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C E L E B R A T I N G L I F E & C U L T U R E O N T H E C E N T R A L C O A S T | winter

Postcards from the Past

Winter 2017/18 $4.95 | sbseasons.com

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COOL WINTER FASHION

THE HISTORY & DELIGHTS OF SAN LUIS OBISPO SIMPLY IRRESISTIBLE GIFTS


DISTINCTIVE SANTA BARBARA PROPERTIES

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Cool Winter Fashion Photographed by Mehosh Written & Styled by Judy Foreman

FEATURES

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Postcards From the Past Photographic Postcards From the Collection of Peter Jordano Written by Leslie Dinaberg

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The History & Delights of San Luis Obispo

72

Winter’s Ultimate Gift Guide

Aminia Rubinacci top and Peter Cohen cropped pant from Allora by Laura. Aquazurra bootie from DIANI. Clutch and necklace from Maison K. Model: Charisse Mannolini of Hello Gorgeous Models; Hair & Makeup: Blush & Lashes; Wardrobe Assistant: Brittany McKinley.

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PHOTO: MEHOSH

Written by Cheryl Crabtree


22 DEPARTMENTS 18 Editor’s Letter

22 Local Lowdown

Performing and Visual Arts and Other Favorite Events for Winter

32 On Exhibit Featured Artists at Local Galleries

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BY CHRISTINE PENKO

38 First Person Roger Durling: Raising the Bar for the Love of Film BY BONNIE CARROLL

40 Sustainable Seasons El Toro: History Meets Sustainability BY NANCY RANSOHOFF

42 Legacies Foodbank of Santa Barbara County BY CHUCK GRAHAM

44 Montecito New eateries come to Coast Village Road

46 A Day Away Carmel and Paso Robles BY LESLIE DINABERG

78 Tee it up! Golf in Santa Barbara County

80 Explore Santa Barbara County 40 great things to do in Santa Barbara, Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria, Goleta, Santa Ynez, Solvang & Los Olivos

82 Santa Barbara Urban Wineries

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C E L E B R A T I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U L T U R E | winter

Postcards from the Past

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COOL WINTER FASHION

THE HISTORY & DELIGHTS OF SAN LUIS OBISPO

sbseasons.com

30 Winter Datebook

“Winter’s Dream”

ULTIM ATE GIFT GUIDE: Pixie Mood Vegan Purse from Nordstrom, Paseo Nuevo. Brass feather from DIANI Living.

C E L E B R AT I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U LT U R E

Retail spotlight on Women’s Heritage Skillshare, Ace Rivington, Home SB, The Shopkeepers and Loveworn. Carpinteria Art Center, Santa Barbara Restaurant Week, The Escape Room, New Cookbooks by Local Authors and More!

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36 Poetry

SANTA BARBARA SEASONS | Winter 2017/18

20 Contributors

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SIMPLY IRRESISTIBLE GIFTS

86 Wine Country Tales of the Vine BY LAURIE JERVIS

89 Spirits of the Season BY WENDY THIES SELL

90 Dining Out Our guide to favorite area restaurants

96 My Santa Barbara BY DAVID FRITZEN

ON THE COVER

“Winter bathing on Miramar Beach” postcard from the collection of Peter Jordano. Ultra-high resolution scan by santabarbaraphotographs.com.

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) LEELA CYD, COURTESY HYATT CARMEL HIGHLANDS, DONNIE HEDDEN, COURTESY WOMEN’S HERITAGE, MEHOSH

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W I N T E R 2 017/18 • VO LU M E L X I I I • N U M B E R 4

PUBLISHER & EDITOR IN CHIEF

David W. Fritzen M ANAGING EDITOR

Leslie Dinaberg A R T  D I R E C T O R

Kim McKeown ADVERTISING M ANAGER

Danielle Hazlett COPY EDITOR

Lindse Davis CONTRIBUTING EDITORS FOOD

Nancy Ransohoff

POETRY STYLE

David Starkey

Judy Foreman

CALENDAR EDITOR

Michelle Jarrard CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Lauren Bennett, Bonnie Carroll, Cheryl Crabtree, Leslie Dinaberg, Judy Foreman, David Fritzen, Chuck Graham, Laurie Jervis, Anna Kodelashvili, Christine Penko, Nancy Ransohoff, Lohana Richmond, Wendy Thies Sell, Hana-Lee Sedgwick, Leslie A. Westbrook CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGR APHERS

Mehosh EDITORIAL INTERNS

Lauren Bennett Lohana Richmond W A R D R O B E A S S I S TA N T

Brittany McKinley

Copyright 2018. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from the publisher. F O R E V E R S U B S C R I P T I O N Santa Barbara Seasons now offers a subscription that lasts “forever” (unless you cancel) for the cost of four quarterly editions. To subscribe, send check or money order for $19.80; email subscribe@sbseasons.com; or visit sbseasons. com/subscribe. Your subscription will automatically begin with the WINTER 2017/18 edition.

For advertising information, please contact the publisher. Editorial and advertising offices: 829 De la Vina Street, Suite 210, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Telephone 805/564-8804. Fax 805/564-8802. Printed in the USA. sbseasons.com

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America’s First Silver Dollar The Lord St. Oswald-Norweb 1794 Silver Dollar • MS-64 (PCGS)

Acquired shortly after striking by William Strickland on his tour of the United States in 1794-1795, this keepsake now ranks among the finest examples of our nation’s first silver dollar. Property of a Santa Barbara family for more than three decades.

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WINTER EDITOR’S LETTER

“Winter is coming.” — NED STARK , GA ME OF THRONES

SANTA BARBAR A IS ALWAYS a beautiful place to revel in the holiday season. Despite almost 300 days of sunshine a year, there’s always something especially celebratory in the air this time of year, and our stunning style feature, “Cool Winter Fashion,” beautifully styled by Judy Foreman and photographed by Mehosh (page

Leslie Dinaberg MANAGING EDITOR

leslie@sbseasons.com

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PHOTO: AMY BARNARD

64), certainly reflects that festive feeling. With a new year dawning, it’s also a great time to reflect on where we’ve been, which I was honored to do with long-time local businessman and philanthropist Peter Jordano, who shares his amazing collection of “Postcards From the Past” with us on page 48. History meets sustainability with the beautiful El Toro project. Talk about #HouseGoals, this gorgeous 1926 Spanish Colonial Revival home is a registered historical landmark, as well as a stunning model of sustainability—read Nancy Ransohoff’s story on page 40. Our “Ultimate Gift Guide” (page 72) is chock-full of great ideas for everyone in your life, as well as some special items you might just have to purchase for yourself, if your loved ones don’t take the hint and buy them for you. We also travel north to explore “The History and Delights of San Luis Obispo” (page 56), “A Grape Escape to Paso Robles” (page 46) and “The Charms of Carmel” (page 47). We venture to Santa Barbara wine country with Laurie Jervis’s “Tales of the Vine,” which chronicles the stories of a professional snowboarder, a baker and a pro volleyball player, all of whom have now turned their talents to winemaking careers (page 86). Just in time for the 2018 festivities, Bonnie Carroll interviews Santa Barbara International Film Festival Executive Director Roger Durling at the festival’s new Riviera Theatre headquarters (page 38), Chuck Graham takes a look at Foodbank of Santa Barbara County and its new Alma Cena Sana (translating to “soul, person, dinner, to cure”) program (page 42), Wendy Thies Sell explores Santa Barbara County’s growing distillery scene in “Spirits of the Season” (page 89), Hana-Lee Sedgwick looks at delicious new cookbooks (page 22) and our publisher, Dave Fritzen reveals our expansion plans for 2018 on page 96. Winter is certainly the snuggliest season in Santa Barbara, so grab a warm blanket and a cup of cocoa—perhaps spiked with something special—and cuddle up with this issue. We’ve got a lot for you to enjoy! All of us at Santa Barbara Seasons wish you the happiest of holidays and an even better new year to come. Cheers to a wonderful winter!


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Nancy Enholm, Lori Murray, Crystal Quintero, and Barbara Zirretta in front of American Riviera Bank’s new residential lending office located at 18 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara.

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WINTER CONTRIBUTORS

Christine Penko | poet Christine Penko is the author of the 2015 poetry collection Thunderbirds—a memoir in poems. Her work has also been published in a variety of journals and anthologies under the name Christine Kravetz. Penko is passionate about bringing the benefits of poetry to the children of Santa Barbara County where, for almost 20 years, she has taught poetry writing in public and private schools. As area coordinator for the statewide nonprofit California Poets in the Schools, she also coordinates classes and trains poet-teachers. As for getting into the holiday spirit, Penko shares, “Last year, I handed my husband and children glue guns and a bunch of Art from Scrap finds. We sat around the dining table and put together some very strange holiday ornaments and called it a party. It was a great time, and I’d like to do it again.”

Cheryl Crabtree has penned many a word for regional and national travel books, magazines and websites. She co-authored the very first edition of The Insider’s Guide to Santa Barbara, and her other credits include Hometown Santa Barbara, California Directory of Fine Wineries: Central Coast, Fodor’s California and Fodor’s The Complete Guide to National Parks of the West. She also covers the Central Coast region for Bindu Trips, a worldwide itinerary-based travel website. “Our favorite holiday tradition is to have a white elephant party with friends and family sometime between Christmas and New Year’s Day,” says Crabtree. Judy Foreman | writer and stylist

Mehosh | photographer Mehosh’s fashion photography has been an integral part of the Santa Barbara scene for more than 30 years. His client base is international, and his work has been seen in catalogs and on the web throughout the world. He is currently working on a spring catalog for Stars & Stripes Western Wear out of Kirchentellinsfurt, Germany. Closer to home, Mehosh shoots for Wendy Foster’s online catalog every month out of his Santa Barbara studio. As for holiday traditions, Mehosh says, “I decorate the cabin in an old Christmas way, but with a southwestern style.”

Judy Foreman has been a lifestyle writer in Montecito and Santa Barbara since 1999, covering fashion, health, fitness, new businesses, nonprofits and people of interest. Foreman has been a lifestyle columnist for The Montecito Journal, Santa Barbara News-Press and Noozhawk, as well as a featured writer for Santa Barbara Magazine and a contributing writer and fashion stylist for Santa Barbara Seasons. Her family holiday and winter traditions involve special food, including, she says, “many of my late mom’s recipes. Favorite times are gathering at my home to make and serve fresh potato latkes with homemade applesauce and sour cream, sweet and sour meatballs, a sweet noodle casserole, jelly-filled donuts and fresh raisinfilled challahs.”

PHOTOS:(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) COURTESY CHRISTINE PENKO, CHERYL CRABTREE, JUDY FOREMAN, MEHOSH

Cheryl Crabtree | writer


P L A N YO U R N E X T E V E N T W I T H V I VA Viva is the quintessential Santa Barbara gem, located in the heart of downtown in the historic La Arcada Plaza, within walking distance of the majestic Santa Barbara courthouse. Viva offers four uniquely beautiful event spaces that create the perfect atmosphere for your perfect celebration. Whether you are hosting a small gathering, large party, corporate event or a lavish wedding, Viva has just the space for you. We are one of the largest, non-hotel event spaces in Santa Barbara with the ability to accommodate any size group up to 400 guests. Our on-site coordinators and gourmet chefs look forward to treating you and your guests to an unforgettable event.

1114 State Street • State Street • 805.708.7039 • events@vivasb.com V I VA S B .C O M / P R I VAT E - E V E N T S


LOCAL LOWDOWN

N E W & N OTE WO R TH Y I N S A N TA B A R B A R A

LOCAL LOWDOWN

WHAT’S COOKING Festive Books From Local Chefs BY HANA-LEE SEDGWICK

Les Legumes

from local author Pascale Beale, Les Légumes: Vegetable Recipes from the Market Table, will have you looking for more excuses to eat more vegetables. With 110 delectable recipes organized by ingredient, this plant-based cookbook brings the essence of California cooking to your table with delicious farmers’ market-driven ideas for every season. Taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother, Beale’s talents in the kitchen shine through the pages of Les Légumes, which showcases vegetables as the main event. Engaging anecdotes and beautiful full-page photos, highlighting the flavors and versatility of California’s vegetables, accompany her approachable recipes. From beets and tomatoes to leeks and asparagus, Beale has a way of making cooking with vegetables fun and inspiring, not to mention entirely craveable. Think roasted eggplant curry with caramelized onions; salt roasted beets with mackerel and spiced onions; and potato and celeriac gratin, a decadent version of the classic gratin. There’s also a recipe for zucchini cappuccino with lime crème fraîche—her whimsical spin on spring green soup—and the show-stopping whole roasted branzino with lemon and fennel fronds. Each innovative recipe provides inspiration for eating vegetables in creative new ways, for every course and season, making Les Légumes a culinary treat that will have you celebrating vegetables all year long.

THE L ATEST COOKBOOK

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PHOTOS: THIS PAGE: MEDIA 27 (3); OPPOSITE: LEELA CYD (2)

Clockwise from top: Roasted spiced cauliflower with yogurt herb sauce; mashed spuds with crème fraîche and sweet potato fries; Les Legumes.


Spiced Glogg makes a wonderful cold weather treat. Right, Tasting Hygge.

The Taste of Hygge

blogger/cookbook author/lifestyle photographer Leela Cyd helps bring the Danish art of hygge into the home with her new cookbook, Tasting Hygge: Joyful Recipes for Cozy Days and Nights. While there’s no exact English translation, hygge (pronounced “hoo-gah”) roughly translates to “the art of spending quality time with people you love surrounded by good food, drink and cheer,” shares Cyd, who traveled to Denmark in the name of research after becoming enamored by the concept. Centered around what Cyd describes as “easy, cozy recipes for slowing down and enjoying the moment,” Tasting Hygge provides a delicious excuse to step back and cultivate hygge moments. More than 50 mouthwatering recipes are organized into categories of warm, spiced, smooth, calm, bright and hygge to go, including recipes for boozy treats, satisfying comfort food and innovative spins on familiar dishes. Cyd’s own colorful, inviting photographs accompany the recipes, along with personal stories that show glimpses of how she creates mindful, happy moments in her life. From poached pears in red wine with yogurt, rose and crushed walnuts to the aromatic Scandinavian-style mulled wine, spiced glogg, the creamy roasted celeriac and sunchoke soup with smoked paprika and the decadent kale gratin with hazelnuts, Cyd’s easy-to-follow recipes will leave you satisfied, comforted and inspired to cultivate more mindful moments at home. 

LOC AL FOOD

SPICED GLOGG

8 servings (from Tasting Hygge by Leela Cyd)

This Scandinavian-style mulled wine with citrus, spices, raisins, and almonds tastes like Christmas in a hot pot. On a cold winter’s evening, this traditional brew brings me such joy, with its heady, boozy warmth. The addition of raisins and almonds is standard in Sweden and Finland, but feel free to leave them out if you prefer. I love their wineinfused plumpness, but the texture may not be for everyone. INGREDIENTS

1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice 3-inch piece of ginger, sliced into ¼-inch rounds 1 orange peel, trimmed into ½-inch wide strips 10 whole cloves

10 cardamom pods 4 cinnamon sticks 1 vanilla bean 1 bottle dry red wine 1 cup brandy 1 orange, cut into ½-inch slices, plus extra for serving

2 tangerines, cut into ½-inch slices, plus extra for serving ½ cup golden raisins, plus extra for serving ½ cup slivered almonds, plus extra for serving

orange juice, ginger, orange peels and all of the spices into a medium pot. Bring to a boil, cover with a lid and remove from heat. Allow it to steep for one hour.

PL AC E

WHEN YOU’RE READY TO SERVE ,

strain and discard all the spices except for cinnamon sticks. Place spiced juice into a 4.5-quart pot and add red wine, brandy, reserved cinnamon sticks, orange slices, tangerine slices, raisins and almonds. Cook on medium heat until tiny bubbles form. Do not boil as this will burn off the alcohol. Serve each cup with a few extra pieces of citrus, raisins and almonds.

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

BY LESLIE DINABERG

the most exciting flavors in town at the first annual Santa Barbara Restaurant Week, taking place February 23–March 4. With an abundant number of restaurants to choose from in Santa Barbara, the possibilities for exceptional dining experiences are endless, with everything available from prime steak to fresh local seafood, from classic American fare to internationally inspired cuisine. Participating restaurants will offer special discounted rates ($25–$45) for a prix fixe three-course menu, and local wineries and hotels are also getting in on the fun. “We are so excited to be launching the first annual Santa Barbara Restaurant Week, which is long overdue with all the culinary talent at our fingertips,” says Leslee Garafalo, owner of Santa Barbara Uncorked, LLC, who is one of the organizers. “This is an opportunity for our restaurant community to come together and showcase their establishments by offering an accessible dining experience for both Santa Barbara and surrounding communities.”

EXPERIENC E

FOR MORE INFORMATION

and an updated list of participants, visit SBrestaurantweeks.com.

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SBSEASONS.COM

“Our goal is to make Carpinteria one of the best small-town art communities in the country,” notes enthusiastic campaign chair David Powdrell, “and make everyone an artist!”

CARPINTERIA ARTS CENTER The little town that could…is getting a new Arts Center BY LESLIE A . WESTBROOK

will soon have a sparkling new arts center in the heart of downtown. At press time, $2.8 million of the $3.1 million needed had already been raised to create the new facility to celebrate the arts. Monthly themed exhibitions of all styles and mediums reward regional talent, young and old. Creative classes and activities are diverse: parent or grandparent/child workshops, African drumming, Chinese calligraphy and jewelry making. Bella Artes students, a volunteer arts program that teaches culturally relevant art to mostly Latino families living in three People’s Self-Help Housing developments in town, proudly exhibit at the Center. For the expansion, the nonprofit purchased the Cajun Kitchen restaurant, conveniently located next door, which is being revitalized and will unveil Charles LoBue Gallery, named for the nonagenarian über-volunteer and donor who has gleefully watched the center blossom over the decades Everyone wants to help. Dave Mendro of Neumann Mendro Andrulaitis Architects C ARPINTERIA

(their offices are across the street) created the final design pro bono—same for courtyard landscaping by noted landscape designer (think Lotusland) Eric Nagelmann. Matching grants, like a generous one from Lynda Fairly, add to the giving spirit. The spacious outdoor courtyard on Linden Avenue hosts everything from yarn bombing to colorful murals created by teens under the guidance of local artist John Wullbrandt. The venue also hosts openings, First Friday celebrations, arts and crafts sales, live music, camps and workshops and even a class on writing and illustrating children’s books. The new design leaves the community courtyard and its colorful overhead sails intact. This means that, considering our sunny weather, the arts in Carp will continue to be enjoyed and celebrated outside—and remain visible to passersby who might just happen to weave into the outdoor embrace of this community gem. Donations of any size are gratefully accepted and often matched. It seems that Mayberry by the Sea is well on its way. Carpinteria Arts Center, 855 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, 805/684-7789, carpinteriaartscenter.org.

PHOTOS:(L-R) COURTESY SANTA BARBARA RESTAURANT WEEK, CARPINTERIA ARTS CENTER, THE HOUSE OF CLUES

SANTA BARBARA RESTAURANT WEEK


Welcome to The House of Clues BY LESLIE DINABERG ESC APE ROOM GA MES are super-popular, and Santa Barbara finally has its own one-of-a-kind venue: The House of Clues. Co-owners Assel Abdrakhmanova and Oscar Zevalos (the third partner is Whitman Heining) were designing props and sets for themed events and escape rooms for outside clients when they decided to create their own custom one-of-a-kind attraction. “We knew we could do a better job and make it even better and more challenging,” says Zevalos. Their goal is eventually to franchise their concepts—Santa Barbara is the first location—and I think they’ve got a winner. Not only was our “Pirate Ghost Ship” game well designed and challenging, it truly was exciting and fun for our all-ages group. Escape rooms combine mental puzzles with physical challenges, and a beat-theclock element keeps things moving along quickly. With 45 minutes to escape from a given room (which is actually a series of rooms), you are under constant video and audio surveillance and can communicate with the game master at any time, as well as receive clues when needed. Every move counts, and nothing is as it seems. In addition to the “Pirate Ghost Ship,” The House of Clues also has “Psycho Dentist” and “Alien Spacecraft Invasion” themes on the menu.

FOR MORE INFORMATION , visit TheHouseofClues.net, 629 N. Salsipuedes St., 805/229-9179.

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

THE SHOPKEEPERS Let’s Stay Home BY JUDY FOREM AN

HGT V STARS Joanna and Chip Gaines of the famed reality TV series Fixer Upper have brought their modern spirit and contemporary architectural design vibe home from Waco, Texas to Santa Barbara. HOME Santa Barbara features the Gaines’s furniture line Magnolia Home. The husband and wife duo—Joanna designs and Chip builds—opened the store (owned by Jason and Lynsey Trueman, Lisa Knutson and Lisa Rodgers) last spring in downtown Santa Barbara. HOME Santa Barbara’s big, fun-tobrowse open showroom with industrial ceilings showcases each selection in a style setting that includes a large range of textiles, lighting and accessories. Bedroom, living

EMBRACE YOUR INNER ACE BY ANNA KODEL ASHVILI

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room, kitchen, office, entry hall, kids room and finishing-touch accessories are all part of this kitschy store. HOME Santa Barbara is family friendly with an aesthetic based on practicality and longevity. Décor from farmhouse to modern in style, from traditional French-inspired to urban, from primitive to boho chic, industrial and architecturally deconstructed looks are all found here. How you put it together is what gives each home its own signature look. Joanna Gaines, who describes her line of furniture and accessories as “simple, fresh and timeless,” loves the use of industrial pieces that have a retro feel. Her specialty is making old things new again and creating functional, approachable rooms that inspire and encourage others to own their own space. “Home is the most important place,” according to Joanna. “I love helping people create beautiful and meaningful spaces in their homes.” HOME Santa Barbara, 14 Parker Way, 805/470-9776, homesantabarb.com

when you mix trendy L.A. style with French terry-cloth comfort? A marvel takes shape in the form of Ace Rivington, a men’s clothing store located in La Arcada with a satellite in the Funk Zone’s Guilded Table. Founder Beau Lawrence designs each item with one character in mind: Ace Rivington himself. “Ace is a modern-day

WHAT HAPPENS

RIGHT IN THE HEART of the Funk Zone is The Shopkeepers, a charming and artisanal purveyor of “curious goods for curious people.” Inside you’ll find high-quality handselected European and American goods such as men’s and women’s clothing, jewelry, shoes, handbags, accessories, books, cards and apothecary items. John and Patti Simpson, known for their local jewelry brand, Waxing Poetic, created a space for those with an ear for music, an eye for art and a soul for fine unique curios. The walls of The Shopkeepers act as an art gallery, boasting photos of musical icons by renowned photographer Norman Seeff, and a handcrafted drum set turned chandelier—an homage to their love of music. The built-in stage hosts intimate musical and artistic spoken events that bring the community together. “This store was inspired by the space and an opportunity to be a part of the community and create something amazing,” John says. “The beauty of the Funk Zone is that it’s okay to be funky…We can be artistic and rough-edged, and we want to celebrate that.” The Shopkeepers, 137A Anacapa St., 805/883-3122, theshopkeepers-sb.com.

private jet pilot who galivants all over the globe flying his boss’s plane from destination to destination in search of adventure,” Lawrence says. What started as a kickstarter campaign in 2013 became a wild success after the initial sale of 600 homespun French terry-cloth sweaters in roughly one month. After nurturing the stylistic evolution of his fashion

line, Lawrence now develops casual yet meticulously designed denim, outerwear, shirts, footwear, accessories, hats, bags and home goods—all to help men around the country embrace their inner Ace. Ace Rivington, 1114 State St. #25, 805/881-2999, acerivington.com.

PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) COURTESY HOME SANTA BARBARA, COURTESY THE SHOPKEEPERS, COURTESY LOVEWORN (2)

BY ANNA KODEL ASHVILI


LOVEWORN BY ANNA KODEL ASHVILI

These two ingredients are the building blocks of Loveworn, a handcrafted denim body shop in the Funk Zone created by Santa Barbara denim icon Jill Johnson, former coowner of True Grit. Loveworn’s style combines beachy 1970s vibes, custommade denim wear and California coastal spirit to create a line of personalized tees, jackets, dresses, swimwear, pants, skirts and accessories that Johnson makes with her own “love-worn hands.” “We do all of our own silk screens, studding, patching, embroidery, everything you can think of—even repairs and alterations. It’s fun to be creative every day,” Johnson says. The eye-catching warehouse is adorned with rustic furniture, bright Americana pop art created by local artist Wallace Piatt and a miniature motorcycle museum in the back of the shop. Every element of Loveworn’s atmosphere works together to create a funky care-free ambience that draws in tourists and locals alike. With every stitch, patch and stud, Loveworn redefines the timeless definition of “made with love.” Loveworn, 11

FUNK ’N’ LOVE:

Rare Coins & Precious Metals | Foreign Exchange Largest collection of Estate Jewelry in Santa Barbara 3000 State Street Santa Barbara CA 93105 805.687.3641 | pbrombal.com

Anacapa St., 805/564-8980 ext. 205, lovewornsb.com.

Santa Barbara Lights Specializing in restored European/American chandeliers, wall sconces and architectural fixtures circa 1870-1930 509 Chapala Street - Santa Barbara

805-884-0535

UL Listed

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LOCAL LOWDOWN

Women’s Heritage Brings Tradition to Everyday Life BY HANA-LEE SEDGWIC K

IN TODAY ’S modern society, it’s much more common to find workshops teaching Instagram skills than those on how to milk a cow or bake bread from scratch…which is not surprising given our digitally-focused fast-paced world. These days, teachings of the more “traditional” life skills of generations past, like those that allow one to live off the land and be self-sufficient, are a bit harder to come by. For friends Emma Moore, Lauren Malloy and Ashley Moore, recognizing a void in today’s modern society for traditional nostalgic skills prompted them to launch Women’s Heritage, a collaborative project that encourages bringing traditional homesteading wisdom into everyday life. While on a trip to the Sierra Mountains in 2016, these three Santa Barbara women started a discussion about traditional folk knowledge, inspired by the homemade bread and pesto Emma brought to share. Realizing each possessed a different skill set that the others wanted to learn—between Ashley’s experience with herbalism and plant medicine, Lauren’s insights on animal science and Emma’s expertise in the kitchen—they decided to find a way to bring those elements together, not only for their own benefit, but to help other women, as well. Thus, in 2016, Women’s Heritage was born. The first workshop offered by Women’s Heritage taught hands-on skills for baking sourdough bread from scratch. Right from the start, the response from the community was strong. “When the first event sold out in minutes, we knew we were on to something,” shares Emma, who leads the food-related workshops. “Our goal is to inspire women to pick up a new skill or hone in on a skill they had before, but most importantly, we want to create a sense of community and encourage a

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feeling of sisterhood.” Lauren adds, “Teaching, learning, sharing and growing in sisterhood are all pillars of why we started our business, and we’re thrilled that our vision of bringing women together has appealed to those in our area.” Today, monthly workshops are held throughout the Santa Barbara area, and the momentum has stayed strong. Offering a variety of sold-out workshops around a diverse set of skills used by generations past, the ladies help women learn things like how to weld; milk a cow and make kefir cheese; forage for edible plants to use in recipes; and ferment vegetables, fruits and beverages. Shares Emma, “What was once passed down from generation to generation has been lost, so I love that we can help reconnect women to these more traditional, slower pace of life skills and hopefully appreciate the process Partners Emma Moore (top photos) and Lauren Malloy and Ashley Moore (above) opened Heritage Goods and Supply (5100 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, heritagegoodsandsupply.com) as an expansion of their Women’s Heritage venture.


PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT, LAUREN ROSS, LAURENANDABBY.COM (3); DONNIE HEDDEN, ALL COURTESY WOMEN’S HERITAGE

even if they decide not to use the skill after the workshop.” Last year, Women’s Heritage launched its own line of skincare products, using local herbs and plants to craft natural face serums and hand salves inspired by Ashley’s experience as an herbalist. They’ve also expanded their offerings to include private events and, more recently, opened up their first brickand-mortar country store in Carpinteria, Heritage Goods and Supply. Offering a curated collection of artisan products, specialty books and supplies for such things as canning, beekeeping and gardening, the three are excited to have a different avenue for sharing with the community. “One of the things we love most about Women’s Heritage is the growing community and friendship,” says Ashley. “We hope the country store broadens that feeling of community, and it won’t be just for women. It’s a store for everyone—men, women and children.” Sure, anyone can walk into a bakery and buy a loaf of bread, but for the ladies of Women’s Heritage, the goal has been to inspire modern women to discover new passions and reinforce the importance of slow-living ideals. “It’s hard to carve out time to learn a new skill in our fast-paced society,” says Emma, “but we hope to inspire other women by making traditional living more accessible for the everyday home.” 

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Winter Datebook Seasonal events, happenings and things to do for December, January and February

Pilobolus Dance Theater, Jan. 28. 30 S B S E A S O N S . C O M


WINTER DATEBOOK

Find updated information and additional events at sbseasons.com/datebook.

December 1 The Quebe Sisters + Joe Robinson When the Quebe Sisters take the stage, and the triple-threat fiddle champions start playing and singing in multi-part close harmony, audiences are blown away | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

1–Jan. 5 Solvang Julefest Solvang, named one of Time Magazine’s “Most Christmassy Towns in America,” comes to sparkly life once again during the 2017 annual Julefest (pronounced yule-fest). This year’s theme is “A Danish Tradition” and features free visits with Santa in Solvang Park; “Shop, Mingle & Jingle” weekends; holiday wine and beer walk and the traditional community tree-lighting ceremony, Julefest parade and free nativity pageant. | Various locations throughout

PHOTOS: (L-R) JOHN KANE, COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES; KAREN ZAZON, COURTESY 10 WEST GALLERY

Solvang, SolvangUSA.com/ things-to-do/solvang-julefest.

2 Homespun Holiday Craft Fair Join more than 60 makers from near and far at a very special Homespun Holiday Craft Fair at the beautiful Dos Pueblos Orchid Farm Green House. This unique setting is a perfect place to find original, handmade gifts. | 10 a.m. –5 p.m., Dos Pueblos Orchid Farm, 301 La Casa Grande Circle, Goleta, facebook.com/ events/125718611397747.

2 Rudolph Rudolph in ballet tells the story of a misfit reindeer named Rudolph and other misfit characters, like Heidi the Elf, the Abominable Snowmonster, Yukon Cornelia and all of the Misfit Toys. Featuring well-known holiday classics, this is a great opening to the holiday season! | 2 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

2 Christmas at the Casa Spend an intimate evening at the historic Casa del Herrero, where guests arrive to twinkling Christmas trees and house overflowing with holiday fun and good cheer, making this gala a winter must attend. | 5 p.m., Casa del Herrero, 1387 E. Valley Rd., 805/565-5653, casadelherrero.com.

2 Pink Martini: A Holiday Spectacular with Singer China Forbes Celebrate the most wonderful time of the year with Pink Martini. No, we aren’t referring to a fruity cocktail. Pink Martini is an internationally known genre-crossing band coming to town for a special holiday concert. | 8 p.m., Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St, 805/9634408, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

2–Jan. 21 Richard Schloss: The Miracle of Light Lauded as a “a master of atmospheric perspective” by American Artist Magazine, the oil paintings of Richard Schloss are a testament to the beauty of the land and sea that surrounds us. Schloss is recognized as one of California’s best landscape artists. | Opening reception Dec. 2, 4 p.m., Fri.-Sun. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and by appointment, Palm Loft Gallery, 410 Palm Ave., Loft A-1, Carpinteria, 805/684-9700, palmloft.com.

3 Love Letters The stars of the iconic eighties sitcom Family Ties reunite to bring to life A.R. Gurney’s wildly popular Love Letters during a benefit performance for Speaking of Stories. | 2 p.m., Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo, 805/963-0408, centerstagetheater.org.

3 Aaron Neville Grammy award-winning R&B singer Aaron Neville, with his distinct

“Feminine Power” by Karen Zazon, on view at 10 West Gallery, 1st Thursday, Dec. 7. New Orleans sound and unique voice, takes to the Lobero stage this December for a soulful duo performance featuring Michael Goods on keyboards. | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre,

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Arturo Sandoval A protégé of legendary jazz master Dizzy Gillespie, Arturo Sandoval was born in Cuba, just two years after Gillespie became the first musician to bring Latin influences to American Jazz. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E.

Quire of Voyces Short Program Concert The Santa Barbara Quire of Voyces returns to Santa Barbara Museum of Art to perform short programs of choral music. The group was founded in 1993 to rediscover the sacred a capella choral music of the Renaissance and the modern age. The Quire comprises professional singers from Southern California who volunteer their time, passion, and skill to create the ensemble’s acclaimed “crystalline” sound. | 6:30-7 p.m., Santa Barbara

Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

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1st Thursday The award-winning 1st Thursdays program highlights downtown arts, culture and entertainment on the 1st Thursday of every month. All 1st Thursday attractions are free from 5–8 p.m. Also on Jan. 4 and Feb. 1 | 5–8 p.m., various downtown loca-

An Irish Christmas An Irish Christmas features an award-winning cast of Irish dancers led by world-champion dancers Scott Doherty (Riverdance, Lord of the Dance, Rockin’ Road to Dublin), Tyler Schwartz (Magic of the Dance, Gaelforce Dance, Celtic Fyre), k

33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/9630761, lobero.com.

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tions, downtownsb.org.

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Connor Reider and Emily MacConnell in a memorable night that sparkles with the unique charm and magic of this festive time of year. | 7:30 p.m.,

Cory Richards Cory Richards is one of the world’s leading adventure and expedition photographers. As a passionate mountain climber, his camera has taken him from Antarctica’s unclimbed peaks to the summit of Mount Everest to capture the soul of exploration and the complex relationship we have with nature. | 7:30 p.m.,

The Hallelujah Project Back for the fifth year, The Hallelujah Project returns with the family-friendly mix of holiday classics and seasonal favorites designed to delight audiences of all ages and kick off the season in magical musical style. This year’s special guest is film and television actress Angela Cartwright, beloved by audiences for her roles in Make Room for Daddy, The Sound of Music and Lost in Space. Rumor has it that there could once again be a visit from the seasonal star of the hour, the Jolly Old Elf himself, so kids of all ages will want to keep a sharp eye out! | 8 p.m. Dec. 9, 3.p.m Dec. 10,

Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

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The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

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On Exhibit Now

Alfred R. Mitchell (1888-1972) On the Desert Framed Oil on Board, 16” x 20” Overview: Alfred Richard Mitchell was born in York, Pennsylvania in 1888, and as a young man he traveled to Nevada to prospect for gold. Eventually, he moved to California, and in 1913 he studied at the San Diego Academy of Art under Maurice Braun. Mitchell later returned to his home state and continued his studies at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art. While at the academy, Mitchell was strongly influenced by his teachers Joseph Pearson, Daniel Garber and Edward Redfield. He returned to San Diego in the early 1920’s where he was a well-known, influential figure in the local art community until his death in 1972.  Mitchell helped found the Laguna Beach Art Association and exhibited regularly at the La Jolla Art Association and the Associated Artists of San Diego, later known as the Contemporary Artists of San Diego.  His work is in numerous museum and private collections, and he is considered a major figure in San Diego plein air painting. Gallery: Stewart Fine Art 215 W. Mission St., Santa Barbara 805/845-0255, dianestewartfineart.com SBADA MEMBER

Brad Nack 20th Annual 100% Reindeer Art Show Come see the herd of more than 100 small elegantly framed oil paintings of reindeer by local artist Brad Nack. This series spans 20 years, but remains true to its founding principle: 100% reindeer paintings. | 6 p.m., Roy Restaurant, 7 W. Carrillo St., 805/966-5636, bradnack.com.

8 Chris Isaak Over the course of Chris Isaak’s career, he has released multiple albums, been nominated for Grammy awards, acted in several motion pictures and starred in his own critically acclaimed TV series. He is best known for hits like “Wicked Game,” “Baby Did A Bad Bad Thing” and “Somebody’s Crying.” The platinumselling artist’s holiday show includes songs from his studio albums, as well as seasonal favorites. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

9 Under The Streetlamp Great music is timeless with the dreamy voices of the four lead singers of pop quartet Under The Streetlamp. Join them as they bring fresh new life into the world of holiday music with a unique mix of harmonies and slick dance moves. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/8989386, granadasb.org.

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The Nutcracker Santa Barbara Festival Ballet brings an enchanting tale of Christmas to light with its 43rd anniversary performance of The Nutcracker. | 2:30 p.m. Dec. 9–10, 7 p.m. Dec. 9, Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St., 805/9634408, thearlingtontheatre.com.

10 Harbor Parade of Lights Head over to Cabrillo Boulevard for the 32nd annual Parade of Lights as boat owners “deck the hulls with bows of holly.” | 5:30 p.m., Santa Barbara, santabarbaraca.gov.

14 Ixacnul The brilliant debut by Guatemalan filmmaker Jayro Bustamante is a mesmerizing fusion of fact and fable, a dreamlike depiction of the daily lives of Kaqchikel-speaking Mayans on a coffee plantation at the base of an active volcano. | 5:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

15–17 The Christmas Revels This favorite Santa Barbara seasonal theatrical production features a large colorfully costumed company of acts, singers and dancers accompanied by an ensemble of traditional instruments. This year’s theme is “An Early California Celebration of the Winter Solstice.” | 7:30 p.m. Dec. 15, 2:30


p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 16, 2:30 p.m. Dec. 17, Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

16 The Blind Boys of Alabama Holiday Show In a roof-raising music event, sixtime Grammy Award winners The Blind Boys of Alabama perform hidden gospel gems along with holiday standards and original songs | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/8933535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

16–17 The Nutcracker at The Granada Theatre State Street Ballet brings together professional dancers, students of Gustafson Dance, Opera San Luis Obispo Orchestra and Morro Bay High School Chorus to perform this holiday classic in Santa Barbara style. | 2 p.m. Dec. 16–17, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 16, The Granada Theatre, 1214 State Street St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

16–17 Mysteries of Christmas Known for its “voluptuous tapestry of sound, vocal purity and radiant sonorities,” the Quire of Voyces presents staples from Byrd, Victoria, and Palestrina, and delves into works by lesser-known Renaissance contemporaries and fresh interpretations of present-day composers such as Eric Whitacre, Michael McGlynn, Steven Sametz, Carl Rütti, and Frank Ticheli. The ensemble also premieres works by its award-winning composer-in-residence, Michael Eglin. | 7 p.m. Dec. 16, 3 p.m. Dec. 17, St. Anthony’s Chapel at the Garden Street Academy,2300 Garden St., 805/965-5935, quireofvoyces.org.

18 The Brian Setzer Orchestra’s 14th Annual Christmas Rocks! Tour Returning for the second year in a row, Brian Setzer brings his 19-piece orchestra to town to whip up a huge dose of retro holiday cheer with his Christmas Rocks! tour. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

18 Miranda Sings Colleen Ballinger, AKA Miranda Sings, has become an international phenomenon whose YouTube channels have amassed more than 12 million devoted subscribers and over two billion views. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

31 New Year’s Eve Pops Bid a celebratory farewell to 2017 at New Year’s Eve Pops, with acrobatic performances from Cirque de la Symphonie as they light up The Granada Theatre and welcome the New Year in unforgettable style. | 8:30 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

January 7 An Evening with Chris Thile Grammy Award winner, MacArthur Fellow, mandolin virtuoso, composer and vocalist Chris Thile encompasses classical, rock, jazz and bluegrass to create a new, distinctly American musical aesthetic. | 7 p.m., Campbell

On Exhibit Now

Patricia Chidlaw

Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

Under the Bridge, 2017 Oil on Canvas, 24” x 16”

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Overview: Patricia Chidlaw was born in San Francisco in 1951. As the child of an enlisted man, her childhood was filled with travel in Europe and across America. Her early nomadic life influences her paintings today. She remains drawn to roadside attractions, the view from a train window, and the fringe of urban life—places both recently inhabited and long vacated. Sometimes moody, occasionally lonely, Chidlaw’s paintings are quintessentially American in subject and feel. Chidlaw settled in Santa Barbara in 1969 to attend UCSB where she received a BA in painting, and has remained here, putting down roots with her husband, Bob. Content in our seaside town, they still often travel by car and train seeking out subject matter for the next painting. Chidlaw has exhibited widely in galleries throughout the American west, including a solo show at the Nevada Museum of Art in 2014.

Motown the Musical Motown the Musical is the true American-dream story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul who launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson and many more. | 7:30 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/8989386, granadasb.org.

11 BJ Miller In Conversation with Pico Iyer Dr. BJ Miller is a hospice and palliative care specialist at UCSF Medical Center and former director of San Francisco’s groundbreaking Zen Hospice. | 7:30 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu. k

Gallery: Sullivan Goss–An American Gallery 11 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara 805/730-1460, sullivangoss.com 

SBADA MEMBER

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11 Lewis Black: The Joke’s on us Tour A Grammy Award-winning, stand-up comedian, Lewis Black is one of the most prolific and popular performers working today. He executes a brilliant trifecta as a stand-up comedian, actor and author. His live performances provide a cathartic release of anger and disillusionment for his audience. He is a passionate performer who is a more pissed-off optimist than a mean-spirited curmudgeon. Black is the rare comic who can cause an audience to laugh themselves into incontinence while making compelling points about the absurdity of our world. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

12–13 Kids Helping Kids Benefit Concert The San Marcos High School Kids Helping Kids (KHK) students have raised more than $2.5 million since KHK was founded in 2002, working together to improve the lives of disadvantaged children both globally and locally. This year’s completely student-run annual gala benefit features Andy Grammer and NeedtoBreathe. | The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. 805/899-2222, granadasb.org, kidshelpingkidssb.org.

13 On Exhibit Now

John Wesley Cotton (1868-1931) Laguna Coast, 1924, Color Aquatint on Paper, 15” x 9-1/2” Overview: John Cotton received his early training in Toronto with the Ontario Society of Artists. He attended the Art Institute of Chicago, and studied in London in 1911. His works are held in the National Gallery in Canada, Art Museum of Toronto, New York Public Library, Art Institute of Chicago, Congressional Library in Washington, LACMA and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Gallery: James Main Fine Art 27 E. De la Guerra St., Santa Barbara 805/962-8347, jamesmainfineart.com

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SBADA MEMBER

The Davey’s Voice Film Festival An evening of family-friendly animalrelated films celebrating the bond between human and animal. Davey’s Voice aims to create awareness regarding animal abuse, as well as support projects and programs that promote animal welfare. | 5 p.m., New Vic Theater, 33 W. Victoria St., 805/965-5400, daveysvoice.org/2017daveys-voice-film-festival.html.

14 Capulina Chisme Caliente Starring Gaspar Henaine, Capulina Chisme Caliente tells the story of Capulina, a telephone company employee who eavesdrops on conversations. Due to his gossiping ways, he becomes an informant for a local journalist and gets involved with a newspaper | 3 p.m., The Granada

Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/8989386, granadasb.org.

16 St. Louis Symphony Founded in 1880, St. Louis Symphony is the second-oldest symphony orchestra in the United States and one of the nation’s great orchestras. A consummate musician, masterful programmer and dynamic presence, American maestro David Robertson has established himself as one of today’s most sought-after conductors. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

19 The Comic Strippers Semi-undressed and completely unscripted, The Comic Strippers take off their shirts and take on your suggestions to create a whole new genre of comedy. | 7:30 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

Jan. 19 An Evening of Standup with Trevor Noah Trevor Noah was catapulted into the spotlight when he was selected to host The Daily Show, becoming one of today’s favorite comics. | 8 p.m., Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St., 805/963-4408, thearlingtontheatre. com.

19–21 ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! A leader in community arts outreach, ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! brings accessible highquality programming to schools and neighborhood venues across Santa Barbara County. Viva works with dozens of local partners to serve students, at-risk youth and families with free family performances and educational outreach activities. Also on Feb. 9–11. | Various locations around Santa Barbara County, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

20–21 The Red Violin With Live Orchestra In a cinematic gem brought to life on the concert stage, Santa Barbara Symphony performs John Corigliano’s Academy Award-winning


score for The Red Violin, accompanied by François Girard’s engrossing film | 8 p.m. Jan. 20, 3 p.m. Jan. 21, The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

21 Telluride Mountainfilm With a mission to educate and inspire audiences about issues that matter, cultures worth exploring, environments worth preserving and conversations worth sustaining, Telluride Mountainfilm returns with a special all-ages program that families can enjoy together! | 3 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/8933535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

25 An Evening with Condoleezza Rice As secretary of state and national security advisor, Condoleezza Rice pioneered a policy of transformational diplomacy and heralded the formation of new global governments based on democratic principles. Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures. | 7:30 p.m., Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St., 805/963-4408, thearlingtontheatre.com.

27 Winter Wine Classic Santa Barbara becomes the epicenter of the California wine world at this gathering of California’s ultra-elite winemaking masters. | Fess Parker Doubletree, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 530/274-1101, californiawinefestival. com/events/winter-winefest.

27 Los Angeles Philharmonic At the height of their powers, Gustavo Dudamel and Los Angeles Philharmonic return to Santa Barbara with a powerful and unique program featuring LA Philharmonic principal timpanist Joseph Pereira’s new concerto for timpani and two percussion. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

28 Trio Valtorna This ensemble promises to offer chamber music par excellence to audiences across the United States. | 3 p.m., Logan House, 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai, 805/646-9951, chamberonthemountain.com.

28 Pilobolus Dance Theater Pilobolus is renowned for its mix of humor, invention and drama. Celebrated for its unique, diverse collaborations, Pilobolus’s highly imaginative works combine athleticism, grace and jaw-dropping imagery, earning them critical acclaim, as well as popular appeal. | 7 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

31 José González + Bedouine Born in Sweden to Argentinian parents, José González seamlessly integrates the sounds of his Latin American roots with sublime introspective folk punctuated by rock panache. | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

31–Feb. 10 Santa Barbara International Film Festival Dedicated to discovering and showcasing the best in independent and international cinema, Santa Barbara International Film Festival offers 10 days of more than 200 films, tributes and symposiums that range from American indie films to world cinema and everything in between. | Various locations around downtown Santa Barbara, sbiff.org.

February 6 Compagnie Accrorap/ Kader Attou French-born Algerian choreographer Kader Attou, with his company Accrorap, is a representative of French hip-hop dance. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

7 Cirque Éloize Be transported to a dusty gathering place with Saloon, Cirque Éloize’s music-packed theatrical thrill ride inspired by the Wild West. Swing open the doors and rustle up some k

On Exhibit Now

Jordan Pope Sonata, Oil painting, 40” x 60” Overview: Artist Jordan Pope’s series of master sized oil paintings, “Quiet Dreams and Reflections,” is now in its final stages, with ten of the 12 conceived paintings already completed. Her painterly point of view and sense of color have made Pope an artistic presence in Santa Barbara, and her paintings are in collections across America as well as internationally.   Gallery: Portico Fine Art Gallery 1235 Coast Village Rd., Santa Barbara 805/695-8850, porticofineart.com 

SBADA MEMBER

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WINTER DATEBOOK

fun for the entire family. | 7 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

8–25 The City of Conversation Set in 1979 Washington, D.C., The City of Conversation by Anthony Giardina is a timely and moving new play that explores a family forced to choose between defending opposing political views and keeping their family together. | 8 p.m., New Vic

WINTER DREA M BY CHRISTINE PENKO

Theater, 33 W. Victoria St., 805/965-5400, etcsb.org.

9 Go Red for Women Luncheon The annual Go Red For Women Luncheon raises funds for research and initiatives preventing heart disease and stroke. | 10:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m., Ritz

It happens every year.

Carlton Bacara Resort & Spa, 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta, 855/968-0100, bacararesort.com.

The near distant islands—Santa Cruz, Anacapa—float

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into hard focus while light glints off waves so bright our eyes water. Winds that blew torrents of flame down our mountains subside to this still pocket of time. Time for forty-two crows to silence their calls and merely adorn the bare-skinned sycamore. Time for our stolen gardens to fill their greenness with a new quiet— a greening at rest. Time to look to our mountains’ scarred faces as to faces of those we love. Time and time again, to live in this dream we walk through.

Mike Birbiglia The New One is a hilarious blend of storytelling and stand-up in Mike Birbiglia’s honest selfdeprecating style. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

10 Friendship Center’s Festival of Hearts The 19th annual Festival of Hearts is a valentine party to benefit Friendship Center where guests enjoy a luncheon with wine, live music and silent and live auctions at the elegant Fess Parker. With an Alice in Wonderland theme, you never know what delightful surprises await you. | 11:30 a.m.–2

15–Mar. 4 The Crucible Inspired by Senator Joseph McCarthy’s witch hunt for Communists in America in the 1950s and the Salem witch trials of 1692, Arthur Miller’s thrilling dramatic play about the Puritan purge of witchcraft in old Salem, Massachusetts is both a gripping historical play and a strikingly timely social parable for today. | Marian Theatre, 800 S. College Dr., Santa Maria, pcpa.org.

16 Lotusland Opens for the Season Situated in the foothills of Santa Barbara, California, this 37-acre botanical wonderland is home to more than 3,000 different types of plants from all around the world | Reservations required. 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

17–18 Bernstein & Americana Getting the jump on what promises to be a worldwide centennial celebration, Santa Barbara Symphony marks the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth with some of his best-known works. | 8 p.m. Feb. 17, 3 p.m. Feb. 18, The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

20–21

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Kinky Boots Inspired by true events, Kinky Boots takes you from a gentlemen’s shoe factory in Northampton to the glamorous catwalks of Milan. | 7:30 p.m., The

Calidore String Quartet Calidore String Quartet, known for its precision of expression, makes its Santa Barbara debut with a sweeping program that includes Mendelssohn, Janácek and its lauded interpretation of Beethoven. | 3 p.m., Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/8933535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

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805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

13 Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment For the past 30 years, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment has shocked, changed and SBSEASONS.COM

1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

p.m., Fess Parker Doubletree, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 530/274-1101, friendshipcentersb.org.

Cameron Carpenter A superstar organist with tremendous technical prowess and a flamboyant persona to match, Cameron Carpenter returns to Santa Barbara with his monumental self-designed electric instrument. | 7 p.m., The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St.,

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mesmerized the music world by reinventing the orchestra. Working with several principal artists, not just one conductor, and performing repertoire from a variety of eras on period-specific instruments, the London-based ensemble stands for excellence, diversity and exploration. | 8 p.m., The Granada Theatre,

Granada Theatre, 1214 State St., 805/898-9386, granadasb.org.

20 Tony Kushner and Sarah Vowell From playwright Tony Kushner and author Sarah Vowell comes a powerful examination of one of American history’s most singular figures: Abraham Lincoln. In this pairing born out of a shared interest in Lincoln’s legacy, two celebrated wordsmiths discuss one of our nation’s greatest presidents. | 7:30 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

21 Çudamani Comprised of Bali’s most respected musicians and dancers, Çudamani performs as a spiritual offering for temples and the village communities in their


PORTICO FINE A RT G A L L E RY

native Indonesia, maintaining the rich treasures of Balinese cultural heritage. | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

1235 Coast Village Road, Montecito Open Daily • 805.695.8850 info@porticofineart.com porticofineart.com

22 Matthew Desmond MacArthur Fellow and Harvard sociologist Mathew Desmond set a new standard for reporting on poverty with his massively influential book Evicted. | 7:30 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

23 Danish String Quartet Comprised of fierce friends who have been playing together since childhood, these darlings of A&L’s Chamber Arts series once again dazzle Santa Barbara with the same irresistible energy that thrills audiences worldwide. | 7 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

23–Mar. 4 1st Annual Santa Barbara Restaurant Week Organized by Santa Barbara Uncorked, Restaurant Week invites guests to enjoy a threecourse meal at a discounted rate at participating restaurants, with an abundant number of establishments to choose from. | Various locations around

Jordan Pope His Golden Touch 42”x42” oil

downtown Santa Barbara, sbrestaurantweeks.com.

24 Peter Serkin, Piano Peter Serkin’s inspired performances and recordings have successfully conveyed the essence of nearly five centuries of keyboard repertoire and been lauded worldwide. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre,

STEWART FINE ART

33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

25 Santa Barbara Youth Symphony in Concert Santa Barbara Youth Symphony is an orchestra of 65–70 young musicians from Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. | 4 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E.

Established 1986 Diane Warren Stewart

Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

26 View from Above: An Astronaut Photographs the World Sometimes, a little distance is all you need to see things in a brand-new way. For astronaut Terry Virts, his newfound perspective was from the International Space Station, where he installed the cupola observation module, granting an unprecedented 360-degree view from the station. | 7:30 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu. All locations are in Santa Barbara unless otherwise noted. For complete event listings, visit sbseasons.com.

Open from 11 to 5:30, closed Thursday and Sunday, available by appointment.

215 W. MISSION STREE T EDWIN ROSCOE SHR ADER (1878-1960 PENNSYLVANIA BARN, CIRCA 1914 FR AMED OIL ON CANVAS 28” HIGH X 3 3.5” WIDE

SANTA BARBAR A, CA 9 3101 805-8 45-0255 PARKING IN BACK

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FIRST PERSON

Roger Durling Raising the Bar for the Love of Film BY BONNIE CARROLL

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POPCORN BOX IN HAND , Santa Barbara International Film Festival Executive Director Roger Durling greets me after the reopening of Riviera Theatre and invites me to have a seat with him in one of the spacious red seats to learn more about the $2.5-million project that is the new home of SBIFF. The tie that binds the recent opening of Riviera Theatre with Durling’s film obsession is the fragile and painful thread of a young boy struggling to find his right of passage and recovery following years of sexual abuse by a priest in his school in Panama. His escape into the world of film, along with his career journey into writing, screenwriting and finally the development of his current position as director of one of the top film festivals in the country, is one he has described as finally giving him purpose and new life. “Many locals know I opened the French Bulldog coffee house in Summerland in

2001 and that I compulsively attended film festivals. It was at the French Bulldog that Michael Keaton, Tim Matheson, Rob Lowe and others would hear me saying, ‘Santa Barbara deserves a great film festival like Sundance or Toronto,’ but we had not yet maximized our potential in Santa Barbara,” says Durling. “I finally met the SBIFF board and convinced them I could turn the festival around,” he continues. “I told them I would do it for free until we turned it around.…I always knew the potential we had due to our proximity to Hollywood, the downtown corridor, our infrastructure of theaters and a destination that people wanted to come to. I honed the festival identity 15 years ago with a goal of creating a venue like the Riviera, with programming throughout the year that would run like an art house.” The late Michael Towbes, who owned the Riviera, shared the festival’s vision to

PHOTOS: COURTESY SBIFF

SBIFF Director Roger Durling welcomes guests to the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. Opposite: Durling, Actor Jeff Bridges and Director Mark Osborne attend the opening night presentation of The Little Prince at the Arlington Theater. The 2018 festival takes place Jan. 31-Feb. 10.


create a cultural hub focused on film. “When we told him about the educational programs and what we could do with it, he was intrigued and gave us a 30-year lease, providing we took it to a state-of-the art condition, which is what we have done. It is bittersweet to know he is not here to see this,” says Durling. He continues, “Lynda Weinman and Bruce Heavin of Lynda.com have always been huge supporters.…Originally, our vision for the Riviera was what you see now, but we knew it could not be done without fundraising. A year ago, we approached Lynda to be SBIFF board president and when she agreed, she asked, ‘What if we had one chance to do this right and money was not an issue?’ Lynda donated $2.5 million to the project. She has been our guardian angel.” “It is a beautiful building and we are very proud of it!” says Durling. Eight speakers became 50 Dolby Atmos speakers with a Dolby Vision laser projection system. “Only 26 theatres in the country have these, and we are the only nonprofit with them. The 400 seats became 300 spacious seats, with 10 new seats for handicapped patrons. We tried to retain the detail of the Riviera ceiling and the red color scheme that is so important in theater, and we have kept the ‘R’s on the signature light fixtures that line the walls.” Durling feels SBIFF has raised the bar quite a bit—people have high expectations, but once again his staff has succeeded in meeting them. 

11 East Anapamu St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101

www.sullivangoss.com

AT PRESS TIME ,

the Riviera campaign has $355,000 left to fundraise. For more information or to donate, visit sbiff.org/Riviera.

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SUSTAINABLE SEASONS

El Toro History Meets Sustainability BY NANCY R ANSOHOFF

IT’S THE STORY of a match made in historical home heaven. The sprawling 1920s estate tucked away in the Arboleda section of Ojai was in need of attention. Relatively untouched since it was built in 1926, the Spanish Colonial Revival home had seen better days. Enter a visionary couple who moved to the Santa Barbara area from Santa Cruz, saw the property and were smitten. Appreciating the home’s architectural integrity and beautiful details, such as colorful handmade tile and wrought-iron finishings, they knew that they wanted to restore it to its original grandeur while honoring its history. They also wanted to bring it up to and beyond today’s energy efficiency standards. Teaming up with Allen Construction as general contractor, they embarked on what would become a two-and-a-half-year restoration project and labor of love.

Old & New

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The original home was designed in 1926 by noted architect A. E. Harvey and built by Robert W. Winfield for Frank & Kathryn Preston. Allen Construction worked on the restoration with the late Santa Barbara architect Peter Becker and his associate Tom Henson.

discovered two balconies that were part of the original design, but had not been built. Those were added, along with a water closet in the master bath, but the rest of the project was essentially a careful, meticulous and respectful restoration of what was there. Dry-rotted plaster throughout the house was replaced with fresh plaster designed to look

as it did in the 1920s. Doors and windows were remade based on the original blueprints. Hardware was salvaged, refurbished or fabricated to match, and exquisite painted ceilings on burlap canvas were restored. A 1950s pool house and swimming pool were torn out and replaced to fit seamlessly with the home’s architecture and surroundings.

PHOTOS: JIM BARTSCH

“The challenge was how to maintain the character while incorporating the modern amenities of a brand-new house,” says Bryan Henson, president of Allen Construction. “The goal is that it doesn’t look like it’s been remodeled.” Set on eight acres and known as El Toro, the house was designed by famed architect Arthur E. Harvey, who created the Château Élysée in Los Angeles. Harvey’s original design blueprints for the property and historical photos were an invaluable reference, as Allen Construction’s team worked with the late Santa Barbara architect Peter Becker and his associate Tom Henson. They


Ultimately, the house will be net zero in energy use, meaning it consumes only as much energy as it produces.

Green Model Now registered as a historical landmark, El Toro is a stunning model of sustainability. Eco-conscious features incorporated during the restoration include three-phase electrical power, ultra-low-flow plumbing fixtures, energy-efficient window glass and zero-VOC finishes. Solar panels are next on the homeowners’ to-do list, with the aim of making the house net-zero energy, where the house only consumes as much energy as it produces. “We want to be good stewards of the land and the property surrounding the home,” says the homeowner. “We feel super-fortunate to be able to caretake this property for a while.” He credits landscape designer Jim Melnik and Connor Jones at Ojai Permaculture for bringing the couple’s garden dreams to fruition. What was once a neglected orange orchard is now a thriving terraced organic garden designed to hold water for irrigation and growing food. “Every drop of water that falls on the property will stay and be used to irrigate or recharge the aquifers,” notes the homeowner. Strolling among native plants and citrus, avocado, persimmon and pomegranate trees, he says, “One of the most important things to me is the community.” The couple donates the majority of their bounty of fruits and vegetables to Ojai and Oxnard nonprofits. They also enjoy sharing El Toro during the Ojai Holiday Home Tour and Green Living Tour. When the project was finished, “The homeowner paid us the highest compliment,” says Henson. “He said, ‘It looks like you guys were never here.’” 

EDUCATE. INSPIRE. ACT.

Your community foundation at work

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Kids engage in fun lessons about nutrition in Foodbank of Santa Barbara County programs.

Food for Life Foodbank of Santa Barbara County Targets Troubled Areas in Empowering Ways BY C HUC K GR AHA M THERE’S CURING HUNGER in America and then there’s doing it the nutritional way. It’s not nearly enough to simply put any kind of food on the table. It’s the right kind of food balanced with a healthy lifestyle that broadens people’s outlook in their everyday lives. Foodbank of Santa Barbara County (Foodbanksbc.org) has instilled this philosophy for those communities in need since 1982, a 35-year span that’s picking up steam with diversified programs targeting troubled areas throughout the county. The foodbank isn’t just showing up and handing out food to those in need. Instead, it created a culture to empower communities to be self-sufficient through nutrition, exercise

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and working together. “We partner with 300 nonprofit agencies and programs to provide food to residents throughout the county in the right places at the right times,” says Judith SmithMeyer, marketing communications manager. “These programs are closely connected to resident’s lives, from schools to social service organizations to healthcare agencies to churches to children’s after-school programs and more.” One of the foodbank’s most recent programs is Alma Cena Sana, translating to “soul, person, dinner, to cure.” Launched in March 2017, Alma Cena Sana was born and bred out of the foodbank’s “Food Action

Plan” proposing goals and action items to ensure Santa Barbara County has in place a stable food eco-system. “Alma Cena Sana is the first program established in direct response to guidance in the plan,” says Smith-Meyer. “Primarily that nutrition education and healthy food, along with an active lifestyle, are supported from within communities.” Nutrition and living an active lifestyle go hand in hand and the foodbank has actively combined the two concepts into their programs since 2011. It began with the Picnic in the Park summer lunch programs to bridge the gap for Santa Barbara County children who relied on school lunch programs for regular nutrition during the school year. For those children who didn’t attend school, no school equated to no lunch. But with fun, physical activities associated with healthy food choices, the program has been successful. One of the foodbank’s long–time essential concepts is introducing healthy foods, their preparation and exercise to today’s youth. Making a dent in the county’s schools instills good eating habits early on in their lives. Foodbank education programs span a wide range of needs for nutrition education. “Our Feed the Future children’s programs aim to end hunger within a generation with a comprehensive education program from preschool to the teen years,” says Smith-Meyer. “The Food Literacy in Preschool Program brings seasonal fresh produce items into preschools to introduce fruits and vegetables and teach kids how to enjoy them early.” In junior high schools, kids can participate in Teens Love Cooking, a six-week course offering cooking classes to prepare wholesome foods supplied by the foodbank. Outside of school, kids can experience their own farmer’s markets, and the foodbank’s Healthy School Pantries combine supplemental foods with healthy eating plans to benefit the whole family. During the holiday season, the foodbank accepts donations for those in need. For every $1 received, the foodbank can provide eight healthy meals to local children, families and seniors in need. Volunteers are welcomed as well. Last year alone, the foodbank engaged more than 2,300 volunteers who donated more than 25,000 hours of service. 

PHOTO:COURTESY FOODBANK OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

LEGACIES


Photo: Nell Campbell

Education is the first step. Thanks to our community of generous supporters, the SBCC Foundation has launched the SBCC Promise, removing financial barriers to ensure that all local high school graduates have access to an outstanding and affordable education at Santa Barbara City College.

Your gift makes the SBCC Promise possible.

sbccpromise.org | (805) 730 - 4416


MONTECITO

KHAO KAENG By Empty Bowl Gourmet Noodle Bar BY L AUREN BENNET T

denizens who flock to Santa Barbara Public Market for Empty Bowl’s savory noodles can now get their fix in Montecito. Empty Bowl is one of the newest restaurants to join the Coast Village Plaza (1187 Coast Village Rd.).

Locals know Santa Barbara Public Market (38 W. Victoria St.) and the amazing reputation that Empty Bowl Gourmet Noodle Bar has gained in this venue. Empty Bowl is an Asian fusion restaurant founded by Jerry Lee, an eight-year veteran of San Ysidro Ranch’s Stonehouse restaurant. The Coast Village Road location is named Khao Kaeng by Empty Bowl Gourmet Noodle Bar, and the fresh, new name embraces the culture of Empty Bowl’s Chef Nui. “Khao Kaeng means ‘curry on rice’ in Thai,” says Lee. “We will offer some of our popular menu items from Empty Bowl Gourmet Noodle Bar plus additional comfort specialty Thai food Chef Nui grew up with in Thailand.” Empty Bowl offers unique menu items such as Roasted Duck Buns, which include two Chinese Bao buns steamed until they are light and fluffy, sliced roasted duck, crisp cucumber, pickled carrots, daikon, cilantro and hoisin sauce. They are best known for noodle bowls, which are fresh takes on classic dishes. A dish that embodies this is “Pad Thai Khao San Road,” which includes a traditional Thai noodle dish of stir-fried thin rice noodles, bean sprouts and chopped peanuts with organic egg, but pushes the boundaries with unique additions like garlic chive, tofu, tamarind, fish sauce and dried chilies. The new Montecito location adds even more distinctive dishes to the already daring menu of Empty Bowl. For more information, visit emptybowlnoodle.com or call 805/335-2426 

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Oliver’s of Montecito BY LOHANA RICHMOND THIS SEASON , plant-based cuisine takes center stage at Montecito’s newest restaurant, Oliver’s of Montecito (1198 Coast Village Rd.), which brings health and wellness to the forefront of the dining experience. The restaurant’s creative dishes are made with organic and fresh ingredients, and local residents are welcoming this new addition to the dining scene with open arms. Oliver’s innovative menu is inspired by nature, minimally processed and carefully prepared to provide guests with delicious and vibrant food. All of the dishes are vegan and vegetarian, using seasonal veggies to nourish the body. Start your meal with one of the standout small plates, such as zucchini flatbread, topped with arugula pesto, peaches, caramelized

onion, cashew cream and zucchini blossoms. Delicious! Entrees range from seasonal fare— toasted farro risotto with sweet corn and patty pan squash—to more unique dishes like carrot Udon noodles with roasted baby bok choy, coconut-miso broth and basillemongrass pesto. Also, be sure to try one of Oliver’s specialty cocktails, which are mixed with organic cold-pressed juice from the local juice shop, Juice Ranch. Pairing high-end spirits with raw organic juice allows guests to indulge in the delicious libations with half the guilt! Oliver’s is open for dinner Sun.–Thurs. from 5–10 p.m. and Fri.–Sat. from 5–11 p.m. 

PHOTOS: OPPOSITE: JIM BARTSCH (3), COURTESY OLIVER’S; THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP, COURTESY RENAUD’S (2), COURTESY EMPTY BOWL

SANTA BARBAR A


Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro Comes to the Coast Village Plaza BY L AUREN BENNET T

LOC ALS will be excited to know that they have another place to get their fix of French pastries. Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro has opened another location at Coast Village Plaza (1187 Coast Village Rd.) in Montecito. This restaurant joins the crowd favorites in the plaza, including Juice Ranch, Here’s the Scoop, The Tennis Shop, UPS, Norvell Bass Cleaners, Riviera Smiles, Sequel Salon, Giovanni’s Pizza and Richie’s Barber Shop. Renaud’s newest location is nestled in the south end of the property near the newest driveway. Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro is a business that emerged within the last decade and, in that short amount of time, has made a name for itself. Their coastal locations reflect the languid luxury that their exquisite pastries provide. Renaud’s serves breakfast and lunch in their Santa Barbara and La Cañada Flintridge locations and

pastries in their location featured in Gelson’s Markets. The menu includes decadent croissants, sweet fruit tarts, delectable macarons, authentic quiche, freshly baked cookies and scrumptious cakes. Breakfast and lunch menus include enticing items such as fresh French toast made on homemade brioche served with a side of maple syrup and jam and homemade pasta topped with savory sautéed mushrooms and aged Gruyere shavings, served alongside a hot garlic baguette. Renaud’s is the dream of chef Renaud Gonthier, a talented chef who honed his culinary skills in Europe’s best culinary schools and pastry shops. Alongside his fruitful career in Europe, Gonthier worked as the top pastry chef for Ritz Carlton and at the renowned Barton G. Catering firm in Miami. For more information, visit renaudsbakery.com or call 805/569-2400. 

Opposite, Oliver’s of Montecito is drawing raves for both its decor and its gourmet vegan cuisine. Above, Santa Barbara favorites Renaud’s and the Empty Bowl now both have outposts in Montecito as well.

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A DAY AWAY

THE CHARMS OF CARMEL The peaceful seaside charms of Carmel are an easy four-hour drive from Santa Barbara. BY LESLIE DINABERG

Where to Stay Vendange Carmel Inn & Suites (24815

Carpenter St., Carmel, 831/624-6400, vendangecarmel.com) is a charming winethemed inn with the homey vibe of a bed & breakfast. Just minutes away from restaurants, shops, galleries and tasting rooms, this boutique inn’s intimate gardens offer a lovely setting to enjoy a glass of wine or a cozy cup of tea. We stayed in the delightful Twisted Roots room. Other partnered wineries and themed rooms include: Blair Estate Wines, Cima Collina Winery, Dawn’s Dream Winery, Galante Vineyards, Holman Ranch Wines, Joullian Vineyards, J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines, Manzoni Cellars, McIntyre Vineyards, Tudor Wines and Ventana Vineyards. Nestled upon a scenic clifftop overlooking the stunning Big Sur coast and celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2017, Hyatt Carmel Highlands (120 Highlands Dr., Carmel, 831/620-1234, highlandsinn.hyatt. com) offers spectacular views in an amazing setting. The legendary inn’s impeccable service was evident from the moment we arrived and were greeted with flutes of Prosecco to the umbrellas that magically appeared when raindrops started to threaten our departure. The gorgeous sliding glass door views and wood-burning fireplace in our room made it hard to leave this relaxing, romantic getaway.

terey, 831/373-3778, whalingstation.net) in nearby Monterey, an old-school steakhouse with on-site dry-age room, diners choose their own prime cuts of beef. As you select your USDA Prime cut of aged beef from a silver tray, then watch them slice Prime Rib from an antique silver carving trolley, it’s easy to see why Whaling Station has been voted the county’s #1 steakhouse for 40 years in a row. California Market at Pacific’s Edge at Hyatt Carmel Highlands (120 Highlands Dr., Carmel, 831/622-5450, highlandsinn.hyatt.com) has a newly remodeled 1,200-square-foot deck, featuring louvered roof and glass-panel walls with dramatic views of the Pacific Ocean and the Big Sur coast. The food is just as impressive as the views, and the extensive menu features the wares of local producers such as Bellwether Farms Creamery in Sonoma, Swank Farms in Hollister and Monterey Abalone Company in Monterey.

Where to Eat

Things to Do

At Whaling Station (763 Wave St., Mon-

Wine tasting in Carmel Valley is a great way

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to spend an afternoon, with 24 wineries and tasting rooms to choose from. Be sure to stop and say hello to Josh & Julie Ruiz of Twisted Roots Winery & Vineyard (located in LyonsHead Art Gallery, 12 Del Fino Pl., Carmel Valley, 831/594-8282, twistedrootsvineyard.com), whose warm hospitality at this family-owned tasting room is just as delicious as their old-vine wines. We also enjoyed sipping on the patio at Joyce Vineyards Tasting Room (1 E. Carmel Valley Rd., Carmel Valley, 831/659-2885, joycevineyards.com/taste). Golfers love Pebble Beach, and the famous 17-Mile Drive is a scenic treat. Big Sur and Monterey Bay Aquarium are just a short drive away as well, offering more than enough entertainment for the entire family. 

PHOTOS:(L-R) COURTESY HYATT CARMEL HIGHLANDS, TWISTED ROOTS, ALLEGRETTO RESORT

The glorious view from California Market at Pacific’s Edge at Hyatt Carmel Highlands. Twisted Roots Winery in Carmel Valley offers a lovely tasting room in an art gallery setting.


Allegretto Vineyard Resort evokes an Italian Estate, with views overlooking grape vines and olive trees.

breconestate.com One of the loveliest views, in a region that’s full of them, is DAOU Vineyards and Winery. Brothers Georges and Daniel Daou searched all around the state to find an unrivaled terroir for producing cabernet sauvignon, a quest that eventually led them to the gorgeous DAOU Mountain in the Adelaida District. Reservations are recommended to sip excellent wine while overlooking the vineyards, with panoramic views from 2,200 feet. daouvineyards.com

A Grape Escape With more than 40,000 vineyard acres and more than 200 wineries in the region, Paso Robles is a perfect weekend destination for a wine lover’s getaway. BY LESLIE DINABERG in Paso Robles wine country, and rich, velvety, complex cabernet sauvignon makes up almost half of all the grapes grown across Paso Robles. The offerings range from boutique wineries to high-production facilities, and with some assistance from the Paso Robles CAB Collective, we did our best to sample as many CABs as we could.

C AB IS DEFINITELY KING

Where to Sip Five distinct soil types are the key to the unique wines of Ancient Peaks Winery, whose estate Margarita Vineyard is the only one in Santa Margarita Ranch AVA. Originally planted by the Robert Mondavi family, the current ranch owners—the Filipponi, Rossi and Wittstrom families— took control of the vineyard in 2005. In addition to a charming tasting room and the delicious food at Ancient Peaks Café, the winery offers personally guided vineyard tours Wed.-Sun. mornings, followed by a

private tasting and cheese and charcuterie (reservations required). ancientpeaks.com Hope Family Wines has a distinctive lounge-style tasting room pouring five unique labels: Liberty School, Austin Hope, Treana, Candor and Troublemaker. Try the big, intense Treana red, a classic Paso Robles blend of cabernet, sauvignon and syrah. hopefamilywines.com By appointment only (and worth it) is a visit to Hoyt Family Vineyards, where you can bring a picnic and feed the goats and chickens as you sip on some amazing wine. Try the sophisticated 2012 cabernet sauvignon, which won Best of Class in the San Francisco Wine Chronicle. hoytfamilyvineyards.com Another lovely spot to sip is Brecon Estate, a boutique sustainably farmed estate winery producing an old-vine cabernet sauvignon. Brecon’s award-winning small batches of premium wines sell out quickly and cannot be purchased anywhere else.

Where to Eat Opolo Winery offers pairings on the patio, as well as delicious homemade sausage and charcuterie, pizzas, salads and such. Idyllic vineyard tours are also available, which include the tasting room, distillery, Inn at Opolo, a walnut orchard and more than 70 acres of vines. opolo.com Offering excellent wine-country cuisine in a beautiful setting, Cello Ristorante & Bar features creative but accessible dishes made from regionally farmed and foraged ingredients, alongside an extensive wine list. allegrettovineyardresort.com/dining A long-standing farm-to-table favorite, Thomas Hill Organics sources a wide variety of ingredients from local purveyors to offer a dynamic array of bold, imaginative dishes. thomashillorganics.com

Where to Stay Nestled among 20 acres that include wine grapes and olive and fruit trees, the eclectically elegant Allegretto Vineyard Resort brings owner Doug Ayres’ singular vision to life. The impressive property evokes an Italian vineyard estate, with 171 guest rooms and suites, a wine bar featuring the resort’s own private wine label, a spa, a pool and cabanas, manicured gardens, a beautiful Abbey, hundreds of antiques, a 12,000-square-foot piazza, and art and artifacts everywhere the eye can see. Alleg rettoresort.com 

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Postcards from the Past BY LESLIE DINABERG IM AGES FROM THE COLLEC TION OF PETER JORDANO

Top row, left to right: Cabrillo Boulevard, as it once looked. Note Los Banos del Mar pool in the foreground. Originally built in 1901, it was rebuilt with a Public Works Administration grant after the 1925 Earthquake and opened in 1939. The Masonic Temple. Middle row: Beach scene. Oil wells off the coast of Summerland. De la Guerra Plaza courtyard with cars. Bottom row: El Encanto hotel. A 1923 postcard of the beach at Castle Rock from the Osborne’s Book Store collection. The remainder of Castle Rock was removed to build the Santa Barbara Harbor, which was completed in 1930. El Paseo Restaurant during Fiesta. W I N T E R 2 017/ 18

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where story inspiration is going to come from. When my brother-in-law, Eric States, casually mentioned that he was creating large-scale metal prints from vintage postcards that belonged to long-time local businessman and philanthropist Peter Jordano, I was intrigued. Especially when Eric said the collection was “impressive.” The word impressive was definitely an understatement. It turns out that Jordano owns about 6,000 pre1950 Santa Barbara postcards, all meticulously organized into photo albums that document the history of Santa Barbara’s waterfront and downtown development, as well as the leisurely lifestyle of days gone by. A significant part of Jordano’s collection is from Osborne’s Book Store—a retail fixture on State Street until it closed in 1987—which published hundreds of Santa Barbara postcards. The postcard collection also parallels the Jordano’s history. The family-owned business started in Santa Barbara in 1915, with four brothers, a family loan and a little grocery store on State Street. On March 1, 1915, the first Jordano Bros. opened at 706 State St., making deliveries by horse and buggy. By the early 1970s, Jordano’s had weathered two world wars, the Depression and a number of minor recessions; had 18 stores throughout Santa Barbara, Ventura and San Luis Obispo counties; and operated a distributing business stocking hotels and restaurants. One son from each of the original four brothers joined the family business, including our postcard collector Peter C. Jordano, who leads Jordano’s Inc. today. Under Jordano’s leadership, the company diversified into what it is today: a distributing conglomerate including food and beverage distributors, a kitchen supply business and an institutional foods distributor. Now it’s a multi-million-dollar corporation with more than 500 employees. Jordano’s postcard collection has also continued to grow and, with help from Eric’s painstakingly highresolution reproductions, will be digitized and preserved for generations to come. Here is a selection of our favorite postcards from the past. To view more of the collection and for more information about metal prints, visit santabarbaraphotographs.com.

YOU NE VER KNOW

Clockwise, from top left: Santa Barbara street scene. Old De la Guerra mansion. El Paseo Restaurant. The Santa Barbara Mission, just after the 1925 earthquake.

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This page: An overview of State Street. Previous spread, clockwise from top left: Santa Barbara State Teachers College on the Riviera, was the predecessor to UCSB. Winter bathing on Miramar Beach (two postcards). Mar Monte Hotel and East Beach. W I N T E R 2 017/ 18

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The Nine Sisters—ancient volcanic plugs, also known as "morros" because they evoked images of headdresses of the Moors who invaded Spain—march across the San Luis Obispo city and coastal landscape. The Cal Poly State University can be seen in the foreground.

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THE HISTORY and DELIGHTS of SAN LUIS OBISPO BY C HERY L C R ABTREE

PHOTO: COURTESY SANLUISOBISPOVACATIONS.COM

Travelers often drive along Highway 101 through the Central Coast without realizing that the city of San Luis Obispo (known regionally as “SLO,” population 47,536), halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles, offers a host of reasons to stop and check out the sights. It’s a character-rich town with modern attractions that are inextricably entwined with its fascinating history—well worth a detour and, if you have time, an extended stay. A S IS THE C A SE with many parts of Santa Barbara County and the Channel Islands, the Chumash Indians lived in what is now San Luis Obispo County for thousands of years. Father Junipero Serra and the Portola expedition arrived there in 1769, on their way north to establish missions in Monterey and Carmel. When supplies dwindled and the Spaniards faced starvation, they recalled the friendly natives and the abundant bear population that roamed the range down south. In the summer of 1772, a hunting expedition traveled back to Cañada de Los Osos (loosely translated in later chronicles as “Valley of the Bears”), charged with fetching food for the hungry mission residents. The group returned to Carmel with more than 25 mules laden with dried bear meat and edible seeds.

Father Serra then decided that Valley of the Bears was a very promising site for his fifth mission and soon led a group south to get started. On September 1, 1772, Serra officially established Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa on the banks of a sparkling creek. Over the centuries, the city of San Luis Obispo grew around the mission community. Today, the mission still serves as the town hub, the heart of a vibrant downtown filled with historic buildings occupied by thoroughly modern businesses, such as the Apple Store and Lululemon, and a slew of restaurants and pubs. Nearly every block has colorful stories to tell, and the best way to discover them is to park and walk along its charming pedestrian-friendly streets.

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PHOTOS: OPENING, COURTESY CAL POLY. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ISTOCK, ALAMY, ISTOCK (3). OPPOSITE: ISTOCK, ALAMY

HISTORIC

Thanks to the diligent work of its residents, the beloved Mission San Luis Obispo and Mission Plaza have been faithfully restored and anchor the city center in shining glory. The same steadfast community efforts have restored historic buildings throughout the city, including the railway depot and adobe, Victorian and other period homes.

MISSION & MISSION PLAZA Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa still reigns as the “queen” of San Luis Obispo. It’s a great place to begin a city walkabout. Visit the small museum to view artifacts and learn about Chumash Indian life, early Spanish settlers and California history. Docents lead tours of the church and grounds most days at 1:15 p.m. (Sundays at 2 p.m.), starting at the mission steps. Call 805/543-6850 to confirm. 751 Palm St., San Luis Obispo, missionsanluisobispo.org. Mission Plaza, adjacent to the mission, is SLO’s community cultural center. Locals and visitors gather here for numerous events held on weekends and holidays throughout the year, from concerts and wine tastings to family-friendly festivals. The Chumash and early Spanish settlers all depended on San Luis Creek as a water source. The creek travels through the city on its way to the ocean and borders Mission Plaza. Follow a footbridge to access the scenic Creek Walk, with various access steps to downtown shops and restaurants, some with patio tables overlooking the always gurgling stream. Just up the road is History Center of SLO County, in the historic Carnegie Library built in 1905. The small museum holds exhibits on regional history from Native American and rancho periods to the railroad era. 696 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo, 805/543-0638, slohistorycenter.org. Admission is free. Open Weds.–Mon. 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

HISTORIC RAILROAD DISTRICT When the first train chugged into San Luis Obispo in 1894, the city was forever changed. For the first time, passengers and goods could travel directly between San Francisco and Los Angeles on the Southern Pacific rails. Southern Pacific built the Ramona Depot in 1889 for guests of the elegant Ramona Hotel. In 1905, the hotel burned to the ground. The depot, however, was spared and today houses the stagecoach that transported guests to and from the train station. Southern Pacific also built a depot in 1895, which stands next to the more modern Spanish-Mediterranean depot completed in 1942. Today’s busy railroad district is still a major transportation center. Pacific Surfliner and Coast Starlight trains stop at the historic depot multiple times a day, ferrying passengers to the San Francisco Bay Area, Southern California and beyond. Buses stop here, as well, to connect travelers to destinations throughout the city and county. The district is also a lively neighborhood with restaurants, shops and businesses, parks and open spaces. If you visit on a Saturday, check out San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum, just south of the Amtrak station. Open Saturdays from 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 1940 Santa Barbara Ave., San Luis Obispo, 805/548-1894, slorrm.com. ADOBES & OTHER HISTORIC HOMES Historic homes dating back to the 1800s are sprinkled throughout the city and stand as excellent examples of bygone eras, from early adobes to Victorian mansions. Here are several standouts you can see on a SLO walkabout.

Dallidet Adobe & Garden Lush gardens surround this lovely adobe home, built in 1853 by Pierre Hypolite Dallidet, who founded the Central Coast’s first commercial vineyard. He and his wife, Maria Ascencion Salazar, and their children lived here for more than a century. Their youngest son, Paul Dallidet, deeded the property to San Luis Obispo County Historical Society in 1953. W I N T E R 2 017/ 18

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EXPLORE

Judge Murray Adobe Englishman Walter Murray built this home in 1849 at the edge of Mission Plaza. Murray was the town judge, postmaster and legislator from 1853 to 1875. He was also a newspaper editor—Murray printed the first editions of SLO’s newspaper, The Tribune, within its walls. Myron Angel Home Myron Angel, publisher of The Tribune in the 1880s, wrote a book on SLO County history (1883). He completed construction of his red Victorian mansion in 1883. Garden Street Inn Morris and Helena Goldtree built this Italianate Queen Anne-style home in 1887. It was later converted into eight apartments and is now an elegant bed-and-breakfast inn. Jack House Rancher and banker Robert Edgar Jack built this classic Victorian in 1875. The well preserved home is now a museum that reflects Victorian life in the 1880s. HIGUERA STREET SLO’s main street—along with the alleys and avenues that connect to it—was named for the Higuera family, who arrived in 1774, just two years after the mission was founded. Shoppers, restaurant goers and students from nearby California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) regularly amble up and down the street, often bumping into friends and acquaintances doing the same thing. Historic buildings abound, and their walls actually do talk. You can listen to their tales by watching a fun and 60

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informative SLO Chamber of Commerce video, 130 Years of Higuera Street in San Luis Obispo in less than five minutes: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=LZuBIVHtFhM&t=1s. THURSDAY NIGHT FARMER’S MARKET This legendary event is much more than a collection of fruit and vegetable stalls—it’s a social gathering of locals and visitors who come here to eat (many restaurants set up shop on the street), listen to music, connect with community groups and shop for all types of culinary delights. It takes place on Higuera Street, between Nipomo and Osos streets, from 6–9 p.m., every Thursday, weather permitting. downtownslo.com/farmers-market. BUBBLEGUM ALLEY Don’t miss this quirky 70-foot-long alley with a 15-foot-high wall covered in gum. No one really knows for sure why and how the tradition started, but people have plastered the wall with fresh wads of chewy gook for decades. It’s now one of SLO’s most unusual attractions. 733 Higuera St., San Luis Obispo. THE CREAMERY For a time, San Luis Obispo County was home to the nation’s largest dairy industry. The Creamery, established in 1905, operated as a full-service dairy for decades. The historic complex at 570 Higuera St. now houses a restaurant and wine shop, a pub and other businesses.

Bubble Gum Alley (above), with walls adorned with thousands of wads of sticky goo, is one of the city’s quirkiest and most visited attractions. SLO’s entire downtown district is a magical blend of past and present. Residents and visitors alike enjoy the legendary farmers market, running, and other thoroughly modern activities amid historic buildings like the Ah Louis Store—the business and cultural center of SLO’s Chinese-American community in the late 1800s.

PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY SANLUISOBISPOVACATIONS.COM, ALAMY, ISTOCK, ALAMY, ISTOCK

Sauer Adobes These two adobes across from the mission, built in 1860, are the oldest commercial buildings in SLO. The pair includes a single-story home and an adjacent two-story Monterey-style structure with two-foot thick walls sided with redwood. 964 and 970 Chorro St., San Luis Obispo.


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PHOTOS: CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: COURTESY CAL POLY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, ALAMY, ISTOCK, SANLUISOBISPOVACATIONS.COM

LIVELY

Top left, when Father Junipero Serra founded Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa in 1772, he situated it next to a clear, sparkling creek that now travels through Mission Plaza and the city with access to shops and restaurants overlooking the year-round stream. Bottom left, the Fremont Theatre has been a nighttime tradition since it opened in 1942. Bottom right, the outrageously gaudy Madonna Inn opened in 1958. Above, Cal Poly Performing Arts Center.

HISTORIC MONTEREY AND OSOS STREETS Walk north of the mission along Monterey Street to view a number of historic sights and landmarks.

Ah Louis Store and Chinatown More than 2,000 Chinese laborers moved to the Central Coast to help construct the railways and tunnels in the region. On Wong (aka Ah Louis), a Chinese-American banker, made his own bricks to build a shop, completed in 1885. His general store, across from the mission on Monterey Street, provided many services and anchored the Chinese community. The city of San Luis Obispo is currently immersed in the Chinatown Project—a major renovation of the downtown area near the Ah Louis Store. Fremont Theatre Designed by architect S. Charles Lee, the art deco Fremont movie palace opened in 1942. Today, the fully restored theater screens films and presents concerts and special events such as the annual San Luis Obispo International Film Festival. 1035 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo. MADONNA INN The Madonna Inn, in a pristine hillside setting just off the highway, first welcomed travelers to SLO in 1958 with 12 rooms and friendly service. They evolved into a landmark hotel and restaurant,

beloved by generations of locals and visitors. Each of its 110 rooms is individually themed, named and decorated, from Rock Bottom (all stone) and Safari to California Poppy and Wilhelm Tell. 100 Madonna Rd., San Luis Obispo. THE NINE SISTERS If you’re driving on Highway 101 in San Luis Obispo County and gaze at the surroundings, you will certainly spot some unusual geographic features along the way: random craggy buttes that seem to suddenly poke up and point to the sky from the flat plains and sea-level meadows below. What are these alien creatures, and why are they there? Millions of years ago, volcanic activity pushed a series of magma plugs above the ocean in what’s now the heart of San Luis Obispo County. The plugs evolved into a series of steep peaks that march in a fairly straight line from the Edna Valley in the south to Morro Bay in the north, with the city of San Luis Obispo at the epicenter. When the Spaniards trekked through the region in 1769, they called the plugs “morros,” as the tall hills evoked images of headdresses of Moors who had invaded Spain. Later, locals referred the peaks collectively as The Nine Sisters, which today distinguish themselves as iconic images of San Luis Obispo, both city and county. They represent the uniqueness of a most unusual piece of the planet, where humans and the natural world continue to evolve in harmony. W I N T E R 2 017/ 18

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P H OTO G R A P H E D BY M E H O S H S T Y L E D & W R I T T E N BY J U DY F O R E M A N M O D E L : C H A R I S S E M A N N O L I N I O F H E L LO G O R G E O U S M O D E L S H A IR & M A K EUP BY SHANNON LOAR- COTE OF BLUSH & L ASHES WA R D R O B E A S S I S TA N T: B R I T TA N Y M C K I N L E Y P H OTO G R A P H E D AT A I R S H I P R E N TA L P H O T O G R A P H Y S T U D I O

our local boutiques renders one slightly giddy as shopkeepers display the best of the best of the holiday and winter season. The holiday months are the best time of the year to get your sparkle on and pop a bottle of champagne or get cozy at home with the fireplace going and some nostalgic music. Whether it’s velvet shoes, fur, cashmere, cozy-up-tothe-fireplace knits, silver and gold tones that catch the light or sexy satins, all of the seasonal palettes are beautiful—and they’re all simply irresistible!

A STROLL THROUGH

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Above: Aminia Rubinacci long sliver silver top with pailettes and Peter Cohen heavy satin silver cropped pant from Allora by Laura. Aquazurra Downtown black bootie from DIANI. Grey lizard leather clutch and silver necklace with pearl from Maison K. Opposite: Silver puffer jacket, Zero+Maria Cornejo curved Rai leather skirt and Robert Clergerie bootie stamped leather ankle boot from Allora by Laura.

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This page: Black 2 Germans long suede cascading vest, leggings, cream silk blouse, ladies Earhart black Stetson hat and AS 98 Air Sherman boots, all from First Street Leather. Earrings from Blanka. Opposite page: Belle Fare reverse fox to silk packable jacket from First Street Leather. Crepe Dart cami dress from Jenni Kayne. Downtown black leather Aquazurra bootie from DIANI. Vintage earrings from Peregrine Galleries.

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This page: Alice and Olivia Blossom dress from Juniper. Nude pumps by Aquazurra from DIANI. Faux fur tote bag from Maison K. Black wool single-button blazer with fringe detail, black chiffon skirt with lace-up detail and silk white body suit, all from Juniper. Black suede high heel with fringe detail by Aquazurra from DIANI. Opposite: Red fox coat, Alice and Olivia gold sequin dress and 1960s-era gold and rhinestone Lariat 9, all from Juniper. High-heel metallic leather sandal from Blanka.

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Opposite page: Alice and Olivia wool pant, Berlin Black Card rose open-back knit mohair sweater and rose earrings from Blanka. Suede Aquazurra pump from DIANI. This page: Leopard Smythe blazer, Citizens of Humanity velveteen jean and Woods brass and diamond necklace from DIANI. Copper knit top from Angel.

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WINTER’S

ULTIMATE

GIFTS ‘Tis the season to make a loved one’s eyes sparkle with glee as you surprise and delight them with the perfect gift! Here are some ideas sure to bring out the holiday spirits of everyone on your list!

C O M P I L E D B Y J U DY F O R E M A N , B R I T TA N Y M C K I N L E Y A N D L E S L I E D I N A B E R G PHOTOGR APHED BY MEHOSH

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OPPOSITE: MEHOSH. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: BRYANT & SONS, SANTA BARBARA AROMATICS, TESLA, MEHOSH.

WOW WORTH Y AND FESTIVE FUN

Opposite: White silk top and palazzo pant from Juniper, white and gold enamel vintage collar from Peregrine Galleries, reindeer from Upstairs at Pierre LaFond and Euroline grey fox blanket from First Street Leather. This page, clockwise from top left: wine and cheese themed gifts from Magerum Reserve Tasting Room. 18 Karat white gold dangle earrings with 12.18 carats of diamonds from Bryant and Sons. Santa Barbara Aromatics sage candle. 2017 Tesla Model S with autopilot capabilities.

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ULTIMATE GIFTS

HOME SWEET ( A N D C OZ Y ) HOME

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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM CENTER: YAASA STUDIOS, MEHOSH (4). OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: CAILOUX, BOTTLEST, PICO, MEHOSH (2), SPOONFUL OF COMFORT.

Clockwise from top: handwoven African baskets, succulents and cutlery from DIANI Living. Maple wood bowl and serving pieces from Imagine. Yaasa Studios infinity blanket. White ceramic plate from Upstairs at Pierre Lafond, hand-carved onyx bowl from Botanik, and luxurious candles, soaps, scents and bath items from Plum Goods. Matches from Upstairs at Pierre Lafond.


TO PLEASE THE DISCERNING PA L AT E

Clockwise from top: fresh finds from Cailoux Cheese Shop; make your own wine, including the label, at Bottlest Bistro (both in Buellton). Assorted housemade commestibles and wine from PICO at Los Alamos General Store. Brass dancing rabbi menorah from Imagine. Chistmas-themed tableware from Coast 2 Coast. A Spoonful of Comfort offers cheery deliveries of homemade chicken soup, rolls and cookies to warm even the coldest winter’s chill.

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ULTIMATE GIFTS

Clockwise from top: Menswear from K. Frank, bracelets from DIANI Living. Black crystal decanter and skull glasses and modern black and white chess set from Imagine. California shirt and Etched Atlas engraved wood Santa Barbara map from Plum Goods, beaded Santa Barbara belt from Imagine. Men’s vegan dyed leather jacket from The Shopkeepers, grey belt from K. Frank. Paul Smith scarf, paisley belt plus electric blue Brackish feather bow tie, all from Upstairs at Pierre Lafond. UWEZO shoes, consciously created from repurposed cowhide.

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THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: MEHOSH (4), UWEZO. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: SNURK, MEHOSH (3), FUNKTIONAL WEARABLES.

LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE B OY S


Clockwise from top: She’ll sleep like a princess in SNURK Living boutique bedding from the Nuture Cottage. Books—including France is a Feast, The Record Store Book, Sweet, Dear Data, Painting California, The New Health Rules, Unmedicated, California Garden Tour, Unique Eats and Eateries of Santa Barbara and The Art of Plein Air Painting—offer something for everyone to enjoy. Bright bracelets from Funktional Wearables will cover up her Fitbit in style. Speks desk toys are great fun for kids of all ages. Unicorn puzzle from the Nuture Cottage, baby quilt, Petit Bateau knit baby cardigan and child’s pom pom fedora from Upstairs at Pierre Lafond.

KEEP IT COLORFUL & BRIGHT

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Golf

Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara County is one of America’s most desirable golf destinations, with splendid courses designed to maximize enjoyment of the region’s splendor and moderate climate.

Glen Annie Golf Club

GOLETA

Sandpiper Golf Club

GOLETA

In the rolling foothills of Goleta, 15 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara, this meticulously maintained and challenging layout offers panoramic ocean, Channel Island and mountain views from nearly every hole. The tee shot from #16, for example, decends 150 ft. in elevation to land softly on a manicured landscape near an adjacent lake with a cascading stream. The clubhouse complex includes Frog Bar & Grill and scenic patios with excellent facilities for gatherings of up to 300. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 71.1; slope rating, 122. 405 Glen Annie Rd., 805/968-6400, glenanniegolf.com.

Established in 1972 as the county’s first resort course open to the public, Sandpiper is an inspiring 18 holes of seaside golf on an extraordinary terrain, with an acclaimed layout named by Golf Digest as one of the top 25 public golf courses in the U.S.. Designed by renowned architect William F. Bell, the links-style layout features rolling fairways leading to enormous greens with ocean views from nearly every hole. The stretch of holes 10–14 is one of the most memorable experiences of any golfer’s life. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.7; slope rating, 136. 7925 Hollister Ave., 805/968-1541, sandpipergolf.com.

River Course at the Alisal

La Purisima Golf Course

SOLVANG

Opened for public play in 1992 on land owned by and adjacent to the renowned Alisal Guest Ranch, River Course provides a layout to be enjoyed by golfers of all levels of skill. Set along the Santa Ynez River, the course features panoramic views, mostly wide fairways and accessible greens. Several holes, however, will challenge even the low handicap golfer, especially any of the river holes. The clubhouse has an excellent restaurant with comfortable, inside seating and a vieworiented patio. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 150 Alisal Rd., 805/688-6042, rivercourse.com. 78

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LOMPOC

Near the Santa Ynez Valley Wine Country, “La P” is challenging, pure golf with long, twisting fairways bordered at times by oak and eucalyptus groves and protected by sand, water and out-of-bounds stakes, finishing with big, lightning-fast greens. In the afternoon, wind often becomes a factor, making the closing holes our own “Amen Corner.” Designed by world-renowned architect Robert Muir Graves, a round at La Purisima will not soon be forgotten, and is worth the drive. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.9; slope rating, 143. 3455 E. Hwy. 246, 805/735-8395, lapurisimagolf.com.


FEATURED GOLF COURSES

FEATURED FOR WINTER

Rancho San Marcos Golf Course the scenic Hwy. 154—the historic road that winds from northern State Street into the Santa Ynez Mountains, leading to the charming Santa Ynez Valley—is a course acclaimed by nearly every major golf magazine as one of the finest experiences in California. Spread out in a valley of rolling terrain, studded with ancient oaks and trees, the historic land this Robert Trent Jones, Jr. design traverses is bordered by the Santa Ynez River—which fills nearby Cachuma Lake—with views of distant furrowed peaks. Every level of golfer is challenged with sand, lakes, native grasses and chaparral, the river itself and changes in elevation. Golfers lucky enough to have played the course shortly after its opening, when it included the short but remarkable 3rd hole whose banks jutted out over the river, will be happy to know that the hole is back—slightly redesigned after the 100year rainstorm of 1998 changed the river’s course forever, but back and adjacent to it.

FIF TEE N MINUTES UP

Par 71. Yardage and stroke ratings: Black (6,939 yards, 73.9/137); White (6,278 yards, 70.8/131); Green (5,386 yards, 71.3/129). 4600 Hwy. 154, 805/683-6334, rsm1804.com.

WINTER 2017/18

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MAP KEY Visitors Centers 1 Garden St. 113 Harbor Wy., 4th FL 45 Hartley Pl., Goleta

D.


E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

Santa Barbara  DOWNTOWN STATE STREET defines the city’s center—and its heart. The intersection of State and Carrillo streets is where Captain Salisbury Haley hammered an iron stake in 1850 to designate the future midtown area. The self-guided Red Tile Walking Tour is a great way to get your bearings (map is available at Santa Barbara Visitor Center, 1 Garden St.). Don’t miss the historic Arlington Theatre, a notable example of both Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival architectural styles. Also worth visiting is the beautiful Alice Keck Park Memorial Garden, named after the benefactor who donated the prime property.

Santa Barbara Urban Wine Tasting Although you won’t find any vineyards in this area, these unique and eclectic wineries and tasting rooms are a great way to begin your wine-tasting journey through the area on foot, as an introduction to local wines. Many of the urban wineries have northern Santa Barbara County vineyards that are also open to visitors. A Area 5.1

137 Anacapa St., Unit B, 805/770-7251

B Au Bon Climat

813 Anacapa St., 805/963-7999

C August Ridge

Vineyards 5 E. Figueroa St., 805/ 770-8442

D Armada Wine

& Beer Merchant 1129-A State St., 805/770-5912 E AVA Santa

Barbara 116 E. Yanonali St., 805/453-6768

Tasting Room 217 Stearns Wharf, 805/618-1185

L Foley Tasting

Room 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta, 805/968-1614 M Grassini

Family Vineyards, 813 Anacapa St., 805/8973366

N Happy Canyon

Vineyard, 30 El Paseo, 805/232-3549

O Jaffurs Wine

U MWC32

813 Anacapa St., 805/845-8435

V Oreana Winery

205 Anacapa St., 805/962-5857

W Pali Wine

Company, 116 E. Yanonali St., 805/560-7254

X Riverbench 137 Anacapa St., Ste. C, 805/324-4100 Y Sanford Winery

1114 State St., 805/7707873

Cellars, 819 E. Montecito St., 805/962-7003

Z Sanguis Wines 8 Ashley Ave., 805/8450920

& Winery, 414 N. Salsipuedes St., 805/965-7985

P Jamie Slone

Wines, 23 E. De la Guerra St., 805/560-6555

AA Santa Barbara Winery, 202 Anacapa St., 805/963-3633

G Cebada Vineyard

Q Kunin Wines

BB Silver Wines

H Corks & Crowns

R LaFond Winery

F Carr Vineyards

& Winery, 8 E. De La Guerra St., 805/4512570

Tasting Room 28 Anacapa St., 805/963-9633

32 Anacapa St., 805/845-8600

111 E. Yanonali St., 805/845-2020

I Corktree Cellars

S Margerum Tasting

724 Reddick St., 805/963-3052

CC Summerland

Wines, 2330 Lillie Ave., 805/565-9463

DD The Bodega, Standing Sun, 15 E. De

Wine Bar & Bistro 910 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, 805/684-1400

Room, 813 Anacapa St., 805/845-8435

la Guerra St., 805/6919413 EE Whitcraft Winery

J Cottonwood

T Municipal

Winemakers, 22 Anacapa St., Ste. D, 805/931-6864

Canyon, 224 Anacapa St., 805/963-1221

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K Deep Sea Wine

SBSEASONS.COM

& Tasting Room, 36-A S. Calle Cesar Chavez, 805/730-1680

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Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a National Historic Landmark in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, was dedicated in 1929. Its immense landscaped courtyard and sunken garden are the site of public celebrations year round. | 1100 Anacapa St. Docent tours Mon.–Fri. 10:30 a.m.; Daily 2 p.m. 805/962-6464, santabarbaracourthouse.org.

a black box venue showcasing live performances, and MCA Santa Barbara, a museum dedicated to exhibiting the highest quality of contemporary art while recognizing the artists of tomorrow with innovative exhibitions. | 651 & 653 Paseo Nuevo. paseonuevoshopping.com, mcasantabarbara.org.

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Santa Barbara Public Market offers foodies an impressive collection of purveyors focused on handcrafted, regionally sourced and sustainably made foods. The LEED-certified space also has a commissary kitchen, featuring cooking classes, winemaker dinners, pop-up chefs and more! | 38 W. Victoria St. at Chapala, Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 7:30 a.m.–11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–10 p.m., sbpublicmarket.com.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s outstanding permanent and special collections, housed in a stately building constructed in 1914 as the city’s first federally funded post office, include the only remaining intact mural by Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros, Portrait of Mexico Today. | 1130 State St. Tues.– Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

PRESIDIO NEIGHBORHOOD is a vibrant section developed around the historic site of the last remaining Spanish fortresses built in California, called presidios. In addition to being Santa Barbara’s birthplace, El Presidio de Santa Barbara, the neighborhood is also home to the historic Lobero Theatre, one of the city’s architectural jewels, as well as Casa de la Guerra historic house museum. El Paseo, a charming adobe plaza built in the 1820s, houses several nice shops and restaurants, along with The Wine Collection of El Paseo, an upscale array of six excellent wine tasting rooms open daily from noon to 6 p.m. (located off of the 800 block of State Street).

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La Arcada, designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1926, is home to a wealth of galleries, shops and restaurants. Dotted along the way are historical curios and sculptures, with all roads leading to the much-loved central fountain inhabited by turtles and fish. | 1100 block of State Street. Paseo Nuevo is a charming outdoor destination to shop, dine, relax, stroll and people watch. Featuring Spanish-style architecture, Paseo Nuevo is also home to Center Stage Theater,

Santa Barbara Historical Museum exhibits fine art and artifacts from local history. Visit Gledhill Library and the new Edward Borein Gallery, which memorializes the artist’s work. | 136 E. De la Guerra St. Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/966-1601, santabarbaramuseum.com.

El Presidio de Santa Barbara was founded in 1782 to offer protection to the mission and settlers, provide a seat of government and guard against


foreign invasion, and is now a state historic park. | 123 E. Canon Perdido St. 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily. 805/965-0093, sbthp.org. MISSION DISTRICT, identified by Mission Santa Barbara, is among the oldest residential neighborhoods in the city. Characterized by revivalstyle architecture, it is also home to the Mission Historical Park and rose garden.

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Santa Barbara Botanic Garden’s 78 acres, accessed by five and a half miles of trails, record the history of the state’s rare and indigenous plants. From the dramatic opening view through the meadows, chaparral and forest to the sweeping ridge-top views of the Channel Islands, the garden is a skillful display of California’s natural bounty. | 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Mar.–Oct. 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Nov.–Feb. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/682-4726, sbbg.org.

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Mission Santa Barbara was dedicated in 1786 by Father Fermin Lasuén. Known as “Queen of the Missions” for its twin belltowers, it remains the only California mission to be continuously occupied by the Franciscans. | 2201 Laguna St. Daily tours 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 805/682-4713, sbmission.org; santabarbaramission.org.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, open since 1916, provides science and nature education to generations of visitors. The museum, located along Mission Creek, reconnects more than 100,000 people each year—including 5,700 members—to nature indoors and outdoors. | 2559 Puesta del Sol Rd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/682-4711, sbnature.org.

WATERFRONT, running the length of Cabrillo Boulevard from East Beach to the harbor, is a feast for outdoor enthusiasts. A paved pathway runs the full distance.

NOT TO BE MISSED and located in the Historic Presidio Neighborhood is Jamie Slone Wines, with a limited production of hand crafted wines from the best vineyards in Santa Barbara County. Jamie Slone specializes in a variety of Red Blends, Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Grenache Blanc, Chardonnay and more. Jamie along with his wife Kym and their little Havanese dog Sophie (she’s the tasting room manager) have a mission to provide an outstanding Santa Barbara County wine experience and the reviews on both Yelp and Trip Advisor support that passion. With a gorgeous Santa Barbara style tasting room that makes you feel like you are in their living room, it is a local wine tasting experience not to be missed.

Jamie Slone Wines - 23 E. De La Guerra St. | 805-560-6555

Mon-Thurs: 12pm-6pm | Fri: 12pm-7pm | Sat: 11am-7pm | Sun: 11am-6pm

jamieslonewines.com

TM

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Andree Clark Bird Refuge—an artificial freshwater lake and marsh pond adjacent to the zoo —provides one of the best biking/jogging/skating paths in the area. | 1400 E. Cabrillo Blvd. 805/564-5418.

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Santa Barbara Harbor and Breakwater is a working harbor, home to fishing boats, private yachts and nearly 1,200 excursion and sightseeing boats. It is always a busy and interesting place to walk, skate, bike, eat and purchase fresh catch at Fisherman’s Market every Saturday morning. | Off Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, situated on the harbor’s scenic waterfront, presents the region’s rich local maritime history. From ancient seafaring Chumash to modern-day deep-sea research, the emphasis is on human interaction with the sea. | 13 Harbor k

Wine Enthusiast 90+ Wines | Best Vineyards Santa Barbara County Yelp and Trip Advisor Favorite | Cheese Plates | Chocolate Pairing WINTER 2017/18

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E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

Way. Memorial Day–Labor Day 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Labor Day–Memorial Day 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; closed Wed. 805/962-8404, sbmm.org.

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Stearns Wharf, a Santa Barbara icon, was built by a Vermont native in 1876 to accommodate ocean-going vessels. Once owned by Jimmy Cagney, its dramatic views of the city and the hills beyond, as well as its mix of shops and restaurants, have charmed visitors for more than a century. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Sea Center on Stearns Wharf engages visitors of all ages with interactive exhibits, opportunities to work like scientists, a theater showcasing the wonders of Santa Barbara Channel, a live shark touch pool and a 1,500-gallon tide pool tank. Discover the fun in science and the wonders of the natural world. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/962-2526, sbnature.org.

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Santa Barbara Arts & Crafts Show is the longest-running public weekly art show in the country, with more than 250 exhibitors, all there in person and carefully screened to ensure originality of work. | Cabrillo Blvd. between State and Calle Puerta Vallarta streets. Sun. 10 a.m. to dusk. 805/8972519, santabarbaraca.gov.

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The Mill is a distinctively modern spin on the original feed mill constructed in 1904, which is now an artisan marketplace, featuring a production winery, craft brewery and farm-to-table barbecue restaurant, as well as some unique retail offerings. | 406 E. Haley St., 10 a.m.–10 p.m., 805/965-9555, themillsb. com.

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Santa Barbara Zoo opened to the public in 1963 with only seven residents. Now more than 500 animals live here, and 30 acres of lush gardens spread across a knoll overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Committed to conservation, species survival and education, the zoo is an enlightening and entertaining place to visit. | 500 Niños Dr. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/962-5339, sbzoo.org.

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MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, is an awe-inspiring experience to motivate a new generation of innovators and problem-solvers, with 17,000 square feet of interactive educational exhibits focused on science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). | 805/708-2282, moxi.org.

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Funk Zone is a hotbed of homegrown artistic production known for its eclectic wall murals, ateliers, galleries, 84

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alternative exhibition spaces, trendy artist shops and the lively Urban Wine Trail. Half the fun is each surprise that awaits you down the alley or painted on the wall in front of you! | funkzone.net.

Montecito and Points South Montecito’s densely wooded, lightly populated residential area between Santa Barbara and Summerland has attracted the privileged for more than a century, but its genesis was agrarian. Remnants of this rich heritage are still in use. The 500-acre property, on which Harleigh Johnston grew citrus trees until 1893, became San Ysidro Ranch. With the ranch’s completion in 1935 and the Montecito Inn’s in 1928, it wasn’t long before well-known captains of industry built estates, many of them incorporating the farms and ranches that had originally settled the area.

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Casa del Herrero is a splendid example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, designed by George Washington Smith, the house—and the gardens—are National Historic Landmarks. The gardens, covering 11 acres, were designed by noted landscape architects Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest and horticulturist Frances T. Underhill. | 1387 E. Valley R. Tours Wed. and Sat. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations required. 805/565-5653, casadelherrero.com.

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Ganna Walska Lotusland is a 37acre garden estate, prized for its rare and exotic plants and providing new perspectives on sustainability of nature’s offerings. Themed gardens include topiary, bromeliad, succulent, cycad, cactus, fern, Japanese, Australian, water and a blue garden, among others. | Reservations required. Tours Wed.– Sat. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. between Feb. 18 and Nov. 15. Reservations required. 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

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Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art educates students and the community about the power and value of the visual arts through physical, critical and spiritual engagement with the creative process and its results. | Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Mon.–Fri. 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/565-6162, westmontmuseum.org. SUMMERLAND is just a stone’s throw off Hwy. 101 and two minutes south of Montecito, and offers the rural charm of an earlier California beach town while maintaining the spirit of an artists’ colony via plentiful antique, home and garden shops, art galleries, boutiques and unpretentious eateries.

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Lookout County Park, off Lillie Avenue at Evans Avenue, is on the bluffs above the beautiful Summerland Beach. From this vantage point, where full picnic facilities await, there are spectacular views of the Channel Islands. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Evans Ave. CARPINTERIA is five minutes south of Montecito and Summerland. Although the city advertises itself as home to the “world’s safest beach,” visitors also come to roam the avocado-laden hills in search of the orchid fields and hothouses, for which Carpinteria is well known.

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Salt Marsh Nature Reserve, a 230acre salt marsh, is home to local and migratory waterfowl and fish and is a birder’s dream. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. at Sandyland Rd., turn right and drive three blocks to Ash Ave.

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Carpinteria State Beach and Bluffs are among California’s most popular destinations—the result of a broad beach and good sunning, tidepooling and fishing. For hikers and birdwatchers, it doesn’t get much better than the Carpinteria Bluffs. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. Continue through town to the beach. Park on Linden Ave. or in the Carpinteria State Beach lot.

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Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club was admitted to the U.S. Polo Association in 1911 and moved to its present location shortly thereafter. The club welcomes visitors for Sunday games from May through October. | 3375 Foothill Rd. 805/684-6683, sbpolo.com.

Goleta and Points North The city of Goleta and several of the area’s well-known institutions and landmarks are just 10 minutes north of Santa Barbara, including UCSB and two championship golf courses.

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Rancho La Patera, one of the oldest landmarks in Goleta Valley, is home to historic Stow House, a beautiful example of Carpenter Gothic architecture, and Cavalletto History Education Center, which focuses on Goleta’s ranching and agricultural history. | 304 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/681-7216, stowhouse.com.

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South Coast Railroad Museum, housed in a restored train depot, is a magnet for train buffs. Tours of the Victorian depot, rides on the “Goleta Short Line” miniature train and exhibits are part of the experience. | 300 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/964-3540, goletadepot.org.


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Goleta Beach Park, adjacent to UCSB, is favored by families and groups for its expanse of lawn with barbecue and picnic table areas. The 1,500-foot-long pier accommodates boat launching facilities, fishermen and strollers. | Exit Hwy. 217 at Sandspit Rd. 805/568-2461.

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Art, Design & Architecture Museum at UCSB holds an impressive fine art collection with one of the largest architectural archives in North America. In addition, it engages contemporary artists in exhibits and programs. | UCSB. Wed.–Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

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El Capitan and Refugio State Beaches, the mixed sand and rock beach at El Capitan links Refugio—a palmlined crescent of sand with tide pools—by beach, bluff and bike trails. Both are popular beach campgrounds. | From Hwy. 101, exit the northernmost El Capitan exit and/or Refugio Rd. 805/968-1033, parks.ca.gov.

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Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes, the Dunes Center at 1055 Guadalupe St. should be the first stop in the exploration of the largest dune complex in the state. | Wed.–Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 805/343-2455, dunescenter.org.

October. | 420 2nd St. 805/686-1789, solvangfestivaltheater.org.

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Old Mission Santa Inés is the 19th of 21 missions built in California from 1769 to 1836 by Spanish Franciscan priests. Founded September 17, 1804 by Padre Estevan Tapis, it was the first European settlement in Santa Ynez Valley and still displays artifacts preserved from the Mission era. | 1760 Mission Dr. at Hwy. 246. 805/688-4815, missionsantaines.org.

Santa Ynez and Los Olivos These small, charming towns look like they belong in the pages of a book on the history of the west and are world-renowned for their vineyards, equestrian culture, art galleries, inns and restaurants that epitomize the region’s signature wine country cuisine.

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Elverhøj Museum of History & Art is housed in a historic handcrafted structure built in a style derived from the large farmhouses of 18th century Denmark. Visitors can view Solvang’s history through photos, artifacts and video displays. | Wed.–Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 1624 Elverhoy Way. 805/686-1211, elverhoj.org.

Los Olivos melds California history with modern-day wine tasting rooms, restaurants, art galleries and upscale shops in this picture-perfect country town dating back to the 1860s, when stagecoaches passed through. Centered by an iconic flagpole, the serenity of vineyards, lavender farms, orchards, ranches and horse trails surround Los Olivos. This is a charming place to visit for a one-stop wine country experience. | Approximately 40 min. north of Santa Barbara via Hwy. 154, losolivosca.com.

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Wildling Art Museum, an educational institution dedicated to presenting art of America’s wilderness, is a place to gain a greater appreciation of art and a better understanding of the importance of preserving our natural heritage. | 1511-B Mission Dr., 805/6881082, wildlingmuseum.org.

Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum celebrates the rich history of the Santa Ynez Valley, its pioneering settlers and the five early townships that formed the foundation of this unique region. | Open Wed.– Sun. noon–4 p.m. 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. 805/688-7889, santaynezmuseum.org. 

Santa Ynez Mountains and Valley Areas The valley is historically rich and geographically diverse, with vineyards dotting the landscape, many with tasting rooms.

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Cachuma Lake Recreation Area provides 750 campsites just 25 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara. Full marina, boat launch, rental boats, fishing equipment and licenses are available. Nature cruises led by park naturalists provide an educational look at the wildlife, birds (including bald eagles) and plants that make Cachuma such a rich habitat. | Hwy. 154. 805/686-5055, sbparks.org.

Solvang With a population of nearly 5,000, Solvang (“sunny field” in Danish) is the largest city in Santa Ynez Valley. Founded in 1911 by Danish educators from the Midwest, Solvang is the “Danish Capital of North America.”

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Solvang Festival Theater, a 700-seat historic outdoor theater, presents excellent productions staged by Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA), as well as other concerts and events. Open June through WINTER 2017/18

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WINE COUNTRY Winemaker Rob Dafoe was a professional snowboarder and documentary filmmaker before entering the wine business.

Tales of the Vine Successful winemaking takes hard work, daily dedication and passion—but the journey from ground to glass is often a twisted path.

M AN Y PEOPLE DAY DREA M of making a living from walking among rows of grape vines and pressing the juice of the berries into something they can market as their own. Here are the stories of three men who cultivated winemaking careers from diverse occupations.

From Film to Fermentation Rob DaFoe, who was born and raised in Goleta and Santa Barbara, traveled around the world as a professional snowboarder and, many years later, produced a documentary about Santa Barbara County’s wine industry before settling in Santa Ynez Valley to make wine of his own. The decade-plus he spent abroad racing down snowy slopes was his introduction to global wine regions, in particular those in Italy and France, he recalls. Historical

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vineyards and the culture of wine impressed the young DaFoe, and he says that the winemaking bug took hold during those years. After two separate boarding crashes, in which he broke his leg and injured his spine, DaFoe began to reconsider his highrisk career, in part because injuries can increase cautiousness in professional athletes. “When you’re coming up to that hill after an injury...if you’re not feeling 130%, you can feel your time is limited and you’re going to get hurt.” So DaFoe left a life “in front of the camera for time behind the camera,” as a

photographer and documentarian. During a photo shoot at Firestone Winery, DaFoe met then-winemaker Chuck Carlson, who encouraged him to pair his wine interest with his video career and document local winemakers. That plan became From Ground to Glass, the aptly named documentary that premiered at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in 2006. While DaFoe shot and directed the film, he also produced his first wine, two barrels of syrah. During those years, he met Jeff Tanner, a former investment banker turned video producer. In 2009, the men launched

PHOTOS:(L-R) COURTESY ROB DAFOE; MATT MCKINNEY PHOTO BY LAURIE JERVIS

BY L AURIE JERVIS


Tanner DaFoe, a cabernet sauvignon-based label that features rich tannic wines. DaFoe’s newer solo endeavor is Rake— as in a ne’er-do-well rascal—inspired by a Townes Van Zandt song that’s both despondent and poetic. The label Rake is everything that Tanner DaFoe is not—an elegant stainless steel chardonnay, a crisp rosé of pinot noir, a red blend and pinot noir, most of them sourced from Destiny Vineyards in Los Alamos. Rake is a family business. Dafoe’s wife, Emily, a handbag designer, is a constant source of support and a key person to

bounce ideas off of, he says. They have a young son, Waylon, age two.

From Gym to Field Like DaFoe, winemaker Matt McKinney segued into winemaking from professional sports. The Santa Ynez Valley Union High School basketball and volleyball standout helped the school win its third consecutive Southern Division III championship. The school enjoyed a reputation as a national prep volleyball power, having also produced U.S. National Team members George Roumain and Andy Witt, McKinney says.

The 6-foot, 8-inch athlete entered UCLA on a full scholarship and, for the better part of three years, competed in both sports, but was plagued by injuries, he says. In 2005, he declared medical retirement. He recovered, however, to play pro volleyball in Greece, Italy and Puerto Rico for four years. “I loved living in Italy, with its history. The people have such pride in their culture,” he says. But the injuries crept back, threatening to disable him, and, in 2013, he returned to Santa Ynez Valley. In 2010, during his third season playing in Puerto Rico, McKinney and his parents

Former professional volleyball player Matt McKinney planted his first grapes in 2010, on a half-acre of horse pasture on his family’s property in the Santa Ynez Valley.

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planted their first grapevines on a half-acre of horse pasture on the family’s 10-acre property. McKinney’s first vintage from that acreage was in 2012. The following year, when he moved home for good, McKinney enrolled in winemaking and viticulture classes at Santa Maria’s Allan Hancock College. He also led wine tours for Coastal Concierge, picking up guests for tasting at area wineries, which “helped me formulate a plan for marketing my winery,” he says. McKinney sources his grapes for the McKinney Family Vineyards label from the Sta. Rita Hills and Happy Canyon AVAs, in addition to using those from the family estate property in the new Los Olivos District A.V.A.

Among his current releases are a sauvignon blanc, chardonnay, rosé, viognier, grenache blanc, syrah, two pinot noirs and a sangiovese-based red blend—“I learned to love sangiovese in Italy,” he says.

From Baker to Maker To call winemaker James Sparks “cheerful” would be a disservice to his personality— he sports a beatific smile, is generous and makes strangers feel like family. Sparks is one of 10 children—five girls and five boys—raised in a Mormon family in Idaho. While he calls himself an introvert, Sparks is one of the most grounded and compassionate souls one could ever hope to meet. Sparks grew up baking with his mother,

who at one point owned a bakery in their hometown. Upon moving from Idaho, he utilized that skill for work in other cities where he lived—Portland, Seattle, Durango, Colorado, and Sun Valley, Idaho—before moving to Los Angeles to pursue a career in music. Bread making is similar to wine making in that timing is key, and good ingredients beget a good final product. In the scheme of life, Sparks is new to wine: He had never consumed it until just over a decade ago, when he left the Mormon faith. “I broke in my palate on good burgundies with my brother-in-law, Brandon Sparks-Gillis—who is one of the owners/winemakers of Dragonette Cellars, for whom Sparks worked before joining Liquid Farm during harvest 2013. Sparks and his wife, wine and food publicist Anna Ferguson-Sparks, reside in Solvang with their daughter, Bea, age two. The first bottled vintage of Sparks’s “Kings Carey” was 2014, but Sparks delayed the official launch until spring of 2017. The label focuses on just one grape varietal: grenache. “Kings Carey” is so named for the couple’s respective hometowns: Carey, Idaho, for Sparks, and Kings Point, New York, for Ferguson-Sparks. Sparks sources his grenache from a variety of vineyards—early vintages came from Brick Barn, just west of Buellton, and more recently from the newer Spear Vineyards in Sta. Rita Hills to the coveted John Sebastiano Vineyards on that AVA’s eastern edge. He favors neutral barrels to showcase the bright but delicate essence of grenache and limits production to between 100 and 250 cases each of two grenaches and a grenache rosé. “I’m trying to produce ‘untypical’ wines of typicity,” explains Sparks. “It’s not that this region can’t produce these types of wines; it’s just that you don’t see it very often. These are not fruit bombs. These are clean expressions of the fruit at hand.” 

“Kings Carey” is so named for James Sparks’ (left) and his wife Anna FergusonSparks’ respective hometowns: Carey, Idaho, for Sparks, and Kings Point, New York, for Ferguson-Sparks.

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PHOTOS: (L-R) JEREMY BALL, COURTESY CUTLER’S ARTISAN SPIRITS

WINE COUNTRY


Chuck’s Rickey is one of several seasonal cocktails created by Cutler’s Artisan Spirits. Visit sbseasons.com for cocktail recipes from these local distillers.

LOCAL LIBATIONS

SPIRITS OF THE SEASON BY WENDY THIES SELL

to be jolly, and what better way to get in the holiday spirit than by sipping Santa Barbara County spirits. This winter, our local micro-distilleries have new craft creations ready for you to sample. Cutler’s Artisan Spirits, with a distillery and tasting room in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone (137 Anacapa St., Suite D), recently built a tap system to serve cocktails, in addition to their tasting flights of smallbatch whiskey, vodka and gin. Fourth-generation distiller Ian Cutler produces a liqueur that “screams holiday season”—“Grandma Tommie’s Apple Pie” (40-proof). “We start with a seven-times-

’TIS THE SEASON

distilled vodka—a white canvas to build the apple pie flavor on top of,” he says. “It ends up tasting exactly like my grandmother’s apple pie.” Cutler embraces his high-spirited family history. His great-grandfather, Duke Cutler, served up booze to gold miners at his Oakdale bar. During the Prohibition Era, Duke ran a successful moonshining operation in the Sierra Nevada Foothills before legally opening Duke’s Bar in 1933. What does Cutler sip at home during the holidays? His favorite winter whiskey cocktail is Cutler’s “33 Straight Bourbon Whiskey” (86-proof), a bit of his housemade chocolate bitters, his pecan and walnut bitters, a twist of orange and a splash of maple syrup. This will surely warm you up on a dreary December night! In Santa Ynez Valley, the former Brothers Spirits, owned by brothers Jay and Jeff Lockwood, recently changed its brand name to Dorwood Distillery (a combination of their mother’s maiden name and their last name). Dorwood’s handcrafted straight-sipping “G7 Gin,” containing nine botanicals and less juniper than most gins, is sure to multiply

holiday merriment. “This is not your dad’s gin!” says head distiller Jay Lockwood. “This is a cocktail in a bottle waiting to be poured over a glass of ice.” Dorwood Distillery and Tasting Room (201 Industrial Way, Unit D, Buellton) also creates clean ever-so-sweet vodka from Santa Barbara County wine, distilling it four times and filtering it through coconut shell charcoal. “We’re in wine country, and you can make vodka out of anything, so why not use wine? It’s a different mouth feel. It’s creamy, velvety. You can drink the vodka straight,” says Lockwood. “It’s actually converting people back to drinking vodka.” “We don’t do tastings here; we do experiences. You can see and smell everything that’s happening inside the distillery at any time,” he adds. Ascendant Spirits, offering tastings and tours (37 Industrial Way, Suite 103, Buellton), was the county’s first post-Prohibition distillery, founded in 2011 by master distiller, Steve Gertman, who opened the doors to the public in 2013. As of January, his products will be distributed in 50 states. The distillery’s flagship, Breaker Bourbon (90-proof), barrel aged 6+ years, is something Santa would sip. Breaker is Gertman’s “go to” drink during the holidays, “Usually just neat. I’m pretty simplistic like that. There’s a greater shift into the brown spirits during the chillier months. They seem to be more comforting, in some ways. Most folks gravitate more toward a bourbon drink.” Ascendant also produces a unique variety of American Star vodkas; the “crystal clear” original, Caviar Lime, Ghost Chili and Strawberry. In the winter, Gertman makes a spicy Mexican hot chocolate. “We simply, as Emeril Legasse would say, kick it up a notch” with Ghost Chili vodka, giving it a nice extra warmth to it with a little bit of capsaicin that goes over really, really well,” he says. Taste for yourself, stock up, and why not celebrate the season by gifting the grown ups in your life with spirited Santa Barbara-made stocking stuffers! 

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The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/blog/restaurant-guide.

O U R F AVO R I T E R E S TA U R A N T S I N M O N T E C I T O, S A N TA B A R B A R A , G O L E TA A N D S A N TA Y N E Z VA L L E Y

Montecito Bella Vista (Contemporary Italian) at the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore commands panoramic ocean views across Montecito’s Butterfly Beach and promises top notch cuisine and impeccable service. Guests enjoy a contemporary Italian menu showcasing fresh California ingredients. It’s also home to one of the most celebrated Sunday brunches in the U.S. 1260 Channel Dr., 805/969-2261. $$$–$$$$

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is a cozy restaurant attached to the bar at San Ysidro Ranch and is well-known for its comfort food. 900 San Ysidro Ln., 805/565-1720. $$$

Trattoria Mollie (Italian) is a charming standby for locals-in-theknow. The dynamic cuisine consists of recipes that Mollie gathered during her years of training with “the best chefs in Italy.” 1250 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-9381. $$$

Tre Lune (Italian) offers a delicious Cava (Mexican) serves the bold flavors of Spain, Mexico and Latin America in a charming setting with classic margaritas and martinis amid a vibrant outdoor patio, romantic dining room or cozy fireplace. 1212 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-8500. $$–$$$

Lucky’s (American) offers steaks, chops and seafood as well as chicken entrées, wonderful salads, six different potato dishes and beautiful desserts. The wine list runs to the extravagant. The adjacent bar is a favorite among locals. 1279 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-7540. $$$–$$$$

Montecito Wine Bistro (Californian) is a casual yet sophisticated spot to sit on the outdoor patio or cozy up to the fireplace and nibble wine-friendly food, and sip wines by the glass or the flight, or enjoy a cocktail. 516 San Ysidro Rd., 805/969-7520. $$–$$$ Stella Mare’s (French) pairs a beautiful Victorian building with stylish, Normandy-inspired cuisine. The glassencased greenhouse’s panoramic view and fireside couches make it a perfect spot for listening to Wednesday night jazz. 50 Los Patos Way, 805/969-6705. $$–$$$

menu that isn’t afraid of flavor. The high quality, genuine Italian cuisine includes excellent minestrone soup, fall-off-the-fork ossobuco, basil pesto, lobster ravioli and more. 1151 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-2646. $$$

Santa Barbara Waterfront

- Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach (Seafood) serves locally caught, fresh seafood specialties. Dine inside or al fresco with one of the best ocean views in Santa Barbara. Full bar and regional wine list. 2981 Cliff Dr., 805/898-2628. $$–$$$

Brophy Bros. (Seafood) has long been one of Santa Barbara’s most popular eateries and is located at the harbor with excellent views. You’ll find great shellfish cocktails and fresh fish here. 119 Harbor Way, 805/966-4418. $$

Chuck’s Waterfront Grill (Steaks & Fish House) serves prime-grade top sirloin steaks and Australian lobster tail among many other delicious offerings. The restaurant’s lively upstairs extension,

(American) is located in a 19th-century citrus-packing house on the grounds of San Ysidro Ranch. Stonehouse has a full bar and a menu emphasizing local fish and produce. Open daily for dinner only $$$$. Plow and Angel (American) 90

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The Harbor Restaurant and Longboard’s Grill (Seafood) on Stearns Wharf are two different experiences from one great vantage point. The Harbor is a romantic oceanview restaurant and Longboard’s is a noisy, energy-packed bar and grill. 210 Stearns Wharf, 805/963-3311. $$–$$$

Rodney’s Grill (American) Located in the Fess Parker A Doubletree by Hilton Resort, Rodney’s menu spotlights naturally raised meats and poultry, seasonal produce and sustainable seafood—all paired with wines from the finest local vineyards. 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/884-8554. $$$

- Santa Barbara FisHouse (Seafood) serves fresh local fish in a lively setting. Gathering with friends on the dining terrace with ocean views is the perfect way to start the weekend. Be sure to order lobster during the season from these “lobster specialists.” 101 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/966-2112. $$

Santa Barbara Shellfish Co. (Seafood) is a fun, no-frills seafoodlover’s paradise. Select your dinner fresh from the tanks or from that day’s catch just steps from the ocean. 230 Stearns Wharf, 805/966-6676. $$

Shoreline Beach Café (Mexican,

(Seafood), has two terraces for al fresco dining on more casual fare. 113 Harbor Way, 805/564-1200. $$–$$$

Seafood) is a lively, open-air beach restaurant. Salads, burgers, fish tacos, fresh seafood and vegetarian items are served daily. Breakfast served on weekends. 801 Shoreline Dr., 805/568-0064. $$

Convivo Restaurant and Bar

Toma Restaurant and Bar (Italian)

(Italian) located across from East Beach on the ground floor of the historic Santa

is a romantic spot to savor excellent Italian and Mediterranean dishes

The Endless Summer bar-café

- Stonehouse Restaurant

Barbara Inn, draws its inspiration from Santa Barbara’s bounty of seafood and meats prepared “Nomad Italian” style by Chef Peter McNee. Sit on the outdoor patio for al fresco dining with a view of the Channel Islands. 901 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-6789. $$-$$$

from Santa Barbara’s seasonal bounty while enjoying warm and attentive service and a view of the enchanting Santa Barbara harbor. 324 W. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/962-0777. $$-$$$

Downtown Arigato Sushi (Japanese) provides designer sushi from inventive chefs. Daily specials explore the limitless varieties of this Japanese delicacy. 1225 State St., 805/965-6074. $$$ Arnoldi’s Café (Italian) specializes in traditional homestyle Italian cuisine, featuring the freshest local produce and seafood, imported Italian meats, cheeses and olive oils, as well as an extensive wine list, bocce courts and a heated patio. 600 Olive St., 805/962-5394. $$$

Benchmark Eatery (Seafood, American) is a casual eatery that does American fare proud, with everything from soul-satisfying pastas, pizzas, grilled ahi and fish and chips to fresh salads, juicy burgers and generous sandwiches. 1201 State St., 805/845-2600, $-$$ Blackbird (Californian) is a one of Santa Barbara’s newest hot spots. Classic meets contemporary at Hotel Californian’s signature restaurant. Under the direction of Executive Chef Alexander La Motte, Blackbird features exquisite Mediterranean-influenced cuisine emphasizing locally-sourced and hyper-seasonal ingredients. With the Pacific Ocean and the Funk Zone as a backdrop, Blackbird offers a sleek, yet approachable and wholly unpretentious atmosphere. Dinner only. 36 State St., 805/882-0135. $$$

Black Sheep (Californian) has a cool, casual vibe, but serves seriously good farm-to-table food. Try scallop crudo, roasted bone marrow or re-constructed chicken stuffed with walnuts and dried apricots. 26 E. Ortega St., 805/965-1113. $$$


bouchon (Californian French) serves “Santa Barbara Wine Country” cuisine complemented by a remarkable wine list that includes more than 50 Central Coast wines by the glass. Open for dinner nightly. 9 W. Victoria St., 805/730-1160. $$$

Ca’Dario (Italian) promises fine Italian cuisine, whether pasta, fish or fowl—don’t miss the ravioli pillows with brown butter and sage sauce and, when in season, grilled asparagus wrapped with pancetta—and an extensive wine list. A few doors down, Ca’Dario Pizzeria features a tasty array of pizzas, including gluten-free options. 37 E. Victoria St., 805/884-9419. $$$

Carlitos Café y Cantina (Mexican) offers exciting regional Mexican cuisine and 100% blue agave Margaritas, along with fresh, imaginative Mexican grilled specialties that borrow from Pueblo, Mayan and Aztec cultures. 1324 State St., 805/962-7117. $$ Casa Blanca Restaurant & Cantina (Mexican) is a fun Mexican hot spot with killer Margaritas, tasty tacos, ample enchiladas and other classic south-of-theborder inspired fare. 330 State St., 805/845-8966. $$ China Pavilion (Chinese) is a spacious and charming restaurant with large picture windows looking out over downtown Santa Barbara. It features high-quality traditional Chinese food, as well as a delicious dim sum brunch on weekends. 1202 Chapala St., 805/560-6028. $$

Enterprise Fish Co. (Seafood) is one of Santa Barbara’s largest and busiest seafood restaurants. In an exhilarating, nautical atmosphere are an oyster bar and a variety of fresh fish that are mesquite-broiled and served at reasonable prices. 225 State St., 805/962-3313. $$

Finch & Fork (Californian) in the Canary Hotel offers hearty items like buttermilk fried chicken and excellently prepared lighter fare, complete with farmfresh salads, fresh oysters and yummy flatbreads. 31 W. Carrillo St., 805/879-9100. $$–$$$ Intermezzo Bar/Café (Californian) serves local wines on tap, craft cocktails and light fare such as burgers, flatbreads, salads and desserts ‘til late. Enjoy an array of small plates to share—including charcuterie, oysters, mussels, steak bites and the crispy cauliflower—make this a perfect pre- or post-theater stop. 819 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$–$$$

Jane (Californian) offers upscale, fresh, tasty fare that runs the gamut from huge seasonal salads and gourmet burgers to fish and chips with chipotle ketchup and creamy dill. The delicious goat cheese pancakes with smoked salmon and caviar are crafted from a family recipe. 1311 State St., 805/962-1311. $$

Joe’s Café (American) is a Santa Barbara icon known for its stiff cocktails and raucous k

LUNA TERRACE AT

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Luna Terrace, the newest addition to Ty Lounge,

brings an exclusive and eclectic outdoor terrace to Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara. During brunch and sunset hour, your party up to eight guests can escape to Morocco through customized menus and hand-crafted cocktails. Create your next experience at Luna Terrace by calling (805) 565-8290. www.fourseasons.com/santabarbara


DINING OUT

Breakfast • Lunch Dinner • Cocktails

atmosphere. The menu of American classics includes steaks, sandwiches and Mexican specialties. Lunch and dinner served daily; breakfast served weekends. 536 State St., 805/966-4638. $$

The Lark (American) delights with Chef Jason Paluska’s sophisticated family-style plates designed to share and made with the freshest possible local “farm-to-fork” ingredients, along with creative cocktails and a wonderful wine selection. Dinner, Tues.–Sun. 131 Anacapa St., 805/284-0370. $$–$$$

- Les Marchands (French) this stylish caveau is the perfect place to discover expertly chosen wines from around the world and enjoy tastes with locallysourced bites and traditional French fare pairings in a relaxing, Funk Zone atmosphere, free of intimidation. 131 Anacapa St. Suite B, 805/ 284-0380. $–$$$

- Loquita (Spanish) specializes in authentic Spanish

2981 Cliff Drive (805) 898-2628 www.boathousesb.com

food, including hot and cold tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats, and three types of paella. Executive Chef Peter Lee’s innovative cuisine has a California twist and is complimented with a full bar of Spanish and local wines and spirits. 202 State St., 805/880-3380. $$-$$$

Louie’s (Californian), located inside Santa Barbara’s oldest operating hotel, The Upham, reflects the charm and tradition of its location. You’ll find extraordinary fresh seafood, pastas, filet mignon and a changing menu of specialties, with options to dine outside on a beautiful wrap-around porch or inside at tables next to paned windows or booths, several of which are tucked into intimate alcoves. 1404 De La Vina St., 805/963-7003. $$–$$$ Nectar (Californian) focuses on small and shareable plates using fresh and international flavors. Featuring an extensive local wine list and inventive cocktail flights to pair with luscious food, Nectar is a great spot for a quick bite or a long and lingering evening. 20 E. Cota St., 805/899-4694. $$–$$$

Olio e Limone (Italian) uses only the freshest ingredients for simply delicious preparations. Tuck into a plate of housemade ravioli filled with roasted eggplant and goat cheese, topped with a fresh tomato and basil sauce and shaved ricotta salata. Olio Pizzeria offers a casual pizza bar, wine and cocktails next door, while Olio Crudo Bar offers cocktails and sashimi with an Italian accent! 11 W. Victoria St. #17, 805/899-2699 ext. 1. $$$

Opal (Californian) is a classic European-style bistro serving eclectic California cuisine complemented by a wood-burning pizza oven, an extensive wine list and full bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1325 State St., 805/966-9676. $$

The Palace Grill (Cajun) is a place resonating with jazz music that creates the perfect setting for spicy food and spirited service to chase the blues away. Features authentic Louisiana specialities like 92

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jambalaya, crawfish etouffée and blackened steaks and seafood. 8 E. Cota St., 805/963-5000. $$–$$$

BELMOND

EL

ENCANTO,

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BARBARA

Paradise Café (American) is located downtown in a unique old building with wall murals from the 1940s. It has one of Santa Barbara’s favorite patios for dining and a bar that will take you back in time with cocktails of your choice and a well-selected wine and beer list. 702 Anacapa St., 805/962-4416. $$ Petit Valentien (French), with its quaint atmosphere and intimate setting, is hidden away in a small corner of La Arcada. Be sure to check out the prix fixe menu only available on Sundays. 1114 State St. #16, 805/966-0222. $$

Petros (Greek) is home to Hellenic-California cuisine and one of the prettiest patios in town. Owner Petros Benekos gives traditional Hellenic recipes a contemporary California spin. Entrée hits include tender feta-crusted rack of lamb and fresh sautéed sea bass, along with Greek classics. 1316 State St. 805/899-9100. $$-$$$ Viva (Mexican) indulges your senses with its modern Mexican cuisine, beautiful courtyard patio and inviting dining room in the historic La Arcada. Taco happy hour (Mon.-Fri. from 3-6 p.m.) is a perfect time to sample creative tacos and other antojitos, or “small cravings,” along with the raw bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh shellfish. 1114 State St., 805/965-4770. $$ Wine Cask (Californian) in the historic El Paseo complex offers a beautiful spot to enjoy fine dining and exceptional service in a relaxed setting. Don’t miss the stellar wine selections, including an impressive variety of local wines on tap. 813 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$$

Uptown

COME RAISE A GLASS. WE’LL RAISE THE BAR. CELEBRATE YOUR SPECIAL OCCASION WITH US — IN UNFORGETTABLE STYLE. FROM A BIRTHDAY LUNCH WITH FRIENDS TO A ROMANTIC DINNER FOR TWO, WE WILL CREATE A MEMORABLE EVENT.

- Belmond El Encanto (Coastal-Californian) presents California coastal cuisine and seasonal favorites from executive chef Johan Denizot, featuring specialties like fresh local oysters, pan seared diver scallops and short ribs sous vide alongside stunning Santa Barbara views. Sit under the stars on the terrace or in the elegant dining room. 800 Alvarado Pl., 805/770-3530. $$$-$$$$

LINGER IN OUR GARDENS OR ON OUR TERRACE, AND LET US SPOIL YOU WITH SUPERB CUISINE AND WINES.

Chuck’s of Hawaii (American) is the home of California’s first salad bar and offers awardwinning steaks and fresh seafood right from the grill. A local favorite hangout since 1967. 3888 State St., 805/687-4417. $$-$$$ Crocodile Restaurant (Italian/Californian), a local’s secret found at the Lemon Tree Inn, offers a chic, relaxing atmosphere with a full cocktail bar and kitchen. A great spot for watching a sporting match or catching up with a friend. Breakfast, lunch and dinner served daily. 2819 State St., 805/687-6444. $$-$$$­

800 ALVARADO PLACE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 | 805 845 5800 HOTELS | TRAINS | RIVER CRUISES | JOURNEYS | BELMOND.COM

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Le Café Stella (French-American) is perched across from Santa Barbara Golf Club and is a neighborhood hot spot for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour— try the juicy burgers on brioche buns or heart-warming coq au vin. 3302 McCaw Ave., 805/569-7698. $$ Lure Fish House (Seafood) specializes in fresh and sustainable seafood from trusted sources and locally caught seafood, organically grown local produce, and wines from local vineyards whenever possible. 3815 State St., 805/618-1816. $$-$$$

The Tee-Off (American) is a friendly steak and seafood restaurant and lounge with a long history of local appreciation that features a short but sweet menu of steaks, chops, chicken and seafood. 3627 State St., 805/687-1616. $$-$$$

Goleta

202 State Street, Santa Barbara | 805-880-3380 Dinner Daily 5pm - 10pm | Reservations Recommended LOQUITASB.COM

@loquitasb

Angel Oak (French-Californian) ) is a modern steak and seafood restaurant housed at Bacara Resort & Spa. Angel Oak showcases the culinary knowledge and classical training of Parisian Executive Chef Vincent Lesage, featuring classic steakhouse dishes with a uniquely Santa Barbara interpretation as part of a diverse menu of locally-sourced fare—including Santa Barbara’s famously fresh uni and the restaurant’s certified Kobe and dry-aged beef program. 8301 Hollister Ave., 866/654-5879. $$$-$$$$ Beachside Bar + Café (Seafood) sits just above the sand and Goleta Pier, and serves expertly prepared fish and other delicious foods for lunch and dinner in the tropical-style dining room, on the glass-walled open-air patio, at the oyster bar or in the big, full-service bar—all with wide views of the ocean and sandy beach. Pair your cocktail with the fish tacos, excellent clam chowder or Ceasar salad for memorable seaside dining. 5905 Sandspit Rd., 805/964-7881. $$-$$$

Jane at the Marketplace (Californian), presents flavorful fare for lunch and dinner including steak, chicken and pasta in cozy surroundings. This is a bright, sunny space known for its friendly service and authentic family recipes. 6940 Marketplace Dr., 805/770-5388. $$ Outpost (Californian) is a casual, hip spot at the

131 A N AC A PA S TR E E T, S T E. B , S A N TA B A R B A R A | 8 0 5 - 2 8 4 - 0 3 8 0 Sun-Thur: 11am – 9pm | Fri & Sat: 11am – 10pm B R U N C H W E E K E N D S 1 1 A M – 3 P M | D I N N E R DA I LY 5 P M LESMARCHANDSWINE.COM

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Goodland Hotel. The excellent seasonal menu includes shareable plates, entrees and fresh salads, as well as fish tacos with battered halibut, flat iron steak with salsa verde, pork bao buns and a caper-studded Caesar salad with grilled romaine. 5650 Calle Real, 805/964-1288. $$-$$$

Santa Ynez Mountains Cold Spring Tavern (American) is an iconic establishment virtually unchanged since the days of the stagecoach run that has served excellent food—including wild game—to hungry locals


DINING OUT

and travelers alike for more than 100 years. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 5995 Stagecoach Rd., 805/967-0066. $$$

Santa Ynez Valley The Bear and Star (American) at Fess Parker’s Wine Country Inn takes its name from the two states Parker called home, Texas and California, celebrating refined ranch cuisine paired with California’s bounty. 2860 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/686-1359. $$–$$$S Bottlest Bistro (American) is an upscale, contemporary eatery featuring eclectic small plates and entrees, plus a choose-your-own wine wall with 52 constantly changing wines available by the taste, half glass or full glass. 35 Industrial Way, Buellton, 805/686-4742. $$-$$$ Brothers Restaurant at the Red Barn (American) offers innovative “made from scratch” cuisine in this exquisitely refurbished barn. The hearty menu offers American classics like chops, prime rib, and chicken-fried steak. Lunch and dinner served daily.  3539 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-4142. $$-$$$$ Dos Carlitos Restaurant & Tequila Bar (Mexican) brings bold Mexican and Latin flavors to the valley. An open-fire grill imparts a smoky essence to authentic grilled specials, delicious salsas and the aroma of fresh handmade tortillas. 3544 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-0033. $$ First & Oak (Fusion) distinguishes itself with beautifully prepared, elegant small plates designed to pair with fine wines and allow guests to taste multiple, exciting dishes in a single sitting. Housed in the charming Mirabelle Inn, this modern American restaurant has a European influence as well as a Californian emphasis on food that is seasonal, local and sustainable. 409 First St., Solvang, 805/688-1703. $$$ The Gathering Table at Ballard Inn (California Fusion) is Owner/Chef Budi Kazali’s new concept, which offers a fun and inviting place to gather over incredible food that’s meant to be shared in a warm and inviting modern farmhouse atmosphere. 2436 Baseline Ave., Ballard, 805/688-7770. $$-$$$$ The Hitching Post (American) is an old-fashioned, western-style steakhouse and lounge just a few minutes off Hwy. 101. In addition to Newport Meat Company beef, there are also ribs, quail, turkey, duck and ostrich plus seafood on the menu. 406 E. Hwy. 246, Buellton, 805/688-0676. $$$–$$$$ Los Olivos Café and Wine Merchant (Californian) is a casual restaurant in one of the town’s original Main Street buildings. The

thoughtful menu of homemade pizzas and California cuisine is complemented with an enormous list of wines from the adjacent store. 2879 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-7265. $$ Pico (Californian), specializes in a menu of approachable Californian cuisine sourced from locally farmed, seasonal ingredients. Chef Drew Terp offers a creative, eclectic spin on American comfort food with an extensive wine list showcasing the best from Santa Barbara’s wine country, as well international selections. 458 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805/344-1122. $$-$$$ Root 246 (American), located at Hotel Corque, features innovative cuisine emphasizing local, seasonal ingredients to create the ultimate in farmto-table cuisine. Root 246 has one of the area’s most extensive selections of local wines, whiskey and craft beers, as well as refreshing signature cocktails. Try the Sunday brunch for a delicious weekend experience. 420 Alisol Rd., Solvang, 805/686-8681. $$-$$$ Sides Hardware & Shoes—A Brothers Restaurant (American) is located in a restored 1901 building where chef-owners and brothers Jeff and Matt Nichols turn out hearty American favorites with original gourmet twists. 2375 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-4820. $$–$$$

- S.Y. Kitchen (Italian) is a charming “California version of a little Italian farmhouse” with a focus on unfussy rustic Italian food made from fresh, local ingredients. Expect inventive salads, woodfired pizzas and house-made pastas with everything from seasonal seafood to duck ragu. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez, 805/691-9794. $$-$$$ Trattoria Grappolo (Italian) is a great destination for gourmet pizzas from a woodburning oven, housemade pastas, fresh salads and more than 150 wines from around the world. Open daily for dinner and for lunch Tues.-Sun. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-6899. $$-$$$ The Vineyard House (American) offers local farm fresh cuisine in a charming Victorian house that dates back to the days when the Santa Ynez Valley’s world-class vineyards were just a dream. 3631 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-2886. $$$ The Willows at Chumash Casino Resort (American) is a AAA Four Diamond Award-winner specializing in mouthwatering prime steaks and seafood. The elegance of this exquisite dining room is matched by incomparable views of the rolling Santa Ynez hills. 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez, 805/686-0855. $$$–$$$$

Dinner Nightly from 5:00pm Lunch Served Daily 11:30am - 2:30pm Aperitivo Mon-Thurs 4:00pm - 5:30pm

805-691-7974 1110 Faraday Santa Ynez, California www.sykitchen.com

WINTER 2017/18

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MY SANTA BARBARA

“Moonstone Beach at Sunset,” San Luis Obispo County

COM I NG—SLO COU N T Y ! Spring 2018 W HEN MY WIFE AND I moved from California’s central valley to the central coast a long time ago, it was Santa Barbara County’s history, natural beauty, beautiful public buildings, real estate and lifestyle that drew us here within a few days. And the third (now, second) largest city in America was far, far away—perfect! Since then, we have explored much of the central coast, from parts unknown in northern Monterey County through Ventura County in the south.

The content of our spring 2018 issue will be expanded to include San Luis Obispo County, to feature its best and most interesting places, natural wonders, history, people, commerce, golf, wineries and restaurants. The expansion will provide a more complete picture of life and culture on the central coast—one of the wworld’s best places to live. Enjoy it. Write us about it. And have a glorious winter season! —David W. Fritzen, Publisher & Editor in Chief

In between, just beyond Santa Maria’s dry river, Santa Barbara County ends and San Luis Obispo County—with its 270,000 residents in total—begins.

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PaseoNuevoShopping.com • Call or Text 805-900-7385 Located on State Street between Canon Perdido and Ortega Streets • Convenient Parking • Valet Available


Hope Ranch

4480 Via Esperanza

Villa | Views | Botanical Garden | $4,899,000

“Be an opener of doors.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Colleen Parent Beall 805.895.5881

colleen.beall@compass.com colleenbeall.net CalBRE 01201456

Compass is a licensed real estate broker (01991628) in the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. To reach the Compass main office call 805.253.7700

1002 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101

1101 Coast Village Road Montecito, CA 93108

Exquisite villa with luxurious amenities set in sumptuous botanical gardens filled with flowers, lavender, orange trees, and olive trees. This tower entry hints at the delights beyond: uniquely crafted doors including wood carved Indonesian doors, nanodoors, and French doors leading to terraces, patios or balconies throughout that meld the beauty of the outdoors with the meticulous detail of the home. Experience vista and vignette views, and relax to the soothing sounds of a multitude of creative water features in this ultimate retreat.

Santa Barbara SEASONS Magazine, Winter 2017/18  

Santa Barbara Seasons is a resource for locals and visitors alike with lush visuals, engaging features and invaluable information on events,...

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