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C E L E B R A T I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U L T U R E | summer

beachy SUMMER

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BIG BEAUTIFUL BEACH HOUSES SUMMER STYLE HOTEL CALIFORNIAN

Summer 2017 $4.95 | sbseasons.com


DISTINCTIVE SANTA BARBARA PROPERTIES

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Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. | CalBRE License # 01106512


A legacy setting reimagined for modern living. Mela Contemporary Triplex Homes From the Low $800,000s Up to 1,943 Sq Ft and 3 Bedrooms Mela@CalAtl.com

Pera Courtyard-Style Homes From the Low $900,000s Up to 2,143 Sq Ft and 3 Bedrooms Pera@CalAtl.com

Limone Single-Family Luxury Homes From the Mid $1 Millions Up to 3,239 Sq Ft and 4 Bedrooms Limone@CalAtl.com

Amarena Single-Family Luxury Homes From the High $1 Millions Up to 3,906 Sq Ft and 6 Bedrooms Amarena@CalAtl.com

4 New Home Neighborhoods | High $800,000s to mid $1 Millions | Community Pool and Clubhouse

No view is promised. Views may also be altered by subsequent development, construction and landscaping growth. Square footage/acreage shown is only an estimate and actual square footage/acreage will differ. Buyer should rely on his or her own evaluation of useable area. Plans to build out this neighborhood as proposed are subject to change without notice. The estimated completion date of the community clubhouse and pool is summer 2017. The date of actual completion could substantially differ from the estimated date. Prices, plans and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Depictions of homes or other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary. CalAtlantic Group, Inc. California Real Estate License No. 01138346. 4/17


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FINE WINE & CRAFT BEER RETAIL SHOP & BAR LOCATED INSIDE THE

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38 West Victoria Street (805) 770-7701 www.wineplusbeer.com


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Do you miss Ronald Reagan? Would you like to learn more about him?

Mention “Santa Barbara Seasons� to receive a free gift!

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Come visit the Reagan Ranch Center!

our trip to Santa Barbara will not be complete without knowing what Ronald Reagan accomplished while he lived here. The Reagan Ranch Center, in the heart of downtown Santa Barbara, on lower State Street, features original Reagan Ranch artifacts paired with state-of-the-art, interactive, multimedia exhibits that highlight the history of Ronald Reagan’s quarter-century at Rancho del Cielo and the lasting accomplishments of his presidency. More than six hours of dynamic multimedia content is contained in exhibits that provide access to exclusive speeches, interviews, radio addresses, and original video presentations. The galleries also feature a number of unique artifacts of Ronald Reagan’s time in Santa Barbara, including the Reagan family Bible and the table where he signed into law the largest tax cut in American history.

Monday – Thursday 11 AM – 4 PM* Admission Is FREE! *Note: Gallery hours may be shortened or expanded for special events. For the latest information, please call 888-USA-1776.

PLEASE VISIT US AT: The Reagan Ranch Center, 217 State Street, Santa Barbara, California 93101 — Next to the train station! GROUP TOURS: To schedule a class or group tour, please contact us at 888-USA-1776. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Go to www.yaf.org or call 888-USA-1776. ɨF3FBHBO3BODI$FOUFSt4UBUF4USFFUt4BOUB#BSCBSB $BMJGPSOJBt64" /BUJPOBM)FBERVBSUFSTt$PNNFSDF1BSL%SJWF 4JYUI'MPPSt3FTUPO 7JSHJOJBt64"

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SAN YSIDRO RANCH

More awards than any other hotel/resort in the United States.

#1 Favorite Leisure Hotel Anywhere in the world ... Forbes #1 Resort in the United States ... Travel + Leisure #1 Top 20 U.S. Hideaways ... Andrew Harper #1 America’s 100 Best Wine Restaurants ... Wine Enthusiast #1 Top 20 Food + Wine Resorts ... Andrew Harper #1 Most Romantic Restaurant ... Santa Barbara News-Press #1 Diner’s Choice ... Open Table Grand Award - Stonehouse Restaurant ... Wine Spectator Hall of Fame Award ... TripAdvisor 900 SAN YSIDRO LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 805-565-1700


Timeless classics for throughout the year

an eclectic blend of fashion & accessories for women and children

Los Olivos 2920 Grand Avenue • 805.697.7377 Monday-Saturday: 10:30am-5:30pm • Sunday: 11am-5pm

Santa Maria Town Center 317 Town Center East • 805.922.9195 Monday-Saturday: 10am-8pm • Sunday: 10am-6pm

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Destination Rejuvenation The Spa at Bacara is renowned as one of the world’s finest, and with good reason. Set above the calming blue waters of the Pacific, The Spa at Bacara features an expert staff, holistic treatments and wellness classes sure to soothe you long after your visit. Midweek specials are available. Learn more at 888.848.5893 or www.bacararesort.com.


Style for Santa Barbara’s sunniest season. THE SHAPES OF SUMMER

FEATURES

summer

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52 Big, Beautiful Beach Houses

64 68

Re-inventing Hotel Californian

Written by Nancy Ransohoff Photographed by Amy Barnard

Written by Nick Welsh

The Shapes of Summer

Photographed by Mehosh Written & Styled by Judy Foreman

PHOTO BY MEHOSH, STYLED BY JUDY FOREMAN, HAIR & MAKEUP BY SHANNON LOAR-COTE OF BLUSH AND LASHES. CAMERON OF HELLO GORGEOUS WEARS A PASTEL CROCHET BIKINI BY MARA HOFFMAN FROM BONITA BEACH; CITIZENS OF HUMANITY AVA JEAN SHORTS AND SANTORINI CREEPER ESPADRILLES FROM ANGEL; TURQUOISE BEADED BRACELETS FROM SURF-NWEAR’S BEACH HOUSE; SARA J CURTIS PANAMA STYLE HAT AND BAUBLE BAR PASTEL RAFFIA DROP BALL EARRINGS FROM BLANKA; AND SUNGLASSES FROM OCCHIALI.

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Bonita Beach summerland

a Mara Hoffman Lem Lem Tori Praver Stella Mccartney AlĂŠ by Alessandra Heidi Klum Kerry Cassil Vix Mikoh Sundry Cali Dreaming Birkenstock

Carolina K Bonita 2330 Lillie Ave 805.565.3848 Bonita Beach 2325 Lillie Ave 805.565.4848 www.bonitasummerland.com


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22 DEPARTMENTS 18 Editor’s Letter 20 Contributors 22 Local Lowdown

32 On Exhibit Featured Artists at Local Galleries

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40 Sustainable Seasons Fresh Catch—Sourcing Seafood With Kanaloa BY R ACHEL HOMMEL

42 First Person Sullivan Goss Gallery’s Nathan Vonk BY LESLIE DINABERG

44 Legacies The First Tee

78 Santa Barbara County Explore Map

Dwight Murphy: Quiet Generosity on a Golden Steed BY CHERYL CR ABTREE

48 Featured Real Estate Listing: Las Varas Ranch

Our guide to favorite area restaurants

96 My Santa Barbara Lake Cachuma PHOTOGR APH BY BY HENRY L. FECHTMAN

80 Explore Santa Barbara County 40 great things to do in Santa Barbara, Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria, Goleta, Santa Ynez, Solvang & Los Olivos

82 Santa Barbara Urban Wineries

BY KRISTA FRITZEN

46 Rearview Mirror

90 Dining Out

Golf in Santa Barbara County

Riding the Wave to Success: The White Family Restaurants BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK

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C E L E B R A T I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U L T U R E | summer

beachy SUMMER

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BIG BEAUTIFUL BEACH HOUSES SUMMER STYLE

84 Wine Guide & Map 88 Food & Wine

Santa

HOTEL CALIFORNIAN

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Performing and Visual Arts and Other Favorite Events for Summer

BY ENID OSBORN, SANTA BARBAR A POET LAUREATE

76 Tee it up!

C E L E B R AT I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U LT U R E

30 Summer Datebook

“Happiness”

SANTA BARBARA SEASONS | Summer 2017

The Dish on New Santa Ynez Valley Restaurants, State Street Ballet Reaches Out, The Biltmore’s New Luna Terraza, Tiki Cocktails, SB Writers Conference, Shopping Summerland and Santa Claus Lane and More!

36 Poetry

ON THE COVER

The Kavli Estate overlooking Hope Ranch Beach, photo by Amy Barnard.

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) AMY BARNARD, HOTEL CALIFORNIAN, FIGUEROA MOUNTAIN BREWING COMPANY

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S U M M E R 2 017 • VO LU M E L X I I I • N U M B E R 2

PUBLISHER & EDITOR IN CHIEF

David W. Fritzen A S S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R

Krista N. Fritzen M ANAGING EDITOR

Leslie Dinaberg A R T  D I R E C T O R

Kim McKeown COPY EDITOR

Lindse Davis CONTRIBUTING EDITORS FOOD

Nancy Ransohoff

POETRY STYLE

David Starkey

Judy Foreman

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Lauren Bennett, Cheryl Crabtree, Leslie Dinaberg, Judy Foreman, Krista Fritzen, Danielle Hazlett, Rachel Hommel, Danielle Moss, Victoria Tai Murphy, Enid Osborn, Toby Qualls, Nancy Ransohoff, Hana-Lee Sedgwick, Kathryn Shim, Nick Welsh CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGR APHERS

Amy Barnard Henry L. Fechtman Mehosh EDITORIAL INTERNS

Lauren Bennett, Danielle Hazlett, Danielle Moss, Victoria Tai Murphy, Toby Qualls, Kathryn Shim

Copyright 2017, Seasons Publishing Company. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from the publisher. F O R E V E R S U B S C R I P T I O N Santa Barbara Seasons now offers a subscription that lasts “forever” (unless you cancel) for the cost of four quarterly editions. To subscribe, send check or money order for $19.80; email subscribe@sbseasons.com; or visit sbseasons. com/subscribe. Your subscription will automatically begin with the SUMMER 2017 edition.

For advertising information, please contact the publisher. Editorial and advertising offices: 829 De la Vina Street, Suite 210, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Telephone 805/564-8804. Fax 805/564-8802. Printed in the USA. sbseasons.com

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SUMMER EDITOR’S LETTER

“I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” — F. SCOT T FITZGER ALD

Expert Repairs, Restoration, and Re-Purposing Custom Design by Master Goldsmith Lee Charles Buckingham

Leslie Dinaberg MANAGING EDITOR

leslie@sbseasons.com

814 State Street | Santa Barbara 805.957.9100 | 33Jewels.com 18

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PHOTO: AMY BARNARD

Luxury for Men, a Unique Selection of Fine, Estate, and Bridal Jewelry

SUMMER IS S Y NON YMOUS with the beach lifestyle, and there’s no shortage of our sandy shores in this issue. From “Big, Beautiful Beach Houses”—a colorful cliffside lair accented with salvaged architectural finds, a sprawling scientist’s retreat and an Italian-style villa with murals hand-painted by the owner—(page 52) to our fabulous fashion shoot at Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, Leadbetter Beach and the harbor (page 68), as well as an update on the future of the waterfront area and “Re-Inventing Hotel Californian” (page 64), we’ve got something sandy and summery in these pages for just about everyone. We also dip our toes into the local business world with stories about how the White family restaurant empire (which includes Santa Barbara Shellfish Company, The Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach, Santa Barbara FisHouse and Casa Blanca) rides the wave to success (page 88), Sullivan Goss Gallery’s new owner Nathan Vonk (page 42) and Don and Randee Disraeli’s sustainable seafood sourcing at Kanaloa Seafood (page 40). One of Santa Barbara’s quintessential summer celebrations is Old Spanish Days Fiesta, and one of its most enduring events—the nation’s largest equestrian parade, which first dates back to 1924—owes much of its tradition to one of Santa Barbara’s greatest philanthropists, Dwight Murphy. Our Rearview Mirror takes a look back at Murphy’s legacy on page 46. Another great local tradition—tête-à-têtes at Four Seasons Resort the Biltmore Santa Barbara—got even more cushy and cozy with the addition of the new Luna Terraza, an exclusive and intimate outdoor private space just outside of the recently renovated Ty Lounge. The story is on page 24. We also have the lowdown on Music Academy of the West’s Summer Festival (page 39), Santa Barbara Writer’s Conference (page 28) and Santa Barbara Bowl’s Summer Season (page 39), as well as a preview of the annual Santa Barbara Studio Artists Tour (page 39). We’re very honored to include a poem, “Happiness,” by Enid Osborn, Santa Barbara’s newest Poet Laureate, on page 36. The Santa Ynez Valley food scene is really heating up this summer. Take a peek into the kitchens at Figueroa Mountain Brewery, The Bear and Star, Bacon & Brine and Bottlest Bistro (page 22). Get the scoop on perfect cocktails for summer (umbrella drinks, anyone?) at Solvang’s High Roller Tiki Lounge (page 25), as well as excellent shopping options in Summerland and on Santa Claus Lane (page 26). The only thing more ubiquitous than ocean views in Santa Barbara is philanthropic activities. From building character through the game of golf with First Tee (page 44) to State Street Ballet’s Community Outreach (page 28), we’ve got a lot of giving back in these pages as well. Cheers to a summer full of fun in the sun!


We Approve Your Move!

Nancy Enholm, Lori Murray, Crystal Quintero, and Barbara Zirretta in front of American Riviera Bank’s new residential lending office located at 18 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara.

Ready for your new home? Our decision-makers are right here in Santa Barbara — you’re looking at them! We like to find a way to say yes, and we can move quickly. Come talk to us. And then start packing! Home Equity Lines | Conforming and Jumbo Mortgages | Bridge Loans

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SUMMER CONTRIBUTORS

Amy Barnard, who shot “Big, Beautiful Beach Houses” (page 52), has worked as a professional photographer since 2004. She started her career in the film industry, shooting actors’ headshots and then as a still photographer, eventually working with such notable people as Jessica Biel and Oscar winners Forest Whitaker and Eddie Redmayne. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Brooks Institute, and her work has been published in Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine, BBC Outlook, The Hollywood Reporter, Montecito Magazine, California Riding Magazine, Solvang Magazine and The Design Magazine.

Mehosh’s fashion photography has been an integral part of the Santa Barbara scene for more than 30 years and is featured in “The Shapes of Summer” (page 68). His client base is international, and his work is seen in catalogs and on the web throughout the world. He is currently working on a spring catalog for Stars & Stripes Western Fashion out of Kirchentellinsfurt, Germany. Closer to home, Mehosh shoots for Wendy Foster’s online catalog every month out of his Santa Barbara studio.

Judy Foreman | writer & stylist Judy Foreman, whose work is featured in “The Shapes of Summer” (page 68), has been a lifestyle writer in Montecito and Santa Barbara since 1999, covering fashion, health, fitness, new businesses, nonprofits and people of interest within The American Riviera. Foreman has been a columnist for The Montecito Journal and Noozhawk, as well as a featured writer for Santa Barbara Magazine and a contributing writer and fashion stylist for Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine.

Nancy Ransohoff | writer Nancy Ransohoff, who wrote “Big, Beautiful Beach Houses” (page 52), is a Rhode Island native who has lived in Santa Barbara with her family for 25 years. A former editor for Bon Appetit and Architectural Digest, she writes for a number of regional magazines and covers Santa Barbara area restaurants for Westways. “Visiting gorgeous ocean view homes and hot new restaurants is definitely one of the perks of the job,” she quips.

Southern California’s Premier Choice for Sustainably Built Homes, Estates, and Remodels BuildAllen.com | 805.884.8777 General Contractor License #503300

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) AMY BARNARD, ANDREW BISSEL, STEPHANIE BAKER, JUDY FOREMAN

Mehosh | photographer Amy Barnard | photographer


M O N T I al M A R É

S A N TA B A R B A R A F U N K ZO N E

THREE-BEDROOM TOWNHOMES STARTING AT $3,195,000

128-130ANACAPASTREET.COM Monti al Maré consists of two new luxury townhomes in the heart of Santa Barbara’s waterfront. Constructed with meticulous quality and craftsmanship, these Mediterranean-style townhomes have compelling views of the mountains to the panoramic coastline. These one-of-a-kind homes are close to some of the best restaurants, art galleries, and wine tasting rooms in Santa Barbara. One block from the waterfront and State Street and the brand new MOXI Museum. TIM WALSH TIM@VILLAGESITE.COM | 805-259-8808 PRISCILLA BEDOLLA PRISCILLA@VILLAGESITE.COM | 805-680-7 146

All information provided is deemed reliable but has not been verified and we do not guarantee it. We recommend that buyers make their own inquiries. Tim Walsh CalBRE #00914713 • Priscilla Bedolla CalBRE 00892339


LOCAL LOWDOWN

N E W & N OTE WO R TH Y I N S A N TA B A R B A R A

LOCAL LOWDOWN THE DISH ON SANTA YNEZ VALLEY’S NEW EATERIES From refined ranch cooking to gourmet burgers and creative couplings of unexpected ingredients to upscale wine country cuisine, the Santa Ynez Valley has a host of terrific new places to dine out and indulge in this summer. BY LESLIE DINABERG

Beer & (Big) Bites in Buellton 1

at FigMtnBrew is now open and, as Executive Chef Brian Champlin vows, this place definitely has, as he modestly states, “under-promised and over-delivered!” The eatery now offers a full menu of beer-friendly gastropub fare such as creative burgers, fried chicken sandwiches, tacos, salads and more. Our group particularly loved the 21+ and over grilled cheese, Davy Brown nachos and chorizo cheese fries —but honestly, everything that came out of the kitchen was delicious, especially paired with craft beers like Fig Mtn Mosaic and Paradise Rd. Pilsner. “We wanted to provide top-notch food with great prices,” says General Manager Jeff Hawxhurst, a longtime local chef who started his career as a teenager working at the original Habit in Goleta and most recently worked with the Chumash Casino Resort. “The casual environment helps us keep prices affordable while offering fresh farm-to-table cuisine.” Champlin also has impressive foodie credentials, most recently as co-owner and executive chef of Succulent Café in Solvang. Taking the farm-to-table concept up a notch, “Our brewery actually gives our spent grain to a local farm who then feeds it to their cattle. We are then able to serve the local beef on our menu. It’s a sustainable “THE KITCHEN”

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cycle that ensures we know what’s in our food and where it is coming from. We call it ‘brewery-to-farm-to-table’ cuisine.” The Kitchen, Figueroa Mountain Brewing Company, 45 Industrial Way, Buellton, FigMtnBrew.com.

Refining Ranch Cuisine at The Bear and Star 2

(a nod to patriarch Fess Parker’s California and Texas roots) gets its culinary inspiration from the 714-acre Fess Parker Home Ranch located seven miles away, where 75 head of Wagyu cattle are raised and finished with the spent grains and pomace from the family brewery and winery, along with chickens, quail, rabbits, pigs, bees and a number of heirloom fruits and organic vegetables.

THE BEAR AND STAR

This impressive ecosystem was developed under Chef/Partner John Cox’s passion and vision. Also integral to the restaurant is a 30’ custom reverse-flow Texas smoker that he specially designed for slow smoking and barbecuing many of the dishes. Cox, formerly with Sierra Mar at Big Sur’s renowned Post Ranch Inn, has created an inventive ranch-inspired menu offering lunch and dinner items like Wagyu Fries with garden herb aioli; deviled ranch eggs with Santa Barbara urchin and espelette; fried green tomatoes with “cheese wiz” and BBQ spice; Parker Ranch


PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT) BACON & BRINE BY TENLEY FOHL PHOTOGRAPHY; BOTTLEST BISTRO BY BOTTLE BRANDING (2); FIGMTNBREW, COURTESY PHOTO; THE BEAR AND STAR BY KODIAK GREENWOOD

Wagyu burger with smoked cheddar, tomato jam and butter pickles; crispy catfish with

re-fried black-eyed-peas and “blackened” smoked tomato sauce; Wagyu meat loaf with potato puree, garden vegetables and pan jus; Parker Ranch chile with cheddar, chives and cornbread crouton; local stuffed quail with farro risotto, bay laurel and red wine demi glace; and an array of steaks, ribeyes and filets, among other items. Highlights for breakfast are dishes of cheddar biscuit and country gravy; steel cut oatmeal brûlée with local blueberries and caramelized palm sugar; and smoked Wagyu hash with farm eggs, root vegetables and lemon-thyme hollandaise. The Parker family’s acclaimed wines are prominently featured and the offerings also showcase expressive small-production wines from Santa Barbara County’s most soughtafter wineries, and beyond, as well as a stunning wine-walled private dining room. The Bear and Star, Fess Parker’s Wine Country Inn, 2860 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/686-1359, thebearandstar.com.

Bottlest Winery Bar & Bistro 3

one of the most unique wine-tasting experiences in California—with

ALREADY OFFERING

its expansive “Wine Wall” of 52 constantly changing wines available by the taste, half glass or full glass—the new Bottlest Winery Bar & Bistro has stepped up its cuisine tremendously, with a new restaurant concept from Executive Chef Owen Hanavan, the former Head Chef of Barbareño, whose culinary résumé includes time spent at Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara and the Michelin-starred COI Restaurant in San Francisco. Utilizing a bounty of locally sourced organic produce, meats and fish, a recent sampling of Chef Owen’s creations was so delicious that it’s hard to name a favorite dish. Definitely high on my list are the beautifully plated “Sixteen Spiced Pork Shoulder ” (with almond rice pilaf, date glaze, romanesco broccoli and lemon oil), melt-in-your-mouth New York strip (with sousbise, duck fat potato, chimichurri and crispy leeks) and yellowtail (with poached tuna, rice cracker, nori vinaigrette and micro cilantro). In addition to the elevated evening cuisine, the lunch and midday menus include a variety of small plates (the lamb meatballs on housemade potato chips are divine), as well as sandwiches, salads and pizzas sure to please every palate. Also a crowd pleaser is the view of Terravant Winery’s popular custom-crush facility, which shares the space with Bottlest Bistro and the soon-to-be-launched bottlest.com online wine experience, where you can craft your own wine (and labels) from start to finish, based on a sliding scale of personal preferences. For more information, visit bottlest.com. Bottlest Winery Bar & Bistro, 35 Industrial Way, Buellton, 805/686-4742, bottlest.com/bistro.

Blissful Bellies at Bacon & Brine 4

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HYPER LOCAL culinary entrepreneurs Chef Pink and Courtney Rae DeLongpré’s Bacon & Brine sits at the top of the ever-evolving Santa Ynez Valley food chain. This delicious addition to the Solvang scene opened last summer to eager fans and customers of the duo’s previous sandwich shop. With guidance from Chef Pink, we ate our way through much of the menu, an impressive gastronomic collection of delights that evidence the couple’s full commitment to utilizing local organic vegetables and organic grass-fed pasture-raised

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animals. In fact, none of their food items come from more than 10 miles away, except spices and seasonings, which are all fair-trade. Beef, chicken and vegetarian options mingle with the pork menu items (all of the cattle and poultry come from Shadow Creek Ranch, a small Santa Ynez Valley farm), but the flavors are even more impressive than the menu’s provenance. Our favorites include Korean Fried Chicken (KFC), “The Hipster” sandwich (buttermilk fried chicken, shredded lettuce, pickle and aioli on a doughnut bun), the kimchi burger (wagyu beef, bacon, housemade “legit” kimchi, farm egg, chives and bacon aioli), fried Brussels sprouts, roasted beets and the to-die-for salted caramel bacon doughnuts. Chef Pink, the “bacon” half of this business, is a 17-year food and restaurant industry veteran who has worked with California chefs and restaurants stretching from Los Angeles to San Francisco, as well as in New York and Paris kitchens. She’s also a bit of TV food celebrity, appearing on Spike TV’s Bar Rescue, Food Network’s Cutthroat Kitchen and FYI’s Man vs. Child. The “brine” half of “Bacon & Brine” is Courtney Rae DeLongpré, a proponent of healthy eating with a passion for food, nutrition and small-scale homesteading, which led to her studies of traditional old-world food preparations, segueing to her fermentation craft. “We want to share with the surrounding community our personal mix: fine dining techniques using local ingredients and our use of fermentation to create flavor profiles, which let those ingredients shine,” says Chef Pink. “I’m meshing my years of training as a proper chef, with our philosophies of hyper-local organic, whole, sustainable food systems…and my love of, and allegiance to, a great food experience that’s accessible to everyone.” Bacon & Brine, 1618 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang, 805/688-8809, baconandbrine. com. Hours vary by season. 

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

BY L AUREN BENNETT

Looking for that perfect vacation beach read? Look no further than the friendly neighborhood Mesa Bookstore (1838 Cliff Dr.). Recently purchased by longtime Mesa residents Diane Arnold and D.J. Palladino—she’s a former special education teacher and he’s a writer for many local publications (including this one)—together they’re taking their love of literature to heart. According to Palladino, all the best bookstores he has been in throughout his lifetime are filled with cool, esoteric books—his impending changes reflect this belief. Palladino wants to set up a literary section in the store that offers classic novels, an edgy graphic novel section and even an author’s table, and Arnold wants to cater to the younger patrons of the bookstore by expanding the children’s section. The entire store is very quaint and cozy, measuring up at only 205 square feet, making it the perfect space to curl up and explore. 

Cooking Up Trouble BY VICTORIA TAI MURPH Y M AKING A DIFFERENC E can be as simple as whipping up a meal in the comfort of your own kitchen! As authors, photographers and long-time friends, Santa Barbara’s own Leela Cyd (a Santa Barbara

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THE BILTMORE BY LESLIE DINABERG

on its laurels, Santa Barbara’s grand dame of luxurious hideaways, Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore, continues to add to its offerings. The recently opened Luna Terraza offers an exclusive and intimate outdoor private space just outside of the recently renovated Ty Lounge. Suitable for parties of up to eight guests, the stunning Luna Terraza feels like a journey to Morocco, complete with cushy curtains and couches in a rich palette of red, blue, camel and gold. Guests can enjoy several “Elite Experiences” including Tangier Bottle Service, Private Brunch, Casablanca Romance and Moroccan Feast. Highlights from the menu include: Mezze featuring dips, such as yogurt herb, charred eggplant and warm housemade hummus (the best I’ve ever tasted); Moroccan Mezze plate, which comprises a whole roasted cauliflower, NEVER CONTENT TO REST

Seasons contributor) and Portland resident Anne Parker have joined forces to create a delicious testament to the strength and creativity of all women. Their mini-cookbook, Cooking Up Trouble: Recipes to Nourish Women, combines vintage retro flair with sumptuous culinary expertise to satisfy your appetite and feed your soul. Make your mornings that much brighter with an

Moroccan chicken skewers, grilled lamb kefta and vegetable tagine; and a Private Brunch, with a Bloody Mary bar including a selection of house-made garnishes like hickory smoked bacon, mozzarella pearls, pickled asparagus and fried jalapeno. Bottomless Bellinis or Mimosas are also available, along with Chef Marco Fossati’s select brunch menu with seafood platter. Notable Architect Reginald Johnson designed the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara in 1926. Johnson brought together Mediterranean, Spanish and Moorish revival styles. Staying true to the integrity of the original vision, artist Darin Ward reimagined the Ty Lounge space in 2016. Other recent enhancements to the resort include the addition of private heated plunge pools to all of the resort’s bungalow suites, as well as the new Palm Nail Suite, where guests now enjoy pedicure and manicure nail treatments along with an unobstructed view of the Pacific Ocean.  Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara, 1260 Channel Dr., fourseasons. com/santabarbara.

enticing serving of breakfast salad with toasted brioche. Skip the pint of ice cream and indulge in some lemon tea cake at the end of the day to satisfy your sweet tooth. All of the recipes in Cooking Up Trouble are created by women near and far, with some recipes from Cyd and Parker sprinkled in. They’re perfect for a gathering with the women—or men—in your life. Plus, 100% of the book’s

proceeds are donated to Planned Parenthood, an organization that’s been at the forefront of many conversations. Giving back to the community means that your sense of purpose and pleasure continues long after you clean your plate. Eating in style has never felt so good! Cooking Up Trouble is available for purchase at cookinguptrouble.org. 

PHOTOS: (L-R) LAUREN BENNETT, SILAS FALSTICH; (OPPOSITE) COURTESY HIGH ROLLER TIKI LOUNGE

BOOK ‘EM

RESORT REPORT


Carrying a Torch for Tiki Drinks ENTERING SOLVANG’S High Roller Tiki

Lounge is like taking a trip back to the mid-century era of kitsch culture—perhaps an episode of Mad Men on a tropical vacation crossed with a visit to Disneyland’s Tiki Room. This clever concept shouldn’t be a surprise, given that owner Michael Cobb had a 17-year career with Disneyland before relocating to Solvang in 2007 to found Sort This Out Cellars winetasting room, another kitschy charmer inspired by the Rat Pack era when men were men and real women had curves. High Roller Tiki Lounge, located in the intimate back room of Sort This Out Cellars, is a dimly lit tropical oasis with immaculate attention to detail. The décor offers something to amuse on every available surface, including hula-dancer tchotchkes, a wood-carved “Witco” bar and a replica of P.T. Barnum’s “Feejee Mermaid.” Custom-made swizzle sticks and mermaid mugs also set the stage for a fun array of classic inspired Tiki “Winetails,” ranging from tweaks on the traditional “Mai Tai” and “Blue Hawaiian” to the more adventurous “Solvang Siren” and “This Drink Will Get you Lei’d,” in which, yes, a necklace of flowers does indeed appear when you order it! This whimsical spin on Tiki bars is a great way to make your Solvang experience even more international—and more fun! High Roller Tiki Lounge, 1636 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang, highrollertiki.com. —Leslie Dinaberg

Top: Nautilus Table Clock Inspired by the circa 1902 French torpedo. Featuring several moving parts, including a solid brass four-blade propeller and operable dive planes mounted on a marble base. 17.5” x 9” Bottom: Rocket Table Clock Polished cast aluminum and brass. This icon from the birth of the space age houses a retro 1950s dial and hands amidst sleek lines of polished aluminum and brass. It comes complete with antenna and hatch windows. 17”

A RT F U L T H I N G S , I n c

1 4 7 0 E A S T VA L L E Y R OA D, M O N T E C I TO, C A ( 8 0 5 ) 6 9 5 - 0 2 2 0 W I N T E R 2 014/15

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

Strolling Santa Claus Lane BY LESLIE DINABERG

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Thoughtful gifts, eclectic accessories and bohemian jewelry await lucky treasure seekers a few shops down at Hummingbird, while Rowan boutique embodies the casual elegance of the Santa Barbara lifestyle with clothing and accessories. Santa may be gone, but the shopping scene is alive and well on his namesake street in Carpinteria. Tucked just south of Montecito, amid the soothing sounds of the sea—and occasional toots from the train— the eclectic Santa Claus Lane is home to an impressive variety of charming storefronts. All stores are located between 3765 and 3825 Santa Claus Lane, Carpinteria.

Below: Shopping is plentiful on the charming beachside street Santa Claus Lane, in Carpinteria. Clockwise from left: A-Frame Surf Shop, Hummingbird and Ze Bird.

GATHER*SHOP*SHARE IN SUMMERLAND BY DANIELLE HA ZLETT

beach town of Summerland, a weekly Saturday Marketplace welcomes locals and tourists to gather and shop around a plethora of artisan makers, food purveyors and musical guests. Presented by two of Summerland’s most graceful and fashionable destinations, Bonita Beach

IN THE UPSC ALE

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) SUMMERLAND SATURDAY MARKETPLACE, COURTESY BONITA; SANTA CLAUS LANE (3) BY MERCEDES LOWE

dubbed Santa Claus Lane—named after the iconic statue of St. Nick that greeted visitors for more than 50 years, until it was moved in 2002—boasts epicurean delights and local wines, plus a tranquil garden to while away the hours at Garden Market, while Padaro Beach Grill is a great spot for kids and dogs to play while you sit outside, enjoy the ocean view and peruse a tasty menu of burgers, salads, sandwiches and fish specialties. Shopping in the area includes surfinspired fashions—along with surf lessons and boards for the intrepid consumer—at A-Frame Surf Shop. Original artwork plus a design and consign business make ZeBird Design an ever-evolving treasure trove for the fashionable home, while interior design enthusiasts flock to the contemporary-rustic home furnishings at Porch, “where shelter and nature converge” into distinct art, as well as home accessories and furniture. A BEAC HSIDE STREET


Left, Erin Balint of Erin Balint jewelry at Gather*Shop*Share in Summerland.

and Botanik , the marketplace promises to embody these two boutiques’ style and to charm its visitors every Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. throughout the entire summer. Bonita Beach, a hip and sophisticated boutique, not only combines a balance of bohemian elegance with Southern California styles, but also reflects the Gypset spirit of easy living and spontaneous travel. Filled with clothing, jewelry, fragrances, leather goods and textiles that were hunted down from across the globe, Bonita’s top-designer products and welcoming staff create the perfect blend of an earthy, organic feel with a hip, Mexican vibe. For those garden enthusiasts who appreciate design and love to bask in the aroma of floral scents, the Botanik garden is the perfect destination. Set within the ambience of a 1920s Victorian that has both interior and private gardens, the boutique has garnered regional and national acclaim that attests to its unique treasures from around the globe. Owner Molly Hutto uses beauty and history to tell a story with faded vintage textiles, reclaimed woods and old moss-covered pottery. Other participants in the Saturday festivities vary, but include artisans such as Bestow pottery, Kala Handmade With Love jewelry, 110Made leather goods, Summerland Beach Designs jewelry, Kate McMahon knitwear, Erin Balint jewelry, India Hicks Lifestyle, Moving Mountains jewelry, artist Sierra Balint, Deb Jorgenson pottery, Wendu Seskind leather, Nostrum Shrubs, Salty Hen sugar scrubs, and Sandy Chique Turkish towels and wraps (which donates a percentage of the profits to The Gwendolyn Strong Foundation, a local charity that provides research and support for Spinal Muscular Atrophy). The summer-long marketplace— held outdoors next to Bonita Beach and in the garden area of Botanik—hosts vendors that reflect the beachy summer style and atmosphere of Summerland and the Southern California lifestyle.  For more information, visit bonitasummerland.com or visit the stores in Summerland at 2330 Lillie Ave. (Bonita), 2325 Lillie Ave. (Bonita Beach) and 2329 Lillie Ave. (Botanik).

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

State Street Ballet Extends Reach BY LESLIE DINABERG

Boys and Girls Club; June 24, Santa Barbara Boys and Girls Club; June 29, Santa Maria Boys and Girls Club; June 30, Fresno (location to be determined); July 1, Salinas, Breadbox Recreation Center; and July 7, San Bernardino, Garcia Center for the Arts. 

FOR MORE INFO on State Street Ballet and the community outreach program, visit statestreetballet.com.

A WRITER’S PARADISE

BY TOBY QUALLS

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State Street Ballet Company member Edgar Zendejas demonstrates a dance move; company members teach a free jazz dance class as part of State Street Ballet’s community outreach effort.

area wait all year to attend a one-week confluence of agents, speakers and authors at the Santa Barbara Writers Conference (SBWC). Dating back to 1972, SBWC has seen literary greats traverse its doors and has molded aspiring writers into published authors. Participants can expect to hear talks from the likes of Fannie Flagg (author of Fried Green Tomatoes), Angela Rinaldi (The Angela Rinaldi Literary Agency), Tracy Daugherty (The Last Love Song: A Biography of Joan Didion), David Brin (Existence), Lesley M.M. Blume (Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway’s Masterpiece The Sun Also Rises) and WRITERS IN THE SANTA BARBAR A

Shanti Sekaran (Lucky Boy). Catherine Ryan Hyde, author of the 1999 bestselling novel Pay It Forward, concludes the guest speaker series. In addition to guest appearances by professional authors, those registered for SBWC have access to full agent panels with the opportunity for publication. SBWC also offers daily writing workshops for those who wish to hone their craft. This year marks the 45th anniversary of Santa Barbara’s longtime writing tradition. 

TO REGISTER FOR SBWC ,

taking place June 18–23, visit sbwriters.com.

PHOTOS: ANDRE YEW (2)

REAC HING OUT beyond the professional stage to make ballet accessible and fun for everyone is an important part of State Street Ballet ’s community outreach programming. This summer, company dancers Meredith Harrill, Deise Mendonca, Cecily Stewart, Edgar Zendejas, John Piel, Noam Tsviskin, Skyler Rodgers and Alvaro Oquita hit the road for a series of free performances in Santa Barbara and beyond. The 30-minute performances feature not only ballet, but also hip-hop and contemporary pieces, with excerpts from State Street Ballet productions of Cinderella, An American Tango, Common Ground and w. In addition, the company offers free dance classes in a variety of styles, including ballet, jazz, contemporary, choreography, Latin combo, hip hop and yoga. As of press time, confirmed dates were: June 23, Ventura


PHOTO:

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Summer Datebook Seasonal events, happenings and things to do for June, July and August

Music Academy of the West’s Summer Festival, Jun. 12–Aug. 5 30

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SUMMER DATEBOOK

Find updated information and additional events at sbseasons.com/datebook.

June 1 Ryan Adams & Band Ryan Adams made his debut in 2000 as a solo artist with the album Heartbreaker—which was named one of Rolling Stone’s 100 Best Albums of the Decade. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/8992222, granadasb.org.

1–24 Out of Place Join Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art once again for its annual tri-county juried exhibition, featuring art from artists living and working in Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties. | Westmont RidleyTree Museum of Art, 955 La Paz Rd., 805/565-6162, westmontmuseum.org.

1–Aug. 20 You Are Going On A Trip You Are Going On A Trip brings together a selection of highlights from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s wide-ranging collection of modern and contemporary prints. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/ 963-4364, sbma.net.

PHOTOS: (L-R) COURTESY MUSIC ACADEMY OF THE WEST, LOTUSLAND

1–Sept. 3 In the Saddle In the Saddle: Horses, Santa Barbara, and the Way of the West presents the history of our region’s equestrian culture—its origins, craft, practitioners and most importantly, its beauty. | Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m., Sun. noon - 5 p.m., Santa Barbara Historical Museum, 136 E. De la Guerra St., 805/966-1601, santabarbaramuseum.com.

Park, 2398 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, jazzandolivefestival.org.

3 Zoo Brew With tastings from more than 30 breweries, Zoo Brew offers a great opportunity for adults to savor local suds and bites, socialize and experience special animal encounters while fundraising for Santa Barbara Zoo’s programs. | 3–6 p.m., Santa Barbara Zoo, 500 Ninos Dr., 805/962-5339, sbzoo.org.

3 Dream Foundation Third Annual Summer Dream Dream Foundation, a nonprofit organization that serves terminally ill adults and their families by providing end-of-life dreams, presents its third annual Summer Dream, which includes food, drinks and a fashion show, as well as synchronized swimming and spirits, courtesy of Patròn. | 4–7 p.m., Nesbitt Estate, 2800 Via Real, Carpinteria, dreamfoundation.org.

3 Ali Wong Stand-up comedian, writer and actress Ali Wong has performed on late night shows with Jay Leno, John Oliver and Seth Meyers, as well as on Inside Amy Schumer. Her new comedy, American Housewife, premieres in the fall. With the recent release of her Netflix special, “Ali Wong: Baby Cobra,” she became the first comedian to record a stand-up special while seven months pregnant. | 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb. org.

3

3–4

Los Olivos Jazz and Olive Festival The pairing of these two very different things—jazz music and olives—may be unexpected, but it certainly is delightful. Enjoy wine tastings and 30 different olive-themed dishes while listening to world-class jazz music. | 1–4 p.m., Laviana Campbell

Thumbelina Presented by Gustafson Dance and adapted from the Hans Christian Andersen fairytale, Thumbelina features dancers ages 2 and up. | June 3 at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m., June 4 at 2 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/ 966- 4946, lobero.com.

Ishi-Doro of Lotusland on view through Nov. 15

5 Dead Man Walking Part of the “Movies That Matter” film series, this film illustrates how to live a life of compassion through forgiveness and love. | 7 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

8–11 Ojai Music Festival Each year, artists and audiences return to Ojai Music Festival for an exceptional musical experience. Vijay Iyer, music director, takes the helm for the 71st annual festival, drawing from classical, jazz and Carnatic traditions. | Various locations in Ojai, 805/ 6462053, ojaifestival.org.

8–25 Syncopation Set in the 1910s in Manhattan’s lower east side, Syncopation is a magical romance underscored with dance that tells a story about reaching for dreams. Desperate for an escape from

his solitary life as a meatpacker and dishwasher, Henry places a classified ad in the paper for a dance partner. | 8 p.m., New Vic Theater, 33 W. Victoria St., 805/965-5400, etcsb.org.

10 Lotusland June Solstice Twilight Tour View the gardens of Lotusland in the magical light of late afternoon with blooms and colors that are unique to the season. This popular event invites guests to enjoy the long days of summer. | 4–6:30 p.m., Lotusland, 695 Ashley Rd., 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

10 KJEE Summer Round Up This year’s KJEE Summer Round Up includes Empire of the Sun, Bishop Briggs, Judah and the Lion, and Soul Majestic. | 4:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., 805/9627411, sbbowl.com. k

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SUMMER DATEBOOK

10–11 Relay for Life Santa Barbara Relay for Life is a 24-hour team event created to raise awareness of cancer in the community and raise money to support the programs and services of the American Cancer Society. | 10 a.m., Bishop Garcia Diego High School, 4000 La Colina Rd., relay.acsevents.org.

16–18 Live Oak Music Festival Blues, jazz, bluegrass, rock, folk, gospel and Latino musicians generate three exciting days of guitar riffs and bellowing voices. Performers include Donovan Frankenreiter, Ozomatli, Jackie Green and The Paul Thorn Band, among many others. | Live Oak Camp, Hwy. 154, liveoakfest.org.

18 On Exhibit Now

Edward Borein (1872 - 1945) Lone Horseman, 1928, 5” x 4-1/2,” watercolor on paper Overview: Renowned as one of the most popular artists of western painting, Edward Borein was born and raised in San Leandro, CA. In 1907, he enrolled in the Art Students League of New York, studying etching and perfecting his watercolor technique under the guidance of Child Hassam and Ernest Roth. He opened a studio that became a gathering place for westerners such as Charles Russell, Will Rogers, Olaf Seltzer and Carl Oscar Borg. He moved to Santa Barbara in 1921 and taught etching and watercolor at the Santa Barbara School of the Arts. Borein maintained a studio in the Oreña Adobe and in El Paseo where he produced etchings and watercolors. Borein’s works are included in the permanent collections of the Santa Barbara Historical Museum; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Whitney Western Art Museum, and National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, among others. Gallery: James Main Fine Art 27 E. De la Guerra St., Santa Barbara 805/962-8347, jamesmainfineart.com SBADA MEMBER

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Rebelution Reggae music band Rebelution, who recently announced “The Good Vibes Summer Tour 2017,” came together in Isla Vista in 2004. | 7 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

18–23 Santa Barbara Writers Conference Over the past 45 years, Santa Barbara Writer’s Conference has connected writers with mentors, agents and editors. This year, the conference welcomes acclaimed writers Fannie Flag, Angela Renaldi, Tracy Daughtery and David Brin, among others, who discuss their award-winning pieces and the inspiration behind their work. | Hyatt Santa Barbara, 1111 E. Cabrillo Blvd., sbwriters.com.

23–25 Summer Solstice Celebration Celebrate the longest day of the year with thousands of other locals and visitors at the Summer Solstice Celebration festival and parade, themed “Celebrating Unity” this year. | The festival is held at Alameda Park throughout the weekend. The parade starts at noon on June 24, at State and Cota Streets, and ends at Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St., solsticeparade.com.

24 6th Annual Santa Ynez Valley Polo Classic Guests enjoy a fast-paced polo match featuring several of the highest-rated players in the world, in addition to local Santa Ynez valley polo celebrities, comfortable tented seating, a champagne reception and a delicious three-course gourmet luncheon, as well as an opportunity to win prizes. Proceeds benefit People Helping People. | 11 a.m., Piocho Ranch, 1100 Secretariat Dr., Santa Ynez, syvpoloclassic.com.

24 Santa Barbara Wine and Food Festival Swirl, sip and savor wines from more than 50 Central Coast premier wineries, complemented with savory and sweet edibles in the beautiful setting of Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. | 2–5 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta Del Sol, 805/682-4711 ext. 181, sbnature.org.

24 Sings Like Hell Presents: Charlie Faye & The Fayettes + Eric Ambel Charlie Faye & the Fayettes weren’t around in the 60s, but their smart soul-pop music merges the swinging and swaying sound and style of 60s girl groups with a modern vibe that’s so current, they’re dancing to the forefront of a retro revival. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

26 Trading Places This 1983 comedy classic, featuring Eddie Murphy and Dan Akroyd, provides audiences with lots of laughs in honor of Santa Barbara resident, composer and songwriter Elmer Bernstein. | 7 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

July 4 Fourth of July Parade Find unity and community in all things


patriotic at the annual Fourth of July parade, put together by the all-volunteer Spirit of ‘76 nonprofit organization. | 1 p.m., parade begins at Micheltorena and State Streets, concluding at Cota Street, spiritof76sb.org.

4 Fourth of July Fireworks After the parade, bring a picnic blanket and set up for a fun day at the beach, complete with food and beverage vendors and musical entertainment. | 9 p.m., Cabrillo Boulevard at West Beach, santabarbara.com/events/fourth_of_july/.

5, 7 Dr. No Dr. No (1962) was the first of the Bond movies, in which a resourceful British government agent seeks answers about the disappearance of a colleague and the disruption of the American space program. This film is part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at UCSB Campbell Hall, 8:30 p.m. on Friday at SB County Courthouse, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

7 Blondie & Garbage For the last four decades, Blondie has both k

Concerts Under the Evening Sky Santa Barbara Bowl (SBBowl) is in the midst of an exciting summer concert series. On June 11, Thievery Corporation at SB Bowl, photo the famed band Boston takes ©A. Arthur Fisher, all rights reserved. the stage, promising to evoke “More Than a Feeling” to bowl-goers. Following Boston is the homecoming of the now-famed Isla Vista reggae band Rebelution on June 18. Dirty Heads & Soja perform July 13 to jam out more reggae tunes among the foothills of the Riviera. On July 17 and 18, witness the return of Jack Johnson, UCSB alumnus and soft-rock legend. Slightly Stoopid performs on July 23 with the group’s unique blending of genres, followed by Young the Giant on August 25. Also performing during the summer months are La Arrolladora Banda el Limon (June 9), Empire of the Sun (June 10), Bishop Briggs (June 10), Blondie & Garbage (July 7), Natalie Merchant (July 15), Diana Krall (August 6) and Bryan Ferry (August 19), among countless accompanying special guests. Even more artists are scheduled to perform into October, and SBBowl often adds concerts to their lineup during the season, so stay tuned. Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., sbbowl.com. —Toby Qualls

THE ICONIC

7 0 th A N N I V E R S A R Y

Community Corporate Sponsor

2017 Summer Festival June 12-August 5 Please visit musicacademy.org for information about events and tickets.


SUMMER DATEBOOK

shaped and informed the worlds of music, fashion and art. The band will forever be synonymous with that punk spirit that lives somewhere in all of us. | 6:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122

15

7–Aug. 20

Lotusfest Lotusfest is a celebration of the spectacular lotus flower that is Lotusland’s namesake. | 2–5 p.m.,

Museum, 552 University Rd., 805/8932951, museum.ucsb.edu.

8

Arthur Grover Rider Market in Cuernavaca, 1940, 12” x 14,” oil on board Overview: Arthur Grover Rider first studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. He earned an early living painting for the Chicago Lyric Opera, and after traveling to Europe, painting for the London Opera at Covent Garden. Rider subsequently studied art at Académie de la Grande Chaumière, and Colarossi in Paris. For nine summers he painted in Spain with the famous impressionist Joaquín Sorolla until his death in 1923. Rider then settled in Los Angeles and kept a studio in Laguna Beach, exhibiting regularly and working as a scene painter for the Hollywood studios. Gallery: Stewart Fine Art 215 W. Mission St., Santa Barbara 805/845-0255, dianestewartfineart.com SBADA MEMBER

Run to Surf 2017 Surf Like a Girl’s 2nd annual Run to Surf adventure challenge has a little something for everyone, including a 5k run, a half-mile surf paddle, a beach obstacle course and a sweet beach fiesta with music, food trucks and beer. | 8 a.m.–2 p.m., Leadbetter Beach, 801 Shoreline Dr., RuntoSurf.com.

12, 14 From Russia with Love James Bond stumbles into an assassination ploy involving a Russian beauty in order to retrieve a Soviet encryption device. This film is part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at UCSB Campbell Hall, 8:30 p.m. on Friday at SB County Courthouse, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

13 Dirty Heads & Soja Dirty Heads was formed in 2003 in Huntington Beach. Since the release of its 2008 debut album, the group has consistently experimented with its sunny style, fusing reggae, hiphop and acoustics. | 6 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

13–15 California Wine Festival Enjoy sampling pours of hundreds of California’s finest vintages—some entirely new, some old favorites— while soaking up your intake with gourmet appetizers and relishing 34

SBSEASONS.COM

Various Santa Barbara locations, californiawinefestival.com.

N. Milpas St., 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com

Nell Campbell: About Face For more than 40 years, photographer Nell Campbell has documented the people and places she encounters in the everyday, on her travels and at the political gatherings she frequents. | UCSB Art, Design & Architecture

On Exhibit Now

live music and the ocean view—the best scenery for enjoying wine. |

Lotusland, 695 Ashley Rd., 805/9699990, lotusland.org.

15 Natalie Merchant Natalie Merchant and her band are joined by a string quartet for a concert that spans her 30-year recording career, with songs from 10,000 Maniacs’ albums and her solo albums. | 7:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

15–16 Relay for Life Carpinteria Relay for Life is a 24-hour team event created to raise awareness of cancer in the community and raise money to support the programs and services of American Cancer Society. | Aliso Elementary School, 4545 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, relay.acsevents.org.

15–16 Santa Barbara French Festival The ever-popular French Festival returns for its 29th year with delicious Parisian delicacies, beaucoup de breads and pastries, an array of other French cuisines and wine, live performances, international jazz, classical French music and much more. | 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Oak Park, 300 W. Alamar Ave., 805/963-8198, frenchfestival.com.

17–18 Jack Johnson Jack Johnson brings his laid-back tunes back to the Santa Barbara Bowl for two fun-filled evenings this summer. | 6:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., 805/9627411, sbbowl.com.

19, 21 Goldfinger Investigating a gold magnate’s


smuggling, James Bond uncovers a plot to contaminate the Fort Knox gold reserve in Goldfinger. This film is part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at UCSB Campbell Hall, 8:30 p.m. on Friday at SB County Courthouse, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

22 La Fiesta del Museo Gather under the July moon and join Santa Barbara Historical Museum to celebrate Old Spanish Days with Spanish food, drink, art and dance at the annual La Fiesta del Museo fundraiser. | 5:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Historical Museum, 136 E. De la Guerra St., 805/966-1601, santabarbaramuseum.com.

23 Slightly Stoopid Slightly Stoopid describes its music as “a fusion of folk, rock, reggae and blues with hip-hop, funk, metal and punk.” The group’s 11th annual summer tour, Sounds of Summer, takes the California natives across North America, including a stop at Santa Barbara Bowl. Joining them on tour are Iration, J Boog and The Movement. | 5 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122

11 East Anapamu St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 730-1460

www.sullivangoss.com

N. Milpas St., 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

26, 28 You Only Live Twice Agent 007 and the Japanese secret service ninja force must find and stop the true culprit of a series of spacejackings before nuclear war is provoked. This film is part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at UCSB Campbell Hall, 8:30 p.m. on Friday at SB County Courthouse, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

29 Lotusland Celebrates: Avant Garden Lotusland’s signature annual fundraising gala, Lotusland Celebrates: Avant Garden, is one of the hottest tickets of Santa Barbara’s summer social scene and is always a sold-out affair. | 3:30–8 p.m., Lotusland, 695 Ashley Rd., 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

29–30 Santa Barbara Greek Festival Indulge in baklava, gyros and moussaka to your heart’s content at this delicious annual event showcasing the best bounty of Greece from the sights, sounds and tastes of the Mediterranean land. | 11 a.m.- 7 p.m., Oak Park, 300 W. Alamar Ave., 805/9638198, santabarbaragreekfestival.org. k

SUMMER 2017

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SUMMER DATEBOOK

31 70th Anniversary Community Concert Join Music Academy of the West and New York Philharmonic at the 70th Anniversary Community Concert, honoring Alan Gilbert’s last appearance as the philharmonic’s music director. | 7:30 p.m., Santa Barbara City College, 721 Cliff Dr., 805/9650581, musicacademy.org.

August 2 On Her Majesty’s Secret Service James Bond woos the mob boss’s daughter and goes undercover to expose a germ warfare plot that could kill millions. It all takes place in the Swiss Alps and involves beautiful women from around the world. This film is part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m.,

BY ENID OSBORN

Blue, common as sky, many as borage stars.

From the Ace Hotel, 2017, 34” x 24,” oil on linen Overview: Patricia Chidlaw was born in San Francisco in 1951. As the child of an enlisted man, her childhood was filled with travel in Europe and across America. Her early nomadic life influences her paintings today. Chidlaw settled in Santa Barbara in 1969 to attend UCSB where she received a BA in painting. She has remained here, putting down roots with her husband Bob. Content here in our seaside town, they still often travel by car and train to seek out subject matter for the next painting. Chidlaw has exhibited widely in galleries throughout the American west, including a solo show at the Nevada Museum of Art in 2014.

SBSEASONS.COM

93rd Annual Old Spanish Days Fiesta This year’s theme for the annual Old Spanish Days festivities is “Unidos en Comunidad (Unity through Community),” chosen by La Presidente Rhonda Henderson because, in her words, “Fiesta has always meant one thing— community!” A celebration of Santa Barbara’s unique history and culture, Fiesta brings locals and out of towers alike to the streets of Santa Barbara for traditional Spanish and MexicanAmerican foods at the Mercados, while listening to live music and enjoying vibrant dance performances—plus all entertainment is free. Celebración de Los Dignatarios (DIGS!)—presented jointly by Old Spanish Days and Santa Barbara Zoo—is the hot place to dance the night away alongside lions, snow leopards, elephants and elected

FROM LITTLE WAKES

Patricia Chidlaw

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2–6

HAPPINESS

On Exhibit Now

Gallery: Sullivan Goss–An American Gallery 11 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara 805/730-1460, sullivangoss.com 

UCSB Campbell Hall, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

SBADA MEMBER

Bluebirds perched on the storm gutter, burbling their melodies, make the heart jump more than sparrows in the grass, for being blue. And the dainty butterflies—the blues. But their wings are brown, you say. Watch. It’s the flutter that makes them blue, and the shutter in your eye: You have a part in their becoming blue. And the dance your heart does when you see blue: That, too, is you making a plain moth into happiness.


officials! Other favorite Fiesta traditions include a rodeo, El Desfile Des Los Ninos (children’s parade) and El Desfile Historico (historical parade), as well as Las Noches de Ronda (Nights of Gaiety) held in the Sunken Gardens of the beautiful Santa Barbara County Courthouse. | Various Santa Barbara loca-

STEWART FINE ART

tions, 805/ 962- 8101, oldspanishdays-fiesta.org.

3–Sept. 4 Art Preview: Santa Barbara Studio Artists Tour Preview the art that many regional, national and international collectors, interior designers and Editor’s the preview portion of galleryNote: ownersUnfortunately plan their Labor-Day-weekend thetrips Santa Studio around. Artists has cancelled to Barbara Santa Barbara Thebeen Santa Barbara dueStudio to circumstances beyond control of is thea unique Artists Annual Openthe Studios Tour organizers. Guests mayand enjoy the Santa Barbara opportunity to view purchase premier one-of-a Studio Annual Studios Tourinside fromSanta Sept. kindArtists artworks whileOpen enjoying a peek 2-4, along with a preview exhibition from 5 to 8 p.m. Barbara’s leading artists’ private studios. More than at 10 (10 W.are Anapamu santabar30 West local Gallery artists’ works featuredSt.), in this awardbarastudioartists.com. winning wonderland of landscape, contemporary

Established 1986 Diane Warren Stewart Open from 11 to 5:30, closed Thursday and Sunday, available by appointment.

and figurative painting, as well as sculpture and assemblage. | Distinctive Art Gallery, 1331 State St., 215 W. MISSION STREE T

805/ 280- 9178, santabarbarastudioartists.com. DANA BARTLE T T (1882-1957)

6 Diana Krall Diana Krall is a five-time Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and world-renowned singer. Concertgoers also receive a free copy of her new album, Turn Up the Quiet. | 7 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl,

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9, 11 The Spy Who Loved Me James Bond investigates the hijacking of British and Russian submarines carrying nuclear warheads with the help of a KGB agent whose lover he killed. This film is part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at UCSB Campbell Hall, 8:30 p.m. on Friday at SB County Courthouse, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

16, 18 GoldenEye James Bond teams up with the lone survivor of a destroyed Russian research center to stop the hijacking of a nuclear space weapon by a fellow agent who was believed to be dead. This film is part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at UCSB Campbell Hall, 8:30 p.m. on Friday at SB County Courthouse, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

19 Bryan Ferry From his earliest recordings at the beginning of the 1970s, Bryan Ferry has taken his place as one of k the most iconic and innovative artists to emerge

“Evening Light, Goleta Slough” 36 x 60 Oil on Canvas by Ralph Waterhouse

Waterhouse Gallery

La Arcada, 1114 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805-962-8885

www.waterhousegallery.com Open Daily 11am to 5pm

32 YEARS OF FINE ART IN SANTA BARBARA

SUMMER 2017

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SUMMER DATEBOOK

Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

23, 25 Skyfall Bond’s loyalty to M is tested when her past comes back to haunt her. While MI6 comes under attack, 007 must track down and destroy the threat, no matter how personal the cost. This film is part of UCSB Arts and Lectures’ summer film series “007: Bond, James Bond.” | 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday at UCSB Campbell Hall, 8:30 p.m. on Friday at SB County Courthouse, ucsbartsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

25 Young the Giant Young the Giant celebrates the release of its third studio album, Home of the Strange, this summer on a tour featuring Cold War Kids and Joywave. | 6 p.m., Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., 805/9627411, sbbowl.com.

25–27 On Exhibit Now

Kyle Ma Still Life With Red and White Roses, 18” x 14” Overview: Kyle Ma was born in the year 2000 and developed a love of nature during his childhood. Drawn to art at an early age, Ma says that painting allows him to express his viewpoint of our world. In 2010, Ma moved with his family to Austin, TX where he continues to pursue his love and affection for art. He enjoys painting en plein air, and says, “Painting to me now is an extremely passionate experience, I paint as much as I can and hope that I can communicate with the viewer what I saw and how I feel each time that I pick up a brush.” Ma is already winning awards for his paintings and recently was a featured artist at a Premier National Plein Air Painting event. Gallery: Waterhouse Gallery 1114 State St., Ste. 9, Santa Barbara 805/962-8885, waterhousegallery.com SBADA MEMBER

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2017 Central Coast Wine Classic Enjoy five days filled with wine tastings, symposiums, a rare-wine dinner, a wine and lifestyle auction, tours and more at the Central Coast Wine Classic, returning for its 32nd year with various events throughout the Central Coast. | Various venues, 805/ 544-1285, centralcoastwineclassic.org.

26 Pacific Pride Festival Pacific Pride Festival builds community, fosters visibility, celebrates gender diversity and raises funds for LGBTQ+ programs and services in Santa Barbara County. | 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Chase Palm Park, 323 E. Cabrillo Blvd., pacificpridefoundation.org.

Ongoing Through Jul. 4 Jane Gottlieb’s Fantasy Gardens Exhibition Santa Barbara Botanic Garden displays Jane Gottlieb’s unique combination of paint, colors and photography in the four-month-long

exhibit “Fantasy Gardens,” held in the new Pritzlaff Conservation Center Gallery. | Daily, 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd., 805/682- 4726, sbbg.org.

Through Aug. 20 Free Play Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara commissioned acclaimed design expert Alexandra Cunningham Cameron to curate this exhibition, which centers around the idea of play as an influential actor in the design process, producing work that intimately reveals our drive toward novelty and upends traditional notions about the role of design in our lives. Featuring contemporary furniture, architecture, artworks and objects from an international selection of designers, architects and artists, the exhibition shares each creator’s alternate view of the world through objects that appropriate childhood motifs, employ satire and generate form through chance. | Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara, 653 Paseo Nuevo, 805/9665373, mcasantabarbara.org.

Through Nov. 15 Lotusland: Japanese Lantern Exhibit Madame Ganna Walska began the creation of her Japanese garden in the 1960s with her gardener/ designer, Frank Fujii and stonemason Oswald Da Ros, at a time when relations between the United States and Japan were warming and the Japanese aesthetic was favored once again in American garden and estate design. True to her penchant for collecting, Walska amassed more than 30 Japanese stone lanterns, or ishi-doro, to embellish her Japanese stroll garden. The Ishi-Doro of Lotusland exhibit remains in place until the Japanese garden renovation is completed, when the ishi-doro will be returned to their original positions in the garden. | Visits are by reservation only, Lotusland, 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

All locations are in Santa Barbara unless otherwise noted. For complete event listings, visit sbseasons.com.

PHOTOS: (TOP-BOTTOM) COURTESY MUSIC ACADEMY OF THE WEST, SB STUDIO ARTISTS

in popular music. | 8 p.m., Santa


Music Academy of the West 70th Anniversary Summer Festival (MAW) not only knows how to harmonize instruments and tunes, but also knows how to harmonize musicians around the country and abroad. Since 1947, MAW has welcomed 137 fullscholarship recipients to study and perform each summer in what former fellows call “one of the most beautiful cities” they have ever been. Performers and artists, from more than 20 states and 10 countries, audition every year to gather for an eight-week summer school program and to showcase their talents in the annual festival. Not only do they receive high-quality instruction, but they are also invited to participate in beach barbecues, movie and game nights, hiking, soccer and volleyball games, and excursions. With all that fun, it is obvious why one former fellow states, “I came here to get better at the violin. Instead, I went home not only a better

MUSIC AC ADEMY OF THE WEST

musician, but a better human being as well.” This summer, the class of 2017 performs eight weeks of world-class music during the 70th Anniversary Festival, featuring more than 200 events— many of which are free to the public. On July 27 and 29, the opera event of the summer takes the stage at The Granada Theatre (1214 State St.). Donizetti’s The Elixir of Love, a romantic comedy conducted by Speranza Scapucci, tells a lighthearted and comical story of a phony love potion, along with a couple of valuable life lessons. Then on July 31, the academy welcomes you to Santa Barbara City College’s (SBCC) La Playa Stadium to enjoy the sunset and witness the oldest symphony orchestra, New York Philharmonic, joining the Music Academy’s Festival Orchestra as they present the

largest classical music event in Santa Barbara history, followed by an evening of fireworks overlooking the ocean. The concert celebrates Alan Gilbert’s final appearance as New York Philharmonic Music Director and offers more than 7,000 $10 tickets, as well as free student tickets. The festival also features distinguished guest artists, composers and premier performances in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, harp, piano, vocals, and more. For more information, visit musicacademy.org.  —Danielle Hazlett

Art Around Town the heart is and where the art is, and there’s no better glimpse into the world of artists than in their creative homes. That’s why the Santa Barbara Studio Artists Open Studios Tour has remained a prominent annual occasion for the last 16 years. Professional artists from around the county open their studio doors to local and national admirers and shine a spotlight on the city as a leading destination for the arts. With more than 30 of Santa Barbara’s leading artists slated for this year’s showcase, it’s sure to be the best and brightest open studios tour yet. Participants plan their own routes at their own pace, so you’re at the wheel throughout your own personalized adventure! Don’t worry—maps are provided to help you navigate from the contemporary Funk Zone to the sprawling hills of MonHOME IS WHERE

Untitled SBS 84 by Pamela Benham

tecito, and everywhere in between. Discover some hidden neighborhood gems, talk with the artists while viewing their work and invest in the fruits of their labor this Labor Day weekend. Inquiring minds can get an early first impression of our American Riviera art community at the artist’s reception on Friday, September 1, from 5 to 8 p.m. at 10 West Gallery (10 W. Anapamu St.) The tour kicks off on Saturday and Sunday, September 2–3, with artists’ studios open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Additional tour hours on Monday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. mean there’s plenty of time to discover the beauty in your citywide backyard. Tickets are available for purchase at any of the artists’ studios, or online at santabarbarastudioartists.com, with proceeds going to William Sansum Diabetes Center. Call 805/845-4833 for more information.  — Victoria Tai Murphy SUMMER 2017

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SUSTAINABLE SEASONS

Fresh Catch Sourcing Seafood With Kanaloa BY R ACHEL HOM MEL

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K I NA’ OL E : Doing the right thing, in the right way, at the right time, in the right place, to the right person, for the right reason, with the right feeling every time. a PhD in Coastal Ecology and Ecosystems Management from University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and Randee has a degree in Geographic Information Systems from UCSB. “We have been entrenched in environmental studies from the beginning. We have never lost sight of our commitment,” says Randee. “The seafood movement allows us a different venue to educate and practice what we are passionate about.” At Kanaloa, each farmer, distributor or broker goes through a rigorous auditing process, as set by the company’s 14001 ISO (International Organization for Standardization) certification. As the only seafood distributor in North America to be recognized, this environmental accolade ensures that

companies not only practice what they preach, but stay ahead of the curve. Audited every six months, Kanaloa has successfully improved its environmental performance by reducing raw material/resources usage, energy consumption, waste generation and eco-packaging. “Our clients, consumers, the community, they can have assurance that we are doing what we say we are doing, that we are true to our commitment,” says Randee. “We don’t just offer lip service, we truly deliver.” In addition to an internationally recognized external auditing system, the company is also certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), raising the level of traceability through a chain-of-custody standard. This

PHOTOS: KANALOA SEAFOOD

K ANALOA is the Hawaiian god of the sea and all that live in the oceans. Inspired by his mystic power, Kanaloa Seafood has sourced fresh seafood since 1983, creating a sustainable model that protects the valued waters and the livelihood of its fishing communities. Acting as a seafood sourcing, processing and distribution company, Kanaloa started with five customers—Julia Child being one of them. Fast-forward 30+ years, and the company has wholesale customers all over the country, with 250 active accounts. At Kanaloa, owners Don and Randee Disraeli take a regional approach to sustainability, which includes full eco-system evaluation and audits. This model looks at the interdependence of the marine system by assessing entire regions, a much more aggressive and comprehensive approach toward sustainability. “We want to ensure the species is not creating a negative impact on the fishing community,” says Randee. “This is vital for the health of the ocean and a positive direction for sustainable seafood.” The couple had big dreams when they embarked on their mission to change the future of seafood. Trained and inspired by a thirdgeneration Japanese family, they learned the business from the bottom up in Oahu, Hawaii before opening in Santa Barbara. From gutting and scaling to cleaningand traditional cutting techniques, Kanaloa was born, promoting and supporting environmentally responsible, scientifically sustainable fisheries. Don, a former associate professor, holds


Mission Street

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Featuring

Popular menu items at Kanaloa Seafood include the fishwich (left) and Korean seafood tacos with marinated salmon (above).

certification ensures that Kanaloa can trace each species all the way back to the source to ensure that it was sustainably raised— from a certified fishery or farm to final sale. Awarded the 2016 Spirit of Entrepreneurship Award for Green/Social Entrepreneurship, Kanaloa is dedicated to the health of our oceans and the local community. “Santa Barbara is our home. This is our community, and we want people to have access to fresh seafood, but also access to knowledge,” says Randee. “We take it on as our responsibility to legitimize our choices.” In each of their two restaurants, located in Santa Barbara and Oxnard, the daily offerings are listed alongside a variety of marine certifications, highlighting both where the fish comes from and what organization has certified it. With a devotion to full-ecosystem evaluations, guests can feel confident in their food choices. With everything made from scratch, the menu ranges from tacos and chowders to poke, all inspired by friends, chefs and some of their favorite fishermen. Kanaloa recently added a dinner menu to the lunch offerings in Santa Barbara and will soon do so in Oxnard. “Light bulbs go on when you talk to people about seafood, we are constantly learning and evolving,” says Randee. “It’s exciting to know that you are part of a movement that’s going to make a difference for future generations.” 

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FIRST PERSON

Preserving the Legacy, Embracing the Future Sullivan Goss Gallery’s Nathan Vonk BY LESLIE DINABERG

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New Sullivan Goss Gallery owner Nathan Vonk is flanked by his colleagues and fellow curators Jeremy Tessmer and Susan Bush.

to do in graduate school.” Vonk laughs, “I came in and volunteered for the week, and on Friday, Frank [Goss] offered me a job. I never went back to school, and I’ve been there ever since.” He continues, “I was the one guy in the whole country who got a new job in October of 2008. When everyone else was going on unemployment and Bear Stearns was crashing, I was one of the luckiest people in the country. I’ve been at Sullivan Goss ever since, and I couldn’t be happier.”

So happy, in fact, that when Goss told the team (which includes Tessmer and fellow curator Susan Bush) he planned to retire after 2016, Vonk bought the gallery because he wanted to make sure the legacy continued, with its staff intact. “If you think of arts in Santa Barbara as an ecosystem, the part that Sullivan Goss fulfills—if that goes away, the whole ecosystem suffers greatly and it’s not a part that someone is going to step in and fill that void. That was a large part of my motivation

PHOTO: SULLIVAN GOSS

THE LINK BET WEEN Burning Man’s annual bacchanal festivities and Sullivan Goss Gallery’s 30-plus-year legacy of celebrating important 19th-, 20th- and 21st century American art may seem tenuous, but it was a visit to Burning Man that first sparked Nathan Vonk’s interest in art and the friends he made in the desert that first brought him to Santa Barbara. Armed with a master’s degree in postmodern literature theory, Vonk taught night school at Ventura College and walked dogs during the day. He eventually bought out the owners of the dog business, ran it for a few years and then sold it for a profit, right before the market crashed in September of 2008. Now fully enmeshed in the Santa Barbara scene, Vonk contemplated going back to school and getting a doctorate in art history or curatorial sciences and asked Sullivan Goss curator Jeremy Tessmer if he “could volunteer some hours at the gallery, so I could see if it was something that I wanted


“I came in and volunteered for the week, and on Friday, Frank [Goss] offered me a job. ... I’ve been there ever since.” — NATHAN VONK

to take on the risk of running a commercial gallery,” says Vonk. He and his wife, Erin Smith, have a son, Lowen, who, Vonk says, “has been to more art shows at age 2-1/2 than I think the average Santa Barbaran probably has.” Part of what Vonk loves about Santa Barbara is its casual, egalitarian nature. “I think we all understand how lucky we are to work in a gallery like this, in a town like this. Shortly after working for Frank, I had the opportunity to go to New York and visit galleries…the whole vibe there is so different than it is in Santa Barbara. If you don’t look like you can afford it, they don’t give you the time of day.…It kind of left a bad taste in my mouth about the whole situation, and it made me all the more excited to come back and work for Frank, because we don’t operate that way. In part we can’t, because the man or woman who comes into our gallery in shorts and flip-flops could very easily be a billionaire, and I don’t know that. So I have to treat everyone like they are billionaires, and I like that.” Vonk views part of his art-dealer role as acting like a sort of docent, saying, “What we sell are not just pretty pictures; they are pretty pictures that come with a history and a provenance and some other interesting part of them that, hopefully, people who are interested in buying them will understand that if they buy them, they are only going to be a small portion of that object’s history.” He also clearly loves the work. “One of the great things about Sullivan Goss is that I was sort of an academic, and I loved studying and writing essays and we do all that.… We’ve written four or five books…all the things I wanted from going back to school I got. Plus I got to stay in Santa Barbara so it was even better.” 

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LEGACIES

“We teach life skills through golf. We are building character, not just golfers!” — BUTC H BREEDAN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE FIRST TEE C ENTR AL COAST

BY KRISTA FRITZEN

BRIGHT SPRING SUNLIGHT glints off palm fronds overhead as the golfer lines up a putt. He shifts his feet, eyeing the hole seven feet away. He takes a couple of practice swings, making slight adjustments in angle and power. He strokes the putt and misses the hole by just inches—too short. He sighs, shrugging his shoulders, tips the ball in and begins to prepare for the next hole on the practice green. At age eight, this golfer appears to be learning one of the sport’s great lessons, as summed up by rock star and golf enthusiast Alice Cooper: “Mistakes are part of the game. It’s how you recover from them, that’s the mark of a great golfer.” Cooper wasn’t the first to note the connection between golf lessons and life lessons.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION , contact The First Tee Central Coast, 805/637-9415, butch.thefirsttee@gmail.com, thefirstteecentralcoast.org.

PHOTO: THE FIRST TEE

The First Tee

In 1997, The First Tee was founded through a partnership that included the LPGA, PGA and USGA, among other organizations. While its aim is to increase interest and participation in the game by younger people, it also recognizes golf’s unique ability to teach life lessons. The First Tee’s nine core values—honesty, respect, courtesy, judgment, confidence, perseverance, sportsmanship, integrity and responsibility—are built directly into the program curricula, in order to positively impact participants’ lives. Locally, The First Tee Central Coast reaches more than 30,000 children yearly in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties through programs at schools and on golf courses and practice greens. At the Santa Barbara afterschool program’s first spring session meeting, coach Kyle Marme gathers the small group of third- and fourthgraders at benches just off the practice green. Marme, a PGA professional, begins a discussion about showing respect on the golf course—replacing turf when it’s chipped out of the green, observing silence as a fellow player putts. The discussion extends to respect for oneself with the ideas of “personal par: good players hit bad shots” and “don’t compare yourself to others; ultimately you

are playing against yourself.” Beginning the first lesson with a discussion about etiquette and self-respect may seem a bit unusual. Butch Breedan, executive director of The First Tee Central Coast, comments, “We teach life skills through golf. We are building character, not just golfers!” This isn’t to say that participants don’t learn the sport. Many eventually compete in high school and college; other chapters have produced golf professionals. Breeden attributes this to the excellent program coaches. Many are PGA professionals, and all have undergone extensive curriculum certification. Coaches aim to instill a love for the game. Breeden points out that golf is a life-long sport that appeals to a wider range of athletic abilities, noting that “kids who get picked last for a team also do really well with this program.” The First Tee works to ensure that the program’s benefits—and golf in general—are accessible to everyone. Historically an overwhelmingly white, wealthy, male-dominated sport, approximately 39% of The First Tee program participants are female and 50% are non-white (according to 2014 data). With lessons already well priced, approximately 50% of The First Tee Central Coast afterschool program participants receive financial aid, and equipment is provided as needed. Collaborations with afterschool programs, including Girls, Inc., help spread the word. The support and enthusiasm the program generates speaks of its value in the community. “Our nation needs honesty and integrity in the workforce,” says Breeden. We can all hope that organizations that foster such important values continue to grow. 


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REARVIEW MIRROR

This silver-horned capped saddle was made for Dwight Murphy by Visalia Saddle Company. Below, Murphy serving as Old Spanish Days El Presidente (1925-1926).

Dwight Murphy Quiet Generosity on a Golden Steed

SANTA BARBAR A C ELEBR ATES its Spanish and early California roots in a huge way every August during Old Spanish Days Fiesta, a five-day festival with dance and musical performances, a rodeo and mercados with delectable foods. On Fiesta Friday, one of the nation’s largest equestrian parades marches up State Street, led by men and women dressed in authentic Spanish costume, sitting in silver-embellished saddles atop magnificent golden palomino horses. This beloved equestrian tradition dates back to the first Fiesta parade in 1924 and has everything to do with one of Santa Barbara’s greatest philanthropists, Dwight Murphy. Murphy’s parents, Peter and Jennie, visited Santa Barbara in 1904 and became so enamored with the climate and setting that they decided to build a home in Montecito. (The second version of the home is now Kerrwood Hall at Westmont College.) Dwight came to Santa Barbara in 1905 and decided to stay for a bit. The Murphy family operated a railroad equipment manufacturing company in Pittsburgh, but also had a ranch in Kansas where Dwight learned to ride horses and helped with ranching duties at an early age. He volunteered to work as a ranger with the National Forest Service, which meant he spent many months roaming the Santa Barbara County backcountry on horseback. Murphy returned to Pennsylvania in 1907, but visited Santa Barbara often. Over the

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years, he met other avid outdoors people and civic-minded community members who became lifelong friends. He married a local gal, Grace Price, and their only child, Marjorie, was born in 1912. Although Murphy’s business responsibilities required him to spend significant time back east, his heart remained in Santa Barbara, and he began to establish roots in the county. In 1920, Murphy leased 3,500 acres of land around Paradise Road and called the property Los Prietos Ranch. According to Edward A. Hartfeld, author of California’s Knight on a Golden Horse, Murphy developed an elaborate facility with houses, stables and other structures. He planned to breed palominos, a rare type of horse with a golden hue

that was on the verge of extinction. In 1924, Santa Barbara decided to host a citywide event to attract visitors and focus on early California’s Spanish heritage. Dwight Murphy was asked to chair the parade committee, and as an avid equestrian, he made sure the event included horses. A 1924 photo in Hartfeld’s book shows Murphy posing in the classic garb of a Spanish Don, atop one of his prized palomino stallions, Fernando. The first Fiesta was a great success, and Murphy was the event’s first El Presidente (1925–1926). He stepped down in 1927, but continued to lend his palominos and silver saddles to dignitaries to ride in Fiesta parades. In 1925, Murphy sold his stock in the family business and retired at just 40 years old. Dwight, Grace and Marjorie moved permanently to Santa Barbara, and Murphy set up an office on the second floor of the new El Paseo building in downtown Santa Barbara. “In 1925, Murphy began his palomino breeding experiments at Los Prietos; he succeeded beyond anyone’s imagination by increasing the odds of producing a palomino from one in 1,000 to about eight in ten. He soon initiated weekly exhibitions of these beautiful horses, and as they gained attention in newspapers and newsreels, owning a palomino became fashionable among the

PHOTOS: (TOP-BOTTOM) SANTA BARBARA HISTORICAL MUSEUM, OLD SPANISH DAYS

BY CHERYL CR ABTREE


wealthy,” writes Hartfeld. Dozens of prominent people, including film stars, governors and presidents, were among the flood of visitors to the ranch. After his permanent move, Murphy spent the rest of his life helping to preserve and improve the local community. His managerial skills, humanitarianism and ample personal wealth enabled him to make big projects happen. Along with friends such as editor and publisher Thomas More Storke and yeast king Max Fleischmann, Murphy led the charge to acquire and preserve the waterfront, construct the breakwater to create the harbor and develop an abundant parks system. Murphy also organized efforts to transform a salt pond into the Andree Clark Bird Refuge. He helped rebuild the mission twice and was instrumental in the construction of Bradbury Dam and Cachuma Lake, even though it entailed the loss of some of his own prized ranch land. He helped establish and promote the National Horse Show, and convinced the state to build Earl Warren Showgrounds (opened in 1958). In 1953, Dwight Murphy was named Santa Barbara’s Man of the Year, and in his 1968 obituary, Santa Barbara News-Press dubbed him “Man of the Century.” Murphy was a major force in Santa Barbara’s preservation and beautification efforts, as well as a substantial donor to scholarship programs and other charitable endeavors. However, you won’t find his name attached to most of his projects; he was an extremely modest, unassuming man who preferred to donate anonymously. A lone exception is Dwight Murphy Field across from Santa Barbara Zoo, which was dedicated to him in 1932. Murphy did share a bit of his life with the public by donating a number of items to Santa Barbara Historical Society, including saddles and paintings. Two saddles are on display at Pershing Park’s Carriage and Western Museum. Several of his saddles are also prominently displayed in a new exhibition, In the Saddle, at Santa Barbara Historical Museum. “The saddles we have of Dwight Murphy’s aren’t just any old saddles,” says Peterson. They’re special. ... The saddles had silver horn caps with an owl on them ... and are of incredible quality.” As for Murphy’s palomino legacy, look for the golden palominos in the Fiesta parade on August 4—many of them descendants of his superb stallions, Fernando and Rey de los Reyes. 

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TODAY! kids dog camera picnic

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Las Varas Ranch Near Santa Barbara, California

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PHOTO: BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY

RE AL ESTATE FE ATUR E


PHOTO:

A southernly outlook on Las Varas Ranch

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PHOTOS: BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY

RE AL ESTATE FE ATUR E

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Las Varas Ranch— A Coastal Jewel A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own truly pristine California coastline property and Los Padres National Forest near Santa Barbara, Las Varas Ranch is a significant part of the Rancho de los Pueblos 1842 Mexican land grant, where Santa Barbara was first discovered. And for the first time in 50 years, the ranch is available for sale by the descendants of California oil magnate Edward Laurence Doheny. The 1,800 acre property features two miles of private, unspoiled and accessible sandy beaches—and Edwards Point, with its coveted surf break; 160 acres of avocado and lemon orchards; 500 acres of pristine, gentle ranch land with oak-filled canyons; seven turn-ofthe-century homes, including Doheny Hacienda; an 18-acre lake overlooking the entire ranch; and pastures, barns and a lighted rodeo arena for housing and working horses and cattle. Above all, Las Varas Ranch is an accessible dream with spectacular privacy and panoramic ocean and Channel Island views awaiting to be enjoyed.

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Architect Richard E. Johnson, AIA designed the 11,574 square foot Kavli Estate to capture the stunning ocean views from throughout the home. Right: This is just one of several cozy spots to enjoy the warmth of the sun and the scents of the sea.

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E VEN HE ARING THE WORDS “BE AC H HOUSE ”

brings on feelings of relaxation. Those two enchanting words conjure images of lazy golden days spent lounging on a porch, gazing out at a seemingly endless ocean; strolling in soft sand with waves lapping at your feet; or plying the swells with surfboard or kayak until sunset when, tired and happy, you skip just steps to a welcoming seaside home. Here, we highlight three uniquely beautiful Santa Barbara area beach houses—a sprawling scientist’s retreat, an Italian-style villa with murals hand painted by the owner and a colorful cliffside lair accented with salvaged architectural finds. Each is a personal statement, completely different in style, but they all share a stunning oceanfront location. BY NANC Y R ANSOHOFF PHOTOGR APHED BY A MY BARNARD

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BRAINY retreat THE ELEGANT OC E ANFRONT Kavli estate in Hope Ranch has the feel of a private resort. Set on about four acres, the property includes a tennis court, a swimming pool, sprawling lawns, bluff-top patios and private access to the beach. Physicist, entrepreneur and philanthropist Fred Kavli, who passed away in 2013, owned the nearly 12,000-square-foot home. The estate is on the market, and proceeds from its sale will benefit the Kavli Foundation, which Kavli founded to advance science for the betterment of humanity and to promote public understanding and support for scientists and their work. Designed by architect Richard E. Johnson, AIA, the island-style contemporary home is ideal for entertaining on a grand scale. If these mahogany paneled walls could talk, they’d probably speak of theoretical physics and nanoscience. “Mr. Kavli entertained a lot of intellectual

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company here, including world famous physicists and Nobel laureates,” says Adrienne Schuele, estate director with COMPASS real estate, which represents the property. Trained as an engineer, Kavli was exacting and precise in the planning and materials for his home, from the redwood exterior with copper facings, stone accents and expansive custom windows to interior elements of rich woods and marble. “He took great pride in every detail,” says Schuele. The elegant living room has walls of glass that make the most of sweeping ocean views. Mahogany-wrapped box-coffered ceilings and limestone fireplaces both here and in the adjoining dining room add a warm and cozy feeling that belies the spaciousness of the rooms. Just a few steps up, a large wood-paneled office overlooks both the living room and the ocean.


CREATURE COMFORTS SET APART FROM THE COMMON ROOMS , the large master bedroom suite is a private sanctuary in itself, with views of stately cypress trees and the Pacific. A sunken lounge area and Italian marble fireplace provide a comfortable place to read, relax or drink in the views. Down the hall, an attached guesthouse with private entrance includes two bedrooms and a living room with fireplace. Three guest bedrooms in the opposite wing share a glass-topped atrium bath that adjoins a unique two-person stone shower and exercise room, with access to a private garden and the swimming pool. Downstairs on the lower level, a recreation room offers a card-playing area, wet bar, fireplace and wine cellar. “This is the place to let your hair down,� says Schuele. Yet for all its grandeur and creature comforts, this estate is all about the breathtaking setting. Wooden stairs lead down to the beach, where tide-poolers and shell-seekers stroll in the ocean breezes, waves lapping at their feet. And back up at the house, we sit on one of three bluff-top patios that provide front-row seats for dramatic sunsets. We see a migrating whale spouting in the distance and take in views that sweep up the coast to UCSB and out to the Channel Islands on this uniquely beautiful stretch of coastline.

Clockwise, interiors, from opposite left: Custom stained-glass windows and Mahogany-wrapped box-coffered ceilings add elegant detailing in the music room and entryway; unusual stone walls and ceiling features add to the wow-factor as you enter the estate; as do the soaring living room ceilings with tree and ocean views. With four acres to wander, the Kavli Estate feels like a private oceanfront hideaway.

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ITALIAN idyll A S WE ARRIVE AT Gene and Deanna Dongieux’s elegant home on the beach in Carpinteria, we feel transported to the Italian Riviera. The sand-colored stucco exterior is accented with delicate wrought ironwork, dark wood doors, graceful arches and columns, and a red tile roof. Vines hug the curves of floor-to-ceiling arched windows, giving the impression that the house has been here for a long time. Deanna is perched on a stepladder, paintbrush in hand, on the spacious back patio that overlooks the beach. “It’s like a boat,” she says with a laugh. “There’s always something that needs painting. You finish at one end and have to start again at the other!” As she touches up the trim around large windows that capture panoramic

Looking out over formal gardens, with the sea just beyond, at the Dongieux home.

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ocean views, she tells us, with husband Gene, about the house; it’s clear that their seaside home is a labor of love. Gene, co-founder and chief investment officer of Ariadne Wealth Management in Montecito, and Deanna, a talented artist, shared a vision for the Mediterraneanstyle family beach house. Deanna did much of the painting, stenciling and refinishing throughout the house, which took a year to build with local firm Ribbens Construction. The result is an inviting gathering place where their son and daughter, who are now away at college, could bring their friends over the years for surfing, kayaking and paddle boarding. “We finished the house, and the kids put their fingerprints in the cement in 1999,” says Deanna.


A cozy corner in the master bedroom. S U M M E R 2 017

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Clockwise, from far left: The combination of ocean views and elegant, European-style gardens is very unusual; Deanna Dongieux’s original paintings grace the dining room walls and ceiling; the living room’s neutral shades of beige and cream let the ocean view take center stage; and the master bath offers a charming spot to end the day.

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ARTIST’S PALETTE of shades of beige and cream reflect the home’s sandy setting and allow the blues and greens of the ocean views to take center stage. Sophisticated elements include eggshell-color travertine floors that let a bit of errant beach sand blend in. “Keeping sand out of the house is a challenge…but I don’t worry about it,” says Deanna. Her artistic talents are showcased most strikingly in the dramatic dining room. Trompe l’oeil designs in hues of golden flax and pale blue adorn the cathedral ceiling. On a wall that holds a fireplace, Deanna painted trompe l’oeil columns that echo actual columns between the dining room and kitchen. Sliding metal doors between those columns are painted with an eye-catching scene depicting Renaissance-era courtiers in a formal garden setting. “I was inspired by paintings we saw while traveling in Europe,” she says, “and I included elements from beautiful estates in Montecito that I liked.” Drawing again on her exacting artist’s eye, along with the

A SOOTHING NEUTR AL PALET TE

problem-solving skills and precision that no doubt served her well in her UCSB math/economics major, Deanna has artfully applied decorative moldings throughout the house. Another example of Deanna and Gene’s hands-on approach is their willingness to literally drive the extra mile to make their vision a reality. “When we were building the house almost 20 years ago, you couldn’t just find everything on the Internet. By asking around, I found some beautiful wooden doors that were available in Mexico. We drove down to Ensenada with our daughter in the car seat to get them,” says Deanna. She stained the round-top doors a deep chocolate brown, and they were incorporated into the home’s interior. As we walk out onto the roomy patio with large stone fireplace and beckoning seating areas, the sun begins to melt into the ocean, and the Channel Islands float in the distance. Gene points out some frolicking dolphins. “When you see dolphins, you know it’s a good day,” he says. S U M M E R 2 017

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VISION & views the ever-changing ocean show presents another act at the home of Tammy and Kim Hughes, perched above Leadbetter Beach on the Mesa. It’s no surprise that the panoramic Pacific views stretching from Montecito to Shoreline Park originally captured the imaginations of the couple. When they first saw the property, says Tammy, “The house was a 1960s concrete box that had been occupied by college students over the years—it was in bad shape.” Although the house was partially demolished, the property came with renovation permits and a good footprint; both Tammy and Kim had the vision to see the possibilities. “When I saw the views with no other houses obstructing them, I was sold,” says Tammy. The couple quickly settled on a Spanish Colonial style for the house and worked with Becker Construction, which “did a beautiful job of completing the construction

UP THE COA ST,

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within a year,” says Tammy, an interior designer and principal of Emerald Eye Designs. In fact, Becker Construction won Contractor of the Year for their work on the project. Tammy notes that Kim, a real estate investor, also “has an amazing art eye.” The two have worked on projects ranging from a beach house in Nicaragua, where they spend part of the year, to their most recent home in Hope Ranch. But their three-bedroom bluff-top home is “the perfect size and location,” says Tammy. The location suits the Hughes’s easy-breezy lifestyle just fine. “Kim’s office is in the Funk Zone, so it’s really convenient,” says Tammy. “Friends will ask us to meet them at The Lark, and we’ll hop on the bike path and join them.” The couple, who has a teenage son at home, as well as three older children, soak up the bird’s-eye views of the Shoreline Park bike path with its parade of cyclists, runners and walkers, along with the bustling harbor.


Concrete tiles from the Hughes family’s second home in Nicaragua, lots of comfortable seating and a cozy fire pit make the backyard patio a favorite spot to entertain.

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TILES & TEXTILES are highlighted even from the home’s front step. A 1920s hand-carved wood-and-glass door allows a glimpse through the living room to the ocean. The dramatic two-story foyer opens into a warm and colorful living room with reclaimed wood floors, beautiful objects from the Hughes’s travels and architectural finds. One such find is a Churrigueresque concrete relief fireplace mantle, which is set against a deep cobalt blue wall. Tammy found the fireplace in pieces in Los Angeles. “It lends itself to the Gaudi-esque style I was looking for,” she says. An un-fussy mix of vintage and modern furnishings suits the family’s style. “We really live in our houses,” says Tammy. “We have to not be afraid of spilling wine…and we love sharing our life with people.” Her eye for color is evident in the adjoining open

THE STUNNING VIE WS

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kitchen, where ocean hues are on display. Silvery blue soapstone counters are combined with handmade tiles in shades of grey-green and grey-blue that Tammy and Kim brought back from Europe. “Tiles and textiles are my absolute weakness,” says Tammy. Tammy seems to be an arty magnet for what she calls “scrappy bits.” She points us to a powder room with turquoise tiles against walls of pale yellow. “This is my little nod to Casa del Herrero,” she says, referring to the historic Montecito estate known in part for its dazzling Mediterranean tile work. In bathrooms and the laundry room, Tammy has combined finds from the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Art from Scrap, Craigslist and tile store sample boards for a distinctive look.


THE LIFE AQUATIC to take full advantage of its setting. “I wanted to make the three bedrooms all feel part of the sea…that’s the superstar,” says Tammy. Iron and glass French doors let in the ocean breezes while standing up to the salty air, and balconies provide perfect spots for a swing chair and a cup of tea. Outside on the patio, the floor is composed of concrete tiles the family brought back from Nicaragua. A hammock and seating area overlook the curve of coastline where sailboats glide in the yacht club regatta and pelicans swoop. “It’s like nature television,” says Tammy. “It’s always changing.” 

THE HOUSE IS DESIGNED

A unique Churrigueresqure concrete relief fireplace is the centerpiece of the open living room/dining room; another Churrigueresqure piece graces the entryway, along with custom tile designs on the stairs and in a guest bathroom (left). Above, Leadbetter Beach is just beyond the patio. S U M M E R 2 017

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HOTEL CALIFORNIAN Re-inventing

appears poised to land at the intersection of State and Mason Streets in downtown Santa Barbara, less than two blocks from the Pacific Ocean. Santa Barbara will never be the same. At the helm is Los Angeles developer Michael Rosenfeld, who in his own low-key, unassuming, yet exceptionally definite way is about to reap a whirlwind of political and personal melodramas that has taken 20 years to play out on Santa Barbara’s stage. All this has profound implications for the future character, flavor and function of the city’s downtown. That’s because sometime this summer, Rosenfeld turns the lights on at his new Hotel Californian —121 rooms of a high-end Spanish-Revival-glitz-accentuated-with-designer-Moroccan-glam hotel that spans three parcels and 2.14 acres of high-octane real estate located barely spitting distance from the beach. Such numbers tell only part of the story. Included in this package —roughly valued at $120 million—are three restaurants, multiple bars, an outdoor community plaza space, a gym, a spa, a grand ballroom, multiple meeting rooms, a rooftop pool and an outdoor lawn terrace. The impact of Rosenfeld’s new hotel is analogous to heaving enriched uranium into the core of a nuclear-power generator. Right next door to the new hotel is TV producer Dick Wolf’s architecturally extravagant—at least by Santa Barbara standards—MOXI museum, catering to young minds (also dubbed The Wolf Museum of Exploration and Innovation, as Wolf and his wife, Noelle, were the nonprofit MOXI’s largest donors) plus Tony Romasanta’s new 35-room hotel development. Spanning nearby Mission Creek and Cabrillo Boulevard is a brand-new multi-million-dollar wide-sidewalk pedestrian bridge.

THE MOTHE R OF ALL MOTHE RSHIPS

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BY NIC K WEL SH

Along Cabrillo, Virginia Castagnola-Hunter is building her new high-end seafood restaurant next to the faux lighthouse. And local home-boy developer Ray MahBoob has yet to unveil his grand plans for the two waterfront properties—the former Surf Museum on Helena and the former El Torito restaurant on Cabrillo—that he just managed to snag. That Rosenfeld’s new hotel complex rubs up against Santa Barbara’s semi-mythic Funk Zone is fraught with synergistic implications that commercial real estate brokers dream about with unabashed prurient delight. Not all that long ago, after all, this neighborhood was the embodiment of urban blight: oil-soaked used car lots, fleabag hotels and well-known watering holes like the tiki-flavored Lei Lani Room and the boisterous partyhearty emporium, Rocky Gallenti’s. As these changes unfold, Santa Barbara’s more traditional brick-and-mortar central business district has found itself struggling with the same intractable existential crisis afflicting major retail centers everywhere: why go to downtown malls when you can shop online? With the arrival of Hotel Californian imminent, no one knows for sure what’s going to happen next. But whatever it is, most insiders agree it will happen fast. One thing is certain, however; Santa Barbara’s commercial center of gravity is sliding inexorably down State Street in the direction of Rosenfeld’s new hotel. In person, Rosenfeld smiles easily and is quick to extend a handshake. Conspicuously—unlike several other high-profile developers—he does not sport French-collar shirts. Instead, he gravitates toward blue blazer casual, no tie, his shirt unbuttoned at the top. Rosenfeld grew up in Santa Monica, the son of exceptionally successful

PHOTO: HOTEL CALIFORNIAN

When Something Old is Very New


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residential developer Eugene S. Rosenfeld, and attended UC Berkeley where he studied classical literature and business finance. Rosenfeld fell into real estate development on his own—via the finance side up in the Bay Area—and never worked with his father. Today, Rosenfeld focuses mostly on luxury hotels, explaining that he buys properties in gateway locations with “high barriers to entry” and where “high value can be added.” All elements clearly apply to the new hotel project. Rosenfeld may or may not qualify as a bona fide business genius, but in the context of Santa Barbara commercial real estate, he’s the next best thing. “The third time’s the charm,” he says with a quick laugh during a recent interview. By that, Rosenfeld means he’s the property’s third owner. The first one, Bill Levy—charismatic and controversial in large and equal doses—spent roughly $100 million leasing the land and securing the permits needed from the Santa Barbara City Council and California Coastal Commission. Levy first started beating the drum for the project—he initially envisioned something far more audacious—as far back as 1994. At the time, he boldly—and absurdly—predicted it would take just five years to get the project approved and built. By 2001, Levy had managed to obtain the permits needed to build a 56unit time-share condo project—dubbed Entrada de Santa Barbara or “La Entrada”—that the Ritz-Carlton empire would run. But along the way, Levy ran terminally afoul of Santa Barbara’s environmental watchdogs and many of his own longtime investors, who took to the courts demanding to know where their money went. Levy found himself waging a two-pronged war; the ensuing opera was grinding and crippling. By 2007, Levy—who at one

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time was paying himself $60,000 a month—was forced to declare bankruptcy. His chief creditor, Mountain Funding—a South Carolina lending outfit specializing in crisis loans to distressed developers—took over. Its agents, however, had no clue what to do with Levy’s project. As a result, they did next to nothing. For years, city hall was furious and embarrassed by the festering hole in the ground, not to mention the loss of potential revenues. Before the recession, Mountain Funding had rejected offers to buy the project—land and permits—for as much as $36 million. After the recession, however, it was desperate to unload. In 2011, it sold to Rosenfeld and his company Woodridge Capital. The cost was about $7 million. That coup was the first indication that Rosenfeld might be close to a genius. The second and third were the efforts he took to resemble neither Bill Levy nor Mountain Funding. By any reckoning, he succeeded wildly. “There’s been no drama, no pressure, no big changes,” says City Administrator Paul Casey. “He’s done everything he said he would and everything we’ve asked him to.” In fact, Rosenfeld did propose some changes when he took over. Instead of spreading the parking throughout all three parcels, he proposed concentrating it in one spot. He also proposed reducing the square footage set aside for commercial outdoor plaza spaces. In so doing, he ran headlong into the buzz saw of the city’s design review process. One committee member disparaged the “postage stamp” allotment of open space he proposed, while dissing his new designs as “boring.” Rosenfeld listened. And he got it. In Los Angeles, he’d tussled with historic preservationists over his $2.5-billion proposal to radically

PHOTOS: HOTEL CALIFORNIAN

Opening spread: a rendering of what the Hotel Californian complex at the base of State Street will look like when it’s completed. Above: a street view rendering of the historic Hotel Californian with the front façade relatively intact. Opposite (top-bottom): one of the hotel’s 121 guest rooms; an as yet-tobe-named restaurant; and the hotel’s spa.


redevelop Century Plaza Hotel—an architectural icon of 1960s jet-setting modernity. In that showdown, Rosenfeld backed off plans to demolish the Century Plaza outright, winning in exchange the preservationists’ support to build two new 46-story towers on either side of the hotel. In Santa Barbara, by the time Rosenfeld got his final changes approved, even his most outspoken critics had come to sing his praises. By the numbers, Rosenfeld’s project occupies about 40,000 fewer total square feet than the Entrada project approved in 2001, but offers about 40 more parking spaces and a few more hotel rooms. Conspicuously expunged from the new plans—or from any of the publicity materials for the new hotel—is any reference to “Entrada” or the toxic smoke that name conjures. More fundamental, however, is the shift away from Entrada’s time-share— “fractional ownership”—strategy and quasi-gated community feel endemic to such operations. Instead, Rosenfeld and his team stress the need to invite, welcome and encourage the broader Santa Barbara community to visit the hotel complex’s many bars, restaurants, meeting rooms, lawns and other amenities. They have embraced the original name of the hotel—built in 1925 right before the city’s defining earthquake—rebuilding and preserving Hotel Californian’s existing façade. Even if the hotel draws 40–50 percent of its visitors from the rich SoCal tourist market—as is the strategy—its economic game plan depends on robust interaction with the local market. To the extent that Rosenfeld’s hotel offers a porous entry to and from the Funk Zone, so much the better. While many debate the time and place when the Funk Zone ceased to be “funky,” Rosenfeld says it remains still very much a creative space. “We see this as very much an arts district, a place where you can have culinary adventures,” he says. “We do not see what’s happening there as traditional.” It’s clear that Rosenfeld has a serious case of the Santa Barbara itch, but it’s too soon to say he’s succumbed to the bug. Yes, he and his wife were married here in 2013— at Lotusland—but he has yet to buy a Santa Barbara home. He is, however, expanding his range of local investments. He’s already bought—for $30 million—the Chapala One mixed-use condo project in the 400 block of Chapala Street, another of Santa Barbara’s most troubled and troubling developments. He’s currently working to redevelop the old Craviotto warehouse in the 600 block of Anacapa Street into a three-story 30-unit rental project. And he’s negotiating with Bill Wright to lease a large swath of beachfront property—now a commercial storage yard—where he hopes to build a mid-range franchised hotel, such as a Marriott. In the meantime, Michael Rosenfeld—engineeroperator-owner of the Hotel Californian mothership—is enjoying Santa Barbara, hanging out when time allows and munching at such places as Three Pickles sandwich shop or La Superica taqueria. “In Santa Barbara, you can see someone on the street, grab a cup of coffee and have a conversation,” he says. “That’s one of the things I value. In L.A., people are more in a hurry.”  S U M M E R 2 017

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This page: “These Days� maxi dress By Free People from Blanka, Chanel rose tone gold mirrored eye wear from Occhiali, copper leather Birkenstock sandal from DIANI and gold hoop hammered metal earrings from Angel. Opposite: Iro silk print dress and Robert Clergerie/Self Portrait raffia sneakers from DIANI.


The Shapes of Summer has a mild climate year-round, there is something special about the summer months that get even the most devout couch potatoes heading outdoors to the beach or the harbor, where a cornucopia of walkers, joggers, bikers, parents with strollers, dogs and their owners, fishermen and tourists await. On the style front, looking your casual best in bikinis, tank suits, sun hats, tote bags, flowing cover-ups and the essential cool eyewear—“sunnies” is the new word for shades—makes you feel good and look good this summer season. From the deck of the historic Ranger— the first private sport-fishing boat built on the West Coast in 1917 and restored to pristine condition by Santa Barbara Maritime Museum—to our beautiful harbor and serene Leadbetter Beach, our lovely town set the scene for summer fashions that capture the energy and spirit of beach life. The scents of salt water, suntan lotion, warm breezes, fishing boats pulling in their catches of the day and blooming yellow ice plants were heavenly. Throw in some warm sand on your toes or the cool tingle of dangling them in the water, and it’s no wonder that so many locals choose to staycation in town this time of year. Although we were working hard, we felt like we were on a holiday, too.

WHILE SANTA BARBAR A

P H OTO G R A P H E D BY M E H O S H S T Y L E D & W R I T T E N BY J U DY F O R E M A N MODEL CA MERON OF HELLO GORGEOUS H A IR & M A K E-UP BY SHANNON LOAR- COTÉ , BLUSH AND L A SHE S

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Soak up the sun

This page: Reversible blue and tan batik bikini from Bikini Factory and beach volleyball from Surf-n-Wear’s Beach House. Opposite: South Pacific bralette and boa bottom by à le by Alessandra from Bonita and white cotton shirt by Faithful from Angel.

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Easy does it

Opposite: Blue and white off-the-shoulder top and matching pull-on cotton bottom by Beach Riot from Angel, Jacques Marie Mage eye wear from Occhiali and white beaded tassel earrings by Bauble Bar from Blanka. Above: A Piece Apart chambray bell sleeve top, James Carr bandana, A. Marie pyrite bead wrap bracelet, Loeffler Randall pom pom leather lace up sandal and black and white stripe pom pom clutch, and white denim skirt from DIANI.

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Dress it down

This page: Indigo Cult maxi dress by Jens Pirate Booty from Angel and shell necklace from Bonita Beach. Opposite: South Pacific maxi dress by Ă le by Alessandra from Bonita, Janessa Leone wide brim hat from Angel and Chanel eye wear from Occhiali.

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Golf

Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara County is one of America’s most desirable golf destinations, with splendid courses designed to maximize enjoyment of the region’s splendor and moderate climate.

Glen Annie Golf Club

GOLETA

Sandpiper Golf Club

GOLETA

In the rolling foothills of Goleta, 15 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara, this meticulously maintained and challenging layout offers panoramic ocean, Channel Island and mountain views from nearly every hole. The tee shot from #16, for example, decends 150 ft. in elevation to land softly on a manicured landscape near an adjacent lake with a cascading stream. The clubhouse complex includes Frog Bar & Grill and scenic patios with excellent facilities for gatherings of up to 300. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 71.1; slope rating, 122. 405 Glen Annie Rd., 805/968-6400, glenanniegolf.com.

Established in 1972 as the county’s first resort course open to the public, Sandpiper is an inspiring 18 holes of seaside golf on an extraordinary terrain, with an acclaimed layout named by Golf Digest as one of the top 25 public golf courses in the U.S. Designed by renowned architect William F. Bell, the links-style layout features rolling fairways leading to enormous greens with ocean views from nearly every hole. The stretch of holes 10–14 is one of the most memorable experiences of any golfer’s life. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.7; slope rating, 136. 7925 Hollister Ave., 805/968-1541, sandpipergolf.com.

Rancho San Marcos

La Purisima Golf Course

SANTA YNEZ MOUNTAINS

Twelve miles from Santa Barbara, up scenic Hwy 154—the historic road winding off State Street into the Santa Ynez Mountains leading to the charming Santa Ynez Valley wineries—“Rancho” has been acclaimed as one of the finest experiences in Southern California. This historic land challenges with sand, lakes, the Santa Ynez River, fields of native grasses, oak tree-lined chaparral and changes in elevation. A comfortable clubhouse has a grill with food to go or to enjoy at tables inside or outside on scenic patios. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 4600 Hwy. 154, 805/683-6334, rsm1804.com. 76

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LOMPOC

Near the Santa Ynez Valley Wine Country, “La P” is challenging, pure golf with long twisting fairways bordered at times by oak and eucalyptus groves and protected by sand, water and out-of-bounds stakes, finishing with big lightning-fast greens. In the afternoon, wind often becomes a factor, making the closing holes our own “Amen Corner.” Designed by world-renowned architect Robert Muir Graves, a round at La Purisima will not soon be forgotten, and is worth the drive. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.9; slope rating, 143. 3455 E. Hwy. 246, 805/735-8395, lapurisimagolf.com.


FEATURED GOLF COURSES

FEATURED FOR SUMMER

River Course at the Alisal in 1992 on land owned by and adjacent to the renowned Alisal Guest Ranch, River Course provides a layout to be enjoyed by golfers of all levels of skill. Set along the Santa Ynez River, the course features panoramic views, mostly wide fairways and accessible greens. Several holes (especially any of the river holes) will challenge even the low handicap golfer. The clubhouse has an excellent restaurant with comfortable inside seating and a view-oriented patio.

OPE NED FOR PUBLIC PL AY

Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 150 Alisal Rd., 805/688-6042, rivercourse.com

SUMMER 2017

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E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

in California, called presidios. In addition to being Santa Barbara’s birthplace, El Presidio de Santa Barbara, the neighborhood is also home to the historic Lobero Theatre, one of the city’s architectural jewels, as well as Casa de la Guerra historic house museum. El Paseo, a charming adobe plaza built in the 1820s, houses several nice shops and restaurants, along with The Wine Collection of El Paseo, an upscale array of six excellent wine tasting rooms open daily from noon to 6 p.m. (located off of the 800 block of State Street).

6

Santa Barbara Historical Museum exhibits fine art, costumes and artifacts from Santa Barbara’s colorful history. Gledhill Library houses photographs and historic documents. | 136 E. De la Guerra St. Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/966-1601, santabarbaramuseum.com.

7

Santa Barbara  D OW N TOW N S TAT E S T R E E T defines the city’s center—and its heart. The intersection of State and Carrillo streets is where Captain Salisbury Haley hammered an iron stake in 1850 to designate the future midtown area. The self-guided Red Tile Walking Tour is a great way to get your bearings (map is available at Santa Barbara Visitor Center, 1 Garden St.). Don’t miss the historic Arlington Theatre, a notable example of both Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival architectural styles. Also worth visiting is the beautiful Alice Keck Park Memorial Garden, named after the benefactor who donated the prime property.

1

Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a National Historic Landmark in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, was dedicated in 1929. Its immense landscaped courtyard and sunken garden are the site of public celebrations year round. | 1100 Anacapa St. Docent tours Mon.–Fri. 10:30 a.m.; Daily 2 p.m. 805/962-6464, santabarbaracourthouse.org.

2

Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s outstanding permanent and special collections, housed in a stately building constructed in 1914 as the city’s first federally funded post office, include the only remaining intact mural by Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros, Portrait of Mexico Today. | 1130 State St. Tues.– Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

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3

La Arcada, designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1926, is home to a wealth of galleries, shops and restaurants. Dotted along the way are historical curios and sculptures, with all roads leading to the much-loved central fountain inhabited by turtles and fish. | 1100 block of State Street.

4

Paseo Nuevo is a charming outdoor destination to shop, dine, relax, stroll and people watch. Featuring Spanish-style architecture, Paseo Nuevo is also home to Center Stage Theater, a black box venue showcasing live performances, and MCA Santa Barbara, a museum dedicated to exhibiting the highest quality of contemporary art while recognizing the artists of tomorrow with innovative exhibitions. | 651 & 653 Paseo Nuevo. paseonuevoshopping.com, mcasantabarbara.org.

5

Santa Barbara Public Market offers foodies an impressive collection of purveyors focused on handcrafted, regionally sourced and sustainably made foods. The LEED-certified space also has a commissary kitchen, featuring cooking classes, winemaker dinners, pop-up chefs and more! | 38 W. Victoria St. at Chapala, Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–10 p.m., sbpublicmarket.com.

PRESIDIO NEIGHBORHOOD is a vibrant section developed around the historic site of the last remaining Spanish fortresses built

MISSION DISTRIC T, identified by Mission Santa Barbara, is among the oldest residential neighborhoods in the city. Characterized by revival-style architecture, it is also home to the Mission Historical Park and rose garden.

8

Santa Barbara Botanic Garden’s 78 acres, accessed by five and a half miles of trails, record the history of the state’s rare and indigenous plants. From the dramatic opening view through the meadows, chaparral and forest to the sweeping ridge-top views of the Channel Islands, the garden is a skillful display of California’s natural bounty. | 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Mar.–Oct. 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Nov.–Feb. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/682-4726, sbbg.org.

9

Mission Santa Barbara was dedicated in 1786 by Father Fermin Lasuén. Known as “Queen of the Missions” for its twin belltowers, it remains the only California mission to be continuously occupied by the Franciscans. | 2201 Laguna St. Daily tours 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 805/682-4713, sbmission.org; santabarbaramission.org.

10

Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History celebrated its 100th birthday in 2016, and provides science and nature education to generations of visitors, from toddlers to seniors. The museum, located along Mission Creek, reconnects more than 100,000 people each year—including 5,700 members—to nature indoors and outdoors. | 2559 Puesta del Sol Rd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/682-4711, sbnature.org.

PHOTO: COURTESY SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY SEA CENTER

15. Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Sea Center

El Presidio de Santa Barbara was founded in 1782 to offer protection to the mission and settlers, provide a seat of government and guard against foreign invasion, and is now a state historic park. | 123 E. Canon Perdido St. 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily. 805/9650093, sbthp.org.


WAT E R F R O N T, running the length of Cabrillo Boulevard from East Beach to the harbor, is a feast for outdoor enthusiasts. A paved pathway runs the full distance—by Stearns Wharf and along West Beach to the harbor.

11

Andree Clark Bird Refuge—an artificial freshwater lake and marsh pond adjacent to the zoo —provides one of the best biking/jogging/skating paths in the area around its perimeter. | 1400 E. Cabrillo Blvd. 805/564-5418.

12

Santa Barbara Harbor and Breakwater is a working harbor, home to fishing boats, private yachts and nearly 1,200 excursion and sightseeing boats. It is always a busy and interesting place to walk, skate, bike, eat and purchase fresh catch at Fisherman’s Market every Saturday morning. | Off Cabrillo Blvd.

13

Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, situated on the harbor’s scenic waterfront, presents the region’s rich local maritime history. From ancient seafaring Chumash to modern-day deep-sea research, the emphasis is on human interaction with the sea. | 113 Harbor Way. Memorial Day–Labor Day 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Labor Day–Memorial Day 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; closed Wed. 805/962-8404, sbmm.org.

14

Stearns Wharf, a Santa Barbara icon, was built by a Vermont native in 1876 to accommodate ocean-going vessels. Once owned by Jimmy Cagney, its dramatic views of the city and the hills beyond, as well as its mix of shops and restaurants, have charmed visitors for more than a century. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd.

15

Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Sea Center on Stearns Wharf engages visitors of all ages with interactive exhibits, opportunities to work like scientists, a theater showcasing the wonders of Santa Barbara Channel, a live shark touch pool and a 1,500-gallon tide pool tank. Discover the fun in science and the wonders of the natural world. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/962-2526, sbnature.org.

16

Santa Barbara Arts & Crafts Show is the longest-running public weekly art show in the country, with more than 250 exhibitors, all there in person and carefully screened to ensure originality of work. | Cabrillo Blvd. between State and Calle Puerta Vallarta streets. Sun. 10 a.m. to dusk. 805/8972519, santabarbaraca.gov.

17

The Mill is a distinctively modern spin on the original feed mill constructed in 1904, which is now an artisan marketplace, featuring a production winery, craft brewery k

June 9 – September 4, 2017 John and Peggy Maximus Gallery Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara 805.682.4711


E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

and farm-to-table barbecue restaurant, as well as some unique retail offerings. | 406 E. Haley St., 10 a.m.–10 p.m., 805/965-9555, themillsb.com.

18

Santa Barbara Zoo opened to the public in 1963 with only seven residents. Now more than 500 animals live here, and 30 acres of lush gardens spread across a knoll overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Committed to conservation, species survival and education, the zoo is an enlightening and entertaining place to visit. | 500 Niños Dr. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/962-5339, sbzoo.org.

19

Urban Wine Tasting Although you won’t find any vineyards in this area, these unique and eclectic wineries and tasting rooms are a great way to begin your wine-tasting journey through the area on foot, as an introduction to local wines. Many of the urban wineries have northern Santa Barbara County vineyards that are also open to visitors. A Area 5.1

137 Anacapa St., Unit B, 805/770-7251

B Au Bon Climat

813 Anacapa St., 805/963-7999

C Armada Wine

& Beer Merchant 1129-A State St., 805/770-5912

D AVA Santa

Barbara 116 E. Yanonali St., 805/453-6768

E Carr Vineyards

& Winery, 414 N. Salsipuedes St., 805/965-7985

F Cebada Vineyard

& Winery 8 E. De La Guerra St., 805/451-2570

G Corks & Crowns

32 Anacapa St., 805/845-8600

H Corktree Cellars Wine Bar & Bistro 910 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, 805/684-1400 I Cottonwood

Canyon, 224 Anacapa St., 805/963-1221

J Deep Sea Wine

Tasting Room 217 Stearns Wharf, 805/618-1185

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K Foley Food

U Municipal

L Giessinger Winery by the Sea 210 State St., 805/568-0820

V MWC32

M Grassini

205 Anacapa St., 805/962-5857

& Wine Society 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta, 805/968-1614

Family Vineyards, 813 Anacapa St., 805/897-3366

N Happy Canyon

Vineyard, 30 El Paseo, 805/232-3549

O Jaffurs Wine

Cellars, 819 E. Montecito St., 805/962-7003

P Jamie Slone

Winemakers, 22 Anacapa St., Ste. D, 805/931-6864

813 Anacapa St., 805/845-8435

W Oreana Winery

X Pali Wine Company, 116 E. Yanonali St., 805/560-7254 Y Riverbench

137 Anacapa St., Ste. C, 805/324-4100

Z Sanford Winery 1114 State St., 805/770-7873

Wines, 23 E. De la Guerra St., 805/5606555

AA Sanguis Wines 8 Ashley Ave., 805/845-0920

Q Kalyra by the

BB Santa Barbara

Sea, 212 State St., 805/965-8606

Winery, 202 Anacapa St., 805/963-3633

R Kunin Wines Tasting Room 28 Anacapa St., 805/963-9633

CC Silver Wines

S LaFond Winery

Wines, 2330 Lillie Ave., 805/565-9463

T Margerum Tasting

EE Whitcraft Winery & Tasting Room, 36-A S. Calle Cesar Chavez, 805/730-1680

111 E. Yanonali St., 805/845-2020

Room, 813 Anacapa St., 805/845-8435

724 Reddick St., 805/963-3052

DD Summerland

MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, is an awe-inspiring experience to motivate a new generation of innovators and problem-solvers. The new museum space includes 17,000 square feet of interactive educational exhibits focused on science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). | 805/708-2282, moxi.org.

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Funk Zone is a hotbed of homegrown artistic production. The Funk Zone is known for its eclectic wall murals, ateliers, galleries, alternative exhibition spaces, trendy artist shops and the lively Urban Wine Trail. Half the fun is each surprise that awaits you down the alley or painted on the wall in front of you! | funkzone.net.

Montecito and Points South Montecito’s densely wooded, lightly populated residential area between Santa Barbara and Summerland has attracted the privileged for more than a century, but its genesis was agrarian. Remnants of this rich heritage are still in use. The 500-acre property, on which Harleigh Johnston grew citrus trees until 1893, became San Ysidro Ranch. With the ranch’s completion in 1935 and the Montecito Inn’s in 1928, it

wasn’t long before well-known captains of industry built estates, many of them incorporating the farms and ranches that had originally settled the area.

21

Casa del Herrero, designed for George Steedman by the “father of the Santa Barbara style,” George Washington Smith, offers a glimpse into Montecito life in the 1930s. A splendid example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, the house—and the gardens—are National Historic Landmarks. The gardens, covering 11 acres, were designed by noted landscape architects Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest and horticulturist Frances T. Underhill. | 1387 E. Valley R. Tours Wed. and Sat. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations required. 805/5655653, casadelherrero.com.

22

Ganna Walska Lotusland is a 37-acre garden estate, prized for its rare and exotic plants and providing new perspectives on sustainability of nature’s offerings. Themed gardens include topiary, bromeliad, succulent, cycad, cactus, fern, Japanese, Australian, water and a blue garden, among others. | Reservations required. Tours Wed.–Sat. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. between Feb. 18 and Nov. 15. Reservations required. 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

23

Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art educates students and the community about the power and value of the visual arts through physical, critical and spiritual engagement with the creative process and its results. | Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Mon.–Fri. 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/5656162, westmontmuseum.org. S U M M E R L A N D is just a stone’s throw off Hwy. 101 and two minutes south of Montecito, and offers the rural charm of an earlier California beach town while maintaining the spirit of an artists’ colony via plentiful antique, home and garden shops, art galleries, boutiques and unpretentious eateries.


24

Lookout County Park, off Lillie Avenue at Evans Avenue, is on the bluffs above the beautiful Summerland Beach. From this vantage point, where full picnic facilities await, there are spectacular views of the Channel Islands. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Evans Ave. CARPINTERIA is five minutes south of Montecito and Summerland. Although the city advertises itself as home to the “world’s safest beach,” visitors also come to roam the avocado-laden hills in search of the orchid fields and hothouses, for which Carpinteria is well known.

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30

Goleta Beach Park, adjacent to UCSB, is favored by families and groups for its white sands and expanse of lawn with numerous barbecue and picnic table areas. The 1,500-foot-long pier accommodates boat launching facilities, fishermen and strollers. | Exit Hwy. 217 at Sandspit Rd. 805/568-2461.

31

Art, Design & Architecture Museum at University of California Santa Barbara holds an impressive fine art collection with one of the largest architectural archives in North America. In addition, it engages contemporary artists in exhibits and programs. | UCSB. Wed.– Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

of professional actors and advanced students, as well as other concerts and events. Open June through October. | 420 2nd St. 805/686-1789, solvangfestivaltheater.org.

36

Old Mission Santa Inés is the 19th of 21 missions built in California from 1769 to 1836 by Spanish Franciscan priests. Founded September 17, 1804 by Padre Estevan Tapis, it was the first European settlement in Santa Ynez Valley and still displays artifacts preserved from the Mission era. | 1760 Mission Dr. at Hwy. 246. 805/688-4815, missionsantaines.org.

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37

Carpinteria State Beach and Bluffs are among California’s most popular destinations—the result of a broad beach and good sunning, tidepooling and fishing. Most any sunny weekend, you’ll find loads of families settled in for the day. For hikers and birdwatchers, it doesn’t get much better than the Carpinteria Bluffs. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. Continue through town to the beach. Park on Linden Ave. or in the Carpinteria State Beach lot.

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38

27

Santa Ynez Mountains and Valley Areas

Salt Marsh Nature Reserve, a 230acre salt marsh, is home to local and migratory waterfowl and fish and is a birder’s dream. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. at Sandyland Rd., turn right and drive three blocks to Ash Ave.

26

Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club was admitted to the U.S. Polo Association in 1911 and moved to its present location shortly thereafter. The club welcomes visitors for Sunday games from May through October, with the high-goal season capped by the Gulfstream Pacific Coast Open. | 3375 Foothill Rd. 805/684-6683, sbpolo.com.

Goleta and Points North The city of Goleta and several of the area’s well-known institutions and landmarks are just 10 minutes north of Santa Barbara, including University of California Santa Barbara and two championship golf courses.

28

Rancho La Patera, one of the oldest landmarks in Goleta Valley, is home to historic Stow House, a beautiful example of Carpenter Gothic architecture, and Cavalletto History Education Center, which focuses on Goleta’s ranching and agricultural history. | 304 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/681-7216, stowhouse.com.

29

South Coast Railroad Museum, housed in a restored train depot, is a magnet for train buffs. Tours of the Victorian depot, rides on the “Goleta Short Line” miniature train and exhibits are part of the experience. | 300 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/964-3540, goletadepot.org.

El Capitan and Refugio State Beaches, the mixed sand and rock beach at El Capitan links Refugio—a palmlined crescent of sand with tide pools—by beach, bluff and bike trails. Both are popular beach campgrounds. | From Hwy. 101, exit the northernmost El Capitan exit and/or Refugio Rd. 805/968-1033, parks.ca.gov.

Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes, the Dunes Center at 1055 Guadalupe St. should be the first stop in the exploration of the largest dune complex in the state. | Wed.–Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 805/343-2455, dunescenter.org.

The valley is historically rich and geographically diverse. In the valley, vineyards dot the landscape, many with tasting rooms. Please refer to our winery guide.

34

Cachuma Lake Recreation Area provides 750 campsites just 25 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara. Full marina, boat launch, rental boats, fishing equipment and licenses are available. Nature cruises led by park naturalists provide an educational look at the wildlife, birds (including bald eagles) and plants that make Cachuma such a rich habitat. | Hwy. 154. 805/686-5055, sbparks.org.

Solvang With a population of nearly 5,000, Solvang (“sunny field” in Danish) is the largest city in Santa Ynez Valley. Founded in 1911 by Danish educators from the Midwest, Solvang is the “Danish Capital of North America.”

35

Solvang Festival Theater, a 700-seat historic outdoor theater, presents excellent productions staged by Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA), a combination

Elverhøj Museum of History & Art is housed in a historic handcrafted structure built in a style derived from the large farmhouses of 18th century Denmark. Visitors can view Solvang’s history through photos, artifacts and video displays; enjoy exhibits celebrating the Danish-American pioneer spirit and the colorful heritage of Denmark. | Wed.– Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 1624 Elverhoy Way. 805/6861211, elverhoj.org.

Wildling Art Museum, an educational institution dedicated to presenting art of America’s wilderness, is a place to gain a greater appreciation of art and a better understanding of the importance of preserving our natural heritage. | 1511-B Mission Dr., 805/6881082, wildlingmuseum.org.

Santa Ynez and Los Olivos These small, charming towns look like they belong in the pages of a book on the history of the west and are world-renowned for their vineyards, equestrian culture, art galleries, inns and restaurants that epitomize the region’s signature wine country cuisine.

39

Los Olivos melds California history with modern-day wine tasting rooms, restaurants, art galleries and upscale shops in this picture-perfect country town dating back to the 1860s, when stagecoaches passed through. Centered by an iconic flagpole, the serenity of vineyards, lavender farms, orchards, ranches and horse trails surround Los Olivos. This is a charming place to visit for a one-stop wine country experience. | Approximately 40 min. north of Santa Barbara via Hwy. 154, losolivosca.com.

40

Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum celebrates the rich history of the Santa Ynez Valley, its pioneering settlers and the five early townships that formed the foundation of this unique region. | Open Wed.– Sun. noon–4 p.m. 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. 805/688-7889, santaynezmuseum.org.  SUMMER 2017

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WINE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

Los Alamos Santa Barbara County vineyards grow exceptional grapes, and now, after more than 40 years of experimentation with an incredible diversity of microclimates and soil types, growers and winemakers know a lot about what to plant and where those vines thrive best—and a host of talented vintners transform those grapes into world-class wines. The best way to explore this authentic wine-producing and wine grape growing region is by visiting the tasting rooms and speaking directly to the people. Here are more than 100 that offer the wine tasting experience.

Western hospitality meets world class wine in the picturesque Western town of Los Alamos. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Martian Ranch & Vineyard

9110 Alisos Canyon Rd., 805/344-1804 IN-TOWN TASTING

Bedford Winery

448 Bell St., 805/344-2107 Casa Dumetz Wines

388 Bell St., 805/344-1900 Municipal Winemakers

423 Bell St., 805/931-6864

Santa Maria Valley

Los Alamos Valley

The Santa Maria Valley American Viticulture Area was the third AVA established in the United States (in 1981) and the first in Santa Barbara County. With its east-west valley and river lands, this scenic area has a climate that leads to early bud break and a long ripening season for the grapes.

Lompoc The ever-growing numbers of urban wineries and tasting rooms in Lompoc are Santa Barbara County’s most western tasting region and are primarily located in the area affectionately known as the “Wine Ghetto,” a bustling industrial park with world-class wines. IN-TOWN TASTING

Ampelos

312 N. 9th St., 805/736-9957 Arcadian Winery/Bratcher Winery

1515 E. Chestnut Ave., Ste. B, 805/737-3900 Brewer-Clifton

329 N. "F" St., 805/735-9184 Cebada Vineyard

4001 Forbidden Fruit Ln., 805/735-4648 Fiddlehead Cellars

1597 E. Chestnut Ave., 805/742-0204 Flying Goat Cellars

TASTING AT THE VINE YARD 1

Babcock Winery & Vineyards

Winemaking pioneer Bryan Babcock continues to mesmerize Santa Barbara’s wine scene with his radical farming and terroir driven Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays. Enjoy stunning wines while interacting in Lisa Babcock-designed super soulful, industrial chic Sta. Rita Hills tasting room. Vintage finds abound, including a selection of classic vinyl. Picnic, listen to cool music and spend an afternoon surrounded by beautiful vineyard views. Open daily 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Cambria Winery & Vineyard

5475 Chardonnay Ln., 805/937-8091 Cottonwood Canyon Vineyard & Winery

3940 Dominion Rd., 805/937-8463 Foxen Winery & Vineyard

7600 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/937-4251 Kenneth Volk Vineyards

5230 Tepusquet Rd., 805/938-7896 Presqu'ile Winery & Vineyards

5391 Presquile Dr., 805/937-8110

5175 E. Hwy. 246, 805/736-1455 babcockwinery.com

1520 E. Chestnut Ct., Unit A, 805/736-9032 La Montagne Winery

1509 E. Chestnut Ave., 805/291-6643 Longoria Wines

415 E. Chestnut Ave., 866/759-4637 Pali Wine Co.

1501 E. Chestnut Ct., 805/735-2354 Palmina

1520 E. Chestnut Ct., 805/735-2030 Scott Cellars

316 N. "F" St., 805/736-6161 Stolpman Vineyards

1700 Industrial Way, 805/688-0400 Transcendence

313 N. “F” St., 805/689-5258 Zotovich Cellars

300 N. 12th St., Ste. 1D, 805/736-1600

Lompoc/Sta. Rita Hills The eastern gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills appellation is Buellton, while Lompoc lies

as the western gateway. Sta. Rita Hills is home to the most extreme cool-climate vineyards in the area, growing primarily pinot noir and chardonnay, along with other interesting cool-climate wines. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Babcock Winery & Vineyards

5175 E. Hwy. 246, 805/736-1455 Foley Estates Vineyard & Winery

6121 E. Hwy. 246, 805/737–6222 Huber Vineyards & Cellars

4892 Hapgood Rd., 805/736-3854 Melville Vineyards & Winery

5185 E. Hwy. 246, 805/735-7030 Sanford Winery & Vineyards

5010 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/735-5900 IN-TOWN TASTING

Dierberg/Star Lane/Three Saints

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Presqu'ile Winery & Vineyards

Presqu'ile (press-KEEL), Creole for “almost an island,” was a haven and refuge on the Gulf Coast for generations of the Murphy family. Presqu’ile Winery, named in honor of that place, produces elegant Santa Maria Valley pinot noir, chardonnay, sauvignon blanc and syrah. Enjoy these estate grown wines, food pairings and views of the valley in the relaxed, yet refined tasting room. Open Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 5391 Presquile Dr., 805/937-8110 presquilewine.com

1280 Drum Canyon Rd., 805/693-0744

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WINE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

Rancho Sisquoc Winery

Koehler Winery

6600 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/934-4332

5360 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/693-8384

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery

Zaca Mesa Winery

6020 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/937-8340

6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/688-9339

Tres Hermanas Winery

IN-TOWN TASTING

IN-TOWN TASTING

2933 Grand Ave., Ste. A, 805/686-1144

9660 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/937-8451

Alta Maria Vineyards

Ca’ Del Grevino

Alexander & Wayne

2510 E. Clark Ave., Santa Maria, 805/621-5889

2922 Grand Ave., 805/688-9665

Costa De Oro

Arthur Earl Winery

1331 S. Nicholson Ave., Santa Maria, 805/922-1468 Core Wine Co.

105 W. Clark Ave., Old Orcutt, 805/937-1600

Santa Ynez Valley Ballard This charming wine country inn offers a selection of difficult to find boutique wines produced locally by family owned, small production wineries.

2922 Grand Ave., 805/693-1771 4

Andrew Murray Vineyards

Andrew Murray—a grape-growing pioneer and Rhône varietal visionary in Santa Barbara County—founded his winery in 1990, planting a hillside vineyard dedicated exclusively to Rhône varieties. Murray and his team look forward to sharing the AMV experience at their newly remodeled winery and visitor center along Foxen Canyon Road. Open 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/686-9604 AndrewMurrayVineyards.com

2436 E. Baseline Ave., 805/688-7770

Buellton The largest custom-crush operation in the area shares geography with tasting rooms in Buellton, located just off Highway 101, it's the eastern gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills area. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Lafond Winery & Vineyards

6855 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/688-7921

Barbieri Wine Co.

2369 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/688-8882 Bernat Vineyards & Winery

2879 Grand Ave., 805/688-7265 Bien Nacido Vineyards

2963 Grand Ave., Ste. B, 805/691-9913 Blair Fox Cellars

2902 San Marcos Ave., Ste. B, 805/691-1678 Byron

2367 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/938-7365

IN-TOWN TASTING

Ballard Inn Tasting Room

Artiste Winery & Tasting Studio

2948 Grand Ave., Studio E, 805/686-2626

Mosby Winery

9496 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/688-2415 IN-TOWN TASTING

Alma Rosa Winery

181 Industrial Way, Ste. C, 805/691-9395 Cold Heaven

92 Second St., Ste. A, 805/686-1343 Crawford Family Wines

92 Second St., Ste. G & H, 805/698-3889 Hartley-Ostini Hitching Post Winery

Carhartt Vineyard

2990 Grand Ave., 805/693-5100 Carina Cellars

2900 Grand Ave., Ste. A, 805/688-2459 Cinque Stelle Wineries

2982 Grand Ave., 805/686-4101 Consilience, Marianello & Tre Anelli Wines

2923 Grand Ave., 805/691-1020 Coquelicot Estate Winery

2884 Grand Ave., 805/688-1500

406 E. Hwy. 246, 805/688-8403 Ken Brown Wines

157 W. Hwy. 246, 805/688-9400 Point Concepción

420 E. Hwy. 246, 805/691-1300 Terravant Wine Co. (24 wineries under one roof)

35 Industrial Way, 805/686-9400

Los Olivos The historic village of Los Olivos is a hub for tasting rooms, interspersed with art galleries, boutique shops and cafés. It's a great place to stroll and relax, or drive north to enjoy the bucolic Foxen Canyon Wine Trail. 3

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Lafond Winery & Vineyards

TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Long known as Santa Barbara’s tastemaker, Pierre Lafond founded Santa Barbara County’s first winery since prohibition (now located in downtown Santa Barbara, two blocks from the beach). His 65 acres in the Sta. Rita Hills and 30 acres across the river have produced medal-awarded syrah, chardonnay, and a pinot noir that “is truly an expression” of the Sta. Rita Hills appellation. Open 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

2670 Ontiveros Rd., 805/688-8664

6855 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/688-7921 lafondwinery.com

Firestone Vineyard

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Andrew Murray Vineyards

5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/686-9604 Beckmen Vineyards Brander Vineyard

2401 N. Refugio Rd., 805/688-2455 Fess Parker Winery & Vineyard

6200 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/688-1545 5017 Zaca Station Rd., 805/688-3940

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Artiste Winery & Tasting Studio

Combining a reverence for tradition and a philosophy of winemaking as an artistic expression, this unique tasting room and art studio makes wines—all blends, like many wineries do in France, Italy and Spain—and labels them with beautiful works of impressionist art, each named after the title of the painting that graces its bottle. As owner and winemaker Bion Rice conveys in a video on his website, “people first arrive at Artiste, they are surprised.” The place is indeed special and so are the wines. Open 11 a.m.–5:30 p.m. 2948 Grand Ave., Studio E, 805/686-2626 artiste.com


Toretti Family Vineyard

2933 San Marcos Ave., Ste. 101, 805/688-8002

Santa Ynez Peaceful and rolling vistas of ranches and farms mingle with vineyards and tasting rooms along the country roads in this region, which is anchored by the town of Santa Ynez. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Bridlewood Estate Winery

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Sunstone Vineyards & Winery

Committed to growing wine grapes without the use of herbicides, pesticides, or synthetic fungicides, Sunstone’s 28-acre certified organic estate vineyard produces wine from “a vineyard in harmony with Earth’s cycles throughout the year.” Known for its Provenceinspired ambience and private event venues, Sunstone is the perfect destination for tastings and luxurious group experiences. Open 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 125 N. Refugio Rd., 805/688-9463 sunstonewinery.com

Daniel Gehrs Wines Dragonette Cellars

2445 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/693-0077 Dreamcôte Wine Co.

2933 San Marcos Ave., Ste. 107, 805/691-1200 Epiphany Cellars

2974 Grand Ave., 805/686-2424

Lincourt Vineyards

1711 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/688-8554 Rideau Vineyards

1562 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/688-0717 Rusack Vineyards

1819 Ballard Canyon Rd., 805/688-1278 Shoestring Vineyard & Winery

800 E. Hwy. 246, 805/693-8612

3555 Roblar Ave., 805/688-9000

IN-TOWN TASTING

Gainey Vineyard

Carivintas Winery

3950 E. Hwy. 246, 805/688-0558 Kalyra Winery

343 N. Refugio Rd., 805/693-8864 Roblar Winery & Vineyards

3010 Roblar Ave., 805/686-2603 Sunstone Vineyards & Winery

125 N. Refugio Rd., 805/688-9463 Vincent Vineyards

2370 N. Refugio Rd., 805/691-4200 IN-TOWN TASTING

Carr Vineyards and Winery

3563 Numancia St., Ste. 101, 805/688-5757 2939 Grand Ave., 805/693-9686

Buttonwood Farm Winery

1500 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/688-3032

Solvang "The Danish Capital of America,” Solvang is a quaint village full of shops, parks, hotels, bakeries, restaurants and wine tasting rooms. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Blackjack Ranch

2205 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/686-4492

476 First St., 805/693-4331 Casa Cassara

1607 Mission Dr., Ste. 112, 805/688-8691 Dascomb Cellars

1659 Copenhagen Dr., Ste. C, 805/691-9175 The Good Life/Baehner Fournier

1672 Mission Dr., 805/688-7111 Lions Peak

1659 Copenhagen Dr., 805/693-5466 Lucas & Lewellen Vineyards

1645 Copenhagen Dr., 805/686-9336 Presidio Winery

1603 Copenhagen Dr., Ste. 1, 805/693-8585 Royal Oaks Winery

1582 Mission Dr., 805/693-1740 Sevtap Winery

1622 Copenhagen Dr., 805/693-9200 Sort This Out Cellars

1636 Copenhagen Dr., 805/688-1717 Toccata

1665 Copenhagen Dr., 805/686-5506

Evans Ranch (Gainey)

2901 Grand Ave., 805/688-0558 J Ludlow Vineyard

2890 Grand Ave., 805/688-8989

LaFond Winery & Vineyards, Santa Maria

Kaena

2890 Grand Ave., 805/688-4069 Larner Wines

2900 Grand Ave., 805/688-8148 Qupé, Verdad & Ethan

2963 Grand Ave., Ste. B, 805/686-4200 Refugio Ranch

2990 Grand Ave., 805/688-5400 Saarloos & Sons

2971 Grand Ave., 805/688-1200 SAMsARA

2466 Alamo Pintado Ave., Ste. A, 805/331-2292 Semler Wines

2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/688-8105 Stolpman Vineyards & Winery

2434 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/688-0400 Tensley Wines

2900 Grand Ave., Ste. B, 805/688-6761 Tercero Wines

2445 Alamo Pintado Ave., Ste. 104, 805/245-9584 Tessa Marie Wines (E&TWines)

2901 Grand Ave., Ste. C, 805/688-6081

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FOOD & WINE

Riding the Wave to Success From seafood shack to successful restaurant empire, the Whites make it work with a recipe of hard work and dedication

IT’S NOT SUC H AN UNUSUAL STORY… a family-owned restaurant starts out with humble roots, overcomes hardships and eventually grows into a multi-business operation. However, Tom and Adam White, the father-and-son team behind such restaurants as Santa Barbara Shellfish Company and The Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach, know this abbreviated version lacks many of the details that led to where they are today. In the 1970s, Tom White was working as an assistant professor of marine biology at UC Santa Barbara when he became interested in the fishing industry. Drawn to the ocean and the independence that fishing

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allowed, he purchased a boat and began fishing lobster while learning the ins and outs of the local fishing business. He was soon hooked and, after noticing an absence in the local wholesale market, negotiated a lease on Stearns Wharf to open a small fish market of his own. In 1980, Santa Barbara Shellfish Company opened its doors, operating as a wholesale market—purchasing exclusively from local fishermen and their families—with a small counter-style restaurant component to sell freshly prepared seafood from the market’s small window. “What began as a humble place to grab a bite, for customers too timid to cook crustaceans

themselves, turned into an immensely popular spot in the summertime and on weekends,” shares Tom’s son, Adam, who spent much of his childhood helping out at SB Shellfish Co. and now manages operations of the family’s restaurants. “We’d routinely serve as many as 1,000 cups of our housemade New England clam chowder, which we churned out 25 gallons at a time.” Although Adam left for college at University of Colorado Boulder, he continued to help his dad run the business while in town over the summers, where he learned to appreciate the communal aspect of the restaurant. “We had ranch owners drop off

PHOTOS: COURTESY WHITE FAMILY

BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK


local Hass avocados and lemons that we’d use in our ceviche. We’d marinate local white sea bass in the juice of freshly squeezed lemons and stuff the truly amazing ceviche into those avocados. Everything was local and just a lot of fun.” All seemed to be going well until one fateful night in 1998 when a fire erupted on Stearns Wharf, consuming 420 feet of the wharf and completely destroying three businesses—Santa Barbara Shellfish Company included. Upon news of the family’s devastation, Adam decided to return to Santa Barbara to help his dad re-establish the business. While the Whites fully intended to

rebuild on the wharf, an opportunity to lease the space of a former Chart House caught Tom’s attention and within a year, the duo opened Santa Barbara FisHouse on Cabrillo Boulevard across the street from Stearns Wharf. “We hired a chef and a general manager, staff, did a minor remodel…but then within the first couple of months, both the chef and GM quit,” shares Adam. “Not only that, but we were very green and inexperienced in the restaurant business. There was a lot of stress, but we just had to manage it all by showing up, working hard and learning how to do everything from scratch.” Over the next year, the family endured several

Clockwise from top left: Adam and Tom White and shellfish made a winning combination way back when. Brunch at The Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach; Santa Barbara Shellfish Company; Ceviche from Casa Blanca and Uni from Santa Barbara Shellfish Company.

financial hardships, relying on friends and a dedicated staff that helped them make it despite being down to their last dollar on more than one occasion. “Talk about an underdog success story,” Adam can say now with a laugh. “People took chances on us as we learned more about the business. It was a rough few years, but eventually things just started to work out.” In October of 2000, the Whites reopened SB Shellfish Co. on the wharf as a restaurant that featured wine and beer, indoor seating and a proper cook line, while still retaining the window service component with picnic tables out front. After finally starting to see some success with both businesses, the Whites took over the former home of The Brown Pelican in 2008 to add a third restaurant to their portfolio, The Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach. Noticing the number of vacancies on State Street, they decided to take another risk in 2011, despite the bleak economic times, to open Casa Blanca, a sit-down Mexican restaurant with a large bar, loosely based on the lively Mexican restaurants Adam frequented in college. Although Casa Blanca was a departure from their other three seafood-focused restaurants, Adam explains that he and his dad weren’t afraid to face new challenges head on, adding, “and Santa Barbara loves its Mexican food, so it seemed like a great opportunity to venture into new territory.” The name Casa Blanca is a take on the “house” theme of their other restaurants, as well as the family’s last name. Today, each restaurant maintains separate identities, but “there’s a noticeable and fully intended common thread between all four locations. We want them all to be casual, simple and fun.” While the Whites have dominated the market on oceanfront (and over-water) dining in Santa Barbara, they don’t seem too eager to slow down the momentum they’ve built. “We aren’t ruling out the possibility of another restaurant in the future,” shares Adam. “We are constantly throwing ideas back and forth. The restaurant business is truly fun for us. If you don’t love the business, you can’t handle the challenges that come with owning a restaurant, but if you do love it, you come alive during the most challenging moments.” 

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DINING OUT

DINING OUT

The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/blog/restaurant-guide.

O U R F AVO R I T E R E S TA U R A N T S I N S A N TA B A R B A R A , M O N T E C I T O, G O L E TA A N D S A N TA Y N E Z VA L L E Y

Montecito Bella Vista (Contemporary Italian) at the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore commands panoramic ocean views across Montecito’s Butterfly Beach and promises top notch cuisine and impeccable service. Guests enjoy a contemporary Italian menu showcasing fresh California ingredients. It’s also home to one of the most celebrated Sunday brunches in the U.S. 1260 Channel Dr., 805/969-2261. $$$–$$$$

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Cava (Mexican) serves the bold flavors of Spain, Mexico and Latin America in a charming setting with classic margaritas and martinis from the bar amid the sounds of Spanish guitar. Enjoy the vibrant outdoor patio, romantic dining room or cozy fireplace—the décor, menu and staff reflect the sophisticated yet casual character of Montecito. 1212 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-8500. $$–$$$

Lucky’s (American) offers steaks, chops and seafood as well as chicken entrées, wonderful salads, six different potato dishes and beautiful desserts. The wine list runs to the extravagant. The adjacent bar is a favorite among locals. 1279 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-7540. $$$–$$$$ Montecito Wine Bistro (Californian) is a casual yet sophisticated spot to sit on the outdoor patio or cozy up to the fireplace and nibble wine-friendly food, including flatbreads from the wood-burning oven, grilled steaks and chops, roasted chicken, savory pot pies and juicy burgers, along with fresh salads and sandwiches. Sip wines by the glass or the flight, or a cocktail. 516 San Ysidro Rd., 805/969-7520. $$–$$$

Stella Mare’s (French) pairs a beautiful Victorian building with stylish, Normandy-inspired cuisine. The glassencased greenhouse’s panoramic view and fireside couches make it a perfect spot for listening to Wednesday night jazz. 50 Los Patos Way, 805/969-6705. $$–$$$ 90

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- Stonehouse Restaurant (American) is located in a 19th-century citrus-packing house on the grounds of San Ysidro Ranch. Stonehouse has a full bar and a menu emphasizing local fish and produce. Open daily for dinner only $$$$. Plow and Angel (American) is a cozy restaurant attached to the bar at San Ysidro Ranch and is well-known for its comfort food. 900 San Ysidro Ln., 805/565-1720. $$$

Trattoria Mollie (Italian) is a charming standby for locals-in-theknow. The dynamic cuisine consists of recipes that Mollie gathered during her years of training with “the best chefs in Italy.” 1250 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-9381. $$$

Tre Lune (Italian) offers a delicious menu that isn’t afraid of flavor. The high quality, genuine Italian cuisine includes excellent minestrone soup, fall-off-the-fork ossobuco, basil pesto, lobster ravioli and more. 1151 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-2646. $$$

Santa Barbara Waterfront

- Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach (Seafood) serves locally caught, fresh seafood specialties. Dine inside or al fresco with one of the best ocean views in Santa Barbara. Full bar and regional wine list. 2981 Cliff Dr., 805/898-2628. $$–$$$

Brophy Bros. (Seafood) has long been one of Santa Barbara’s most popular eateries and is located at the harbor with excellent views. You’ll find great shellfish cocktails and fresh fish here. 119 Harbor Way, 805/966-4418. $$ Chuck’s Waterfront Grill (Steaks & Fish House) serves prime-grade top sirloin steaks and Australian lobster tail among many other delicious offerings. The restaurant’s lively upstairs extension,

The Endless Summer bar-café

(Seafood), has two terraces for al fresco dining on more casual fare. 113 Harbor Way, 805/564-1200. $$–$$$

vegetarian items are served daily. Breakfast served on weekends. 801 Shoreline Dr., 805/568-0064. $$

Convivo Restaurant and Bar

Toma Restaurant and Bar (Italian) is a romantic spot to savor excellent Italian and Mediterranean dishes from Santa Barbara’s seasonal bounty while enjoying warm and attentive service and a view of the enchanting Santa Barbara harbor. 324 W. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/962-0777. $$-$$$

(Italian) located across from East Beach on the ground floor of the historic Santa Barbara Inn, draws its inspiration from Santa Barbara’s bounty of seafood and meats prepared “Nomad Italian” style by Chef Peter McNee. Sit on the outdoor patio for al fresco dining with a view of the Channel Islands. 901 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-6789. $$-$$$

Downtown Arigato Sushi (Japanese) provides

The Harbor Restaurant and Longboard’s Grill (Seafood) on Stearns Wharf are two different experiences from one great vantage point. The Harbor is a romantic oceanview restaurant and Longboard’s is a noisy, energy-packed bar and grill. 210 Stearns Wharf, 805/963-3311. $$–$$$

Rodney’s Grill (American) Located in the Fess Parker A Doubletree by Hilton Resort, Rodney’s menu spotlights naturally raised meats and poultry, seasonal produce and sustainable seafood—all paired with wines from the finest local vineyards. 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/884-8554. $$$

- Santa Barbara FisHouse (Seafood) serves fresh local fish in a lively setting. Gathering with friends on the dining terrace with ocean views is the perfect way to start the weekend. Be sure to order lobster during the season from these “lobster specialists.” 101 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/966-2112. $$

Santa Barbara Shellfish Co. (Seafood) is a fun, no-frills seafoodlover’s paradise. Select your dinner fresh from the tanks or from that day’s catch just steps from the ocean. 230 Stearns Wharf, 805/966-6676. $$

Shoreline Beach Café (Mexican, Seafood) is a lively, open-air beach restaurant. Salads, burgers, fish tacos, fresh seafood and

designer sushi from inventive chefs. Daily specials explore the limitless varieties of this Japanese delicacy. 1225 State St., 805/965-6074. $$$

Arnoldi’s Café (Italian) specializes in traditional homestyle Italian cuisine, featuring the freshest local produce and seafood, imported Italian meats, cheeses and olive oils, as well as an extensive wine list, bocce courts and a heated patio. 600 Olive St., 805/962-5394. $$$ Benchmark Eatery (Seafood, American) is a casual eatery that does American fare proud, with everything from soul-satisfying pastas, pizzas, grilled ahi and fish and chips to fresh salads, juicy burgers and generous sandwiches. 1201 State St., 805/845-2600, $-$$ Black Sheep (Californian) has a cool, casual vibe, but serves seriously good farm-to-table food. Try scallop crudo, roasted bone marrow or re-constructed chicken stuffed with walnuts and dried apricots. 26 E. Ortega St., 805/965-1113, $$$

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bouchon (Californian French) serves “Santa Barbara Wine Country” cuisine complemented by a remarkable wine list that includes more than 50 Central Coast wines by the glass. Open for dinner nightly. 9 W. Victoria St., 805/730-1160. $$$


Ca’Dario (Italian) promises fine Italian cuisine, whether pasta, fish or fowl—don’t miss the ravioli pillows with brown butter and sage sauce and, when in season, grilled asparagus wrapped with pancetta—and an extensive wine list. A few doors down, Ca’Dario Pizzeria features a tasty array of pizzas, including gluten-free options. 37 E. Victoria St., 805/884-9419. $$$ Carlitos Café y Cantina (Mexican) offers exciting regional Mexican cuisine and 100% blue agave Margaritas, along with fresh, imaginative Mexican grilled specialties that borrow from Pueblo, Mayan and Aztec cultures. 1324 State St., 805/962-7117. $$ Casa Blanca Restaurant & Cantina (Mexican) is a fun Mexican hot spot with killer Margaritas, tasty tacos, ample enchiladas and other classic south-of-theborder inspired fare. 330 State St., 805/845-8966. $$ China Pavilion (Chinese) features highquality traditional Chinese food, as well as a delicious dim sum brunch on weekends. 1202 Chapala St., 805/560-6028. $$

- Downey’s (Californian) is an intimate restaurant that has received numerous accolades and is widely considered one of California’s finest. With just 14 tables and a menu that changes daily, owner/chef John Downey creates matchless nouvelle cuisine. Open for dinner only, Tues.–Sun. 1305 State St., 805/966-5006. $$$$

Enterprise Fish Co. (Seafood) is one of Santa Barbara’s largest and busiest seafood restaurants. In an exhilarating, nautical atmosphere are an oyster bar and a variety of fresh fish that are mesquite-broiled and served at reasonable prices. 225 State St., 805/962-3313. $$

Finch & Fork (Californian) in the Canary Hotel offers hearty items like buttermilk fried chicken and lighter fare, complete with farm-fresh salads, fresh oysters and yummy flatbreads. 31 W. Carrillo St., 805/879-9100. $$–$$$ Intermezzo Bar/Café (Californian) serves local wines on tap, craft cocktails and light fare such as burgers, flatbreads, salads and desserts ‘til late. An array of small plates to share—including cheese and charcuterie offerings, oysters, mussels, steak bites and the most amazing crispy cauliflower—make this a perfect pre- or post-theater stop. 819 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$–$$$ Jane (Californian) offers upscale, fresh, tasty fare that runs the gamut from huge seasonal salads and gourmet burgers to fish and chips with chipotle ketchup and creamy dill. The delicious goat cheese pancakes with smoked salmon and caviar are crafted from a family recipe. 1311 State St., 805/962-1311. $$

WELLNESS IS IN THE AIR

Joe’s Café (American) is a Santa Barbara

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COME REVIVE WITH US JUNE 7-10, 2017 RETREAT DETAILS (805) 565-8299


DINING OUT

Breakfast • Lunch Dinner • Cocktails

icon known for its stiff cocktails and raucous atmosphere. The menu of American classics includes steaks, sandwiches and Mexican specialties. Lunch and dinner served daily; breakfast served weekends. 536 State St., 805/966-4638. $$

The Lark (American) delights with Chef Jason Paluska’s sophisticated family-style plates designed to share and made with the freshest possible local “farm-to-fork” ingredients, along with creative cocktails and a wonderful wine selection. Dinner, Tues.–Sun. 131 Anacapa St., 805/284-0370. $$–$$$

The Little Door (French Mediterranean) is a romantic haven for farm fresh cuisine inspired by the atmosphere and eclecticism of French Mediterranean kitchens. Overlooking the breathtaking Courthouse Sunken Garden, this is a lovely spot to enjoy a unique dining experience and celebrate Santa Barbara’s Joie De Vivre. 129 E. Anapamu St., 805/560-8002. $$$–$$$$

2981 Cliff Drive (805) 898-2628 www.boathousesb.com

- Loquita (Spanish) specializes in authentic Spanish food, including hot and cold tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats, and three types of paella. Executive Chef Peter Lee’s innovative cuisine has a California twist and is complimented with a full bar of Spanish and local wines and spirits. 202 State St., 805/880-3380. $$-$$$

Louie’s (Californian), located inside Santa Barbara’s oldest operating hotel, The Upham, reflects the charm and tradition of its location. You’ll find extraordinary fresh seafood, pastas, filet mignon and a changing menu of specialties, with options to dine outside on a beautiful wrap-around porch or inside at tables next to paned windows or booths, several of which are tucked into intimate alcoves. 1404 De La Vina St., 805/963-7003. $$–$$$

“We found Downey’s, hands down, to be the best bet in town. ”

—FOOD AND WINE MAGAZINE

Olio e Limone (Italian) uses only the freshest ingredients for simply delicious preparations. Tuck into a plate of housemade ravioli filled with roasted eggplant and goat cheese, topped with a fresh tomato and basil sauce and shaved ricotta salata. Olio Pizzeria offers a casual pizza bar, wine and cocktails next door, while Olio Crudo Bar offers cocktails and sashimi with an Italian accent! 11 W. Victoria St. #17, 805/899-2699 ext. 1. $$$

SINCE 1982

1305 State Street | Santa Barbara

Dinner Tuesday – Sunday from 5:30

— RESERVATIONS —

805.966.5006 www.downeyssb.com

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Nectar (Californian) focuses on small and shareable plates using fresh and international flavors. Featuring an extensive local wine list and inventive cocktail flights to pair with luscious food, Nectar is great spot for a quick bite or a long and lingering evening. 20 E. Cota St., 805/899-4694. $$–$$$

Opal (Californian) is a classic European-style bistro serving eclectic California cuisine complemented by a wood-burning pizza oven, an extensive wine list and full bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1325 State St., 805/966-9676. $$ Oveja Blanca (South American) is a labor of love for the Perez family, who capture the essence of many


B E L M O N D E L E N C A N T O , S A N TA B A R B A R A Latin cultures and countries through food and drink in this innovative restaurant. Dig into creative cuisine like Deep Fried Frog Leg Tamal and Ham and Chocolate Croquettes for a taste adventure you won’t forget. 34 E. Ortega St., 805/963-1012. $$$$

The Palace Grill (Cajun) is a place resonating

WINEMAKER DINNER SERIES

with jazz music that creates the perfect setting for spicy food and spirited service to chase the blues away. Features authentic Louisiana specialities like jambalaya, crawfish etouffée and blackened steaks and seafood. 8 E. Cota St., 805/963-5000. $$–$$$

Paradise Café (American) is located downtown in a unique old building with wall murals from the 1940s. It has one of Santa Barbara’s favorite patios for dining and a bar that will take you back in time with cocktails of your choice and a well-selected wine and beer list. 702 Anacapa St., 805/962-4416. $$ Petit Valentien (French), with its quaint atmosphere and intimate setting, is hidden away in a small corner of La Arcada. Be sure to check out the prix fixe menu only available on Sundays. 1114 State St. #16, 805/966-0222. $$

Petros (Greek) is home to Hellenic-California cuisine and one of the prettiest patios in town. Owner Petros Benekos gives traditional Hellenic recipes a contemporary California spin. Entrée hits include tender feta-crusted rack of lamb and fresh sautéed sea bass, along with Greek classics. 1316 State St. 805/899-9100. $$-$$$

Somerset (European), an old-world-style grand café created by Steve Hermann Hotels and Restaurants, has gorgeous décor that pairs well with Chef Lauren Herman’s menu, emphasizing the bounty of the Santa Barbara coast. 7 E. Anapamu St., 805/845-7112. $$$$

Viva (Mexican) indulges your senses with its modern Mexican cuisine, beautiful courtyard patio and inviting dining room in the historic La Arcada. Taco happy hour (Mon.-Fri. from 3-6 p.m.) is a perfect time to sample creative tacos and other antojitos, or “small cravings,” along with the raw bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh shellfish. 1114 State St., 805/965-4770. $$

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Join us at our next Winemaker Dinner Belmond El Encanto's Executive Chef Johan Denizot has married his regionally inspired cuisine with the exquisitely produced local Santa Barbara County wines and presents these glorious epicurean events. Gather for a welcome reception at 6:30pm, followed by a gastronomic tasting menu where each course is expertly paired with each label's complement in mind. The Winemaker Dinner Series will take place at The Dining Room at Belmond El Encanto and is $120 per person. For reservations, please call 805 770 3530.

DAOU VINEYARDS – JUNE 29TH

SANDHI WINES – JULY 19TH

Wine Cask (Californian) in the historic El Paseo complex offers a beautiful spot to enjoy fine dining and exceptional service in a relaxed setting. Don’t miss the stellar wine selections, including an impressive variety of local wines on tap. 813 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$$

Uptown

- Belmond El Encanto (Coastal-Californian) presents California coastal cuisine and seasonal favorites from executive chef Johan Denizot, featuring specialties like fresh local oysters, pan seared diver scallops and short ribs sous vide alongside stunning Santa Barbara views. Sit under

800 ALVARADO PLACE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 | 805 845 5800 HOTELS | TRAINS | RIVER CRUISES | JOURNEYS | BELMOND.COM

EE Santa Barbara Magazine Winemakers Dinners 2/3-page ad 0417.indd 1

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the stars on the terrace or in the elegant dining room. 800 Alvarado Pl., 805/770-3530. $$$-$$$$

Chuck’s of Hawaii (American) is the home of California’s first salad bar and offers award-winning steaks and fresh seafood right from the grill. A local favorite hangout since 1967. 3888 State St., 805/687-4417. $$ Crocodile Restaurant (Italian/Californian), a local’s secret found at the Lemon Tree Inn, offers a chic, relaxing atmosphere with a full cocktail bar and kitchen. A great spot for watching a sporting match or catching up with a friend. Breakfast, lunch and dinner served daily. 2819 State St., 805/687-6444. $$-$$$­ Le Café Stella (French-American) is perched across from Santa Barbara Golf Club and is a neighborhood hot spot for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour— try the juicy burgers on brioche buns or heart-warming coq au vin. 3302 McCaw Ave., 805/569-7698. $$ Lure Fish House (Seafood) specializes in fresh and sustainable seafood from trusted sources and locally caught seafood, organically grown local produce, and wines from local vineyards whenever possible. 3815 State St., 805/618-1816. $$-$$$

The Tee-Off (American) is a friendly steak and seafood restaurant and lounge with a long history of local appreciation that features a short but sweet menu of steaks, chops, chicken and seafood. 3627 State St., 805/687-1616. $$-$$$

Goleta Angel Oak (French-Californian) ) is a modern steak and seafood restaurant housed at Bacara Resort & Spa. Angel Oak showcases the culinary knowledge and classical training of Parisian Executive Chef Vincent Lesage, featuring classic steakhouse dishes with a uniquely Santa Barbara interpretation as part of a diverse menu of locally-sourced fare—including Santa Barbara’s famously fresh uni and the restaurant’s certified Kobe and dry-aged beef program. 8301 Hollister Ave., 866/654-5879. $$$-$$$$

TAPAS PINTXOS PAELLA 202 State Street Santa Barbara, Ca 93101 (805) 880-3380 loquitasb.com 94

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Jane at the Marketplace (Californian) presents flavorful fare for lunch and dinner including steak, chicken and pasta in cozy surroundings. This is a bright, sunny space known for its friendly service and authentic family recipes. 6940 Marketplace Dr., 805/770-5388. $$ Outpost (Californian) is a casual, hip spot at the Goodland Hotel. The excellent seasonal menu includes shareable plates, entrees and fresh salads, as well as fish tacos with battered halibut, flat iron steak with salsa verde, pork bao buns and a caper-studded Caesar salad with grilled romaine. 5650 Calle Real, 805/964-1288. $$-$$$


DINING OUT Santa Ynez Mountains Cold Spring Tavern (American) is an iconic establishment virtually unchanged since the days of the stagecoach run that has served excellent food—including wild game—to hungry locals and travelers alike for more than 100 years. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 5995 Stagecoach Rd., 805/967-0066. $$$

Santa Ynez Valley The Bear and Star (American) at Fess Parker’s Wine Country Inn takes its name from the two states Parker called home, Texas and California, celebrating refined ranch cuisine paired with California’s bounty. 2860 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/686-1359. $$–$$$S Bottlest Bistro (American) is an upscale, contemporary eatery featuring eclectic small plates and entrees, plus a choose-your-own wine wall with 52 constantly changing wines available by the taste, half glass or full glass. 35 Industrial Way, Buellton, 805/686-4742. $$-$$$ Brothers Restaurant at the Red Barn (American) offers innovative “made from scratch” cuisine in this exquisitely refurbished barn. The hearty menu offers American classics like chops, prime rib, and chicken-fried steak. Lunch and dinner served daily.  3539 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-4142. $$-$$$$

duck and ostrich plus seafood on the menu. 406 E. Hwy. 246, Buellton, 805/688-0676. $$$–$$$$ Los Olivos Café and Wine Merchant (Californian) is a casual restaurant in one of the town’s original Main Street buildings. The thoughtful menu of homemade pizzas and California cuisine is complemented with an enormous list of wines from the adjacent store. 2879 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-7265. $$ Root 246 (American), located at Hotel Corque, features innovative cuisine emphasizing local, seasonal ingredients to create the ultimate in farmto-table cuisine. In addition to a full menu of craftbased cuisine, Root 246 has one of the area’s most extensive selections of local wines, whiskey and craft beers, as well as refreshing signature cocktails. Try the Sunday brunch for a delicious weekend experience. 420 Alisol Rd., Solvang, 805/686-8681. $$-$$$ Sides Hardware & Shoes—A Brothers Restaurant (American) is located in a restored 1901 building where chef-owners and brothers Jeff and Matt Nichols turn out hearty American favorites with original gourmet twists. 2375 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-4820. $$–$$$ S.Y. Kitchen (Italian) is a charming “California

version of a little Italian farmhouse” with a focus on unfussy rustic Italian food made from fresh, local ingredients. Expect inventive salads, woodfired pizzas and house-made pastas with everything from seasonal seafood to duck ragu. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez, 805/691-9794. $$-$$$ Trattoria Grappolo (Italian) is a great destination for gourmet pizzas from a wood-burning oven, housemade pastas, fresh salads made with local produce and nightly specials. Grappolo features a list of more than 150 wines from around the world. Open daily for dinner and for lunch Tues.-Sun. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-6899. $$-$$$ The Vineyard House (American) offers local farm fresh cuisine in a charming Victorian house that dates back to the days when the Santa Ynez Valley’s world-class vineyards were just a dream. 3631 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-2886. $$$

- The Willows at Chumash Casino Resort (American) is a AAA Four Diamond Award-winner

specializing in mouthwatering prime steaks and seafood. The elegance of this exquisite dining room is matched by incomparable views of the rolling Santa Ynez hills. 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez, 805/686-0855. $$$–$$$$

Dos Carlitos Restaurant & Tequila Bar (Mexican) brings bold Mexican and Latin flavors to the valley. An open-fire grill imparts a smoky essence to authentic grilled specials, delicious salsas and the aroma of fresh handmade tortillas. 3544 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-0033. $$ First & Oak (Fusion) distinguishes itself with beautifully prepared, elegant small plates designed to pair with fine wines and allow guests to taste multiple, exciting dishes in a single sitting. Housed in the charming Mirabelle Inn, this modern American restaurant has a European influence as well as a Californian emphasis on food that is seasonal, local and sustainable. 409 First St., Solvang, 805/688-1703. $$$

modern american cuisine LOUNGE OPEN DAILY

|

DINING NIGHTLY

reservations recommended

The Gathering Table at Ballard Inn (California Fusion) is Owner/Chef Budi Kazali’s new concept, which offers a fun and inviting place to gather over incredible food that’s meant to be shared in a warm and inviting modern farmhouse atmosphere. 2436 Baseline Ave., Ballard, 805/688-7770. $$-$$$$ The Hitching Post (American) is an old-fashioned, western-style steakhouse and lounge just a few minutes off Hwy. 101. In addition to Newport Meat Company beef, there are also ribs, quail, turkey,

3400 East Highway 246, Santa Ynez | ChumashCasino.com | 800.248.6274

SUMMER 2017

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Lake Cachuma, May 3, 2017 Photograph by Henry L. Fechtman

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NEW STORES & Pop-Up Shops!

See what’s happening now:

@ShopPaseoNuevo PaseoNuevoShopping.com • Call or Text our Guest Services at 805-900-7385 Located on State Street between Canon Perdido and Ortega Streets • Convenient Parking • Valet Available


Compass 1101 Coast Village Road Montecito, CA 93108

The Morehart Group Pairing the industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most innovative technology with unsurpassed local expertise, The Morehart Group delivers the most intelligent and sophisticated real estate experience in Santa Barbara and Montecito.

805.689.7233

Pippa Davis | Mitch Morehart | Beverly Palmer | Susan Pate TheMorehartGroup.com CalBRE 00828316

805.253.7700 | compass.com Compass is a licensed real estate broker (01991628) in the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. To reach the Compass main office call 805.253.7700

Santa Barbara SEASONS Magazine, Summer 2017  

Santa Barbara Seasons is a resource for locals and visitors alike with lush visuals, engaging features and invaluable information on events,...

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