to local and migratory waterfowl and fish and is a birder’s dream. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. at Sandyland Rd., turn right and drive three blocks to Ash Ave.

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Carpinteria State Beach and Bluffs are among California’s most popular destinations—the result of a broad beach and good sunning, tidepooling and fishing. For hikers and birdwatchers, it doesn’t get much better than the Carpinteria Bluffs. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. Continue through town to the beach. Park on Linden Ave. or in the Carpinteria State Beach lot.

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Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club was admitted to the U.S. Polo Association in 1911 and moved to its present location shortly thereafter. The club welcomes visitors for Sunday games from May through October. | 3375 Foothill Rd. 805/684-6683, sbpolo.com.

Goleta and Points North The city of Goleta and several of the area’s well-known institutions and landmarks are just 10 minutes north of Santa Barbara, including UCSB and two championship golf courses.

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Rancho La Patera, one of the oldest landmarks in Goleta Valley, is home to historic Stow House, a beautiful example of Carpenter Gothic architecture, and Cavalletto History Education Center, which focuses on Goleta’s ranching and agricultural history. | 304 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/681-7216, stowhouse.com.

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South Coast Railroad Museum, housed in a restored train depot, is a magnet for train buffs. Tours of the Victorian depot, rides on the “Goleta Short Line” miniature train and exhibits are part of the experience. | 300 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/964-3540, goletadepot.org.


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Goleta Beach Park, adjacent to UCSB, is favored by families and groups for its expanse of lawn with barbecue and picnic table areas. The 1,500-foot-long pier accommodates boat launching facilities, fishermen and strollers. | Exit Hwy. 217 at Sandspit Rd. 805/568-2461.

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Art, Design & Architecture Museum at UCSB holds an impressive fine art collection with one of the largest architectural archives in North America. In addition, it engages contemporary artists in exhibits and programs. | UCSB. Wed.–Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

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El Capitan and Refugio State Beaches, the mixed sand and rock beach at El Capitan links Refugio—a palmlined crescent of sand with tide pools—by beach, bluff and bike trails. Both are popular beach campgrounds. | From Hwy. 101, exit the northernmost El Capitan exit and/or Refugio Rd. 805/968-1033, parks.ca.gov.

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Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes, the Dunes Center at 1055 Guadalupe St. should be the first stop in the exploration of the largest dune complex in the state. | Wed.–Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 805/343-2455, dunescenter.org.

through October. | 420 2nd St. 805/686-1789, solvangfestivaltheater.org.

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Old Mission Santa Inés is the 19th of 21 missions built in California from 1769 to 1836 by Spanish Franciscan priests. Founded September 17, 1804 by Padre Estevan Tapis, it was the first European settlement in Santa Ynez Valley and still displays artifacts preserved from the Mission era. | 1760 Mission Dr. at Hwy. 246. 805/688-4815, missionsantaines.org.

Santa Ynez and Los Olivos These small, charming towns look like they belong in the pages of a book on the history of the west and are world-renowned for their vineyards, equestrian culture, art galleries, inns and restaurants that epitomize the region’s signature wine country cuisine.

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Elverhøj Museum of History & Art is housed in a historic handcrafted structure built in a style derived from the large farmhouses of 18th century Denmark. Visitors can view Solvang’s history through photos, artifacts and video displays. | Wed.–Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 1624 Elverhoy Way. 805/686-1211, elverhoj.org.

Los Olivos melds California history with modern-day wine tasting rooms, restaurants, art galleries and upscale shops in this picture-perfect country town dating back to the 1860s, when stagecoaches passed through. Centered by an iconic flagpole, the serenity of vineyards, lavender farms, orchards, ranches and horse trails surround Los Olivos. This is a charming place to visit for a one-stop wine country experience. | Approximately 40 min. north of Santa Barbara via Hwy. 154, losolivosca.com.

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Wildling Art Museum, an educational institution dedicated to presenting art of America’s wilderness, is a place to gain a greater appreciation of art and a better understanding of the importance of preserving our natural heritage. | 1511-B Mission Dr., 805/688-1082, wildlingmuseum.org.

Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum celebrates the rich history of the Santa Ynez Valley, its pioneering settlers and the five early townships that formed the foundation of this unique region. | Open Wed.–Sun. noon–4 p.m. 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. 805/688-7889, santaynezmuseum.org. 

Santa Ynez Mountains and Valley Areas The valley is historically rich and geographically diverse, with vineyards dotting the landscape, many with tasting rooms.

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Cachuma Lake Recreation Area provides 750 campsites just 25 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara. Full marina, boat launch, rental boats, fishing equipment and licenses are available. Nature cruises led by park naturalists provide an educational look at the wildlife, birds (including bald eagles) and plants that make Cachuma such a rich habitat. | Hwy. 154. 805/686-5055, sbparks.org.

Solvang With a population of nearly 5,000, Solvang (“sunny field” in Danish) is the largest city in Santa Ynez Valley. Founded in 1911 by Danish educators from the Midwest, Solvang is the “Danish Capital of North America.”

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Solvang Festival Theater, a 700-seat historic outdoor theater, presents excellent productions staged by Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA), as well as other concerts and events. Open June SUMMER 2018

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Ragged Pt.

San Miguel

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Nacimiento Lake Recreation Area

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Estrella 101

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San Simeon

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Paso Robles

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Creston

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MAP KEY Visitors Centers

Morro Bay

SLO Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center 895 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo 1

2

California Welcome Center Pismo Beach 333 Five Cities Dr. #100, Pismo Beach

Santa Margarita

17 3

1

Morro Bay State Park 16 Baywood Park

Santa Margarita Lake Recreation Area

Los Osos

Morro Bay Visitor Center 695 Harbor St., Morro Bay

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Paso Robles Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center 1225 Park St., Paso Robles

Sa

O

5

Laguna Lake Park

Hearst Castle Visitor Center, San Simeon

HI

4

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3

Visitor Center, Atascadero Chamber of Commerce 6904 El Camino Real, Atascadero

CA

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LO

6

8

Exploring Ideas

227

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9

Lopez Lake Recreation Area

14

Pismo Beach 2

11

12

Grover Beach

10

Arroyo Grande

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San Luis Obispo  The city of San Luis Obispo (SLO) reigns as “queen” of the county, blessed with historical sights, arts, culture, a vibrant downtown and a friendly small-town vibe. Lush hills and vast open spaces with hiking trails ring the town, making it seem like a giant urban park. California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) infuses the town with stimulating intellectual energy, arts and culture. Walking here is a joy—stroll along the scenic creek, browse through shops and galleries, and feast on regional cuisine at the many restaurants and cafés.

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Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa Visit the small museum to view artifacts and learn about Chumash Indian life, early Spanish settlers and California history. Docents lead tours of the church and grounds most days at 1:15 p.m. (Sundays at 2 p.m.), starting at the mission steps (call to confirm). Mission Plaza, adjacent to the mission, is SLO’s community cultural center. | 751 Palm St., 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily, 805/543-6850, missionsanluisobispo.org.

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Downtown/Higuera Street SLO’s main street—along with the alleys and avenues that connect to it—was named for the Higuera family, who arrived here in 1774, just two years after the mission was founded. Higuera Street also hosts SLO’s world-famous Thursday Night Farmer’s Market—a social gathering of locals and visitors who come here to eat (many restaurants set up shop on the street), listen to music, connect with community groups and shop for fresh produce and culinary delights. | Farmer’s Market: Higuera Street, between Nipomo and Osos streets, 6–9 p.m. Thurs., weather permitting.

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Creek Walk San Luis Creek travels through the city on its way to the ocean and borders Mission Plaza. Follow a footbridge to the scenic Creek Walk, with various access steps to downtown shops and restaurants, some with patio tables overlooking the bubbling stream. | Between Higuera and Monterey streets, from Nipomo Street to Osos Street.

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Historic Railroad District In 1894, a train chugged into San Luis Obispo, marking the first time passengers and goods could travel directly between San Francisco and Los Angeles on the Southern Pacific rails. Pacific Surfliner and Coast Starlight trains stop here multiple times a day and connect with bus systems throughout the city and county. The district is also a lively neighborhood with restaurants, shops and

businesses, parks and open spaces. | San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum, 1940 Santa Barbara Ave., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sat., 805/548-1894, slorrm.com.

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San Luis Obispo Museum of Art SLOMA focuses on contemporary California art and presents ever-changing exhibits of paintings, sculpture, printmaking, fine crafts and photography. The center also hosts films, classes, lectures and special events. | 1010 Broad St., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. (closed Tues.), 805/543-8562, sloma.org. Admission is free.

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Children’s Museum Parents and kids explore, investigate and create at the fabulous San Luis Obispo Children’s Museum. The three-story 8,400-sq.ft. center houses indoor and outdoor learning environments that stimulate curiosity and discovery through play. | 1010 Nipomo St., hours vary by day and season (closed Mon.), 805/545-5874, slocm.org.

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Bubblegum Alley People have been plastering this quirky 70-foot-long alley with a 15-foot-high wall with fresh wads of chewing gum for decades. No one really knows for sure why and how the tradition started, but it’s now one of SLO’s signature attractions. | 735 Higuera St.

South County Inland EDNA VALLEY & ARROYO GRANDE VALLEY To the east of Hwy. 101, travel back to turn-ofthe-century California in the charming village of Arroyo Grande. Arroyo Grande is also the gateway to the pastoral Arroyo Grande and Edna Valley wine growing AVAs.

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Old Edna In the heart of the Edna Valley wine region, historic Old Edna, a restored early 1900s town site, offers a tasting room, deli counter and several vacation rental cottages. | Hwy. 227 at Price Canyon Rd., 805/544-8062, oldedna.com.

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Lopez Lake Recreational Area Camp, fish, picnic, hike, sail and water ski along 22 miles of shoreline at this gem of a lake. In the summer, kids can whoosh down slides in a water park near the campgrounds. | 10 miles northeast of Arroyo Grande, 805/788-2381, slocountyparks.org/camp/lopez-lake.

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Arroyo Grande Village

Get a dose of authentic Americana by strolling along the main street of this quaint village, lined with modern shops and eateries

housed in historic buildings dating back to the 1800s and early 1900s. A lush village green fronts a meandering creek and holds one of the last swinging bridges from early California days. | East Branch St., east of Hwy. 101 to

Huasna Rd., arroyograndevillage.org.

South County Coast PISMO BEACH, OCEANO, GROVER BEACH, SHELL BEACH, AVILA BEACH The southern region of the county encompasses miles of beaches, state parks, seaside towns, and quaint historic villages. The hub of this region, the town of Pismo Beach, preserves the spirit of early California with 23 miles of pristine sandy beaches and spectacular coastal scenes. Two fabulous state parks hug the coast for miles just south of town.

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Pismo Beach Pier This 1,200-ft. historic pier anchors the downtown waterfront area. Shops and restaurants abound in the neighborhood surrounding the pier. Note: the pier is closed for renovation until Fall 2019, but the adjacent beaches and boardwalk will remain accessible during most of the construction period. | West end of Pomeroy Ave., Pismo Beach.

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Pismo Beach State Park Experience fantastic seaside activities at this popular park: tide pooling, fishing, surfing, boogie boarding and bird watching. From November through March, about 50,000 Monarch butterflies spend the winter in a grove of eucalyptus trees amid the sand dunes—one of the largest such wintering sites in the nation. | 555 Pier Ave., Oceano, 805/489-1869, parks.ca.gov.

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Oceano Dunes State Recreational Vehicle Area This is the only drivable beach in California— pull up and camp close to the waves and drive ATVs on the vast stretches of sand dunes. You can also swim, surf, fish, hike and camp in the recreation area, which includes fascinating views of unusual geologic formations, flora and fauna. | Entrance is at west end of Pier Ave. off Hwy. 1, Oceano, 805/ 473-7220, parks.ca.gov.

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Avila Beach South-facing Avila Beach is reputedly the sunniest and warmest beach in the county. Once a major shipping and international customs port, the tiny town is a vibrant family-friendly destination with many attractions, including restaurants, hotels, wine tasting venues and a wonderful park and children’s playground. Sport-fishing and whale-watching excursion k SUMMER 2018

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boats depart from Port San Luis wharf, famous for its scenic views and seafood restaurants. | Avila Beach Dr. exit off Hwy. 101.

MID-COUNTY COAST LOS OSOS, BAYWOOD PARK, MORRO BAY, CAYUCOS The charming, adjacent communities of Los Osos and Baywood Park edge the quiet southern portion of Morro Bay Estuary. The town of Morro Bay is home to a state and national estuary and Morro Rock, a state historic monument.

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Montaña de Oro State Park The spectacular 8,000-acre park’s name, “Mountain of Gold,” pays tribute to the fields of the springtime wildflowers that blanket the park’s meadows, hills and coastal bluffs. It’s an ideal destination for hiking, biking, horseback riding, tide pooling and camping. Monarch butterflies spend several months here every winter, and sea otters often frolic at Spooner’s Cove. | On Pecho Rd., seven miles south of Los Osos, 805/772-7434, parks.ca.gov.

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El Moro Elfin Forest Walk along an accessible boardwalk that loops through a 90-acre nature area with more than 200 species of plants, from pygmy oak woodlands to coastal marsh. It supports more than 200 species of plants, plus more than 100 bird, 22 mammal and 13 reptile and amphibian species. | Entrance is north of Santa Ysabel Ave., between South Bay Blvd. and 10th St., Los Osos, 805/528-0392, elfin-forest.org.

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Morro Rock Sometimes called the “Gibraltar of the Pacific,” this dome-shaped sentinel is 576 feet high and 50 acres at its base. It’s actually a volcanic plug—one of nine similar peaks that pop out of the landscape between San Luis Obispo and Morro Bay. More than 250 birds visit the estuary every year, making it one of the most popular bird-watching destinations in the state. | West end of Coleman Dr., Morro Bay, 805/772-7434, parks.ca.gov.

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Cayucos This classic California beach town has a historic pier, built in 1875, and other buildings that reflect its various eras. Stroll along the miles of beaches and bluff-top trails, and walk along the historic main street to find delectable treats like fresh-baked cookies and smoked fish. | Hwy. 1, 4 miles north of Morro Bay, cayucosbythesea.com.

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North County Coast CAMBRIA The charming arts-oriented town of Cambria sits amid hillsides studded with towering Monterey pines. It has two adjacent downtown sections: the historic East Village and the newer West Village. Each boasts an array of excellent choices for dining and shopping for unusual artworks, crafts and antiques.

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Moonstone Beach On the western edge of town, romantic Moonstone Beach derived its name from the semi-precious agate and jasper stones hidden amid the granules of sand along the shore. It’s a fantastic place to stroll along the bluffs and gaze at the wild, dynamic Pacific coast. | Moonstone Beach Dr., west of Hwy. 1.

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Harmony The tiny one-block town of Harmony (pop. 18) dates back to 1915 and includes a pottery studio, glassworks, a restaurant and the Harmony Cellars winery and tasting room. | 7 miles south of Cambria off Hwy. 1, harmonytown.com. SAN SIMEON AND RAGGED POINT The historic town of San Simeon is forever linked to one of the most magnificent private estates in the nation—Hearst Castle. North of San Simeon to the county line, the scenic Piedras Blancas coastline becomes ever wilder as it rises from sandy dunes to meet the rugged cliffs near Ragged Point, the southernmost entry point to the dramatic Big Sur coast.

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Hearst Castle Famed California architect Julia Morgan designed this magnificent estate, officially known as Hearst San Simeon State Historical Monument, for publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst in the early 1900s. It’s now a state monument where visitors can join various tours and gaze over the stunning coastline from the castle’s bluff-top perch, two miles via tram uphill from the visitor center. | 750 Hearst Castle Rd., tours daily from 8 a.m. to late afternoon plus seasonal evening tours, 800/444-4445 or 518/218-5078, www. hearstcastle.org.

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Piedras Blancas Light Station Built in 1875 to guide ships into San Simeon Bay, this light station is one of only

three tall seacoast lighthouses built in California. | On Hwy. 1, about 7 miles north of Hearst Castle, guided tours at 9:45 a.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sat. except national holidays, 805/927-7361, piedrasblancas.org.

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Piedras Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery About 4.5 miles north of Hearst Castle, pull over to the Piedras Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery, where a colony of giant elephant seals hauls out each year to molt, mate and give birth—an estimated 1,800 pups are born here each year during the winter months. Docent tours are available. | Off Hwy. 1, 4.5 miles north of Hearst Castle, elephantseal.org.

North County Inland PASO ROBLES, ATASCADERO, TEMPLETON, SANTA MARGARITA Starting in the 1860s, tourists flooded into Paso Robles to “take the cure,” soaking in the tubs or pools fed by the region’s abundant hot sulfur mineral springs. Today the town blends its Old West heritage and mineral spring spas with a booming wine business. Atascadero, a quiet residential town at the crossroads of Highways 41 and 101, serves as a gateway to nearly all North-County destinations and activities.

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Historic Downtown Paso Robles Downtown, historic buildings, shops, antique stores, restaurants and hotels surround the oak-studded Paso Robles City Park, aka The Square—the hub of Paso life and the site of festivals and concerts, including the annual Paso Robles Wine Festival weekend every May. | Downtown City Park bordered by 11th, 12th, Spring and Pine streets, travelpaso.com.

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Atascadero Lake Park – Charles Paddock Zoo Scenic Atascadero Lake Park has a walking/running trail that circles the lake, plus picnic areas, a sand volleyball court and a children’s playground. The park is also home to the five-acre Charles Paddock Zoo with hundreds of animal species from around the globe. | Park at 9305 Pismo Ave., Atascadero , Zoo at 9100 Morro Rd., open daily 10 a.m.– 5 p.m. daily (10 a.m.–4 p.m.in winter), 805/461-5080, charlespaddockzoo.org. 


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The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/restaurant-guide.

75 E X C E L L E N T R E S TA U R A N T S I N M O N T E C I T O, S A N TA B A R B A R A , G O L E TA A N D S A N TA Y N E Z VA L L E Y

Montecito Bella Vista (Contemporary Italian) at the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore commands panoramic ocean views across Montecito’s Butterfly Beach and promises top notch cuisine and impeccable service. Guests enjoy a contemporary Italian menu showcasing fresh California ingredients. It’s also home to one of the most celebrated Sunday brunches in the U.S. 1260 Channel Dr., 805/969-2261. $$$–$$$$

Cava (Mexican) serves the bold flavors of Spain, Mexico and Latin America in a charming setting with classic margaritas and martinis amid a vibrant outdoor patio, romantic dining room or cozy fireplace. 1212 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-8500. $$–$$$

Lucky’s (American) offers steaks, chops and seafood as well as chicken entrées, wonderful salads, six different potato dishes and beautiful desserts. The wine list runs to the extravagant. The adjacent bar is a favorite among locals. 1279 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-7540. $$$–$$$$

Montecito Wine Bistro (Californian) is a casual yet sophisticated spot to sit on the outdoor patio or cozy up to the fireplace and nibble wine-friendly food, and sip wines by the glass or the flight, or enjoy a cocktail. 516 San Ysidro Rd., 805/969-7520. $$–$$$

Trattoria Mollie (Italian) is a charming standby

Oliver’s of Montecito (Gourmet Vegan)

Tre Lune (Italian) offers a delicious menu that isn’t

brings health and wellness to the forefront of the dining experience. The restaurant’s creative dishes are made with organic and fresh ingredients. Oliver’s innovative menu is inspired by nature, minimally processed and carefully prepared to provide guests with delicious and vibrant food. All of the dishes are vegan and vegetarian, using seasonal veggies to nourish the body. 1198 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-0834. $$$

afraid of flavor. The high quality, genuine Italian cuisine includes excellent minestrone soup, fall-off-the-fork ossobuco, basil pesto, lobster ravioli and more. 1151 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-2646. $$$

for locals-in-the-know. The dynamic cuisine consists of recipes that Mollie gathered during her years of training with “the best chefs in Italy.” 1250 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-9381. $$$

Santa Barbara Waterfront

Stella Mare’s (French) pairs a beautiful Victorian

Bluewater Grill (Seafood) zeroes in on fresh,

building with stylish, Normandy-inspired cuisine. The glass-encased greenhouse’s panoramic view and fireside couches make it a perfect spot for listening to Wednesday night jazz. 50 Los Patos Way, 805/969-6705. $$–$$$

sustainable seafood and pairs it with produce from local farms. The menu runs the seafood gamut, from classics like crab cakes, rainbow trout amandine, cioppino, New England clam chowder and fish and chips to daily specials of fresh fish. The harbor views are spectacular from this restored lighthouse-themed building, especially from the second floor and the waterfront outdoor patio. 15 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-5121. $$-$$$

Sautéed White Sea Bass from Santa Barbara FisHouse.

Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach (Seafood) serves locally caught, fresh seafood specialties. Dine inside or al fresco with one of the best ocean views in Santa Barbara. Full bar and regional wine list. 2981 Cliff Dr., 805/898-2628. $$–$$$

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Brophy Bros. (Seafood) has long been one of Santa Barbara’s most popular eateries and is located at the harbor with excellent views. You’ll find great shellfish cocktails and fresh fish here. 119 Harbor Way, 805/966-4418. $$ Chuck’s Waterfront Grill (Steak, Seafood) serves prime-grade top sirloin steaks and Australian lobster tail among many other delicious offerings. The restaurant’s lively upstairs extension, The Endless Summer bar-café (Seafood), has two terraces for al fresco dining on more casual fare. 113 Harbor Way, 805/564-1200. $$–$$$

Convivo Restaurant and Bar (Italian) located across from East Beach on the ground floor of the historic Santa Barbara Inn, draws its inspiration from Santa Barbara’s bounty of seafood and meats prepared “Nomad Italian” style. Enjoy al fresco dining with a view of the Channel Islands. 901 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-6789. $$-$$$ 88

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The Harbor Restaurant and Longboard’s Grill (Seafood) on Stearns Wharf are two different experiences from one great vantage point. The Harbor is a romantic ocean-view restaurant and Longboard’s is a noisy, energy-packed bar and grill. 210 Stearns Wharf, 805/963-3311. $$–$$$

Breakfast • Lunch Dinner • Cocktails

Rodney’s Grill (American) celebrates the cuisine and wines of the Central Coast with seasonal chef specials that are inspired by early California Spanish and Native American cooking styles. Located in the Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort, Rodney’s menu spotlights naturally raised meats and poultry, seasonal produce and sustainable seafood—all paired with wines from the finest local vineyards. 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/884-8535. $$$

Santa Barbara FisHouse (Seafood) serves fresh local fish in a lively setting. Gathering with friends on the dining terrace with ocean views is the perfect way to start the weekend. Be sure to order lobster during the season from these “lobster specialists.” 101 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/966-2112. $$

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2981 Cliff Drive (805) 898-2628 www.boathousesb.com

Santa Barbara Shellfish Co. (Seafood) is a fun, no-frills seafood-lover’s paradise. Select your dinner fresh from the tanks or from that day’s catch just steps from the ocean. 230 Stearns Wharf, 805/966-6676. $$ Shoreline Beach Café (Mexican, Seafood) is a lively, open-air beach restaurant. Salads, burgers, fish tacos, fresh seafood and vegetarian items are served daily. Breakfast served on weekends. 801 Shoreline Dr., 805/568-0064. $$

Toma Restaurant and Bar (Italian) is a romantic spot to savor excellent Italian and Mediterranean dishes from Santa Barbara’s seasonal bounty while enjoying warm and attentive service and a view of the enchanting Santa Barbara harbor. 324 W. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/962-0777. $$-$$$

Downtown Arigato Sushi (Japanese) provides designer sushi from inventive chefs. Daily specials explore the limitless varieties of this Japanese delicacy. 1225 State St., 805/965-6074. $$$

Arnoldi’s Café (Italian) specializes in traditional homestyle Italian cuisine, featuring the freshest local produce and seafood, imported Italian meats, cheeses and olive oils, as well as an extensive wine list, bocce courts and a heated patio. 600 Olive St., 805/962-5394. $$$

Benchmark Eatery (Seafood, American) is a casual eatery that does American fare proud, with everything from soul-satisfying pastas, pizzas, grilled ahi and fish and chips to fresh salads, juicy burgers and generous sandwiches. 1201 State St., 805/845-2600, $-$$ SUMMER 2018

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Bibi Ji (Indian, Seafood) is a hot new restaurant from acclaimed chef Jessi Singh, who’s been lauded for his inventive “inauthentic” Indian cooking at the popular Babu Ji restaurants in San Francisco, Manhattan and Melbourne. The locally inspired seafood-focused menu pairs with wines from James Beard Award-winning sommelier Rajat Parr. 734 State St., 805/560-6845. $$-$$$

Blackbird (Californian) is a one of Santa Barbara’s newest hot spots. Classic meets contemporary at Hotel Californian’s signature restaurant. Blackbird features exquisite Mediterranean-influenced cuisine emphasizing locally-sourced and hyper-seasonal ingredients. With the Pacific Ocean and the Funk Zone as a backdrop, Blackbird offers a sleek, yet approachable and wholly unpretentious atmosphere. Dinner only. 36 State St., 805/882-0135. $$$

Black Sheep (Californian) has a cool, casual vibe,

The P E R F E C T S P A C E for your P R I V A T E E V E N T

but serves seriously good farm-to-table food. Try scallop crudo, roasted bone marrow or re-constructed chicken stuffed with walnuts and dried apricots. 26 E. Ortega St., 805/965-1113. $$$

bouchon (Californian French) serves “Santa Barbara Wine Country” cuisine complemented by a remarkable wine list that includes more than 50 Central Coast wines by the glass. Open for dinner nightly. 9 W. Victoria St., 805/730-1160. $$$

Natalie Thompson Photo

Ca’Dario (Italian) promises fine Italian cuisine, whether pasta, fish or fowl—don’t miss the ravioli pillows with brown butter and sage sauce and, grilled asparagus wrapped with pancetta—and an extensive wine list. A few doors down, Ca’Dario Pizzeria features a tasty array of pizzas, including gluten-free options. For a quick fix, try Ca’Dario Pizzeria Veloce in the Santa Barbara Public Market (38 W. Victoria St.). 37 E. Victoria St., 805/884-9419. $$$ Cadiz (Mediterranean) offers a mix of foods from Spain, Southern Italy and France, Sicily and Morocco. Enjoy tapas and artisanal cheeses on the patio or a full course meal in the dining room. Open daily for dinner. with late night lounge hours Thurs.-Sat. 509 State St. 805/770-2760 $$-$$$

Carlitos Café y Cantina (Mexican) offers exciting regional Mexican cuisine and 100% blue agave Margaritas, along with fresh, imaginative Mexican grilled specialties that borrow from Pueblo, Mayan and Aztec cultures. 1324 State St., 805/962-7117. $$

Casa Blanca Restaurant & Cantina (Mexican) is a fun Mexican hot spot with killer Margaritas, tasty tacos, ample enchiladas and other classic south-of-the-border inspired fare. 330 State St., 805/845-8966. $$

202 State Street, Santa Barbara | 805-880-3380 Dinner Daily 5pm - 10pm | Reservations Recommended LOQUITASB.COM @loquitasb

China Pavilion (Chinese) is a spacious and charming restaurant with large picture windows looking out over downtown Santa Barbara. It features high-quality traditional


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Chinese food, as well as a delicious dim sum brunch on weekends. 1202 Chapala St., 805/560-6028. $$

Enterprise Fish Co. (Seafood) is one of Santa Barbara’s largest and busiest seafood restaurants. In an exhilarating, nautical atmosphere are an oyster bar and a variety of fresh fish that are mesquite-broiled and served at reasonable prices. 225 State St., 805/962-3313. $$ Finch & Fork (Californian) in the Canary Hotel offers hearty items like buttermilk fried chicken and excellently prepared lighter fare, complete with farm-fresh salads, fresh oysters and yummy flatbreads. 31 W. Carrillo St., 805/879-9100. $$–$$$ Intermezzo Bar/Café (Californian) serves local wines on tap, craft cocktails and light fare such as burgers, flatbreads, salads and desserts ‘til late. Enjoy an array of small plates to share—including charcuterie, oysters, mussels, steak bites and the crispy cauliflower—make this a perfect pre- or post-theater stop. Now open Tues.-Sat. for lunch, as well as daily for dinner. 819 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$–$$$ Jane (Californian) offers upscale, fresh, tasty fare that runs the gamut from huge seasonal salads and gourmet burgers to fish and chips with chipotle ketchup and creamy dill. The delicious goat cheese pancakes with smoked salmon and caviar are crafted from a family recipe. 1311 State St., 805/962-1311. $$

Joe’s Café (American) is a Santa Barbara icon known for its stiff cocktails and raucous atmosphere. The menu of American classics includes steaks, sandwiches and Mexican specialties. Lunch and dinner served daily; breakfast served weekends. 536 State St., 805/966-4638. $$

The Lark (American) delights with Chef Jason Paluska’s sophisticated family-style plates designed to share and made with the freshest possible local “farm-to-fork” ingredients, along with creative cocktails and a wonderful wine selection. Dinner, Tues.–Sun. 131 Anacapa St., 805/284-0370. $$–$$$

COME RAISE A GLASS. WE’LL RAISE THE BAR. CELEBRATE YOUR SPECIAL OCCASION WITH US — IN UNFORGETTABLE STYLE. FROM A BIRTHDAY LUNCH WITH FRIENDS TO A ROMANTIC DINNER FOR TWO, WE WILL CREATE A MEMORABLE EVENT. LINGER IN OUR GARDENS OR ON OUR TERRACE, AND LET US SPOIL YOU WITH SUPERB CUISINE

- Les Marchands (French) this stylish caveau is the perfect place to discover expertly chosen wines from around the world and enjoy tastes with locally-sourced bites and traditional French fare pairings in a relaxing, Funk Zone atmosphere, free of intimidation. 131 Anacapa St. Suite B, 805/ 284-0380. $–$$$

AND WINES.

- Loquita (Spanish) specializes in authentic Spanish food, including hot and cold tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats, and three types of paella. Executive Chef Peter Lee’s innovative cuisine has a California twist and is complimented with a full bar of Spanish and local wines and spirits. 202 State St., 805/880-3380. $$-$$$

Louie’s (Californian), located inside Santa Barbara’s oldest operating hotel, The Upham, reflects the charm k

800 ALVARADO PLACE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 | 805 845 5800 HOTELS | TRAINS | RIVER CRUISES | JOURNEYS | BELMOND.COM SPRING 2018

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and tradition of its location. You’ll find extraordinary fresh seafood, pastas, filet mignon and a changing menu of specialties, with options to dine outside on a beautiful wrap-around porch or inside at tables tucked into intimate alcoves. 1404 De La Vina St., 805/963-7003. $$–$$$

Mizza Artisan Pizza and Italian Cuisine (Italian) is a beautiful new indoor/outdoor dining experience at the entrance to the historic La Arcada Plaza. Featuring handmade artisan pizzas, handmade pastas, salads, locally caught fresh fish, free-range chicken and Harris ranch CAB meats, along with local fresh produce, and a selection of carefully selected house specialties, the patios at Mizza are a great place to watch the world go by in the heart of downtown Santa Barbara. Serving lunch and dinner daily, weekend brunch. 1112 State St., $-$$ Olio e Limone (Italian) uses only the freshest ingredients for simply delicious preparations. Tuck into a plate of housemade ravioli filled with roasted eggplant and goat cheese, topped with a fresh tomato and basil sauce and shaved ricotta salata. Olio Pizzeria offers a casual pizza bar, wine and cocktails next door, while Olio Crudo Bar offers cocktails and sashimi with an Italian accent! 11 W. Victoria St. #17, 805/899-2699 ext.1. $$$

Opal (Californian) is a classic European-style bistro serving eclectic California cuisine complemented by a wood-burning pizza oven, an extensive wine list and full bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1325 State St., 805/966-9676. $$

Smithy Kitchen + Bar (Californian) features organic, rustic, locally-sourced fare from critically acclaimed Chef Lauren Herman in a beautiful setting that’s great for both small and large gatherings. The lovely outdoor patio is perfect for dining under both the stars and the sunshine, with a gorgeous canopy of 100-year-old olive trees. 7 E. Anapamu St., 805/845-7112. $$-$$$

featuring classic steakhouse dishes with a uniquely Santa Barbara interpretation. Accompanying the cuisine is an ambiance of pure scenic beauty, with ceiling-to-floor windows boasting expansive panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean from every table and a striking 25-seat bar topped with vibrant blue Amazonite quartz that mirrors the dazzle and grandeur of the ocean. 8301 Hollister Ave., 805/571-4240. $$$-$$$$

- Viva (Mexican) indulges your senses with its modern Mexican cuisine, beautiful courtyard patio and inviting dining room in the historic La Arcada. Taco happy hour (Mon.-Fri. from 3-6 p.m.) is a perfect time to sample creative tacos and other antojitos, or “small cravings,” along with the raw bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh shellfish. 1114 State St., 805/965-4770. $$

Beachside Bar + Café (Seafood) sits just above the sand and Goleta Pier, and serves expertly prepared fish and other delicious foods for lunch and dinner in the tropical-style dining room, on the glass-walled open-air patio, at the oyster bar or in the big, full-service bar— all with wide views of the ocean and sandy beach. 5905 Sandspit Rd., 805/964-7881. $$-$$$

Wine Cask (Californian) in the historic El Paseo

Hollister Brewing Company (American) offers

complex offers a beautiful spot to enjoy fine dining and exceptional service in a relaxed setting. Don’t miss the stellar wine selections, including an impressive variety of local wines on tap. 813 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$$

a rotating menu of beers on tap. Menu items include duck fat French fries, Kobe beef sliders and fish tacos. 6980 Marketplace Dr., 805/968-2810. $-$$

Uptown

- Belmond El Encanto (Coastal-Californian) presents California coastal cuisine and seasonal favorites from executive chef Johan Denizot, featuring specialties like fresh local oysters, pan seared diver scallops and short ribs sous vide alongside stunning Santa Barbara views. Sit under the stars on the terrace or in the elegant dining room. 800 Alvarado Pl., 805/770-3530. $$$-$$$$

The Palace Grill (Cajun) is a place resonating with jazz music that creates the perfect setting for spicy food and spirited service to chase the blues away. Features authentic Louisiana specialities like jambalaya, crawfish etouffée and blackened steaks and seafood. 8 E. Cota St., 805/963-5000. $$–$$$

Chuck’s of Hawaii (American) is the home of

Paradise Café (American) has a unique old

Le Café Stella (French-American) is perched across from Santa Barbara Golf Club and is a neighborhood hot spot for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour— try the juicy burgers on brioche buns or heart-warming coq au vin. 3302 McCaw Ave., 805/569-7698. $$

building with wall murals from the 1940s. It has one of Santa Barbara’s favorite patios for dining and a bar that will take you back in time with cocktails of your choice and a well-selected wine and beer list. 702 Anacapa St., 805/962-4416. $$

California’s first salad bar and offers award-winning steaks and fresh seafood right from the grill. A local favorite hangout since 1967. 3888 State St., 805/687-4417. $$-$$$

Jane at the Marketplace (Californian), presents flavorful fare for lunch and dinner including steak, chicken and pasta in cozy surroundings. This is a bright, sunny space known for its friendly service and authentic family recipes. 6940 Marketplace Dr., 805/770-5388. $$ Outpost (Californian) is a casual, hip spot at the Goodland Hotel. The excellent seasonal menu includes shareable plates, entrees and fresh salads, as well as fish tacos with battered halibut, flat iron steak with salsa verde, pork bao buns and a caper-studded Caesar salad with grilled romaine. 5650 Calle Real, 805/964-1288. $$-$$$

Spyglass Bistro & Bar (Californian) is a modern rooftop bistro bar, offering lunch, craft cocktails and small bites, with a breathtaking panoramic view. This unexpected gem features creative shared plates from Executive Chef Michael Blackwell (formerly of the Stonehouse at San Ysidro Ranch and Montecito Country Club) to be enjoyed in cozy fireplace groupings under the stars. 6878 Hollister Ave., 805/562-5996. $-$$

Lure Fish House (Seafood) specializes in fresh and Petit Valentien (French), with its quaint atmosphere and intimate setting, is hidden away in a small corner of La Arcada. Be sure to check out the prix fixe menu only available on Sundays. 1114 State St. #16, 805/966-0222. $$

sustainable seafood from trusted sources and locally caught seafood, organically grown local produce, and wines from local vineyards whenever possible. 3815 State St., 805/618-1816. $$-$$$

The Tee-Off (American) is a friendly steak and

- Santo Mezcal (Mexican) is the newest creation of Los Agaves restaurants founder Carlos Luna. Located next to Hotel Indigo a block from Stearns Wharf, the restaurant showcases fine cuisine rooted in Mexican flavors and traditions that also celebrate local ingredients, and an impressive cocktail menu featuring an extensive mescal and tequila collection. Dining options include tables inside or outside on the patio, where the sights and scenes of lower State Street abound. 119 State St., 805/883-3593. $$ 92

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seafood restaurant and lounge with a long history of local appreciation that features a short but sweet menu of steaks, chops, chicken and seafood. 3627 State St., 805/687-1616. $$-$$$

Goleta Angel Oak (French-Californian) is a modern steak and seafood restaurant housed at Ritz-Carlton Bacara,

Santa Ynez Mountains Cold Spring Tavern (American) is an iconic establishment virtually unchanged since the days of the stagecoach run that has served excellent food— including wild game—to hungry locals and travelers alike for more than 100 years. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 5995 Stagecoach Rd., 805/967-0066. $$$

Santa Ynez Valley, Los Alamos Valley The Bear and Star (American) at Fess Parker’s Wine Country Inn takes its name from the two states Parker called home, Texas and California, celebrating


refined ranch cuisine paired with California’s bounty. 2860 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/686-1359. $$–$$$$

the best from Santa Barbara’s wine country, as well international selections. 458 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805/344-1122. $$-$$$

Bottlest Bistro (American) is an upscale, contemporary eatery featuring eclectic small plates and entrees, plus a choose-your-own wine wall with 52 constantly changing wines available by the taste, half glass or full glass. 35 Industrial Way, Buellton, 805/686-4742. $$-$$$

Brothers Restaurant at the Red Barn (American) offers innovative “made from scratch” cuisine in this exquisitely refurbished barn. The hearty menu offers American classics like chops, prime rib, and chicken-fried steak. Lunch and dinner served daily. 3539 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-4142. $$-$$$$

Root 246 (American), located at Hotel Corque, features innovative cuisine emphasizing local, seasonal ingredients to create the ultimate in farm-to-table cuisine. Root 246 has one of the area’s most extensive selections of local wines, whiskey and craft beers, as well as refreshing signature cocktails. Try the Sunday brunch for a delicious weekend experience. 420 Alisol Rd., Solvang, 805/686-8681. $$-$$$

Sides Hardware & Shoes—A Brothers Restaurant (American) is located in a restored

(Mexican) brings bold Mexican and Latin flavors to the valley. An open-fire grill imparts a smoky essence to authentic grilled specials, delicious salsas and the aroma of fresh handmade tortillas. 3544 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-0033. $$

1901 building, where chef-owners Jeff and Matt Nichols turn out hearty American favorites with original gourmet twists. The brothers strive to have legendary service, innovative “made from scratch” cuisine, and a welcoming and comfortable atmosphere that causes you to return time and time again. Try the delicious Bacon Steak if you need further incentive to return. 2375 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-4820. $$–$$$

First & Oak (Fusion) distinguishes itself with

- S.Y. Kitchen (Italian) is a charming “California

beautifully prepared, elegant small plates designed to pair with fine wines and allow guests to taste multiple, exciting dishes in a single sitting. Housed in the charming Mirabelle Inn, this modern American restaurant has a European influence as well as a Californian emphasis on food that is seasonal, local and sustainable. 409 First St., Solvang, 805/688-1703. $$$

version of a little Italian farmhouse” with a focus on

Dos Carlitos Restaurant & Tequila Bar

The Gathering Table at Ballard Inn (California Fusion) is overseen by Owner/Chef Budi Kazali and offers a fun and inviting place to gather over incredible food that’s meant to be shared in a warm and inviting modern farmhouse atmosphere. 2436 Baseline Ave., Ballard, 805/688-7770. $$-$$$$

The Hitching Post (American) is an old-fashioned, western-style steakhouse and lounge just a few minutes off Hwy. 101. In addition to Newport Meat Company beef, there are also ribs, quail, turkey, duck and ostrich plus seafood on the menu. 406 E. Hwy. 246, Buellton, 805/688-0676. $$$–$$$$ Los Olivos Café and Wine Merchant (Californian) is a casual restaurant in one of the town’s original Main Street buildings. The thoughtful menu of homemade pizzas and California cuisine is complemented with an enormous list of wines from the adjacent store. 2879 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-7265. $$

Pico (Californian), specializes in a menu of approachable Californian cuisine sourced from locally farmed, seasonal ingredients. Chef Drew Terp offers a creative, eclectic spin on American comfort food with an extensive wine list showcasing

unfussy rustic Italian food made from fresh, local ingredients. Expect inventive salads, woodfired pizzas and house-made pastas with everything from seasonal seafood to duck ragu. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez, 805/691-9794. $$-$$$

Trattoria Grappolo (Italian) is a great destination for gourmet pizzas from a wood-burning oven, fresh salads made with local produce and nightly specials. Other specialties include: Carpaccio, Rollino Veneto—rolled-up pizza pouches stuffed with smoked mozzarella and radicchio—pastas and fresh seafood dishes. Desserts such as chocolate flourless cake and house made tiramisu are also a hit with guests. Grappolo features a list of more than 150 wines from around the world. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-6899. $$-$$$

The Willows at Chumash Casino Resort (American) is a AAA Four Diamond Award-winner specializing in mouthwatering prime steaks and seafood. The elegance of this exquisite dining room is matched by incomparable views of the rolling Santa Ynez hills. 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez, 805/686-0855. $$$–$$$$

Dinner Nightly from 5:00pm Lunch Served Daily 11:30am - 2:30pm Aperitivo Mon-Thurs 4:00pm - 5:30pm

805-691-9794 1110 Faraday Santa Ynez, California www.sykitchen.com

SUMMER 2018

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DINING OUT SAN LUIS OBISPO

DINING OUT

The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/blog/coastal-seasons-dining-out-guide.

3 0 E XC E L L E N T R E S TA U R A N T S I N S L O C O U N T Y

San Luis Obispo City

Paso Robles & Templeton

Buona Tavola (Italian) has delighted

Bistro Laurent (French) offers an

Central Coast diners since 1992 with flavors and family recipes from Chef Antonio Varia’s native northern Italy—plus an extensive list of regional and European wines—in a peaceful garden setting in downtown SLO. 1037 Monterey St., 805/545–8000. Also visit their second location at 943 Spring St. in Paso Robles. $$

escape to Paris in the heart of Paso Robles at this authentic French bistro on the city square. Dishes range from classics such as onion soup and steak frites to multicourse tasting menus paired with local and international wines. 1202 Pine St., 805/226–8191. $$-$$$

Café Roma (Italian) has attracted a loyal following to this rustic Italian restaurant in historic Railroad Square for decades by offering authentic Tuscan dishes in a romantic dining room and garden patio. Sip a cocktail or a glass of wine and munch on pizza at the casual bar, or feast on grilled octopus, fresh seafood, housemade pastas and hearty entrees such as wine-braised short ribs. 1020 Railroad Ave., 805/541–6800. $$

Guiseppe’s Cucina Rustica (Italian) offers simple, fresh, and authentic fare from Southern Italy in a downtown creek side restaurant setting. It’s a farm-to-table star: nearly everything is made in-house, from pastas and sauces to bread and gelato, with ingredients from local farms and purveyors. 849 Monterey St., 805/541–9922. $$-$$$

Luna Red (Fusion) attracts SLO residents and visitors alike to gather in this artsy, airy space on Mission Plaza to enjoy locavore world-fusion dishes, cocktails and local wines, and a lively late-night music scene. Ceviches, traditional Valencian paellas, tacos and tapas headline the menus. 1023 Chorro St., 805/540–5243. $$

Novo (Global) is a popular downtown eatery where flavors from around the globe meld with farm-fresh Central Coast ingredients. The eclectic menu includes everything from lettuce wraps and Thai curries to pork carnitas sopes and prime rib eye steak, plus savory seasonal dishes. 726 Higuera St., 805/543–3986. $$ 94

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Cello Ristorante & Bar (Italian) receives regular accolades for sourcing fresh regional ingredients and transforming them into inventive northern Italian dishes; the restaurant is also known for its extensive wine list, craft beer and cocktails. Wear your comfy jeans and cowboy boots or dress up in elegant attire at this chic dining room and bar at Allegretto Vineyard Resort. 2700 Buena Vista Dr., 805/369–2500. $$$

- Enoteca (Californian) is a magnet for foodies and wine aficionados from north county and beyond, specializing in contemporary locavore meals paired with award-winning Central Coast vintages in a sophisticated setting within the elegant La Bellasera Hotel. 206 Alexa Ct., 805/238–2834. $$-$$$

come with tantalizing salsas and sauces. 416 S. Main St., 805/434–3204. $$-$$$

Thomas Hill Organics (Californian) has been a favorite since it opened in 1997. This boho-chic eatery a block from the city square serves as a stellar showcase for ingredients from local farms and wines from regional vintners, large and small. Meats come from local purveyors, fish from nearby seas, organic produce from down the road and bread from Paso Robles artisan bakers. 1313 Park St., 805/226–5888. $$

Arroyo Grande & Grover Beach Ember (Californian, Italian) is a spot that local winemakers, farm hands, business folk and practically everyone else in SLO County who enjoys sharing food and wine with friends comes whenever they get a chance. Its Cal-Italian focus is simple: find fresh, quality ingredients in the vicinity, make nearly everything in-house, and cook most dishes over a wood fire in an open kitchen where everyone can enjoy the convivial, family-oriented vibe. No reservations accepted, so plan accordingly. 1200 E. Grand Ave., 805/474–7700. $$$

Il Cortile (Italian) is an intimate fine-dining establishment for rustic Italian dishes with a sophisticated Central Coast twist. The chef develops creative dishes after forays to local farmers markets and vendors, and suggests appropriate pairings from the extensive wine list. The menu changes seasonally, but perennial faves include seared scallops with sweet peas, homemade pappardelle with wild boar ragu and ravioli with lobster, shrimp, zucchini. 608 12th St., 805/226–0300. $$$

McPhee’s Grill (American) is the place if you’re hankering for mouthwatering barbecue and fine wines to boot. Many menu items—artichokes, pork chops, rib eye steaks and rack of lamb, for example—are grilled over traditional Central Coast red oak and

The Spoon Trade (American) cooks up classic American comfort food (made with healthy regional ingredients)—everything from deviled eggs and fried chicken and waffles to meat loaf and root beer floats—for hungry patrons throughout the Central Coast. The convenient location, a half block from the Grover Beach train station and a short walk to the beach, makes this a good choice for anyone staying in or traveling through the Five City region of SLO County. 295 W. Grand Ave., 805/904–6773. $$

Pismo Beach Blonde (Californian) is The Inn at the Pier’s signature restaurant, which sets the stage for quintessential California

dining with a vintage surfer vibe, an array of local wines and regional cuisine. Before or after your meal, head up to The Rooftop bar for craft beer and cocktails and panoramic ocean views. 601 Cypress St., 805/295–5565. $$$$

Ventana Grill (Latin American, Californian) is a casual, glass-walled restaurant with a bluff top setting overlooking the ocean and nearby beaches. Renowned for its eclectic Latin America-California fusion menu, try crab-encrusted mahi-mahi, an organic chicken mole bowl, or blackened diver scallops with shrimp, all served with pinquito beans and poblano rice. 2575 Price St., 805/773–0000. $$ Cracked Crab (Seafood) is where seafood lovers find nirvana at this casual crab shack, which cooks up savory seafood plucked from local and national and international vendors. Here you’ll find a vast array of menu choices, from abalone, crab cakes, and fish tacos to shellfish buckets and cioppino. 751 Price St., 805/773–2722. $-$$$ Lido at Dolphin Bay (Californian) sits perched on an oceanfront bluff at the swank Dolphin Bay Resort. The elegant Lido serves creative dishes made with fresh local ingredients, from artisanal breads and poached prawns with avocado to steaks and truffle fries. The wine cellar holds more than 800 bottles of regional and international wines. 2727 Shell Beach Rd., 800/516-0112. $$$

Oyster Loft (Seafood) is a raw bar with various oysters from the east and west coasts of the U.S., shucked on the half shell. This beach area eatery also serves a well-rounded selection of other ocean bounty, plus meat and poultry. 101 Pomeroy Ave., 805/295–5104. $$-$$$ SeaVenture Restaurant (Californian) features spectacular ocean views that unfold from the sophisticated third-floor restaurant at the SeaVenture Beach Hotel, a longtime local favorite


Cello Ristorante & Bar, Allegretto Vineyard Resort, Paso Robles. known for its contemporary coastal cuisine and extensive wine list. 100 Ocean View Ave., 805/773–4994. $$$

Cayucos The Grill at Cass House (American) is housed

Avila Beach Custom House (American) offers pancakes, pizzas, salads, steaks and seafood: this longtime local favorite serves an array of eclectic dishes in a casual setting with excellent views of sand and sea. 404 Front St., 805/595–7555. $-$$$

Gardens of Avila (Californian) has a one-acre onsite chef’s garden, and local purveyors provide abundant fresh ingredients for the coastal California dishes served at this romantic restaurant at Sycamore Springs Mineral Resort. Choose among various indoor/outdoor dining settings. 1215 Avila Beach Dr., 805/595–7302. $$

Ocean Grill (American) features wood fired flatbreads, inventive tacos, fresh seafood and grilled steaks and chops, among the many options at this upscale-casual restaurant with stellar views of Avila Bay. 268 Front St., 805/595–4050. $$-$$$

in a casual pavilion next to the historic Cass House bed-and-breakfast. The Grill sources the freshest possible ingredients from the onsite garden and local purveyors, then creates delectable seasonal dishes, many prepared in a wood-burning hearth. 222 North Ocean Ave., 805/995–3669. $$

Morro Bay Windows on the Water (Californian) features views of Morro Rock and the bay that surrounds diners at this sophisticated, glass-walled restaurant, famed for its organic and sustainably sourced ingredients, cocktails, and extensive 5,000-bottle wine cellar with 300 different varieties. 699 Embarcadero, 805/772–0677. $$$

Cambria Linn’s Restaurant (American) is owned by

Olde Port Inn (Seafood) specializes in fresh seafood and ocean views, which have lured patrons to this salty restaurant at the end of Harford Pier in Port San Luis for decades. Named one of the “Top Ten Seafood Restaurants in California” by The California Writers Association, the Olde Port Inn is a perennial favorite for dining, cocktails or banquets. 805/595–2515. $$-$$$

the Linn family, which has produced farm-fresh country produce and pies (especially olallieberry) for decades. The family restaurant has evolved into a one-stop complex where you can dine on comfort foods with a contemporary twist, pick up pies and shop for gourmet food and wine. 2277 Main St., 805/927–0371. $-$$

Robin’s (Asian, International) has long been defined by healthful dishes packed with flavors from Asia and around the world. Robin’s is best known for its house-made cioppino, curries, and many vegetarian options. 4095 Burton Dr., 805/927–5007. $-$$ Sea Chest Oyster Bar & Seafood Restaurant (Seafood) has lured patrons for more than 30 years to this cozy, cottage-style restaurant to line up early to snag prime ocean view tables overlooking Moonstone Beach, and to savor local oysters, cioppino, calamari steaks, crab legs and a wide array of other seafood delights. 6216 Moonstone Dr., 805/927–4514. $$-$$$

Sow’s Ear (American) is a longtime local fave that emphasizes a casual approach to dining, while offering refined comfort food and excellent service. 2248 Main St., 805/927–4865. $$

Ragged Point Ragged Point Inn Restaurant (American) features dramatic bluffs and vistas at the southern endpoint of the scenic Big Sur coast. This glass-walled restaurant places diners at the edge of the scene. Many seasonal ingredients come from the onsite gardens. 19019 Highway 1, 805/927–5708. $$ SUMMER 2018

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

Coming in the Fall Issue of Coastal Seasons IF YOU LIVE IN or will be visiting SLO County in the near future, you will want to have a copy of the fall issue of Coastal Seasons, which will feature the remarkable development of Paso Robles and surrounding towns. Once only famous for its county fair and heat in the summertime, Paso has become a destination, not just for wine but for its new, first-class hotels and inns, restaurants and lively downtown, all the while maintaining the city’s western roots.

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There will be more SLO County content—more Wine Country, a restaurant feature and a spread on the county’s resort golf courses. Don’t miss it, and let us know what you think. Happy summer!

David W. Fritzen, Publisher & Editor in Chief


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Compass is a licensed real estate broker (01991628) in the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. To reach the Compass main office call 805.253.7700

Charting a new course John and Mirella Venti have moved to Compass! Venti Partners are not your ordinary agent group. The husband and wife team of John and Mirella Venti have more than 40 years of combined experience delighting homebuyers and sellers alike. Their partnership with Compass is a seamless match given their proven ability to leverage cutting-edge technology in the real estate market, all while holding personal service and client advocacy as their highest values. People choose to work with John and Mirella because they are true experts in the Santa Barbara and Los Angeles markets, they consistently achieve maximum results, and make the home selling and buying experience a joy.

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Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine Summer 2018  

Our summer issue features outdoor adventures on the Carrizo Plain, Secrets of Santa Barbara, Coastal Histories of Morro, Cayucos and Cambria...

Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine Summer 2018  

Our summer issue features outdoor adventures on the Carrizo Plain, Secrets of Santa Barbara, Coastal Histories of Morro, Cayucos and Cambria...

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