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Spring

FEATURES

46 19 Great

Small Places to Stay

By Cheryl Crabtree

60 Santa Barbara County’s

Budding Cannabis Industry By Nick Welsh

Garden Guru Finds Inspiration in her own Backyard By Nancy Ransohoff

68 Scout, Lush Elements and 12

SBSEASONS.COM

Pearl Chase Society Historic Homes Tour By Anna Kodelashvili

FESS PARKER'S WINE COUNTRY INN & SPA IN LOS OLIVOS IS FEATURED IN “19 GREAT SMALL PLACES TO STAY.”

PHOTO: HENRY L. FECHTMAN

64 Home & Garden


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44 94

Page 34-Jennifer Koh. Page 26-Rock N Roll Tequila. Page 94-fine dining at Cello Ristorante & Bar, Allegretto Vineyard Resort, Paso Robles. Page 44-Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

DEPARTMENTS 18 Editor’s Letter 20 Contributors 22 Local Lowdown Spring Fashion Focus, Prison Yoga, Rock n Roll Tequila, Madisyn Taylor’s Daily Om, Cachuma Lake’s Disc Golf, The River’s Journey at Wildling Museum, Montecito Recovery, Olympian Gary Hall, Visit San Simeon and Ragged Point, San Luis Obispo International Film Festival and More!

34 Datebook and Cultural Calendar: Performing and Visual Arts and Other Favorite Events for Spring 14

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36 On Exhibit Featured Artists at Local Galleries

43 Poetry “Now This is Spring” BY MARY L. BROWN

44 Legacies Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation

76 Explore Santa Barbara County 40 great things to do in Santa Barbara, Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria, Goleta, Back Country, Santa Ynez, Solvang and Los Olivos

78 Santa Barbara Urban Wineries

86

Chef’s Table Recipes from S.Y. Kitchen and Les Marchands Executive Chefs

88

Dining Out Our guide to favorite area restaurants

96 Coastal Seasons BY DAVID FRITZEN

BY JUDY FOREMAN

70 Wine Country Springtime Eats: Celebrate the season with these wine and food pairing tips BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK

Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County Wine Maps

74 Tee it up! Golf in Santa Barbara County

82 Explore San Luis Obispo County 25 great things to do in San Luis Obispo, Edna Valley, Arroyo Grande Valley, Pismo Beach, Oceano, Grover Beach, Shell Beach, Avila Beach, Los Osos, Baywood Park, Morro Bay, Cayucos, Cambria Paso Robles, Atascadero, Templeton and Santa Margarita

ON THE COVER SANTA BARBARA SEASONS: SIMPSON HOUSE INN, SANTA BARBAR A, PHOTO BY BLAKE BRONSTAD, COURTESY SIMPSON HOUSE. COASTAL SEASONS: HOTEL CHEVAL, PASO ROBLES, COURTESY HOTEL CHEVAL.

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) JUERGEN FRANK, ROCK N ROLL TEQUILA, ALLEGRETTO, KENDALL KLEIN

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S P R I N G 2 018 • VO LU M E L I X • N U M B E R 1

PUBLISHER & EDITOR IN CHIEF

David W. Fritzen M ANAGING EDITOR

Leslie Dinaberg A R T  D I R E C T O R

Dan Levin ADVERTISING M ANAGER

Danielle Hazlett COPY EDITOR

Lindse Davis CONTRIBUTING EDITORS FOOD

Nancy Ransohoff

POETRY

David Starkey

TRAVEL/SLO COUNTY STYLE

Cheryl Crabtree

Judy Foreman

CALENDAR EDITOR

Michelle Jarrard CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Mary L. Brown, Cheryl Crabtree, Leslie Dinaberg, Judy Foreman, Anna Kodelashvili, Nancy Ransohoff, Hana-Lee Sedgwick, Wendy Thies Sell, Nancy A. Shobe, Nick Welsh, Leslie A. Westbrook CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGR APHERS

Henry L. Fechtman Holly Lepere Paul Wellman EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ashley Killion Jessica Morelli Ali Rank

Copyright 2018, Tiger Oak Media, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from the publisher. F O R E V E R S U B S C R I P T I O N Santa Barbara Seasons and Coastal Seasons now offer a subscription that lasts “forever” (unless you cancel) for the cost of four quarterly editions. To subscribe, send check or money order for $19.80; email subscribe@sbseasons.com; or visit sbseasons.com/subscribe. Your subscription will automatically begin with the SPRING 2018 edition.

For advertising information, please contact the publisher.

Our hearts go out to all those affected by the tragedy in Montecito. We are here to help restore the beauty of your landscape. #MontecitoStrong

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SPRING EDITOR’S LETTER

“If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome.” — ANNE BR ADSTREET

“Spring is far more than just a changing of seasons; it’s a rebirth of the spirit.” —TONI SORENSON

Leslie Dinaberg MANAGING EDITOR

leslie@sbseasons.com

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PHOTO: AMY BARNARD

AFTER A DEVASTATING WINTER of what felt like one disastrous tragedy after another, I have never felt more ready to welcome the renewal of the spirit that comes with spring. The bright side of all of the heartbreak is that our community has proven how strong and resilient it can be. From our heroic first responders to the compassionate work done by dozens of nonprofits and hundreds of individuals, there is loads of evidence that the worst of circumstances often bring out the best of humanity, and that has certainly been the case in our tightly intertwined town. With all that in mind, I’m particularly happy to be able to use this spring issue to throw some light on some of the wonderful things that Santa Barbara County has to offer both locals and visitors. Our cover story, “19 Great Small Places to Stay,” by our resident travel editor Cheryl Crabtree, spotlights some real gems: a showcase of our favorite B&Bs, inns and hotels with less than 20 rooms. Whether you live near or far, all of these places are great getaways, which take you up the coast from Summerland and Santa Barbara to Ballard, Solvang, Los Olivos, Santa Ynez, San Luis Obispo, Cambria, Morro Bay and Paso Robles. Our Home & Garden section offers a peek into the Montecito home of renowned landscape designer and contractor Margie Grace, principal at landscape design-build firm Grace Design Associates. Grace and partner Dawn Close extensively remodeled a 1950s California ranch-style house, creating a welcoming park-like setting, complete with outdoor rooms and hidden gardens inspired by Ganna Walska Lotusland (their neighbor), Japanese culture and even Prince’s iconic Purple Rain album. We have a fascinating report from Nick Welsh on “Santa Barbara County’s Budding Cannabis Industry,” a potential billion-dollar industry offering a big payoff for a relatively small agricultural footprint. We also have seasonally-inspired “Chef’s Table” recipes from renowned Executive Chef Luca Crestanelli of S.Y. Kitchen and Executive Chef Weston Richards of Les Marchands, as well as wine and food pairing tips from writer and certified Specialist of Wine and Sommelier Hana-Lee Sedgwick. Wendy Thies Sell interviews former Olympic swimmer-turned-philanthropist Gary Hall, and Judy Foreman profiles the work of Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation. We also give you the scoop on Prison Yoga, Rock n Roll Tequila, Lush Elements, Wildling Museum and more. This issue also marks our new expanded foray into San Luis Obispo County, complete with beautiful new sections (and map illustrations by the talented Zack Paul) highlighting its best and most interesting places, natural wonders, history, golf, wineries and restaurants. Cheers to a spectacular spring!


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SPRING CONTRIBUTORS

Mary L. Brown | Poet

Dan Levin | Art Director

Featured Poet Mary L. Brown is the author of Drought, winner of the Claudia Emerson Poetry Chapbook Award. Her poems have appeared in various journals including The Valparaiso Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, The Pittsburgh Poetry Review and PMS PoemMemoirStory. When not working on her poetry, Brown devotes her time to raising funds for Planned Parenthood of the California Central Coast.

Dan Levin was born in Los Angeles in the 1960s, raised near New York City and returned to California to attend California State University, Northridge, where he earned a degree in graphic design and fine art in 1984. A graphic designer for more than 30 years, he is also an accomplished fine artist and assemblage artist and has exhibited his work in Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Australia and France. His “Objects of Curiosity” can be found in art collections from NYC to New Zealand. (danlevin.com)

Cheryl Crabtree has penned many a word for regional and national travel books, magazines and websites. She co-authored the very first edition of The Insider’s Guide to Santa Barbara, and her other credits include Hometown Santa Barbara, California Directory of Fine Wineries: Central Coast, Fodor’s California and Fodor’s The Complete Guide to National Parks of the West. She also covers the Central Coast region for Bindu Trips, a worldwide itinerary-based travel website.

20 S B S E A S O N S . C O M

Nancy Ransohoff | Writer Nancy Ransohoff, who wrote “Garden Guru Finds Inspiration in Her Own Backyard,” is a Rhode Island native who’s lived in Santa Barbara with her family for 25 years. A former editor for Bon Appetit and Architectural Digest, she writes for a number of regional magazines and covers Santa Barbara area restaurants for Westways. When she’s not writing, Ransohoff says, “I like to hike, especially in the spring, when trails are bursting with wildflowers like brilliant California poppies, lupine and buttercups and scented with sage.”

Henry L. Fechtman | Photographer

Wendy Thies Sell | Writer

Henry L. Fechtman’s work has appeared in numerous local and national magazines, including Architectural Digest, People, Town & Country, Bon Appétit, Arizona Highways, Spa, Garden Design, Santa Barbara Magazine, Montecito Magazine and Great Resorts & Hotels, among others. He was also an instructor for Brooks Institute of Photography and the still photographer for Julia Child’s PBS series, “Dinner with Julia.”

An Emmy Award-winning journalist who anchored the local TV news for 12 years on the Central Coast at KSBY-TV and KCOY-TV, wine country wanderer Wendy Thies Sell is now a freelance writer based in northern Santa Barbara County. She has had the pleasure of strolling through vineyards and sipping in cellars with hundreds of winemakers from Paso Robles to Santa Barbara, as well as interviewing scads of interesting Central Coast residents like Olympian Gary Hall, who she interviews in this issue of Santa Barbara Seasons.

Judy Foreman | Writer

Nick Welsh | Writer

Judy Foreman has been a lifestyle writer in Montecito and Santa Barbara since 1999, covering fashion, health, fitness, new businesses, nonprofits and people of interest on The American Riviera. Foreman has been a lifestyle columnist for The Montecito Journal, Santa Barbara News-Press and Noozhawk, as well as a featured writer for Santa Barbara Magazine and a contributing writer and fashion stylist for Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine.

Nick Welsh is a cartoonist trapped in a writer’s body. During his long career at The Santa Barbara Independent, he has yet to learn how to draw. Nor, in fact, has he ever learned to type. Even so, he manages to pound out a relentless stream of news articles every week on a wide range of subjects, including the one on “Santa Barbara County’s Budding Cannabis Industry” in this issue. Welsh also writes the Independent’s Angry Poodle column.

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) MARY L. BROWN, DAN LEVIN, STEPHANIE BAKER, WENDY THIES SELL, PAUL WELLMAN, JUDY FOREMAN, HENRY L. FECHTMAN, CAM CRABTREE

Cheryl Crabtree | Writer


LOCALS HELPING LOCALS

THE FUTURE OF BUILDING IN MONTECITO

W

hat’s the next year look like for building in Montecito? We sat down with Allen Construction’s President, Bryan Henson, to find out. In addition to helping local homeowners with insurance and/or rebuilding efforts after many of the area’s natural disasters, Bryan also has experience in both the disaster remediation and insurance industries. As such, he believes that affected homeowners should prepare for an 18-24 month road to recovery. While the County is doing all that they can to speed up the permitting process, there are a few other significant topics for homeowners to consider: INSURANCE: Be sure to enlist an expert ASAP to help you make sense of your insurance policy and offer suggestions on how to best negotiate your settlement. General contractors often have significant experience in this arena and can be a good ally. Allen and other local experts have been participating in community meetings throughout the region and will continue to do so as long as their guidance is needed. BUILDING YOUR TEAM: Getting your whole team—architect, builder, landscape designer—on board early makes the rebuilding process smoother. Bryan recommends creating local partnerships you can count on for the long haul. Local firms know the ins and outs of our unique, and quickly changing, planning and building processes. BUILD BACK BETTER: Bryan encourages affected homeowners to look at rebuilding as an opportunity. Possible considerations include incorporating greater energy efficiency, improving floor plans for better comfort and flow, or even reorienting to capitalize on views. PREPARE YOUR PROPERTY FOR THE FUTURE: Even if your property wasn’t directly impacted in December and January, you need to protect it from future forces of nature. Have an expert evaluate your home’s wildfire, storm, and erosion protection needs before the next storm hits. Allen Construction 805.884.8777 | buildallen.com


N E W & N OTE WO R TH Y I N S A N TA B A R B A R A

LOCAL LOWDOWN

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THE RIVER’S JOURNEY O N E Y E A R , S I X A R TI S T S , 9 2 M I LE S BY LESLIE DINABERG SIX LOC AL ARTISTS have pooled their talents around one very big idea—our communal connection to and responsibility for our water resources—uniting their unique points of view in a new exhibit, The River’s Journey: One Year, Six Artists, 92 Miles, on view at the Wildling Museum of Art & Nature through July 9. Initially joining together to experiment with the lesser-known medium of gouache (an opaque watercolor paint), the group— which includes Connie Connally, Holli Harmon, Libby Smith, Nicole Strasburg, Nina Warner and Pamela Zwehl-Burke—is united in a quest to use their art to inform the public about how the Santa Ynez River and the watershed functions and our individual responsibility to protect its viability. “Originally, I was just enthralled with the medium of gouache,” says Strasburg, who saw the potential through the work of artist

Thomas Paquette, who had a wildernessthemed show at the Wildling and also has some paintings in The River’s Journey. As Strasburg dug deeper into the subject matter of the watershed, “it became about so much more than painting the landscape.…I just keep reading and researching and discovering new connections.” The group, now known as Rose Compass (named for the flower-shaped figure on a map and “like the compass rose, our work reflects our individual points of view”), is very dedicated to the project. “The three devoted plein air artists have gone out every single Monday for the past two years to paint the water in the area,” says Strasburg. They routinely post their musings and progress on the project on the website (rose-compass.com) and are working to secure additional venues to showcase the breadth and depth of their work on

The River’s Journey, which visually brings to the forefront questions of stewardship, preservation and conservation. “Art starts the conversation while providing education and information that can change behavior and expectations at a pivotal moment in our new paradigm of water resource management,” says their collective artist statement. “When artists, scientists and water managers work together, we create a powerful and compelling message that moves the community to make better ecological and civic choices. Awareness, conservation, stewardship and collaboration will all be key to the new paradigm of protecting this resource and ensuring the longevity and viability of our entire community.” Wildling Museum of Art & Nature is located at 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. For more information, call 805/688-1082 or visit wildlingmuseum.org.

PHOTO: MONICA WIESBLOTT

Opposite, paintings in the Wildling Museum show The River’s Journey: One Year, Six Artists, 92 Miles include work by (clockwise from top left): Holli Harmon, Pamela Zwehl-Burke, Nicole Strasburg, Nina Warner, Connie Connally and Libby Smith. Below, Rose Compass artists (L-R): Nicole Strasburg, Connie Connally, Libby Smith, Holli Harmon, Pamela Zwehl-Burke and Nina Warner. After the exhibition ends in July, it will travel later in 2018 to Santa Barbara City Hall and Sullivan Goss Gallery.

S PR I N G 2018

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

The Prison Yoga Project BY LESLIE A . WESTBROOK

Kuhn, founder of Prison Yoga, began an enlightening journey into the darkness of Santa Barbara’s correctional institutions system. Her odyssey began with teaching yoga at Santa Barbara County Jail Honor Farm (medium security). Two years later, she was invited to teach in the high-security section of Santa Barbara County’s main jail. “I was really scared, but I said yes,” she recalls. Kuhn was escorted by a security guard as they rolled a huge securely locked plastic trash bin filled with yoga mats into the outdoor exercise area of Santa Barbara County’s main jail—a courtyard with high cement walls encircled by a barbed wire fence. Then, as her new pupils gathered, she instructed the inmates to bring their attention inward as she began their first yoga lesson. The environment was less than conducive to such a task. “There was lots of noise. Inmates were humming and screaming, and guards in the tower were talking on intercoms!” That first day of class, the noise did subside, and despite the setting, Kuhn encouraged the women to focus on their breath while introducing the concept of being “present with” and “aware of” their thoughts and emotions. “Being outdoors in the sunshine invited a healing environment,” says Kuhn. Inspired by her University of Santa

Monica’s graduate school question, “How would she use her masters degree to make a heartfelt contribution to the world?” the yogini decided then and there that she would teach yoga to a population that might not otherwise have access to the practice. Consequently, she created the nonprofit to follow her bliss. “My passion is to work with incarcerated (people) and work on re-entry,” says the married mother of two young adults. Prison Yoga classes are also taught at Los Prietos Boys Camp, and Kuhn worked with Michael Morgan’s Odyssey Project there. Both men and women are taught at the honor farm, main jail and, recently, Santa Maria Juvenile Hall. “Yoga is a great healing tool and modality for the inmates to not only connect with

their bodies, but see what’s going on in their heads and their hearts and really process it. It affords them the opportunity to express themselves at a soul level. Often, they are either beating themselves up or not taking ownership, feeling terrible and guilty. This allows them to see themselves beyond their choices and behavior,” Kuhn notes. Prison Yoga’s stated mission is to train incarcerated individuals in yoga, meditation and mindful practices in order to reduce the impact of trauma and stress of a life of incarceration, as well as build the skills and mindsets that increase successful re-entry and reduce recidivism rates. Kuhn enthusiastically stresses: “Through these practices, these populations see themselves beyond their choices and behavior. Everyone is worthy of love.” FOR MORE INFORMATION,

visit prisonyogaSB.org.

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PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, COURTESY PRISON YOGA (3), OPPOSITE, COURTESY COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA

IN JUNE OF 2012 , yoga instructor Ginny


C S I D R U O Y FLIP

AT CACHUMA LAKE BY LESLIE DINABERG

to the long list of fun recreational activities offered at Cachuma Lake, which now has an 18-hole championship level disc golf course! The 2.25-mile course is designed to challenge both newbies and experts, with multiple basket positions

ADD FLIPPING FRISBEES

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available to make the course different each time you play. This rapidly growing sport—disc golf is the 4th fastest-growing sport in United States, behind MMA, Roller Derby and Parkour, according to parkeddiscgolf.org—has rules that are similar to golf, with a set course and baskets set up as targets. Players seek to complete the course—which begins and ends in front of Cachuma Store—in the lowest number of total throws. Play is free with a $10 parking fee. Cachuma Lake is located off scenic Hwy. 154 in Santa Barbara County. FOR MORE INFORMATION,

visit countyofsb.org/parks/cachuma.sbc.

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S PR I N G 2018

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

ROCK N ROLL

TEQUILA BY LESLIE DINABERG

natural mango flavor, giving it sweet citrus notes and a super smooth finish. Cristalino: This Añejo Tequila is barrelaged for two–three years and filtered to perfection, making it cleaner and healthier. Cristalino is also made with 100% pure highlands blue agave, featuring classic notes of French oak and vanilla.    At press time, Rock N Roll Tequila is served in Santa Barbara at Viva Modern Mexican (1114 State St., 805/965-4770), Foxtail Kitchen & Bar (14 E. Cota St., 805/845-6226) and O’Malley’s (523 State St., 805/564-8904) and sold at Santa Barbara Liquor and Crafts (501 Anacapa St., 805/966-6716), as well as additional venues throughout the Central Coast. FOR MORE INFORMATION,

visit rocknrolltequila.com.

Rock N Roll Recipes FOR WEB EXCLUSIVE COCKTAIL RECIPES, VISIT SBSEASONS.COM/2018/03/ WEB-EXCLUSIVE-ROCK-N-ROLLTEQUILA-RECIPES/

PHOTOS: THIS PAGE, COURTESY ROCK N ROLL TEQUILA (2), OPPOSITE, COURTESY DAILYOM

THE HANDC R AFTED glass guitar bottles are eye-catching, but it’s the crisp distinct taste of Rock N Roll’s three premium tequilas that will really knock your socks off. The company was founded by Santa Barbara local Andy Herbst, an entrepreneur, surfer and soccer player, who came to the U.S. in the 1960s from South Africa and went to Santa Barbara High School and Santa Barbara City College, where he says he majored in surfing. After a successful career as a music promoter, Herbst traveled to the highlands of Mexico, where he was introduced to the smoothest, purest blue agave and soon turned his passion for tequila into creating his own label. His partners in the venture, which launched in 2017, include businessman Scott

Woolley and NFL great Dan Marino, who played quarterback for the Miami Dolphins and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. “After tasting Rock N Roll Tequila, I knew it was a quality spirit, and I wanted to be a member of the team,” says Marino. “It is great to be associated with a high-quality product at a reasonable price, and it doesn’t hurt to have an iconic name like Rock N Roll!” Crafted by Master Distiller Jose Aceves, a third-generation tequila producer, Rock N Roll’s 100% pure blue agave comes from deep in the highlands of Jalisco, Mexico. The bottles, which feature a unique patented top known as the “roadie,” provide the consumer a complimentary two shots of Platinum Tequila that come in three varieties: Platinum: Hand crafted, triple distilled, made with 100% pure highlands blue agave, giving it a delicious, smooth taste. Mango: Double distilled with 100% pure highlands blue agave and the highest-quality

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We can all do good. But together we can #dobetter.

DailyOm Founder Madisyn Taylor

Join the Santa Barbara Foundation at SBFoundation.org/dobetter.

The OM of Daily Messages BY NANCY A. SHOBE EVERY MORNING, a free inspirational Dai-

SOLVANG | BUELLTON | BALLARD | LOS OLIVOS | LOS ALAMOS | SANTA YNEZ

lyOM message arrives in my email. How did I first hear about DailyOM? I have no idea. But what I do know is that I count on the daily messages written by Santa Barbarabased Madisyn Taylor to start my day. Editor-in-Chief Taylor and her husband, CEO Scott Blum, founded DailyOm in 2004 in Los Angeles when they decided to “do something bigger that could help shift the planet.” Previously, Taylor created and operated a successful aromatherapy company in Los Angeles, and Blum, the person whom Taylor lovingly refers to as the “brains” of the company, was in the music industry. They agreed that their new business should have a global impact and wouldn’t be product based—so DailyOM began with Taylor’s writings and daily messages. “I walk around with a journal attached (continued on pg. 29)

Book your trip at VisitSYV.com to experience the beautiful Santa Ynez Valley 18SYV009 Santa Ynez Valley “Picnic” ad S P R I N G 2 0 1 8 Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine, Spring 2018, 1/3 Page 5.125” x 4.75”

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

SPRING

FASHION FOCUS

BEC AUSE THE TEMPER ATURE rarely dips below 60 degrees, layered looks are ideal for the Santa Barbara lifestyle. Whether you are a devotee of athleisure style; torn jeans, white sneakers with a sweater or blazer and white t-shirt; or a classic 9–5 polished and unique look for work, Santa Barbara’s retailers who shop the bigger venues of L.A., New York and Europe know that the fashion industry is trend-driven and will provide you with many options for spring style. Peppering your wardrobe with some of this season’s influences will give you a fresh take on your closet without throwing everything out that you bought last spring. Runway styles that translate well into our everyday wardrobes are where most retail stores shine with a practical, casual and cool array of options. Brittany McKinley, stylist for Diani, looks for abstract and geometric prints in soft color palettes, blush to light fuchsia and a modern updated take on spring classics like lace and eyelet tops in edgy cuts and textures. All of these tops can be paired with a culotte jean in really washed-out light denim. Mimi Doll at Jenni Kayne says their spring 2018 collection focuses on back-to-basic style, with clean lines and natural fabrics like cashmere, cotton and linen. Jenni Kayne also likes mixing in some classic prints like leopard, polka dots and stripes. Mostly neutrals like white, navy, oatmeal and earth tones like green and yellow will be in style, they report. Edgy and fashion-forward Marie Ferris, owner of Montecito’s newest fashion resource Juniper, says her store has a mix of eclectic colors and prints for spring. Soft romantic slip dresses and lace continue to be in style, as well as a boyish attitude with comfy cardigans and wonderful pastels with roughed- up denim. Rebecca McKinney, owner and buyer for Whistle Club, says her store features many items in brown tones, ditzy floral, statement earrings and an abundance of interesting iterations on the classic button-down shirt. Shoulder and sleeve interest continues, and a throw-back item that was everywhere on the spring must-have lists, the fanny pack, is also in high demand. Other items this spring are the return of anklets, dark denim, small 90s-inspired eyewear, rubber and rousching, and statement straw hats. White suiting and white sneakers once left for the gym will be a staple in your spring wardrobe with many looks. Fashion should reflect something for everyone, and spring in Santa Barbara provides just that.

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PHOTOS: BRITTANY MCKINLEY, COURTESY DIANI (4)

BY JUDY FOREM AN


THE OM OF DAILY MESSAGES

(continued from pg. 27)

to my hip,” says Taylor. She also takes Tuesdays “off work” to meditate at home in front of her personal altar to see what inspiration comes. “The most common email that I receive in response to DailyOM is, ‘Dear Madisyn: How do you know what I need to hear every day?’ We are all going through the exact same thing, but it looks a little different for each one of us,” says Taylor. “No one is spared his/her lesson.” Accompanying each DailyOM message is a stunning photograph and an online course offering, like Becoming a Peacemaker by international spiritual leader Deepak Chopra and the free Dalai Lama Speaks by the Dalai Lama. Santa Barbara locals Sadie Nardini and Beth Alexander offer courses on DailyOM as well, and local Zumba sensation Josette Tkacik is currently developing a course. Almost all of the courses are offered at a low sliding-scale price of $10 to $40, and individuals choose what they pay. “Healing should be available to everyone,” says Taylor. Two of Taylor’s four published books were directly inspired by DailyOM, including DailyOM: Inspirational Thoughts for a Happy, Healthy and Fulfilling Day and DailyOM: Learning to Live. Taylor understands better than many the importance of taking care of oneself. She’s had a lifetime of managing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and mononucleosis. She is a highly sensitive person who has struggled with bright lights, overstimulation, anxiety and depression. Taylor found that meditation became her way to health, as well as healthcare and supplements prescribed by her doctor, David Allen M.D., a Santa Monica-based integrative physician. Taylor’s newest book, Unmedicated: The Four Pillars of Natural Wellness, chronicles her years of illness and her path to wellness. Through her self-identified four pillars of wellness—clear your mind, nurture your spirit, strengthen your body and find your tribe—Taylor takes readers on a journey toward reclaiming and rediscovering their own minds, bodies and spirits. Taylor is the gift that keeps on giving. How fortunate we are to have her inspiration, compassion and light in our community. FOR MORE INFORMATION,

visit dailyom.com.

S PR I N G 2018

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

GARY HALL JR.

How much can I afford?

How long will I have this loan?

MAKING A SPLASH IN SANTA YNEZ BY WENDY THIES SELL

Residential Lending

montecito.bank/mortgage

NMLS ID#: 472185 30

SBSEASONS.COM

GARY HALL JR. doesn’t swim anymore, but that will soon change. The former fastest swimmer on Earth sprinted through water to earn ten Olympic medals—five gold—at the 1996, 2000 and 2004 Summer Olympics. The 43-year-old Hall retired from competition and settled in Santa Ynez Valley seven years ago with his wife, Elizabeth, and their two children, Gigi (12) and Charlie (10). It’s not that Hall doesn’t like the water anymore—he loves swimming—but the area’s only public pool, the local YMCA, is indoors. Raised in sunlit Arizona, Hall is partial to swimming outdoors. And besides, at 6’6”, he needs more room than most to spread out his advantageous wingspan.

Swimming runs in his family; Gary Hall Sr. also swam in three Olympiads and set 10 world records, and Hall’s grandfather, Charles Keating Jr., was a collegiate swimming champion. They built the Phoenix Swim Club, the “ultimate sport playground,” that the younger Hall credits with his success in the pool. “For me, it was never working out. It was just going and playing,” says Hall. “We went straight to the pool after school. It was that environment that had more of an impact on me being a successful swimmer than any genetic inheritance or anything like that.” Following in his family’s footsteps, Hall is building something similar. He is executive director of Santa Ynez Valley Community Aquatics Foundation, which has raised more than $7 million to construct a state-of-the-art aquatic, wellness and sports medicine facility. The foundation secured an Olympic-size swimming pool used by USA Swimming during the 2016 Olympic Trials. The stainless steelpaneled pool was disassembled and, when reconstructed at Santa Ynez Valley Union High School, will make up two pools; an Olympic-size competition pool and a smaller warm pool; both

PHOTOS: COURTESY GARY HALL (2)

Fixed or Adjustable Rates?


MONTECITO RECOVERS WE’VE GOT YOUR BACK THE WORD COMMUNITY has never meant more since Santa Barbara and Montecito were ravished of hillside foliage and loss of lives, ignited by the Thomas Fire and fatal debris flow that closed down our town in early December and January. Broken pipes, boulder filled creeks, mud, lost homes and businesses and evacuation orders became the new normal—but not for long. Nonprofits, first responders, neighbors, support volunteers and rapid response teams stepped up to save beloved Montecito with an urgency and determination. Mother nature may have tried to rip the heart out of its residents, but within hours and weeks agencies providing shelter, food, support, preparedness, emotional support and local assistance centers rose like phoenixes to help the needy and set the community healing and cleanup in motion. With too many to mention, here are a few of those local heroes who provided shelter, food, support and preparedness and are still doing it everyday, even after months have passed.

COMPILED BY JUDY FOREM AN & CONNIE SMITH

DIRECT RELIEF coordinates medical needs and works to coordinate responses, including free tetanus vaccines. Direct Relief also made a $300,000 donation directly to victims and donated supplies and equipment. Directrelief.org AMERICAN RED CROSS provides disaster relief, medical support, food and water. Redcross.org Started by locals, the 93108 FUND raised funds for hourly wage earners and those in the service industries whose jobs and wages were curtailed by the evacuations. 93108fund.org SANTA BARBARA BUCKET BRIGADE provides various opportunities for volunteers to help clear mud, provide emotional assistance and save oak trees. santabarbarabucket.org HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF SANTA BARBARA

provides volunteer opportunities for rebuilding, especially for those with technical building skills. Email rose@sbhabitat.org to volunteer.

COAST VILLAGE ROAD RECOVERY CENTER

works to connect those in need with help. coastvillageroad.com/thomas-fire-mudslide-assistance

Mortgage questions? We’ve got answers!

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY SERVICES

Readysbc.org provides alerts and information as well as links to resources. ANIMAL SERVICES, 805/681-5285, provides disaster planning tips and resources for owners of pets and livestock.

Residential Lending are expected to be open to the public in 2019. “We’re handing over an $11.2 million aquatics and sports science facility,” Hall says. “It will be a great community center for Santa Ynez Valley.” And that’s when one of Santa Barbara County’s most decorated Olympians will dive back in.

“Once this pool goes in, I’ll be swimming every day,” Hall vows. On dry land, the influential Hall has delivered more than 80 keynote speeches internationally on advancements in sportsscience and medical research. His 1999 diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was pivotal. Hall has testified multiple times on Capitol Hill, successfully advocating for diabetes research funding; he spoke at a Vatican conference on stem cell breakthroughs; and he serves on several boards including Sanford Health International and National Youth Sports Health & Safety Institute. The next Summer Games, the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, is on his calendar: “That’s going to be a lot of fun!” And in his spare time, Hall handcrafts western comic book-inspired leather belts and guitar straps for friends and musicians such as Lucinda Williams and Foo Fighters’ guitarist Chris Shiflett. “It’s a kind of cool unexpected direction to be taking it.” There is nothing unexpected about Gary Hall Jr. doing something cool.

Loans up to $5 million* Fixed & Adjustable Rates Owner Occupied & 2nd Home *Subject to credit approval

montecito.bank/mortgage

NMLS ID#: 472185 S PR I N G 2018

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY

SAN SIMEON AND RAGGED POINT ROAD TRIP BY CHERYL CR ABTREE

up scenic Hwy. 1, but heard the road is closed? Yes, the highway is closed north of Salmon Creek Falls, 7.5 miles north of Ragged Point, just below the site of a mudslide that covered the highway at Mud Creek. It’s not expected to reopen until late summer 2018, but the stretch of coast from San Simeon to Ragged Point and Salmon Creek offers a taste of the full Hwy. 1 experience, with dramatic vistas, elephant seals, otters and Hearst Castle. Here are just few of this gorgeous area’s highlights, news and springtime events.

HANKERING FOR A ROAD TRIP

R AGGED POINT

Stop at Ragged Point Inn and Resort, on a 350-foot cliff about 16 miles north of Hearst Castle, to gaze at the stunning Big Sur coastline that stretches to the north. Dine in the glass-walled restaurant or garden-rimmed patio, taste wines, grab an espresso or pick up a sandwich to go. You can also hike along a trail from the 350-foot bluff top down toward the beach. 19019 Hwy. 1, Ragged Point, about 20 miles north of San Simeon, 805/927-4502 hotel, 805/927-5708 restaurant, raggedpointinn.com.

PIEDR AS BLANCAS ELEPHANT SEAL ROOKERY

About 22,000 elephant seals (at last count) haul out on beaches near Point Piedras Blancas every year. They typically arrive in November and December to give birth and mate. By early March, all adult seals and most sub-adults and juveniles have returned to sea. The weaned pups (weaners) remain, exploring their beach environment and using stored fat to grow. “This age is as cute as elephant seals get,” says Michele Roest, founder and principal of Science and Environmental Education Development (SEED). By mid-April, females begin to arrive for the spring molt. In late April to early May, the beaches are packed with females that haul out for a 30- to 45-day “catastrophic” molt—they shed all the fur on their skin and grow an entirely new coat. For

spectacular views of the beach scenes below, hike the bluff-top Boucher Trail (3.8 miles round-trip). Elephant Seal Vista Point, 4.5 miles north of Hearst Castle. Friends of the Elephant Seals Visitor Center, 250 San Simeon Ave., San Simeon, 805/924-1628, elephantseal.org. WILLIAM R ANDOLPH HEARST MEMORIAL STATE BEACH

On the ocean side of Hwy. 1 across from Hearst Castle, this scenic beach with a pier on San Simeon Bay is a fantastic place to hang out for a few hours or a day. Be sure to pop into the Coastal Discovery Center at the beach and check out its new outdoor Whaling History exhibit. Continue on the frontage road near the beach entrance to explore Old San Simeon, formerly an 1800s whaling village, where you can pick up lunch at Sebastian’s Café and sample wines at the Hearst Ranch Winery tasting room. This spring, the winery

SAN LUIS OBISPO INTERNATIONAL FILM March 13–18 FESTIVAL 32

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PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, ISTOCK, MICHELE ROEST, COURTESY SAN LUIS OBISPO FILM FESTIVAL

A new realigned section of Hwy. 1, above, stretches three miles, from the Arroyo de la Cruz Bridge near San Simeon to Point Piedras Blancas. The project, initially conceived in 2000, moved the road farther inland, away from beaches that seals had begun to frequent regularly. The new road offers great views and wide bike lanes. Left, visitors flock to see elephant seals near Point Piedras Blancas.

partners with Sea for Yourself Kayak Outfitters to offer a kayak, wine and lunch package. Call 805/467-2241 for details. 750 Hearst Castle Rd., San Simeon. HEARST CASTLE

Officially called Hearst San Simeon State Historical Monument, the magnificent 127-acre Hearst Castle perches on a hilltop overlooking San Simeon Bay. Even if you don’t have time to join a tour via a 20-mile tram ride up the hill, you can browse the museum exhibits and view an IMAX film about William Randolph Hearst’s life in the visitor center. 750 Hearst Castle Rd., 800/444-4445, 518/218-5078, hearstcastle.org. HUNGRY FOR MORE? Big Sur’s Pfeiffer Bridge has reopened, and Hwy. 1 along the Big Sur coast is open all the way from Carmel and Big Sur down to the tiny town of Gorda. After your San Simeon and Ragged Point adventures, you can explore Cambria and connect to Paso Robles and Hwy. 101 via Hwy. 46 West.

CINEPHILES SHOULD MARK THEIR CALENDARS for SLO’s increasingly popular film festival. It presents contemporary and classic films at various venues, including the art deco Fremont Theatre, independent Palm Theatre and other sites throughout SLO County. slofilmfest.org.

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Spring Datebook Seasonal events, happenings and things to do for March, April and May

Jennifer Koh: Shared Madness, April 27, presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures


SPRING DATEBOOK

Find updated information and additional events at sbseasons.com/datebook.

Ongoing Through Mar. 25 The (curious case of the) Watson Intelligence The (curious case of the) Watson Intelligence spins in the orbit of four Watsons: Watson the trusty sidekick to Sherlock Holmes; Watson the loyal engineer who built Bell’s first telephone; Watson the unstoppable super-computer that became reigning Jeopardy! Champ; and Watson the amiable techno-dweeb who, in the present day, is just looking for love. Presented by PCPA. | 7 p.m. Fri. and Sat., 1:30 p.m. Sun. and Wed. Severson Theatre, 870 S. Bradley, Santa Maria, 805/922- 8313, pcpa.org.

Through Apr. 1 Keith Puccinelli To announce the extraordinary gift of works and an archive by Keith Puccinelli, as well as the recent establishment of The Frances Garvin and Keith Julius Puccinelli Endowed Fund, UCSB’s AD&A Museum presents a celebratory exhibition in anticipation of a larger, forthcoming presentation of this incredible donation. | AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951,

Mark Morris Dance Group: Pepperland, May 10. Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures.

museum.ucsb.edu.

Through Apr. 29

PHOTOS: (L-R) JUERGEN FRANK; STEPHANIE BERGER, COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

Chiura Obata: An American Modern Surveying Obata’s rich and varied oeuvre, this exhibition features more than 100 superb works of art, many of which have never been on public display. Drawing from private and public collections, the retrospective showcases representative works from every decade of Obata’s career and presents them under thematic groupings in a loosely chronological order. | AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

Through Apr. 29 Jane Gottlieb Photographs France Jane Gottlieb’s vision of France is not like anyone else’s. Riotous in color, hyper-vibrant in energy and deeply Californian, shot through with a purely Mexican palette. When she discovered the possibility of hand painting Cibachrome prints, she had the tools to change the world to match her vision. The exhibition includes 20 works by Gottlieb that survey both the development of her techniques and the specific motifs she has concentrated on in France. | AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

Through May 27 Crosscurrents Before the invention of photography, painted portraits were the most coveted means of commemorating important members of society. This exhibition, drawn

exclusively from the permanent collection, explores American, British and French portraitists from the Colonial period through the Industrial Revolution. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/884-6423, sbma.net.

Through Jul. 9 The River’s Journey Local artists Connie Connally, Holli Harmon, Libby Smith, Nicole Strasburg, Nina Warner and Pamela Zwehl-Burke have pooled their talents around one very big idea—our communal connection to and responsibility for our water resources—uniting their unique points of view in a new exhibit, The River’s Journey: One Year, Six Artists, 92 Miles. | Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang, wildlingmuseum.org.

March 17 Dancing With The Stars: Live!— Light Up The Night Following the success of Dancing with the Stars: Live!—Hot Summer Nights and its 25th TV season, America’s favorite dance show goes back on tour across America this winter. Fans of the show have the

opportunity to see the best ballroom dancers in the business perform live as this all-new production showcases every style of dance seen on ABC’s hit show, from sizzling salsas to elegant waltzes and high-energy group numbers, plus original pieces choreographed by Emmy-winning choreographer Mandy Moore. | Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St., 805/963-4408, axs. com/events/343881/dancing-with-the-stars-live-tickets.

17–Apr. 29 Richard Schloss Lauded as a “a master of atmospheric perspective” by American Artist Magazine, the oil paintings of Richard Schloss are a testament to the beauty of the land and sea that surrounds us. Schloss is recognized as one of California’s best landscape artists. | Opening reception Mar. 17, open Fri.-Sun. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and by appointment, Palm Loft Gallery, 410 Palm Ave., Loft A-1, Carpinteria, 805/684-9700, palmloft.com.

23–24 Romeo and Juliet Using music by Sergei Prokofiev, State Street Ballet and Artistic Director Rodney Gustafson highlight the most emotional and romantic moments of the world’s most treasured love story. The result is spellbinding, with fast-paced action and enhanced empathy for the young lovers. | 8 p.m. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

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SPRING DATEBOOK

25–26

NatureTrack Film Festival The festival kicks off with an opening reception at the historic and newly reopened Mattei’s Tavern prior to screenings that day. A full slate of films is offered on Saturday, and the festival concludes on Sunday with a half day of programming and a closing reception. | Various Los Olivos

Speaking of Stories: Surprising Stories Sometimes people will surprise you, and all of these stories promise to do just that. This season’s stories include: You Don’t Miss Your Water (‘Til the Well Runs Dry) by T.C. Boyle, Take My Hand by John Romano and Bleacher Couch Man by Jess Walter. | Center Stage Theater, 751

venues. 805/886-2047, naturetrack.org/ naturetrack-film-festival.

Paseo Nuevo, 805/963-0408, speakingofstories.org.

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Sophisticated Ladies The Center for Successful Aging presents Sophisticated Ladies, an entertaining tribute to the Assistance League of Santa Barbara for its 70 years of service to the community. The tribute features Santa Barbara jazz conductor and musician Ike Jenkins and his amazing 20-piece Santa Barbara Big Band (all of whom are music teachers). The show, directed by Rod Lathim, is sure to be an inspiring and fun-filled night of entertainment. | Marjorie Luke Theater,

San Francisco Symphony Founded in 1911, San Francisco Symphony is among the country’s most artistically adventurous and innovative arts institutions. Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas has won 11 Grammys for his recordings, is the recipient of the National Medal of Arts, and is a Chevalier dans l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France and renowned musician Gil Shaham is one of the foremost violinists of our time. | Granada Theatre, 1214

Santa Barbara Jr. High, 721 E. Cota St., csasb.org.

On Exhibit Now

Adolf M. Brougier (1870-1926) Santa Barbara Pergola, circa 1920 Framed Oil on Canvas, 26” x 20” Overview: Adolf Brougier was born in Germany, he studied art in both Germany and France. He traveled and painted extensively, particularly in Switzerland and England, where he produced many portraits and landscapes. Brougier moved to Santa Barbara in 1917 where he remained until his death in 1926. He was a member of the Royal Academy of British Artists and his work was exhibited at Curtis Gallery in Los Angeles (1924) and Holland & Garrison Gallery in Los Angeles (1924). Gallery: Stewart Fine Art 215 W. Mission St., Santa Barbara 805/845-0255, dianestewartfineart.com

23–25

SBADA MEMBER

24–25 Liszt and Tchaikovsky Benjamin Britten’s The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra has delighted audiences of all ages since its premiere in 1946. This considerable program, performed by Santa Barbara Symphony, includes Liszt’s first Piano Concerto and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5. | Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

24–May 28 Robert Stivers Noted and highly collectible fine art photographer Robert Stivers—whose work is in major collections such as the Bibliothèque nationale, the Getty Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum Ludwig and the Victoria and Albert Museum—is on hand for an artist reception at Los Olivos’s new R & D Gallery, launching a comprehensive installation of his black and white photography. | Reception Mar. 24, 5–7 p.m. Work remains on view through May 28. R&D Los Olivos, 2446 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, randdlosolivos.com.

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State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

31 It’s Magic! America’s longest-running magic revue returns to dazzle audiences with an all-new lineup of top illusionists direct from exotic showrooms and Hollywood’s famous Magic Castle. You won’t believe your eyes as top magicians perform incredible feats, from jaw-dropping sleight of hand and offbeat comedic magic to mind-boggling full-stage illusions. | 8 p.m. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

April 3 Julia Bullock Julia Bullock, a young soprano who has established an enviable career showcasing her luminous full voice, makes her Santa Barbara debut in a UCSB Arts & Lectures presentation. This captivating artist proves she is equally at home with opera and concert repertoire in a program featuring Schubert, Barber and contemporary blues. | Music Academy of


the West, Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

4 The Moth Mainstage What began as a modest storytelling collective in its founder’s living room has grown into an epic, nationwide phenomenon with a cult-like following. In the Moth’s Mainstage, each story is true and every voice authentic, and the show dances between documentary and theater, creating a unique, intimate, and often enlightening experience for the audience. | 8 p.m. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/9630761, lobero.org.

4 Pete McBride and Kevin Fedarko, “Between River and Rim: Hiking the Grand Canyon” In an effort to share the Grand Canyon’s uncharted glory and shed light on the many threats it faces, Photographer/Filmmaker Pete McBride and Writer Kevin Fedarko set off on an audacious and demanding adventure: to transect the length of the canyon on foot. They now find themselves among only a handful of people who have through-hiked the entire canyon. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

5 Indigenous Poetry in Contemporary Mexico: Voices, Translations, Cultures Several contemporary poets from Mexico read from their works written in indigenous languages, including their own translations into Spanish and English. This is a great opportunity to listen to the new voices that re-define the literary landscape of Latin America today. | AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951,

STEWART FINE ART

museum.ucsb.edu.

5 Maria Popova in Conversation with Pico Iyer A self-described reader, writer, interestingness huntergatherer and curious mind at large, Maria Popova is the creative mind behind Brain Pickings, an immensely popular online compendium of treasures spanning art, science, poetry, design, philosophy, history, anthropology and more. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535,

Established 1986 Diane Warren Stewart Open from 11 to 5:30, closed Thursday and Sunday, available by appointment.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

8 Studio Sunday On the second Sunday of each month, participants explore a different medium, including clay, metal, ink, wood, photography and paper. All projects are inspired by works of art in the Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s permanent collection or special exhibitions. Also May 13. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130

215 W. MISSION STREE T HENRY JAMES SOULEN (1888-1965) “PRESENTATION TO THE ROYAL CHILD” CIRCA 1920 FR AMED OIL ON CANVAS 28” HIGH X 28” WIDE

SANTA BARBAR A, CA 9 3101 805-8 45-0255 PARKING IN BACK

State St., 805/884-6430, sbma.net.

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SPRING DATEBOOK

12 Sir András Schiff Sir András Schiff is world-renowned and critically acclaimed as a pianist, conductor, pedagogue and lecturer. He returns to Santa Barbara for his seventh CAMA Masterseries appearance in recital. Knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for his services to music, Schiff is one of the piano’s true legends. 8 p.m. | Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

12–29 The Invisible Hand Capitalism intersects with Islamic fanaticism in a race against time in this heart-pounding thriller, set in Pakistan and presented by Ensemble Theatre Company. An American investment banker is kidnapped and held for a $10-million ransom. When his company refuses to meet the terrorists’ demands, he convinces his captors that he can manipulate the stock market to make his own ransom. | The New Vic Theatre, 33 W. Victoria St., 805/965-5400, ensembletheatre.com.

15 Poetry as Portraiture: Adam Zagajewski and Andrew Winer Prize-winning globally admired poet Adam Zagajewski writes with precision and wonder about the calm and courage of ordinary life. His most recent book, Slight Exaggeration, is a blend of memoir, essay and anecdote, in which he defines poetry as a slight exaggeration, until we make ourselves at home in it. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art,

On Exhibit Now

Whitney Brooks Abbott Yellow Bowl, 2017 Oil on canvas, 30” x 24” Overview: Whitney Brooks Abbott is a fine arts graduate of UC Santa Cruz. She also completed a fellowship at Yale School of Art in Norfolk, CT. Abbott is a second generation member of the Oak Group, based in Santa Barbara since 1986. She currently lives and paints in Carpinteria, and is part of the Brooks and Abbott families that have farmed the area for many generations. Gallery: Sullivan Goss–An American Gallery 11 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara 805/730-1460, sullivangoss.com 

Child Abuse Listening and Mediation (CALM) Celebrity Authors’ Luncheon More than 600 book lovers gather for a day of appearances and book signings from a variety of authors, both big-name and local, with all proceeds going to benefit the good work of CALM. Headline authors are interviewed at the 32nd annual event, with book signings and the opportunity to meet dozens of local authors as well. | Fess Parker Doubletree, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., calm4kids.org/events/ celebrity-authors-luncheon.

21 Blue Water Ball Santa Barbara Channelkeeper is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to protect the channel and its watersheds. Its advocacy is science-based, providing education about the channel and working to promote solutions to water pollution and aquatic habitat degradation. The 18th annual benefit event includes fine food and wine, a silent auction and live music, as well as an inspiring keynote presentation by conservationist and filmmaker Mimi DeGruy. | Deckers Brands Rotunda, 6601 Hollister Ave., Goleta, 805/9677611, sbck.org.

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Mahler 6 Santa Barbara Symphony’s rendition of Mahler’s Symphony No. 6 exerts an almost hypnotic hold on listeners. This immensely powerful work for nearly 100 players is truly orchestral in scope, presenting ample opportunity for listeners to revel in its sonic glories. | Granada Theatre, 1214 State St.,

Joyce DiDonato Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato entrances audiences across the globe with a warmth in her voice that can light a fire. With her latest and most personal album, In War and Peace, DiDonato offers powerful interpretations of Baroque arias. | Granada granadasb.org.

Bedlam Theater Company: Hamlet and Saint Joan Iconic figures from two great dramatic classics—William Shakespeare’s Hamlet and George Bernard Shaw’s Saint Joan—come vividly to life in two riveting stagings. SBSEASONS.COM

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21–22

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Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

1130 State St., sbma.net.

Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, SBADA MEMBER

Directed by Eric Tucker, four actors exhibit the adventurously pared-down aesthetic that has left Bedlam Theater Company in high demand. | Campbell

805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

21–22 Earth Day Festival Community Environmental Council’s annual Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival is all about bringing the community together—something we need more than ever at this time. Come together to heal, to help build climate resiliency, and to work toward local solutions to environmental concerns.


| 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St., sbearthday.org.

24 An Evening with Anne Lamott Profound, caring and hopeful, author Anne Lamott is known for addressing complex subjects like addiction, motherhood and faith with self-effacing humor and ruthless honesty. Lamott’s numerous works of fiction and her memoir have become handbooks for parents and writers whose lives lean toward the joyously messy. Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures. | Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, artsandlectures. ucsb.edu.

26 TAO: Drum Heart Combining highly physical Taiko drumming with contemporary costumes, precise choreography and innovative visuals, the performers of TAO: Drum Heart create a modern, dynamic performance showcasing the ancient art of Japanese drumming. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

26 Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation Clam Bake Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation’s traditional New England clam bake includes a selection of wines to match the distinctive flavors of the sea, online and silent auctions, and a raffle with a variety of fun and exciting items, with all proceeds going to local children battling cancer. | The Harbor Restaurant, 210 Stearns

PHOEBE BRUNNER AN EXHIBITION IN APRIL – MAY

11 East Anapamu St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 730-1460

www.sullivangoss.com

Wharf, 805/963-3311, teddybearcancerfoundation.org.

26–May 13 The Hunchback of Notre Dame Two of the biggest names in American musical theatre, Alan Menken (Beauty and the Beast) and Stephen Schwartz (Wicked), team up to deliver an emotionally sweeping score and powerful story, making Disney’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame the musical an unforgettable instant classic. | Marian Theatre, 800 S. College Dr., Santa Maria, 805/922-8313, pcpa.org.

27 Jennifer Koh: Shared Madness No stranger to ambitious undertakings, violinist Jennifer Koh presents Shared Madness, an unprecedented project that speaks to the generous and supportive spirit that thrives within the musical community. Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, Koh performs a selection of short violin pieces created by more than 30 composers. | St. Anthony’s Chapel at Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St., 805/8933535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

27–29 Art of the Table Santa Barbara Museum of Art Women’s Board’s new signature fundraiser features dramatic and imaginative tablescapes created by ten designers of local and national acclaim, each inspired by a specific k SPRING 2018

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SPRING DATEBOOK piece of artwork from the museum’s permanent collection. The Signature Designer 2018, is the renowned John Saladino. Art of the Table opens with an elegant reception where guests will meet the designers and delight in their imaginative artistry. Public viewing of the displays follows the next day. For designer names and selected works of art, visit sbma.net. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/9634364, sbma.net.

29 Joey Alexander Trio Following his inspired performance in 2016, three-time Grammy Awardnominated jazz pianist Joey Alexander is back by popular demand, exhibiting his astonishing prowess as a composer, bandleader and artist looking toward a limitless future. Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures. ucsb.edu.

May 3

On Exhibit Now

Alfredo Ramos Martinez (1871 - 1946) Laguna Coast, c.1930, Mixed media on newsprint, 21-1/2” x 15-1/2 Overview: Born in Monterey, Mexico in 1871, Alfredo Ramos Martinez studied at the Academia Nacional de Bellas Artes in Mexico City between 1884 and 1892. As a young artist he caught the attention of Phoebe Hearst, who arranged financial support for Martinez while he studied and worked in Paris. He had a successful career in the U.S., painting portraits and murals in the Mexican peasant genre. His artwork was included in solo and group exhibitions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the San Diego Art Gallery and the Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. Gallery: James Main Fine Art 27 E. De la Guerra St., Santa Barbara 805/962-8347, jamesmainfineart.com

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SBADA MEMBER

Anthony Doerr in Conversation with Pico Iyer Author Anthony Doerr is lauded for his lyricism, precise attention to the physical world and gift for metaphor. With the eye of a scientist and the heart of a poet, the celebrated prose stylist reveals his keen naturalist’s perception and empathetic engagement with humanity’s largest questions in a conversation with fellow writer Pico Iyer, presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

7 The Capitol Steps The Capitol Steps has elevated political satire to an art form. No matter who or what is in the headlines, you can bet The Capitol Steps tackles both sides of the political spectrum and all things equally foolish. | 8 p.m. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

10 Mark Morris Dance Group: Pepperland Choreographer Mark Morris returns to Santa Barbara with Pepperland, a new work celebrating the 50th anniversary

of The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Pepperland features Morris’s ingenuity and musicality, accompanied live by a seven-piece chamber ensemble. | Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

11 The Weepies Musicians Deb Talan and Steve Tannen are the husband-wife duo of The Weepies. Through the struggles and joys of their life together, Talan and Tannen created remarkable musicianship. Backed by musicians who played on the original recording, The Weepies celebrate the 10-year anniversary of their popular album Hideaway. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

12 Soprano Isabel Bayrakdarian & St. Lawrence String Quartet Canadian-American soprano Isabel Bayrakdarian is widely celebrated for her strikingly multi-hued voice and immense interpretive talent. Established in Toronto in 1989, St. Lawrence String Quartet quickly earned acclaim at top international chamber music competitions and was soon playing hundreds of concerts per year worldwide. | 8 p.m. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

15 Audra McDonald Luminous soprano Audra McDonald has a voice that will make you believe in angels. She is radiant on Broadway and opera stages, as well as in film and television. Backed by a superb trio of musicians, McDonald presents her trademark mix of show tunes, classic songs from movies and pieces written for her by contemporary composers. | Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

17 Arturo O’Farrill and Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra Pianist and composer Arturo O’Farrill is the multi-Grammy Award-winning founder of Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra. Don’t miss this cross-cultural, cutting-edge 18-piece powerhouse outfit on tour, delivering their unique fusion of Afro-Caribbean rhythms and jazz improvisation. Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures.


| Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

U AL The Presents Its Seventeenth Annual TH EPearl P E ARLChase CH A SESociety S O CIETY pr E s E nts its F i Ft EE nth ANN

histo ric ho mes to ur

Violin Fest Award-winning violinist Anne Akiko Meyers teams up with Santa Barbara Symphony Concertmaster Jessica Guideri for a program of violin treasures, including Vivaldi’s arresting Double Violin Concerto. | Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

Illustration: Gail Lucas

19–20

20 Pearl Chase Historic Homes Tour For more than 18 years, Pearl Chase Society, a nonprofit conservancy dedicated to preserving Santa Barbara and Montecito’s historic sites, landscapes and heritage, has featured diverse architectural landmarks in their annual Historic Homes Tour. Guests will tour five unique 20th-century residences hidden in the hedgerows of Montecito. These five homes have purposefully been chosen to represent the unique culture, history and style of the upscale oceanside town. | 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Various Montecito locations, pearlchasesociety.org.

20–21 Celebration of Stories Enjoy readings of the following inspirational and moving stories: The Haunting by John Connally, Wishing by Deena Goldstone and Refresh by Benjamin Percy, presented by Speaking of Stories. | Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo,

Illustration: Gail Lucas

sunday, May m ay 20, 18, 2018 2014 Sunday,

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. • by advance reservation . From romantic cottage to elegant mediterranean FEATURING SEVERAL OF GEORGEWASHINGTON SMITH’S ,

. visit MONTECITO Five exceptional GRAND HOMESmontecito IN THE SPANISH homes REVIVAL STYLE $60 MEMBERS/$$70 NON-MEMBERS TICKET PRICE:$80 ticKet price: members/ 85 non-members

For reservations visit PEARLCHASESOCIETY.ORG or call (805) 961-3938

/PearlChaseSociety

805/963-0408, speakingofstories.org.

26-28 I Madonnari Memorial Day weekend brings the colorful I Madonnari Festival of Italian street painting to the Old Mission. The pavement blossoms with vibrant pastels for these three days, as artists create dazzling works that delight visitors year after year. Not only is the festival beautiful, but all proceeds benefit Children’s Creative Project, a nonprofit arts education program that serves 50,000 children in more than 100 schools with visual and performing arts workshops and performances throughout Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties. | 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Mission Santa Barbara, 2201 Laguna St., imadonnarifestival.com.

30 Brian Culbertson With love, romance and his recent 20th wedding anniversary serving as his inspiration, Brian Culbertson crafted 13 new songs that were released as Colors of Love on Valentine’s Day. A nearly threemonth-long U.S. concert tour brings Colors of Love to life in a vivid theatrical production. | 8 p.m. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

Get Back to Nature at the

Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

1212 MISSION CANYON ROAD • SANTA BARBARA, CA • (805) 682-4726 • sbbg.org

All locations are in Santa Barbara unless otherwise noted. For complete event listings, visit sbseasons.com. SPRING 2018

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SPRING DATEBOOK

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY EVENTS

Ongoing

April

Through Apr. 1

7

Jewelbox San Luis Obispo Museum of Art presents Jewelbox, a non-juried exhibition showcasing artwork from The Painters Group, whose members were asked to submit up to three pieces for exhibition. The concept was deliberately left open, with the only restriction being the size of the artwork. | San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo, 805/543-8562, sloma.org.

Alternative Viewpoints Alternative Viewpoints is an interactive mixed-media installation by artist Lori Wolf Grillias that grapples with a difficult subject: opioid addiction. In preparation, Grillias collected metal spoons from several locations, which are symbolic in her sculpture. | San

On Exhibit Now

Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo, 805/543-8562, sloma.org.

Richard Schloss End of Day, 2018 Oil on Canvas, 30” x 40” Overview: Richard Schloss was born in 1953 in Fort Worth, Texas but has worked and showed his art in Santa Barbara since 1972. He completed a Master of Fine Arts in Painting at UCSB in 1979 and a BA in Italian in 1981. He initially explored many different styles and mediums but focused on painting outside in the landscape, which he continued to do exclusively until the mid-1980s. Today he continues to paint en plein air on small paintings but does most of his work in the studio on large paintings. His commissioned work is on view at Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara Historical Museum and The Palo Alto Medical Foundations in Mountain View and in Sunnyvale, among others. His current show, “The Miracle of Atmosphere,” is a follow up to “The Miracle of Light” a beautiful and impressive show that was largely unseen due to the Thomas fire, mudslides and subsequent freeway closures. Gallery: Palm Loft Gallery 410 Palm Ave., Loft A-1, Carpinteria 805/684-9700, palmloft.com

42 S B S E A S O N S . C O M

March 16–18 Vintage Paso: Zinfandel Weekend Once a year, Paso Robles toasts its heritage variety, zinfandel. This three-day celebration features events at more than 100 wineries, a “Zin’ seminar and the Z After Party, pairing zinfandel with dessert and live jazz. Hosted by Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance at various locations around Paso Robles. | 805/239-8463,

Arlo Guthrie Arlo Guthrie is an American folk singer-songwriter and like his equally famous father, Woody Guthrie, he is known for singing songs of protest against social injustice. The Re:Generation tour is the spirit of an American family making music together. Arlo’s children Abe and Sarah Lee join their dad to present music of the Guthrie Generations. | 8 p.m., Fremont Theatre, 1035 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo, fremontslo.com.

7-8 10th Annual Wine 4 Paws Come enjoy the bounty of the Central Coast—with more than 80 local wineries, breweries, and olive oil producers participating—all to help support a great cause, Woods Humane Society. “Help homeless pets, one glass at a time,” by supporting participating Wine 4 Paws tasting rooms and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to Woods. No advance tickets needed! Print your free map/passport from the website, or get one at any participating winery during the event. | wine4paws. com for more info.

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The 39 Steps Mix a Hitchcock masterpiece with a juicy spy novel, add a dash of Monty Python and you have The 39 Steps, a fast-paced whodunit for anyone who loves the magic of theatre! Packed with nonstop laughs, over 150 zany characters (played by a cast of four), an onstage plane crash, handcuffs, missing fingers and some good oldfashioned romance! | San Luis Obispo

Koresh Dance Company, Deconstructing Mozart & Other Works Koresh Dance Co. produces contemporary works that are highly technical and deeply resonant. The troupe is widely recognized for its superb technique and emotionally-compelling appeal, promoting high-speed attack and gestural diversity drawn from Graham technique, Luigi jazz, classical ballet, hip-hop and Israeli folk dance. The Spanos Theatre program takes a musical and emotional journey through choreographer Roni Koresh’s classic highlights and features his seminal work, “Deconstructing Mozart,” a collaborative masterpiece that dares to deconstruct the composer’s 23rd Piano Concerto. | 8 p.m., Alex and Faye

Repertory Theatre, 888 Morro St., San

Spanos Theatre, 1 Grand Ave., Cal Poly,

Luis Obispo, slorep.org.

San Luis Obispo, calpolyarts.org.

pasowine.com/events/vintage-pasozinfandel-weekend.

30-Apr. 15


27 La Santa Cecilia Named after the patron saint of music, La Santa Cecilia is a musical phenomenon that defies musical and cultural boundaries, taking inspiration from a long list of Pan American rhythms, as well as jazz, rock, rumba, bolero, tango, bossa nova and cumbia. With the captivating voice of lead vocalist Marisol Hernandez singing about love, loss and everyday struggles, this Grammy-winning band has become the voice of a new bicultural generation in the United States–fully immersed in modern music, but still close to its Latino influences and Mexican heritage. | 8 p.m., Fremont Theatre, 1035 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo, calpolyarts.org.

28-29 13th Annual Cambria Wildflower Show Come see a display of fresh wildflowers collected from the Monterey County line to the Morro Bay Estuary and from the coastal bluffs to the ride of the Santa Lucia Mountains. | Sat. noon-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Veteran’s Hall, 1000 Main St., Cambria, 805/927-2856, ffrpcambria.org.

28–29 Race SLO Festival Choose from four incredible races— marathon, half marathon, 5K and kids races—across two days, along with a finish line party highlighting the best of the Central Coast to celebrate each runner. | Various San Luis Obispo locations, slomarathon.com.

May

| San Luis Obispo Repertory Theatre, 888 Morro St., San Luis Obispo, slorep.org.

5 Flavors of SLO Sample some of the best food, wine and beer the Central Coast has to offer at the 10th annual Flavors of SLO, with all proceeds benefitting United Way of San Luis Obispo, which seeks to create lasting change in the community by focusing on the building blocks of a good life: education, health and financial stability. | Noon–5 p.m. Mission Plaza San Luis Obispo, 751 Palm St., San Luis Obispo, 805/781-7067, flavorofslo.org.

5-6 Cambria Olallieberry Festival Enjoy Olallieberry delicacies, along with live music, cooking demonstrations by local chefs, special activities for the kids and more. | 11 a.m.- 4 p.m., Cambria Historical Society,

Emerson’s Bar & Grill, McDonald has had a successful television and film career. She also regularly appears on the great stages of the world and with leading international orchestras. | 7:30 p.m., Sidney Harman Hall, 1 Grand Ave., Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, calpolyarts.org.

a variety of subgenres from mellow jazz harmonies to high-energy rhythms that are sure to get you on your feet. Proceeds from the event benefit SLO Jazz Festival, a nonprofit dedicated to celebrating and continuing the tradition of jazz music throughout the Central Coast. | Mission Plaza San Luis Obispo, 751 Palm St.,

17–20

805/781-7067, slojazzfest.org.

Paso Robles Wine Fest Now in its 36th year, Wine Fest is a Paso Robles tradition where wineries bring the Paso Robles region to one central location for four days of events. Venture into wine country for events at more than 100 wineries all weekend long. | Various locations around Paso Robles, 805/239-8463, pasowine.com/ events/winefest.

18–19 SLO Jazz Festival Tucked in the heart of downtown San Luis Obispo, SLO Jazz Festival offers

26 Beerfest Memorial Day Weekend brings beer lovers from all over out for San Luis Obispo’s biggest beer fest weekend. Plenty of food, beer, entertainment, games and fun are in store along with 23 sprawling acres of pristine grassy meadows and the scenic backdrop of Cerro San Luis Obispo Mountain and lush pastures of Madonna Meadows. | Madonna Inn Meadows, 100 Madonna Rd., San Luis Obispo, memorialdaybeerfest.com.

2251 Center St., CambriaOlallieberryFestival.com.   

12 Stephen Stills & Judy Collins It was 50 years ago that singersongwriter Stephen Still met singer-songwriter Judy Collins, known for her piercing ocean blue eyes. Their tumultuous love affair would later be immortalized by Stills with his composition “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes,” performed by Crosby, Stills & Nash on their landmark debut. Both artists would go gone to shape modern music with visionary approaches, but Stills and Collins’ short fiery union remains a transformative era for the two artists. | 8 p.m., Fremont Theatre, 1035 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo, fremontslo.com.

4-20

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Lost in Yonkers Winner of the 1991 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, this memory play by America’s great comic playwright is set in Yonkers in 1942. Ne’er-do-well Eddie deposits his two young sons on his stern mother’s doorstep when he takes to the road as a salesman. The boys are left to contend with Grandma Kurnitz, their sweet Aunt Bella (and her secret romance) and with their Uncle Louie, a small-time hoodlum in a strange new world called Yonkers.

Audra McDonald Audra McDonald is unparalleled in the breadth and versatility of her artistry as both a singer and an actress. The winner of a record-breaking six Tony Awards, two Grammy Awards, and an Emmy, she also received a 2015 National Medal of Arts from President Barack Obama. In addition to her Tony-winning performances in Carousel, Master Class, Ragtime, A Raisin in the Sun, The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess, and Lady Day at

NOW THIS IS SPRING BY MARY L. BROWN

a faded rain, hieroglyphs of drip   in painted caves. What we know is drought   so learn to hear  how sea shells curl    in mountain shale,  wringing out    their closing drops  of ocean. 


SPRING 2018

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Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation BY JUDY FOREMAN

SINCE ITS INCEPTION in 2002, Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation (TBCF) has provided emotional, educational and comprehensive non-medical financial support for families whose children are diagnosed with cancer, both during treatment and into recovery in Santa Barbara, Ventura and San Luis Obispo. While it’s a regional-focused foundation, TBCF can provide local families with more financial assistance than any other organization in the nation. Since Nikki Katz founded the nonprofit more than 15 years ago, TBCF has helped more than a thousand individuals and awarded over $1.8M in financial assistance to

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Six-year old Jayson (with volunteer Carla Tomson) was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma at age three. He has spent the past three years in and out of the hospital and is known as “Pizza Jay,” because when taking his photo for TBCF’s Gold Ribbon Campaign last year, the photographer said, “Say ‘Pizza,’ Jay!” and his little voice yelled out, “Pizza Jay!” Last year, Jayson underwent a stem cell transplant at City of Hope and is back home now and TBCF is assisting him up with tutoring, as he has missed a large amount of school due to his treatments.

families who have a child with cancer. Low- and moderate-income families can receive up to $5,000 for living expenses such as rent, groceries, car expenses or hotel accommodations near the hospital. For children who relapse, families can request an additional $2,500. The foundation serves children from birth to age 18, or, if diagnosed after 18 years old, until they turn 21. “With a disease as life-threatening as cancer, when it comes to caring for a child, parents shouldn’t have to make the decision to be at their child’s bedside when they are sick or be at work. That’s why Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation exists: to alleviate

the financial and emotional challenges so that parents can focus on what matters most— their child,” says Executive Director Lindsey Leonard. “Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation helps families— through their donors‘ enduring, generous support—to alleviate the financial and emotional strains experienced while caring for a child battling cancer. By supporting the family and covering payments of critical expenses including rent, utilities and car payments, plus educational assistance, it supports the physical and emotional needs of the children and their families to help children overcome learning challenges commonly associated with cancer and its treatment.” TBCF devotes a significant portion of their programs to emotional support through family support groups, realizing that children and families face many challenges after a cancer diagnosis. In partnership with local organizations and licensed professionals, TBCF offers groups for families whose child is newly diagnosed or undergoing treatment and bereavement support for those experiencing the loss of a child. They also provide childcare for younger children during support groups. Realizing that the stress of caring for a sick child is exhausting and isolating, TBCF hosts events, such as Mother’s Spa Day, to provide rest and rejuvenation for parents. Bear Necessities, another support group, provides families with furniture, appliances, clothing, bedding and hospital care packages. Family Fun Days are another important component of emotional wellness and can include excursions to sporting events and the children’s pediatric holiday party. Families of children in treatment can receive Christmas gifts, Easter baskets, Thanksgiving dinners, valentine baskets, grocery vouchers and, of course, lots of stuffed teddy bears to hug, all filled with love by donors whose generous support provide all these items and programs.  FOR MORE INFORMATION , call 805/962-7466 or visit teddybearcancerfoundation.org.

PHOTOS: KENDALL KLEIN

LEGACIES


Photo: Nell Campbell

Education is the first step. The SBCC Promise removes financial barriers to ensure that all local high school graduates have access to an outstanding and affordable education at Santa Barbara City College.

Your gift makes the SBCC Promise possible.

sbccpromise.org | (805) 730- 4416


Great 19 Small Places

toStay BY C HERY L C R ABTREE

W

hen it comes to lodging in the Central Coast, travelers enjoy a wealth of choices. A sprawling resort with swimming pools and a mega-spa? A hotel with 24-hour dining and concierge services? Or a trusted, dependable brand— say Ritz-Carlton or Four Seasons, Hyatt or Kimpton? We’ve got it all. Larger properties offer many perks and amenities. But some folks prefer to stay at small, intimate lodges that feel a lot like home—only better! “I nearly always seek out the smaller places that reflect the

owner’s unique character,” says a friend and colleague who travels often. She prefers more solitude and a homelike atmosphere to a busy hotel with a lively nightlife scene and dozens (or hundreds) of rooms. “A weekend at a cozy inn, where I can curl up with a book by the fireplace and chat with other guests over wine and homemade appetizers—that’s my kind of escape.” To help you find those escapes, we've created a list of our favorite Central Coast B&B's, inns and hotels—with no more than 20 rooms—in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties. All offer the cozy one-of-a-kind experience that only a small inn can provide.

Simpson House Inn

T

all hedges surround this luxury bed-and-breakfast inn, filled with antiques and lauded around the globe for its excellent service and elegant Victorian atmosphere. It encompasses an acre of manicured English gardens in a residential neighborhood, just a short walk from Santa Barbara’s arts and culture district. The Victorian main house, built in 1874, has 15 guest rooms, suites and cottages, including four junior suites and five cottages, each with a wood-burning fireplace. Guests are welcome to relax in comfy chairs that speckle the gardens, porches, living room and library. Rates include a gourmet breakfast and evening appetizers and wine, Wi-Fi, bicycles and parking. You can also arrange for massages and spa services in your room. The inn is just a few blocks from the Arlington and Granada theaters, and it’s an easy walk to all downtown attractions and shuttle buses. 121 E. Arrellaga St. • 805/963-7067 • simpsonhouseinn.com.

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PHOTOS: SIMPSON HOUSE (3)

S A N TA B A R B A R A


S PR I N G 2018

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Cheshire Cat S A N TA B A R B A R A

E

nglish tradition blends seamlessly with upscale Santa Barbara style at The Cheshire Cat, an elegant bed-and-breakfast in Santa Barbara’s arts and culture district. Owner Christine Dunstan hails from Cheshire, England. When she purchased two Queen Anne Victorian homes on a single lot a block from State Street in 1985, she decided to remodel them in traditional British innkeeper fashion and a whimsical Alice in Wonderland theme throughout. The Victorian buildings hold 12 rooms, and many are named for Alice in Wonderland characters, e.g., Duchess, Dormouse, Mock Turtle. Many rooms have original fireplaces, sitting areas, and balconies; one has a spa tub. In the 1990s Dunstan built a coach house with two rooms with kitchenettes (one with a living room) and acquired four cottages across the street, each with two bedrooms and full kitchen. The inn is filled with fascinating antiques collected by family members. 36 W. Valerio St. • 805/569-1610 • cheshirecat.com.

Inn on Summer Hill

P

erched on a hill overlooking the ocean at the border of Montecito and Summerland, just south of Santa Barbara, this luxury bed-and-breakfast inn (built in 1989) looks like an authentic historic California Craftsman home and feels like an ultra-elegant English country manor. The 16 individually decorated rooms (really mini-suites) reflect a blend of contemporary and antique furnishings. All have laminated wood floors, canopy beds with puffy duvets, fireplaces, flat-screen TVs, refrigerators, Wi-Fi, whirlpool tubs and fabulous ocean views from a private balcony or patio (choose a second-floor room for the best views). The tranquil setting includes an outdoor hot tub and sitting areas. You won’t go hungry here—guests rave about the gourmet breakfast in the fireside dining room, afternoon appetizers with wine and cheese, and bedtime desserts. Add to your bliss with treatments in the dedicated massage room (be sure to make advance arrangements before you arrive). 2520 Lillie Ave. • 805/969-9998 • innonsummerhill.com.

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PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) CHESHIRE CAT (2), UPHAM (3), INN ON SUMMER HILL (2)

SUMMERLAND


Tiffany Country House S A N TA B A R B A R A

B

at The Upham Hotel

anker Amasa Lincoln (a relative of Abraham Lincoln) built the New England-style Upham Hotel in 1871. Cyrus Upham changed the name to Hotel Upham after he bought the property in 1898. The Upham’s Victorian main building and cottages occupy an acre of gardens and grounds in Santa Barbara’s downtown arts and culture district. But those seeking a traditional bed-and-breakfast experience ask for rooms in the Upham’s centuryold Tiffany Country House, a restored Victorian manor that holds eight traditional bed-and-breakfast rooms. Popular rooms include the Victoria, with its king bed, fireplace and whirlpool tub. Looking for a special romantic retreat? Stay in The Penthouse, which occupies the entire third floor and has a living room, fireplace, spa tub, waterfall shower and a private terrace with mountain views. Fine dining is just a short walk away at the Upham’s excellent onsite restaurant, Louie’s California Bistro. 1323 De la Vina St. • 805/962-0058 • countryhousesantabarbara.com.

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Ballard Inn BALLARD

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ooking for seclusion in a country setting? Head to the tiny town of Ballard, two miles south of Los Olivos, and check into Ballard Inn, one of the most romantic lodgings in Santa Ynez Valley. This elegant retreat offers 15 traditional bed-and-breakfast rooms, seven of which have wood-burning fireplaces. All rooms are decorated in different themes, designed to capture the valley’s history and character. Most popular rooms include the spacious Vineyard Room, with hardwood floors and a circular bay window overlooking the historic Ballard Country Church, and Mountain Room, with views of the historic town from a private balcony. The fabulous onsite restaurant, The Gathering Table, is one of the main draws, since chef-owner Budi Kazali serves some of finest FrenchAsian farm-to-table food in Southern California (open for dinner Wed.–Sun.). He whips up a mighty fine breakfast, too, which is included in the rate. 2436 Baseline Ave. • 805/688-7770 • ballardinn.com.

Mirabelle Inn and Restaurant

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hink Copenhagen, Paris and New York—now imagine a four-story home (or inn) that blends the cultures and aesthetic of all three. That’s the Mirabelle—a cozy 12room refuge in the heart of downtown Solvang—a block or two (but a world away) from the busier tourist arteries. Bernard and Jonathan Rosenson, father-and-son owners of Coquelicot Estate Vineyard, purchased the property in 2015. They kept the former property’s name and elegant décor while transforming the restaurant into one of Solvang’s best. Famed chef Steven Snook creates flexible hyper-local seasonal menus (with small and large plate options) that trigger all five senses. Each individually decorated room has a private bath and luxurious bedding. Some have fireplaces and/or whirlpool or claw-foot tubs. Head up to the guest library for a warm hearth or to sip wine in the lounge. Rates include a full breakfast in the dining room. 409 1st St. • 805/688-1703 • mirabelleinn.com.

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PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) BALLARD INN (2), FESS PARKER (3), MIRABELLE INN (2)

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Fess Parker Wine Country Inn and Spa LO S O LI VO S

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ess Parker, the legendary actor who portrayed Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone on TV in the ‘50s and ‘60s, purchased The Grand Hotel in the heart of Los Olivos in 1998 and renamed it Fess Parker Wine Country Inn & Spa. Now owned and operated by his descendants, the luxe lodge was completely remodeled in 2012. The inn is home to one of the valley’s best restaurants, The Bear and Star, where famed chef John Cox (formerly at Post Ranch Inn) creates one-of-a-kind menus that blend refined ranch cuisine (a tribute to Chef Cox’s and Fess Parker’s Texas roots) and fresh, seasonal California ingredients. The 19 spacious luxury rooms (including seven suites) have wet bars, fireplaces and Wi-Fi. An annex across the street holds the inn’s pool and day spa, where you can pamper yourself with an array of treatments. 2860 Grand Ave. • 805/688-7788 • fessparkerinn.com.

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Sunstone Villa S A N TA Y N E Z

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et amid vineyards at the 55-acre Sunstone Winery estate in Santa Barbara wine country, this luxurious, Tuscan-inspired villa reflects Old World architecture and interior design. It was completed in 2004, built entirely from artifacts and materials recovered from European buildings and rural villages. The palatial residence has 8,500 square feet of living space, including five master suites with private baths, eight fireplaces, a billiards room, and numerous terraces and patios with views of the mountains and vineyard. The residence can accommodate up to ten guests, and the venue can host up to 80 guests for private gatherings. 125 Refugio Rd. • 805/688-9463 • sunstonewinery.com/sunstone-villa.

ForFriends Inn

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his luxury B&B is a veritable dream-come-true of four friends, who delighted in gathering in their backyards to enjoy good wine, fine food and great music. Jim and Debbie Campbell and Dave and Katie Pollock mused about possibilities and thought: Why not create a similar social hub for guests? Fast forward to 2005, and the opening of the upscale Craftsman farmhouse-style ForFriends Inn, where guests (often friends, or strangers who form friendships) gather to enjoy wine, food and music in a homelike setting. The inn has eight rooms: six in a main building, and a cottage and tower suite that border an expansive garden area. Each has a California king bed, premium linens, a balcony or outside seating area, and a fireplace or stove; and all have either jacuzzi tubs or walk-in showers. Rates include a three-course breakfast and late happy hour with wine and hors d’ouevres— sometimes with live acoustic music on the garden stage. 1121 Edison St. • 805/693-0303 • forfriendsinn.com.

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PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) SUNSTONE (2), HENRY L. FECHTMAN, SANTA YNEZ INN (2), FORFRIENDS INN (2)

S A N TA Y N E Z


Santa Ynez Inn S A N TA Y N E Z

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alk to restaurants, shops and attractions from this posh two-story Victorian-style building, perched on historic Sagunto Street in downtown Santa Ynez. The 20 spacious rooms (500 square feet or more) all have plush beds and many have fireplaces. Deluxe rooms have spa tubs with jets; some also have semi-private patios and balconies. Splurge on a suite, and you’ll also get to relax in an oversized marble bathroom with whirlpool tubs and steam showers. Downstairs, you can book a massage in the onsite spa or unwind in the sauna or hot tub. Top-of-the-line amenities include a full gourmet breakfast served in an elegant dining room, afternoon wine and cheese in the cozy library, a passport to local wine-tasting rooms, HDTV and Wi-Fi, free parking and a Tesla charging station. Need a venue for a special event? Book the newly remodeled Coach House, with a stunning bar and expansive dining room. 3627 Sagunto St. • 805/688-5588 • santaynezinn.com.

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Petit Soleil SAN LUIS OBISPO

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alk through a quaint cobblestone courtyard and enter a magical door into Petit Soleil, a French provincial bed-and-breakfast at the upper end of Monterey Street, five blocks from downtown SLO and a short drive to Cal Poly. Each of the 15 rooms are unique and hold beds of varying numbers and sizes. All have private baths, TVs, and Wi-Fi, and reflect rustic charm, the colors of Provence and whimsical elements. For a premium French experience, book Joie de Vivre, the inn’s 540-square-foot grand suite, with a king bed and living area with a fireplace, wet bar and refrigerator and a sofa bed. Head to the cozy dining room or the sunny back patio to taste local and French wines and appetizers every evening, and feast on fresh-brewed coffee and a gastronome breakfast in the morning. 1473 Monterey St. • 805/549-0321 • psslo.com.

Granada Hotel and Bistro

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he Hotel Granada, originally built in 1922 in downtown San Luis Obispo, operated as a hotel for nearly 50 years. Next door was the Elmo Theatre, SLO’s main vaudeville venue, and the hotel housed many traveling artists and actors. But word on the street hinted that rooms were rented by the hour in the 1920s—part of SLO’s busy brothel business. The Granada was completely renovated in 2012 and is now a full-service hotel with a vintage vibe. Each of the 17 guest rooms features marble and tiled baths, plush duvets and original art; some have fireplaces. Suites have floor-to-ceiling windows and a balcony. You won’t go hungry here. The Granada Bistro is open daily for late afternoon small plates and dinner, and brunch on weekends. You can also grab healthy food to go from Nourish, a health-centric takeout counter on the ground floor (open Mon.–Fri.). 1126 Morro St. • 805/544-9100 • granadahotelandbistro.com.

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PHOTOS: PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE (CLOCKWISE FROM FROMTOP TOP LEFT) LEFT) PETIT PETIT SOLEIL, SOLEIL (2), GARDEN GARDEN STREET STREET INN,INN GRANADA (3), GRANADA HOTEL(2)

SAN LUIS OBISPO


Garden Street Inn SA N LUIS OBISPO

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elena and Morris Goldtree built this multistory family residence in 1887. Elizabeth and Patrick McCaffrey purchased the home in 1898. Today it’s a fully restored traditional bed-andbreakfast inn just a few blocks from San Luis Obispo’s main social hub, Higuera Street—one of the only lodging options in the downtown area. Each of the nine rooms and four suites reflects a different décor, but all have private baths, armoires, queen beds and historical furnishings and memorabilia. Some have decorative fireplaces and/or balconies and jacuzzi tubs and vintage stained-glass windows. Meet other guests in the comfy and well-stocked Goldtree Library. Feast on a full, home-cooked breakfast (featuring historic inn recipes) in the downstairs McCaffrey Morning Room, where the morning light illuminates the table via vintage stained glass windows. Pets are welcome in select rooms; contact the inn for details. 1212 Garden St. • 805/545-9802 • gardenstreetinn.com.

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J Patrick House CAMBRIA

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erched on a hilltop amid Monterey pines, J. Patrick House provides an authentic bed-and-breakfast experience in a quiet residential area less than a mile from downtown Cambria. Its central location—a five-minute drive to Moonstone Beach and a nine-mile drive to Hearst Castle—makes this rustic yet refined log house an ideal home base for Hwy. 1 adventures. A front building includes cozy gathering areas for the hosted wine and appetizer social hour and hearty multi-course breakfast. The seven individually decorated rooms are housed in a tranquil building across a courtyard in the back. Each room has a king or queen bed, a fireplace, window seat and private bath. Guests can also relax in a common room with comfy chairs, a microwave and refrigerator, and fresh-baked cookies at the end of the day. 2990 Burton Dr. • 805/927-3812 • jpatrickhouse.com.

Anderson Inn

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his elegant, yet unpretentious lodge is perched on the water’s edge on the Embarcadero, enabling guests to immerse themselves in Morro Bay’s pristine marine environment. Built in 2008, the inn enjoys a reputation for excellent service, largely due to the Anderson family’s insistence on a warm welcome and personal attention for every guest. All eight rooms include queen beds, travertine tiled bathrooms, cozy comforters, Wi-Fi, balconies with harbor views, refrigerators, large HD flatscreen TVs and vaulted ceilings with fans. Three premium “on the water” rooms boast stellar views of the ocean and Morro Rock, and have soaking tubs and fireplaces. This is also a convenient base for all types of adventures, from cycling and kayaking to fishing and surfing. Dozens of restaurants and shops line the Embarcadero and nearby streets. The staff can help you book massage and spa services, in your room or at nearby establishments. 897 Embarcadero • 805/772-3434 • andersoninnmorrobay.com.

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PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) J. PATRICK HOUSE (2), OLALLIEBERRY INN (3), ANDERSON INN (2)

M O R RO B AY


Olallieberry Inn CAMBRIA

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n 1875, pharmacist brothers Otto and Carl Manderscheid built a spacious home in downtown Cambria, using local Cambria pine and Big Sur redwood. They also planted an English garden in the back and a giant sequoia seedling in the front. Innkeepers Nelson and Maureen Hubbell purchased the property in 2016 and renovated it from top to bottom, infusing it with luxurious modern conveniences while retaining the feel of a vintage property. Today, the nine-room inn is a national historical monument (the second oldest home in Cambria) and the 150-year-old tree serves as a beacon, welcoming the community and guests to come enjoy its homey comforts. Olallieberry Inn highlights include stunning English gardens overlooking Santa Rosa Creek, a music-themed parlor with a full-sized replica of Sir Paul McCartney standing near the fireplace, a wine hour with homemade appetizers, a gourmet three-course breakfast and regular cooking classes in the onsite commercial kitchen. 2476 Main St. • 805/927–3222 • olallieberry.com.

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SummerWood Inn PA S O R O B L E S

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mmerse yourself in Paso Robles wine country life at this sophisticated bed-and-breakfast, on scenic Hwy. 246 west, just a mile from Hwy. 101. Set amid cabernet sauvignon vineyards and oak-studded hills across from the SummerWood Winery tasting room, the two-story inn reflects a contemporary French farmhouse style. The nine individually decorated rooms bear the names of rhone and bordeaux grape varietals, for example, marsanne, viogner and grenache blanc. Each has a gas or electric fireplace and a private balcony or deck overlooking the vineyards or lush gardens. Rates include a farm-fresh, cooked-to-order breakfast, afternoon wine and appetizers, evening dessert and coffee, and handmade caramels set atop your plush bed when you’re ready to retire for the night. This is a centrally located hub for all Paso Robles wine touring trails, including the inn's own SummerWood Winery, which offers guests complimentary pours of their limited production wines. 2130 Arbor Rd. • 805/227-1111 • summerwoodwine.com/inn.

JUST Inn PA S O R O B L E S

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PHOTOS: PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE (CLOCKWISE FROM FROM LEFT TOP LEFT) TO RIGHT) SUMMERWOOD SUMMERWOOD (2), HOTEL INN, HOTEL CHEVAL CHEVAL, (3), JUST JUST INNINN (2)

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stay at this tiny, secluded wine country inn with just four suites—next to the JUSTIN Winery tasting room—is the ultimate wine country getaway. It sits among the vineyards in the “far out” western hills in Paso Robles. JUSTIN wines rank among the best in the region. The winery is best known for its famed Isosceles Bordeaux blend and estate cabernet sauvignon. The Restaurant at JUSTIN, renowned for its excellent regional dishes, serves prix fixe dinner five nights a week, plus lunch Thu.–Sat. and Sun. brunch. Three oversized suites reflect both contemporary sophistication and casual comfort. Soak in the spa tub and sink into blissful reverie in luxurious linens atop Tempurpedic mattresses (rates include breakfast). For even more privacy, book the 1,400-square-foot French Country-style Vintner’s Villa with full kitchen and a dining room, about a quarter mile from the tasting room and restaurant. 11680 Chimney Rock Rd. • 805/238-6932 • justinwine.com.


Hotel Cheval PA S O R O B L E S

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ark your wheels at chic Hotel Cheval, just a half-block from Paso Robles Downtown City Park, and walk to fine restaurants, tasting rooms and shops. The horse-loving owners imbued the twostory inn with an equine theme. Furnishings and artworks reflect contemporary European country estate lifestyle, where horses and humans interact daily. Each of the 16 individually decorated rooms bears the name and associated photos of historically significant horses plus original paintings and other art; all have king beds with luxury linens and duvets, and most have fireplaces and window seats. In the evening, the onsite Pony Club serves local and international wines and appetizers at their sleek zinc bar and surrounding tables. This is also where you head in the morning to enjoy a full breakfast (included in the rate). Between dusk and 10 p.m., feast on complimentary made-to-order s’mores in the courtyard. 1021 Pine St. • 805/226-9995 • hotelcheval.com.

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a r b a r C a o B u a n t t n y ’s a S

Budding

Cannabis Industry

THE MORE THINGS CHANGE, THE MORE THEY DON’T

BY NICK WELSH PHOTOS BY PAUL WELLMAN

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PHOTO:

So much for California’s much-vaunted cannabis revolution. More than 60 days after recreational dispensaries were officially “legalized”—and more than a year after voters resoundingly legalized pot statewide by approving Prop. 64—there’s still not a single recreational storefront to be found anywhere in Santa Barbara County. The wild Wild West has yet to materialize. Prohibition may be over—as some newspaper headlines have giddily proclaimed—but here in Santa Barbara, there’s been a conspicuous absence of champagne corks popping. And for good reason. On February 6—Ronald Reagan’s birthday coincidentally—the county supervisors passed an omnibus cannabis ordinance regulating just where cannabis can and can’t be grown. Likewise for its manufacturing and sales. The supervisors opened the door for up to as many as eight dispensaries to operate countywide in the unincorporated areas. Neighborhood critics, concerned about the impacts of the burgeoning industry, got bigger buffer zones between outdoor grows and their homes. It was something, but it’s not over. All this—the ordinance and tax plan—go before county voters this June. A simple majority is needed for passage. To the extent cannabis can be legally obtained in Santa Barbara now or over the coming months, mostly it will be via one of the county’s 92 driveby delivery services. These operate in the vast gray market spawned by medical marijuana. To the extent that cannabis can be bought—at least in the near future—at any retail establishment, it won’t be at any of the upscale sleek-chic salonstyle emporiums envisioned by trendsetters like Canndescent, a statewide industry player headquartered in downtown Santa Barbara. When it comes to retail cannabis, past is prologue. As they have for years, Santa Barbarans will still be able to buy their decriminalized bud in one of three old-school medical marijuana dispensaries. Coincidentally, all three are located in the chic-free, not-so-mean streets of Old Town Goleta. All three operate in the legal twilight zone created with the passage of Prop. 240 more than 20 years ago, which allowed for the dispensation of pot for medical purposes. None of these three outlets, however, suggest any of the gleeful glam promised by repeal. One is located discreetly in an industrial office yard near the airport just off Hollister Avenue. A few blocks away stands another dispensary located in a one-story, cinder-block building that

was somehow jammed onto the back of an old Quonset hut. There is no sign outside; the only thing indicating what takes place inside is an avocado green paint job, conspicuously fresh for the surrounding neighborhood. A bearded young man enters the dispensary. A young woman follows suit a few minutes later. Another man comes out and departs. They all leave carrying white paper bags, stapled shut at the top. Inside the dispensary, a sign proclaims no recreational weed is sold. Sitting safely behind a bullet-proof Plexiglass window, a young man screens customers to make sure they’re legit. There’s a tiny slot at the bottom of the window where medical ID cards can be slipped through. This definitely is not the second coming of Amsterdam—where cannabis cafes outnumber those peddling coffee. Only in Lompoc is the possibility of such cafes being entertained. There, no regulations, restrictions or even taxes will be imposed. Aside from the required buffer zones separating storefronts from schools and parks, market forces will dictate how many retail outlets the City of Flowers—originally a city of temperance—will have. For the immediate and foreseeable future, what we’ve had is what will continue to be. Change, however is coming. It’s inevitable. It’s irresistible. The financial stakes are too immense. The new and improved legalized cannabis trade—which involves not just retail, but cultivation, manufacturing, distribution and testing—is expected to generate such big bucks that Sacramento bean counters estimate $1 billion a year in additional state tax revenues. In Santa Barbara County, that’s about the same amount the beefedup pot industry is expected to inject into the local economy. To put that in perspective, all sectors of the county’s agriculture market combined currently generate $1.4 billion annually. To put that into even greater perspective, cannabis cultivation only occupies 396 acres of canopy; wine grapes


occupy 21,000 acres and all other fruit crops, 18,000. That’s a whole lot of cash for a relatively tiny footprint. Little wonder that at almost every level of government, there’s a palpable giddiness over revenues anticipated by legalized cannabis businesses. The new crop—and its attendant smorgasbord of value-added oils, creams, tinctures, vape cartridges and edibles—constitutes a genuinely new revenue stream. Better yet, it’s not oil. County tax collectors are conservatively guessing they can reap $20 million a year from sales generated by legalized cannabis. Privately, they whisper about raking in twice that much. The truth is that no one really knows. As a revenue source, pot—unlike oil—is something conservatives and liberals can agree about. Leading the charge for the new industry at the county board of supervisors are Das Williams—the liberal lefty eco-Democrat from Carpinteria—and Steve Lavagnino—the card-carrying Republican from Santa Maria. Their collaboration over cannabis has been so congenial that they’ve been dubbed “the Dooby Brothers” in the press. In this context, it’s little wonder that Graham Farrar is champing at the bit. Farrar is the new face of a new industry that’s also been around Santa Barbara for a very long time. A Goleta native and father of two kids, Farrar—38—lives on the Mesa with his family. He’s been described as “a serial entrepreneur,” having cut his teeth first with software.com and later with Sonos. He’s now jumping feet first into the cannabis trade, having started a company that manufactures and sells the growing systems needed by any 21st-century pot plantation. More recently, he bought serious square footage in Carpinteria greenhouses. “It all starts with the plant,” he says. When asked what his secret sauce is, Farrar says, “I have a lot of experience doing stuff that no one has experience doing. We figure out how to do stuff no one has ever done before.” For example, a few years back, Farrar launched an interactive app that allowed kids to access

children’s books via their parents’ cell phones. That took off. For giggles, he and some buddies then created a global business selling Donald Trump toupees for tots. That was a hit too. But this is really different. And however inevitable the cannabis revolution may be, Santa Barbara is still Santa Barbara. Everything takes forever. Nothing is easy. And politics are always complicated. Even with a pot-friendly city council and a cannabis-savvy Santa Barbara police chief, the time allowed to craft new rules and regulations for what’s been an illegal industry that’s thrived underground has been exceptionally limited. One year. Under the new state rules, there are no less than 22 types of licenses required for the new pot-trepreneurs. This means there are multiple points of taxation to be considered: cultivation, manufacture, testing and retail to name a few. The challenge confronting decision makers? How to squeeze as much as possible from the new industry without killing the proverbial golden goose. Late last year, the Santa Barbara City Council voted to approve five recreational storefront dispensaries, but there would be no tasting rooms, no cafes. With a new council sworn into office this January, that number was soon reduced to just three. Arguing in favor of the change were the usual neighborhood activists who didn’t want dispensaries near their homes and schools. But it also included executives from Canndescent, who expressed concern about market oversaturation. Their concern— again—was killing the golden goose. If too many retail outlets are allowed to operate, the crew from Canndescent argued, none would make enough to survive. If the point was to put black-market pot dealers out of business, they added, their survival was key. But when it comes to regulation and taxation, the real action is taking place in front Cannabis entrepreneur of the county supervisors. It’s far from over. Graham Farrar in one Although the supervisors recently adopted a

THE GREAT IRONY OF LEGALIZATION IS THAT IT WILL SPAWN FAR MORE LAW ENFORCEMENT ACTION AND PROSECUTION WHERE MARIJUANA IS CONCERNED THAN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY HAS SEEN IN MANY YEARS.

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of his greenhouses, left. Marijuana plants in Carpinteria, right.


tax plan—significantly reducing the tax rates from those initially proposed in response to industry complaints—no ordinance for the new industry has yet been crafted. The details are, as usual, devilish. Many focus on cultivation. What is the size of parcels where pot cultivation can take place? In hoop houses or greenhouses? Can manufacturing be done there, too? How far do they need to be from the property line: 600 feet? 1,000? 1,200? The big stink, of course, is the intense skunk odors that have overwhelmed the small community of Carpinteria. In the past year, Farrar stated, more marijuana has been cultivated in California than ever before. (Even before then, economists reckoned California produced eight times more cannabis than its residents consumed.) Much of that’s concentrated off Santa Rosa Road near Buellton; cannabis and pinot noir grapes seem to do remarkably well there. But Carpinteria has felt the impact most intensely. Its greenhouses have exploded with cannabis, and the concentrated odors have all but shut down the local high school. It’s an issue. “There’s been more grown than in anytime in human history,” Farrar says. Leading the charge against the new industry has been Anna Carrillo, a retired school teacher and 45-year resident. “There are 51 growers in Carpinteria,” Carrillo says. “But if we have a problem with smells, we don’t know who to call because we don’t know exactly where they’re coming from.” Carrillo has been active with Carpinteria Valley Association (CVA) since 1976; now she’s in charge. She meets regularly with supervisor Williams and testifies frequently before him and the other supervisors. Carrillo bristles at the suggestion she’s some kind of pot prude. “I definitely supported decriminalization,” she says. But neither she nor CVA are about to roll over for the seemingly inevitable. If county supervisors seem eager to green-light the new industry as fast as possible, the Carpinteria City Council appears poised to take them to court. The issue—as always—is environmental review. The Carpinteria council put the county supes on notice that the environmental analysis understates the impact to housing, traffic and water. If stench is the obvious and overwhelming problem, the sub-rosa fear among valley activists—formidable in the extreme—is that the supervisors will weaken the county’s hard-fought ordinance regulating where and how many greenhouses are allowed. Should that happen, it will be World War III.

Clockwise from above, detail photographs of how marijuana is grown and cultivated for commercial usage. Below, Sheriff Bill Brown shares details from a pot bust.

Farrar—a newcomer to Carpinteria Valley—made a point to reach out to Carrillo. He gave her a tour of his facilities. He insists that new odor-clamping technologies can solve the stench problem. She remains unconvinced, but appreciated the gesture. Farrar gets her concern. “If 19 out of 20 greenhouses are using this system and only one isn’t, then Carpinteria’s going to have an odor problem,” he says. “It’s up to us to do a better job.” Farrar says that as a child, he watched the orchards of Goleta Valley get swallowed up by condo development. Maybe cannabis, he suggests, can help preserve agriculture in Carpinteria Valley. The great irony of legalization is that it will spawn far more law enforcement action and prosecution where marijuana is concerned than Santa Barbara County has seen in many years. The premise behind Prop. 64 is that pot should be regulated and taxed, not prohibited. But in other states where legalization was approved, black-market cultivation and sales persisted. In Colorado, for example, 41 percent of the pot used originated from the black market. “There will still be Panga boats here in Santa Barbara, there will still be illegal sales and illegal grows in the national forest,” says Lt. Butch Olmstead of the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office. “But if this goes through, we’ll now have a dedicated income stream for enforcement.” According to county projections, the new revenues would pay the salaries for three new enforcement deputies in year two and another five for screening applications and enforcing permit compliance. “Right now, we don’t have any dedicated funds for enforcement.” In the meantime, the billion-dollar question remains—how much cannabis can Santa Barbara actually consume? The short answer: we’ll find out soon enough. 

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GARDEN GURU

FINDS INSPIRATION IN HER OWN BACKYARD

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GOOD NEIGHBOR: the welcoming front garden was created out of the former concrete driveway.

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hen Margie Grace, principal at landscape design-build firm Grace Design Associates, embarks on a new project, she makes a point of getting to know her clients—how they live, what they value—in order to establish a shared vision and creative alignment. In the case of a recent home and garden remodel, that wasn’t hard. She was the client.

Nestled among majestic mature trees on Sycamore Canyon Road, the home is owned by Grace and Dawn Close, who is also a principal at Grace Design Associates. They took the mid-1950s California ranch-style house down to the studs, updating it with all new systems and design details that exude a rustic elegance. The home, set on an approximately one-acre lot, is designed to embrace its transformed outdoor spaces, with large bi-fold windows and doors opening to a park-like setting complete with outdoor “rooms” and hidden gardens.

Good Neighbor The front garden faces a view of tall Chilean wine palms that flank the perimeter of Lotusland. “It’s incredibly cool to drive out the driveway and see the

BY NANC Y R ANSOHOFF PHOTOS BY HOLLY LEPERE

pink wall of Lotusland,” says Grace, who took some of her inspiration from the renowned botanical gardens across the street. To add life and texture to the formerly asphalt-laden front yard, Grace used three-level terracing: gravel in a mix of greys and golds to complement a historic native sandstone wall that edges the property; plants, including Chitalpa, which is pink-hued at different times of year; and a shaggy curtain of Acacia cognata. A gurgling fountain is surrounded by the grey-green softness of Dymondia margaretae (Silver Carpet). Also delighting the eye are dramatic potted plants and a couple of cement garden gnomes, reproductions of antique stone grotesques in Lotusland’s Theater Garden. Grace relishes the transformation process. “I love the blight to beauty thing,” she says.

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HOM E

&

G A R DE N

Whimsy and Water Grace also loves a bit of whimsy. Her adjacent Purple Rain Garden is an admiring and playful nod to Prince. “It’s just light-hearted and fun,” she says, pointing out three large aubergine-colored Gracie Modern steel arbor hoops festooned with strings of tiny mirrors that send spots of light dancing around the garden. Concentric bands of Agapanthus and Agave attenuata sweep around the perimeter. Ever mindful of her setting, Grace uses low-water-demand plantings throughout. “I’m always going to do smart maintenance, smart water and smart fire,” she notes. “We did the project in dribs and drabs. I would do a garden and run to the water meter and see. Then do another section.”

Outside In Stepping from the Sydney Peak flagstone front step into the four-bedroom house, the same natural, serene aesthetic continues. Wide-plank engineered wood floors in “French oak” create continuity throughout, with marble floors in the bathrooms. Design details, such as shaker doors, crown moldings and a white palette, contribute to the crisp, clean, updated look. “We’re calling it Napa/Sonoma,” says Grace. “When I was a little kid, I used to work on my fort,” she says. “I’m still working on my fort.” Bringing the outside in was a top priority, and

purposeful design features make it seamless. Large accordion doors, most often open to fresh breezes, replaced sliders in the dining room. Above the kitchen sink, eight-foot bi-fold windows over a Calcutta marble countertop pass through to an inviting park-like backyard.

Out Back Here, Grace created distinct gardens while retaining mature trees that include a dozen show-stopping live oaks, a large she-oak and some relic pines. A flat lawn was replaced by drifts of perennial grasses. Sweeping outdoor spaces include areas for dining, lounging and barbecuing, along with a fire pit patio. Sycamores laced with twinkle lights form a living arbor over a massive stone table in the dining pergola. Adding to the park-like feeling is a man-made pond edged with local sandstone. “We wanted to attract as many native components of the biome as we could,” Grace says. “It’s a big bird attractor.” Continuing the Lotusland narrative, a walled Asianthemed secret garden sits behind a set of massive antique Chinese doors—inside is a granite fountain, Japanese maples, a serpentine-form weeping birch and a clump of Chusquea coronalis. “There was definitely a little Asian thing going on at Lotusland,” says Grace. “We want the gardens to be an invitation to wander, to linger,” says Grace. “People are better when they can be around nature. They need it to recharge their batteries.”

WHIMSY AND WATER: the Purple Rain Garden in the front yard is a happy, light-hearted nod to Prince.

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OUT BACK: retaining these beautiful live oaks was a critical element in the backyard design.

OUTSIDE IN: multiple seating areas and the large accordion doors make this an ideal space for entertaining or relaxing.


HOM E

&

G A R DE N

Scout’s charming retail space showcases vintage goods in a sleek contemporary environment.

MODERN TREASURE HUNT BY ANNA KODEL ASHVILI THE CONCEPT OF A “TREASURE HUNT” is something that brings mystery and wonder to anyone’s mind. For mother-daughter duo Edie Caldwell and Meredith Shank, treasure hunts have become part of their day-today lives. Their love of unique antiques and uncommon finds spurred a partnership and business venture now known as Scout, a sanctuary of goods that praises the archaic and the unusual. The delicate balance of placing vintage goods in a sleek, contemporary space gives Scout a refreshing look that breaks the dingy and cramped stereotype associated with antique stores. “We wouldn’t sell anything that we wouldn’t want in our own homes,” says Caldwell. Their “unusual goods” are items and objects that can’t be found in your average shop. “Every store has similar pillows and similar scented candles…What’s fun is when you go to a store and no two things are the same. The things we like the most are things other people have never seen before or rarely see,” says Shank.

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Don’t be surprised when you walk in and find yourself surrounded by wooden geese that were handcrafted in Japan, a timeworn railroad switch, a disassembled pitchfork or old-fashioned crystalline whisky decanters. “Even though the things we sell are so varied in style and time, it all goes together…It’s eclectic, but it’s curated eclectic,” say Caldwell and Shank. The enchantment of Scout lies in the fact that once something is sold, it’s gone. New curios are constantly being brought in from anywhere imaginable: Craigslist, junkyards, industrial warehouses or even the middle of the desert, which means the shop is always evolving. “We aren’t creating something new, we’re recycling things that are already there and bringing new life to them,” says Shank. This proves that the everyday ordinary, with an ounce of appreciation and a second chance, can be turned into the extraordinary. Scout, 35 E. Ortega St., 805/730-7333, scout-goods.com.


LUSH ELEMENTS

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM OPPOSITE LEFT) SCOUT, GAIL LUCAS ILLUSTRATION COURTESY PEARL CHASE SOCIETY, ELLIOT LOWNDES

BY ANNA KODELASHVILI NO LONGER RESTRICTED to potted plants and palm trees, contemporary plantscaping is evolving. People crave dynamic, multifunctional gardens that bring life back into indoor spaces. Lush Elements, a local company composed of avid plant connoisseurs, integrates living art and design to create functional, sustainable plantscapes for commercial and residential spaces. Terra Basche, the founder and lead designer, uses her special eye for composition to craft each plantscape based on the environment in which it resides, whether it’s indoor or outdoor, vertical or floor-bound. The various installations that the team creates include Lush Living, which are vertical living walls; Lush Edibles, which are fresh-vegetable tower gardens; Lush Air, which are air plants that survive without soil; Lush Plants, which are indoor floor-bound container plants; Lush Patios, which are outdoor floor-bound container plants; and the newest addition to the lineup, Lush Walls, which are vertical preserved gardens made with mosses and ferns that require no maintenance. Each plant installation plays three important roles: It creates a functional atmosphere, boosts sustainability efforts and inspires enriching creativity through artistic aesthetic. “Art is subjective. Everyone has their own

idea of what art is. For plant work, it’s highlighting the beauty of each plant and playing off the texture, color and feel of it…Nature speaks for itself,” says Basche. “Not only are these pieces beautiful and create a sense of well-being, but they lower stress levels and increase productivity of people working in the space.” There are many other functions of Lush Elements installations, such as air quality improvement, sound absorption and climate enhancement; however, in order to enjoy these benefits, proper plant sustainability is required. “I like to choose plants that will thrive in the environment that people want them to be in. Knowing the plant and paying attention to its needs is very important,” says Basche. She not only focuses on the design and installation process, but also places special attention and focus on the maintenance process. While some installations require sunlight and water, others, such as Lush Walls, are capable of thriving without any care. Because of the varying needs, interests and styles of clients, no two Lush Elements designs are the same, which means the creativity and genius of this plantscaping team can bring the allure of the natural world into any space imaginable through the creation of a custom one-of-a-kind plant design. For more information, visit lushelements.com.

This colorful outdoor plant installation is from Lush Elements’ “Lush Patios” design collection.

HIDDEN IN THE HEDGEROWS BY ANNA KODEL ASHVILI

FOR MORE THAN 18 YEARS, Pearl Chase

Society, a nonprofit conservancy dedicated to preserving Santa Barbara and Montecito’s historic sites, landscapes and heritage, has featured diverse architectural landmarks in their annual Historic Homes Tour. On May 20, guests are encouraged to gather together and tour five unique 20th-century residences hidden in the hedgerows of Montecito. These five homes have purposefully been chosen to represent the unique culture, history and style of the upscale oceanside town. On the tour, attendees can expect to explore homes that flaunt Montecito’s Spanish Colonial Revival style from acclaimed architects George Washington Smith, William Edwards and Joseph Plunkett, as well as homes that exude hints of romantic European and Mediterranean influences. The mix of traditional and nontraditional architectural design provide an inside look at a snapshot of the past that has been preserved and protected for decades. The event takes place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $80 for Pearl Chase Society members and $85 for nonmembers, with a portion of the proceeds going toward repairing damage done by the Thomas Fire and resulting debris flow. For more information, visit pearlchasesociety.org. S PR I N G 2018

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WINE COUNTRY SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County vineyards grow exceptional grapes, and now, after decades of experimentation with an incredible diversity of microclimates and soil types, growers and winemakers know a lot about what to plant and where those vines thrive best—and a

host of talented vintners transform those grapes into world-class wines. The best way to explore these authentic wine-producing and wine grape growing regions is by visiting the vineyards and speaking directly to the people who grow and produce these exceptional vintages.

Springtime Eats: Celebrate the season with these wine and food pairing tips

PHOTO: DENISSE SALINAS

BY HANA-LEE SEDGWIC K WINE AND FOOD go hand in hand any time of year, but sometimes finding the perfect pairing can be a challenge with the changing of the seasons. Along with longer days and blooming flowers, spring brings a plethora of colorful produce to our local markets—from greens and fragrant herbs to vibrant citrus and juicy berries—all begging to take center stage on your plate. When it comes to matching spring staples with wine, however, these delicious and healthy offerings are notoriously difficult to pair. With the help of a few simple pairing guidelines, and inspiring ways local chefs and food bloggers utilize spring’s variety of produce, you’ll be ready to take on the season’s bounty of food and wine in no time. In the world of wine and food pairing, there are no black and white rules. In fact, there are no strict rules at all. Ultimately,

Sauvignon blanc or gruner veltliner will compliment this zucchini crust flatbread from Denisse Salinas of Le Petit Chef.

you should drink what you like. However, if you’ve ever experienced a perfect pairing (or a terrible one for that matter), you know that some pairings are better than others. To help elevate a meal with wine pairings this spring, try matching the weight of the wine to the weight of the food. Lighter, more delicate foods work well with lighter wines because neither is dominating the other in body or weight. It’s also helpful to seek similar flavor profiles. Enhancing a certain flavor in the food by finding a similar flavor in the wine, or vice versa, helps find a nice balance of complementary flavors between what you’re eating and drinking. Another bit of advice is to pair acidic food with higher-acid wine; otherwise, the wine may taste flat. For this reason, crisp whites, refreshing rosés and sparkling wines are all worthy candidates for springtime fare, such as green salads dressed with vinaigrette and seasonal vegetables with a splash of lemon. Local private chef and food blogger Denisse Salinas of Le Petit Chef loves to utilize spring greens for a healthy spin on traditional flatbread. For her zucchini crust flatbread, made using shredded zucchini, parmesan cheese, egg, chickpea flour and fresh herbs, Salinas tops it with goat cheese, raw thinly shaved asparagus, micro greens, herbs and even edible flowers. “It’s an ideal canvas for all sorts of toppings, but peak-season shaved asparagus and edible flowers, like nasturtium, give this dish a spring-forward feel.” This flatbread is an ideal match for a crisp, refreshing dry white wine like sauvignon blanc or gruner veltliner, which have plenty of herbaceous

To make your experience as complete and enjoyable as possible, of the 200+ wineries where you can taste in Santa Barbara County, we recommend the following 20 based on their significance historically, visually and their quality of wine and hospitality.

Buellton

Santa Maria

1 Lafond Winery

11 Presqu’ile Winery & Vineyards

& Vineyards

6855 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/688-7921

5391 Presquile Dr. 805/937-8110

2 Mosby Winery

12 Rancho Sisquoc Winery

9496 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/688-2415

6600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/934-4332

Lompoc

Santa Ynez

3 Babcock Winery & Vineyards

13 Bridlewood Estate Winery

5175 Hwy. 246 805/736-1455

3555 Roblar Ave. 805/688-9000

4 Foley Estates

Vineyard & Winery

14 Gainey Vineyard

6121 E. Hwy. 246 805/737–6222

3950 E. Hwy. 246 805/688-0558

5 Sanford Winery & Vineyards

15 Roblar Winery & Vineyards

5010 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/735-5900

3010 Roblar Ave, 805/686-2603

Los Olivos

16 Sunstone Vineyards & Winery

125 N. Refugio Rd. 805/688-9463

6 Andrew Murray

Vineyards

5249 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/686-9604 7 Fess Parker

Solvang 17 Buttonwood Farm Winery

Winery & Vineyard

6200 Foxen Canyon Rd. 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/688-1545 805/688-3032 8 Firestone Vineyard

5017 Zaca Station Rd. 805/688-3940

18 Lincourt Vineyards

1711 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/688-8554

9 Koehler Winery

19 Rideau Vineyards

5360 Foxen Canyon Rd. 1562 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/693-8384 805/688-0717 10 Zaca Mesa Winery

6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/688-9339

20 Rusack Vineyards

1819 Ballard Canyon Rd. 805/688-1278

S PR I N G 2018

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PASO ROBLES

San Simeon

23 ADELAIDA

12

32

Cambria 1

Paso Robles

34

DISTRICT 14

San Miguel 40

SAN MIGUEL DISTRICT

31 18 24 17 20 29 26 TEMPLETON 16 GAP DISTRICT 28 YORK 36 15 21 25 MOUNTAIN 37 46

22

PASO ROBLES

PASO ROBLES ESTRELLA DISTRICT

19

Templeton

41

38

PASO ROBLES WILLOW CREEK DISTRICT

Cayucos

46

PASO ROBLES 30 SAN JUAN GENESEO 27 33 CREEK DISTRICT PASO ROBLES EL POMAR 39 DISTRICT

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To make your experience as complete and enjoyable as possible, of the 250+ wineries where you can taste in San Luis Obispo County, we recommend the following 40 based on their significance historically, visually and their quality of wine and hospitality.

Orcutt

San Luis Obispo

Arroyo Grande

1 Baileyana, Tangent & True Myth Tasting Room 5828 Orcutt Rd., 1 805/269-8200

453 Laetitia Vineyard Dr., 805/481-1772

2 Biddle Ranch Vineyard Los

Alamos

2050 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/543-2399

2649 Carpenter Canyon Rd.,246 805/544-4066 Lompoc

442 SLO San Simeon CANYON Rd., Olivos

805/927-4100 SANTA LOS BALLARD RITA HILLSBuelltonOLIVOS CANYON

5 Edna Valley Vineyards

2585 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/544-5855 6 Kelsey See Canyon Vineyards

1

1947 See Canyon Rd., 805/595-9700 7 Saucelito Canyon

3080 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/543-2111 4910 Edna Rd., 805/782-0500 6238 Orcutt Rd., 805/781-0448

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SANTA YNEZ

12Los Hearst Ranch VALLEY Winery HAPPY

4 Claiborne & Churchill Vintners

9 Wolff Vineyards

11 Talley Vineyards & Bishops Peak

3031 Lopez Dr., 805/489-0446

San Simeon

3 Chamisal Vineyards

7525 Orcutt Rd., 805/541-9463

8 Tolosa Winery

72

10 Laetitia Vineyard & Winery

OF SANTA BARBARA

Santa Margarita

Solvang 13 Ancient Peaks Winery Santa 22720 El Camino Real, 805/365-7045 Ynez

Paso Robles

154

14 Adelaida Vineyards & Winery

5805 Adelaida Rd., 805/676-1232

101

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WINE COUNTRY SA N LUIS OBISPO COUNT Y

PHOTOS: (L-R) TENLEY FOHL, BECKY SUE WILBERDING

vegetal components and citrus notes that balance the similar green, tart flavor profiles of the dish. Adds Salinas, “The crisp, clean flavors of the raw vegetables and nasturtium, and the lemony tang from the goat and parmesan cheeses beg for a white wine with complementary characteristics.” Private chef and cookbook author Robin Goldstein also finds inspiration from the herbs and greens that flourish this time of year. “I love using delicate soft herbs and lettuces in salads when they are very young and fragrant

Try cucumber grapefruit crab salad, by Chef Robin Goldstein, with chenin blanc or prosecco.

15 Brecon Estate

in spring,” shares Goldstein. In her latest cookbook, Simply Delicious Wine Country Recipes, Goldstein shares her recipe for cucumber grapefruit crab salad—a simple, yet vibrant seafood salad ideal as a light spring meal. “Using the flavors of honey and lime with succulent crab, bright citrus from the grapefruit and fresh spring herbs like chives, dill and parsley, this is a refreshing and light salad…with no cooking involved!” While the herbal and citrus notes of sauvignon blanc make it a nice pairing, a lean mineral-driven chenin blanc or light, fruity sparkling wine, such as prosecco, would also complement the dish. “Coming out of the long winter months, spring represents sunshine and growth, translating into lighter and fresher ingredients and recipes,” shares blogger and recipe developer Becky Sue Wilberding of Baking The Goods, who enjoys looking beyond spring’s greens for inspiration in the kitchen. “In my eyes, there is no combination of flavors that represents spring more strongly than strawberry and rhubarb,” she says. Her recipe for rhubarb rose and strawberry pistachio galettes impresses with both flavor and presentation, transforming ribbons of rhubarb into delicate roses she simmers in rose water syrup, layered atop sweet strawberries in a flaky crust made with pistachios, flour and butter. “This rustic and refined dessert looks and tastes like spring,”

25 Niner Wine Estates

7450 Vineyard Dr., 805/239-2200

2400 Hwy. 46 W., 805/239-2233

16 Caliza Winery

26 Opolo Vineyards

2570 Anderson Rd., 805/237-1480

7110 Vineyard Dr., 805/238-9593

17 Clos Solène Winery

27 Robert Hall Winery

2040 Niderer Rd., 805/239-7769

3443 Mill Rd., 805/239-1616

18 Daou Vineyards & Winery

28 SummerWood Winery

2777 Hidden Mountain Rd., 805/226-5460

2175 Arbor Rd., 805/227-1365

19 Eberle Winery

29 Tablas Creek Vineyard

3810 Hwy. 46 E., 805/238-9607

9339 Adelaida Rd., 805/237-1231

20 Halter Ranch Vineyard

30 Tobin James Cellars

8910 Adelaida Rd., 805/226-9455 21 J Dusi Wines

1401 Hwy. 46 W., 805/226-2034 22 J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines

8950 Union Rd., 805/239-2204

35 Castoro Cellars

1315 N. Bethel Rd., 805/238-0725 36 Epoch Estate Wines

7505 York Mountain Rd., 805/237-7575 37 Peachy Canyon Winery

1480 N. Bethel Rd., 805/239-1918 38 Turley Wine Cellars

2900 Vineyard Dr., 805/434-1030 39 Wild Horse Winery & Vineyards

1437 Wild Horse Winery Ct., 805/788-6310

32 Villa Creek Cellars

40 Four Sisters Ranch Vineyards & Winery

23 JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery

33 Vina Robles Vineyards & Winery

2815 Live Oak Rd., 805/227-1588

Templeton

San Miguel

5995 Peachy Canyon Rd., 805/238-7145

24 L’Aventure

adds Wilberding. “I can’t help but think pink when selecting wines to pair with it.” A rosé with a touch of sweet red fruit would indeed be a wonderful addition, not only to complement the pink-hued roses of the galette, but also to balance its fruity and floral flavors. Of course, there is no one pairing that works for everyone, but with these ideas for making use of spring’s best and brightest flavors, you’ll be able to plan your next feast or simple gathering feeling inspired by the season. 

31 Treana and Hope Family Wines

1585 Live Oak Rd., 805/238-4112

6169 Airport Rd., 805/239-8900 11680 Chimney Rock Rd., 805/238-6932

Rhubarb, rose and strawberry pistachio galettes from Becky Sue Wilberding pair perfectly with rosé.

2995 Pleasant Rd., 805/467-2417

3700 Mill Rd., 805/227-4812 34 Windward Vineyard

1380 Live Oak Rd., 805/239-2565

S PR I N G 2018

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Golf

Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara County is one of America’s most desirable golf destinations, with splendid courses designed to maximize enjoyment of the region’s splendor and moderate climate.

Glen Annie Golf Club

GOLETA

Sandpiper Golf Club

GOLETA

In the rolling foothills of Goleta, 15 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara, this meticulously maintained and challenging layout offers panoramic ocean, Channel Island and mountain views from nearly every hole. The tee shot from #16, for example, decends 150 ft. in elevation to land softly on a manicured landscape near an adjacent lake with a cascading stream. The clubhouse complex includes Frog Bar & Grill and scenic patios with excellent facilities for gatherings of up to 300. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 71.1; slope rating, 122. 405 Glen Annie Rd., 805/968-6400, glenanniegolf.com.

Established in 1972 as the county’s first resort course open to the public, Sandpiper is an inspiring 18 holes of seaside golf on an extraordinary terrain, with an acclaimed layout named by Golf Digest as one of the top 25 public golf courses in the U.S.. Designed by renowned architect William F. Bell, the links-style layout features rolling fairways leading to enormous greens with ocean views from nearly every hole. The stretch of holes 10–14 is one of the most memorable experiences of any golfer’s life. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.7; slope rating, 136. 7925 Hollister Ave., 805/968-1541, sandpipergolf.com.

River Course at the Alisal

Rancho San Marcos

SOLVANG

Opened for public play in 1992 on land owned by and adjacent to the renowned Alisal Guest Ranch, River Course provides a layout to be enjoyed by golfers of all levels of skill. Set along the Santa Ynez River, the course features panoramic views, mostly wide fairways and accessible greens. Several holes, however, will challenge even the low handicap golfer, especially any of the river holes. The clubhouse has an excellent restaurant with comfortable, inside seating and a vieworiented patio. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 150 Alisal Rd., 805/688-6042, rivercourse.com. 74

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SANTA YNEZ MOUNTAINS

Twelve miles from Santa Barbara, up scenic Hwy 154—the historic road winding off State Street into the Santa Ynez Mountains that leads to the charming Santa Ynez Valley wineries—“Rancho” has been acclaimed as one of the finest experiences in Southern California. This historic land challenges with sand, lakes, the Santa Ynez River, fields of native grasses, oak tree-lined chaparral and changes in elevation. A comfortable clubhouse has a grill with food to go or to enjoy at tables inside or outside on scenic patios. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 4600 Hwy. 154, 805/683-6334, rsm1804.com.


FEATURED GOLF COURSE

FEATURED FOR SPRING

La Purisima Golf Course

LOMPOC

LESS THAN AN HOUR from Santa Barbara, and a half-hour

from the charming Danish town of Solvang and Santa Ynez Valley wineries, “La P” is pure golf—no real estate, no commercial development for miles, just long, twisting fairways bordered at times by oak and eucalyptus groves and protected by sand, water and out-of-bounds stakes, finishing with huge, lightning-fast greens. In the afternoon, wind often becomes an additional factor, making the closing holes our own “Amen Corner.” Designed by world-renowned golf architect Robert Muir Graves, a round at this beautiful, challenging course will not soon be forgotten, and is worth the scenic drive up the coast and into the pastoral countryside. A big, hacienda-style club house complex includes a substantial retail display and, in a separate building, Piranha Grille for breakfast through lunch.

Yardage and stroke rating from men’s tees: Black (7,105 yards), 75.6/143; Blue (6,670 yards), 73.1/136; White (6,187 yards), 71.1/131. 3455 E. State Hwy. 246, 805/735-8395, lapurisimagolf.com

SPRING 2018

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Santa Barbara Urban Wine Tasting Although you won’t find any vineyards in this area, these unique and eclectic wineries and tasting rooms are a great way to begin your wine-tasting journey through the area on foot, as an introduction to local wines. Many of the urban wineries have northern Santa Barbara County vineyards that are also open to visitors. 1 Area 5.1 137 Anacapa St. 2 Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St.

Vineyard 30 El Paseo

16 Jaffurs Wine

3 August Ridge Vineyards 5 E. Figueroa St

Cellars 819 E. Montecito St

4 Armada Wine &

Wines 23 E. De La Guerra St.

Beer Merchant 1129-A State St.

5 AVA Santa Barbara 116 E. Yananoli St.

17 Jamie Slone

18 Kunin Wines

Tasting Room 28 Anacapa St.

6 Carr Vineyards

19 LaFond Winery

7 Cebada Vineyard & Winery 8 E. De La Guerra St.

20 Laplace Wine Bar

8 Corks & Crowns 32 Anacapa St.

21 Margerum Tasting Room 813 Anacapa St.

414 N. Salsipuedes St.

9 Corktree Cellars

Wine & Bar 910 Linden Ave., Carpinteria 10 Deep Sea

111 E. Yanonali St.

& Shop 205 Santa Barbara St.

22 Municipal

Winemakers 22 Anacapa St.

Wine Tasting 217 Stearns Wharf

23 MWC32

11 DV8 Cellars

24 Oreana Winery

28 Anacapa St.

205 Anacapa St.

12 FFWS Bacara Tasting Room 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta

25 Pali Wine Company 116 E. Yanonali St.

13 Fox Wine Co. and

210 State St.

Blair Fox Cellars 120 Santa Barbara St. 14 Grassini Family

Vineyards 24 El Paseo

78

15 Happy Canyon

813 Anacapa St.

26 Paradise Springs 27 Potek Winery 406 E. Haley St. 28 Riverbench

137 Anacapa St.

SBSEASONS.COM

29 Sanford Winery 1114 State St. 30 Sanguis Wines 8 Ashley Ave. 31 Santa Barbara

Winery 202 Anacapa St.

32 Santa Barbara

Wine Collective 131 Anacapa St.

33 Santa Barbara

Wine Therapy 732 State St.

34 Screaming Eagle

7 W Figueroa St.

35 Silver Wines

724 Reddick St.

36 Skyenna Wine

Lounge 12 Helena Ave.

37 Summerland

Winery 2330 Lillie Ave., Summerland

38 The Bodega Standing Sun 15 E. De La Guerra St. 39 Villa Wine Bar

and Kitchen 618 Anacapa St.

40 Whitcraft Winery 36-A S. Calle Cesar Chavez 41 Vogelzang Vineyard 1129 State St.

DOWNTOWN STATE STREET defines the city’s center—and its heart. The intersection of State and Carrillo streets is where Captain Salisbury Haley hammered an iron stake in 1850 to designate the future midtown area. The self-guided Red Tile Walking Tour is a great way to get your bearings (map is available at Santa Barbara Visitor Center, 1 Garden St.). Don’t miss the historic Arlington Theatre, a notable example of both Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival architectural styles. Also worth visiting is the beautiful Alice Keck Park Memorial Garden, named after the benefactor who donated the prime property.

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Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a National Historic Landmark in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, was dedicated in 1929. Its immense landscaped courtyard and sunken garden are the site of public celebrations year round. | 1100 Anacapa St. Docent tours Mon.–Fri. 10:30 a.m.; Daily 2 p.m. 805/962-6464, santabarbaracourthouse.org.

a black box venue showcasing live performances, and MCA Santa Barbara, a museum dedicated to exhibiting the highest quality of contemporary art while recognizing the artists of tomorrow with innovative exhibitions. | 651 & 653 Paseo Nuevo. paseonuevoshopping.com, mcasantabarbara.org.

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Santa Barbara Public Market offers foodies an impressive collection of purveyors focused on handcrafted, regionally sourced and sustainably made foods. The LEED-certified space also has a commissary kitchen, featuring cooking classes, winemaker dinners, pop-up chefs and more! | 38 W. Victoria St. at Chapala, Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–10 p.m., sbpublicmarket.com.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s outstanding permanent and special collections, housed in a stately building constructed in 1914 as the city’s first federally funded post office, include the only remaining intact mural by Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros, Portrait of Mexico Today. | 1130 State St. Tues.–Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

PRESIDIO NEIGHBORHOOD is a vibrant section developed around the historic site of the last remaining Spanish fortresses built in California, called presidios. In addition to being Santa Barbara’s birthplace, El Presidio de Santa Barbara, the neighborhood is also home to the historic Lobero Theatre, one of the city’s architectural jewels, as well as Casa de la Guerra historic house museum. El Paseo, a charming adobe plaza built in the 1820s, houses several nice shops and restaurants, along with The Wine Collection of El Paseo, an upscale array of six excellent wine tasting rooms open daily from noon to 6 p.m. (located off of the 800 block of State Street).

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La Arcada, designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1926, is home to a wealth of galleries, shops and restaurants. Dotted along the way are historical curios and sculptures, with all roads leading to the much-loved central fountain inhabited by turtles and fish. | 1100 block of State Street. Paseo Nuevo is a charming outdoor destination to shop, dine, relax, stroll and people watch. Featuring Spanish-style architecture, Paseo Nuevo is also home to Center Stage Theater,

Santa Barbara Historical Museum exhibits fine art and artifacts from local history. Visit Gledhill Library and the new Edward Borein Gallery, which memorializes the artist’s work. | 136 E. De la Guerra St. Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/966-1601, santabarbaramuseum.com. El Presidio de Santa Barbara was founded in 1782 to offer protection to the mission and settlers, provide a seat of government and guard


against foreign invasion, and is now a state historic park. | 123 E. Canon Perdido St. 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily. 805/965-0093, sbthp.org. MISSION DISTRICT, identified by Mission Santa Barbara, is among the oldest residential neighborhoods in the city. Characterized by revival-style architecture, it is also home to the Mission Historical Park and rose garden.

8

Santa Barbara Botanic Garden’s 78 acres, accessed by five and a half miles of trails, record the history of the state’s rare and indigenous plants. From the dramatic opening view through the meadows, chaparral and forest to the sweeping ridge-top views of the Channel Islands, the garden is a skillful display of California’s natural bounty. | 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Mar.–Oct. 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Nov.– Feb. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/682-4726, sbbg.org.

Urban Santa Barbara has long been known for its casual walkup wine tasting scene, until now. NOT TO BE MISSED are three amazing, behind the scenes Appointment Only Wine Experiences at Jamie Slone Wines. Each experience takes place in the classic Santa Barbara style private reserve room, located in the Historic Presidio Neighborhood, Downtown Santa Barbara.

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Mission Santa Barbara was dedicated in 1786 by Father Fermin Lasuén. Known as “Queen of the Missions” for its twin belltowers, it remains the only California mission to be continuously occupied by the Franciscans. | 2201 Laguna St. Daily tours 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 805/682-4713, sbmission.org; santabarbaramission.org.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, open since 1916, provides science and nature education to generations of visitors. The museum, located along Mission Creek, reconnects more than 100,000 people each year—including 5,700 members—to nature indoors and outdoors. | 2559 Puesta del Sol Rd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/682-4711, sbnature.org.

Jamie Slone Wines offers three elevated and local wine tasting experiences. Wine and Chocolate Experience hosted by owner Kym Slone; also a terrifc Wine Education Experience that wine educator, Hope Riley hosts. Lastly, get a behind the scenes look with an Owner Wine Tasting led Jamie or Kym Slone. Enjoy!

WATERFRONT, running the length of Cabrillo Boulevard from East Beach to the harbor, is a feast for outdoor enthusiasts. A paved pathway runs the full distance.

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Andree Clark Bird Refuge— an artificial freshwater lake and marsh pond adjacent to the zoo —provides one of the best biking/jogging/skating paths in the area. | 1400 E. Cabrillo Blvd. 805/564-5418.

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Santa Barbara Harbor and Breakwater is a working harbor, home to fishing boats, private yachts and nearly 1,200 excursion and sightseeing boats. It is always a busy and interesting place to walk, skate, bike, eat and purchase fresh catch at Fisherman’s Market every Saturday morning. | Off Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, situated on the harbor’s historic breakwater, presents the region’s rich local maritime history. From ancient seafaring Chumash to modern-day deep-sea research, the emphasis is on human interaction with the sea. k

Mon-Thurs: 12pm-6pm | Fri: 12pm-7pm Sat: 11am-7pm | Sun: 11am-6pm 23 E. De La Guerra St. Santa Barbara, CA 805-560-6555 | jamieslonewines.com

SPRING 2018

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E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

| 113 Harbor Way. Open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily, except Saturdays 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., and closed Wednesdays. 805/962-8404, sbmm.org.

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Stearns Wharf, a Santa Barbara icon, was built by a Vermont native in 1876 to accommodate ocean-going vessels. Once owned by Jimmy Cagney, its dramatic views of the city and the hills beyond, as well as its mix of shops and restaurants, have charmed visitors for more than a century. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Sea Center on Stearns Wharf engages visitors of all ages with interactive exhibits, opportunities to work like scientists, a theater showcasing the wonders of Santa Barbara Channel, a live shark touch pool and a 1,500-gallon tide pool tank. Discover the fun in science and the wonders of the natural world. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/962-2526, sbnature.org.

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Santa Barbara Arts & Crafts Show is the longest-running public weekly art show in the country, with more than 250 exhibitors, all there in person and carefully screened to ensure originality of work. | Cabrillo Blvd. between State and Calle Puerta Vallarta streets. Sun. 10 a.m. to dusk. 805/897-2519, santabarbaraca.gov.

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The Mill is a distinctively modern spin on the original feed mill constructed in 1904, which is now an artisan marketplace, featuring a production winery, craft brewery and farm-to-table barbecue restaurant, as well as some unique retail offerings. | 406 E. Haley St., 10 a.m.–10 p.m., 805/965-9555, themillsb.com.

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Santa Barbara Zoo opened to the public in 1963 with only seven residents. Now more than 500 animals live here, and 30 acres of lush gardens spread across a knoll overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Committed to conservation, species survival and education, the zoo is an enlightening and entertaining place to visit. | 500 Niños Dr. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/962-5339, sbzoo.org.

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MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, is an awe-inspiring experience to motivate a new generation of innovators and problem-solvers, with 17,000 square feet of interactive educational exhibits focused on science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). | 805/708-2282, moxi.org.

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Funk Zone is a hotbed of homegrown artistic production known for its eclectic wall murals, ateliers, galleries, 80

SBSEASONS.COM

alternative exhibition spaces, trendy artist shops and the lively Urban Wine Trail. Half the fun is each surprise that awaits you down the alley or painted on the wall in front of you! | funkzone.net.

Montecito and Points South Montecito’s densely wooded, unique and beautiful area between Santa Barbara and Summerland has been home to Indians, Spanish and Yankee settlers, agricultural pioneers and eastern millionaires in search of the perfect climate. Though it has attracted the privileged for more than a century, its genesis was agrarian. Many of the historic estates incorporate the farms and ranches that had originally settled the area. Other remnants of this rich heritage include the 500-acre property on which Harleigh Johnston grew citrus trees until 1893, which later became San Ysidro Ranch, completed in 1935.

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Casa del Herrero is a splendid example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, designed by George Washington Smith, the house—and the gardens—are National Historic Landmarks. The gardens, covering 11 acres, were designed by noted landscape architects Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest and horticulturist Frances T. Underhill. | 1387 E. Valley R. Tours Wed. and Sat. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations required. 805/565-5653, casadelherrero.com.

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Ganna Walska Lotusland is a 37acre garden estate, prized for its rare and exotic plants and providing new perspectives on sustainability of nature’s offerings. Themed gardens include topiary, bromeliad, succulent, cycad, cactus, fern, Japanese, Australian, water and a blue garden, among others. | Reservations required. Tours Wed.–Sat. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. between Feb. 18 and Nov. 15., 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

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Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art educates students and the community about the power and value of the visual arts through physical, critical and spiritual engagement with the creative process and its results. | Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Mon.–Fri. 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/565-6162, westmontmuseum.org.

SUMMERLAND is just a stone’s throw off Hwy. 101 and two minutes south of Montecito, and offers the rural charm of an earlier California beach town while maintaining the spirit of an artists’ colony via plentiful antique, home and garden shops, art galleries, boutiques and unpretentious eateries.

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Lookout County Park, off Lillie Avenue at Evans Avenue, is on the bluffs above the beautiful Summerland Beach. From this vantage point, where full picnic facilities await, there are spectacular views of the Channel Islands. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Evans Ave. CARPINTERIA is five minutes south of Montecito and Summerland. Although the city advertises itself as home to the “world’s safest beach,” visitors also come to roam the avocado-laden hills in search of the orchid fields and hothouses, for which Carpinteria is well known.

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Salt Marsh Nature Reserve, a 230-acre salt marsh, is home to local and migratory waterfowl and fish and is a birder’s dream. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. at Sandyland Rd., turn right and drive three blocks to Ash Ave.

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Carpinteria State Beach and Bluffs are among California’s most popular destinations—the result of a broad beach and good sunning, tidepooling and fishing. For hikers and birdwatchers, it doesn’t get much better than the Carpinteria Bluffs. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. Continue through town to the beach. Park on Linden Ave. or in the Carpinteria State Beach lot.

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Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club was admitted to the U.S. Polo Association in 1911 and moved to its present location shortly thereafter. The club welcomes visitors for Sunday games from May through October. | 3375 Foothill Rd. 805/684-6683, sbpolo.com.

Goleta and Points North The city of Goleta and several of the area’s well-known institutions and landmarks are just 10 minutes north of Santa Barbara, including UCSB and two championship golf courses.

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Rancho La Patera, one of the oldest landmarks in Goleta Valley, is home to historic Stow House, a beautiful example of Carpenter Gothic architecture, and Cavalletto History Education Center, which focuses on Goleta’s ranching and agricultural history. | 304 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/681-7216, stowhouse.com.

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South Coast Railroad Museum, housed in a restored train depot, is a magnet for train buffs. Tours of the Victorian depot, rides on the “Goleta Short Line” miniature train and exhibits are part of the experience. | 300 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/964-3540, goletadepot.org.


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Goleta Beach Park, adjacent to UCSB, is favored by families and groups for its expanse of lawn with barbecue and picnic table areas. The 1,500-foot-long pier accommodates boat launching facilities, fishermen and strollers. | Exit Hwy. 217 at Sandspit Rd. 805/568-2461.

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Art, Design & Architecture Museum at UCSB holds an impressive fine art collection with one of the largest architectural archives in North America. In addition, it engages contemporary artists in exhibits and programs. | UCSB. Wed.–Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

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El Capitan and Refugio State Beaches, the mixed sand and rock beach at El Capitan links Refugio—a palmlined crescent of sand with tide pools—by beach, bluff and bike trails. Both are popular beach campgrounds. | From Hwy. 101, exit the northernmost El Capitan exit and/or Refugio Rd. 805/968-1033, parks.ca.gov.

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Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes, the Dunes Center at 1055 Guadalupe St. should be the first stop in the exploration of the largest dune complex in the state. | Wed.–Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 805/343-2455, dunescenter.org.

through October. | 420 2nd St. 805/686-1789, solvangfestivaltheater.org.

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Old Mission Santa Inés is the 19th of 21 missions built in California from 1769 to 1836 by Spanish Franciscan priests. Founded September 17, 1804 by Padre Estevan Tapis, it was the first European settlement in Santa Ynez Valley and still displays artifacts preserved from the Mission era. | 1760 Mission Dr. at Hwy. 246. 805/688-4815, missionsantaines.org.

Santa Ynez and Los Olivos These small, charming towns look like they belong in the pages of a book on the history of the west and are world-renowned for their vineyards, equestrian culture, art galleries, inns and restaurants that epitomize the region’s signature wine country cuisine.

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Elverhøj Museum of History & Art is housed in a historic handcrafted structure built in a style derived from the large farmhouses of 18th century Denmark. Visitors can view Solvang’s history through photos, artifacts and video displays. | Wed.–Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 1624 Elverhoy Way. 805/686-1211, elverhoj.org.

Los Olivos melds California history with modern-day wine tasting rooms, restaurants, art galleries and upscale shops in this picture-perfect country town dating back to the 1860s, when stagecoaches passed through. Centered by an iconic flagpole, the serenity of vineyards, lavender farms, orchards, ranches and horse trails surround Los Olivos. This is a charming place to visit for a one-stop wine country experience. | Approximately 40 min. north of Santa Barbara via Hwy. 154, losolivosca.com.

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Wildling Art Museum, an educational institution dedicated to presenting art of America’s wilderness, is a place to gain a greater appreciation of art and a better understanding of the importance of preserving our natural heritage. | 1511-B Mission Dr., 805/688-1082, wildlingmuseum.org.

Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum celebrates the rich history of the Santa Ynez Valley, its pioneering settlers and the five early townships that formed the foundation of this unique region. | Open Wed.–Sun. noon–4 p.m. 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. 805/688-7889, santaynezmuseum.org. 

Santa Ynez Mountains and Valley Areas The valley is historically rich and geographically diverse, with vineyards dotting the landscape, many with tasting rooms.

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Cachuma Lake Recreation Area provides 750 campsites just 25 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara. Full marina, boat launch, rental boats, fishing equipment and licenses are available. Nature cruises led by park naturalists provide an educational look at the wildlife, birds (including bald eagles) and plants that make Cachuma such a rich habitat. | Hwy. 154. 805/686-5055, sbparks.org.

Solvang With a population of nearly 5,000, Solvang (“sunny field” in Danish) is the largest city in Santa Ynez Valley. Founded in 1911 by Danish educators from the Midwest, Solvang is the “Danish Capital of North America.”

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Solvang Festival Theater, a 700-seat historic outdoor theater, presents excellent productions staged by Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA), as well as other concerts and events. Open June SPRING 2018

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San Luis Obispo  The city of San Luis Obispo (SLO) reigns as “queen” of the county, blessed with historical sights, arts, culture, a vibrant downtown and a friendly small-town vibe. Lush hills and vast open spaces with hiking trails ring the town, making it seem like a giant urban park. California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) infuses the town with stimulating intellectual energy, arts and culture. Walking here is a joy—stroll along the scenic creek, browse through shops and galleries, and feast on regional cuisine at the many restaurants and cafés.

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Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa Visit the small museum to view artifacts and learn about Chumash Indian life, early Spanish settlers and California history. Docents lead tours of the church and grounds most days at 1:15 p.m. (Sundays at 2 p.m.), starting at the mission steps (call to confirm). Mission Plaza, adjacent to the mission, is SLO’s community cultural center. | 751 Palm St., 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily, 805/543-6850, missionsanluisobispo.org.

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Downtown/Higuera Street SLO’s main street—along with the alleys and avenues that connect to it—was named for the Higuera family, who arrived here in 1774, just two years after the mission was founded. Higuera Street also hosts SLO’s world-famous Thursday Night Farmer’s Market—a social gathering of locals and visitors who come here to eat (many restaurants set up shop on the street), listen to music, connect with community groups and shop for fresh produce and culinary delights. | Farmer’s Market: Higuera Street, between Nipomo and Osos streets, 6–9 p.m. Thurs., weather permitting.

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Creek Walk San Luis Creek travels through the city on its way to the ocean and borders Mission Plaza. Follow a footbridge to the scenic Creek Walk, with various access steps to downtown shops and restaurants, some with patio tables overlooking the bubbling stream. | Between Higuera and Monterey streets, from Nipomo Street to Osos Street.

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Historic Railroad District In 1894, a train chugged into San Luis Obispo, marking the first time passengers and goods could travel directly between San Francisco and Los Angeles on the Southern Pacific rails. Pacific Surfliner and Coast Starlight trains stop here multiple times a day and connect with bus systems throughout the city and county. The district is also a lively neighborhood with restaurants, shops and

businesses, parks and open spaces. | San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum, 1940 Santa Barbara Ave., 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sat., 805/548-1894, slorrm.com.

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San Luis Obispo Museum of Art SLOMA focuses on contemporary California art and presents ever-changing exhibits of paintings, sculpture, printmaking, fine crafts and photography. The center also hosts films, classes, lectures and special events. | 1010 Broad St., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. (closed Tues.), 805/543-8562, sloma.org. Admission is free.

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Children’s Museum Parents and kids explore, investigate and create at the fabulous San Luis Obispo Children’s Museum. The three-story 8,400-sq.ft. center houses indoor and outdoor learning environments that stimulate curiosity and discovery through play. | 1010 Nipomo St., hours vary by day and season (closed Mon.), 805/545-5874, slocm.org.

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Bubblegum Alley People have been plastering this quirky 70-foot-long alley with a 15-foot-high wall with fresh wads of chewing gum for decades. No one really knows for sure why and how the tradition started, but it’s now one of SLO’s signature attractions. | 735 Higuera St.

South County Inland EDNA VALLEY & ARROYO GRANDE VALLEY To the east of Hwy. 101, travel back to turn-ofthe-century California in the charming village of Arroyo Grande. Arroyo Grande is also the gateway to the pastoral Arroyo Grande and Edna Valley wine growing AVAs.

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Old Edna In the heart of the Edna Valley wine region, historic Old Edna, a restored early 1900s town site, offers a tasting room, deli counter and several vacation rental cottages. | Hwy. 227 at Price Canyon Rd., 805/544-8062, oldedna.com.

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Lopez Lake Recreational Area Camp, fish, picnic, hike, sail and water ski along 22 miles of shoreline at this gem of a lake. In the summer, kids can whoosh down slides in a water park near the campgrounds. | 10 miles northeast of Arroyo Grande, 805/788-2381, slocountyparks.org/camp/lopez-lake.

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Arroyo Grande Village

Get a dose of authentic Americana by strolling along the main street of this quaint village, lined with modern shops and eateries

housed in historic buildings dating back to the 1800s and early 1900s. A lush village green fronts a meandering creek and holds one of the last swinging bridges from early California days. | East Branch St., east of Hwy. 101 to

Huasna Rd., arroyograndevillage.org.

South County Coast PISMO BEACH, OCEANO, GROVER BEACH, SHELL BEACH, AVILA BEACH The southern region of the county encompasses miles of beaches, state parks, seaside towns, and quaint historic villages. The hub of this region, the town of Pismo Beach, preserves the spirit of early California with 23 miles of pristine sandy beaches and spectacular coastal scenes. Two fabulous state parks hug the coast for miles just south of town.

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Pismo Beach Pier This 1,200-ft. historic pier anchors the downtown waterfront area. Shops and restaurants abound in the neighborhood surrounding the pier. Note: the pier is closed for renovation until Fall 2019, but the adjacent beaches and boardwalk will remain accessible during most of the construction period. | West end of Pomeroy Ave., Pismo Beach.

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Pismo Beach State Park Experience fantastic seaside activities at this popular park: tide pooling, fishing, surfing, boogie boarding and bird watching. From November through March, about 50,000 Monarch butterflies spend the winter in a grove of eucalyptus trees amid the sand dunes—one of the largest such wintering sites in the nation. | 555 Pier Ave., Oceano, 805/489-1869, parks.ca.gov.

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Oceano Dunes State Recreational Vehicle Area This is the only drivable beach in California— pull up and camp close to the waves and drive ATVs on the vast stretches of sand dunes. You can also swim, surf, fish, hike and camp in the recreation area, which includes fascinating views of unusual geologic formations, flora and fauna. | Entrance is at west end of Pier Ave. off Hwy. 1, Oceano, 805/ 473-7220, parks.ca.gov.

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Avila Beach South-facing Avila Beach is reputedly the sunniest and warmest beach in the county. Once a major shipping and international customs port, the tiny town is a vibrant family-friendly destination with many attractions, including restaurants, hotels, wine tasting venues and a wonderful park and children’s playground. Sport-fishing and whale-watching excursion k SPRING 2018

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boats depart from Port San Luis wharf, famous for its scenic views and seafood restaurants. | Avila Beach Dr. exit off Hwy. 101.

MID-COUNTY COAST LOS OSOS, BAYWOOD PARK, MORRO BAY, CAYUCOS The charming, adjacent communities of Los Osos and Baywood Park edge the quiet southern portion of Morro Bay Estuary. The town of Morro Bay is home to a state and national estuary and Morro Rock, a state historic monument.

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Montaña de Oro State Park The spectacular 8,000-acre park’s name, “Mountain of Gold,” pays tribute to the fields of the springtime wildflowers that blanket the park’s meadows, hills and coastal bluffs. It’s an ideal destination for hiking, biking, horseback riding, tide pooling and camping. Monarch butterflies spend several months here every winter, and sea otters often frolic at Spooner’s Cove. | On Pecho Rd., seven miles south of Los Osos, 805/772-7434, parks.ca.gov.

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El Moro Elfin Forest Walk along an accessible boardwalk that loops through a 90-acre nature area with more than 200 species of plants, from pygmy oak woodlands to coastal marsh. It supports more than 200 species of plants, plus more than 100 bird, 22 mammal and 13 reptile and amphibian species. | Entrance is north of Santa Ysabel Ave., between South Bay Blvd. and 10th St., Los Osos, 805/528-0392, elfin-forest.org.

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Morro Rock Sometimes called the “Gibraltar of the Pacific,” this dome-shaped sentinel is 576 feet high and 50 acres at its base. It’s actually a volcanic plug—one of nine similar peaks that pop out of the landscape between San Luis Obispo and Morro Bay. More than 250 birds visit the estuary every year, making it one of the most popular bird-watching destinations in the state. | West end of Coleman Dr., Morro Bay, 805/772-7434, parks.ca.gov.

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Cayucos This classic California beach town has a historic pier, built in 1875, and other buildings that reflect its various eras. Stroll along the miles of beaches and bluff-top trails, and walk along the historic main street to find delectable treats like fresh-baked cookies and smoked fish. | Hwy. 1, 4 miles north of Morro Bay, cayucosbythesea.com.

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North County Coast CAMBRIA The charming arts-oriented town of Cambria sits amid hillsides studded with towering Monterey pines. It has two adjacent downtown sections: the historic East Village and the newer West Village. Each boasts an array of excellent choices for dining and shopping for unusual artworks, crafts and antiques.

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Moonstone Beach On the western edge of town, romantic Moonstone Beach derived its name from the semi-precious agate and jasper stones hidden amid the granules of sand along the shore. It’s a fantastic place to stroll along the bluffs and gaze at the wild, dynamic Pacific coast. | Moonstone Beach Dr., west of Hwy. 1.

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Harmony The tiny one-block town of Harmony (pop. 18) dates back to 1915 and includes a pottery studio, glassworks, a restaurant and the Harmony Cellars winery and tasting room. | 7 miles south of Cambria off Hwy. 1, harmonytown.com. SAN SIMEON AND RAGGED POINT The historic town of San Simeon is forever linked to one of the most magnificent private estates in the nation—Hearst Castle. North of San Simeon to the county line, the scenic Piedras Blancas coastline becomes ever wilder as it rises from sandy dunes to meet the rugged cliffs near Ragged Point, the southernmost entry point to the dramatic Big Sur coast.

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Hearst Castle Famed California architect Julia Morgan designed this magnificent estate, officially known as Hearst San Simeon State Historical Monument, for publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst in the early 1900s. It’s now a state monument where visitors can join various tours and gaze over the stunning coastline from the castle’s bluff-top perch, two miles via tram uphill from the visitor center. | 750 Hearst Castle Rd., tours daily from 8 a.m. to late afternoon plus seasonal evening tours, 800/444-4445 or 518/218-5078, www. hearstcastle.org.

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Piedras Blancas Light Station Built in 1875 to guide ships into San Simeon Bay, this light station is one of only

three tall seacoast lighthouses built in California. | On Hwy. 1, about 7 miles north of Hearst Castle, guided tours at 9:45 a.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sat. except national holidays, 805/927-7361, piedrasblancas.org.

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Piedras Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery About 4.5 miles north of Hearst Castle, pull over to the Piedras Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery, where a colony of giant elephant seals hauls out each year to molt, mate and give birth—an estimated 1,800 pups are born here each year during the winter months. Docent tours are available. | Off Hwy. 1, 4.5 miles north of Hearst Castle, elephantseal.org.

North County Inland PASO ROBLES, ATASCADERO, TEMPLETON, SANTA MARGARITA Starting in the 1860s, tourists flooded into Paso Robles to “take the cure,” soaking in the tubs or pools fed by the region’s abundant hot sulfur mineral springs. Today the town blends its Old West heritage and mineral spring spas with a booming wine business. Atascadero, a quiet residential town at the crossroads of Highways 41 and 101, serves as a gateway to nearly all North-County destinations and activities.

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Historic Downtown Paso Robles Downtown, historic buildings, shops, antique stores, restaurants and hotels surround the oak-studded Paso Robles City Park, aka The Square—the hub of Paso life and the site of festivals and concerts, including the annual Paso Robles Wine Festival weekend every May. | Downtown City Park bordered by 11th, 12th, Spring and Pine streets, travelpaso.com.

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Atascadero Lake Park – Charles Paddock Zoo Scenic Atascadero Lake Park has a walking/running trail that circles the lake, plus picnic areas, a sand volleyball court and a children’s playground. The park is also home to the five-acre Charles Paddock Zoo with hundreds of animal species from around the globe. | Park at 9305 Pismo Ave., Atascadero , Zoo at 9100 Morro Rd., open daily 10 a.m.– 5 p.m. daily (10 a.m.–4 p.m.in winter), 805/461-5080, charlespaddockzoo.org. 


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FOOD

CHEF’S TABLE

Our food series highlights seasonal recipes selected by head chefs at Santa Barbara County’s best restaurants. We hope you will try them in your own kitchen— bon appetit!

LEMON BRINED FRIED CHICKEN With Crispy Fingerling Potato, Sugar Snap Peas, Carrots and Sausage Gravy. Serves 4.

Lemon Brined Chicken 2 chicken thighs, boneless Lemon brine 4 cups buttermilk

Method Clean chicken thighs, removing any remaining cartilage, place in a large non-reactive container and cover with lemon brine. Refrigerate for 12 hrs. Drain brine and cover chicken with buttermilk. Lemon Brine 4 cups water 3 tablespoons salt 3 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon rosemary 1 tablespoon black pepper, cracked 3 lemons

Method Zest lemons using zester or vegetable peeler, then juice and remove all seeds. Combine with remaining ingredients. Vegetables 1 lb. baby carrots 1 lb. snap peas 1 lb. Fingerling potatoes 1 lb. onions, medium dice Olive oil

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2 tablespoons salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 4 cloves garlic, peeled 1/4 bunch thyme 1/4 bunch oregano

Method Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees. Wash and clean snap peas. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and blanch snap peas for 20 seconds, remove immediately and shock in an ice bath. Cook onions over very low heat with olive oil and salt to taste, stirring occasionally until caramelized and very soft (one hour or more). Wash baby carrots thoroughly, dry and toss with enough olive oil to coat. Season with salt and pepper to taste and place on a baking sheet in one layer. Roast in the oven for 10 min., rotate and cook for 8–10 min. more until they begin to brown. Toss potatoes, garlic, thyme and oregano in olive oil, salt and pepper and place on a baking sheet in a single layer. Roast in oven until very soft; set aside until cool. Using a kitchen spatula or a gloved hand, smash potatoes on a cutting board and reserve for later.

CHEF WESTON RICHARDS’ career in the culinary world began more than 16 years ago at Santa Barbara’s Sage & Onion. From there, he quickly made his mark at Wine Cask and its sister restaurant Intermezzo, creating dishes to complement a Wine Spectator Grand Award-winning wine list. Soon after, he founded the critically acclaimed Spare Parts, a locals’ pop-up favorite. Richards was integral in opening Les Marchands, his current home, and has directed the culinary program for more than four years. His menu is heavily influenced by his travels in Italy, where he spent time in Rome, Tuscany and Naples, and by North African cuisine, particularly from Morocco and Tunisia. Chef Richards creates diverse and seasonally inspired menus for dinner and weekend brunch, along with an extensive offering of cheese and house-made charcuterie.

Gravy 1/2 lb. pork breakfast sausage 2 quarts milk 4 oz. flour 4 oz. butter 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 teaspoon hot sauce 1-1/2 tablespoons salt Sear sausage over medium heat until well browned and cooked through. Lower heat, add butter and cook until melted. Add flour and cook, stirring gently, until flour is no longer raw, about 3 min. Add milk in stages, whisking constantly to prevent lumps, and continue to stir until gravy reaches a boil. Season to taste with salt, pepper and hot sauce.

Dredge for frying 4 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup cornstarch Salt and pepper to taste To assemble as needed Canola oil for frying Salt Black pepper Olive oil Butter Basil Dill

Sauté potatoes in a cast iron skillet with a small amount of oil over medium high heat until golden brown and crispy, remove from heat, season with salt and place on paper towels to drain. Sauté carrots, onions and snap peas until warm, adding a small amount of butter as needed. Coat chicken in frying dredge, making sure each piece is well coated. Fill a large heavybottom pot (preferably cast iron) with oil for frying and bring to 350 degrees. Or alternately, shallow-fry chicken in cast iron skillet. Fry chicken in small batches, season with salt immediately after removing from fryer and lay out on paper towels to drain. Divide vegetables onto four plates and top with fried chicken and 3 oz. of gravy (or more if desired); garnish with torn basil and sprigs of dill.


CRISPY POACHED EGG CHEF LUCA CRESTANELLI was born and raised

in Verona, Italy where he received his Gastronomy and Culinary Arts degree. He came to the United States in 2002 to work under renowned Chef Nicola Mastronardi at Vincenti in Brentwood. He then worked as a private chef until 2010, when he began his collaboration with the Gordon family, owners of Brentwood’s famed Toscana (and now partners in S.Y. Kitchen). Together they launched Bar Toscana, with Crestanelli as executive chef, creating an inspired menu for a restaurant/bar concept to complement their innovative craft cocktail and wine program. When Crestanelli later learned about an old farmhouse/restaurant that was available in downtown Santa Ynez, he pitched the Gordon’s with the idea of a rustic restaurant infusing Italian style with a rural sensibility, using products from local fisherman, ranchers, farmers and vintners. Already residents of Santa Ynez, they enthusiastically embraced the idea and partnered with him to create S.Y. Kitchen, which opened in 2013 to rave reviews.

With Cheese Fondue, Red Endive, Green Onion and Asparagus. Serves 1.

INGREDIENTS

For fried egg 2 eggs Kosher salt Fresh ground pepper 1 tablespoon flour 1 cup bread crumbs 2 cups canola oil for frying For salad 1 red endive, thinly sliced 1 green onion, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 lemon, juiced 3 spears asparagus For fondue 2 oz. Teleggio 2 oz. Gorgonzola 2 tablespoons cream 2 tablespoons milk Maldon salt to finish

Method Clean, trim and blanch asparagus. Set aside. Poach one egg, making sure that the yolk is soft and whites are just set. Remove from poaching water and chill in ice bath. Reserve. Whisk remaining egg in a bowl; season with salt and pepper. Place bread crumbs in a small plate or bowl. Place flour in a second small plate or bowl. Gently coat poached egg with flour, then dip into the egg mixture and coat with breadcrumbs. Place sliced onion and endive in a mixing bowl; season to taste with extra virgin olive oil, fresh lemon juice, salt and pepper. Arrange a bain-marie or double boiler on the stove with water in lower section. Place Teleggio and Gorgonzola cheeses in upper section; add milk and cream. Heat on medium and cook until cheeses melt; stir regularly to blend together. Keep warm on low heat. Place canola oil in a saucepan and heat to medium high. When hot, gently add battered poached egg and fry just until golden brown. Remove from heat and drain on paper towel to remove excess oil. In another sauté pan, gently roast asparagus with some olive oil for a minute until heated through. Remove and cut diagonally into 2–3” pieces. To plate, spoon hot cheese onto a serving plate. Place egg over the fondue and arrange endive salad around the side of the egg. Finish with roasted asparagus tips as desired and a sprinkling of Maldon salt on the egg before serving.

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DINING OUT

The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/restaurant-guide.

75 E X C E L L E N T R E S TA U R A N T S I N M O N T E C I T O, S A N TA B A R B A R A , G O L E TA A N D S A N TA Y N E Z VA L L E Y

Montecito Bella Vista (Contemporary Italian) at the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore commands panoramic ocean views across Montecito’s Butterfly Beach and promises top notch cuisine and impeccable service. Guests enjoy a contemporary Italian menu showcasing fresh California ingredients. It’s also home to one of the most celebrated Sunday brunches in the U.S. 1260 Channel Dr., 805/969-2261. $$$–$$$$

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glass-encased greenhouse’s panoramic view and fireside couches make it a perfect spot for listening to Wednesday night jazz. 50 Los Patos Way, 805/969-6705. $$–$$$

- Stonehouse Restaurant

of Spain, Mexico and Latin America in a charming setting with classic margaritas and martinis amid a vibrant outdoor patio, romantic dining room or cozy fireplace. 1212 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-8500. $$–$$$

(American) is located in a 19th century citrus packing house on the grounds of San Ysidro Ranch. Stonehouse has a full bar and a menu that emphasizes local fish and produce. Open daily for dinner only. Also on this historic property is Plow and Angel (American), a cozy restaurant attached to the bar and well known for its comfort food—famous mac ‘n cheese and ribs are just some of the choices. Dinner and bar service daily. 900 San Ysidro Ln., 805/565-1700. Currently closed for damage repairs. $$$-$$$$

Lucky’s (American) offers steaks, chops

Trattoria Mollie (Italian) is a

and seafood as well as chicken entrées, wonderful salads, six different potato dishes and beautiful desserts. The wine list runs to the extravagant. The adjacent bar is a favorite among locals. 1279 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-7540. $$$–$$$$

charming standby for locals-in-the-know. The dynamic cuisine consists of recipes that Mollie gathered during her years of training with “the best chefs in Italy.” 1250 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-9381. $$$

Cava (Mexican) serves the bold flavors

Tre Lune (Italian) offers a delicious Montecito Wine Bistro (Californian) is a casual yet sophisticated spot to sit on the outdoor patio or cozy up to the fireplace and nibble wine-friendly food, and sip wines by the glass or the flight, or enjoy a cocktail. 516 San Ysidro Rd., 805/969-7520. $$–$$$

Oliver’s of Montecito (Gourmet Vegan) brings health and wellness to the forefront of the dining experience. The restaurant’s creative dishes are made with organic and fresh ingredients. Oliver’s innovative menu is inspired by nature, minimally processed and carefully prepared to provide guests with delicious and vibrant food. All of the dishes are vegan and vegetarian, using seasonal veggies to nourish the body. 1198 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-0834. $$$

Stella Mare’s (French) pairs a beautiful Victorian building with stylish, Normandy-inspired cuisine. The 88

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menu that isn’t afraid of flavor. The high quality, genuine Italian cuisine includes excellent minestrone soup, fall-offthe-fork ossobuco, basil pesto, lobster ravioli and more. 1151 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-2646. $$$

Santa Barbara Waterfront

Way, 805/966-4418. $$

Chuck’s Waterfront Grill (Steak, Seafood) serves prime-grade top sirloin steaks and Australian lobster tail among many other delicious offerings. The restaurant’s lively upstairs extension,

The Endless Summer bar-café (Seafood), has two terraces for al fresco dining on more casual fare. 113 Harbor Way, 805/564-1200. $$–$$$

Convivo Restaurant and Bar (Italian) located across from East Beach on the ground floor of the historic Santa Barbara Inn, draws its inspiration from Santa Barbara’s bounty of seafood and meats prepared “Nomad Italian” style. Enjoy al fresco dining with a view of the Channel Islands. 901 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-6789. $$-$$$

$$–$$$

Brophy Bros. (Seafood) has long been one of Santa Barbara’s most popular eateries and is located at the harbor with excellent views. You’ll find great shellfish cocktails and fresh fish here. 119 Harbor

Shoreline Beach Café (Mexican, Seafood) is a lively, open-air beach restaurant. Salads, burgers, fish tacos, fresh seafood and vegetarian items are served daily. Breakfast served on weekends. 801 Shoreline Dr., 805/568-0064. $$

Toma Restaurant and Bar (Italian) is a romantic spot to savor excellent Italian and Mediterranean dishes from Santa Barbara’s seasonal bounty while enjoying warm and attentive service and a view of the enchanting Santa Barbara harbor. 324 W. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/962-0777. $$-$$$

Downtown Arigato Sushi (Japanese) provides

The Harbor Restaurant and Longboard’s Grill (Seafood) on Stearns Wharf are two different experiences from one great vantage point. The Harbor is a romantic oceanview restaurant and Longboard’s is a noisy, energy-packed bar and grill. 210 Stearns Wharf, 805/963-3311. $$–$$$

Rodney’s Grill (American) celebrates the cuisine and wines of the Central Coast. Located in the Fess Parker—A Doubletree by Hilton Resort, Rodney’s menu spotlights naturally raised meats and poultry, seasonal produce and sustainable seafood—all paired with wines from the finest local vineyards. 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/884-8535. $$$

- Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach (Seafood) serves locally caught, fresh seafood specialties. Dine inside or al fresco with one of the best ocean views in Santa Barbara. Full bar and regional wine list. 2981 Cliff Dr., 805/898-2628.

from the tanks or from that day’s catch just steps from the ocean. 230 Stearns Wharf, 805/966-6676. $$

- Santa Barbara FisHouse (Seafood) serves fresh local fish in a lively setting. Gathering with friends on the dining terrace with ocean views is the perfect way to start the weekend. Be sure to order lobster during the season from these “lobster specialists.” 101 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/966-2112. $$

Santa Barbara Shellfish Co. (Seafood) is a fun, no-frills seafoodlover’s paradise. Select your dinner fresh

designer sushi from inventive chefs. Daily specials explore the limitless varieties of this Japanese delicacy. 1225 State St., 805/965-6074. $$$

Arnoldi’s Café (Italian) specializes in traditional homestyle Italian cuisine, featuring the freshest local produce and seafood, imported Italian meats, cheeses and olive oils, as well as an extensive wine list, bocce courts and a heated patio. 600 Olive St., 805/962-5394. $$$

Benchmark Eatery (Seafood, American) is a casual eatery that does American fare proud, with everything from soul-satisfying pastas, pizzas, grilled ahi and fish and chips to fresh salads, juicy burgers and generous sandwiches. 1201 State St., 805/845-2600, $-$$ Bibi Ji (Indian, Seafood) is a hot new restaurant from acclaimed chef Jessi Singh, who’s been lauded for his inventive “inauthentic” Indian cooking at the popular Babu Ji restaurants in San Francisco, Manhattan and Melbourne. The locally inspired seafood-focused menu pairs with wines from James Beard Award-winning sommelier Rajat Parr. 734 State St., 805/560-6845. $$-$$$


Blackbird (Californian) is a one of Santa Barbara’s newest hot spots. Classic meets contemporary at Hotel Californian’s signature restaurant. Blackbird features exquisite Mediterranean-influenced cuisine emphasizing locally-sourced and hyper-seasonal ingredients. With the Pacific Ocean and the Funk Zone as a backdrop, Blackbird offers a sleek, yet approachable and wholly unpretentious atmosphere. Dinner only. 36 State St., 805/882-0135. $$$

Fresh Pasta Alle Vongole by Bella Vista Executive Chef Marco Fossati, at the fine dining restaurant at Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara.

Black Sheep (Californian) has a cool, casual vibe, but serves seriously good farm-to-table food. Try scallop crudo, roasted bone marrow or re-constructed chicken stuffed with walnuts and dried apricots. 26 E. Ortega St., 805/965-1113. $$$

bouchon (Californian French) serves “Santa Barbara Wine Country” cuisine complemented by a remarkable wine list that includes more than 50 Central Coast wines by the glass. Open for dinner nightly. 9 W. Victoria St., 805/730-1160. $$$ Ca’Dario (Italian) promises fine Italian cuisine, whether pasta, fish or fowl—don’t miss the ravioli pillows with brown butter and sage sauce and, grilled asparagus wrapped with pancetta—and an extensive wine list. A few doors down, Ca’Dario Pizzeria features a tasty array of pizzas, including gluten-free options. For a quick fix, try Ca’Dario Pizzeria Veloce in the Santa Barbara Public Market (38 W. Victoria St.). 37 E. Victoria St., 805/884-9419. $$$ Carlitos Café y Cantina (Mexican) offers exciting regional Mexican cuisine and 100% blue agave Margaritas, along with fresh, imaginative Mexican grilled specialties that borrow from Pueblo, Mayan and Aztec cultures. 1324 State St., 805/962-7117. $$

Casa Blanca Restaurant & Cantina (Mexican) is a fun Mexican hot spot with killer Margaritas, tasty tacos, ample enchiladas and other classic south-of-the-border inspired fare. 330 State St., 805/845-8966. $$

China Pavilion (Chinese) is a spacious and charming restaurant with large picture windows looking out over downtown Santa Barbara. It features high-quality traditional Chinese food, as well as a delicious dim sum brunch on weekends. 1202 Chapala St., 805/560-6028. $$ Enterprise Fish Co. (Seafood) is one of Santa Barbara’s largest and busiest seafood restaurants. In an exhilarating, nautical atmosphere are an oyster bar and a variety of fresh fish that are mesquite-broiled and served at reasonable prices. 225 State St., 805/962-3313. $$ Finch & Fork (Californian) in the Canary Hotel offers hearty items like buttermilk fried chicken and excellently prepared lighter fare, complete with farm-fresh salads, fresh oysters and yummy flatbreads. 31 W. Carrillo St., 805/879-9100. $$–$$$ Intermezzo Bar/Café (Californian) serves local wines on tap, craft cocktails and light fare such as burgers, flatbreads, salads and desserts ‘til late. k SPRING 2018

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DINING OUT

Breakfast • Lunch Dinner • Cocktails

Enjoy an array of small plates to share—including charcuterie, oysters, mussels, steak bites and the crispy cauliflower—make this a perfect pre- or post-theater stop. Now open Tues.-Sat. for lunch, as well as daily for dinner. 819 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$–$$$

Jane (Californian) offers upscale, fresh, tasty fare that runs the gamut from huge seasonal salads and gourmet burgers to fish and chips with chipotle ketchup and creamy dill. The delicious goat cheese pancakes with smoked salmon and caviar are crafted from a family recipe. 1311 State St., 805/962-1311. $$

Joe’s Café (American) is a Santa Barbara icon known for its stiff cocktails and raucous atmosphere. The menu of American classics includes steaks, sandwiches and Mexican specialties. Lunch and dinner served daily; breakfast served weekends. 536 State St., 805/966-4638. $$

The Lark (American) delights with Chef Jason Paluska’s

2981 Cliff Drive (805) 898-2628 www.boathousesb.com

sophisticated family-style plates designed to share and made with the freshest possible local “farm-to-fork” ingredients, along with creative cocktails and a wonderful wine selection. Dinner, Tues.–Sun. 131 Anacapa St., 805/284-0370. $$–$$$

- Les Marchands (French) this stylish caveau is the perfect place to discover expertly chosen wines from around the world and enjoy tastes with locally-sourced bites and traditional French fare pairings in a relaxing, Funk Zone atmosphere, free of intimidation. 131 Anacapa St. Suite B, 805/ 284-0380. $–$$$

- Loquita (Spanish) specializes in authentic Spanish food, including hot and cold tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats, and three types of paella. Executive Chef Peter Lee’s innovative cuisine has a California twist and is complimented with a full bar of Spanish and local wines and spirits. 202 State St., 805/880-3380. $$-$$$

Louie’s (Californian), located inside Santa Barbara’s oldest operating hotel, The Upham, reflects the charm and tradition of its location. You’ll find extraordinary fresh seafood, pastas, filet mignon and a changing menu of specialties, with options to dine outside on a beautiful wrap-around porch or inside at tables tucked into intimate alcoves. 1404 De La Vina St., 805/963-7003. $$–$$$ Olio e Limone (Italian) uses only the freshest ingredients for simply delicious preparations. Tuck into a plate of housemade ravioli filled with roasted eggplant and goat cheese, topped with a fresh tomato and basil sauce and shaved ricotta salata. Olio Pizzeria offers a casual pizza bar, wine and cocktails next door, while Olio Crudo Bar offers cocktails and sashimi with an Italian accent! 11 W. Victoria St. #17, 805/899-2699 ext. 1. $$$ Opal (Californian) is a classic European-style bistro serving eclectic California cuisine complemented by a wood-burning pizza oven, an extensive wine list and full 90

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BELMOND

EL

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bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1325 State St., 805/966-9676. $$

The Palace Grill (Cajun) is a place resonating with jazz music that creates the perfect setting for spicy food and spirited service to chase the blues away. Features authentic Louisiana specialities like jambalaya, crawfish etouffée and blackened steaks and seafood. 8 E. Cota St., 805/963-5000. $$–$$$

Paradise Café (American) has a unique old building with wall murals from the 1940s. It has one of Santa Barbara’s favorite patios for dining and a bar that will take you back in time with cocktails of your choice and a well-selected wine and beer list. 702 Anacapa St., 805/962-4416. $$

Petit Valentien (French), with its quaint atmosphere and intimate setting, is hidden away in a small corner of La Arcada. Be sure to check out the prix fixe menu only available on Sundays. 1114 State St. #16, 805/966-0222. $$ Viva (Mexican) indulges your senses with its modern Mexican cuisine, beautiful courtyard patio and inviting dining room in the historic La Arcada. Taco happy hour (Mon.-Fri. from 3-6 p.m.) is a perfect time to sample creative tacos and other antojitos, or “small cravings,” along with the raw bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh shellfish. 1114 State St., 805/965-4770. $$

COME RAISE A GLASS. WE’LL RAISE THE BAR. CELEBRATE YOUR SPECIAL OCCASION WITH US —

Wine Cask (Californian) in the historic El Paseo complex offers a beautiful spot to enjoy fine dining and exceptional service in a relaxed setting. Don’t miss the stellar wine selections, including an impressive variety of local wines on tap. 813 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$$

IN UNFORGETTABLE STYLE. FROM A BIRTHDAY LUNCH WITH FRIENDS TO A ROMANTIC DINNER

Uptown

- Belmond El Encanto (Coastal-Californian) presents California coastal cuisine and seasonal favorites from executive chef Johan Denizot, featuring specialties like fresh local oysters, pan seared diver scallops and short ribs sous vide alongside stunning Santa Barbara views. Sit under the stars on the terrace or in the elegant dining room. 800 Alvarado Pl., 805/770-3530. $$$-$$$$

Chuck’s of Hawaii (American) is the home of California’s first salad bar and offers award-winning steaks and fresh seafood right from the grill. A local favorite hangout since 1967. 3888 State St., 805/687-4417. $$-$$$

FOR TWO, WE WILL CREATE A MEMORABLE EVENT. LINGER IN OUR GARDENS OR ON OUR TERRACE, AND LET US SPOIL YOU WITH SUPERB CUISINE AND WINES.

Crocodile Restaurant (Italian/Californian), a local’s secret found at the Lemon Tree Inn, offers a chic, relaxing atmosphere with a full cocktail bar and kitchen. A great spot for watching a sporting match or catching up with a friend. Breakfast, lunch and dinner served daily. 2819 State St., 805/687-6444. $$-$$$­ Le Café Stella (French-American) is perched across from Santa Barbara Golf Club and is a neighborhood k

800 ALVARADO PLACE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 | 805 845 5800 HOTELS | TRAINS | RIVER CRUISES | JOURNEYS | BELMOND.COM SPRING 2018

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hot spot for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour— try the juicy burgers on brioche buns or heart-warming coq au vin. 3302 McCaw Ave., 805/569-7698. $$

IS THE

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Lure Fish House (Seafood) specializes in fresh and sustainable seafood from trusted sources and locally caught seafood, organically grown local produce, and wines from local vineyards whenever possible. 3815 State St., 805/618-1816. $$-$$$

The Tee-Off (American) is a friendly steak and seafood restaurant and lounge with a long history of local appreciation that features a short but sweet menu of steaks, chops, chicken and seafood. 3627 State St., 805/687-1616. $$-$$$

Goleta Angel Oak (French-Californian) is a modern steak and seafood restaurant housed at Ritz-Carlton Bacara, featuring classic steakhouse dishes with a uniquely Santa Barbara interpretation. Accompanying the cuisine is an ambiance of pure scenic beauty, with ceiling-to-floor windows boasting expansive panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean from every table and a striking 25-seat bar topped with vibrant blue Amazonite quartz that mirrors the dazzle and grandeur of the ocean. 8301 Hollister Ave., 805/571-4240. $$$-$$$$ Beachside Bar + Café (Seafood) sits just above the sand and Goleta Pier, and serves expertly prepared fish and other delicious foods for lunch and dinner in the tropical-style dining room, on the glass-walled open-air patio, at the oyster bar or in the big, full-service bar— all with wide views of the ocean and sandy beach. 5905 Sandspit Rd., 805/964-7881. $$-$$$

Jane at the Marketplace (Californian), presents flavorful fare for lunch and dinner including steak, chicken and pasta in cozy surroundings. This is a bright, sunny space known for its friendly service and authentic family recipes. 6940 Marketplace Dr., 805/770-5388. $$ Outpost (Californian) is a casual, hip spot at the Goodland Hotel. The excellent seasonal menu includes shareable plates, entrees and fresh salads, as well as fish tacos with battered halibut, flat iron steak with salsa verde, pork bao buns and a caper-studded Caesar salad with grilled romaine. 5650 Calle Real, 805/964-1288. $$-$$$

Spyglass Bistro & Bar (Californian) is a modern rooftop bistro bar, offering lunch, craft cocktails and small bites, with a breathtaking panoramic view. This unexpected gem features creative shared plates from Executive Chef Michael Blackwell (formerly of the Stonehouse at San Ysidro Ranch and Montecito Country Club) to be enjoyed in cozy fireplace groupings under the stars. 6878 Hollister Ave., 805/562-5996. $-$$

Santa Ynez Mountains EVENTS: EVENTS@THELARKSB.COM OR 805-705-8895 DINNER TUE–SUN 5PM / 131 ANACAPA ST. / 805 -284-0370

Cold Spring Tavern (American) is an iconic establishment virtually unchanged since the days of the stagecoach run that has served excellent food—including


DINING OUT

Santa Ynez Valley

Mattei’s Tavern (Californian) is a former stagecoach stop (circa 1886) that continues to be a destination, with creative farm-to-table wine country dining. Soak up the rustic elegance and enjoy dinner Tuesday through Sunday. 2350 Railway Ave., 805/688-4820. $$$–$$$$

The Bear and Star (American) at Fess Parker’s Wine

Pico (Californian), specializes in a menu of

Country Inn takes its name from the two states Parker called home, Texas and California, celebrating refined ranch cuisine paired with California’s bounty. 2860 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/686-1359. $$–$$$S

approachable Californian cuisine sourced from locally farmed, seasonal ingredients. Chef Drew Terp offers a creative, eclectic spin on American comfort food with an extensive wine list showcasing the best from Santa Barbara’s wine country, as well international selections. 458 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805/344-1122. $$-$$$

wild game—to hungry locals and travelers alike for more than 100 years. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 5995 Stagecoach Rd., 805/967-0066. $$$

Bottlest Bistro (American) is an upscale, contemporary eatery featuring eclectic small plates and entrees, plus a choose-your-own wine wall with 52 constantly changing wines available by the taste, half glass or full glass. 35 Industrial Way, Buellton, 805/686-4742. $$-$$$

Brothers Restaurant at the Red Barn (American) offers innovative “made from scratch” cuisine in this exquisitely refurbished barn. The hearty menu offers American classics like chops, prime rib, and chicken-fried steak. Lunch and dinner served daily. 3539 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-4142. $$-$$$$

Dos Carlitos Restaurant & Tequila Bar (Mexican) brings bold Mexican and Latin flavors to the valley. An open-fire grill imparts a smoky essence to authentic grilled specials, delicious salsas and the aroma of fresh handmade tortillas. 3544 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-0033. $$

First & Oak (Fusion) distinguishes itself with beautifully prepared, elegant small plates designed to pair with fine wines and allow guests to taste multiple, exciting dishes in a single sitting. Housed in the charming Mirabelle Inn, this modern American restaurant has a European influence as well as a Californian emphasis on food that is seasonal, local and sustainable. 409 First St., Solvang, 805/688-1703. $$$

The Gathering Table at Ballard Inn (California Fusion) is overseen by Owner/Chef Budi Kazali and offers a fun and inviting place to gather over incredible food that’s meant to be shared in a warm and inviting modern farmhouse atmosphere. 2436 Baseline Ave., Ballard, 805/688-7770. $$-$$$$

The Hitching Post (American) is an old-fashioned, western-style steakhouse and lounge just a few minutes off Hwy. 101. In addition to Newport Meat Company beef, there are also ribs, quail, turkey, duck and ostrich plus seafood on the menu. 406 E. Hwy. 246, Buellton, 805/688-0676. $$$–$$$$

Los Olivos Café and Wine Merchant (Californian) is a casual restaurant in one of the town’s original Main Street buildings. The thoughtful menu of homemade pizzas and California cuisine is complemented with an enormous list of wines from the adjacent store. 2879 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-7265. $$

Root 246 (American), located at Hotel Corque, features innovative cuisine emphasizing local, seasonal ingredients to create the ultimate in farm-to-table cuisine. Root 246 has one of the area’s most extensive selections of local wines, whiskey and craft beers, as well as refreshing signature cocktails. Try the Sunday brunch for a delicious weekend experience. 420 Alisol Rd., Solvang, 805/686-8681. $$-$$$

S.Y. Kitchen (Italian) is a charming “California version of a little Italian farmhouse” with a focus on unfussy rustic Italian food made from fresh, local ingredients. Expect inventive salads, woodfired pizzas and house-made pastas with everything from seasonal seafood to duck ragu. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez, 805/691-9794. $$-$$$

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Trattoria Grappolo (Italian) is a great destination for gourmet pizzas from a wood-burning oven, housemade pastas, fresh salads and more than 150 wines from around the world. Open daily for dinner and for lunch Tues.-Sun. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-6899. $$-$$$

The Vineyard House (American) offers local farm fresh cuisine in a charming Victorian house that dates back to the days when the Santa Ynez Valley’s worldclass vineyards were just a dream. 3631 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-2886. $$$ The Willows at Chumash Casino Resort

Sides Hardware & Shoes—A Brothers Restaurant (American) is located in a restored 1901 building where chef-owners and brothers Jeff and Matt Nichols turn out hearty American favorites with original gourmet twists. 2375 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-4820. $$–$$$

(American) is a AAA Four Diamond Award-winner specializing in mouthwatering prime steaks and seafood. The elegance of this exquisite dining room is matched by incomparable views of the rolling Santa Ynez hills. 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez, 805/686-0855. $$$–$$$$

Dinner Nightly from 5:00pm Lunch Served Daily 11:30am - 2:30pm Aperitivo Mon-Thurs 4:00pm - 5:30pm

805-691-9794 1110 Faraday Santa Ynez, California www.sykitchen.com

SPRING 2018

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DINING OUT SAN LUIS OBISPO

DINING OUT

The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/blog/coastal-seasons-dining-out-guide.

3 0 E XC E L L E N T R E S TA U R A N T S I N S L O C O U N T Y

San Luis Obispo City

Paso Robles & Templeton

Pine St., 805/226–8191. $$-$$$

Buona Tavola (Italian) has delighted

Bistro Laurent (French) offers an

Cello Ristorante & Bar (Italian)

Central Coast diners since 1992 with flavors and family recipes from Chef Antonio Varia’s native northern Italy—plus an extensive list of regional and European wines—in a peaceful garden setting in downtown SLO. 1037 Monterey St., 805/545–8000. Also visit their second location at 943 Spring St. in Paso Robles. $$

escape to Paris in the heart of Paso Robles at this authentic French bistro on the city square. Dishes range from classics such as onion soup and steak frites to multicourse tasting menus paired with local and international wines. 1202

receives regular accolades for sourcing fresh regional ingredients and transforming them into inventive northern Italian dishes; the restaurant is also known for its extensive wine list, craft beer and cocktails. Wear your comfy

jeans and cowboy boots or dress up in elegant attire at this chic dining room and bar at Allegretto Vineyard Resort. 2700 Buena Vista Dr., 805/369–2500. $$$

- Enoteca (Californian) is a magnet for foodies and wine aficionados from north county and beyond, specializing in contemporary locavore meals paired

Café Roma (Italian) has attracted a loyal following to this rustic Italian restaurant in historic Railroad Square for decades by offering authentic Tuscan dishes in a romantic dining room and garden patio. Sip a cocktail or a glass of wine and munch on pizza at the casual bar, or feast on grilled octopus, fresh seafood, housemade pastas and hearty entrees such as wine-braised short ribs. 1020 Railroad Ave., 805/541–6800. $$

Guiseppe’s Cucina Rustica (Italian) offers simple, fresh, and authentic fare from Southern Italy in a downtown creek side restaurant setting. It’s a farm-to-table star: nearly everything is made in-house, from pastas and sauces to bread and gelato, with ingredients from local farms and purveyors. 849 Monterey St., 805/541–9922. $$-$$$

Luna Red (Fusion) attracts SLO residents and visitors alike to gather in this artsy, airy space on Mission Plaza to enjoy locavore world-fusion dishes, cocktails and local wines, and a lively late-night music scene. Ceviches, traditional Valencian paellas, tacos and tapas headline the menus. 1023 Chorro St., 805/540–5243. $$ Novo (Global) is a popular downtown eatery where flavors from around the globe meld with farm-fresh Central Coast ingredients. The eclectic menu includes everything from lettuce wraps and Thai curries to pork carnitas sopes and prime rib eye steak, plus savory seasonal dishes. 726 Higuera St., 805/543–3986. $$ 94

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Coconut Crusted Halibut by Chef Luis Salazar at Enoteca, the fine dining restaurant at La Bellasera Hotel & Suites, Paso Robles


with award-winning Central Coast vintages in a sophisticated setting within the elegant La Bellasera Hotel. 206 Alexa Ct., 805/238–2834. $$-$$$

Il Cortile (Italian) is an intimate fine-dining establishment for rustic Italian dishes with a sophisticated Central Coast twist. The chef develops creative dishes after forays to local farmers markets and vendors, and suggests appropriate pairings from the extensive wine list. The menu changes seasonally, but perennial faves include seared scallops with sweet peas, homemade pappardelle with wild boar ragu and ravioli with lobster, shrimp, zucchini. 608 12th St., 805/226–0300. $$$

McPhee’s Grill (American) is the place if you’re hankering for mouthwatering barbecue and fine wines to boot. Many menu items—artichokes, pork chops, rib eye steaks and rack of lamb, for example—are grilled over traditional Central Coast red oak and come with tantalizing salsas and sauces. 416 S. Main St., 805/434–3204. $$-$$$

Thomas Hill Organics (Californian) has been a favorite since it opened in 1997. This boho-chic eatery a block from the city square serves as a stellar showcase for ingredients from local farms and wines from regional vintners, large and small. Meats come from local purveyors, fish from nearby seas, organic produce from down the road and bread from Paso Robles artisan bakers. 1313 Park St., 805/226–5888. $$

Arroyo Grande & Grover Beach Ember (Californian, Italian) is a spot that local winemakers, farm hands, business folk and practically everyone else in SLO County who enjoys sharing food and wine with friends comes whenever they get a chance. Its Cal-Italian focus is simple: find fresh, quality ingredients in the vicinity, make nearly everything in-house, and cook most dishes over a wood fire in an open kitchen where everyone can enjoy the convivial, family-oriented vibe. No reservations accepted, so plan accordingly. 1200 E. Grand Ave., 805/474–7700. $$$ The Spoon Trade (American) cooks up classic American comfort food (made with healthy regional

ocean bounty, plus meat and poultry. 101 Pomeroy Ave., 805/295–5104. $$-$$$

Morro Bay

SeaVenture Restaurant (Californian) features spectacular ocean views that unfold from the sophisticated third-floor restaurant at the SeaVenture Beach Hotel, a longtime local favorite known for its contemporary coastal cuisine and extensive wine list. 100 Ocean View Ave., 805/773–4994. $$$

(Californian) features views of Morro Rock and the bay that surrounds diners at this sophisticated, glass-walled restaurant, famed for its organic and sustainably sourced ingredients, cocktails, and extensive 5,000-bottle wine cellar with 300 different varieties. 699 Embarcadero, 805/772–0677. $$$

Pismo Beach

Avila Beach

Cambria

Blonde (Californian) is The Inn at the

Custom House (American) offers

Pier’s signature restaurant, which sets the stage for quintessential California dining with a vintage surfer vibe, an array of local wines and regional cuisine. Before or after your meal, head up to The Rooftop bar for craft beer and cocktails and panoramic ocean views. 601 Cypress St., 805/295–5565. $$$$

pancakes, pizzas, salads, steaks and seafood: this longtime local favorite serves an array of eclectic dishes in a casual setting with excellent views of sand and sea. 404 Front St., 805/595–7555. $-$$$

Linn’s Restaurant (American) is owned by the Linn family, which has produced farm-fresh country produce and pies (especially olallieberry) for decades. The family restaurant has evolved into a one-stop complex where you can dine on comfort foods with a contemporary twist, pick up pies and shop for gourmet food and wine. 2277 Main St., 805/927–0371. $-$$

ingredients)—everything from deviled eggs and fried chicken and waffles to meat loaf and root beer floats—for hungry patrons throughout the Central Coast. The convenient location, a half block from the Grover Beach train station and a short walk to the beach, makes this a good choice for anyone staying in or traveling through the Five City region of SLO County. 295 W. Grand Ave., 805/904–6773. $$

Ventana Grill (Latin American, Californian) is a casual, glass-walled restaurant with a bluff top setting overlooking the ocean and nearby beaches. Renowned for its eclectic Latin America-California fusion menu, try crab-encrusted mahi-mahi, an organic chicken mole bowl, or blackened diver scallops with shrimp, all served with pinquito beans and poblano rice. 2575 Price St., 805/773–0000. $$ Cracked Crab (Seafood) is where seafood lovers find nirvana at this casual crab shack, which cooks up savory seafood plucked from local and national and international vendors. Here you’ll find a vast array of menu choices, from abalone, crab cakes, and fish tacos to shellfish buckets and cioppino. 751 Price St., 805/773–2722. $-$$$

Lido at Dolphin Bay (Californian) sits perched on an oceanfront bluff at the swank Dolphin Bay Resort. The elegant Lido serves creative dishes made with fresh local ingredients, from artisanal breads and poached prawns with avocado to steaks and truffle fries. The wine cellar holds more than 800 bottles of regional and international wines. 2727 Shell Beach Rd., 800/516-0112. $$$

Oyster Loft (Seafood) is a raw bar with various oysters from the east and west coasts of the U.S., shucked on the half shell. This beach area eatery also serves a well-rounded selection of other

Windows on the Water

Gardens of Avila (Californian) has a one-acre onsite chef’s garden, and local purveyors provide abundant fresh ingredients for the coastal California dishes served at this romantic restaurant at Sycamore Springs Mineral Resort. Choose among various indoor/ outdoor dining settings. 1215 Avila Beach Dr., 805/595–7302. $$

Ocean Grill (American) features wood fired flatbreads, inventive tacos, fresh seafood and grilled steaks and chops, among the many options at this upscale-casual restaurant with stellar views of Avila Bay. 268 Front St., 805/595–4050. $$-$$$ Olde Port Inn (Seafood) specializes in fresh seafood and ocean views, which have lured patrons to this salty restaurant at the end of Harford Pier in Port San Luis for decades. Named one of the “Top Ten Seafood Restaurants in California” by The California Writers Association, the Olde Port Inn is a perennial favorite for dining, cocktails or banquets. 805/595–2515. $$-$$$

Cayucos The Grill at Cass House (American) is housed in a casual pavilion next to the historic Cass House bed-and-breakfast. The Grill sources the freshest possible ingredients from the onsite garden and local purveyors, then creates delectable seasonal dishes, many prepared in a wood-burning hearth. 222 North Ocean Ave., 805/995–3669. $$

Robin’s (Asian, International) has long been defined by healthful dishes packed with flavors from Asia and around the world. Robin’s is best known for its house-made cioppino, curries, and many vegetarian options. 4095 Burton Dr., 805/927–5007. $-$$ Sea Chest Oyster Bar & Seafood Restaurant (Seafood) has lured patrons for more than 30 years to this cozy, cottage-style restaurant to line up early to snag prime ocean view tables overlooking Moonstone Beach, and to savor local oysters, cioppino, calamari steaks, crab legs and a wide array of other seafood delights. 6216 Moonstone Dr., 805/927–4514. $$-$$$

Sow’s Ear (American) is a longtime local fave that emphasizes a casual approach to dining, while offering refined comfort food and excellent service. 2248 Main St., 805/927–4865. $$

Ragged Point Ragged Point Inn Restaurant (American) features dramatic bluffs and vistas at the southern endpoint of the scenic Big Sur coast. This glass-walled restaurant places diners at the edge of the scene. Many seasonal ingredients come from the onsite gardens. 19019 Highway 1, 805/927–5708. $$ SPRING 2018

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COASTAL SEASONS

Note from the publisher re: Coastal Seasons IF YOU LIVE IN OR ARE VISITING San Luis Obispo County, you may have obtained a copy of Coastal Seasons in the mail, from a guest room or lobby at a fine hotel, or purchased it on a newsstand— and we are glad you did. However, this is not a new magazine, but one well known in Santa Barbara County since its founding in the year 2000 as Santa Barbara Seasons. As you will see, we have begun to blend content reflective of SLO County with that of southerly adjacent Santa Barbara County, highlighting the similarities between the two—their natural beauty, slower pace, history and lifestyles. All of us lucky enough to live in either of the two counties enjoy the proximity of both mountains and sea, the Mexican heritage, beaches, celebrations, and a feeling of exceptional freedom—at least in relation to places less fortunate.

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SBSEASONS.COM

So, that is the mission of Santa Barbara Seasons and Coastal Seasons—to showcase these most excellent dots on our planet and the best and most interesting of our people, places and histories. There will be content added in future editions of Coastal Seasons— an expansion of our Wine Country section, a spread on SLO County’s best golf courses, takes on local businesses and more colorful features. We wish you joyful Seasons to come!

David W. Fritzen, Publisher & Editor in Chief


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Santa Barbara Seasons Spring 2018  

Santa Barbara Seasons is a resource for locals and visitors alike with lush visuals, engaging features and invaluable information on events,...

Santa Barbara Seasons Spring 2018  

Santa Barbara Seasons is a resource for locals and visitors alike with lush visuals, engaging features and invaluable information on events,...

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