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C E L E B R A T I N G L I F E & C U L T U R E O N T H E C E N T R A L C O A S T | fall

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F E A T U R E S 51 The Essence of Santa Barbara Style

64 Montecito Foothills Meet French Country Chic By Nancy Ransohoff / Photos by Amy Barnard

By Nancy Ransohoff / Photos by Jim Bartsch

58 Here’s Your Moment of Zen By Nancy Ransohoff

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Photos by Amy Barnard and Nancy Neil

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70 The New Paso Robles By Cheryl Crabtree 76 Pebble Beach Takes Luxury to New Levels By Leslie Dinaberg

PHOTO: JIM BARTSCH

52 Sophisticated Spanish Style


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ANN JAMES N T E R I O R

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PHOTOS: (L-R) ERIN FEINBLATT, CARA ROBBINS, ECLIPSE PRODUCTION STUDIOS

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DEPARTMENTS

42 First Person Natalie Orfalea’s

16 Editor’s Letter + Editor’s Picks

17 Local Lowdown Cider Spotlight, Cycling Fun, Wine that Gives Back, Ranch Table Gatherings, New Restaurants, Horseback Riding Fun, Montecito’s New Art Gallery, Hip Camping Haunts, The Faces of Dyslexia, Outdoor Concerts and More!

32 Datebook and Cultural Calendar Performing and Visual Arts and Other Favorite Events for Fall

34 On Exhibit Featured Artists at Local Galleries

41 Poetry “Autumn Morning” BY PEG QUINN

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Call 2 Action BY NANCY SHOBE

44 Rearview Mirror UCSB College of Creative Studies Celebrates 50 Years BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK

46 Legacies Beyond the Classroom With UCSB Arts and Lectures BY CHUCK GR AHAM

48 Legacies The Lasting Impact of Anthony Bourdain BY LESLIE DINABERG

80 Tee it up! Golf in Santa Barbara County

82 Our Guide to Santa Barbara Urban Wineries

84 Wine Country Harvest Tales By Wendy Thies Sell With Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County Wine Maps

90 Explore Santa Barbara County 40 great things to do in Santa Barbara, Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria, Goleta, Back Country, Santa Ynez, Solvang and Los Olivos

96 Chef’s Table New recipes from the Mixologist at S.Y. Kitchen and the Chef at Tyger Tyger

98 Our Dining Out Guide to Favorite Area Restaurants in Santa Barbara County

104 My Santa Barbara

ON THE COVER SANTA BARBARA SEASONS: FROM “MONTECITO FOOTHILLS MEET FRENCH COUNTRY CHIC,” PHOTO BY AMY BARNARD COASTAL SEASONS: FROM “HERE’S YOUR MOMENT OF ZEN,” PHOTO BY NANCY NEIL


FA L L 2 018 • VO LU M E L X • N U M B E R 3

PUBLISHER

Brian Kramer M ANAGING EDITOR

Leslie Dinaberg A R T  D I R E C T O R

Dan Levin DISTRIBUTION M ANAGER

Raymond Rangel COPY EDITOR

Laurie Jervis CONTRIBUTING EDITORS FOOD

Nancy Ransohoff

POETRY

David Starkey

TRAVEL/SLO COUNTY STYLE

Cheryl Crabtree

Judy Foreman

CALENDAR EDITOR

Michelle Jarrard CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Cheryl Crabtree, Leslie Dinaberg, Chuck Graham, Delaney Mayfield, Cheri Rae, Nancy Ransohoff, Hana-Lee Sedgwick, Ashley Self, Wendy Thies Sell, Nancy Shobe, Peggy Quinn CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGR APHERS

Amy Barnard, Jim Bartsch, Monie deWit, Josh T. Meadows, Nancy Neil, Wendy Thies Sell EDITORIAL INTERNS

Emily Calcara, Chloe Hamer, Taryna Hollinger, Tatiana Karme-Scalisi, Samantha Lee, Delaney Mayfield, Josh T. Meadows, Emma Sheridan, Sabrina Stroot

Copyright 2018, Tiger Oak Media, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from the publisher. S U B S C R I B E Santa Barbara Seasons and Coastal Seasons offer an annual subscription for $15 for four quarterly issues. To subscribe, visit our website at sbseasons.com/subscribe. Your subscription will automatically begin with the WINTER 2018 edition.

For advertising information, please contact the publisher, brian.kramer@sbseasons.com.

The International Association of Professional Landscape Designers has named Margie Grace 2018 Designer of the Year

Editorial and advertising offices: 829 De la Vina Street, Suite 210, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Telephone 805/564-8804. Fax 805/564-8802. Printed in the USA. sbseasons.com

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GREEN BUILDING FEATURE

KEEPIN’ IT COOL

A

s we experience sweltering heat waves more frequently on the Central Coast, many of us are getting knocked out of our “no A/C needed” comfort zones. The downside is that air conditioning draws significant electrical power generated mostly from fossil fuels, thus exacerbating global warming. Even when powered by renewable energy, the production of any AC equipment can use a lot of resources. Since most of us have limited tolerance for hot weather, if you are a sustainably minded homeowner, it is important to consider natural cooling strategies along with air conditioning when seeking ways to cool your home. Many natural cooling techniques boil down to one basic principle: keep air moving. Funneling afternoon breezes through homes when you can is ideal. You can optimize the channeling of these breezes by carefully selecting the location and types of windows and doors. A combination of small low inlets and larger outlets achieves the best and fastest indoor air movement. A ratio of 1:3 is ideal. Another way to keep air moving is to install Casablanca ceiling fans in the main rooms of a house. If a room has a central ceiling light, a combined fan-light fixture can easily replace it. The effectiveness of ventilation can be further enhanced by pre-cooling the air before it enters the home. Trees can both shade windows and cool the afternoon air currents. Deciduous trees are best, because they shed their leaves in winter to allow the sun and its warmth in. Moisture evaporating from a pond, fountain or supplied by a mister also remove heat from air. Trellises, building overhangs and awnings are simple yet effective strategies for keeping a building cool by limiting solar gain. Exterior shade screens prevent direct sunlight from striking a window. Awnings block light and heat whereas shade screens allow some light through. Another consideration is your home’s color. Dark-colored exteriors absorb 70-90 percent of the sun’s radiant energy, some of which is transferred into the exterior walls resulting in heat gain. In contrast, light-colored exteriors reflect most of the heat away. You might also want to consider adding insulation to your existing walls and attic. In most cases, this is less expensive than installing air conditioning equipment and helps to keep the house not only cool but also quiet (or warm when desired). It is important to use a professional installer in order to achieve a complete, high-performance thermal barrier. For more information, call, click or visit Allen Construction. Santa Barbara | San Luis Obispo | Ventura 805.884.8777 | buildallen.com The Central Coast’s leading green building experts since 1983.


FALL EDITOR’S LETTER

“I’ve never known anyone who doesn’t suffer a certain restlessness when autumn rolls around …. We’re all eight years old again and anything is possible.” —SUE GR AFTON

Fall Editor’s Picks Santa Barbara Studio Artists Tour takes place on Labor Day weekend this year (Sept. 1-3). It’s always a treat to peek inside the diverse array of local artists’ homes. With 30+ artists participating this year, collectors are sure to find something to suit their style. santabarbarastudioartists.com I love Lucy, and I’ve always loved the episode where she gets to stomp the grapes. So I’m super excited about a new event this year—the Solvang Stomp— where we’ll have the opportunity to stomp grapes barefoot in vats, sip tastes from dozens of area wineries, dance to live music, drink pink in the “I Love Rosé Lounge” and more on Oct. 13. SolvangUSA.com/stomp I’m a huge fan of public art and Pianos on State—where local artists transform pianos into unique, interactive works of art for all of us to play with—is one of my absolute faves. Make your own kind of music Oct. 2-24 at various locations in Downtown Santa Barbara. … and while you’re there, go out and give our local retailers some love as well!

Web Exclusives We went crazy for interactive maps this summer, as our awesome intern team created brand new interactive online guides for: Explore Santa Barbara County – 40 great things to do Explore SLO County – 25 great things to do Urban Wine Tasting Rooms in Santa Barbara – 44 unique and eclectic tasting rooms to begin your wine-tasting journey through the area Santa Barbara County Wineries – 20 “can’t miss” wineries where you can taste at the vineyard

Leslie Dinaberg MANAGING EDITOR

leslie@sbseasons.com

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SBSEASONS.COM

SLO County Wineries – 40 recommended wineries where you can taste Check them all out at sbseasons.com and let us know what you think.

PHOTOS: (TOP-BOTTOM) ZAK KLOBUCHER, COURTESY CBS, COURTESY SB STUDIO ARTISTS, ART FISHER. OPPOSITE: COURTESY BRISTOLS CIDER HOUSE

NO MATTER HOW MANY YEARS

I’ve been out of school, when fall rolls around, I always feel like I’m starting a brand-new semester, with pencils sharpened, ready to fill the page with notes in a brand-new notebook. Planning a new issue of the magazine always feels a little bit like that first day of school, where the sky’s the limit and the world is full of endless possibilities. Trying to capture the essence of life in Santa Barbara on these pages is both a joy and a challenge, but thankfully I have lots of help from our wonderful writers, photographers and team members. It also helps that we live in such a gorgeous place—where the rugged mountains and gentle foothills meet the deep blue sky in one direction, and the palm tree-dotted seashores meet the ever-changing coastline in the other—there truly is beauty wherever you look. And as the three homes showcased in our special design section illustrate, that beauty extends both indoors and out. As these stunners from Interior Designers Penny Bianchi, Jodi Goldberg and Ann James demonstrate, chic and stylish homes come in all sorts of shapes and styles and sizes. Fall is traditionally harvest time and we’ve got some great “Harvest Tales” to reveal from some of our region’s most respected winemakers, as well as an expanded new map of Urban Wine Tasting Rooms in Santa Barbara. We’ve also got some great getaways to share this issue, from the ultra luxurious Pebble Beach to hip new options for private camping trips. Every season has its own delights, and I hope you’ll have more than your fill of fun this fall. Cheers!


IDER CSPOTLIGHT BY WENDY THIES SELL

Neil Collins, the Central Coast’s first modern-day cider maker, opened Bristols Cider House three years ago.


AUTUMN IS APPLE PICKING TIME

The Central Coast’s first modern-day cider maker was Neil Collins, the Tablas Creek and Lone Madrone winemaker who made his first batch of cider in Paso Robles in 1994, “which was long before anyone had any interest in cider,” he recalls. Named after his hometown, Bristol, England, Collins opened Bristols Cider House (bristolscider.com) in Atascadero three years ago; it’s a pub atmosphere with live music and food vendors. “It started with a lot of ladies drinking it. Then local winemakers. Lately the gluten free thing has become so big it’s a big plus for the cider industry, a viable alternative to beer.” Collins presses his own locally-grown apples, “so, they are sweet and full of sunshine.” His cider is rooted in tradition but Collins also gets creative, aging small batches in bourbon or spirit barrels. Eight different Bristols ciders are on tap daily. In Goleta, Ben Schroeder found himself with enough family and friends avoiding gluten that he decided to create a beer-like beverage with gluten-free ingredients. He started Santa Barbara Cider Company (sbcider.com) and in 2017 opened a tasting room in “the new” Old Town Goleta. “Cider is kind of an undefined space right now,” says Schroeder. “You can make it like wine or a little bit more like beer. I really like beer, so I make ciders that hit the palate of

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) VERONIKA ROOSIMAA, ISTOCK; LERINA WINTER, COURTESY THE APIARY; COURTESY TIN CITY CIDER; COURTESY SCAR OF THE SEA; COURTESY SEA CANYON CIDER COMPANY; DAVID VOORHEES, COURTESY SB CIDER COMPANY

The fall comes alive in area orchards. Autumn is also the season when cider houses are pressing apples to make batches of fresh cider—the hard stuff. If you haven’t heard, cider is cool again.


LOCAL LOWDOWN

Clockwise from top left, fall is apple picking season; Rachna Hailey of The Apiary Ciderworks & Meadery; cans from Tin City Cider Co.; behind-the-scenes at Scar of the Sea Winery; Sea Canyon Cider Company bottles and Santa Barbara Cider Company flights.

what I like in terms of tasting things.” His menu changes daily with 12 ciders on tap, rotating 50 different flavors made with fresh pressed juices and ingredients, nothing artificial. Santa Barbara Cider’s unique flavors include pineapple habanero, gingerbread, and hibiscus currant tea. “I want people to be delighted with something different they haven’t tried before,” says Schroeder. Nole Cossart, a professional surfer and brand ambassador for Prana, and Rachna Hailey, an aerial dancer and former chef, also make cider. The health-conscious couple started by botanically-infusing honey-based drinks. Their motto is “drink your flowers.” Their locally-foraged pink jasmine mead was a popular springtime flavor in their Carpinteria tasting room, The Apiary Ciderworks & Meadery (theapiary.co). “Whatever was blooming we wanted to put into the beverages,” says Hailey. “We literally wanted our mead to taste like jasmine, like you were walking around the town of Santa Barbara.” They also source organic Santa Barbara County apples and press them behind the tasting room. “Our all-time favorite cider so far has been Crimson Gold,” says Cossart. “It’s made from a variety of crabapples called Crimson

Gold, that are really sweet and pack tons of flavor. When fermented, you get a dry cider that has a really velvety texture and floral aroma to it.” Winemaker Mikey Giugni’s cider awakening occurred while working a sparkling wine harvest in Tasmania, where the ciders are very dry and crisp. Giugni has been handcrafting highend ciders since 2012 under his Santa Mariabased Scar of the Sea (scaroftheseawines.com) label. Giugni and business partner Michael Brughelli have access to organic “old American” apple varieties, such as Newtown Pippin, from a dry-farmed orchard in Aptos. “I very much wanted Scar of the Sea cider to be a terroir-driven cider, so it’s all from one orchard, farmed by the same family that’s farmed it for three generations,” says Giugni. “Like wine, using really good apples, you don’t need to do anything to it.” Three years ago, Giugni teamed up with two local winemakers, Curt Schalchlin of Sans Liege and Andrew Jones of Field Recordings, to start Tin City Cider Company (tincitycider.com). Giugni guided them in crafting cider in the early days and recently left the partnership. Schalchlin and Jones now share production duties. Visitors to the Tin City Cider taproom in Paso Robles drink it by the glass, pitcher or flight, fill a growler or buy bottles or cans. Tin City’s top selling flavors by the can are its original dry hopped cider and the equally approachable Poly Dolly, a pink blend of cider and rosé. “Cider is allowing people from two camps to come together: beer people and wine people,” says Schalchlin. “It’s easier for beer people to make the leap to cider

than wine. It’s lower in alcohol than wine can be. It also goes to that refreshing side like a cold beer.” Another winemaker who has collaborated on cider with Giugni is Sonja Magdevski of Casa Dumetz (casadumetzwines.com) and Clementine Carter wines. Each year, Magdevski makes a different cider/wine co-ferment: grenache blanc cider, semillon cider, grenache rosé cider, and her Clementine Carter mourvedre cider, now available in her Los Alamos tasting room. “I treat them exactly like wine,” says Magdevski. “The cider brightens the character of the wine that you are pairing it with.” Her next 50-50 blend, a Champagnestyle grüner veltliner cider, will be ready in spring 2019. But that’s not all, even more locals are producing their own unique styles of cider: Two Broads Ciderworks (twobroadscider.com), Jean Marie Cidery (jeanmariecidery.com), See Canyon Cider Company (seecanyonhardcider.com), Gopher Glen (gopherglen. com), Meraki Cider (merakicider.com) and Dreamcote (dreamcotewines.com). Keep an eye out for the 4th annual Central Coast Cider Festival (centralcoastciderfestival.com) in Atascadero in May or June 2019. This event, in the planning stages now, is an opportunity for the public to sample most of the aforementioned ciders and meet many of the Central Coast’s cider makers. —WENDY THIES SELL

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

Freewheelin’ Fall in Morro Bay BY CHERYL CR ABTREE

Autumn on the Central Coast typically provides excellent conditions for outdoor activities like cycling. A popular destination for two-wheel enthusiasts is Morro Bay, where you can wheel along miles of trails while gazing at stunning ocean views amid pristine natural settings. Here are 11 trails within a 10-mile radius of Morro Bay. For more details, download a city bike map at morrobay.org. MORRO ROCK TO CAYUCOS PIER BEACH CRUISE

Catch views of Morro Rock, surf beaches and pristine bays all along this 6.05-mile ride (one-way) in the sand.

and the marina, then up to the Embarcadero and Harbor Walk path to Morro Rock. Head to the new Morro Creek Trail Bridge to Cloisters Park, where you can pedal down to and along the beach.

MORRO BAY HARBOR WALK

Ride along the 0.5-mile Morro Bay Harbor Walk, which stretches from the Embarcadero to iconic Morro Rock. DOWNTOWN TO MORRO BAY

3-mile round trip ride with some moderately steep climbs. CERRO CABRILLO AND TIKI ROCK

The trail to the 911-foot summit passes by Tiki Rock, a boulder that resembles Polynesian carvings. 2.5-mile round trip.

MORRO BAY BIKE PARK

This city park is designed for all ages and skill levels. It incorporates a pump track, dirt jumps and mountain bike skills area. 301 Little Morro Creek Rd.

STATE PARK AND DUNES

This 1.6-mile trail includes several challenging climbs and downhill sections, wooden bridges and great opportunities for spotting wildlife.

MORRO BAY STATE PARK

Begin downtown and ride along the bay to Morro Bay State Park

BLACK HILL

QUARRY SHORT LOOP

A breathtaking approximately

This 2.3-mile loop ride through

SBSEASONS.COM

MONTAÑA DE ORO STATE PARK HAZARD PEAK TRAIL

A 4.1-mile trek with cliff side trails.

LOWER CRESPI TRAIL

CLOISTER TRAIL

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rolling hills is mostly a singletrack trail through a quiet, lightly traveled area.

OAT’S PEAK TRAIL

Fun switchbacks line this 11.3-mile trail to and from the 1,433-foot summit. BLUFF TRAIL

A 4.6-mile round-trip ride on a fast, flat trail along the bluffs.


Somm’s Kitchen

PHOTOS: (L-R) COURTESY MORRO BAY TOURISM, SABRINA KLOMP

BY CHERYL CR ABTREE HANKERING FOR A FEAST of fine food, expertly paired with fine wines? Head to downtown Paso Robles, where master sommelier Ian Adamo serves up stellar spreads in an intimate setting. Food, wine and culture have been part of Adamo’s life since childhood. He grew up in New York, where he worked in the kitchen and dining room at legendary restaurants, including Le Cirque and La Grenouille. His career also includes stints in Seattle, London, Hong Kong and Paris. So how did Adamo land in Paso Robles? “I first went to Paso to work at Bistro Laurent,” he explains. “I was impressed by the people and all that was happening in the wine world here. Also, I thought it would be kind of neat to be part of something that’s growing.” Somm’s Kitchen opened in early 2017, with a sleek curved counter with 14 seats “where every night you could come to my home,” he says, plus a private dining room for six to eight guests. “The idea is to introduce people to new flavors and wines. It’s cool to introduce people to a new idea, so they walk away knowing something they didn’t know before.” Adamo does all the cooking, serving, pouring himself, but is training a sous chef to assist. Adamo’s feasts generally consist of eight to ten shared courses per couple, each paired with wine. The menu varies constantly, but popular examples include foie gras with champagne and salmon paired with a lightbodied Pinot Noir. Adamo sources ingredients from the Central Coast and around the world. About half the wines are local; the rest come from around the globe. “It’s fun to compare wines and food with international counterparts,” he explains. Somm’s Kitchen is open for lunch and dinner Thursday through Sunday. Adamo recommends making reservations at least two weeks in advance. 849 13th St., Paso Robles, 805/369–2344, sommskitchen.com.


LOCAL LOWDOWN

Elizabeth Poett, above, and The Ranch Table’s Strawberry Gathering in June, right.

Gathering Around GROWING UP ON HER FA MILY ’S R ANC H ,

Elizabeth Poett happily spent her childhood gathering cows, climbing trees and helping her mother cook and host events both big and small at their 14,000-acre historic ranch just south of Lompoc in Northern Santa Barbara County. The ranch, known as Rancho San Julian, is one of the oldest family-run ranches in California and has remained dedicated to raising cattle for more than 200 years. Today, the seventh-generation rancher runs Rancho San Julian Beef, selling her family’s ranch-raised, grass-fed beef directly to chefs and consumers, but it’s Poett’s love of cooking, hosting events and gathering people together that led her to start The Ranch Table Gatherings. Held at Rancho San Julian, The Ranch Table Gatherings offers a series of workshops and events centered around California culture, history, traditions and the bounty of the Central Coast. “Historically, the Ranch has been a place

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the Ranch Table

to celebrate and gather,” shares Poett, who enjoys cooking for friends and family using the varied ingredients found on the ranch, such as vegetables, fruits and grass-fed beef. “I wanted to start working more with the people in our region, cultivating a place to gather together, enjoy locally-grown food and appreciate the natural beauty of our surroundings while learning something, too.” She adds, “Starting these workshops felt like a great way to diversify, allowing me to expand upon my passions for local food and entertaining while sharing our history and ranch with the community around us.” Prior gatherings have included a Summer Strawberry Gathering, where guests enjoyed tea and strawberry shortcakes while learning the art of strawberry jam making, as well as Food Writing on the Ranch, a deep dive into the different styles of food writing, led by Poett and food writer/cookbook author, Georgia Freedman.

This fall, The Ranch Table hosts a GrassFed Beef Gathering on September 16, offering attendees a chance to learn about the various cuts of meat and what makes grass-fed beef different before enjoying a Santa Maria-style barbecue under the 100-year-old arbor. The October 6 gathering is a Pumpkin Patch Brunch, a family-friendly event in the middle of the Ranch’s pumpkin patch, where 15 different varieties—from heirloom to classic Jack-’O-Lantern—are grown. The pumpkin patch is also open to the public every Saturday in October. While the purpose of these gatherings is to create a place where food, history, tradition and community converge in the beautiful setting of the historic ranch, Poett shares that a percentage of all workshop costs go directly to the preservation of the ranch, “to help us maintain the land, the historic buildings and our local history for generations to come.” theranchtable.com/gatherings

PHOTOS: (L-R) BLAKENEY SANFORD (2), COURTESY HEATHER JAMES GALLERY

BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK


paul brombal Sam Francis’s work will be the first exhibit at the new gallery.

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collectors are in for a sweet surprise this fall when the new Heather James Gallery opens at 1298 Coast Village Rd. in Montecito. Husband and wife James (Jim) Carona and Heather Sacre— whose combined names can be found on the walls of prestigious gallery locations in New York, San Francisco, Palm Desert and Jackson Hole—were vacationing in Santa Barbara when they came upon the Coast Village Road location that Carona describes as a “perfect fit” for a museum quality art gallery. “It was an opportunistic situation, but we often do things on an opportunistic basis,” he says. Set against a backdrop of Spanish-style architecture, the program of exhibitions will echo Heather James’ four other galleries, whose exhibits have included paintings by Van Gogh, several Monets, a masterpiece by Matisse—which achieved the highest price ever paid at auction—cubist Picasso paintings and a Frida Kahlo self-portrait. As Coast Village Road gets back on its feet after the disastrous debris flow earlier in the year, Carona says, “We’re excited to be coming to Montecito during this period of time. We had not yet signed a lease when the disaster hit, but had made a verbal commitment and have a lot of confidence in the area.” The first exhibition at the gallery, expected to open by October 1, features works by Sam Francis (1923–1994), an American artist known for his exuberantly colorful, largescale abstract paintings. heatherjames.com SERIOUS CONTEMPOR ARY ART

Rare Coins & Precious Metals | Foreign Exchange Largest collection of Estate Jewelry in Santa Barbara 3000 State Street Santa Barbara CA 93105 805.687.3641 | pbrombal.com

foundation Celebrating 90 years of service in Santa Barbara County In 1947, Mrs. Lillian Child deeded her estate, Vegemar, to the Santa Barbara Foundation. It was her firm belief that the property should belong to the people of Santa Barbara. The Santa Barbara Foundation presented the deed for the Child Estate to the city of Santa Barbara in 1953. Ten years later the estate opened to the public as the Santa Barbara Zoological Gardens.

SBFoundation.org


LOCAL LOWDOWN

R e m e m b er o t s t h g i N BY ASHLEY SELF

IF YOU M ADE A VENN DIAGR A M comparing a hotel stay to camping, the space in the middle would be labeled “the coolest thing I never knew existed.” These properties fit right in that middle section—each in their own unique way.

HIPCAMP The ever-expanding sharing economy that delivered innovations like Uber, Lyft and AirBnB spawned Hipcamp, for crowd-weary campers looking for sites away from the mainstream. Generous property owners throughout the country offer private camping ranging from rustic to refined via Hipcamp’s booking interface. Most listings have detailed, adoring reviews and photos. hipcamp.com

Songdog Ranch in the Cuyama Badlands is definitely rustic, but it offers guests incredible views, highly rated hospitality and a wealth of privacy. The Glampout option is perfect for weekenders in search of a camping experience without all the gear. The spacious Sibley tent sits on a rustic wooden deck and is outfitted with two queen size mattresses and ample cooking utensils. The site itself offers running water, firewood and fire ring, a cooking grill, rocking chairs and a picnic table, and is dog friendly. The pit toilet (an upgrade to back country campers; a daunting adventure for those who typically opt for a hotel) is clean and well stocked.

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Guests are required to bring their own bedding and food, and while many may be disappointed to discover there are no hot showers, the silver lining—a rustic farm tub included with the Glampout booking—more than makes up for it. Then there are the stars … when was the last time you spent an hour pondering the universe with a view of the Milky Way? Hiking trails abound right from the camp or a short drive away, and the wildflowers are glorious in springtime. hipcamp.com

AUTOCAMP SANTA BARBARA While Autocamp Santa Barbara sits on a historic property that has served wayward California campers since the 1920s, the current accommodations are decidedly not your grandparents’ Airstreams. Their gleaming, traditional exteriors hide sumptuous secrets. In place of a thin foam pad is a plush luxury mattress. In place of a small plastic shower stall stands a custom marble walk-in shower. And, fortunately or unfortunately, in place of weathered paperbacks there’s a flat screen TV, MP3 player and abundant WiFi. The upper De La Vina location is convenient but still nicely tucked away from

the bustle of downtown, which is only a short ride away on the two complimentary beach cruisers that come with the booking. Despite the upgrades, the experience still feels authentic: sitting outside on the patio, under the oaks and palms, tending steaks on the grill—it feels like camping. Whoever said camping has to be uncomfortable hasn’t stayed at Autocamp. autocamp.com

FARM STAY AT PIANETTA RANCH & WINERY CAMP A little less rustic but still on this side of the DIY spectrum is a stay at Pianetta Ranch & Winery in Paso Robles wine country. With ample parking and upgraded amenities, this is a great option for Airstream/RV owners (tent camping is equally popular) and large groups of up to 120 guests. Pianetta Ranch is a 95-acre working winery with 65 acres of vineyard. Cozy up around the campfire with a nice bottle of Pianetta’s Tuscan Nights blend and watch the sun set over the rolling hills surrounding the Indian Valley. Those who don’t want to camp but don’t have an RV of their own can book the property’s Airstream Vineyard Retreat package. If that’s not heavenly enough, guests can reserve a catered winemaker dinner and vineyard tour, specialized tastings or champagne brunch. The owners are often on site and enjoy answering questions about their wines and even host small tastings. As an added

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM LOWER LEFT, ERIN FEINBLATT, TINKER TIN TRAILER CO. (2)

GLAMPOUT AT SONGDOG


bonus, the bathrooms have hot showers and conventional toilets. pianettawinery.com/ visit-pianetta-winery

THE TRAILER POND AT ALTA COLINA You only have to see a picture of The Trailer Pond at Alta Colina Vineyard to put it on your bucket list. Carl and Jaime Holm, the visionaries behind this amazing experience, wanted to provide a backdrop for an authentic 1950s campout, and they did it down to the finest detail. Five 1950s-era camper trailers dot the edge of a small pond, complete with an Instagramworthy dock. While each unique camper is outfitted with modern comforts, such as coffee makers, the bathrooms along the pond are a composting toilet housed in a refurbished vintage horse trailer (naturally!), with modern facilities and showers a short walk away. It’s a short drive into Paso Robles— though part of it is up/down an intimidating but manageable stretch of dirt road— but if you don’t feel like running back and forth for meals, you can upgrade to the Retreat Package. This includes farm-to-table style breakfast, lunch and dinner served at the family-style picnic table. In addition, there is also a fully stocked shared kitchen on the pond. thetrailerpond.com/trailers The Trailer Pond at Alta Colina (above and below) offers an authentic 1950s style experience, while Autocamp Santa Barbara's lodgings (left) are definitely not your grandparents' Airstreams.

Mapping the Pacific Coast in the Age of Exploration

October 5, 2018–January 2, 2019 John and Peggy Maximus Gallery Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara 805-682-4711 sbnature.org


LOCAL LOWDOWN

We invest in the Central Coast. The B-52s

$912 Million

BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK

(Balances in 2017)

BUILT IN 1936 , the Santa Barbara Bowl has

OUTREACH

482 Nonprofits (Annually)

14 Best Bank Awards in the Last 6 Years

Z NE

VAL

W Y NE S LE

SANTA Y

25th

AWARDS

BEST OF THE VALLEY 2017 SINCE 1925

2013 – 2017

2014 – 2018

2014 – 2017

2017 Bank of the Year Western Independent Bankers

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A Musical Blast from the Past

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been a beloved concert venue and community gathering place for decades, attracting some of the world’s best and biggest names in the business. While it’s always exciting to attend a concert put on by the hottest new band or performing artist, part of the appeal of the Bowl is its commitment to keeping things varied by hosting a mix of both old and new musical acts. “We don’t want to be a one-trick pony,” says Moss Jacobs, senior vice president of Goldenvoice/AEG. “It’s too narrow of a focus to only zone in on what’s contemporary at this moment, so we try to give variety to the musical menu.” In that regard, this year’s line-up at the Santa Barbara Bowl features a few “blast from the past” concerts, including Boy George & Culture Club and The B-52s, who take the stage on September 23, Rod Stewart on October 21 and, earlier this summer, the “Freestyle Explosion” in July, which featured ‘80s hitmakers Taylor Dayne, The Jets and Lisa Lisa, among others. “Both The B-52s and Culture Club have played the Bowl before, and many people growing up here saw these bands headline and still remember it like it was yesterday,” shares Jacobs, whose first experience working at the Bowl was passing out flyers in the 1980s. “I was that flyer guy!” he says with a laugh. “When

Culture Club first headlined the Bowl, Ronald Reagan was president,” Jacobs points out. “In fact, the two were in town at the same time and staying at the Biltmore. You can imagine what a scene it was with all the Boy George lookalikes floating around the property while the President’s security team looked on in what was likely horror!” While Jacobs adds that the point of these throwback shows isn’t to hit on nostalgia alone, he admits that bringing back older musical acts has all the elements to be successful here in Santa Barbara, allowing those to revisit a show from their past and a new generation to experience them for the first time. “Both The B-52s and Culture Club put on exceptional shows back then, and it’s fun to have them back together all these years later,” says Jacobs. “Even if someone is too young to really understand how big, important or impressive these bands were at the time, it’s pretty special that now multiple generations get to experience them together. Not only that, but the Bowl’s incredible setting, acoustics and general vibe of the staff and audience create one of the most unique concert experiences in North America.” He adds, “It’s the full package, and our goal is for everyone who comes to the Bowl to have such an amazing experience that they want to come back again… even if it’s 35 years later.” Santa Barbara Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara, 805/962-7411, sbbowl.com.

PHOTOS: (L-R) PIETER M. VAN HATTEM, COURTESY VINA ROBLES

LOANS & LENDING


Vina Robles Amphitheatre MELDING THE ARTS WITH WINE and food has always been a classic pairing for Swiss-owned Vina Robles Winery in Paso Robles. Since 2007, the winery has hosted various cultural activities—from chamber music and live bands to fine art exhibitions. Recognizing the potential of the natural bowl of the landscape behind its event lawn, site of a popular summer concert series, in late 2009 plans were launched to build a California mission-style outdoor amphitheater set on an oak-studded hillside, where patrons could enjoy fine wine, food and live music in an intimate setting. The project would also enable Vina Robles to expand its offerings and showcase an even broader selection of artists from around the world. The grand 3,300-seat Vina Robles Ampitheatre—one of the largest arts and entertainment venues in San Luis Obispo County—opened in 2013. Since then, it has hosted numerous world-class performing artists in all genres, from Bonnie Raitt and Crosby, Stills and Nash to Trevor Noah and Joe Bonamassa.

Vina Robles Amphitheatre

BY CHERYL CR ABTREE

The event and concert season lasts from April through October each year. The fall lineup includes: Los Lobos and The Mavericks.................... September 13 KANSAS.............................. September 15 Anjelah Johnson................ September 16 NEEDTOBREATHE............... September 19 Sebastian Maniscalco........September 22 Brothers Osborne.....................October 7 Kip Moore...............................October 30

Guests can choose among various seating options: floor or lawn, fixed stadium-style or luxury boxes, all within 150 feet of the stage. You won’t go thirsty or hungry here. A wellstocked concession area offers wine (starring Vina Robles estate wines by the glass or bottle), craft beer, wood-fired pizzas, and sandwiches. Vina Robles Amphitheatre, 3800 Mill Rd., Paso Robles, 805/286-3680, vinaroblesamphitheatre.com.

Where does your bank invest? VOLUNTEERING

5,200 Hours (Annually)

DONATIONS

$1.4 million (Annually)

Personal. Business. Nonprofit. Wealth.

montecito.bank


LOCAL LOWDOWN

Up the Road from Ordinary BY ASHLEY SELF

Above, Work family members riding on the ranch.

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EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE

you have an experience that is particularly memorable because of its rarity, the way it opened your eyes to something new or just the simple pleasure of it. The Work Family Guest Ranch is like that. The Work family homesteaded The Work Family Guest Ranch land in the 1880s. Ben Work and his high school sweetheart-now-wife, Kelly, are the fourth generation to manage the 12,000-acre ranch, located in San Miguel, about 20 miles outside of Paso Robles among the rolling Cholame Hills. It’s remained a multigenerational family operation: Ben and Kelly’s kids, barely into their 20s, are primed to take over eventually, and their grandparents still reside in the main residence. Visitors from all over the world have come to the ranch for trail rides to add a little whimsy to their Central Coast vacations, and to see the land the way it used to be, wild and open. Trail rides last about 90 minutes, but budget three hours to have enough time to get to know the horses (and the dogs, the goats, and sometimes, the puppies), as well as the hosts. Also, you’ll want to spend some time in the guest book—an old outbuilding with guest signatures and comments covering just about every surface. There are two ways to get to the ranch, and I’d follow Frost’s advice and take the road less travelled on your way up (Hog Canyon Road). A couple of things to keep in mind when you arrive: One, ranches weather, and most fourth-generation ranchers, if they were raised right, would say it’s a travesty to tear down or renovate an old barn that

has stood the test of time. So don’t expect a stacked-stone entryway and manicured grounds. Instead, embrace sensibility and old-fashioned, cheerful hospitality. This family practices environmentalism and land stewardship as a way of life that is based on experiences and knowledge passed down four generations. Two, relax! Animals in general and horses in particular are therapeutic by nature, and trail riding is in our freedomseeking-American genes. The therapeutic benefits are not lost on the Works, who, in partnership with Mighty Oak Ministry, host rides for about 25 active and non-active military veterans every month. Many of these veterans are struggling to recover from the physical and emotional traumas of their service, and all of them benefit from the peace and perspective of a day on the trail. Settle in and enjoy. Also, set aside your notion of the tired old nag you usually see at a vacation-style pony ride. This is a working ranch. All of the horses are rotated in and out of daily work, whether running out to bring in a stray bull or competing in the local rodeo. These ponies are seasoned and safe, but refreshingly energetic. If you stay on Ranchita Canyon Road on your way out, it will take you through the backside of the Pleasant Valley Wine Trail (pleasantvalleywinetrail.com) where you can rest your legs at one of the 13 wineries and feel like you’ve earned a full glass after a long day on the trail. The Work Family Guest Ranch, 75893 Ranchita Canyon Rd., San Miguel, 805/610-0961, workranch.com. Reservations required.


PHOTOS: (L-R) COURTESY WORK FAMILY (2), COURTESY TEDDY BEAR CANCER FOUNDATION (2)

Wine Bottle with a Story BY DEL ANEY M AYFIELD

that their child has cancer, that marks the beginning of a horrifying journey filled with anxiety, fear and often significant financial insecurity. This nightmare became a reality in 2013 for the Johnson family when their daughter, Emery, was diagnosed with leukemia at age 3. While a child is battling cancer, it’s common for at least one parent to take a substantial amount of time off work in order to be with their child through treatment. This frequently results in a significant reduction in income. When the Johnson family recalled Emery’s treatment, they noted: “Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation was there for our family from day one. They arranged a hotel room for us so we could be close to our daughter in the WHEN PARENTS HEAR

A happy, healthy Emery Johnson signs a bottle of her Melville Estate Pinot Noir.

hospital, and they even brought a cake to help celebrate Emery’s dad’s birthday during her hospital stay.” Throughout Emery’s 26 months of treatment, her father, Ethan, the wine club manager at Melville Winery, was able to take the time he needed to be with his daughter. Both Ron and Chad Melville, father and son and the owners of Melville Winery, wanted to help, but did not know how. Shortly after Emery’s diagnosis, the Johnsons received financial and emotional support from Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation. The Melville team was inspired to find a way to support the organization. Five years later, Melville Winery has dedicated a special half-acre of their vineyard to honor Emery’s journey back to health,

by donating 100 percent of the proceeds from each bottle sold of Estate Pinot Noir— Emery’s—to Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation. Fortunately, Emery is now a healthy and happy 7-year-old girl. When asked how she feels about the wine named in her honor, she says, “I’m famous!  I feel very lucky to have my name on a bottle of wine and I am happy that it can help other kids who are battling cancer.” please visit www.melvillewinery.com and  TeddyBearCancerFoundation.org. FOR MORE INFORMATION


LOCAL LOWDOWN

1 in 5: The Face of Dyslexia in Santa Barbara and Beyond Joan, a 1961 graduate of Santa Barbara High School, has an IQ of 130, but didn’t learn the basics of reading until a high school teacher, Marion Whelpley, took her on as a project. She was so grateful she named her daughter after her. “I finally learned I was dyslexic when I was 64,” she notes, “when I was tested at Santa Barbara City College.”

BY CHERI RAE PHOTOS BY MONIE DEWIT PHOTOGRAPHY FOR MORE THAN A DECADE , photographer Monie deWit and I have lived just a couple blocks apart in Bungalow Haven; raising our children in our quirky, old-fashioned neighborhood, we have often met for summertime picnics with a group of neighbors at Alice Keck Memorial Garden. We always knew we were kindred spirits, with our shared interest in historic preservation; what we didn’t know is that during the school years, we were both fighting the same fight—working tirelessly to get a proper education for our dyslexic sons, and advocating for others as well. When we finally figured that out, we excitedly shared ideas about a creative dyslexia-themed project each of us had always had in the back of our minds—only she needed a writer, and I needed a photographer. When we teamed up, something special happened. We’re now two moms on a mission

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to make dyslexia more visible and more understandable in a creative way that informs minds and touches hearts. The photojournalism project, “1 in 5: The Face of Dyslexia in Santa Barbara and Beyond,” is a work-in-progress created to showcase—in artistic photographs and personal reflections—the diversity of the dyslexia experience, which affects 20 percent of the population. In January, it was displayed at the Central Library, and we’ve been asked to photograph individuals in Orange County for a community event in October for Dyslexia Awareness Month. Dyslexia is not a mystery. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not about seeing things backward, and does not indicate a lack of intelligence. It is a hereditary neurological difference in the brain that affects an individual’s ability to read, write and spell (hence the meaning of dyslexia = trouble with words). This can be addressed with intensive one-on-one intervention, not commonly known by educators or adopted

Ashley is a 2016 graduate of Dos Pueblos High School where she earned A’s and B’s on her classwork, but D’s and F’s on her test scores. Today she attends Arizona State University, majoring in journalism at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and offers the following advice for other dyslexic students who want to attend college: “Do your research, look up schools and their programs. You have to put yourself out there, and you have to advocate for yourself.”

in our schools. If you’re not personally touched by dyslexia, you likely know someone who is: The child struggling to read; the teen feeling like school is a place for other, smarter students; the young woman in her first job, trying to keep her poor spelling a secret; the new father too embarrassed to read a book out loud to his children; the professional terrified to take a test required for career advancement; the senior citizen reduced to tears at the memory of elementary school shame endured decades ago. These unnecessary humiliations often overshadow the positive characteristics of dyslexia that include creativity, thoughtful


problem-solving and outside-the-box thinking. Count among accomplished dyslexic strengths the musical talent of John Lennon, the creativity of Pablo Picasso, the brilliance of Albert Einstein, the innovation of Steve Jobs, the athleticism of Magic Johnson, the entrepreneurialism of Sir Richard Branson, and the storytelling of Fannie Flagg. Even more significant than the ever-growing list of famous and accomplished individuals with dyslexia is the wealth of information gained from personal insights shared by the cross-section of the population who deal with it every day of their lives. In our time in the studio and on location, we’ve met individuals whose dyslexic experience transcends boundaries of cultural identity, financial status, ethnic heritage and community standing. With grace, honesty and a spirit of generosity, they have shared their innermost thoughts, sometimes haltingly, often with great relief, frequently with tears, hugs and a warm feeling of connection with others. The result? Conversations we need to hear, images we need to see, compassion we need to cultivate, and changes we need to make. “1 in 5: The Face of Dyslexia in Santa Barbara and Beyond” is on view at the Book Den in October, with Cheri Rae signing her new book, DyslexiaLand: A Field Guide for Parents of Children with Dyslexia, on October 4. To participate in this project, contact TheDyslexiaProject@ gmail.com. This project made possible thanks to a grant from the Kirby-Jones Family Foundation. 

Lana acts in local productions, and attends drama and dance classes in Los Angeles. She listens to many of her reading assignments thanks to Learning Ally, and observes, “Being able to listen means everything to me. People have to understand that it’s not cheating, it’s just another way to get the information, through your ears instead of your eyes.”

Paul, an accomplished architect, shares his dyslexic experiences as a panelist in community discussions and encourages young aspiring architects with dyslexia. “One of the most important things you learn early on with dyslexia is resilience; you have to get back up and figure out workarounds. Technology is wonderful; I use spellcheck and dictation on my phone all the time to help me spell.”

David, who loves soccer, riding bikes and scooters, is feeling better about himself since his mom found an advocate to help him get appropriate instruction. “I know I can learn to read,” says the rising third-grader, “I just have to work really hard.”

FA LL 2018

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Fall Datebook Seasonal events, happenings and things to do for September, October and November

DANCEworks, Sep. 7-8, Lobero Theatre. Photo by David Bazemore.


FALL DATEBOOK Arketype Architects Inc. Independence House, AIA ArchitecTours, Oct. 6.

Find updated information and additional events at sbseasons.com/datebook.

Ongoing Through Oct. 14 Nam June Paik: TV Clock A crucial work in the late Korean-born, American artist Nam June Paik’s long career, “TV Clock” offers audiences the chance to experience the art and thought of one of the 20th century’s most innovative and enduringly vital artists. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130

and Hilary Brace use diverse materials and methods to create environments that engage the imagination. | 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wed. –Mon., Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511 Mission Dr., Solvang, 805/688-1082, wildlingmuseum.org.

September

State St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

1- 3

Through Oct. 14

653 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, 805/966-5373,

Open Studios Tour Enjoy art on Labor Day weekend as you visit the 30+ Santa Barbara Studio Artist ateliers open to the public. The Open Studios Tour is a really fun way to discover the hidden beauty and back roads you wouldn’t necessarily visit. Create your own driving tour through paradise. Tickets and a map to the studios can be picked up at 10 West Gallery (10 W. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara) or online. | Santa Barbara Studio Artists, various locations

mcasantabarbara.org.

throughout Santa Barbara, 805/280-9178,

Barry McGee Don’t miss this solo exhibition featuring a sprawling installation of paintings, drawings and sculptural objects by San Francisco-based artist Barry McGee, who is arguably the most well-known and influential of the recent surge of artists from the Bay Area to have international success. | MCA Santa Barbara,

santabarbarastudioartists.com.

Through Nov. 5 Nature Regenerated The Wildling Museum presents its annual photography competition, celebrating its 10th year. Photographers were encouraged to capture examples of nature’s magical ability to regenerate and thrive. | 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Wed. – Mon., Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511 Mission Dr., Solvang,

1- 9 A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Stephen Sondheim’s joyous, musical romp through Rome has desperate lovers, scheming neighbors and secrets behind every toga! | SLO Repertory Theatre, 888 Morro St., San Luis Obispo, 805/786-2440, slorep.org.

805/688-1082, wildlingmuseum.org.

Through Nov. 11 Fauvism to Fascism The tumultuous period between the two World Wars is the backdrop for this intimately scaled and timely exhibition, which explores the little-known relationship between modern art and totalitarianism in the work of the French Fauves, Maurice de Vlaminck (1876-1958) and André Derain (1880-1954). | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., Santa Barbara, 

PHOTOS: (L-R) DAVID BAZEMORE, JOSHUA CURRY

805/963-4364, sbma.net.

Through Nov. 26 The Secret Life of Flowers This art exhibition of Cynthia James’ ethereal work makes a wonderful addition to an exploration of the Botanic Garden, on view in the Pritzlaff Conservation Center Gallery. | 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. daily, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd., Santa Barbara, 805/682-4726, sbbg.org.

Through Jan. 21 Nature Imagined Inspired by nature, artists Cheryl Medow, Ellen Jewett

5 Man & Woman of the Year Awards Luncheon Santa Barbara Foundation recognizes outstanding citizens at the 75th Man & Woman of the Year Awards Luncheon. | 11:30 a.m., Coral Casino Beach and Cabana Club, 1260 Channel Dr., Montecito, SBFoundation.org/MW75.

6 Curated Cocktails: Summer Nights with KCRW Savor warm summer nights with art, cocktails and live music, along with unique themes inspired by the current exhibition, Barry McGee: SB Mid-Summer Intensive. | 7 – 9 p.m., MCA Santa Barbara, 653 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, 805/966-5373, mcasantabarbara.org.

7 Art After Dark Celebrate art for free on the first Friday of every month throughout the year in downtown San Luis Obispo. On a typical Art After Dark, approximately 30 galleries and non-traditional art venues including restaurants, boutique shops and salons, etc., showcase the work of

established and emerging local artists, and sometimes internationally acclaimed artists. Also on Oct. 5 and Nov. 2. | 6 – 9 p.m., Downtown San Luis Obispo, 895 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo, sloartscouncil.org.

7-8 DANCEworks 10th Anniversary Celebration DANCEworks is turning 10 this year, and what better way to celebrate than to welcome celebrated choreographer Doug Elkins back to the Lobero to create a new work based on influences from Japanese philosophy and art. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

7, 14 Concerts in the Plaza Head to Mission Plaza in downtown San Luis Obispo to enjoy live music by the 15 musical groups that were selected for the Annual Concerts in the Plaza summer series. | 5 – 8 p.m., Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 751 Palm St., San Luis Obispo, downtownslo.com/events.

7 – Oct. 1 Wave Wave, the understated exhibition title, belies the quiet power of the potent and beautiful photographic images of the sea by artist Roe Anne White, in her solo exhibition. | Artist reception Sep. 8, 3-5 p.m., Porch, 3823 Santa Claus Ln. Carpinteria, porchsb.com.

8-9 Santa Barbara Sea Glass & Ocean Arts Festival An exciting celebration of ocean-inspired art and jewelry, this one-of-a-kind event showcases handmade sea glass jewelry and ocean-themed art by artists from across the country. A portion of festival proceeds will benefit the Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network, a local nonprofit that rescues, rehabilitates and returns injured and orphaned animals back to their homes. | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, santabarbaraseaglassandoceanartsfestival.com.

FALL 2018

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FALL DATEBOOK

9 Taste of the Town Featuring Santa Barbara’s finest wineries, breweries, restaurants and caterers, all proceeds from Taste of the Town support the programs and services of the Arthritis Foundation. The Foundation is the only nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of 53 million people (including nearly 300,000 children) with arthritis through health education, advocacy, research and local juvenile arthritis support. | Noon – 3 p.m., Riviera Park Gardens, 2030 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Barbara, https://bit.ly/2mWTrQy.

Overview: Born in 1871, Albert Herter studied at the Art Students League in New York, then went on to Paris to pursue his career. In 1890, he exhibited at the Paris Salon. After returning to the United States, he taught at the Art Institute of Chicago during the late 1890’s. Then, in 1909, he and his wife Adele bought a home in Santa Barbara and lived there until his death in 1950. His murals are at the Massachusetts State House, theaters in New York and Hollywood, Los Angeles Public Library, and the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco. He was also a member of the American Watercolor Society, Society of Mural Painters, Architectural League of New York and New York Watercolor Club, as well as an associate member of the National Academy. Gallery: James Main Fine Art 27 E. De la Guerra St., Santa Barbara 805/962-8347, jamesmainfineart.com

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SBADA MEMBER

Granada Theatre Legends Gala Santa Barbara Center for the Performing Arts honors and celebrates philanthropist Sara Miller McCune, artist Kenny Loggins and Santa Barbara Symphony. | 6 p.m.,

granadasb.org/about/legends-gala.

Boz Scaggs Boz Scaggs’ place in rock history goes back to his early days with the acclaimed rock group, The Steve Miller Band. Just as widely known is his solo career, which includes the hit release “Loan Me a Dime” and the best-selling platinum album, Silk Degrees. | 7:30 p.m., The Granada Theatre,

Still Life with Flowers and Japanese Print, c.1895 Gouache on Board, 26” x 19”

14

Consorts This solo exhibition of art by Dane Goodman features selected bodies of works from 1978-2018 from this wellknown Santa Barbara artist whose art has been exhibited widely through the region, as well as across America. The artist’s reception is Sept. 15, from 3-5 p.m. | Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., College

11

(1871-1950)

Montecito, friendshipcentersb.org.

The Granada Theatre, 1214 State

805/893-2364, ccs.ucsb.edu/majors/art.

Albert Herter

Friendship Center, 89 Eucalyptus Ln.,

10 – Oct. 13

of Creative Studies Gallery, UCSB,

On Exhibit Now

beverages for tasting, along with hearty hors d’oeuvres and live music. The annual Big Heart Awards will also be presented to notable supporters, and guests will have a chance to contribute much-needed funds with silent and live auctions. | 4 – 7 p.m.,

St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222,

14 - 16 Solvang Danish Days The weekend’s numerous offerings, encompassing activities for all ages, range from fan-favorite food events surrounding Aebleskiver, the iconic Danish pastry rounds; to a Danishstyle beer and wine garden serving Danish import Carlsberg beer alongside local brews and wines; to interactive history lessons at the Elverhoj Museum; a Viking Encampment in Solvang Park; to an afternoon and evening of free, live rock concerts; to chainsaw woodcarving demonstrations and an Old World artisanal crafts marketplace. | Various venues throughout Solvang, solvangdanishdays.org.

1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

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12

Perfume Workshop Explore the art of natural perfumery in a three-hour workshop with Susan Farber of Sol Aromatics. | 1- 4 p.m.,

Heroes of Hospice The 6th annual Heroes of Hospice luncheon honors the incredible individuals and organizations that have supported Hospice of Santa Barbara’s mission to provide care to anyone experiencing the impact of serious illness or death of a loved one. | 11 a.m., Coral Casino, 1260 Channel Dr., Montecito, hospiceofsantabarbara.org.

13 Friendship Center’s Wine Down & Big Heart Awards Join Friendship Center for a relaxing yet festive gathering in the courtyard of its Montecito Center with at least 10 local wineries/breweries pouring

Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511 Mission Dr., Solvang, 805/688-1082, wildlingmuseum.org.

16 Apples and Honey Festival The 2018 Apples and Honey Festival, themed “Sweet New Year,” celebrates the county’s autumn agricultural bounty. The event includes apple-related crafts, artists’ booths, apple and honey tasting, baked goods and kosher hot dogs, music, face painting, bee education and storytelling. | 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Mitchell Park, 1400 Osos St., San Luis Obispo, jccslo.com.


16 Endless Summer Dream This fresh, summer-themed event is focused on living and wellness, at one of the most prestigious and picturesque private estates in Summerland, overlooking the ocean. Fashion mogul Jimmy Sommers will be on hand with his famed Wildfox Couture brand—a favorite among A-list celebs and influencers—to kick-off a poolside runway show with live entertainment and delectable local food and spirits. The event also features a spectacular after party with dinner and dancing at the estate’s onsite night club. | 4 p.m., dreamfoundation.org/summerdream.

16, 23 (final) USPA Presidents Cup The USPA Presidents Cup kicks off with the Pony Parade, followed by the singing of the National Anthem, team introductions and the ball throw-in. Sunday Polo is open to the public with a variety of seating options, including Grandstand Seating as well as Luxury Cabanas. | 2:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Polo and Racquet Club, 3300 Via Real, Carpinteria, 805/684-6683, sbpolo.com.

17 Mission Creek Legacy Society Annual Dinner This event recognizes donors who have remembered the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History in their will, trust or estate plan. Leaving a legacy ensures that the Museum will stay strong for many years to come. | 5:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta Del Sol, Santa Barbara, 805/682-4711, sbnature.org.

20 Live Dive at the Sea Center Become immersed in the world below the ocean’s surface. Watch and interact with SCUBA divers live as they explore our local coastal ecosystems under Stearns Wharf and beyond. FREE public program. | 11 a.m. - noon, Santa

annual Changing Lives Gala. | 6:30 p.m., Belmond El Encanto, 800 Alvarado Pl., Santa Barbara, sbnbcc.org.

21 CEC’S Green Gala This noteworthy annual event is the eco-chic party of the year, as well as an opportunity to hear how CEC (Community Environmental Council) works to preserve Santa Barbara’s unique way of life and to build a grass-roots movement that embraces both personal action and government accountability to create a resilient, green future worthy of the next generation. | 6:30 p.m., The Lark, 131 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, cecsb.org.

21 Celebrating Storm Reading Storm Reading began in Santa Barbara and gained worldwide recognition for its thought-provoking, humorous and out-of-the-box approach to breaking down barriers that separate those living with disabilities from the rest of the world. Thirty years later, the cast and creators take a look back at the impact it had on audiences and at the sustaining relevance its message still has today. | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre,

On Exhibit Now

Chris Peters

33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara,

Early Sunday Morning, 2018

805/963-0761, lobero.org.

Oil on canvas, 30” x 24”

21 The Sorrow Cart Dijo Productions presents the West Coast premiere of The Sorrow Cart, a musical play about and for the homeless. All proceeds from the show will benefit The Soldiers Project to assist in aiding our homeless vets. | 8 p.m., Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, 805/963-0408, centerstagetheater.org.

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Overview: Chris Peters’s formal education began in Seattle where he received Bachelor and Master degrees from the University of Washington. Later he trained for three years at the Gage Academy of Art, learning the drawing and painting methods of the 19th-century academic tradition. Peters’s work has been exhibited at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art as part of the private collection of Academy Award winning director Guillermo del Toro. Peters’s collectors include many members of the music and film industries. He

Sea Center, 211 Stearns Wharf, Santa

The Beach Boys The Beach Boys recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of the hit “Good Vibrations,” which is widely considered one of the greatest masterpieces in the history of rock and roll. | 7:30 p.m.,

Barbara, sbnature.org.

The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St.,

11 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara, granadasb.org.

805/730-1460, sullivangoss.com 

Barbara Museum of Natural History

20 Changing Lives Gala Enjoy delicious food, live music and time with friends as New Beginnings Counseling Center honors its 2018 Community Champions at the 6th

has also had eight solo shows at galleries in Santa Monica, Santa Fe, and New York City. Gallery: Sullivan Goss–An American Gallery SBADA MEMBER

22 Ya Ya Festival Experience the Ya Ya Festival, presented by Tales From the Tavern and featuring Dave Alvin & The Guilty k FALL 2018

35


FALL DATEBOOK Ones, Ruthie Foster, Michael On Fire and Steve Poltz. Expect a great day of music and entertainment, arts and crafts, food and drink, culture and community and “inspiration vibration.” | 2-10 p.m., Solvang Festival Theater,

camp, and accredited summer sleepaway camp that empowers girls and women through music education, creative expression and performance. Its promotes self-confidence, creativity and teamwork. | 6 p.m. outdoor

420 2nd St., Solvang, 805/688-0383,

activities, 7 p.m. concert, Lobero

talesfromthetavern.com.

Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

29 Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis: Spaces Inspired by the variety of movements in the animal kingdom, Wynton Marsalis’ Spaces is a 10-part jazz suite featuring Lil Buck and Jared Grimes interpreting everything from snakes to chickens. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

29 - 30 On Exhibit Now

Thomas Lorraine Hunt

(1882-1938)

Fishing Boats in Harbor, c. 1930 Framed Oil on Canvas, 20” x 24”

His paintings are in the collections of Bowers Museum, Kansas City Museum and Orange County Museum. In addition, his work was exhibited widely, including at California State Fair, 1923 (1st prize); Penn Academy of Fine Arts, 1924; San Francisco Art Association, 1924, 1927; Painters of the West (Los Angeles), 1925; Painters & Sculptors of Los Angeles, 1926; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1927; Laguna Beach Art Association, 1927-1935 (1st prizes); California Art Club, 1932-1933; Pasadena Art Institute, 1933 (award); and San Diego Fine Art Guild, 1933 (prize).

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SBSEASONS.COM

lemonfestival.com.

29 – Dec. 9

Overview: Thomas L. Hunt was born in London, Ontario, Canada. His father is artist John Powell Hunt, with whom he studied. Early in his life he moved to the U.S. where he studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, but continued to work in construction, and only paint part time.  He moved to California in 1924, and built a studio in Laguna Beach, where he taught, and exhibited his paintings. He was a founding member of the Laguna Beach Museum.  Hunt specialized in painting harbor scenes, landscapes, and coastal views up and down the California coastline, using bold bright colors and a modern technique.

Gallery: Stewart Fine Art 215 W. Mission St., Santa Barbara 805/845-0255, dianestewartfineart.com

California Lemon Festival When life gives you acres and acres of lemon trees, the only thing to do is celebrate the harvest with a festival– with lots of lemonade, of course! | Girsh Park, 7050 Phelps Rd., Goleta,

SBADA MEMBER

All Under Heaven All Under Heaven presents the solo and collaborative work of internationally renowned painter Arnold Chang and photographer Michael Cherney. | Art Design & Architecture Museum, UCSB, 552 University Rd., Santa Barbara, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

October 1 - 31 Santa Ynez Valley Scarecrow Fest During the month-long fest, visitors and locals are encouraged to play, stay and enjoy the scarecrow sights and many scheduled fall events. Last year, the valley boasted approximately 150 scarecrows, most of which were available for public viewing and voting to determine viewers’ favorites. | Various venues throughout Santa Ynez Valley, syvscarecrows.com.

2 - 24 Pianos on State Pianos on State is an interactive musical experience that takes place in Downtown Santa Barbara each October, which is recognized as National Arts and Humanities Month. For the project, local Santa Barbara artists transform pianos into unique, interactive works of art that are displayed on designated pads along State Street for the public to play. | 10 a.m. – 10 p.m., various locations in Downtown Santa Barbara,

29 – Dec. 9

pianosonstate.com.

Prints! The Joan and Stu Levin Collection This exhibit celebrates Joan and Stu Levin’s outstanding collection of contemporary works on paper, featuring seminal works by artists such as Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. | Art Design & Architecture Museum,

4

UCSB, 552 University Rd., Santa Barbara, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

30 Girls Rock Santa Barbara Presents Raise Her Voice An evening of live music, featuring Los Angeles-based hit songwriter Sophie Rose, silent auction, live screen printing and a chance to learn more about Girls Rock Santa Barbara. Girls Rock is an after-school program, accredited summer day

Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation Annual Gold Ribbon Luncheon This event marks the culmination of the Gold Ribbon Campaign in honor of Childhood Cancer Awareness month in September. Highlights include live entertainment, a plated lunch and an assortment of wine varietals, as well as a one-of-a-kind auction. | Four Seasons Biltmore, 1260 Channel Dr., Montecito, teddybearcancerfoundation.org.

4 - 20 PCPA’s An Iliad An Iliad is a modern rendering of Homer’s classic story, which grapples with humankind’s perpetual capacity for violence, while exploring the beauty and kinship to be found even in the midst


of war. | PCPA/Severson Theatre, 800 S. College Dr., Santa Maria, pcpa.org.

5 Red Feather Ball United Way of Santa Barbara County’s 22nd Annual Red Feather Ball is a fun event filled with music and dancing, featuring a curated silent auction. Come for a gracious evening to support the impactful programs of United Way of Santa Barbara County. | 6 p.m., Coral Casino, 1260 Channel Dr., Montecito, 805/8820505, unitedwaysb.org.

5-7 California Avocado Festival Celebrate peace, love and guacamole at the threeday Carpinteria fest dedicated to the California fruit in all its forms. This is one of the largest free festivals in California with more than 75 music acts on four stages, arts and crafts galore, fun games and an amazing variety of avocado-infused culinary delights. | 10 a.m. – 10 p.m., Linden Ave., Carpinteria, avofest.com.

5-7 Central Coast Railroad Festival The Central Coast Railroad Festival celebrates the many types of railroading with an eye toward the beauty of the Central Coast of California. Welcoming all ages, the Festival presents historical, educational and recreational events for locals and visitors alike. | 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum, 1940 Santa Barbara Ave., San Luis Obispo, ccrrf.com.

K. HEHNKE

5 – Jan. 2 The Kingdom of California This exhibit offers stories of “Mapping of the Pacific Coast in the Age of Exploration” told through antique maps and voyage atlases. | Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta Del Sol, Santa Barbara, sbnature.org.

6 AIA Santa Barbara’s 10th Anniversary ArchitecTours This year’s tour celebrates the fabric of Santa Barbara’s very own downtown, including some of its history, hidden gems and evolution. The tour encourages attendees to “Rediscover Downtown Santa Barbara: Imagine How You Can Live, Work & Play.” There have been many conversations recently about the changing face of Downtown Santa Barbara and how best to support its economic vitality, while making it more vibrant, livable and welcoming. Rediscover Downtown Santa Barbara tour expands these discussions by exploring downtown’s housing, business and entertainment through its architecture, with a walking tour of downtown to explore this important and evolving center of Santa Barbara. | 10 a.m. –

Experience Nature

Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

at the

BECOME A MEMBER TODAY at sbbg.org

1212 MISSION CANYON ROAD SANTA BARBARA, CA (805) 682-4726 • sbbg.org

4 p.m. tour, 4 – 6 p.m. after party, various locations in downtown Santa Barbara, 805/966-4198, aiasb.com.

FALL 2018

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FALL DATEBOOK

6

Tavern, Maverick Saloon, 3687 Sagunto

The Bayou Open This playful golf themed event is a once-a-year showstopper during which participants meet and mingle with other members of the Santa Barbara Rescue Mission family of friends and enjoy a clubhouse dinner on the green, music by the Idiomatiques, fellowship and fun. The event also honors David and Anna Grotenhuis with the Léni Fé Bland Award. | 2 p.m., Rancho Dos

St., Santa Ynez, talesfromthetavern.com.

10 SBCC Benefit Concert Featuring Michael McDonald SBCC Music Live presents a concert featuring Michael McDonald. This show, benefiting the SBCC Music Scholarship Fund, displays the amazing talent of Santa Barbara City College music students and faculty. | 7 p.m., Lobero

Pueblos, 220 La Casa Grande Circle,

Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa

Goleta, sbrm.org.

Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

6-7

10 - 27

Chaplin State Street Ballet opens the 2018-19 season with Chaplin, a groundbreaking full-length world premiere based on Charlie Chaplin, one of the most iconic and creative artists of the 20th Century. | 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6 & 2 p.m. Oct. 7,

Ken Ludwig’s The Game’s Afoot It is December 1936, and Broadway star William Gillette, admired around the world for his leading role in the play Sherlock Holmes, has invited his fellow cast members to his Connecticut castle for a weekend of revelry. However, when one of the guests is stabbed to death, the festivities in this isolated house of tricks quickly turn dangerous. | Garvin Theatre, Santa Barbara City

The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, granadasb.org.

7 – Jan. 6 Let it Snow! Paintings of Winter In this installation, a range of European and American artists are represented, and in each canvas, a different motif allows the artist to take expressive advantage of the picturesque effects of snowfall. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

9

33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

10 Tales From the Tavern Presents Danny O’Keefe Danny O’Keefe’s songs have been recorded by a who’s who of artists during the last 30+ years: Elvis Presley, Alison Krauss, Jimmy Buffett, Nickel Creek, Judy Collins, John Denver, Sheena Easton and Alan Jackson, among others. “Well, Well, Well,” which O’Keefe wrote with Bob Dylan, has been recorded by Ben Harper, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Bonnie Raitt and David Lindley. | 8 p.m., Tales From the 38

SBSEASONS.COM

1214 State St., Santa Barbara,

Brunch, which includes live music, multisensory art demonstrations, a silent auction, the famous Bloody Mary bar and more. | 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.,

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang, 805/688-1082,

13

wildlingmuseum.org.

Santa Barbara Harbor & Seafood Festival Celebrate lobster season at the free annual Harbor & Seafood Festival. Fresh seafood, from crabs and prawns to chowder and gumbo, are complemented by fun activities, free boat rides and dockside tours. | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.,

16

Santa Barbara Harbor, 132-A Harbor Way, Santa Barbara, harborfestival.org.

13

Seong-Jin Cho South Korean pianist Seong-Jin Cho was thrust into the top ranks of the musical world in 2015, when his flawless, insightful performances earned the Gold Medal at the Chopin Competition in Warsaw. After his sold-out Santa Barbara debut last season, the poetic young artist returns, bringing his deep musicianship and “lucid and shimmering sound” to masterful renditions of Debussy and Chopin. | 7 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB,

College, 721 Cliff Dr., Santa Barbara,

Solvang Stomp At Solvang Stomp guests have the opportunity to stomp grapes barefoot in vats, sip tastes from dozens of area wineries, dance to a live band, drink pink in the “I Love Rosé Lounge” and purchase food inside the festival area from popular area eateries. | 2-5 p.m., Downtown Solvang on First

theatergroupsbcc.com.

Street, between Mission Drive/Hwy. 246

Boo at the Zoo Santa Barbara Zoo is transformed for three nights of traffic-free trick-ortreating fun for monstrous thrills and chills. | Oct. 19 5:30 - 8:30 p.m., Oct.

and Copenhagen Drive, SolvangUSA.

20 4:30 – 8:30 p.m., Oct. 21 4:30 – 7:30

11

com/stomp.

p.m., Santa Barbara Zoo, 500 Ninos Dr.,

JD Souther Grammy-nominee and Songwriter’s Hall of Fame inductee JD Souther creates a perfect balance of understated jazz and ineffable pop narratives in his latest album, Tenderness. | 8 p.m., Lobero

13

Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa

Graham Nash Legendary artist Graham Nash is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, two-time Songwriter’s Hall of Fame inductee and Grammy Award winner. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre,

sorrow and how the dialogue between technique and creativity takes flight. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre,

Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

12 Poncho Sanchez For more than three decades as both a leader and a sideman, conguero Poncho Sanchez has stirred up a fiery stew of straight-ahead jazz, gritty soul music and infectious melodies and rhythms from a variety of Latin American and South American sources. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

13 Borderline Sébastien Ramirez and Honji Wang create dance-theater works that are deeply rooted in hip hop and street culture. Created for six performers— five dancers and an aerial rigger— Borderline is a series of stunning and intimate vignettes about human relationships, love and hate, joy and

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

19 - 21

Santa Barbara, sbzoo.org.

I’m With Her Multi-Grammy-Award winners Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz and Aoife O’Donovan— I’m With Her—have released seven solo efforts, co-founded two seminal bands and contributed to critically acclaimed albums from a host of esteemed artists.| 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

14 Old-Time Fiddlers’ Convention & Festival Goleta Valley Historical Society hosts the 47th annual Old-Time Fiddlers’ Convention & Festival, featuring all day entertainment, an Old-Time Music contest, free workshops, opportunities to “jam” with other musicians, family friendly fun and much more. | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Rancho La Patera & Stow House, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta, fiddlersfestival.org.

14 The Art of Brunch Wildling Museum of Art and Nature holds its annual fall event, The Art of

19 - 21 Quique Escamilla ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! opens the 14th season of free family concerts and community outreach with Juno award-winner Quique Escamilla performing original songs in Spanish and English inspired by the political and social issues of today. | Oct. 19, Isla Vista School, 6875 El Colegio Rd., Isla Vista; Oct. 20, Guadalupe City Hall, 918 Obispo St., Guadalupe; Oct. 21, Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St., Santa Barbara. All concerts start at 7 p.m., facebook.com/VivaelArteSB.

20 Santa Barbara Beer Festival Enjoy a sunny day at beautiful Elings Park, where attendees can listen to local bands while sampling from the best breweries and eateries in the country. | Noon – 4 p.m., Elings Park, 1298 Las Positas Rd., Santa Barbara, sbbeerfestival.com.

20 Paseo Nuevo Fall Runway Show Fall’s newest trends hit the runway as


Paseo Nuevo retailers and pop-up shops reveal their fall collections in active, beach, holiday and evening wear. The free event includes beauty bars, photo ops, samples, a DJ, special in-store events, pop-up shops, one-day sales and the highly anticipated runway show featuring more than 35 models wearing looks available at Paseo Nuevo. | 1 p.m., Paseo Nuevo

Santa Barbara’s largest art gallery: where Los Angeles and San Francisco meet to explore, discuss, and collect American Art.

Shops & Restaurants, 651 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, paseonuevoshopping.com.

20 - 21 Rhapsody in Blue Santa Barbara Symphony launches its 65th anniversary season with a program every bit equal to the occasion, beginning with Ernest von Dohnányi’s folk- and gospel-infused “American Rhapsody.” Chart-topping recording artist Jeffrey Biegel, renowned for his interpretations of works by both classic and contemporary composers, next takes to the piano for George Gershwin’s wonderfully intoxicating “Rhapsody in Blue.” The program concludes with Berlioz’s epic “Symphonie fantastique,” which captures the young composer’s consuming passion for an actress, and clearly exudes the revolutionary spirit of 1830 France. | 8 p.m. Oct. 20 & 3 p.m. Oct. 21, The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

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11 East Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara, California 93101 (805) 730-1460 | www.sullivangoss.com

Ojai Storytelling Festival on Tour Whether it’s a tall tale filled with hilarity or a journey of the imagination, master storytellers deliver a program children will never forget. | 3 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

21 St. Paul & The Broken Bones High-voltage soul-based rockers St. Paul & The Broken Bones render a blazing mating of ’60s soul fire with later-day influences like Sly Stone, David Bowie and Prince. The Alabama-based band’s takeno-prisoners live shows caught the eye of the Rolling Stones, who tapped them as an opening band. | 7 p.m., Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St.,

STEWART FINE ART

Santa Barbara, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

Established 1986 Diane Warren Stewart

21 Puddles Pity Party The “Sad Clown with the Golden Voice” is here with his heartfelt anthems and a suitcase full of Kleenex. But this Pity Party is not all sadness and longing; it is also peppered with a brilliant sense of the absurd, mixing lots of humor with the awkward, tender moments. | 8 p.m. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St.,

Open from 11 to 5:30, closed Thursday and Sunday, available by appointment.

Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

23 Joan Halifax in Conversation with Pico Iyer Joan Halifax is many things—activist, author, caregiver, teacher, Zen Buddhist priest—but in all her roles, she is consistently courageous and compassionate. Halifax runs the Upaya Zen Center k

215 W. MISSION STREE T WILLIAM G. PURVIS (1870-1924) SANTA BARBAR A, CIRCA 1920 FR AMED OIL ON BOARD 12” HIGH X 14” WIDE

SANTA BARBAR A, CA 9 3101 805-8 45-0255 PARKING IN BACK

FALL 2018

39


FALL DATEBOOK in New Mexico, a Zen Peacemaker community she opened in 1990 after founding and leading the Ojai Foundation for 10 years. In an intimate conversation with Pico Iyer, Halifax offers a unique opportunity to hear the stories behind her extraordinary life. | 7:30 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB,

road with a beautiful new album about which I am truly proud.” The new album, Whistle Down the Wind, gathers material by some of Baez’s favorite composers, from Tom Waits and Josh Ritter, to Eliza Gilkyson and Mary Chapin Carpenter. | 8 p.m., Arlington

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

Theatre, 1317 State St., Santa Barbara,

3 SLO Blues Dance Concerts The San Luis Obispo Blues Society is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing the Central Coast with high-quality live Blues music performances at reasonable prices. | 8 p.m., SLO Vets Hall, 801 Grand Ave., San Luis Obispo, sloblues.org.

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2 - 18

Finding Neverland Tony-award winner Diane Paulus directs this breathtaking show that follows playwright J.M. Barrie, the creator of Peter Pan and the magical world of Neverland. | 7:30 p.m., Harold Miossi

The Glass Menagerie A theatrical piece of distinct power, Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie is a memory play as told to us by Tom Wingfield, a merchant marine looking back on the Depression years he spent with his overbearing Southern genteel mother and his physically disabled, cripplingly shy sister. | SLO Repertory Theatre,

Hall, Cal Poly, 1 Grand Ave., San Luis Obispo, calpolyarts.org.

28

888 Morro St., San Luis Obispo,

Los Angeles Philharmonic Two of the nation’s most respected classical music institutions come together to create a shared centennial as Community Arts Music Association opens its 100th anniversary season with a performance by the dynamic Los Angeles Philharmonic. On the podium is British conductor Daniel Harding, who was mentored by both Simon Rattle and Claudio Abbado, and has since enjoyed a quintessentially meteoric career as one of the world’s most favored conductors. | 4 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

28 Pat Metheny Recently inducted into the Downbeat Hall of Fame as its youngest member and only its fourth guitarist, 20-time Grammy Award-winning guitarist Pat Metheny performs alongside his long-time drummer Antonio Sanchez, Malaysian/Australian bassist Linda Oh and British pianist Gwilym Simcock. | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org. 

November 1 Joan Baez Shortly after her 2017 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction, Joan Baez announced, “While 2018 will be my last year of formal, extended touring, I’m looking forward to being on the 40

SBSEASONS.COM

805/786-2440, slorep.org.

7 Michael McDonald: TRAP Benefit Concert Join Michael McDonald and special guests Bonnie Bramlett, Carl Graves, Amy McDonald, Tamara Champlin and Bill Champlin in celebrating The Rhythmic Arts Project (TRAP) and more than 20 years of service to our friends with intellectual and developmental differences locally and globally. | 7:30 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara,

Penn & Teller: Fool Us Ivan Amodei, on an epic journey to discover the secrets of life in his brand-new stage show Secrets and Illusions. | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

11 Voices for Justice Human Rights Watch Annual Dinner For 40 years, Human Rights Watch has been at the forefront of the international human rights movement, investigating human rights abuses and exposing the truth to create deep-rooted change. Support its important work at this annual benefit dinner. | 5:30 p.m., Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Santa Barbara, HRW.org/ santa-barbara.

13 Compagnie Käfig, Pixel Precision, energy, speed, power— France’s acclaimed Compagnie Käfig merges elements of Brazilian urban dance and capoeira with hip hop, modern dance and circus arts in its breakneck productions. A global phenomenon, Pixel is a surreal brew of bodies and abstractions yielding a visionary approach to both video and bodily gesture. | 8 p.m., The Granada

3

805/963-0761, lobero.org.

Día de Los Muertos SLO’s annual Día de Los Muertos celebration is a festive, family-friendly event featuring decorated altars, traditional dances, mariachi music, poets, artists and sellers, arts and crafts, educational talks, costume contests, Mexican food and beverages and more! | 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. , Mission

8 – Dec. 23 Peter Pan The PCPA season opens with an innovative new production of the high-flying musical, Peter Pan, based on the J.M. Barrie classic tale. | PCPA/Marian Theatre,

San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 751 Palm St,

9, 11

805/899-2222, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

La Boheme Opera Santa Barbara launches its 25th anniversary season with Puccini’s beloved story of love, friendship and loss. Omer Ben Saedia directs and Kostis Protopapas conducts a classic production from Des Moines Metro Opera. | 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9 & 2:30 p.m. Nov. 11,

14

San Luis Obispo, wilshirehospicecc.org.

3 Anthony Jeselnik Presented by Live Nation, Anthony Jeselnik is a comedy-industry veteran who has wowed audiences for more than 15 years, including on Chris Rock’s Total Blackout tour and his own show on Comedy Central, which ran for two seasons. | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre,

870 S. Bradley St., Santa Maria, pcpa.org.

Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara,

The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org.

9 - 11

3

CALM Antiques, Decorative Arts & Vintage Show & Sale From 18th century to mid-century modern, this antique and decorative arts show is presented by more than 80 dealers throughout the West. | 11

Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra Actor Jeff Goldblum has been lending his uniquely wry charm and unpredictable edge to films like Jurassic Park, The Fly and The Grand Budapest Hotel for more than four decades. But he’s also an accomplished pianist who shows off his chops in a jazz showmeets-musical hootenanny with his band, The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra. | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

a.m. – 6 p.m., Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, calmantiqueshows.com.

10 Ivan Amodei’s Secrets and Illusions Join master illusionist and winner of

Nebula Dance Lab: Helix Enter a world where dreaming takes flight in this collaborative dance exploration. Enjoy performances by Santa Barbara Centre for Aerial Dance and Santa Barbara Dance Theater, new works by Meredith Cabaniss and Shelby Lynn Joyce, and Nebula’s eveninglength work Through the Looking Glass.  | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805/963-0761, lobero.org. 

14 Tales From the Tavern Presents Mara Muldaur & her Bluesiana Band Maria Muldaur is best known worldwide for her 1974 mega-hit “Midnight at the Oasis,” which received several Grammy nominations and enshrined her forever in the hearts of Baby Boomers everywhere. Despite her considerable pop music success, her 50-year career could best be described a long and adventurous odyssey through the various


forms of American Roots Music. | 8 p.m., Tales From the Tavern, Maverick Saloon, 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, talesfromthetavern.com.

16 Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir & Tallinn Chamber Orchestra The Grammy Award-winning Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir is renowned for the shimmering quality of its sound and enthralling performances. The choir recorded Arvo Pärt’s “Te Deum” with the Tallinn Chamber Orchestra, now celebrating its 25th anniversary. Among the foremost interpreters of Estonian choral composer Pärt, the two ensembles, together with more than 50 artists, perform Adam’s Lament, Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten and works by Carlo Gesualdo, Brett Dean and Lepo Sumera. | 7 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, artsandlectures. ucsb.edu.

17 - 18 The Rite of Spring Santa Barbara Symphony teams with

State Street Ballet and Ensemble Theatre Company for performances marking the 100th anniversary of The Soldier’s Tale, Igor Stravinsky’s Faustian parable, paired with his ballet, The Rite of Spring. | 8 p.m. Nov. 17 & 3 p.m. Nov. 18, The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

20 Dorado Schmitt & the Django Festival All-Stars Back by popular demand, French guitarist/violinist and Gypsy jazz genius Dorado Schmitt and his all-star ensemble return for an encore performance celebrating the legacy of Django Reinhardt. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara,

Santa Barbara, paseonuevoshopping.com.

24 Home for the Holidays In the spirit of the season, bring the family and guests “Home for the Holidays” Thanksgiving Day weekend. Prepare to be delighted and warmed by favorite holiday classics in a program curated and led by the Santa Barbara Symphony’s celebrated Music and Artistic Director, Nir Kabaretti. For the young and the young at heart, an abbreviated Family Matinee program will be performed at 3 p.m., with a longer performance at 8 p.m. | The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

805/963-0761, lobero.org.

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23 – Dec. 30

Cinderella Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella is the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical from the creators of The Sound of Music and South Pacific that’s delighting audiences with its contemporary take on the classic tale. This lush production features an incredible orchestra, jaw-dropping transformations and all

Let it Snow Check out Santa Barbara’s “best in snow” as Paseo Nuevo’s nightly snowfall shows delight Christmas carolers, shoppers and families alike. | 6 – 7 p.m., Paseo Nuevo Shops & Restaurants, 651 Paseo Nuevo,

the moments we love—the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more—plus some surprising new twists. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., Santa Barbara, 805/899-2222, granadasb.org.

28 The Tallest Man on Earth Playing spare, tuneful indie folk enlivened by passionate vocals and poetic lyrics, The Tallest Man on Earth is Swedish singer-songwriter Kristian Matsson, whose “highly personal lyrics and irresistibly rollicking guitar [are] a thing of refined and impeccable beauty,” says NPR. | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

29 Jake Shimabukuro Expect the unexpected as Ukulele wizard Jake Shimabukuro’s virtuosic performances combine his singular mix of classical grandiosity, jazz ingenuity and rock-star tenacity. | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. 

AUTUMN MORNING BY PEG QUINN

Ending a cold dark orbit the sun fingers through leafy tresses warming the forest floor air still as the space between heart beats, invaded by the fragrant weight of pine and eucalyptus seagulls clouding the waters edge rise on cue, the pop and snap of pressing wings a celebration. FALL 2018

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A Real Call 2 Action with Natalie Orfalea SOME ACTIVISTS STAND in front of television cameras, demanding societal changes. Some orate from stages. Others organize marches down avenues. Yet, there are only a handful of people who work like Santa Barbara-based Natalie Orfalea does—quietly, tirelessly, courageously, and with focus, determination

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BY NANCY SHOBE

and a kind of unparalleled willpower. Orfalea is a well-known name in the Santa Barbara community. Natalie and Paul Orfalea (her former husband and the founder of Kinko’s) co-founded the Orfalea Family Foundation, as well as the Orfalea Fund, which sunsetted in 2015. For 15 plus years,

the Orfalea Foundation was instrumental in affecting change with local initiatives such as food system reform in the schools, early childhood education, youth development, education and disaster preparedness. “I’ve always had the mindset that doing philanthropy close to home is a really good model. You can see it, know the people who are implementing the programs and get inside various organizations that are delivering the goods and services,” said Orfalea during a recent telephone interview. “We (the Orfalea Foundation) had a lot of programming and multiple year commitments,” she says. “We completed those cycles of work and passed the baton on to the next leaders.

PHOTO: AMY BARNARD

FIRST PERSON


Now, it’s an opportunity for a fresh start.” And a fresh start it is, with the founding of the Natalie Orfalea Foundation in 2016. With new starts come new visions. This time, Orfalea is taking her social activism to a bigger stage—documentary filmmaking as a platform for education and spurring social change. Together with her partner Lou Buglioli (chairman and chief executive officer of Viewpointe, a director on the board of Direct Relief International and a 45-year veteran in the Financial Services and Technology Outsourcing Industry), Orfalea invests in documentary films that illuminate issues around women and girls, global health, immigration, environment, conservation, climate change and social justice. As a member of Impact Partners, Chicago Media Project and Women Moving Millions, and on the advisory board of One Heart World-Wide and the Leadership Council for UCSB Arts & Lectures, Orfalea can affect change in a bigger way by disbursing the message on a global messaging platform. “Documentary films really provide a wonderful way of amplifying the message,” says Orfalea. “Lou and I work with these different organizations and they have hundreds of projects. They curate them, vet them and pass them on to us. We talk about which areas fall into our interests and then look deeper at the filmmaker, director and treatment of the material.” A sample of documentaries that Orfalea and Buglioli have been involved with include Eagle Huntress—about a young Mongolian woman whose father has to go up against the tribe in order to train his daughter in the ancestral male tradition of how to hunt with the golden eagle; Bending the Arc—about Dr. Paul Farmer, Dr. Jim Yong Kim, activist Ophelia Dahl, Todd McCormack and investor Thomas White’s movement in the 1980s that forever changed global health; and Step— about a girls’ drill team in an inner city school. Orfalea has invested in a total of 22 films to date, the list of which also includes Won’t You Be My Neighbor, Feeling of Being Watched, The Fourth Estate and The Blue Wall. “We like to get involved in change,” she says. “It’s always characterized how we do our work and it still characterizes how we do our work...It’s so important that we look upon one another as a community and realize how interlinked we are…We are truly all connected.” 


REARVIEW MIRROR

UCSB COLLEGE OF The Little College CREATIVE STUDIES That Could: CELEBRATES

50 YEARS

Above: The College of Creative Studies at UCSB is in its 50th anniversary academic year. Near right: Marvin Mudrick was the founding provost of CCS and chief architect of its unique structure and programming.

Though it’s the smallest of the three colleges at UCSB, the College of Creative Studies is a thriving community of faculty and students now celebrating its 50th year. Designed as a college for students ready to immerse themselves in their chosen area of discipline from the onset, the College of Creative Studies (CCS) offers a less conventional approach to education, based on independent learning and research. The idea for the College began back in 1965 when Chancellor Vernon I. Cheadle commissioned Dr. Marvin Mudrick, Professor of English, to serve as Academic Planner for the UCSB campus. Tasked with proposing a long-range academic plan for the growth of campus, Mudrick went to work on several ideas. Knowing Cheadle’s interest in a special college that would serve

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a small portion of the student population, he proposed a plan for just that: a separate college at the university, independently staffed and administered, with a specially selected student body. The idea was that these students would not only need to meet the UC entrance requirements, but also demonstrate talent for original work in art or science. “Chancellor Cheadle gave

Mudrick the opportunity to invent a different approach to college in CCS that would let unnaturally focused and dedicated students literally create new knowledge in their chosen passion,” explains Bruce Tiffney, Dean Emeritus & Biology Faculty. The proposal was approved by the Regents in February 1967 and by fall that same year, the College opened with an enrollment of 50 students. “CCS started as an innovative college to draw unusual and committed students to UCSB at a time when, honestly, UCSB was everyone’s backup school,” shares Tiffney. “Of course, over time, the reputation of UCSB grew tremendously and the college has become more and more widely known for the demanding and rigorous freedom it gives the fascinated student.” Originally housed in a very small Marine

PHOTOS: COURTESY COLLEGE OF CREATIVE STUDIES (3)

BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK


barracks building next to the library—a relic of WWII when the campus was a seaside military base—CCS moved to its present site, still a former Marine barrack, but a larger one, in the fall of 1975. While other “experimental” colleges established during this era at universities across the country have come and gone, CCS remains true to its mission of providing talented and imaginative undergraduates with the intellectual, collaborative environment to be challenged and stimulated. “CCS offers an immersive, accelerated experience with a goal of participating in the creation of new knowledge or creative work,” shares Kathy Foltz, Interim Dean, College of Creative Studies. “Students meet with a faculty adviser regularly to discuss interests, the academic plan

Above, Hank Pitcher, near the top of the frame, with CCS art students, date unknown. Pitcher, a renowned local artist, was one of the first students accepted at UCSB’s new College of Creative Studies, where he worked with Bay Area Figurative Artist Paul Wonner and Los Angeles iconoclast Charles Garabedian. He is currently Senior Lecturer SOE at CSS, where he has been part of the core faculty since 1971.

and career goals, and instead of grades, student small yet mighty place for students to pursue work is evaluated in a way that translates to advanced studies within eight different units. This encourages risk taking and, coupled majors, from math and computing to art and with the experience gained through conducting music composition. “CCS allows a student to research or creative work, students learn how get her hands dirty early, where the novelto learn.” She adds, “This approach was ‘radical’ ist writes, and the scientist does original in 1967, but it has worked for 50 years now! research. It is a place where failure is merely CCS is unique because it offers a student an a rite of passage, not a disaster,” says Tiffney. intellectual home where they can work with “What an honor, for all of us as mentors, to be others who may have varied interests, but who involved with such young people at UCSB, full wish to collaborate and interact.” of the greatness of heart and the nobility of efWith just 385 students, CCS remains a fort that may transform and save our world.” 

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LEGACIES

UCSB Arts & Lectures

Beyond the Classroom

(A&L) has inspired and taught university students in the performing arts since 1958. Over the decades A&L has continually expanded its reach, targeting both K—12 students and adults to promote active participation in the arts, with renowned lecturers and performers from around the globe. Entering its 60th season, the nonprofit has become the most expansive arts and lectures program up and down the coast between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Arts & Lectures’ reach has broadened as well, with writing, journalism, advocacy, cooking and cuisine, psychology, education, public health, sciences, economics and history among its topics. Arts & Lectures actually began at what was then Santa Barbara College. It was a division that wanted to assist students in experiencing those things they read about in books, through dance, concerts, plays and art exhibits. The division was considered an extension of the classroom. The A&L program began to involve the public at campus events under A&L Director Jan Oetinger, who came onboard in 1980. The current A&L Miller McCune Executive Director, Celesta M. Billeci, has been at A&L since Oetinger retired in 2000. Under Billeci’s direction, A&L’s events have grown and expanded both on and off campus. “We play a vital role on campus, supplementing academic enrichment by providing students with direct access to world-class

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Grammy Award-winning band La Santa Cecilia performs a free concert for Santa Barbara County 4th-6th grade students at the Granada Theatre as part of UCSB Arts & Lectures’s Arts Adventures.

performers across (the) disciplines,” says Billeci. “This access extends into the community with programs that bring artists into elementary classrooms, local dance studios and underserved communities.” A longtime offshoot of A&L is its Educational Outreach Program, which reaches 30,000 individuals each year. The program explores all opportunities, then matches up interests to connect the artists and speakers with local educators and community groups. It has gained such popularity that the outreach component is implemented into the contracts for most of the artists and speakers who come to town. The program serves students and classes at UCSB, but also K—12, Santa Barbara City College, Westmont and community connections, including the Santa Barbara library, Town Halls and others. Half of its outreach participants come from ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara!, which serves students and families in schools and community venues throughout the county, including New Cuyama and Guadalupe. “Education has always been core to our mission,” continues Billeci. “That’s one thing that makes us different from other presenters: we have an education program and it is as important as the public events we produce. Our mantra is access for all. Education is what we’re all about; it all starts with education. Our events are an opportunity for the community to learn something. We bring artists all throughout the

county. We leave no stone unturned.” One of those inspirational events involves incarcerated youth. Five to six times a year A&L works with Santa Barbara County Probation officials to transport artists to the Los Prietos Camp and to Santa Maria Juvenile Hall. Artists give a special hour-long performance for residents that includes time for talk and questions. A&L’s season opener on September 29 is Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, featuring Lil Buck and Jared Grimes in a program called Spaces. Band members will also perform a free educational program narrated by Director Wynton Marsalis called Who Is Thelonious Monk, for local elementary students. They will learn about the musical legacy of Monk and modern jazz in the context of 20th century African American history. Band members will also fan out throughout various schools in the community to offer various clinics and presentations. Individual donors largely provide funding for the Educational Outreach Program, with additional support from national, state and local granting agencies, as well as some family foundations. The breadth and quality of its education programs are unique to A&L, a fact that many funders recognize. The program also receives funding from the University for UCSB student education opportunities. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

PHOTO: DAVID BAZEMORE

BY CHUCK GRAHAM


Photo: Nell Campbell

The SBCC Promise Thanks to our community of generous supporters, the SBCC Promise provides all recent local high school graduates with access to an outstanding and affordable education at Santa Barbara City College. All fees, books, and supplies are covered for two years.

Your gift makes it possible.

sbccpromise.org | (805) 730- 4416


LEGACIES

The Lasting Impact of

Anthony Bourdain

THE TRAGIC DEATH of Anthony Bourdain hit fans around the world like a shockwave, and particularly those in Santa Barbara, where just one month earlier he made one of his last public appearances at a soldout benefit for UCSB Arts & Lectures to raise funds for core programs and educational outreach. Without an inkling of how special the night would become in retrospect, I was honored to enjoy Bourdain’s raw and unfiltered presentation offering entertaining life lessons and anecdotes from the kitchen and on the road. The renowned food personality, award-winning journalist and internationally-acclaimed raconteur delighted all of us with a colorful discussion of his unlikely rise from being “42 years old, completely broke-ass, standing in a kitchen dunking French fries,” to doing what he considers the greatest job in the world, where “life does not suck.” The irony of his suicide was not lost on those who attended, but the legacy of his generosity, way with words and openness to new experiences also lives on. He inspired us to travel with passion, eat with gusto, drink with strangers and connect with our fellow human beings. In death, as in life, Anthony Bourdain brought us closer together. 

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PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) KATHRYN GRACE (4), DAVID BAZEMORE, COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES, DAVID BAZEMORE

BY LESLIE DINABERG


“Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s OK. The journey changes you; it should change you ... You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.” — ANTHONY BOURDAIN

“Context and memory play powerful roles in all the truly great meals in one’s life.” — ANTHONY BOURDAIN

“Maybe that’s enlightenment enough: to know that there is no final resting place of the mind; no moment of smug clarity. Perhaps wisdom ... is realizing how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go.” — ANTHONY BOURDAIN Clockwise from top left: Anthony Bourdain addresses UCSB Arts & Lectures supporters at the sold out benefit event at the Santa Barbara Historical Museum (4). A&L supporters Lynda Weinman & Bruce Heavin and Sara Miller McCune with Anthony Bourdain. Participating local chefs with Anthony Bourdain. Event Planner Tamara Jensen, Anthony Bourdain and A&L Ambassador Sherry Villanueva.

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T HE R IVER’S J OURNEY – A W IDER V IEW OCTOBER 4 – DECEMBER 2, 2018 C O N N I E C O N N A L LY • H O L L I H A R M O N • L I B B Y S M I T H N I C O L E S T R A S B U R G • N I N A WA R N E R • PA M E L A Z W E H L- B U R K E

E a r l i e r t h i s y e a r, t h e W i l d l i n g M u s e u m o f A r t a n d N a t u r e i n S a n t a Y n e z h o s t e d t h e e x h i b i t i o n T h e R i v e r ’ s J o u r n e y : O n e Y e a r, S i x A r t i s t s , 9 2 M i l e s , w h i c h w a s o r g a n i z e d i n c o l l a b o r a t i o n w i t h a g r o u p o f S a n t a B a r b a r a a r t i s t s c a l l e d R o s e C o m p a s s . S u b s e q u e n t l y, a n u p d a t e d v e r s i o n o f t h e e x h i b i t i o n w a s i n s t a l l e d i n S a n t a B a r b a r a C i t y H a l l . F i n a l l y, t h e a r t i s t s o f R o s e C o m p a s s p l a n o n a n u p d a t e d a n d e x p a n d e d v e r s i o n o f t h e e x h i b i t i o n a t S u l l i v a n G o s s – A n A m e r i c a n G a l l e r y. T h i s timely exhibition deals with the conservation of water – where it comes from, how it’s used, and how we can protect it.

11 East Anapamu Street | Santa Barbara, California 93101 | (805) 730-1460 | www.sullivangoss.com


The Essence of Santa Barbara Style Beautiful spaces don’t have to be confined to a single design

aesthetic. As you’ve seen many times in the pages of our magazine, chic and stylish homes come in all sorts of shapes and styles and sizes. The one feature that the majority of these homes do have in common is that they’ve been developed with the creative guidance of a professional interior designer. Here are projects from three of Santa Barbara’s top designers—Penny Bianchi, Jodi Goldberg and Ann James—that are as distinct and varied as the women themselves. From Ann’s Spanish sophistication to Penny’s French Country charmer and Jodi’s clean and serene Zen style abode, a refined sense of design and extraordinary attention to detail imbue each of these homes with a distinctive vision, combining beauty with comfort and livability, that imbues the essence of life in Santa Barbara.

PHOTO:

LESLIE DINABERG, M ANAGING EDITOR


Sophisticated Spanish Style BY NANC Y R ANSOHOFF

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PHOTOS BY JIM BARTSCH


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he thread that connects the work of interior designer Ann James is her attention to detail and emphasis on combining style and livability. A Spanish-style project in Montecito, infused with a sophisticated sensibility, beautifully displays all of those qualities.

Artful Architecture

Collections In this case, “They [the homeowners] came with an abundance of furniture and things collected over a lifetime from their previous home,” Ann says. They worked together to compile an inventory of each piece of the collection,

which focused on Mexican, Spanish Colonial and Spanish styles, with some antiques. “The client’s love of that style so coincided with mine,” says Ann, who sourced additional furnishings from Michael Haskell at Haskell Antiques in Montecito and from Holler & Saunders, Ltd. in Nogales, Arizona, to fill gaps where needed. “For instance,” says Ann, “I wanted a corner cabinet for the living room and I got in touch with Holler & Saunders. They sent a photo of an 18th century Peruvian piece that they had and we took it.” When she couldn’t find a piece that she had in mind for a particular spot, Ann turned to Santa Barbara-based fine furniture designer and builder Blaine Taylor, who created numerous custom pieces, including the dining room table, sideboard, consoles and service tables.

“I believe designing a home should always be a collaborative endeavor between the client and the designer. My goal is to design unique homes that reflect the individual tastes and lifestyles of the people that live in them. Combining style, comfort and appropriateness in beautiful personalized environments is the ultimate reward.” —Ann James

Pleasing Palette The warm, rich color palette of the home was established by the faded reds and blues of the Persian rugs, which were sourced mainly from Aga John

Rugs and J. Iloulian Rugs in Los Angeles. Also incorporated into the design were the homeowner’s collections of Spanish and Mexican pottery, and early to mid-20th century California art, which worked seamlessly with both the color and feel of the house.

Working Together Ann, whose design business has been based in Santa Barbara for more than 30 years, notes, “I believe designing a home should always be a collaborative endeavor between the client and the designer.” She says of working with the homeowner on the approximately one-year project, “I knew I could bring her the best of what I could find and she would recognize and appreciate it,” she notes. “It’s lovely to work with someone with such sophisticated taste. She has an eye. It was so much fun.” The end result is a timeless, refined home that exudes an unfussy elegance. “It totally reflects who they are,” says Ann, “and that’s the most important thing to me with all of my projects.”  56

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PHOTOS: ANN JAMES PORTRAIT BY JOSH T. MEADOWS. ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY JIM BARTSCH

The crucial first step was transforming the 1970s-era house to a Spanish style, which was carried out by Jerry Goodman Architectural. After doing some research, the homeowners connected with Ann for the interior design, and she knew immediately that “we were right on the same wavelength,” she says. “And the architecture was so beautiful.” In describing her design philosophy, Ann notes, “I don’t have a signature style. It’s always the client’s house. My job is to pull out of the client what it is they love and we make it work to design a unique home for them. It’s to get an understanding of what they’re drawn to. I ask a lot of questions. Sometimes it’s easier to find out what they don’t like and take it from there.”


Here’s Your Moment of Zen PHOTOS BY A MY BARNARD & NANC Y NEIL

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BY NANC Y R ANSOHOFF

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PHOTOS: OPENING SPREAD BY AMY BARNARD. THIS PAGE: LEFT, BY AMY BARNARD; OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM RIGHT, AMY BARNARD, NANCY NEIL (3)


he Santa Barbara home of designer Jodi Goldberg and her husband, Johnny, is infused with a sense of calm and peace that belies the story behind it. The couple lost their longtime family home, a colorful Balinese-style retreat with lush gardens that was a labor of love for Jodi, in the Montecito debris flows in January. Jodi, who is the owner of interior and landscape design firm Jodi G Designs, says of their current rented home, “I feel grateful that I had a project for our family as a way to heal from the loss of everything we had and knew. I wanted to create an organic, open, light-filled sanctuary with very neutral colors. Right now we need a clean and simple space with lots of life so we can heal and stay in the positive and the moving forward.”

Clean and Serene The light, airy and uncluttered design is a study in serenity, with a palette of whites, creams and greys, punctuated with natural textures and materials. The spacious living room incorporates thoughtfully curated pieces including African art and textiles, along with a large driftwoodframed mirror by Santa Barbara’s Madera del Mar and custom-made feather art by San Francisco artist Trudy Elliott. An adjoining open dining area is anchored by a live-edge suar wood table from Bali. On a teak root console table by the front door

are a Buddha statue and Tibetan bell that were the only treasures found in the debris flow rubble. Though she and her husband were the clients in this project, Jodi, who began her career by styling for editorials at the age of 16, followed her tried-and-true philosophy. “When I design for my clients, the first step is to get to know how they want to live in their spaces. I want to make each room functional, with a specific intention in mind, and create the magic to bring their vision to life for them.” For example, she says that for this project, “I wanted to make sure that the living room was a place where we could put up our feet and relax, and also have groups gather together.”

PHOTOS: OPPOSITE PAGE, NANCY NEIL (4); THIS PAGE, AMY BARNARD (2)

Making It Work Since both husband and wife work from home, Jodi made it a priority to design inviting spaces where they could let their creative juices flow. Her beautifully minimalist office incorporates a large raw wood table and painting by local artist Todd Mossman with the words “let go, let in,” the couple’s mantra after losing their home. Johnny, who is known professionally as Johnny G, invented fitness programs Spinning, Kranking and In-Trinity.

“Making a connection with the client and understanding their vision is the single most important aspect of my discovery process. I like to know how they live and most importantly, how they want to feel in their new space.” —Jodi Goldberg

A lower-level workout room includes his new innovation, Spirit bikes, and the adjoining den provides a hang-out space for playing guitar with their son.

Coming Together Another design goal was for the inside to flow seamlessly with the outdoors. “I love connecting the in and the out,” says Jodi. An outdoor deck that overlooks the sparkling pool and ocean beyond is a favorite spot for dining and entertaining, along with seating areas around the pool and garden. Overall, the home embodies Jodi’s signature design approach of infusing interiors with soul and character by mixing furniture, unique artwork and one-of-a-kind objects, and blending in unexpected and distinctive elements. “This is a Zen retreat for us,” Jodi says. She points out gifts given by friends and clients after the family lost their home, including large crystals on the kitchen island and stones etched with the words “love & light,” “strength” and “gratitude.” “Words cannot explain how the community came together to be supportive, with so much love,” she says. “This is a process and every day people are taking steps to stay positive, move forward and help one another.” 


Montecito Foothills Meet French Country Chic BY NANC Y R ANSOHOFF

PHOTOS BY A MY BARNARD


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“A house should feel personally collected … not decorated. … I’ve been collecting things my whole life because I don’t like anything new. I like everything old, weathered and used.” —Penny Bianchi


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hen attorney David Cohn and his wife, Debby, came to Montecito from Bakersfield, they connected with two key people who helped make their dream home a reality. After buying a remodeled 1960s-’70s ranch-style house, they hired Jon Sorrell of Sorrell Design, who transformed their ordinary ranch into a French country-style stone farmhouse with a historic feel. “Even though it isn’t an old house,” says Interior Designer Penny Bianchi, “it feels and looks like one.”

Shared Vision The Cohns had a vision for the interior, but needed help in executing it. When they saw online photos of Penny and Adam Bianchi’s Provence-style farmhouse (featured in Santa Barbara Seasons’ Fall 2017 issue), they knew they had found a match. “They said, ‘Your house looks like what we want our house to look like,’” says Penny. Penny, who has been designing for 49 years, emphasizes the need for creative alignment and a shared vision for each project. “All my work is certainly not the same style, but there’s a general approach. It’s important to be on the same page. I talk with my clients about their lifestyle, what they are interested in and what they like, and I listen,” she says. “In the end, it should not look like a decorator did it.” Perfectly Imperfect The Cohn home is infused with a gracious old-world European feel. “There is nothing that looks new,” notes Penny. “Everything has a patina, old finishes that are worn and look like they have been used and loved. I like to see a mixture of things that look like they were collected over the years. European houses are imperfect—they have cracks. I call it ‘perfectly imperfect.’ For some projects I have gone after limestone counters with a hammer!” The living room presented one of the biggest challenges of the approximately one-year design project. “It’s a central room with no windows,” says Penny. “It opens onto rooms with windows so it gets light, but color was very important. We used a mix of colors and prints, with some chinoiserie prints, for the upholstered furniture.” Timeless Trove

Many of the furnishings and accessories were sourced locally. “There is an enormous trove here in Santa Barbara, with all of the old estates,” Penny notes. Wood-plank floors are warmed throughout the house by old area rugs. “New rugs are against my religion!” says Penny. “When they’re made with vegetable dyes they fade beautifully.” She sources most of her rugs from Shaw Zahiri of Summerland Oriental Rugs, who specializes in handmade carpets from around the world. They add to the timeless quality of the house, which is a signature of Penny’s designs. “If it’s a trend I’m allergic to it!” “It’s a very happy house,” says Penny. “Debby and Dave have grandchildren who visit and it’s a great house for children, with a lot of indoor-outdoor space and lovely gardens.” Outdoor living is enhanced with seating, walking and dining areas, and graced with a gurgling stone fountain. Growing up in Pasadena, Penny was drawn to design at an early age. “Other kids would be out on the swings and I was rearranging the furniture,” she says. “My mother gave me Elsie De Wolfe’s book, I read it and said, ‘Oh my gosh, this is a job?!’” Penny graduated from the University of Southern California with an English major and later took courses at the New York School of Interior Design. “I’m so lucky that I’ve been able to do what I love doing my whole life,” she says, “It’s a passion.” 


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THE NEW

PASO ROBLES CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, COURTESY EL PASO DE ROBLES AREA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, COURTESY TABLAS CREEK, CELESTE HOPE

BY CHERYL CRABTREE

Fall means harvest in Paso Robles—time to gather and sort the juicy, flavor-packed grapes in the hundreds of vineyards that surround the city. Wine-related activities fill the local calendar, with good reason. Paso Robles is a world-class wine destination that rivals Napa, Sonoma and other California districts. According to Chris Taranto of the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance, the greater Paso Robles AVA has more than 200 wineries and 40,000 vineyard acres planted with 62 varietals, and includes 11 sub-appellations. Although wine growing has existed in Paso Robles for centuries, it wasn’t a major player in the international wine industry until fairly recently.

Paso’s winemaking roots date back to the 1700s, when the Franciscan Padres planted vines and fermented wines at Mission San Miguel. At the same time, the native Salinan Indians informed the Spaniards of an important regional resource—abundant spring waters—that would later give rise to a burgeoning tourism industry and the birth of the city we know today. Ranching and farming operations dominated the landscape when local landowners Daniel D. Blackburn and Drury James (legendary outlaw Jesse James’s uncle) developed and promoted access to abundant hot and cold sulphur springs and mud baths in

Vintage Paso Robles (far left) and the timeless aesthetic of Tablas Creek Vineyard (top right) and Hope Vineyard (bottom left).


the 1860s. Central Coast residents and tourists began to flock to the area to “take the cure.”

A City is Born

The first train arrived in the late 1880s, and Blackburn, James and other investors set out to design and build a town with first-class amenities. The city was incorporated in 1889, and new buildings—including an expansive bathhouse over the mineral spring, an opera house, the Hotel El Paso de Robles and Victorian and Craftsman homes—sprouted up around the new City Park. Water and wine went hand in hand from the get-go. The city’s first commercial wineries were also established in the 1880s, including Andrew York’s Ascension Winery (now York Mountain Winery). In the early decades of the 20th century other families—the Nerellis, Dusis, Martinellis, Busis, Vostis and Bianchis, to name a few—also launched wineries. Famed Polish concert pianist Ignacy Paderewski

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bought the 2,000-acre Rancho Ignacio in the Adelaida region west of Paso Robles and planted a vineyard with Petite Sirah and Zinfandel. He also entertained visitors, including President Theodore Roosevelt and actor Douglas Fairbanks. Prohibition squelched the burgeoning wine industry, but in the late 1960s and ‘70s, it sprang back to life.

Grape is the Word

In the early 1970s, UC Davis enology doctoral student Gary Eberle and his professors traveled south to Paso Robles to collect soil samples. Their research pinpointed Paso Robles as an area with great grape-growing potential. Eberle soon moved there to cofound Estrella River Winery (now Meridian) and worked as head winemaker for nearly a decade. In 1974, Eberle planted Syrah vines— the first in the United States since the repeal of Prohibition—and was the first Paso Robles

winemaker to make a 100 percent Syrah wine. “When I first came to Paso Robles, there were three wineries—Pesenti, Rotta and York—and maybe 300 to 400 acres of grapes, and that was it,” Eberle recalls. “It was a farming community that had lost the almond industry. There was dry farm grain, cattle, alfalfa, and slightly less than 7,000 residents in the community and not a whole lot of opportunity at the time. The wine industry was the kind of boon we needed to see the kind of growth we hoped to generate.” Paso Robles’ relative affordability attracted about 15 wineries over a 15-year period, mostly smaller, family-run enterprises with limited funding. Eberle says that collectively, we all “made a lot of mistakes early on. Chenin Blanc and Sauvignon Blanc just didn’t do well here.” But he adds that the pioneers also discovered the varietals that thrived. “Cabernet, Zinfandel and Syrah were real champions that worked well.”


PHOTOS: (L-R) COURTESY EBERLE, COURTESY TABLAS CREEK

Left, the patio at Eberle Winery overlooks the vineyard. Above, the “Scruffy Hill” block at Tablas Creek Vineyard uses dry farming techniques.

According to Eberle, Paso Robles’ rise in the wine world “really started in the mid to late ‘80s, I think because we were making some really good wines.” Eberle himself officially established his own label and winery partnership in 1982. He bought nearly 64 acres a few miles west of Estrella and released his flagship wine, the 1979 Cabernet Sauvignon, the same year. He also built an onsite winery and helped establish the Paso Robles appellation. Over the years he built a tasting room and wine caves, and began to offer complimentary tastings and tours to attract visitors and a loyal following, a tradition Eberle Winery continues to this day. Chuck and Marlyn Hope and their young family also planted some of Paso Robles’ earliest vines. “I was born in Bakersfield and my family was working for my grandfather in the beer business,” says Austin Hope, current head of Hope Family Wines, adding that the move came about after his grandfather passed away and the business was sold to the general manager. The family sought advice from Chuck’s father’s best friend, a farmer, on where to go and what to farm. “He said,

‘move to Paso Robles and plant apples and grapes.’ We moved to Paso in 1978 and did just that, but we quickly learned apples were not the right thing to grow and transitioned into farming only wine grapes.” Austin Hope remembers Paso as “a sleepy farming town with very few wine grapes and only a handful of wineries. Grain and cattle were dominant at the time—grape farmers were definitely not well liked and were considered outsiders. The funny part about this statement is that the majority of the grain and cattle ranchers are now grape farmers.” The Hope family started making wine in 1987-88 under the Hope Farms Winery label, and built a tasting room and bed and breakfast, which they eventually sold to Summerwood Winery. Chuck Hope helped organize the Paso Robles Vintners and Growers Association in the early 1990s. In the meantime, Austin Hope studied fruit science at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and traveled to France to learn more about winemaking, and the family made plans to build a new wine production facility and tasting room. The Hopes founded Treana Winery in

1996, a label devoted to Rhône-influenced blends, with Austin Hope as winemaker. In 2009 they created Hope Family Wines, a collection of five distinct labels. Austin states that the flagship Treana Red is “considered to be the first Super Paso red blend created to rival the red wines of Napa Valley.” The Treana lineup also includes a Rhone white blend, Cabernet and Chardonnay. The eponymous Austin Hope Cabernet, created to set the standard for Paso Robles luxury Cabernet, took seven years to perfect before he released the inaugural 2015 vintage. “This wine received the highest score ever given to a Paso Robles wine in the 30 years Wine Enthusiast has been in publication, with a 97 point rating,” says Austin, who also produces five limited-production Rhone wines under the label. The Liberty School label produces value-laden Cabernets that have helped bring national attention to Paso Robles for more than 20 years. Austin Hope created the Troublemaker label with his childhood nickname “to try and make wine more fun and less pretentious.” Around the same time the Hopes were first

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Above, Tablas Creek Vineyard cover crops. Right and below, inside and outside the Treana Winery Tasting Cellar.

planting grapevines, the founders of Tablas Creek Vineyard, located about 10 miles west of the Hope estate, were also researching possibilities for a new wine venture in California. In 1989, the families of longtime friends Robert Haas, an East Coast wine importer, and Jacques Perrin, proprietor of Châteauneuf du Pape’s Château de Beaucastel, partnered to establish an estate winery with vines sourced from the Perrins’ renowned vineyard in France. The Haas and Perrin families searched all over the state until they found a suitable site in Paso Robles. As Robert’s son Jason Haas explains, “There were three things [Robert Haas] and the Perrins were looking for, and Paso Robles was the only place they felt confident they’d find all three: one, a long growing season with plenty of heat and sun but cool nights; two, enough rainfall (minimum 25 inches) to dry farm; and three, calcium-rich soils. They absolutely looked other places, and in fact, didn’t come across Paso Robles until they were four years into their search. If you’d asked them at the beginning where they thought they were going to end up, they would have told you ‘Sonoma.’ ”

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Jason adds, “at the time, Paso Robles was pretty much a dying ranching town. There were a few vineyards and wineries here (we were the 17th), but 50 percent vacancy in the storefronts downtown, not many options for dining or shopping, and no real buzz about the place. The first meal they had on the property they bought at KFC. They still talk about it.”

A New Era

Paso Robles today is indeed a far cry from the sleepy cowboy town it was in the late 1800s and early to mid-1900s. Gary Eberle says the winemaking successes of the early 1980s helped spur the changes. “More wineries came in, more people came in, and then we needed more hotels and restaurants. Once we got the ball rolling, it was easier to keep it going, like a big snowball rolling down a hill.” Finer dining establishments (a step above the casual saloons that peppered the downtown streets) with a wine country focus began to open throughout the city, especially on or near the downtown City Park. Pioneering “foodie” restaurants near the square included French-inspired Bistro Laurent and Villa Creek, followed by Thomas

Hill Organics, Buona Tavola, Artisan, plus McPhee’s down the road in Templeton. (Villa Creek and Artisan are now closed.) More recent players on the scene include Il Cortile Ristorante, Somm Kitchen and Cello at Allegretto Vineyard Resort, and small restaurants at winery sites, including JUSTIN, Niner and Opolo. At the start of the new millennium, a number of upscale, wine-inspired hotels opened to accommodate the sophisticated visitors who began to choose Paso Robles for wine tasting experiences. La Bellasera Hotel & Suites—Paso’s first full-service luxury boutique hotel—opened in August 2007, two miles south of downtown off Highway 46 West near Highway 101. The luxurious 16-room Hotel Cheval opened the same year at the southeast edge of downtown’s City Park. (Another 20 rooms are currently under construction across the street).

A Bright Future on the Horizon Today Paso Robles is a thriving community of more than 30,000 residents and a vibrant wine country destination with more than ample creature comforts to satisfy the


PHOTOS: (L-R) COURTESY TABLAS CREEK, COURTESY TREANA (2)

constantly growing number of visitors. Stalwarts of “old” Paso Robles add to the region’s unique character and charm. The hot springs still soothe at Paso Robles Inn and River Oaks Hot Springs spa. The 1800s bathhouse building and the Pine Street Saloon still stand on Pine Street near the square. Paso Robles Inn is still going strong, with historic and wine-themed rooms on the west side of City Park, and a recent groundbreaking for a new spa facility. Paso Robles’ evolution shows no signs of abatement. According to Gary Eberle, Paso Robles has not yet reached full development. He says 3,000 new rooms (six hotels) are currently under construction and scheduled to open in the next 18 months, and six or seven new restaurants are in the works. All this bodes well for Paso Robles visitors, who will soon have an even wider array of lodging options, from well-known brands like La Quinta and Holiday Inn Express to one-of-a-kind resorts. Austin Hope also looks ahead to a bright future for his family and for Paso Robles in general. “We plan to continue to educate people on this amazing region and continue

to elevate the quality of Paso Robles wines and vineyards. I am very proud of Paso Robles and I have so much joy in growing grapes and creating an honest product for all to enjoy.” Jason Haas, reflecting on the region’s growth the past three decades, says, “It’s been amazing to see Paso Robles grow up around us. Both from a viticultural perspective and from a cultural/wine community perspective, Paso Robles has exceeded our expectations. While we were pretty confident that we’d be able to make great red Rhône-style wines here,

and we feel those expectations were met, we’ve been exceptionally happy with how the cool nights keep the whites and rosés we make vibrant and fresh. And to see the wine community blossom … and the town come alive with places to eat and shop and things to do, thanks to the visitors we receive, those have been happy surprises for us. We’re excited to be a part of such a great Paso Robles wine community, and as we approach our 30th anniversary next year, we feel like things are just hitting their stride.” 

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Pebble Beach

Takes Luxury to New Levels BY LESLIE DINABERG

Above, a breathtaking view of Pebble Beach Golf Links, 6-8. Right, a Fairway One Cottage Room, and below right, The Spa at Pebble Beach.


PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) JOHANN DOST, SHERMAN CHU, SCOTT CAMPBELL

s you step onto the greens, the beauty and drama of Pebble Beach simply takes your breath away. The fabled course celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2019 by hosting the U.S. Open Championships for the sixth time, and in preparation for the centennial milestone they’ve done loads of improvements and restorations on an already prime vacation destination. Ranked the #1 public course in America by Golf Digest Magazine along with a #1 rating among the “Top 100 Courses You Can Play in the U.S.” by Golf Magazine, Pebble Beach Golf Links is certainly one of the greatest courses in the world, with a combination of coastal beauty, remarkable architecture

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(Clockwise from left) Elizabeth Taylor celebrated her first honeymoon at Pebble Beach in 1950 with Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, Jr. The iconic seventh hole at Pebble Beach Golf Links. An aerial of The Lodge at Pebble Beach and the 18th hole, circa 1920s. After missing the Crosby Pro-Am from 1947-1950, Bob Hope finally showed up to play in 1951. Bing Crosby decided he’d better catch the moment on film. Clint Eastwood was paired with Ray Floyd in the Crosby Clambake in the late 1960s.

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and legendary golf history. Golf Digest Magazine describes the course as “not just the greatest meeting of land and sea in American golf, but the most extensive one, too, with nine holes [#4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #17, #18] perched immediately above the crashing Pacific surf.” We recently got to stay at The Lodge at Pebble Beach—in a gorgeous ocean view room overlooking the 18th hole—and indulged in the legendary guest experience that makes Pebble Beach so special. While golf is obviously King at Pebble Beach, for the non-

golfers like me, the other elements are equally royal: starting with the absolutely stellar service. From the moment we rolled up to the door to check in—our road weary Honda taking its place of honor amongst the perfectly detailed BMWs and Teslas—we were treated with the type of gracious hospitality that every inn in the world should aspire to emulate. I never wanted to leave. Our casually luxurious, coastally inspired room was comfortable yet completely lavish, with every amenity you could imagine—including full-size, top-of-the-line shampoo and conditioner, which I loved! The ocean-front patio was a perfect spot to enjoy the sunset, watch the whales spout, as if on cue, and toast to the decadence of this plum assignment. Our room had been recently renovated to expand the window walls to maximize views of the course and the ocean and double the size of the patio and deck to serve as an outdoor living space, as well as new indoor furnishings and accessories, bathroom upgrades, a signature fireplace wall, air conditioning and technology upgrades including 55-inch HDTVs, new lighting, energy management systems and state-of-the-art door locks. The place may be 100 years old, but the rooms are up-to-date in every way imaginable. Another recent addition is Fairway One, which added 30 oversized guest rooms and cottages fronting the first fairway of Pebble Beach Golf Links and a new meeting facility, as well as a 2,500-square-foot meeting room. “The Lodge and Pebble Beach Golf Links are where our story began in 1919, and now, as we approach our 100th anniversary, the addition of Fairway One will help us continue that legacy for the next 100 years,” says Bill Perocchi, CEO of Pebble Beach Company. The new section includes two gorgeous four-bedroom cottages with 1,000-square-foot living rooms with 17-foot-high wood-beam ceilings, wood-burning floor-toceiling stacked stone fireplaces,


FOR RESERVATIONS OR MORE

call 800/654-9300 or visit pebblebeach.com.

INFORMATION,

PHOTO:

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) PEBBLE BEACH COMPANY LAGORIO ARCHIVE (3); PEBBLE BEACH COMPANY, J.P. GRAHAM; PEBBLE BEACH COMPANY, W.C. BROOKS

two king bedrooms, two queen/queen bedrooms, and an outdoor terrace with fire pits, as well as full kitchens. What a perfect spot to make your home away from home. It’s almost enough to make you want to cook on vacation. The other culinary options are also plentiful, with six restaurants onsite. Specializing in seafood, Stillwater Bar & Grill is an elegant destination for a relaxing dinner overlooking the fairways. The Tap Room serves a selection of American tavern-style classics, and The Terrace Lounge is a lovely spot to sit back and relax in one of the oversized armchairs while sipping on a cocktail and enjoying panoramic golf course views. Gallery Café offers home-style breakfast and lunch. For cove and ocean views, enjoy lunch at The Beach Club. The Bench is a casual spot overlooking the 18th hole, specializing in crafted cocktails and wood-roasted dishes, with a large central bar and patio tables with fire pits to warm your al fresco dining experience and roast marshmallows for s’more’s. If that’s not enough to entertain you, there’s a free shuttle service to sister property The Inn at Spanish Bay, offering another six dining options. Guests are also provided complimentary access to The Beach & Tennis Club at Pebble Beach, a swanky venue near the renowned 17th hole, featuring tennis, workout facilities and a heated pool. Then there’s The Spa at Pebble Beach—one of only 56 spas in the world to receive the coveted Forbes Five-Star Award—offering an array of blissful body treatments that incorporate the healing properties of plants, herbs and minerals indigenous to the Monterey Peninsula. Pebble Beach’s gorgeous 17-Mile Drive— one of the most scenic rides in the world, encompassing both stunning natural beauty and incredible architecture—is always one of the highlights of a visit to the area, and as guests of The Lodge at Pebble Beach we were able to do the drive in style, test driving a brand new Lexus sports car. Is it any wonder we didn’t want to leave? I may have to take up golf as an excuse to visit again soon. 

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Golf

Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara County is one of America’s most desirable golf destinations, with splendid courses designed to maximize enjoyment of the region’s splendor and moderate climate.

Rancho San Marcos

SANTA YNEZ MOUNTAINS

Sandpiper Golf Club

GOLETA

Twelve miles from Santa Barbara, up scenic Hwy. 154—the historic road winding off State Street into the Santa Ynez Mountains that leads to the charming Santa Ynez Valley wineries—“Rancho” has been acclaimed as one of the finest experiences in Southern California. This historic land challenges with sand, lakes, the Santa Ynez River, fields of native grasses, oak tree-lined chaparral and changes in elevation. A comfortable clubhouse has a grill with food to go or to enjoy at tables inside or outside on scenic patios. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 4600 Hwy. 154, 805/683-6334, rsm1804.com.

Established in 1972 as the county’s first resort course open to the public, Sandpiper is an inspiring 18 holes of seaside golf on an extraordinary terrain, with an acclaimed layout named by Golf Digest as one of the top 25 public golf courses in the U.S. Designed by renowned architect William F. Bell, the links-style layout features rolling fairways leading to enormous greens with ocean views from nearly every hole. The stretch of holes 10–14 is one of the most memorable experiences of any golfer’s life. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.7; slope rating, 136. 7925 Hollister Ave., 805/968-1541, sandpipergolf.com.

La Purisima Golf Course

River Course at the Alisal

LOMPOC

Near the Santa Ynez Valley Wine Country, “La P” is challenging, pure golf with long, twisting fairways bordered at times by oak and eucalyptus groves and protected by sand, water and out-of-bounds stakes, finishing with big, lightning-fast greens. In the afternoon, wind often becomes a factor, making the closing holes our own “Amen Corner.” Designed by world-renowned architect Robert Muir Graves, a round at La Purisima will not soon be forgotten, and is worth the drive. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.9; slope rating, 143. 3455 E. Hwy. 246, 805/735-8395, lapurisimagolf.com. 80

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SOLVANG

Opened for public play in 1992 on land owned by and adjacent to the renowned Alisal Guest Ranch, River Course provides a layout to be enjoyed by golfers of all levels of skill. Set along the Santa Ynez River, the course features panoramic views, mostly wide fairways and accessible greens. Several holes, however, will challenge even the low handicap golfer, especially any of the river holes. The clubhouse has an excellent restaurant with comfortable, inside seating and a vieworiented patio. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 150 Alisal Rd., 805/688-6042, rivercourse.com.


FEATURED GOLF COURSES

FEATURED FOR FALL

Glen Annie Golf Club

GOLETA

of Goleta, 15 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara, this meticulously maintained and challenging layout offers panoramic ocean, Channel Island and mountain views from nearly every hole. The tee shot from #16, for example, decends 150 ft. in elevation to land softly on a manicured landscape near an adjacent lake with a cascading stream. The clubhouse complex includes Frog Bar & Grill and scenic patios with excellent facilities for gatherings of up to 300.

IN THE ROLLING FOOTHILL S

Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 71.1; slope rating, 122. 405 Glen Annie Rd., 805/968-6400, glenanniegolf.com.

FALL 2018

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lthough you won’t find any vineyards in this area, these unique and eclectic wineries and tasting rooms are a great way to begin your wine-tasting journey through the area on foot, as an introduction to local wines. Many of the urban wineries have Deep Sea Wine Tasting 11  217 Stearns Wharf northern Santa Barbara County vineyards that are also open to visitors. 1  Area 5.1 137 Anacapa St. 2  Armada Wine & Beer Merchant 1129-A State St. 3  Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St. 4  August Ridge Vineyards 5 E. Figueroa St 5  AVA Santa Barbara/ The Valley Project 116 E. Yanonali St. 82

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6 The Bodega Standing Sun 15 E. De La Guerra St. 7 Carr Winery 414 N. Salsipuedes St. 8  Cebada Vineyard & Winery 8 E. De La Guerra St. 9  Corks & Crowns 32 Anacapa St. 10 Corktree Cellars Wine & Bar 910 Linden Ave., Carpinteria

DV8 Cellars 12  28 Anacapa St. FFWS Tasting Room at 13  Ritz Carlton Bacara Resort 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta Frequency Wines 14  831 Santa Barbara St. Fox Wine Co. and Blair Fox Cellars 15  120 Santa Barbara St. Grassini Family Vineyards 16  24 El Paseo Happy Canyon Vineyard 17  30 El Paseo


18 Jaffurs Wine Cellars 819 E. Montecito St 19 Jamie Slone Wines 23 E. De La Guerra St. 20 Kunin Wines Tasting Room 28 Anacapa St. 21 LaFond Winery 111 E. Yanonali St. 22 Laplace Wine Bar & Shop 205 Santa Barbara St. Lumen Wines/The Wine Shepard 23  30 E. Ortega St. 24 Margerum Tasting Room 813 Anacapa St. 25 M elville Winery Tasting Room 120 State St., Suite C Municipal Winemakers 26  22 Anacapa St. MWC32 27  813 Anacapa St. 28 Oreana Winery 205 Anacapa St.  29  Pali Wine Company 116 E. Yanonali St.  30  Paradise Springs Winery  210 State St. Potek Winery 31  406 E. Haley St. Riverbench Santa Barbara 32  Tasting Room 137 Anacapa St. Sanford Winery and Vineyards 33  1114 State St. Sanguis Wines 34  8 Ashley Ave. Santa Barbara Winery 35  202 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara Wine Collective  36  131 Anacapa St. 37  Santa Barbara Wine Therapy 732 State St.  38  Satellite Santa Barbara 1117 State St. Silver Wines 39  724 Reddick St. Skyenna Wine Lounge 40  12 Helena Ave. Summerland Winery 41  2330 Lillie Ave., Summerland 42 Villa Wine Bar and Kitchen 618 Anacapa St. 43 Vogelzang Vineyard 1129 State St. Whitcraft Winery 44  36-A S. Calle Cesar Chavez

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In the heart of Downtown Santa Barbara’s Historic Presidio Neighborhood

23 E. De La Guerra Street | 805.560.6555 jamieslonewines.com SPRING 2018

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Santa Barbara County and San Luis Obispo County vineyards grow exceptional grapes, and now, after decades of experimentation with an incredible diversity of microclimates and soil types, growers and winemakers know a lot about what to plant and where those vines thrive best. A

Harvest Tales

host of talented vintners transform those grapes into world-class wines. The best way to explore these authentic wine-producing and wine grape growing regions is by visiting the vineyards and speaking directly to the people who grow and produce these exceptional vintages.

BY WENDY THIES SELL

To make your experience as complete and enjoyable as possible, of the 200+ wineries where you can taste in Santa Barbara County, we recommend the following 20 based on their significance historically, visually and their quality of wine and hospitality.

Buellton 1 Lafond Winery

& Vineyards

6855 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/688-7921 2 Mosby Winery

9496 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/688-2415

Lompoc 3 Babcock Winery & Vineyards

5175 Hwy. 246 805/736-1455

4 Foley Estates

Vineyard & Winery

Sorting the grapes at Riverbench Winery.

is in full swing in Central Coast wine country. Everything is on the line and almost everything else is on hold if you’re a winemaker or vineyard manager. This year, 2018, marks the 36th wine harvest for Santa Barbara County’s first independent female winemaker, Lane Tanner, winemaker/partner at Lumen Wines. “No two harvests are the same, ever! It is the most electrifying time of the year for me! Harvest keeps me young. It is like a rebirth. It taxes my brain, my patience, my fitness and my home life. The only thing

PHOTO: WENDY THIES SELL

FALL MEANS HARVEST

11 Presqu’ile Winery & Vineyards

5391 Presquile Dr. 805/937-8110

12 Rancho Sisquoc Winery

6600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/934-4332

Santa Ynez 13 Bridlewood Estate Winery

3555 Roblar Ave. 805/688-9000 14 Gainey Vineyard

6121 E. Hwy. 246 805/737–6222

3950 E. Hwy. 246 805/688-0558

5 Sanford Winery & Vineyards

15 Roblar Winery & Vineyards

5010 Santa Rosa Rd. 805/735-5900

3010 Roblar Ave, 805/686-2603

Los Olivos

16 Sunstone Vineyards & Winery

6 Andrew Murray

Vineyards

that matters during harvest is harvest and keeping my pets alive. All else falls to the wayside. It is the biggest, longest party you have ever been to and like being the host of any party you have a lot of set up, hard work and clean up. You know there will be laughter, camaraderie, a few fights, an accident or two and memories made that last a lifetime.” This will be Angela Osborne’s first harvest in six years that she won’t be pregnant or nursing a newborn. The owner and

Santa Maria

5249 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/686-9604 7 Fess Parker

Winery & Vineyard

125 N. Refugio Rd. 805/688-9463

Solvang 17 Buttonwood Farm Winery

6200 Foxen Canyon Rd. 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/688-1545 805/688-3032 8 Firestone Vineyard

5017 Zaca Station Rd. 805/688-3940 9 Koehler Winery

18 Lincourt Vineyards

1711 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/688-8554 19 Rideau Vineyards

5360 Foxen Canyon Rd. 1562 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805/693-8384 805/688-0717 10 Zaca Mesa Winery

6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805/688-9339

20 Rusack Vineyards

1819 Ballard Canyon Rd. 805/688-1278

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WINE COUNTRY SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

winemaker at Santa Barbara County-based A Tribute to Grace Wine Co. and winemaker at Folded Hills has three sons under age 5. In 2015, Osborne gave birth to her son, Marlin, in her native New Zealand, but the ripening grenache in California needed her attention, too. “I flew back with him when he was 17 days old and we picked our rosé the next day! The last few years have definitely been mad…There’s been little time for anything in my life outside of babies and wine. I’ve missed my best friends’ weddings and umpteen other milestones, all because it’s harvest. There is no way I could do it if I did not truly love it, but that’s like anything. It just has to be an embraced alternate reality (for a few months).”

86 S B S E A S O N S . C O M

Harvest is the highlight of Eric Johnson’s year. The winemaker at Talley Vineyards in Arroyo Grande and owner/winemaker at Ann Albert Wines thrives on the hectic pace. “You are grinding everyday non-stop. I don’t sleep much then, but I feel like I have the most energy during harvest. We night harvest, so it’s weird hours. There are a lot more people working their asses off in the field and in the winery than I think anybody realizes. You have people who are missing their families to do this and to make a great and special product and I can’t stress enough the importance of the people we have in the field. The other thing I always tell people: go to wineries when it’s harvest because it smells amazing! The best smells in the

world! Go in there and smell some fermentations. It will blow your mind!” Jim Stollberg, owner of Maverick Farming Company and partner at Hampton Farming, oversees seven vineyard properties from Paso Robles to Santa Maria. “For me as a vineyard manager, my hours are crazy! There are a lot of moving parts. The typical day for me: we finish harvesting between 7 and 9 a.m. It takes an hour or two to get the fruit picked up or to the winery. I’m trying to line up as many vineyard walks or conversations with winemakers before noon so I can get set for that night. I usually take a nap until 3 o’clock. Then get up and answer phone calls and get everything finalized so I can


family, and fellow wine lovers.” Preparation is key for Ryan Deovlet, owner/winemaker at Deovlet Wines in San Luis Obispo. “Harvest is fun, albeit very intense, and I think it’s important to be well thought out. I once read that [legendary French vintner] Henri Jayer said, ‘The wines I craft in September and October have already been made at my desk in March and April...as the winegrowing season starts.’ As if to say, you can’t just make wine when the grapes land at your doorstep, but instead, it’s about the journey from bud break to bottle.”  Right, pioneering Winemaker Lane Tanner of Lumen Wines. Below, Clarissa Nagy punches down grapes at Nagy Wines.

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT, WENDY THIES SELL (2), E. HUGHES, ISTOCK

have my guys lined up to get vineyard equipment moved and ready to go. I have a family dinner and am asleep at 8, then at midnight, it all starts over. That schedule goes on for five to six weeks.” Harvest-time invigorates Clarissa Nagy, winemaker at Riverbench Vineyards and Nagy Wines in Santa Maria. “Harvest is early mornings, long days and a huge amount of physical labor. I love the aromas in the winery and the flavors in the vineyard. There’s nothing more intoxicating than walking into the cellar and experiencing the fermentation esters first hand. It’s also a fantastic bonding time for my crew. There’s something special about working together to create an end product enjoyed with friends,

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PASO ROBLES

San Simeon

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SBSEASONS.COM

Santa Barbara


WINE COUNTRY SA N LUIS OBISPO COUNT Y

To make your experience as complete and enjoyable as possible, of the 250+ wineries where you can taste in San Luis Obispo County, we recommend the following 40 based on their significance historically, visually and their quality of wine and hospitality.

San Luis Obispo 1 Baileyana, Tangent & True Myth Tasting Room

5828 Orcutt Rd., 805/269-8200 2 Biddle Ranch Vineyard

2050 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/543-2399 3 Chamisal Vineyards

7525 Orcutt Rd., 805/541-9463 4 Claiborne & Churchill Vintners

2649 Carpenter Canyon Rd., 805/544-4066 5 Edna Valley Vineyards

2585 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/544-5855 6 Kelsey See Canyon Vineyards

1947 See Canyon Rd., 805/595-9700 7 Saucelito Canyon

3080 Biddle Ranch Rd., 805/543-2111 8 Tolosa Winery

4910 Edna Rd., 805/782-0500 9 Wolff Vineyards

6238 Orcutt Rd., 805/781-0448

Arroyo Grande

Paso Robles 14 Adelaida Vineyards & Winery

5805 Adelaida Rd., 805/676-1232 15 Brecon Estate

7450 Vineyard Dr., 805/239-2200 16 Caliza Winery

2570 Anderson Rd., 805/237-1480 17 Clos Solène Winery

2040 Niderer Rd., 805/239-7769 18 Daou Vineyards & Winery

2777 Hidden Mountain Rd., 805/226-5460 19 Eberle Winery

3810 Hwy. 46 E., 805/238-9607 20 Halter Ranch Vineyard

8910 Adelaida Rd., 805/226-9455 21 J Dusi Wines

1401 Hwy. 46 W., 805/226-2034 22 J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines

10 Laetitia Vineyard & Winery

6169 Airport Rd., 805/239-8900

11 Talley Vineyards & Bishops Peak

11680 Chimney Rock Rd., 805/238-6932

453 Laetitia Vineyard Dr., 805/481-1772 3031 Lopez Dr., 805/489-0446

23 JUSTIN Vineyards & Winery

24 L’Aventure

2815 Live Oak Rd., 805/227-1588

San Simeon 12 Hearst Ranch Winery

442 SLO San Simeon Rd., 805/927-4100

25 Niner Wine Estates

2400 Hwy. 46 W., 805/239-2233 26 Opolo Vineyards

7110 Vineyard Dr., 805/238-9593

29 Tablas Creek Vineyard

9339 Adelaida Rd., 805/237-1231 30 Tobin James Cellars

8950 Union Rd., 805/239-2204 31 Treana and Hope Family Wines

1585 Live Oak Rd., 805/238-4112 32 Villa Creek Cellars

5995 Peachy Canyon Rd., 805/238-7145 33 Vina Robles Vineyards & Winery

3700 Mill Rd., 805/227-4812 34 Windward Vineyard

1380 Live Oak Rd., 805/239-2565

Templeton 35 Castoro Cellars

1315 N. Bethel Rd., 805/238-0725 36 Epoch Estate Wines

7505 York Mountain Rd., 805/237-7575 37 Peachy Canyon Winery

1480 N. Bethel Rd., 805/239-1918 38 Turley Wine Cellars

2900 Vineyard Dr., 805/434-1030 39 Wild Horse Winery & Vineyards

1437 Wild Horse Winery Ct., 805/788-6310

Santa Margarita

27 Robert Hall Winery

San Miguel

3443 Mill Rd., 805/239-1616

13 Ancient Peaks Winery

28 SummerWood Winery

40 Four Sisters Ranch Vineyards & Winery

22720 El Camino Real, 805/365-7045

2175 Arbor Rd., 805/227-1365

2995 Pleasant Rd., 805/467-2417

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MAP KEY Visitors Centers 1 Garden St. 113 Harbor Wy., 4th FL 45 Hartley Pl., Goleta

D.


E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

DOWNTOWN STATE STREET defines the city’s center—and its heart. The intersection of State and Carrillo streets is where Captain Salisbury Haley hammered an iron stake in 1850 to designate the future midtown area. The self-guided Red Tile Walking Tour is a great way to get your bearings (map is available at Santa Barbara Visitor Center, 1 Garden St.). Don’t miss the historic Arlington Theatre, a notable example of both Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival architectural styles. Also worth visiting is the beautiful Alice Keck Park Memorial Garden, named after the benefactor who donated the prime property.

1

Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a National Historic Landmark in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, was dedicated in 1929. Its immense landscaped courtyard and sunken garden are the sites of public celebrations year round. | 1100 Anacapa St. Docent tours Mon.– Fri. 10:30 a.m.; Daily 2 p.m. 805/962-6464, santabarbaracourthouse.org.

2

Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s outstanding permanent and special collections, housed in a stately building constructed in 1914 as the city’s first federally funded post office, include the only remaining intact mural by Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros, Portrait of Mexico Today. | 1130 State St. Tues.–Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

Stage Theater, a black box venue showcasing live performances, and MCA Santa Barbara, a museum dedicated to exhibiting the highest quality of contemporary art while recognizing the artists of tomorrow with innovative exhibitions. | 651 & 653 Paseo Nuevo. paseonuevoshopping.com, mcasantabarbara.org.

5

Santa Barbara Public Market offers foodies an impressive collection of purveyors focused on handcrafted, regionally sourced and sustainably made foods. The LEED certified space offers a diverse array of merchants and a truly unique destination to dine, drink, gather and host special events. | 38 W. Victoria St. at Chapala, Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.– 10 p.m., sbpublicmarket.com. PRESIDIO NEIGHBORHOOD is a vibrant section developed around the historic site of the last remaining Spanish fortresses built in California, called presidios. In addition to being Santa Barbara’s birthplace, El Presidio de Santa Barbara, the neighborhood is also home to the historic Lobero Theatre, one of the city’s architectural jewels, as well as Casa de la Guerra historic house museum. El Paseo, a charming adobe plaza built in the 1820s, houses several nice shops and restaurants, along with The Wine Collection of El Paseo, an upscale array of six excellent wine tasting rooms open daily from noon to 6 p.m. (located off of the 800 block of State Street).

3

6

4

7

La Arcada, designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1926, is home to a wealth of galleries, shops and restaurants. Dotted along the way are historical curios and sculptures, with all roads leading to the much-loved central fountain inhabited by turtles and fish. | 1100 block of State Street. Paseo Nuevo is a charming outdoor destination to shop, dine, relax, stroll and people watch. Featuring Spanish-style architecture, Paseo Nuevo is also home to Center

Santa Barbara Historical Museum exhibits fine art and artifacts from local history. Visit Gledhill Library and the new Edward Borein Gallery, which memorializes the artist’s work. | 136 E. De la Guerra St. Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/9661601, santabarbaramuseum.com. El Presidio de Santa Barbara was founded in 1782 to offer protection to the mission and settlers, provide a seat of government and guard against foreign invasion, and is now a state historic park. 6. Santa Barbara Historical Museum

| 123 E. Canon Perdido St. 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily. 805/965-0093, sbthp.org. MISSION DISTRICT, identified by Mission Santa Barbara, is among the oldest residential neighborhoods in the city. Characterized by revival-style architecture, it is also home to the Mission Historical Park and rose garden.

8

Santa Barbara Botanic Garden’s 78 acres, accessed by five and a half miles of trails, record the history of the state’s rare and indigenous plants. From the dramatic opening view through the meadows, chaparral and forest to the sweeping ridge-top views of the Channel Islands, the garden is a skillful display of California’s natural bounty. | 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Mar.–Oct. 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Nov.– Feb. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/682-4726, sbbg.org.

9

Mission Santa Barbara was dedicated in 1786 by Father Fermin Lasuén. Known as “Queen of the Missions” for its twin bell towers, it remains the only California mission to be continuously occupied by the Franciscans. | 2201 Laguna St. Daily tours 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 805/682-4713, sbmission.org; santabarbaramission.org.

10

Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, open since 1916, provides science and nature education to generations of visitors. The museum, located along Mission Creek, reconnects more than 100,000 people each year—including 5,700 members—to nature indoors and outdoors. | 2559 Puesta del Sol Rd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/682-4711, sbnature.org.

WATERFRONT, running the length of Cabrillo Boulevard from East Beach to the harbor, is a feast for outdoor enthusiasts. A paved pathway runs the full distance.

11

Andree Clark Bird Refuge— an artificial freshwater lake and marsh pond adjacent to the zoo —provides one of the best biking/jogging/skating paths in the area. | 1400 E. Cabrillo Blvd. 805/564-5418.

12

Santa Barbara Harbor and Breakwater is a working harbor, home to fishing boats, private yachts and nearly 1,200 excursion and sightseeing boats. It is always a busy and interesting place to walk, skate, bike, eat and purchase fresh catch at Fisherman’s Market every Saturday morning. | Off Cabrillo Blvd.

13

Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, situated on the harbor’s historic breakwater, presents the region’s rich local maritime history. From ancient seafaring Chumash to modern-day deep-sea research, the emphasis is on human interaction with the sea. | 113 Harbor Way. Open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily, k

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PHOTO: MERCEDES LOWE

Santa Barbara 


B E L M O N D E L E N C A N T O , S A N TA B A R B A R A

JOIN US FOR OUR 100-YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Belmond El Encanto first opened its doors to welcome visitors and locals in 1918. In commemoration of this historic event, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve put together a year-long celebration that includes exclusive offers, special events and community activities that pay tribute to the past, present and future of our enchanting resort. For more information or reservations, please call 805 845 5800 or visit belmond.com/elencanto

800 ALVARADO PLACE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 | 805 845 5800

HOTELS | TRAINS | RIVER CRUISES | JOURNEYS | BELMOND.COM

EE SB Seasons Centennial Celebration full-page 8.25x10.125 ad 0818.indd 1

8/17/18 10:32 AM


E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

except Saturdays 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., and closed Wednesdays. 805/962-8404, sbmm.org.

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Stearns Wharf, a Santa Barbara icon, was built by a Vermont native in 1876 to accommodate ocean-going vessels. Once owned by Jimmy Cagney, its dramatic views of the city and the hills beyond, as well as its mix of shops and restaurants, have charmed visitors for more than a century. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Sea Center on Stearns Wharf engages visitors of all ages with interactive exhibits, opportunities to work like scientists, a theater showcasing the wonders of Santa Barbara Channel, a live shark touch pool and a 1,500-gallon tide pool tank. Discover the fun in science and the wonders of the natural world. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd. 10 a.m.– 5 p.m. 805/962-2526, sbnature.org.

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Santa Barbara Arts & Crafts Show is the longest-running public weekly art show in the country, with more than 250 exhibitors, all there in person and carefully screened to ensure originality of work. | Cabrillo Blvd. between State and Calle Puerta Vallarta streets. Sun. 10 a.m. to dusk. 805/897-2519, santabarbaraca.gov.

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The Mill is a distinctively modern spin on the original feed mill constructed in 1904, which is now an artisan marketplace, featuring a production winery, craft brewery and farm-to-table barbecue restaurant, as well as some unique retail offerings. | 406 E. Haley St., 10 a.m.–10 p.m., 805/965-9555, themillsb.com.

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Santa Barbara Zoo opened to the public in 1963 with only seven residents. Now more than 500 animals live here, and 30 acres of lush gardens spread across a knoll overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Committed to conservation, species survival and education, the zoo is an enlightening and entertaining place to visit. | 500 Niños Dr. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/962-5339, sbzoo.org.

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MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, is an awe-inspiring experience to motivate a new generation of innovators and problem-solvers, with 17,000 square feet of interactive educational exhibits focused on science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). | 805/708-2282, moxi.org.

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Funk Zone is a hotbed of homegrown artistic production known for its eclectic wall murals, ateliers, galleries, alternative exhibition spaces, trendy artist 94

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shops and the lively Urban Wine Trail. Half the fun is each surprise that awaits you down the alley or painted on the wall in front of you! | funkzone.net.

Montecito and Points South Montecito’s densely wooded, unique and beautiful area between Santa Barbara and Summerland has been home to Indians, Spanish and Yankee settlers, agricultural pioneers and eastern millionaires in search of the perfect climate. Though it has attracted the privileged for more than a century, its genesis was agrarian. Many of the historic estates incorporate the farms and ranches that had originally settled the area. Other remnants of this rich heritage include the 500-acre property on which Harleigh Johnston grew citrus trees until 1893, which later became San Ysidro Ranch, completed in 1935.

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Casa del Herrero is a splendid example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, designed by George Washington Smith, the house—and the gardens—are National Historic Landmarks. The gardens, covering 11 acres, were designed by noted landscape architects Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest and horticulturist Frances T. Underhill. | 1387 E. Valley R. Tours Wed. and Sat. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations required. 805/565-5653, casadelherrero.com.

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Ganna Walska Lotusland is a 37-acre garden estate, prized for its rare and exotic plants and providing new perspectives on the sustainability of nature’s offerings. Themed gardens include topiary, bromeliad, succulent, cycad, cactus, fern, Japanese, Australian, water and a blue garden, among others. | Reservations required. Tours Wed.–Sat. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. between Feb. 18 and Nov. 15., 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

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Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art educates students and the community about the power and value of the visual arts through physical, critical and spiritual engagement with the creative process and its results. | Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Mon.–Fri. 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/565-6162, westmontmuseum.org.

SUMMERLAND is just a stone’s throw off Hwy. 101 and two minutes south of Montecito, and offers the rural charm of an earlier California beach town while maintaining the spirit of an artists’ colony via plentiful antique, home and garden shops, art galleries, boutiques and unpretentious eateries.

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Lookout County Park, off Lillie Avenue at Evans Avenue, is on the bluffs above the beautiful Summerland Beach. From this vantage point, where full picnic facilities await, there are spectacular views of the Channel Islands. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Evans Ave. CARPINTERIA is five minutes south of Montecito and Summerland. Although the city advertises itself as home to the “world’s safest beach,” visitors also come to roam the avocado-laden hills in search of the orchid fields and hothouses, for which Carpinteria is well known.

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Salt Marsh Nature Reserve, a 230-acre salt marsh, is home to local and migratory waterfowl and fish and is a birder’s dream. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. at Sandyland Rd., turn right and drive three blocks to Ash Ave.

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Carpinteria State Beach and Bluffs are among California’s most popular destinations—the result of a broad beach and good sunning, tide pooling and fishing. For hikers and birdwatchers, it doesn’t get much better than the Carpinteria Bluffs. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. Continue through town to the beach. Park on Linden Ave. or in the Carpinteria State Beach lot.

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Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club was admitted to the U.S. Polo Association in 1911 and moved to its present location shortly thereafter. The club welcomes visitors for Sunday games from May through October. | 3375 Foothill Rd. 805/684-6683, sbpolo.com.

Goleta and Points North The city of Goleta and several of the area’s well-known institutions and landmarks are just 10 minutes north of Santa Barbara, including UCSB and two championship golf courses.

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Rancho La Patera, one of the oldest landmarks in Goleta Valley, is home to historic Stow House, a beautiful example of Carpenter Gothic architecture, and Cavalletto History Education Center, which focuses on Goleta’s ranching and agricultural history. | 304 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/681-7216, stowhouse.com.

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South Coast Railroad Museum, housed in a restored train depot, is a magnet for train buffs. Tours of the Victorian depot, rides on the “Goleta Short Line” miniature train and exhibits are part of the experience. | 300 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/964-3540, goletadepot.org.


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Goleta Beach Park, adjacent to UCSB, is favored by families and groups for its expanse of lawn with barbecue and picnic table areas. The 1,500-foot-long pier accommodates boat launching facilities, fishermen and strollers. | Exit Hwy. 217 at Sandspit Rd. 805/568-2461.

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Art, Design & Architecture Museum at UCSB holds an impressive fine art collection with one of the largest architectural archives in North America. In addition, it engages contemporary artists in exhibits and programs. | UCSB. Wed.–Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

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El Capitan and Refugio State Beaches, the mixed sand and rock beach at El Capitan links Refugio—a palmlined crescent of sand with tide pools—by beach, bluff and bike trails. Both are popular beach campgrounds. | From Hwy. 101, exit the northernmost El Capitan exit and/or Refugio Rd. 805/968-1033, parks.ca.gov.

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Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes, the Dunes Center at 1055 Guadalupe St. should be the first stop in the exploration of the largest dune complex in the state. | Wed.–Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 805/343-2455, dunescenter.org.

through October. | 420 2nd St. 805/686-1789, solvangfestivaltheater.org.

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Old Mission Santa Inés is the 19th of 21 missions built in California from 1769 to 1836 by Spanish Franciscan priests. Founded September 17, 1804 by Padre Estevan Tapis, it was the first European settlement in Santa Ynez Valley and still displays artifacts preserved from the Mission era. | 1760 Mission Dr. at Hwy. 246. 805/688-4815, missionsantaines.org.

Santa Ynez and Los Olivos These small, charming towns look like they belong in the pages of a book on the history of the west and are world-renowned for their vineyards, equestrian culture, art galleries, inns and restaurants that epitomize the region’s signature wine country cuisine.

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Elverhøj Museum of History & Art is housed in a historic handcrafted structure built in a style derived from the large farmhouses of 18th century Denmark. Visitors can view Solvang’s history through photos, artifacts and video displays. | Wed.–Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 1624 Elverhoy Way. 805/686-1211, elverhoj.org.

Los Olivos melds California history with modern-day wine tasting rooms, restaurants, art galleries and upscale shops in this picture-perfect country town dating back to the 1860s, when stagecoaches passed through. Centered by an iconic flagpole, the serenity of vineyards, lavender farms, orchards, ranches and horse trails surround Los Olivos. This is a charming place to visit for a one-stop wine country experience. | Approximately 40 min. north of Santa Barbara via Hwy. 154, losolivosca.com.

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Wildling Art Museum, an educational institution dedicated to presenting art of America’s wilderness, is a place to gain a greater appreciation of art and a better understanding of the importance of preserving our natural heritage. | 1511-B Mission Dr., 805/688-1082, wildlingmuseum.org.

Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum celebrates the rich history of the Santa Ynez Valley, its pioneering settlers and the five early townships that formed the foundation of this unique region. | Open Wed.–Sun. noon–4 p.m. 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. 805/688-7889, santaynezmuseum.org. 

Santa Ynez Mountains and Valley Areas The valley is historically rich and geographically diverse, with vineyards dotting the landscape, many with tasting rooms.

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Cachuma Lake Recreation Area provides 750 campsites just 25 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara. Full marina, boat launch, rental boats, fishing equipment and licenses are available. Nature cruises led by park naturalists provide an educational look at the wildlife, birds (including bald eagles) and plants that make Cachuma such a rich habitat. | Hwy. 154. 805/686-5055, sbparks.org.

Solvang With a population of nearly 5,000, Solvang (“sunny field” in Danish) is the largest city in Santa Ynez Valley. Founded in 1911 by Danish educators from the Midwest, Solvang is the “Danish Capital of North America.”

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Solvang Festival Theater, a 700-seat historic outdoor theater, presents excellent productions staged by Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA), as well as other concerts and events. Open June FALL 2018

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FOOD & DRINK

CHEF’S TABLE

Our food series highlights seasonal recipes selected by head chefs and mixologists at Santa Barbara County’s best restaurants. We hope you will try them in your own kitchen— bon appetit!

EL VIEJO With Mescal, Pineapple, Cilantro, Lime, Agave, Sal De Gusano and Jalapeño. Serves 1.

INGREDIENTS

Mescal Pineapple Cilantro Lime Agave Jalapeño (optional for a spicy flavor) Sal De Gusano (Agave Worm Salt)

Method Pour 2 oz. of mescal into a mixing glass. Add 2 oz. of fresh pineapple puree, add the cilantro and the jalapeño (if you want cocktail to be spicy), add ice and shake it! Double strain drink into a glass and garnish with Sal De Gusano and cilantro leaf. Enjoy!

ALBERTO BATTAGLINI is the Resident Mixologist and General Manager of S.Y. Kitchen. A native of Verona, Italy, he attended Scuola Alberghiera where he learned the fundamentals of cooking and food service and quickly decided that being a chef was not for him. From there he began an ardent love affair with spirits, which took him to Gatwick, London where he met his mentor in mixology, Ian Slater.  He further honed his mixology passion and skills in Brazil, Spain and Mexico before meeting up with his old school friend Luca Crestanelli (Chef/Partner at S.Y. Kitchen), at Bar Toscana in Los Angeles and eventually coming to Santa Barbara County with Toscana and Bar Toscana owners Kathie and Mike Gordon, who partnered with Crestanelli to create S.Y. Kitchen.  Now happily ensconced at S.Y. Kitchen in Santa Ynez, Battaglini creates his own infusions of spirits and bitters from a local bounty of fruits, vegetables and herbs.  “The soul of mixology is found in all the old recipes that we twist with modern ingredients and tools, in order to play with tastes to give every customer an extraordinary experience,” he says. 

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TH A I COCO N UT M U SS E L S With Coconut Milk, Clam Juice, Galangal, Lemongrass and Thai Chili. Serves 2-4. INGREDIENTS

Tom Kha Broth 14 oz. Coconut Milk, light 8 oz. Clam Juice 4 ea. Galangal in ½” slices 6 Cloves Garlic, peeled and smashed 2 ea. Shallots, peeled whole 1 ea. Lemongrass, ends trimmed, lightly crushed with the side of a knife, cut into 1” pieces 1 ea. Thai Chili, dried 4 ea. Kaffir Lime Leaf, rough chop ½ Lime, juiced ½ Lemon, cut into wedges for garnish

INGREDIENTS

Method: Prepare broth. Cut lime in half and reserve one half for the broth and the other half for plating. Heat a pan over medium heat and lightly sweat galangal, garlic, shallot, lemongrass and Thai chili over heat until fragrant. About three minutes. Add clam juice and bring to a simmer. Reduce by half and add coconut milk, kaffir lime and lightly simmer for 15 more minutes. Add the juice of a half lime and remove from heat. Season to taste with salt (about ½ tsp.), strain and reserve while cooking mussels.

CHEF DANIEL PALAIMA is at the helm of the

Funk Zone’s newest restaurant, Tyger Tyger, featuring coastal southeast Asian cuisine in a casual and convivial environment. A Santa Barbara native who returned home from Chicago to lead the charge at Tyger Tyger after stints with internationally-acclaimed

Mussels 5 ea. Mussels, de-bearded and rinsed 2 ea. Shallots, whole, peeled and sliced into rings 1 Tbsp. Parsley, chopped

Method: On medium heat in an 8-quart sauce pot, heat the oil and quickly sweat shallots for 30 seconds, making sure not to brown. Add 2 cups of the reserved Tom Kha Broth and bring to a boil. Stir in mussels, and cover immediately. Shake pot and let boil for one minute. Stir mussels, replace cover, and let boil for two more minutes. When the shells begin to open, stir in parsley, cover again, and cook until all shells are open, one to two minutes. Serve with grilled bread and a lemon wedge. Heirloom tomato and local plum salad is also pictured.

and award-winning chefs Grant Achatz at Next and Stephanie Izard at Duck, Duck, Goat, Palaima launched his culinary career locally at Brothers at Mattei’s Tavern in Los Olivos and Root 246 in Solvang. Tyger Tyger specializes in street foods inspired by food carts from southern Thailand, Cambodia

and Vietnam, made from the year round local bounty of fresh produce, seafood, and other meats. Opening in the fall, it shares this dynamic new marketplace space with Monkeyshine, Asian-inspired ice cream, and Dart Coffee, the Funk Zone’s own small-lot specialty coffee roaster. 

FA LL 2018

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DINING OUT

The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/restaurant-guide.

E X C E L L E N T R E S TA U R A N T S I N M O N T E C I T O, S A N TA B A R B A R A , G O L E TA A N D S A N TA Y N E Z VA L L E Y

Montecito Bella Vista (Contemporary Italian) at the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore commands panoramic ocean views across Montecito’s Butterfly Beach and promises top notch cuisine and impeccable service. Guests enjoy a contemporary Italian menu showcasing fresh California ingredients. It’s also home to one of the most celebrated Sunday brunches in the U.S. 1260 Channel Dr., 805/969-2261. $$$–$$$$

Cava (Mexican) serves the bold flavors of Spain, Mexico and Latin America in a charming setting with classic margaritas and martinis amid a vibrant outdoor patio, romantic dining room or cozy fireplace. 1212 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-8500. $$–$$$

Lucky’s (American) offers steaks, chops and seafood as well as chicken entrées, wonderful salads, six different potato dishes and beautiful desserts. The wine list runs to the extravagant. The adjacent bar is a favorite among locals. 1279 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-7540. $$$–$$$$

Montecito Wine Bistro (Californian) is a casual yet sophisticated spot to sit on the outdoor patio or cozy up to the fireplace and nibble wine-friendly food, and sip wines by the glass or the flight, or enjoy a cocktail. 516 San Ysidro Rd., 805/969-7520. $$–$$$

Oliver’s of Montecito (Gourmet Vegan) brings health and wellness to the forefront of the dining experience. The restaurant’s creative dishes are made with organic and fresh ingredients. Oliver’s innovative menu is inspired by nature, minimally processed and carefully prepared to provide guests with delicious and vibrant food. All of the dishes are vegan and vegetarian, using seasonal veggies to nourish the body. 1198 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-0834. $$$

Stella Mare’s (French) pairs a beautiful Victorian building with stylish, Normandy-inspired cuisine. The glass-encased greenhouse’s panoramic view and fireside couches make it a perfect spot for listening to Wednesday night jazz. 50 Los Patos Way, 805/969-6705. $$–$$$

Tre Lune (Italian) offers a delicious menu that isn’t afraid of flavor. The high quality, genuine Italian cuisine includes excellent minestrone soup, fall-off-the-fork ossobuco, basil pesto, lobster ravioli and more. 1151 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-2646. $$$ 98

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Santa Barbara

and Native American cooking styles. Located in the

Waterfront

menu spotlights naturally raised meats and poultry,

Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort, Rodney’s seasonal produce and sustainable seafood—all

Bluewater Grill (Seafood) zeroes in on fresh,

paired with wines from the finest local vineyards.

sustainable seafood and pairs it with produce from local farms. The menu runs the seafood gamut, from classics like crab cakes, rainbow trout amandine, cioppino, New England clam chowder and fish and chips to daily specials of fresh fish. The harbor views are spectacular from this restored lighthouse-themed building, especially from the second floor and the waterfront outdoor patio. 15 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-5121. $$-$$$

633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/884-8535. $$$

Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach (Seafood) serves locally caught, fresh seafood specialties. Dine inside or al fresco with one of the best ocean views in Santa Barbara. Full bar and regional wine list. 2981 Cliff Dr., 805/898-2628. $$–$$$

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Brophy Bros. (Seafood) has long been one of Santa Barbara’s most popular eateries and is located at the harbor with excellent views. You’ll find great shellfish cocktails and fresh fish here. 119 Harbor Way, 805/966-4418. $$

Chuck’s Waterfront Grill (Steak, Seafood) serves prime-grade top sirloin steaks and Australian lobster tail among many other delicious offerings. The restaurant’s lively upstairs extension, The Endless Summer bar-café (Seafood), has two terraces for al fresco dining on more casual fare. 113 Harbor Way, 805/564-1200. $$–$$$

Convivo Restaurant and Bar (Italian) located across from East Beach on the ground floor of the historic Santa Barbara Inn, draws its inspiration from Santa Barbara’s bounty of seafood and meats prepared “Nomad Italian” style. Enjoy al fresco dining with a view of the Channel Islands. 901 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-6789. $$-$$$

- Santa Barbara FisHouse (Seafood) serves fresh local fish in a lively setting. Gathering with friends on the dining terrace with ocean views is the perfect way to start the weekend. Be sure to order lobster during the season from these “lobster specialists.” 101 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/966-2112. $$

Santa Barbara Shellfish Co. (Seafood) is a fun, no-frills seafood-lover’s paradise. Select your dinner fresh from the tanks or from that day’s catch just steps from the ocean. 230 Stearns Wharf, 805/966-6676. $$

Shoreline Beach Café (Mexican, Seafood) is a lively, open-air beach restaurant. Salads, burgers, fish tacos, fresh seafood and vegetarian items are served daily. Breakfast served on weekends. 801 Shoreline Dr., 805/568-0064. $$

Toma Restaurant and Bar (Italian) is a romantic spot to savor excellent Italian and Mediterranean dishes from Santa Barbara’s seasonal bounty while enjoying warm and attentive service and a view of the enchanting Santa Barbara harbor. 324 W. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/962-0777. $$-$$$

Downtown Arigato Sushi (Japanese) provides designer sushi from inventive chefs. Daily specials explore the limitless varieties of this Japanese delicacy. 1225 State St., 805/965-6074. $$$

Arnoldi’s Café (Italian) specializes in traditional homestyle Italian cuisine, featuring the freshest local

The Harbor Restaurant and Longboard’s Grill (Seafood) on Stearns Wharf are two different

produce and seafood, imported Italian meats, cheeses

experiences from one great vantage point. The Harbor is a romantic ocean-view restaurant and Longboard’s is a noisy, energy-packed bar and grill. 210 Stearns Wharf, 805/963-3311. $$–$$$

courts and a heated patio. 600 Olive St.,

and olive oils, as well as an extensive wine list, bocce 805/962-5394. $$$

Benchmark Eatery (Seafood, American) is a casual eatery that does American fare proud, with everything

Rodney’s Grill (American) celebrates the cuisine

from soul-satisfying pastas, pizzas, grilled ahi and fish

and wines of the Central Coast with seasonal chef specials that are inspired by early California Spanish

and chips to fresh salads, juicy burgers and generous sandwiches. 1201 State St., 805/845-2600, $-$$


Bibi Ji (Indian, Seafood) is an inventive “inauthentic” Indian restaurant from acclaimed chef Jessi Singh and James Beard Award-winning sommelier Rajat Parr, with a locally inspired menu emphasizing seafood. 734 State St., 805/560-6845. $$-$$$

Blackbird (Californian) in Hotel Californian, features exquisite Mediterranean-influenced cuisine emphasizing locally-sourced and hyper-seasonal ingredients in a sleek, yet approachable and wholly unpretentious atmosphere. Dinner only. 36 State St., 805/882-0135. $$$

A shared dining experience featuring artisanal & seasonal ingredients, celebrating the central coast.

Black Sheep (Californian) has a cool, casual vibe, but serves seriously good farm-to-table food. Try scallop crudo, roasted bone marrow or re-constructed chicken stuffed with walnuts and dried apricots. 26 E. Ortega St., 805/965-1113. $$$

2016 Santa Barbara’s 12 Best Places to Eat – Thrillist.com

bouchon (Californian French) serves “Santa Barbara Wine Country” cuisine complemented by a remarkable wine list that includes more than 50 Central Coast wines by the glass. Open for dinner nightly. 9 W. Victoria St., 805/730-1160. $$$ Ca’Dario (Italian) promises fine Italian cuisine, whether pasta, fish or fowl—don’t miss the ravioli pillows with brown butter and sage sauce and grilled asparagus wrapped with pancetta—and an extensive wine list. A few doors down, Ca’Dario Pizzeria features a tasty array of pizzas, including gluten-free options. For a quick fix, try Ca’Dario Pizzeria Veloce and Pasta Veloce in the Santa Barbara Public Market (38 W. Victoria St.). 37 E. Victoria St., 805/884-9419. $$$

Seasonally inspired dinner nightly; cheese & housemade charcuterie at 3pm; gourmet brunch Saturday & Sunday.

Carlitos Café y Cantina (Mexican) offers exciting

100 Best Wine Bars in America

regional Mexican cuisine and 100% blue agave Margaritas, along with fresh, imaginative Mexican grilled specialties that borrow from Pueblo, Mayan and Aztec cultures. 1324 State St., 805/962-7117. $$

– Wine Enthusiast

a fun Mexican hot spot with killer Margaritas, tasty tacos, ample enchiladas and other classic south-of-the-border inspired fare. 330 State St., 805/845-8966. $$

China Pavilion (Chinese) is a spacious and charming restaurant with large picture windows looking out over downtown Santa Barbara. It features high-quality traditional Chinese food, as well as a delicious dim sum brunch on weekends. 1202 Chapala St., 805/560-6028. $$

Serving authentic Spanish food including hot and cold tapas, wood-fire grilled seafood and meat, and seasonal paella.

El Paseo Restaurant (Mexican) oozes with the character of old Mexico. The bar—where great margaritas are the norm—is separated from the festive dining room by large archways, beyond which are a courtyard and a fountain. 813 Anacapa St., 805/9626050. $$–$$$

Enterprise Fish Co. (Seafood) is one of Santa Barbara’s largest and busiest seafood restaurants. In an exhilarating, nautical atmosphere are an oyster bar and a variety of fresh fish that are mesquite-broiled and served at reasonable prices. 225 State St., 805/962-3313. $$

10 Best New Restaurants for 2017 – USA Today

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Casa Blanca Restaurant & Cantina (Mexican) is


DINING OUT

Finch & Fork (Californian) in the Canary Hotel offers hearty items like buttermilk fried chicken and excellently prepared lighter fare, complete with farm-fresh salads, fresh oysters and yummy flatbreads, plus excellent cocktails. 31 W. Carrillo St., 805/879-9100. $$–$$$ Intermezzo Bar/Café (Californian) serves local wines on tap, craft cocktails and light fare such as burgers, flatbreads, salads and desserts ‘til late. Enjoy an array of small plates to share—including charcuterie, oysters, mussels, steak bites and the crispy cauliflower—make this a perfect pre- or post-theater stop. Now open Tues.-Sat. for lunch, as well as daily for dinner. 819 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$–$$$ Jane (Californian) offers upscale, fresh, tasty fare that runs the gamut from huge seasonal salads and gourmet burgers to fish and chips with chipotle ketchup and creamy dill. The delicious goat cheese pancakes with smoked salmon and caviar are crafted from a family recipe. 1311 State St., 805/962-1311. $$

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Joe’s Café (American) is a Santa Barbara icon known for its stiff cocktails and raucous atmosphere. The menu of American classics includes steaks, sandwiches and Mexican specialties. Lunch and dinner served daily; breakfast served weekends. 536 State St., 805/966-4638. $$

quintessential Barbara gem, the heart of downtown in the in historic tessential located downtown the historic P L ASanta NSanta YOBarbara U R N Egem, X Tlocated E V E in Nin T the W Iheart TH VofI VA - The Lark (American) delights with Chef Jason sophisticated family-style plates designed za, within walkingdistance distance of of the the majestic Barbara courthouse. VivaPaluska’s offers four within walking majesticSanta Santa Barbara courthouse. Viva offers four

to share and made with the freshest possible local “farm-to-fork” ingredients, along with creative cocktails and a wonderful wine selection. Dinner, Tues.–Sun. 131 Anacapa St., 805/284-0370. $$–$$$

event spacesthat thatcreate create the atmosphere for your perfect celebration. ulutiful event spaces theperfect perfect atmosphere for your perfect celebration. re hosting a smallgathering, gathering, large large party, event or a or lavish wedding, Viva hasViva has osting a small party,corporate corporate event a lavish wedding, - Les Marchands (European) is a Europeance you. for you. oneofofthe the largest, event spaces in Santa Barbara withand winewith or WeWe areareone largest,non-hotel non-hotel event spaces in Santa Barbara styled restaurant retail shop lead by a world-class team of certified sommeliers offering an ccommodate anysize sizegroup group up up to OurOur on-site coordinators and gourmet extensive wine list from the finest small producers from mmodate any to400 400guests. guests. on-site coordinators and gourmet Santa Barbara County and throughout Europe. A full of handcrafted artisan spirits complements the wine efs look forward treating you you and to an event.barevent. ook forward tototreating andyour yourguests guests to unforgettable an unforgettable Viva is the quintessential Santa Barbara gem, located in the heart of downtown in the historic the quintessential Santa in the heartViva of offers four La Arcada Viva Plaza,iswithin walking distance of theBarbara majestic gem, Santa located Barbara courthouse. downtown in the historic La Arcada Plaza, within walking distance of the uniquely beautiful event spaces that create the perfect atmosphere for your perfect celebration. majestic Santa Barbara courthouse. Viva offers four uniquely beautiful Whether you are hosting a small gathering, large party, corporate event or a lavish wedding, Viva has event spaces that create the perfect atmosphere for wonderful celebrations. just the space for you. We are one of the largest, non-hotel event spaces in Santa Barbara with Whether you are hosting a small gathering, large party, corporate event or the ability to accommodate any size group up to 400 guests. Our on-site coordinators and gourmet a lavish wedding, Viva has just the space for you. We are one of the largest, chefs look forward to treating youBarbara and yourwith guests an unforgettable event. non-hotel event spaces in Santa thetoability to accommodate any size group up to 400 guests. Our onsite coordinators and gourmet chefs look forward to treating you and your guests to an unforgettable event.

program with classic stirred cocktails made in the oldschool traditional way. The menu showcases seasonally inspired food for dinner nightly. 131 Anacapa St. Ste. B, 805/ 284-0380. $–$$$

The Little Door (Mediterranean) brings together

1114 State Street • State Street • 805.708.7039 • events@vivasb.com V I VA S B .C O M / P R I VAT E - E V E N T S

harmonious, farm-to-table inspired dishes with beautiful ambiance for a quaint dining experience with views overlooking the Courthouse Sunken Garden. 129 E. Anapamu St., 805/560-8002. $$$

Loquita (Spanish) specializes in authentic Spanish food, including hot and cold tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats, and three types of paella. Executive Chef Peter Lee’s innovative cuisine has a California twist and is complimented with a full bar of Spanish and local wines and spirits. 202 State St., 805/880-3380. $$-$$$

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1114 State Street •State State Street •• •805.708.7039 • events@vivasb.com • Santa 1114 State •Street Barbara 805.965.4770 • events@vivasb.com 114 State Street Street 805.708.7039 • events@vivasb.com I VASSBB.C .CO E-EEV S TS VV I VA OM M//PPRRI VAT I VAT - EEVNET N


Louie’s (Californian), located inside Santa Barbara’s oldest operating hotel, The Upham, reflects the charm and tradition of its location. You’ll find extraordinary fresh seafood, pastas, filet mignon and a changing menu of specialties, with options to dine outside on a beautiful wrap-around porch or inside at tables tucked into intimate alcoves. 1404 De La Vina St., 805/963-7003. $$–$$$ Mizza Artisan Pizza and Italian Cuisine (Italian) is a beautiful new indoor/outdoor dining experience at the entrance to the historic La Arcada Plaza. Featuring handmade artisan pizzas, handmade pastas, salads, locally caught fresh fish, free-range chicken and Harris ranch CAB meats, along with local fresh produce, and a selection of carefully selected house specialties, the patios at Mizza are a great place to watch the world go by in the heart of downtown Santa Barbara. Serving lunch and dinner daily, weekend brunch. 1112 State St., $-$$ Mollie’s (Italian) features the dynamic cuisine of longtime local favorite Chef Mollie Ahlstrand, formerly of the beloved Trattoria Mollie. This warm, upscale eatery specializes in Italian classics that the Ethiopian born and bred Mollie gathered during her years of training with “the best chefs in Italy.” Try the homemade pastas, and the celebrated turkey meatballs. Open for lunch and dinner. 1218 State St. 805/770-8300. $$$

Olio e Limone (Italian) uses only the freshest ingredients for simply delicious preparations. Tuck into a plate of housemade ravioli filled with roasted eggplant and goat cheese, topped with a fresh tomato and basil sauce and shaved ricotta salata. Olio Pizzeria offers a casual pizza bar, wine and cocktails next door, while Olio Crudo Bar offers cocktails and sashimi with an Italian accent! 11 W. Victoria St. #17, 805/899-2699 ext.1. $$$

Breakfast • Lunch Dinner • Cocktails

Opal (Californian) is a classic European-style bistro serving eclectic California cuisine complemented by a wood-burning pizza oven, an extensive wine list and full bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1325 State St., 805/966-9676. $$

The Palace Grill (Cajun) is a place resonating with jazz music that creates the perfect setting for spicy food and spirited service to chase the blues away. Features authentic Louisiana specialities like jambalaya, crawfish etouffée and blackened steaks and seafood. 8 E. Cota St., 805/963-5000. $$–$$$

Paradise Café (American) has a unique old building with wall murals from the 1940s. It has one of Santa Barbara’s favorite patios for dining and a bar that will take you back in time with cocktails of your choice and a well-selected wine and beer list. 702 Anacapa St., 805/962-4416. $$

2981 Cliff Drive (805) 898-2628 www.boathousesb.com

Petit Valentien (French), with its quaint atmosphere and intimate setting, is hidden away in a small corner of La Arcada. Be sure to check out the prix fixe menu k FALL 2018

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only available on Sundays. 1114 State St. #16, 805/966-0222. $$

wines from local vineyards whenever possible. 3815 State St., 805/618-1816. $$-$$$

Santo Mezcal (Mexican) is located next to Hotel Indigo a block from Stearns Wharf. The restaurant showcases fine cuisine rooted in Mexican flavors and traditions that also celebrate local ingredients, and an impressive cocktail menu featuring an extensive mescal and tequila collection. Dining options include tables inside or outside on the patio, where the sights and scenes of lower State Street abound. 119 State St., 805/883-3593. $$

The Tee-Off (American) is a friendly steak and

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seafood restaurant and lounge with a long history of local appreciation that features a short but sweet menu of steaks, chops, chicken and seafood. 3627 State St., 805/687-1616. $$-$$$

Goleta Angel Oak (French-Californian) is a modern steak

Smithy Kitchen + Bar (Californian) features organic, rustic, locally-sourced fare from critically acclaimed Chef Lauren Herman in a beautiful setting that’s great for both small and large gatherings. The lovely outdoor patio is perfect for dining under both the stars and the sunshine, with a gorgeous canopy of 100-year-old olive trees. 7 E. Anapamu St., 805/845-7112. $$-$$$

and seafood restaurant housed at Ritz-Carlton Bacara, featuring classic steakhouse dishes with a uniquely Santa Barbara interpretation. Accompanying the cuisine is an ambiance of pure scenic beauty, with ceiling-to-floor windows boasting expansive panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean from every table and a striking 25-seat bar topped with vibrant blue Amazonite quartz that mirrors the dazzle and grandeur of the ocean. 8301 Hollister Ave., 805/571-4240. $$$-$$$$

- Viva (Mexican) indulges your senses with its modern Mexican cuisine, beautiful courtyard patio and inviting dining room in the historic La Arcada. Taco happy hour (Mon.-Fri. from 3-6 p.m.) is a perfect time to sample creative tacos and other antojitos, or “small cravings,” along with the raw bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh shellfish. 1114 State St., 805/965-4770. $$

Beachside Bar + Café (Seafood) sits just above the sand and Goleta Pier, and serves expertly prepared fish and other delicious foods for lunch and dinner in the tropical-style dining room, on the glass-walled open-air patio, at the oyster bar or in the big, full-service bar— all with wide views of the ocean and sandy beach. 5905 Sandspit Rd., 805/964-7881. $$-$$$

Wine Cask (Californian) in the historic El Paseo complex offers a beautiful spot to enjoy fine dining and exceptional service in a relaxed setting. Don’t miss the stellar wine selections, including an impressive variety of local wines on tap. 813 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$$

Hollister Brewing Company (American) offers

Uptown

Jane at the Marketplace (Californian), presents flavorful fare for lunch and dinner including steak, chicken and pasta in cozy surroundings. This is a bright, sunny space known for its friendly service and authentic family recipes. 6940 Marketplace Dr., 805/770-5388. $$

- Belmond El Encanto (Coastal-Californian) presents California coastal cuisine and seasonal favorites from executive chef Johan Denizot, featuring specialties like fresh local oysters, pan seared diver scallops and short ribs sous vide alongside stunning Santa Barbara views. Sit under the stars on the terrace or in the elegant dining room. 800 Alvarado Pl., 805/770-3530. $$$-$$$$

Chuck’s of Hawaii (American) is the home of California’s first salad bar and offers award-winning steaks and fresh seafood right from the grill. A local favorite hangout since 1967. 3888 State St., 805/687-4417. $$-$$$

a rotating menu of beers on tap. Menu items include duck fat French fries, Kobe beef sliders and fish tacos. 6980 Marketplace Dr., 805/968-2810. $-$$

Outpost (Californian) is a casual, hip spot at the Goodland Hotel. The excellent seasonal menu includes shareable plates, entrees and fresh salads, as well as fish tacos with battered halibut, flat iron steak with salsa verde, pork bao buns and a caper-studded Caesar salad with grilled romaine. 5650 Calle Real, 805/964-1288. $$-$$$

Rooftop Bistro & Bar (Californian) is a modern

from Santa Barbara Golf Club and is a neighborhood hot spot for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour— try the juicy burgers on brioche buns or heart-warming coq au vin. 3302 McCaw Ave., 805/569-7698. $$

rooftop patio, offering lunch, craft cocktails and small bites, with a breathtaking panoramic view. This unexpected gem features creative shared plates from Executive Chef Michael Blackwell, to be enjoyed in cozy fireplace groupings under the stars. 6878 Hollister Ave., 805/562-5996. $-$$

Lure Fish House (Seafood) specializes in fresh and

Santa Ynez Mountains

Le Café Stella (French-American) is perched across

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Cold Spring Tavern (American) is an iconic

establishment virtually unchanged since the days of the stagecoach run that has served excellent food—including wild game—to hungry locals and travelers alike for more than 100 years. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 5995 Stagecoach Rd., 805/967-0066. $$$

Santa Ynez Valley, Los Alamos Valley The Bear and Star (American) at Fess Parker’s Wine Country Inn takes its name from the two states Parker called home, Texas and California, celebrating refined ranch cuisine paired with California’s bounty. 2860 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/686-1359. $$–$$$$

Bottlest Bistro (American) is an upscale, contemporary eatery featuring eclectic small plates and entrees, plus a choose-your-own wine wall with 52 constantly changing wines available by the taste, half glass or full glass. 35 Industrial Way, Buellton, 805/686-4742. $$-$$$

Brothers Restaurant at the Red Barn (American) offers innovative, “made from scratch” cuisine in this exquisitely refurbished barn. The hearty menu offers American classics like chops, prime rib and chicken-fried steak. Lunch and dinner served daily. 3539 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-4142. $$-$$$$

Dos Carlitos Restaurant & Tequila Bar (Mexican) brings bold Mexican and Latin flavors to the valley. An open-fire grill imparts a smoky essence to authentic grilled specials, delicious salsas and the aroma of fresh handmade tortillas. 3544 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-0033. $$

First & Oak (Fusion) distinguishes itself with beautifully prepared, elegant small plates designed to pair with fine wines and allow guests to taste multiple, exciting dishes in a single sitting. Housed in the charming Mirabelle Inn, this modern American restaurant has a European influence as well as a Californian emphasis on food that is seasonal, local and sustainable. 409 First St., Solvang, 805/688-1703. $$$

The Gathering Table at Ballard Inn (California Fusion) is overseen by Owner/Chef Budi Kazali and offers a fun and inviting place to gather over incredible food that’s meant to be shared in a warm and inviting modern farmhouse atmosphere. 2436 Baseline Ave., Ballard, 805/688-7770. $$-$$$$

The Hitching Post (American) is an old-fashioned, western-style steakhouse and lounge just a few minutes off Hwy. 101. In addition to Newport Meat Company beef, there are also ribs, quail, turkey, duck and ostrich plus seafood on the menu. 406 E. Hwy. 246, Buellton, 805/688-0676. $$$–$$$$


La Botte Bistro & Catering (Italian) is a culinary

Root 246 (American), located at Hotel Corque,

gem tucked away into a nondescript strip mall. With an ambiance that’s as equally quaint and romantic as it is eclectic and fun, this family-owned restaurant provides an unforgettable Italian dining experience served with the heart and soul of Italy. Open for dinner Wed.-Sun. 225 McMurray Rd., Suite A, Buellton, 805/693-2154. $$

features innovative cuisine emphasizing local, seasonal ingredients to create the ultimate in farm-to-table cuisine. Root 246 has one of the area’s most extensive selections of local wines, whiskey and craft beers, as well as refreshing signature cocktails. Try the Sunday brunch for a delicious weekend experience. 420 Alisol Rd., Solvang, 805/686-8681. $$-$$$

Los Olivos Café and Wine Merchant

Sides Hardware & Shoes—A Brothers Restaurant (American) is located in a restored

(Californian) is a casual restaurant in one of the town’s original Main Street buildings. The thoughtful menu of homemade pizzas and California cuisine is complemented with an enormous list of wines from the adjacent store. 2879 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-7265. $$

Pico (Californian), specializes in a menu of approachable Californian cuisine sourced from locally farmed, seasonal ingredients. Chef Drew Terp offers a creative, eclectic spin on American comfort food with an extensive wine list showcasing the best from Santa Barbara’s wine country, as well as international selections. 458 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805/344-1122. $$-$$$

1901 building, where chef-owners Jeff and Matt Nichols turn out hearty American favorites with original gourmet twists. The brothers strive to have legendary service, innovative “made from scratch” cuisine, and a welcoming and comfortable atmosphere that causes you to return time and time again. Try the delicious Bacon Steak if you need further incentive to return. 2375 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-4820. $$–$$$

- S.Y. Kitchen (Italian) is a charming “California version of a little Italian farmhouse” with a focus on unfussy rustic Italian food made from fresh, local ingredients. Expect inventive salads, woodfired pizzas,

fabulous cocktails and house-made pastas with everything from seasonal seafood to duck ragu. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez, 805/691-9794. $$-$$$

Trattoria Grappolo (Italian) is a great destination for gourmet pizzas from a wood-burning oven, fresh salads made with local produce and nightly specials. Other specialties include: Carpaccio, Rollino Veneto—rolled-up pizza pouches stuffed with smoked mozzarella and radicchio—pastas and fresh seafood dishes. Desserts such as chocolate flourless cake and house made tiramisu are also a hit with guests. Grappolo features a list of more than 150 wines from around the world. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-6899. $$-$$$

The Willows at Chumash Casino Resort (American) is a AAA Four Diamond Award-winner specializing in mouthwatering prime steaks and seafood. The elegance of this exquisite dining room is matched by incomparable views of the rolling Santa Ynez hills. 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez, 805/686-0855. $$$–$$$$

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Summer ends, and Autumn comes, and he who would have it otherwise would have high tide always and a full moon every night. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; HAL BORL AND

Photo by Jay Sinclair Courtesy Visit Santa Barbara

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The fall issue of Santa Barbara Seasons shines the spotlight on interior design and the essence of Santa Barbara style.

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