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Santa

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spring | C E L E B R A T I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U L T U R E

THEY LOVE HORSES, don’t they

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY’S EQUESTRIAN LIFESTYLE

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THE FESS PARKER FAMILY

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w w w. S U Z A N N E P E R K I N S . c o m Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. | CalBRE License # 01106512


A legacy setting reimagined for modern living.

No view is promised. Views may also be altered by subsequent development, construction and landscaping growth. Plans to build out this neighborhood as proposed are subject to change without notice. Prices, plans and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Depictions of homes or other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary. CalAtlantic Group, Inc. California Real Estate License No. 01138346.


santa barbara museum of art | january 29–may 14, 2017

David Wiesner & The Art of Wordless Storytelling 1130 state street | santa barbara, ca | www.sbma.net museum hours: tuesday–sunday 11 am–5 pm, free thursday evening 5–8 pm The exhibition catalogue was generously underwritten by Zora and Les Charles. The exhibition was made possible through the additional support of the SBMA Women’s Board, SBMA curatorial support groups Dead Artists Society and D.A.S.ii, Dana White, Gregg Wilson and John Maienza, the City of Santa Barbara, and the Santa Barbara County Office of Arts and Culture.


David Wiesner is one of the most highly acclaimed picture book artists in the world and has won the prestigious Caldecott Medal for Tuesday in 1992, The Three Pigs in 2002, and Flotsam in 2007—only the second person in the history of the award to have received it three times. This is the first comprehensive retrospective devoted to this internationally recognized master of the picture book. It includes 70 original watercolors, exquisitely wrought to mesmerizing effect through painstakingly applied layers of pigment. Accompanying the exhibition is a full color catalogue featuring Wiesner’s original watercolors; family-friendly reading and iPad area; downloadable app; and themed products available in the Museum Store. For related programming, visit www.sbma.net.

this page David Wiesner, original design for National Poetry Week poster (detail), 2001. Watercolor on paper. Courtesy of the artist. facing page David Wiesner, Mr. Wuffles! (detail), pg. 8, 2013. Watercolor and india ink on paper. Courtesy of the artist.


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our trip to Santa Barbara will not be complete without knowing what Ronald Reagan accomplished while he lived here. The Reagan Ranch Center, in the heart of downtown Santa Barbara, on lower State Street, features original Reagan Ranch artifacts paired with state-of-the-art, interactive, multimedia exhibits that highlight the history of Ronald Reagan’s quarter-century at Rancho del Cielo and the lasting accomplishments of his presidency. More than six hours of dynamic multimedia content is contained in exhibits that provide access to exclusive speeches, interviews, radio addresses, and original video presentations. The galleries also feature a number of unique artifacts of Ronald Reagan’s time in Santa Barbara, including the Reagan family Bible and the table where he signed into law the largest tax cut in American history.

Monday – Thursday 11 AM – 4 PM* Admission Is FREE! *Note: Gallery hours may be shortened or expanded for special events. For the latest information, please call 888-USA-1776.

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Spring F E AT U R E S

52 They Love Horses, Don’t They! Santa Barbara County’s Equestrian Lifestyle Written by Cheryl Crabtree Photographed by Amy Barnard

66 The Fess Parker Family Tree Sprouts Deep Roots in Santa Barbara County Written by Wendy Thies Sell

Photographed by Mehosh Written & Styled by Judy Foreman

66 SANTA BARBARA SEASONS | Sring 2017

Santa

B a r bar a

spring | C E L E B R A T I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U L T U R E

C E L E B R AT I N G C O U N T Y L I F E & C U LT U R E

THEY LOVE HORSES, don’t they

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY’S EQUESTRIAN LIFESTYLE

+

THE FESS PARKER FAMILY

COUNTRY STYLE sbseasons.com

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SBSEASONS.COM

SANDY SLICE OF HEAVEN

ON THE COVER

Champion Equestrian Joel Chauran, with Roy, at Rancho Santa Barbara. Photo by Amy Barnard.

PHOTOS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP): AMY BARNARD, COURTESY FESS PARKER WINERY, MEHOSH

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38 18 Editor’s Letter 20 Contributors 22 Local Lowdown Wild Brews; Hackerspace; Santa Barbara’s Official Cocktail; Foodie Fun With Mesa Burger, Chuck’s of Hawaii, Somerset, How to Eat Paleo and Chef Robin Goldstein; Firestone Walker Barrelworks; SB Community Arts Workspace; Apples to Zucchini Cooking School and More! 28 Spring Datebook Performing and Visual Arts and Other Favorite Events for Spring 14

SBSEASONS.COM

30 On Exhibit Featured Artists at Local Galleries 36 Poetry “Child Light” BY CHRISTOPHER BUCKLEY

38 Home & Garden Sandy Slice of Heaven BY NANCY R ANSOHOFF

42 Sustainable Seasons Plug In, Ride Green— Fueling The Rise of Electric Vehicles BY R ACHEL HOMMEL

44 Legacies Ah-One, Ah-Two— the Partnership for Excellence Conference BY NANCY A. SHOBE

46 Rearview Mirror Glimpses Into Santa Barbara’s Stagecoach Past BY FRED NADIS

48 A Day Away The Oaks at Ojai

82 Explore Santa Barbara County 40 great things to do in Santa Barbara, Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria, Goleta, Santa Ynez, Solvang & Los Olivos

BY LESLIE DINABERG

50 Featured Real Estate Listing 78 Tee it up! Golf in Santa Barbara County 80 Santa Barbara County Explore Map

84 Santa Barbara Urban Wineries 86 Wine Guide & Map 90 Dining Out Our guide to favorite area restaurants 96 My Santa Barbara “Celestial ” PHOTOGR APH BY PATRICIA HOUGHTON CLARKE

PHOTOS (L-R): HOLLY LEPERE, COURTESY SOMERSET, COURTESY THE OAKS AT OJAI

D E PA R TM E N T S


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S P R I N G 2 017 • VO LU M E L X I I I • N U M B E R 1

PUBLISHER & EDITOR IN CHIEF

David W. Fritzen M ANAGING EDITOR

Leslie Dinaberg A R T  D I R E C T O R

Kim McKeown A S S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R

Krista Nicole Fritzen COPY EDITOR

Lindse Davis CONTRIBUTING EDITORS FOOD

Nancy Ransohoff

POETRY STYLE

David Starkey

Judy Foreman

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

James Badham, Lauren Bennett, Christopher Buckley, Cheryl Crabtree, Brett Leigh Dicks, Leslie Dinaberg, Judy Foreman, Rachel Hommel, Fred Nadis, Danielle Moss, Victoria Tai Murphy, Nancy Ransohoff, Wendy Thies Sell, Nancy A. Shobe CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGR APHERS

Amy Barnard, Patricia Houghton Clarke, Mehosh PREPRESS PRODUCTION

Glenn Vargen EDITORIAL INTERNS

Lauren Bennett, Danielle Hazlett, Danielle Moss, Victoria Tai Murphy, Toby Qualls, Kathryn Shim DISTRIBUTION M ANAGER

Eddie Diamond Copyright 2017, Seasons Publishing Company. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written permission from the publisher. F O R E V E R S U B S C R I P T I O N Santa Barbara Seasons now offers a subscription that lasts “forever” (unless you cancel) for the cost of four quarterly editions. To subscribe, send check or money order for $19.80; email subscribe@sbseasons.com; or visit sbseasons. com/subscribe. Your subscription will automatically begin with the SUMMER 2017 edition.

For advertising information, please contact the publisher. Editorial and advertising offices: 829 De la Vina Street, Suite 210, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Telephone 805/564-8804. Fax 805/564-8802.

See“Sandy Slice of Heaven” in this issue for more about this beautiful project. 16 W W W . S B S E A S O N S . C O M

Printed in the USA. sbseasons.com

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SPRING EDITOR’S LETTER

“Whenever I was upset by something in the papers, Jack always told me to be more tolerant, like a horse flicking away flies in the summer (or spring).” — JAC KIE KENNEDY

Cheers to a wonderful spring season!

Leslie Dinaberg MANAGING EDITOR

leslie@sbseasons.com

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HORSES STIR THE IM AGINATION in a way that few other animals do. So many great quotes use the horse as a metaphor for life that I had a hard time picking just one to showcase. Similarly, there are so many glorious examples of equestrian life in Santa Barbara County that it would be easy to fill an entire magazine with them (a future special issue perhaps). However, I’m thrilled with the portfolio of people and properties that photographer Amy Barnard and writer Cheryl Crabtree captured in “They Love Horses, Don’t They! Santa Barbara County’s Equestrian Lifestyle” (page 52). From the incredible local history of Rancho Santa Barbara, which was once part of a Mexican land grant owned by Dwight Murphy, and the long-standing horse-loving tradition of Hope Ranch Riding & Hunt Club to Hilliard Bruce’s bucolic pairing of vineyards and horses and Sunnybrook Farm & Ranch’s specialty show barn and training facility, this is a beautiful portrayal of our local love affair with horses. In yet another stunning setting, our “Country Style” fashion feature takes place at the incredibly picturesque Alisal Guest Ranch & Resort (page 72) under the deft eye of contributing style editor Judy Foreman and the skillful photographic lens of Mehosh. Before he was a beloved Hollywood star, 20-year-old Fess Parker first visited Santa Barbara on a furlough from the Navy. He was determined to return and make it his home, and boy did he ever! Read about his adventures and his lasting legacy in Wendy Thies Sell’s story, “The Fess Parker Family Tree Sprouts Deep Roots in Santa Barbara County” (page 66). We also take a look at yesteryear with “Rearview Mirror: Glimpses Into Santa Barbara’s Stagecoach Past” (page 46) by Fred Nadis, and Christopher Buckley’s lovely nostalgic poem “Child Light” set in 1954 Santa Barbara (page 36), as well as toward the future in Rachel Hommel’s Sustainable Seasons story, “Plug In, Ride Green—Fueling The Rise of Electric Vehicles” (page 42). This was a season of “work perks” for me, as I helped judge cocktails at the 2017 “Official Drink of Santa Barbara“ contest (page 22) and visited The Oaks at Ojai (page 48), a magical health spa just a short drive away. We also have Nancy Ransohoff’s “A Sandy Slice of Heaven” in our Home & Garden section (page 38), Foodie Fun With Mesa Burger, Chuck’s of Hawaii, Somerset, How to Eat Paleo and Chef Robin Goldstein (page 22), Nancy A. Shobe’s Partnership for Excellence story (page 44) and more!


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SPRING CONTRIBUTORS

“Shooting for this article was a real dream for me because it encompassed so many of the things that are important in my life: horses, architecture and history,” says Amy Barnard, who shot “They Love Horses, Don’t They!” (page 52). “Every property has its own wonderful story, and the people who are responsible for those properties are passionate and heartfelt about what it means to them and to their communities.” Barnard is a Los Angeles-based photographer and started her career working in the film industry with notable people like Jessica Biel and Oscar winners Forest Whitaker and Eddie Redmayne. Since receiving her BFA from Brooks Institute, she has shot both commercially and editorially. Her work has been published in BBC Outlook, The Hollywood Reporter, Montecito Magazine, California Riding Magazine, Solvang Magazine and The Design Magazine.

Wendy Thies Sell | writer Journalist Wendy Thies Sell, who wrote “The Fess Parker Family Tree Sprouts Deep Roots in Santa Barbara County” (page 66), first met Fess Parker in 1999 at his winery in Los Olivos when he graciously gave her and her parents an hour-long private tour. Over the years, Parker would grant her several interviews during her days anchoring the local news at KSBY-TV. She knows that Parker would be proud of his children and grandchildren, whether they are following in his footsteps or blazing their own trails.

Judy Foreman | contributing editor, style Montecito based writer Judy Foreman has covered lifestyle trends and people in the Santa Barbara community since 1999. Foreman has written for Montecito Journal, Santa Barbara News-Press, noozhawk.com and Santa Barbara Magazine, among other publications. “I loved the opportunity to capture the essence of spring fashion with the backdrop of the historic Alisal Guest Ranch,” says Foreman about this issue’s “Country Style” feature (page 72). “The ranch was the ideal background to capture the perfect mix of spring fashion and of country life in Santa Ynez Valley.”

Christopher Buckley | poet Christopher Buckley, whose poem “Child Light” is on page 36, is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, two NEA grants, a Fulbright Award in Creative Writing and four Pushcart Prizes. He was awarded the James Dickey Prize for 2008 from FIVE POINTS Magazine, the William Stafford Prize in Poetry for 2012 from Rosebud and was the 2013 winner of the Campbell Corner Poetry Contest. His most recent book, Star Journal: Selected Poems (University of Pittsburgh Press) was published in 2016. His 20th book of poetry, Back Room at the Philosophers’ Club, won the 2015 Lascaux Prize in Poetry from Lascaux Review. He edited On the Poetry of Philip Levine: Stranger to Nothing, University of Michigan Press 1991, and Messenger to the Stars: a Luis Omar Salinas New Selected Poems & Reader for Tebot Bach’s Ash Tree Poetry Series.

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PHOTOS: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) AMY BARNARD, SHANNON LOAR-COTE, MATT VALENTINE, THIES FAMILY

Amy Barnard | photographer


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LOCAL LOWDOWN

N E W & N OTE WO R TH Y I N S A N TA B A R B A R A

LOCAL LOWDOWN A Taste of Santa Barbara

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C HEF ROBIN GOLDSTEIN , alumna of the Culinary Institute of America, combines her passion for travel and love of cooking in her newest cookbook, A Taste of Santa Barbara, Crafting A Meal. Anyone who has traveled is all too familiar with the difficulty of falling in love with the flavors and aromas of a foreign city and then leaving them behind. Featuring more than 60 recipes from Provence, Italy, Greece, the Middle East, Morocco and Spain, A Taste of Santa Barbara is a wonderful guide to recreate those dishes once you return home. “I found many of these same flavors and the wonderful connection people have to their food when I moved to Santa Barbara,” Goldstein says. Santa Barbara culture, like the Mediterranean, values eating local seasonal ingredients, a practice made easy as Santa Barbara County hosts farmers’ markets six days a week. Making the most of the local ingredients is the key to perfecting these appetizers, cocktails, entrees, sides and desserts. From her authentic Spanish Sangria to Green Shakshuka, Goldstein’s recipes celebrate both her life-changing time of living in Europe and her childhood years growing up in her family’s restaurant. A Taste of Santa Barbara allows you to experience the luxury of the Mediterranean without having to leave the central coast. —Danielle Moss

Alcazar Wins Official Drink of SB Bragging Rights 2 IT WAS A HEATED CONTEST, but Alcazar Tapas Bar’s Ginspiration Point came out the big winner in the 2017 “Official Drink of Santa Barbara” craft cocktail contest. An homage to Inspiration Point, one of the most famous—and famously beautiful —hiking trails in Santa Barbara’s foothills, this refreshing, citrus-forward cocktail

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PHOTOS (OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP): JOYA ROSE GROVES ILLUSTRATIONS, COURTESY HOW TO EAT PALEO; DANIELLE METHMANN, COURTESY VISIT SANTA BARBARA; COURTESY A TASTE OF SANTA BARBARA PHOTOS (THIS PAGE): COURTESY LARRY STONE, CHUCKS OF HAWAII (2)

features locally sourced ingredients—from the base spirit, Cutler’s Artisan Spirits Gin, to Nostrum’s Pineapple Turmeric Ginger Shrub—along with Bénédictine, Chartreuse, and fresh produce and herbs sourced from Santa Barbara farmers markets: lime, mint, rosemary flowers and egg white. “We feel incredibly fortunate to be carrying the torch for Santa Barbara’s cocktail community among some truly gifted barkeeps,” says Alvaro Rojas, owner of Alcazar Tapas Bar, who was joined by bartender Kyle Pete at the competition. “This cocktail is really an homage to the local makers and growers that have made Santa Barbara not only a beautiful place to live but also a world-class pantry of ingredients.” The cocktail will be on the menus at both Alcazar (1812 Cliff Dr.) and its sister restaurant, milk & honey (30 W. Anapamu St.), for the remainder of the year. Visit Santa Barbara challenged local restaurants, bars and lounges to develop a new, unique signature mixed drink to celebrate the distinctive attributes of The American Riviera. The other four finalists were “La Reina” by The Boathouse; “Montecito” by Loquita;

“True North, The Quintessential Santa Barbara Cocktail” by Olio e Limone; and “The Passion of the Pacific” by Rodney’s Grill at Fess Parker: A Doubletree by Hilton Resort. I was honored to be part of the judging panel, and they were all quite delicious.  —Leslie Dinaberg

How to Eat Paleo

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(When You Don’t Live in a Cave)

A NUTRIENT-RIC H lifestyle like Paleo (i.e., if a caveman couldn’t eat it, neither can you) deserves an information-rich guide to educate and entertain curious readers. If this guide could talk, it would have the encouraging voice of a best friend who has all of the answers to the questions you didn’t know you had. What does a guide like that look like? It looks like Cynthia Spivey’s book How to Eat Paleo (When You Don’t Live in a Cave). Spivey, a Santa Barbara local, channels years of writing and nutrition expertise to compose a 149-page guide to all things Paleo. The book is divided into several segments that combine science with wit to demystify the lifestyle and any

misconceptions surrounding it. Spivey includes a recipe section that reinvents classic dishes like nachos, flan and ABC soup (this time it stands for apple, butternut squash and carrots!) with Paleo twists. Knowledgehungry readers can also refer to the book’s list of outside resources to further guide insatiable appetites and minds. Carpinteria-based illustrator Joya Rose Groves makes her book debut in How to Eat Paleo. Her playful and thoughtful designs are as much of a page-turner as the written content itself and helps maintain the lighthearted tone that spans from cover to cover. It will be hard to put this book down—unless, of course, you’re reaching for a fork to dig in to a few Paleo treats! —Victoria Tai Murphy 

HAPPY 50TH TO CHUCK’S OF HAWAII BY LESLIE DINABERG

SURPRISINGLY LITTLE HAS C HANGED since owner Larry Stone opened Chuck’s of Hawaii in 1967. The staff still wears Hawaiian shirts, the menus are still painted on Lancers wine bottles (Stone did the originals himself), the steaks and seafood are still solidly good, the Tiki Torches still burn brightly on upper State Street and the Mai-Tais are still the best in town. As an avid young surfer, Stone worked for the original Chuck’s founder Chuck Rolles in Hawaii, who was looking to expand his operation. Stone had friends at UCSB and liked the town—plus he knew he’d be able to surf here. As for the location, the Sumida family had a new building available, and Stone thought it might work as a restaurant. “I didn’t have a lot of options, but … they let me have that space and I knew it would be close to Hope Ranch and to people who could dine out daily instead of just weekends.” This was before La Cumbre Plaza was even completed, but “the shopping center it was a big hit” and so was Chuck’s. “Opening day we served about 100 meals,” recalls Stone. “We’ve always had such a great local following.” The formula is simple: high quality food in a casual setting. And then there’s the salad bar. Stone laughs when asked about it,

“I’m not saying it was the first salad bar (although others make that claim) but we get credit for being the first company that popularized the salad bar on the mainland.” Stone also gives much credit for the success of Chuck’s to his longtime employees like manager Brad Schuette, who started at age 15, and Steve Hyslop, who started as a dishwasher and now co-owns and runs Chuck’s Waterfront Grill in the harbor. Stone laughs when asked if he ever imagined that Chuck’s would still be going strong 50 years later. “I wasn’t even thinking about what I’d be doing in five or ten years at that point, but I didn’t think I’d be running around in short pants and Hawaiian shirts as an old man.” 

Chuck’s of Hawaii is located at 3888 State St., 805/687-4417, chucksofhawaii.com.

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WHERE THE WILD BREWS ARE THE SUN RISES ON SOMERSET BY LESLIE DINABERG

AN ELEGANT ADDITION to the downtown Santa Barbara restaurant scene, Somerset is an old world European style grand café created by Steve Hermann Hotels and Restaurants of Palm Springs’ acclaimed L’Horizon Resort and Spa fame. The impressive décor features deep chesterfield sofas, polished zinc tabletops, and 50’s modern vintage chairs and lighting, a swanky combination of mid century and art deco influences. And then there’s the gorgeous courtyard patio with a canopy of 100-year-old olive trees planted in rubble stone planters designed to create the mood of an old courtyard in Tuscany. Chef Lauren Herman (formerly of the James Beard Award-winning A.O.C. and Lucques in Los Angeles) has created a menu that takes advantage of the bounty of the Santa Barbara coast by sourcing all produce within a 100-mile radius and utilizing daily deliveries by local fish mongers and livestock humanely raised on ranches in the hills above America’s Rivera. A visit to Somerset promises an evening of sureto-be-memorable farm-driven California cuisine with light French and Italian influences. At press time it was dinner only, but plans to add lunch and brunch to the menu are in the works. 

Somerset, 7 E. Anapamu St., 805/8457112, somersetsb.com

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BY JA MES BADHA M

a German friend of mine who knows his beer and grew up tasting the best of Europe say unequivocally that, today, the best beer in the world is made right here in the U.S.A. The reason is simple: European brewers are hamstrung by “purity laws” that are designed to honor the past and protect tradition, but also end up putting the brakes on innovation. Meanwhile, unrestrained in their investigation, experimentation and innovation, brewers from Main Street to Manhattan Beach and Seattle to St. Petersburg have generated what is nothing short of a liquid Big Bang, resulting in a rapidly expanding universe of endlessly varied, wildly idiosyncratic, incredibly interesting and gosh-darn good beers. The brewmasters on this new frontier will try almost anything to move forward, and sometimes that leads them back to the Old World, where it all began. Take the guys making beer at Firestone

REC ENTLY, I HEARD

Walker Brewery. They turn out an array of excellent, well-received, widely distributed craft beers from the original brewery in San Luis Obispo. Then quality-control manager Jim Crooks began experimenting with Lambicstyle “sour” ales, which originated about six hundred years ago near Brussels, Belgium. The beers were made with wild yeast and aged in retired wine and spirits barrels crammed into corners of the brewery. They were produced in very small batches and shared sparingly, but word inevitably got out and, when it did, craft beer bars all over the West Coast began trying to secure some. The nearly accidental soon became the inexorable. “Sour” Jim needed space for his burgeoning hobby. It came in the form of Firestone Walker Barrelworks in Buellton, which opened in 2013, with Crooks as brewmaster and Jeffers Richardson, the original brewmaster at Firestone Walker, as director. The Taproom offers excellent pub faire and a dozen or so Firestone craft beers on tap. But for a touch of the exotic, step into the adjacent room and pull up a stool at the small bar for a beer tasting you won’t soon forget. The format is simple and unchanging: three-ounce tastes of some of the most diverse, interesting and intriguing small-batch beers you’ll ever taste. About ten of the rotating beers on tap are wild ales in the Lambic style. The rest of the menu is “strong ales.” Everything poured there is only available there. The “wild ales” are fermented slowly

PHOTOS (L-R): COURTESY SOMERSET, FIRESTONE WALKER, MESA BURGER

SY V NEWS


using wild yeast strains, then aged for up to 48 months in oak wine barrels. Some have a wine-like essence with almost no effervescence. Others are Champagne-like, pink and flavored with raspberries. Among the “strong ales,” don’t miss “Velvet Merkin,” with its robust flavors of coffee and chocolate. As they say at the brewery, the beer with the scandalous name will make you “wig out.” 

Firestone Walker Barrelworks is located at 620 McMurray Rd. Buellton, firestonebeer.com/visit/ buellton.php.

Mesa Burger IRON C HEF AND SANTA BARBAR A LOC AL

Cat Cora is certainly on a roll! Her new burger joint, Mesa Burger, is constantly packed with fans awaiting the award-winning chef’s crave-worthy burger creations. So far, my favorites are the Montecito (made with griddled goat cheese/bourbon glazed mushrooms/house onion ring/truffle aioli/arugula/grilled onions) and the Goodland (with double cheddar/sliced & grilled 805 beer brat/crispy onion strings/applewood smoked bacon/smoked bbq sauce), but we’re slowly working our way through the entire menu. In addition to turkey patties, great sides and delicious salads, the gluten free buns and veggie (vegan/gluten free) patties are also reportedly quite tasty, as are the local beers and wines on tap. All in all, Mesa Burger (315 Meigs Rd., 805/963-7492, mesaburger.com) is a welcome addition to the Mesa neighborhood. —Leslie Dinaberg

One-of-a-kind candlesticks constructed with Vintage Salt and Pepper shakers. 18" and 24"

A RT F U L T H I N G S , I n c

1 4 7 0 E A S T VA L L E Y R OA D, M O N T E C I TO, C A ( 8 0 5 ) 6 9 5 - 0 2 2 0 W I N T E R 2 014/15

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NANC Y M ARTZ’S Apples to Zucchini Cooking School is a culinary course where children of all ages can learn the basis for great cooking. Martz’s son inspired her to create the nonprofit Apples to Zucchini. He participated in a UN Food Day, where he and his classmates were challenged to eat on $1.50 a day. The task got Martz thinking about how others remain frugal while shopping efficiently and boldly underscored the value of fresh ingredients and a well-versed cooking ability. With these values in mind, Martz set up courses at elementary schools in Santa Barbara

BY L AUREN BENNETT

County including Adams, Brandon and Elwood elementary. The classes take place over eight or nine sessions after school. The students receive instruction from talented local chefs including Michele Molony, Michelle Aronson, Diana Cuttrell and Alec Gould. Students learn advanced cooking techniques and how to prepare delectable, nourishing meals like sushi rolls, kale salad with strawberries and grilled cheese sandwiches with fresh fig jam while in a safe environment. Apples to Zucchini Cooking School has quickly become an important local resource for the youth of Santa Barbara. 

COLLABORATIVE EFFORT HELPS CRAFT SANTA BARBARA A CREATIVE CENTER BY BRETT LEIGH DIC KS

Santa Barbara’s collaborative creative spirit quite like the annual Summer Solstice Parade where artisans of all ilks come together for a vibrant and imaginative celebration. It seems fitting that the workshop space that has been the recent home of parade preparations should now become a year-round creative hub. In April 2014, the City of Santa Barbara leased the old city motor pool property at 631 Garden St. to Santa Barbara Arts Collaborative to create Santa Barbara Community Arts Workshop (SBCAW). The facility will feature two large buildings and four separate spaces for performances, rehearsals, painting, sculpture and exhibitions while also providing a permanent home for Santa Barbara Solstice Parade.

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FOR MORE INFO ,

visit atozcookingschool.org or call 805/452-3497

The concept’s history stretches back to the 1980s when the City and County of Santa Barbara jointly devised a Regional Arts Master Plan. The report identified the need for a communal creative space where people could gather to make and see great work and spread inspiration. “The master plan that was done in the 1980s recommended a space that would be affordable for local arts organizations, which the report actually called a community arts workshop,” explains Casey Caldwell, SBCAW’s site manager. “Even back then, Santa Barbara was becoming increasingly difficult for artists. The light industrial spaces that artists could use as studios were being lost, so the report called for a community space that artists could use.” Thirty years later, that Community Arts Workshop is a reality thanks to the enduring vision of local artists and arts supporters. The Santa Barbara Arts Collaborative’s five-year lease of the property came with a $300,000 grant from the City of Santa Barbara and an understanding that a long-term lease would be forthcoming after the arts facility is established. With further funding coming through private donations, renovation

of the site is well underway. “A whole lot of work has already been done on the smaller south building on the site, and that space is largely done,” Caldwell says. The site has not been creatively idle in the midst of its transformation. Ironwork artist David Shelton has designed gates that pay homage to winter and summer solstice while groups like Youth Interactive, Pianos on State and Santa Barbara Revels have already used the space. “Now we need more funds to finish renovating the rest of the site,” Caldwell says. “That includes installing bathrooms and gates on the site and some basic electrical work on the north building. That will accomplish everything the city has asked us to do, and then we’ll be able to go back to the city and ask for a longer lease—that’s an important goal for us.” 

or to make a tax-deductible donation to Santa Barbara Community Arts Workshop, visit sbcaw.org. For more ways to donate, including naming opportunities, contact Marianne Clark at donate@sbcaw.org or 805/455-4521. FOR MORE INFORMATION

PHOTO: COURTESY APPLES TO ZUCCHINI COOKING SCHOOL

Apples to Zucchini


Santa Barbara Hackerspace helps tool locals for success BY BRETT LEIGH DIC KS

has it been said that we’re only limited by our own imaginations? For the past six and half years, a local nonprofit organization has given locals the tools they need to bring their own dreams to life. Founded in August 2010, Santa Barbara Hackerspace is a member-based incubator for ideas. Having started out as a workshop in founder’s Mike Bale’s one-car garage, the organization now occupies a 4,000-squarefoot industrial space in Goleta that is not only filled with the equipment and tools needed to bring even the wildest ideas to life, but also a home for several technicallyminded start-up small businesses. “The idea behind Hackerspace is to give people the resources they need for their own ideas,” Bale explains. “The driving force is to make sure people have what they’re looking for. That might be a tool or it might be other people to bounce ideas off of. We also do classes from time to time.” Santa Barbara Hackerspace supports a wide variety of pursuits—everything from arts and crafts endeavors like sewing, jewelry making and woodworking to more technical undertakings like electronics, such as the design and production of weather balloon trackers as well as a couple of game-related software projects. In Santa Barbara Hackerspace’s toolbox are scanners and printers, computers loaded up with development software, a forge and anvil, just about every power tool known to man and even a Scanning Electron Microscope. “That’s probably the most impressive piece of equipment we have,” Bale says. “It’s the size of three refrigerators lined up side by side and allows you to see down to the angstrom level. It’s a nice showpiece for what we’re all about.” 

HOW M AN Y TIMES

Santa Barbara Hackerspace, 5782 Thornwood Dr., Goleta, 805/242-2533, sbhackerspace.com.

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Spring Datebook Seasonal events, happenings and things to do for March, April and May

Compagnie Herve KOUBI, presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, The Granada Theatre, April 18 28

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Find updated information and additional events at sbseasons.com/datebook.

Ongoing Through Mar. 25

PHOTOS (L-R): DIDIER PHILISPART, COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES; NATHAN CHAPMAN, COURTESY THE GRANADA THEATRE

Bowers/ERRE – So Close and So Far Westmont-Ridley Tree Museum of Art features an exhibition of work by Los Angeles-based artist Andrea Bowers. Bowers communicates her visions for social justice and political issues through her art and activism. The exhibition includes highlights from Bowers’s oeuvre that powerfully address immigration issues in the U.S. | Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum

of Art. | Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

March 2 Family 1st Thursday at Santa Barbara Museum of Art Sculpt the head of the ancient Greco-Roman goddess of the hunt and moon, Diana, or Venus, the goddess of love and beauty, in airdry terracotta clay. | 5:30–7:30 p.m.,

of Art, 955 La Paz Rd., 805/565-6162, westmontmuseum.org.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

Through April 30

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Radical Bodies: Anna Halprin, Simone Forti & Yvonne Rainer In CA and NY, 1955–1972 As well as photographs, videos and original scores and drawings by Halprin, Forti and Rainer, “Radical Bodies” includes work inspired by them by such artists as Imogen Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg, George Brecht, Robert Morris, Jennifer Bornstein and Janine Antoni. | AD&A Museum, UCSB, Goleta, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

Through April 30 Lifeforms: The Makeup Art of Michael Westmore Through sketches, masks and prosthetics, LIFEFORMS explores this legendary makeup artist’s process of creating singular film and television characters and creatures. | AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

Through May 14 David Wiesner & the Art of Wordless Storytelling David Wiesner (b. 1955) is one of the most highly acclaimed picture book artists in the world. The winner of the prestigious Caldecott Medal—for Tuesday in 1992, The Three Pigs in 2002 and Flotsam in 2007—and only the second person in the history of the award to have received it three times, Wiesner’s special exhibition is on view at Santa Barbara Museum

Pop-Up Opera Performing within the galleries of Santa Barbara Museum of Art, members of Opera Santa Barbara’s Mosher Studio Artist program return to present a crowd-pleasing pop-up performance of Leoš Janᡠcek’s songcycle “Diary of One Who Disappeared.” | 5:30–7 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

2 Gloria Steinem Social activist, writer, editor and lecturer Gloria Steinem has been an outspoken champion of women’s rights since the 1960s. Steinem is a key figure in the feminist movement, which has changed the lives of women around the world. She helped create New York and Ms. magazines, helped form the National Women’s Political Caucus and has written numerous books, including her latest, My Life on the Road. | 7:30 p.m., Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures. sa.ucsb.edu.

3 Westmont President’s Breakfast: General Stan McChrystal A bestselling author, a popular college teacher and one of the most revered military officers of his generation, General Stan McChrystal speaks at the 12th annual Westmont

Liner Notes: Songwriters, Stories and Music with Rita Wilson and Billy Steinberg, Richard Marx & MoZella at The Granada Theatre, March 11.

President’s Breakfast. | 7 a.m., The Fess Parker: A Doubletree by Hilton Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/5644333, westmont.edu/presbreakfast/.

3 Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca Hailed by critics for their transcendent and deeply emotional performances, Noche Flamenca embodies the essence, complexity and mystery of flamenco. | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

3–4 World of Pinot Noir The 17th annual celebration of this renowned grape includes two packed days of tastings, seminars, dinners, food pairings and the camaraderie that pinot noir brings to the table. | Bacara Resort & Spa, 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta, 855/968-0100, worldofpinotnoir.com.

4 CALM Celebrity Authors Luncheon More than 600 book lovers gather for a day of appearances and book signings by a variety of authors—including headliners Fannie Flagg, Dianne Dixon, Craig Johnson and Kate McDermott—with all proceeds benefiting the good work of CALM (Child Abuse Listening and Mediation). Headline authors are interviewed at the event, with book signings and the opportunity to meet a dozen local authors as well. | The Fess Parker: A DoubleTree by Hilton Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd. 10 a.m., 805/969-5590, calm4kids.org.

4 An Evening With Jim Messina Rock legend Jim Messina performs in a special benefit concert for William Sansum Diabetes Center. Messina— who was in three of the most iconic Americana folk rock bands of all time, Loggins & Messina, Poco and Buffalo k

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Springfield—plays along with special guest John McFee (The Doobie Brothers) and Jackson Gilles. | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

4 Pacific Pride Foundation’s Royal Ball The 2017 royal ball promises an evening of chic metallic glamour, beauty, high-energy decadence and alluring guests, benefiting Santa Barbara’s vitally important Pacific Pride Foundation, celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. | Coral Casino Beach and Cabana Club, 1260 Channel Dr., ppfroyalball.org.

4, 21 On Exhibit Now

Anna Althea Hills Winter Sunshine in Laguna Canyon, 8” x 10,” framed oil on board Overview: Anna Althea Hills was born in Ohio, raised in Michigan, and attended Olivet College. She studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and Cooper Union in New York City, where she studied under Arthur Dow. She later furthered her studies at the Académie Julian in Paris. She travelled throughout Europe for four years prior to settling in Laguna Beach, CA in 1912. After arriving in California her palette became much lighter and brighter, reflecting the sun-filled landscape of her surroundings. She was an early member of the Laguna Beach Art Association, and served as president for six years, while raising funds for the creation of the Laguna Beach Art Museum. She won medals at the San Diego PanamaCalifornia Exposition, 1915; California State Fair, 1919; and the Laguna Beach Art Association, 1922, and 1923. Hills was a member of California Art Club, Washington Watercolor Club and Laguna Beach Art Association. Gallery: Stewart Fine Art 215 W. Mission St., Santa Barbara 805/845-0255, dianestewartfineart.com SBADA MEMBER

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Chef’s Cycle & No Kid Hungry Two delicious pop-up events from Finch & Fork chefs— a Ramen Pop-Up at M. Special on Mar. 4 and a 7-course pop-up dinner at Sama Sama on Mar. 21—help raise money for Chef’s Cycle and No Kid Hungry charities. Riders Chef James Siao and Chef Peter Cham will ride May 16-18 with a goal of 250+ chefs riding to raise $2 million. | M. Special Brewing Company, 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C, Goleta & Sama Sama Kitchen, 1208 State St., Chefscycle. org, nokidhungry.org.

5 Beauty and the Bizarre: Hummingbirds, Bees, Bats and Zombie Parasites National Geographic Live presents photographer Anand Varma and scientist Rodrigo Medellín. | 3 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

7 Mandelring Quartet Mandelring Quartet performs at Santa Barbara Museum of Art in the Mary Craig Auditorium. | 7:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

7 Aaron Diehl With Cécile McLorin Salvant Timeless classics become modern masterpieces when two of today’s hottest young jazz musicians—pianist Aaron Diehl and vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant—revitalize works

from piano greats George Gershwin and Jelly Roll Morton. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

8 Man & Woman of the Year Awards Luncheon Santa Barbara Foundation recognizes outstanding citizens at the 74th Man & Woman of the Year Awards Luncheon. | 11:30 a.m., Coral Casino Beach and Cabana Club, 1260 Channel Dr., SBFoundation.org/MW74.

8 Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra CAMA presents Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra performing J.S. Bach: The Circle of Creation—a celebration of Bach’s genius and the latest multimedia creation by Alison Mackay, the creator of phenomenally successful Tafelmusik productions seen around the world including The Galileo Project and House of Dreams. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

8 Dorrance Dance A Bessie Award-winning troupe known for “blasting open our notions of tap” (The New Yorker), Dorrance Dance pushes tap dance’s tradition—rhythmically, aesthetically and conceptually. | 8 p.m., The Granada, 1214 State St., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

9 David Wiesner: Artist-Led Tour and Book Signing Join artist David Wiesner in the galleries of Santa Barbara Museum of Art to tour his work in the exhibition David Wiesner & The Art of Wordless Storytelling, followed by a book signing of his latest release, Fish Girl. | 5:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

9 Workshop: Figure Drawing with Colin Gray Artist-instructor Colin Gray shares figure drawing techniques and instruction on observational skills. | 5:30 p.m., AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951, events.ucsb.edu/event/workshopfigure-drawing-with-colin-gray/.


9 Igor Levit UCSB Arts & Lectures presents an evening performance by pianist Igor Levit. | 7 p.m., Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

11 Wild Brew Fest 2.0 As part of the 2017 Santa Barbara Fermentation Festival, Soho Restaurant & Music Club hosts Wild Brew Fest 2.0. | 2–5 p.m., SoHO, 1221 State St., 805/962-7776, sbfermentationfestival.com/wild-brew-fest.

11 Liner Notes: Songwriters, Stories and Music with Rita Wilson and Billy Steinberg, Richard Marx & MoZella Rita Wilson—talented actress (It’s Complicated, The Good Wife, Sleepless in Seattle), film producer (My Big Fat Greek Wedding, Mamma Mia!), and Broadway star (Chicago)—shows off her musical talent as she hits the stage at The Granada Theatre. Special guests Billy Steinberg, Richard Marx and MoZella join Wilson for an evening in which they perform and share the stories behind their music. | 8 p.m., The Granada, 1214 State St., 805/8992222, granadasb.org..

12 Studio Sunday on the Front Steps Visitors of all ages are welcome to participate in this hands-on workshop with Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s Teaching Artists on the museum’s front steps. | 1:30–4:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

12 Hansel & Gretel Beyond the snowy depths of the black forest, a family is frozen by the mystery of their missing mother in this all-ages rock musical. | 3 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

15 Alton Brown Live UCSB’s Arts & Lectures presents an interactive evening of culinary

performance art with Alton Brown at Arlington Theatre. | 8 p.m., Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

15–19 25th Annual Taste of Solvang Taste of Solvang, which has become a destination event for food and wine lovers alike, is a unique experiential culinary festival featuring Solvang farmers, chefs, bakers, winemakers, brewers, distillers and artisans showcasing the bounty of Santa Barbara wine country set amid the quaint Danish town. Festival attendees taste their way through dozens of restaurants, cafes, bakeries, and wine and beer tasting rooms while exploring authentic architecture, thatched roof cottages, old-world craftsmanship, traditional windmills and rich Danish heritage. | Various venues in Solvang, 805/688-6144, solvangusa.com/ wine-country.

17 Schumann & Dvoˇrák Camerata Pacifica presents a concert at Music Academy of the West’s Hahn Hall that includes Schumann’s Fantasy Pieces for Clarinet & Piano, Op. 73; Ewazen’s Ballade, Pastorale, and Dance for Flute, Horn & Piano; and Dvoˇrák’s Sextet for Piano & Winds in A Major, Op. 81 (arr. Jolley). Featured artists include Adrian Spence, flute; Robert Atherholt, oboe; Jose Franch-Ballester, clarinet; Peter Kolkay, bassoon; Martin Owen, horn; and Warren Jones, piano. | 7:30 p.m., Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/893-3535, cameratapacifica.org.

17–19 72nd Annual Santa Barbara International Orchid Show This year’s theme, “Orchid Mystique,” pays homage to a family of flowering plants that boasts 25,000 species, among which beauty is ubiquitous and uniqueness is commonplace. | Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real, 805/687-0766, SBOrchidShow. com.

18 State Street Ballet Young Dancers Choreography Showcase In its annual choreography k showcase, A Celebration of Dance,

On Exhibit Now

Hank Pitcher The Mindbender and the Dovecote, 2016, 108” x 54,” oil on canvas over board Overview: Hank Pitcher attended the College of Creative Studies at UCSB. He subsequently studied with East Coast painter, Paul Georges, and later worked alongside Paul Wonner on the West Coast. Pitcher has been a professor at UCSB in the College of Creative Studies for more than 45 years and is also an original member of the Oak Group. His exhibition history stretches back over 40 years. Gallery: Sullivan Goss–An American Gallery 11 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara 805/730-1460, sullivangoss.com SBADA MEMBER

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the apprentice company to State Street Ballet performs new works by Kassandra Taylor Newberry, William Soleau and Autumn Eckman. | 7 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

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On Exhibit Now

John Wesley Cotton Georgian Bay, Canada, 1925, 30” x 34,” oil on canvas Overview: Born in Ontario, Canada, John Cotton received his early training in Toronto with the Ontario Society of Artists. He attended the Art Institute of Chicago, and studied in London in 1911. He etched and painted throughout Europe, and later taught at American University Beaune in France. He also exhibited throughout Canada, Europe and the United States. After winning a gold medal at the Panama Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco in 1915, he moved to California, eventually settling in Glendale. Cotton was a member of the California Art Club, California Watercolor Society (president), Painters and Sculptors Club of LA and the Chicago Society of Etchers. His works are held in the National Gallery in Canada, Art Museum of Toronto, New York Public Library, Art Institute of Chicago, Congressional Library in Washington, LACMA and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Gallery: James Main Fine Art 27 E. De la Guerra St., Santa Barbara 805/962-8347, jamesmainfineart.com SBADA MEMBER

A Woodwind Affair In a sumptuous feast for discerning woodwind aficionados, Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra presents a program that combines three modernist delicacies—Poulenc’s charming dance-based Suite Francaise (d’après Claude Gervaise), Stravinsky’s Russian-folk-infused Symphonies of Wind Instruments (dedicated to the memory of Claude Debussy) and Kurt Weill’s famed “Kleine Dreigroschenmusik” Suite from The Threepenny Opera—with an agreeably congruous work by contemporary composer Jeff Scott. | 7:30 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

23–27 Santa Barbara Jewish Film Festival This highly acclaimed festival once again brings the community together to experience the power of exceptional films from around the world on themes of Jewish culture and identity. | The New Vic Theatre, 33 W. Victoria St., 805/957-1115, sbjewishfilmfestival.org.

24 Jack Jones Jack Jones is one of the greatest singers of all time; a true “singers’ singer” and a luminary in the music industry. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

25 Sings Like Hell: The Mastersons + Mike Stinson The Austin, TX-based husband and wife duo’s lilting song craft and charismatic chemistry have already won over listeners around the world, thanks to the couples’ ongoing status as members of Steve Earle’s band The Dukes, their frequent opening sets for Earle and their critically lauded album, Birds Fly South. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

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31 Transition House Auxiliary’s 20th annual Mad Hatter Luncheon All proceeds benefit Transition House’s work to combat homelessness and poverty by offering emergency shelter, housing and antipoverty services for homeless families with children. | 11 a.m., The Fess Parker: A Doubletree by Hilton Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/564-4333, transitionhouse.com.

April 1 An Evening with Kathy Griffin Two-time Emmy and Grammy award-winner, New York Times bestselling author and Broadway darling Kathy Griffin brings her critically acclaimed “Celebrity Run-In” Tour to Santa Barbara for a night of take-no-prisoners laughs. | 8 p.m., The Granada, 1214 State St., 805/8992222, granadasb.org.

2 Hershey Felder: The Great American Songbook Santa Ynez Valley Jewish Community presents a performance by pianist Hershey Felder, known for his musical character creations from Gershwin to Bernstein, Chopin to Beethoven and Irving Berlin. | 5:30 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

5 Graham Nash Legendary singer-songwriter Graham Nash appears in concert at Lobero Theatre. A Grammy winner and two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, Nash was also inducted into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, both as a solo artist and with the band Crosby, Stills and Nash. | 7:30 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

6 Family 1st Thursday at Santa Barbara Museum of Art During this special hands-on event, teaching artists assist families in


creating exhibition-based art projects. | 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

6 ADC Lecture Series: Mark Rios, FAIA, FASLA As part of its Architecture and Design Collection Lecture Series, UCSB’s Art, Design & Architecture Museum presents a lecture by Mark Rios. A fellow of both the American Institute of Architects and American Society of Landscape Architects, Rios has long seen those two disciplines as inseparable. He founded Rios Associates (now Rios Clementi Hale Studios) in 1985 with a singular vision: to imagine, design and build complete environments. Under his leadership, the firm quickly developed an international reputation for its groundbreaking multidisciplinary approach to all its commissions. His work is on display in projects such as Grand Park, The California Endowment, Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills and Mark Taper Forum, all in Los Angeles. | 5:30 p.m., AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

6 Mezzo-Soprano Susan Graham As part of CAMA’s Masterseries, Grammy Award-winning Susan Graham appears at Lobero Theatre in an exceptionally fascinating program of songs in seven languages. As one of today’s foremost interpreters of French vocal music, the Texas native was awarded the French government’s “Chavalier de la Legion d’Honneur.” | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

7 Provocative, Silent & Beethoven This concert set, presented by Camerata Pacifica, includes Harbison’s Abu Ghraib; Daugherty’s Sing Sing: J Edgar Hoover and Paul Robeson Told Me; John Cage’s 4’33”; and Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 8 in E Minor, OP. 59, No. 2, “Razumovsky.” | 7:30 p.m., Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/8933535, cameratapacifica.org.

9 Santa Barbara Kite Festival Set on the stunning breezy cliffs of the Santa Barbara City College campus, the 32nd annual fun-filled family-style kite flying festival includes a roster of contests such as “Children’s Tail Chase,” “Most Beautiful” (handmade & commercial), “Highest Flying,” “Largest & Smallest Kites,” “Kite Fighting” and “Sport Flying.” | 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Santa Barbara City College, 721 Cliff Dr., 805/965-0581, sbkitefest.net.

9 Studio Sunday at Santa Barbara Museum of Art Visitors of all ages are welcome to participate in this hands-on workshop with SBMA Teaching Artists on the museum’s front steps. Participants create multiple katagami stencil-inspired water patterns and leaves to print in paint on cotton. | 1:30-4:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St., 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

9 Na Lei Hulu I Ka Wekiu with Masters of Hawaiian Music Escape to paradise in an evening of dance and music celebrating the rich cultural traditions of Hawai’i. | 7 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/8933535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

12 Terry Tempest Williams An acclaimed author, naturalist and fierce advocate for freedom of speech, Terry Tempest Williams has been called a “citizen writer” who speaks eloquently on behalf of an ethical stance toward life, environmental issues and matters of justice. She discusses her new book, The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, published in honor of the National Park Service’s centennial. | 7:30 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

18 Compagnie Herve KOUBI: What the Day Owes to the Night Recognized as one of Europe’s most distinctive choreographers, Hervé Koubi makes his Southern California debut with What the Day Owes to the Night, a highly physical, stunningly k

On Exhibit Now

Andre Kohn BFF, 20” x 13,” oil on panel Overview: Raised by an artistically gifted family near the Caspian Sea in Southern Russia, Andre Kohn’s childhood was marked by the natural splendor of mountains and sea, and by an unfettered access to all the creative arts. Kohn is a preeminent leader of Figurative Impressionism, which seeks to capture the complexity, as well as the simplicity and directness, of the human form. Gallery: Waterhouse Gallery 1114 State St., Ste. 9, Santa Barbara 805/962-8885, waterhousegallery.com 

SBADA MEMBER

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fluid work that invokes the complex interwoven threads of his French-Algerian ancestral history. Combining capoeira, urban and contemporary dance with powerful imagery evocative of Orientalist paintings and the stone filigree of Islamic architecture, 12 French-Algerian and African male dancers appear in striking contrasts of light and dark, skin and textile, and whirling yet chiseled movement to reveal a powerful interpretation of an internal quest. | 8 p.m., The Granada, 1214 State St., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

19 DISRUPTION: Una Noche en El Taller / A Night in The Studio MCA’s annual spring benefit and art auction features interactive art experiences, a boutique auction of unique museum-quality artworks and a cocktail reception. | 6 p.m., Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara, 653 Paseo Nuevo, 805/966-5373, mcasantabarbara.org.

19 11 East Anapamu St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101

www.sullivangoss.com

STEWART

3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

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FINE ART

Established 1986 Diane Warren Stewart Open from 11 to 5:30, closed Thursday and Sunday, available by appointment.

215 W. MISSION STREE T CHARLES ARTHUR FRIES (185 4-19 4 0) “FORENOON ON THE BE ACH, LOWER CALIFRONIA” FR AMED OIL ON CANVAS 8” HIGH X 12” WIDE

An Evening With Isabel Allende Among today’s most respected authors, Isabel Allende is an unapologetic romantic whose enduring passion blends with her unique wisdom gained from the experiences that have shaped her life. In a rare public appearance, “the queen of magical realism” (Los Angeles Times) weaves together her family history, literary trailblazing and the sorrows and heart-stirring beauty of the human condition. | 7:30 p.m., The Granada, 1214 State St., 805/893-

SANTA BARBAR A, CA 9 3101 805-8 45-0255 PARKING IN BACK

18th Annual HOPE Awards Educators, elected officials and community members gather to honor the champions of public education in our community at Santa Barbara Education Foundation’s HOPE Awards. This year, SBEF presents Ed Heron with the 2017 HOPE Award on the occasion of his retirement following eight years of service on the Santa Barbara Unified School District Board of Education. Funds raised at the event help provide scholarships for students enrolled in SBEF’s Get Ahead summer school program, which offers for-credit courses for high school students. Last year, the event helped generate tuition for nearly 100 students in need. | 5:30 p.m., Santa Barbara Historical Museum, 136 E. De La Guerra St., sbefoundation.org/ hope-awards-2017.

20–30 High Fidelity—a Rock Musical Out of the Box Theatre Company presents High Fidelity—a Rock Musical, the story of Rob Gordon, a 30-something indie record store owner who knows everything there is to know about music but nothing about how to have a mature functional relationship. | Center Stage Theater, 651 Paseo Nuevo, 805/9630408, centerstagetheater.org.

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22 Sings Like Hell: An Evening with Eric Andersen, Dan Navarro, Steve Postell and Danny Kortchmar Eric Andersen showcases his songwriting versatility and decades-long staying power in this very special performance. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

22 Michael Westmore Makeup artist Michael Westmore (BA Art History, 1961) gives a talk at UCSB’s Art, Design & Architecture Museum. Westmore has transformed actors such as Sylvester Stallone, Robert De Niro, Patrick Stewart and Tom Hardy for their movie roles including Raging Bull, Rocky and Mask, for which he won an Oscar in 1985. | Noon–2 p.m., AD&A Museum, UCSB, 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

22–23 Earth Day Festival Spend a weekend in Alameda Park celebrating our amazing planet and humanity’s advancements in environmental stewardship during Community Environmental Council’s Earth Day Festival. | Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St., 805/9630583, sbearthday.org.

“Along the Coast” 30 x 60 Oil on Canvas by Ralph Waterhouse

Waterhouse Gallery

La Arcada, 1114 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805-962-8885

www.waterhousegallery.com Open Daily 11am to 5pm

32 YEARS OF FINE ART IN SANTA BARBARA

23 Che Malambo Celebrate the thrilling South American cowboy traditions of the gaucho with Argentina’s Che Malambo, a powerhouse company of 14 performers. | Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

25 Julian Lage, Chris Eldridge and Aoife O’Donovan: Release the Hounds Representing a new generation of Americana music, Julian Lage, Chris Eldridge and Aoife O’Donovan join forces for a night of unflinching songwriting and acoustic innovation. | 8 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

26 Roomful of Teeth Grammy Award-winning vocal project Roomful of Teeth is dedicated to mining the expressive potential of the human voice. | Music Academy of the West Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

28 An Evening With Crystal Bowersox American Idol finalist Crystal Bowersox performs at Lobero Theatre. Her old-soul voice, carefree style and don’t-mess-with-me attitude set her apart from the other contestants and eventually landed the self-taught songstress a career performing with the k SPRING 2017

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SPRING DATEBOOK

CHILD LIGHT SANTA BARBARA, 1954 BY CHRISTOPHER BUCKLEY

It was, of course, another life—the war just over, many of us barely out of bassinets. The sky peeled away layer by layer, the grey air pausing between those days and whatever was going to come. I looked up to clouds, white as napkins, in the high windows of the five and dime and department stores. . . . In the back of the Pontiac, I was learning the names for things, my father driving the wide lanes of State Street, or along the seafront on Cabrillo Boulevard where I knew every palm tree ascending the blue. I sat in the Fox Arlington theater, my eyes adjusting to the dark, the appliqué of stars blinking in the artificial vault above, below which I’d spend the next 10 years happily watching WWII movies save us time and again. . . . I went to Copenhagen with Hans Christian Anderson, and one day walked underwater with Captain Nemo, a gold light glowing from the globed eye-like windows of his fish-shaped boat . . . I was 6 that Saturday kids were admitted free to Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea to promote the future, and the Nautilus, our first nuclear submarine. . . . 60 years later, I walk the same sidewalks in a future I could never have foreseen . . . all the way back there it keeps getting darker, except for these small whitecaps of light surfacing as I walk by remembering what shops were originally behind which doors . . . and sometimes on the upper reaches of State Street, where tourists have not thronged, out of the corner of my eye, I see, in the great glass store fronts of what once were Lou Rose or I. Magnin’s, a woman with auburn hair, wearing her one winter coat, leading a boy out of the shop—the air clear, crisp at his cheeks, the mica in the sidewalks shining back up to the midday sky as he raises a hand to shade his eyes so he can get some idea of where he’s going. . . . 36

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likes of Joe Cocker, Harry Connick, Jr. and Alanis Morrissette. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

29 Carpinteria Beautiful Home and Garden Tour Culminating Carpinteria Beautiful Month, this Carpinteria Beautiful tour celebrates 20 years of opening doors to Carpinteria’s most amazing homes and gardens. Tour proceeds fund community beautification projects, such as the tile murals at Linden Plaza. | 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Various Locations in Carpinteria, carpinteriabeautiful.org/ HomeGardenTour.aspx.

29 Art Without Limits: Art Career Day Conference Art Without Limits, providing business and career mentoring for artists, hosts its annual conference, which offers young artists the opportunity to explore art career strategies, as well as mentorship and internship possibilities. | 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Santa Barbara City College, Fe Bland Forum, 721 Cliff Dr., acdc-sb.org.

29 Murray Perahia With a distinguished career spanning more than four decades, cherished pianist Murray Perahia is celebrated for his “breathtaking drive and imagination” (Los Angeles Times). | 7 p.m., UCSB Campbell Hall, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures. sa.ucsb.edu.

30 Kid Flix Mix The annual festival that “redefin[es] what kids entertainment can be” (Time Out New York) returns to UCSB’s Campbell Hall with a fresh and exciting lineup of kid-friendly parent-approved –and parent-juried selections. | 3 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures. sa.ucsb.edu.

May 2 Yo-Yo Ma With Edgar Meyer and Chris Thile In 2011, these virtuosos and friends made history with The Goat Rodeo Sessions, a recording that blurred the lines of bluegrass, jazz and classical music to the delight of sold-out crowds and critics who gleefully praised the one-of-a-kind collaboration. Together once again, they explore an all-Bach program. | 7 p.m., The Granada, 1214 State St., 805/893-3535, artsandlectures. sa.ucsb.edu.

3 David Sedaris David Sedaris’s sidesplitting Santa Barbara shows have quickly become a local tradition. Returning with his strange-but-true experiences, spot-on satire and impeccable storytelling, Sedaris reveals why he is among today’s greatest American humorists. | 8 p.m., Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St., 805/8933535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

6 Elizabeth Gilbert in Conversation With Pico Iyer In conversation with Santa Barbara favorite and fellow deep-thinker Pico Iyer, Elizabeth Gilbert delves into the mysterious nature of inspiration. | 7:30 p.m., The Granada, 1214 State St., 805/8933535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

7 Fork & Cork Classic Support Foodbank of Santa Barbara County by enjoying food and wine from Santa Barbara’s best chefs and vintners, while lovely live entertainment sets the mood. Proceeds benefit Foodbank’s goal to transform health by eliminating hunger and instilling knowledge of nutrition. | 3-6 p.m., The Fess Parker: A Doubletree by Hilton Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., forkandcorkclassic.org.

8 The Capitol Steps Lobero LIVE presents the hilarious political comedy of The Capitol Steps, the troupe that puts the “mock” in democracy. | 8 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

11 Brooklyn Rider With Kayhan Kalhor Innovative young string quartet Brooklyn Rider is praised for its “Beethoven-goes-indie foray into making classical music accessible but also celebrating why it was good in the first place” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette). | 7 p.m., Campbell Hall, UCSB, 805/893-3535, artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu.

12 Haydn, Mozart and Dohnanyi Camerata Pacifica presents a concert that includes Haydn’s Trio in G Major, Hob XV: 15; Mozart’s String Quintet in G Minor, K. 516; and Dohnanyi’s Piano Quintet in C Minor, Op. 1. Featuring Adrian Spence, flute; Paul Huang and Giora Schmidt, violins; Richard O’Neill and Rob Brophy, violas; Ani Aznavoorian, cello; and Warren Jones, piano. | 7:30 p.m., Music Academy of the West, Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/893-3535, cameratapacifica.org.

13 Foodbank of Santa Barbara Wine Country Half Marathon


BLOOMING NOW!

Wine country becomes “run” country at this annual half marathon, where participants raise money for Foodbank of Santa Barbara County. | Downtown Solvang, destinationraces.com/runsb.

16 Schumann Squared A double helping of Robert Schumann brings Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra’s season to a memorable close, welcoming back dazzling Italian pianist Alessio Bax for Schumann’s intensely expressive “Piano Concerto in A Minor,” followed by a stirring orchestral performance of the remarkably triumphant “Symphony No. 2 in C.” | 7:30 p.m., Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/9630761, lobero.com.

Dream Foundation’s Flower Empower Luncheon Nestled in the foothills of Carpinteria, Klentner Ranch hosts Dream Foundation’s 7th annual luncheon. Guests e`njoy delicious cuisine, myriad silent auction items, bouquet crafting, a raffle and general merriment as the community raises vital funds for one of its most beloved local nonprofit programs. Dream Foundation’s Flower Empower program is a local volunteer-driven program that delivers floral bouquets, fresh-baked cookies, fine chocolates and cards hand made by school children to people in hospitals, hospices, cancer centers and their homes. | 11:30 a.m., Klentner

T. Wardlaw

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Ranch, 3344 Foothill Rd., Carpinteria, 805/564-2131, dreamfoundation.org/flower-empower.

20 Brundibár by Hans Krása Opera Santa Barbara’s newly formed Santa Barbara Youth Opera presents a fully staged production of Brundibár. It premiered in Germanoccupied Prague and was performed by children at a Jewish orphanage. | 2:30 p.m., Lobero Theatre,

SOLVANG | BUELLTON | BALLARD | LOS OLIVOS | LOS ALAMOS | SANTA YNEZ

VISITSYV.COM

33 E. Canon Perdido St., 805/963-0761, lobero.com.

20 The Goldberg Variations Camerata Pacifica presents a concert featuring harpsichordist Paolo Bordignon performing Bach’s Goldberg Variations, BWV 988. | 3 p.m., Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Rd., 805/893-3535, cameratapacifica.org.

27–29 I Madonnari Memorial Day weekend brings the colorful I Madonnari Festival of Italian street painting to the Old Mission in this community favorite benefit for Children’s Creative Project. | Old Mission Santa Barbara, 2201 Laguna St., imadonnarifestival.com.

All locations are in Santa Barbara unless otherwise noted. For complete event listings, visit sbseasons.com.

Book your trip at VisitSYV.com to experience the beautiful Santa Ynez Valley SPRING 2017

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HOME & GARDEN

Sandy Slice of Heaven BY NANC Y R ANSOHOFF

THE BEAC HES THAT LINE the Santa Barbara County coast like a glittering sandy necklace are spectacular and special places. What truly sets them apart is that they’re pristine and relatively undeveloped, with houses on the beach only on short stretches. Padaro Beach is one of those coveted stretches, with unpretentious houses sprinkled along the locals’ secret sandy swath. Folks here appreciate its rustic beauty while surfing, tide pooling or just soaking up the ever-changing Pacific views with the Channel Islands looming on the horizon.

Room With a View Those views are what inspired a unique “backyard” landscape design project for a busy family beach house. The space between the home’s back deck and the public beach was transformed to create a sort of outdoor room, with the sand level raised to enhance the views. The end result is a casual, inviting gathering place for flip-flopped family and friends that blends seamlessly into the natural surroundings. “We raised the soil level by 16 to 18 inches to allow views of the beach—before, it felt like there was a barricade between you and the ocean—you were sitting in a hole, with the house and deck looming over it, looking at boulders. It was unusable space,” says Margie Grace, principal at Grace Design Associates, who designed and built the project. “We imported a heck of a lot of beach sand— five truckloads. They sell it for volleyball courts…we brought it back one wheelbarrow at a time.” Grace notes that the user-friendly seaside space sees a lot of activity. “It’s all about the beach when the family is there, and this space is the transition between the house and the beach. Gear like surfboards, boogie boards and kayaks gets dragged across. We wanted it to be beautiful, useful and low maintenance—no fuss, no muss.”

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Succulents, like the mix shown above, in a custom-made cement pot, are low-maintenance and deal very well with the salt air, an important consideration for beach living. Opposite: Grace Design Associates created this curved flagstone bench/low wall combination that blends into existing granite boulders and cleverly guards against erosion.

Set in Stone While describing the collaborative design process, the homeowner notes that he and Margie Grace were on the same page from the get-go. “Margie had the vision…she sees in her mind’s eye how it’s all going to work out,” he notes. As an example of her vision, he points out the curved flagstone bench/ low wall combination that blends into existing granite boulders. Called riprap, the boulders guard against erosion and were artfully incorporated into the overall design. “We wanted to make the boulders part of the yard,” says Grace, who studied geology in addition to landscape design and comes from a family of geologists. “I get excited about rocks,” she says. “We used dry-stacked flagstone for the low dry-stacked fieldstone walls—the greys

and browns in the color palette match what was there,” says Grace. The bench faces an inviting fire pit that melds beauty and function, composed of chunks of clear and aquamarine refractory glass that evoke the colors of the sea. “We love gathering around the fire pit…it puts out great heat,” notes the homeowner. “Margie sourced the surrounding flat stone slabs [around the fire pit] that are almost a perfect match to the riprap.” Custom contemporary furniture placed around the fire pit includes lounge chairs that encourage relaxing, digging toes into the sand and catching the sunset. The sturdy chairs and small tables were designed and built by Maysun Wells of Wells Concrete Works in Los Osos of materials that hold up well outdoors. Pre-cast concrete is embedded with sea glass, aggregate


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HOME & GARDEN

The ocean view is complemented by an inviting fire pit composed of chunks of clear and aquamarine refractory glass that evoke the colors of the sea.

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ING COU NT Y LIFE & CU LT U R E

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Shades of Green Carefully chosen plants that thrive in this environment add a palette of green shades from sage to silvery. “We wanted plants that are drought resistant and hardy but not just cactus,” says the homeowner. Spikes of Canyon Prince wild rye grass are interspersed with silver-white leaves of the low-spreading licorice plant. “We chose plants that are tough as nails, that could take being ignored and hardly even watered,” says Grace. She extended that theme to the back deck with large custom-made cement pots of mixed low-maintenance succulents. “They have a gift for dealing with salt,” says Grace.

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and ammonites (fossil shells), then ground and polished for the bases. Slats of ipe wood form the chair backs and seats and the tabletops for a sleek look. It’s a soul-soothing place to sit and watch couples walk down the beach hand in hand, enjoy the dolphins leaping offshore, and listen to waves unfurl and flags flap in the ocean breeze.

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And what’s better after a day at the beach than a shower, especially outdoors. “I always wanted an outdoor shower,” says the homeowner, who surfed until sunset the previous evening. Tucked off to the side of the backyard, near the overhang of the back deck, the shower with its minimalist stainless steel design is complemented by a tall vertical stone slab placed as a backsplash just behind it. A handy tree stump sits nearby, providing the perfect spot for wetsuit changing. And no need to step back into the sand after a shower—pavers of sandblasted precast concrete are spaced across the “room” and form a small floor at the bottom of the back deck steps. This beachy backyard is clearly a place that is lived in, enjoyed and appreciated. A weathered teak bench sits to the side next to a greenery-draped fence that borders the property. Although eye-catching in its rustic beauty, the well-used bench also serves as a resting spot after the family’s forays into the sea or a place to plop fins after surfing. “It [the backyard] is comfortable and relaxed and real life happens there,” says Grace. Around the bench, groupings of small rocks are placed in the sand, decoratively painted in bright colors by the kids with sayings such as “Live to Surf, Surf to Live” and “Enjoy the View.” 

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Plug In, Ride Green Fueling the Rise of Electric Vehicles BY R ACHEL HOM MEL

ELECTRIC VEHIC LES used to be a thing of the future. Now they are a deeply entrenched part of our local community. With more than 300 days of abundant sunshine in Santa Barbara, imagine powering your vehicle on that sunshine. From solar-powered cars to battery plug-ins, electric cars—or EVs—offer a valuable option to drive clean and ride green. Since 2011, Community Environmental Council (CEC) has promoted this idea of “driving on sunshine.” With a goal of moving Santa Barbara away from fossil fuels in one generation, pure battery vehicles produce zero tailpipe emissions, with higher fuel economy. This means that no smog-forming pollutants or greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are generated when the vehicle is used. Driving clean energy forward, EVs offer owners a variety of federal and state tax incentives, while being three times more efficient than gas-burning engines. “Transportation is the number one source of emissions in California, more than any sector of the state’s economy,” says Cameron Gray, Energy Program Associate at CEC. “While it can be difficult to decarbonize transportation, EVs play a pivotal role in the long-term success of our climate policy.” When considering an EV, consumers can

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“EVs have to work for your way of life, for your lifestyle. We help you reduce the complexity, we figure out which vehicle is right for you, we encourage you to hop behind the wheel and test drive.” — C A MERON GR AY, ENERGY PROGR A M ASSOCIATE AT C EC

be guaranteed lower fuel costs, less maintenance and an enhanced driving experience. With no oil changes, transmission fluid or spark plugs to replace, consumers can also enjoy longer brake life, due to a regenerative braking system. With a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV), electric motors also have much higher torque, creating an incredibly responsive (and responsible) transportation choice. “EVs have to work for your way of life, for your lifestyle,” says Gray. “We help you reduce the complexity, we figure out which vehicle is right for you, we encourage you to hop behind the wheel and test drive.” With regard to fueling EVs, consumers now have several options—hydrogen (fuel cell electric vehicles) and electricity (battery-powered electric vehicle and plug-in hybrid). All models offer distinct advantages—from increased driving range to rapid charging and increased fuel economy. On the Central Coast alone, more than 300 public charging stations are available for

battery electric vehicles. Plug-in Santa Barbara helps consumers take it a step further, offering solar-based solutions to truly drive emissions-free. With a growing number of affordable models, a new wave of EV adopters is on the rise, as is the need for reliable charging solutions. Founded with the renter in mind, locally owned EVmatch connects EV drivers with EV hosts offering home-charging stations to match their unique needs and driving patterns. Started by UCSB Bren School alumni Heather Hochrein and Shannon Walker, the sharing platform allows EV owners to ride longer and farther, with prices based on actual costs of electricity, reservation capabilities and easy payment processing. For pre-registration, visit evmatch.com. “We hope to make it easier and cheaper to operate an EV, increasing the public charging network by over four times its size now,” says Walker. “The technology is there, the


price point is there…we want to empower this new generation of EV owners.” Interested in cleaning your drive? When purchasing an EV, CEC can assist with education and outreach, figuring out utility rate plans, leveraging incentives, installing EV charging stations at home and connecting current owners with prospective buyers. “California is leading the market in EV purchases, with Santa Barbara at three times the national average,” says Gray. “We have really great ownership rates. We hope that more people will continue to drive on sunshine.” 

Locals Sound Off Michael Chiacos, EV Model: Chevrolet Volt

“I was interested in getting an EV because I wanted to drive on sunshine instead of oil. I often go for a month without using a drop of gas. I like the hatchback design and can fit three people and four surfboards inside without racks!” Jordan BenShea, EV Model: Tesla Model 3

“I believe in the environment, being free of fossil fuels and driving past the gas pump. Tesla is extremely safe, with a great electric range and infrastructure for charging. With the amazing design and 200+ mile range, it’s my clean energy choice.”

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Paul Valentich-Scott, EV Model: Fiat 500e

“We already had solar panels on our roof, so it just made sense to power our car from the sun. This car is super fun to drive, great handling, incredible torque and speed. Charging with our solar panels pretty much makes an EV free to drive, with VERY limited maintenance costs (tires).”

IT’S ELECTRIC! This spring, make sure to check out CEC’s Annual Green Car Show, April 22–23 at Earth Day Festival, where participants can test drive the newest models, talk to current owners and learn more about greening their commute. For more details on how to go electric, visit cecsb.org/drive-clean/.

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LEGACIES

Ah-One, Ah-Two— the Partnership for Excellence Conference BY NANCY A . SHOBE WHAT HAPPENS ON Thursday, April 13, when nearly 500 leaders from Santa Barbara County’s philanthropic sector convene at The Fess Parker, a Doubletree by Hilton Resort in Santa Barbara? The 24th annual Partnership for Excellence (PFE) Conference: Unlocking the Power of Diversity, Inclusion and Equity in Our Community is what happens. This annual conference—funded by The Foundation Roundtable, a regional association of grant makers—serves to unite,

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support, inspire and motivate nonprofit professionals. PFE is believed to be the only conference of its kind in the United States that unites and connects both funders and nonprofit professionals in one room, says Judy Hawkins, PFE volunteer steering committee member, producer of the conference and founder of Ruby Road Leadership. This year’s keynote, Working in Concert, is unique in that it is an interactive hands-on musical experience. Hawkins says, “The keynote will be lead

by Gary Muszynski, chief orchestrator of the Northern California-based Orchestrating Excellence—a global leadership and learning development company. Joining him is a team of professional musician facilitators including Brian Rice, Bryan Dyer and Chris French.” “Maestro” Muszynski and his merry band of musicians engage the audience in a performance that shows firsthand the importance of orchestration, collaboration, improvisation and innovation. According to Orchestrating Excellence’s website, Muszynski is internationally recognized as an organizational development pioneer, bandleader, executive coach and a leader in applying the principles of play and creative engagement to workplace leadership, collaboration, change and innovation. The PFE steering committee decided to focus on the theme of diversity because it was most frequently cited as a preferred future topic in attendee surveys.

PHOTO: ROBERT REDFIELD, COURTESY PARTNERSHIP FOR EXCELLENCE

Keynote speaker Leah Weiss, PhD, at the 2016 Partnership for Excellence Conference.


“The themes of diversity, inclusion and equity are important and sensitive topics...Orchestrating Excellence felt...like the right group to tackle this subject.” — PALMER JAC KSON, JR.

Volunteer chair of the 2017 PFE steering committee and Ann Jackson Family Foundation board member Palmer Jackson, Jr. says, “The themes of diversity, inclusion and equity are important and sensitive topics. The committee looked at a number of keynote speakers. All were great, but Orchestrating Excellence felt more inclusive, like the right group to tackle this subject.” After the morning keynote and provided lunch, attendees participate in a variety of thought-provoking breakout sessions derived by the PFE steering committee. In addition to Jackson and Hawkins, steering committee members include Angela Antenore, Antenore & Associates; Owen Bailey, Environmental Defense Center; Lori Goodman, Child Abuse Listening Mediation (CALM); Greg Gorga, Santa Barbara Maritime Museum; Elsa Granados, Rape Crisis Center; Frederick Janka, Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara; Joni Meisel, The Foundation Roundtable; Kristi Newton, United Boys and Girls Club; Elena Richardson, The Fund for Santa Barbara; Ken Saxon, Leading from Within; Amy Schneider, Santa Barbara Foundation; Jarrod Schwartz, Just Communities; June Sochel, RBK Fund; and Rob Skinner, The Towbes Foundation. “Our goal for this conference is the same that it is for every year—we hope that people are inspired to do something different or better in their jobs and hope that participants walk way with one or two concrete things that they’ve learned that they can put into practice…It’s all about partnership,” says Jackson. 

The Partnership for Excellence Conference is on April 13 from 9 a.m.–6 p.m. at The Fess Parker Doubletree Resort. For conference schedule, workshop overviews and registration, visit. nprnsb.org/PFE. Registration and interpretation are available in both English and Spanish.

Education is the first step. Thanks to our community of generous supporters, the SBCC Foundation launched the SBCC Promise in 2016, removing financial barriers for all local students. Your support ensures that all future local high school graduates have access to an outstanding and affordable education at Santa Barbara City College.

Your investment makes it possible. Join us.

sbccpromise.org | (805) 730- 4416 W I N T E R 2 015/16

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REARVIEW MIRROR

Glimpses Into Santa Barbara’s Stagecoach Past

Above: the arch bridge that carries Highway 154 above Cold Spring Canyon. Right: one of the 53 Wells Fargo “ Old Stagecoach Route” signs found in Santa Barbara County.

I’M WALKING WITH two cheerful women in boots and jeans on Stagecoach Road, a meandering dribble of asphalt on the far side of San Marcos Pass, with a view of the arch bridge that carries Highway 154 above Cold Spring Canyon. At the road’s edge, Julia, with her long white hair draped on her handspun poncho, points and says, “This is it.” We follow an overgrown trail. Sure enough, after it switches back through sandstone, we can see ruts made more than a century ago by the tall iron-rimmed wheels of stagecoaches. We follow a one-mile segment of the abandoned roadway through rock slabs and manzanita. No other hikers are around. Mountain bike tread marks are present, though, and an old rusty beer can, with telltale triangles punctured on either side. “1960s,” I say. “Hmm,” says my wife, Kate. “There wouldn’t be anything left of the can.” I’m a historian. But I don’t argue. I have no idea how old the can is, but it was definitely not drunk by a stagecoach driver. There is a ringing quiet. Lichen and moss grow on the creased sandstone. HOW DID I BECOME a “rut nut?” It started with the signs. There are 53 Wells Fargo “Old Stagecoach Route” signs across the

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county. Santa Barbara remained stagecoach dependent until 1901 when railroads arrived. You can see the first sign at Arlington Theater—the site of the former Arlington Hotel. The earliest stagecoach road led north from the hotels on State Street along what is now Hollister to Gaviota Pass (now Highway 101). It was rough going. Townspeople talked about building a new road over San Marcos Pass. Back then, able-bodied men were required to offer five days of labor a year for public works, but no one grabbed a pickaxe. In 1868, local investors brought in a group of 28 Chinese workers by steamship from San Francisco. They joined another crew of 32. Many of the workers bunked near a spring on Paradise Road. A year after they set to with picks, shovels and explosives, the turnpike over San Marcos Pass was completed. SANTA BARBARA CARRIAGE MUSEUM is a great place to acquaint yourself with the non-automotive past. Tom Peterson—wide-shouldered, wearing a tan cowboy hat and with the ruddy face of someone who has ridden horses for decades—greets me at the gate. He leads me past historic saddles, many ornately carved and silver-laden, as well as a parade ground’s worth of conveyances

including an ornate Spanish cart, buggies, an antique hearse and an army wagon. To the left of the entrance hall, daubed in the yellow and red indicating it was for hire, is a stagecoach emblazoned Santa Barbara and Los Olivos Stage Co. Peterson demonstrates how the foot brake worked, applying pressure to the rear wheels. When I ask where the lock-box would be kept, Peterson says, “Under the driver’s seat, in the boot,” and urges me to “climb up.” I do. People once boarded this stage at downtown hotels and paid the 25-cent fare for the eight-hour slog to Los Olivos. Built in Stockton, it is a “mud wagon,” somewhat lighter yet sturdier than the Concord stagecoaches made in New Hampshire commonly seen in Hollywood westerns. Nearby are the whips that two of Santa Barbara’s last stagecoach drivers, Ted Whitney and Selin Carrillo, flicked at their teams of six horses. Peterson says, “One of Selin’s grandchildren called and said he had this stuff out in the garage, did I want it? We sure did.” The museum also has a coach from Santa Barbara and Saugus Stage Co. Passengers heading north from Saugus (Santa Clarita

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$1,595,000 - Santa Ynez Vacation or Permanent Ranch

today) down through Ventura and up the beach would wait for the tides to change at Rincon—at times, apparently, beset by bandits while stuck on the sand. BEFORE OUR PLANNED RENDEZ VOUS with Julia, my wife and I drive up Turnpike Road toward the mountains and stop near sign 18 at San Marcos Road where the daily stagecoach once passed the one-room schoolhouse that is still part of Cathedral Oaks Nursery School. The road built by the Chinese workers continued north, then wound up into the mountains above Fairview and Patterson roads. A steep section, known as Slippery Rock, where workers with pickaxes carved grooves for wagon wheels and horses’ hooves, was another favorite place for hold-ups. In 1891, when ranchers grew tired of telling drivers to close gates to protect stock, the route shifted south to San Marcos Road, complete with its present double-U turns. Kinevan’s Summit House, atop the pass, where tolls were collected and horses changed, is no longer around. On the far side of the pass, a second staging station, Cold Spring Tavern, still thrives, with buildings that date to the early 1860s—“or so legend has it,” says staffer Patty Tierney. PARTICUL ARLY ON WEEKENDS , you can count dozens of motorcycles in the tavern’s dirt parking lot. Mainly Harley-Davidsons, but also Triumphs, Ducatis and Suzukis. Tourists and white-haired desperadoes mingle calmly in the shade. You can look inside a historic bunkhouse used by the Chinese road workers, but won’t see much. Nearby, cooks tend slabs of tri-tip barbecue and bang their tongs to Norteño music, while a woman talks her child down from where he hangs in the thin vines on the steep embankment above the old stage roadway. AFTER A TAST Y SANDWIC H , and short drive down the pass, I stop to study the long descent into Santa Ynez Valley with binoculars, but don’t spot any remnants of the old route; it took stagecoaches from Cold Spring four hours to reach Los Olivos, where passengers, as of 1886, could catch a train north. Much of the old road through the valley has been hidden below Cachuma Lake. After years of drought, however, the artificial lake has shrunk and looks more like it once was: a river. The past can be stubborn that way.

A gated entry leads leads to this value-packed ranch on 4.77 acres in Santa Ynez, welcoming you with a substantial garden with pergola and fountain. The updated and remodeled house features a sunlit kitchen with a huge eat-in island, vaulted ceilings, stone floors and a large dining area. The living room leads to the master bedroom with large, walk-around closet, wood-paneled tub, walk-in shower and double sinks. Upstairs are three quality bedrooms and two baths (including the master suite) plus a screened porch. Extra amenities include an office, store room, three-car garage, spa and patios. For the equestrian are a four-stall barn, four more covered stalls, a hot walker and corrals.

$3,250,000 - Lone Oak Ranch, Santa Ynez

The entry drive to this fabulous 20-acre ranch begins with horse-filled pastures framed with palm trees and roses for 600 feet, then a custom-designed pond with a waterfall surrounded with lush lawns. A circular drive leads to the classic, remodeled home with solid cedar doors that open to the visually rich foyer and views. A large and open great room includes a dining area, wet bar and flagstone patio. The custom kitchen provides for gourmet cooking and entertaining, while the 1200 sq. ft. master suite features 15-foot ceilings, separate sitting area with fireplace, floor-to-ceiling windows and master bath. Additional comforts include two large guest bedrooms with baths, an attached guest house, and two large bonus rooms (one, a wine cellar). This fully operational horse ranch offers grand-style living and all facilities for the serious equestrian.

1595 Mission Drive, Solvang, CA 93463 1-800-959-5717 www.santaynezvalley.com W I N T E R 2 015/16

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A DAY AWAY

The Oaks at Ojai BY LESLIE DINABERG

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LOOKING FOR A BIT OF “spring cleaning” for the mind, body and soul? The Oaks at Ojai is a great place to refresh and recharge your spirit any time of the year. I had a girlfriend getaway for a few days last fall and was pleasantly surprised and charmed at every turn. Spring is an even better time to visit The Oaks, as April in Ojai brings special celebrations to honor the Pixie Tangerine, a special orange orb grown only in that area. In prior years, The Oaks guests have devoured more than 7,000 sweet, seedless Pixies during Pixie month. Expect to find special deals on tangerine tints and scents everywhere this time of year. The Oaks is first and foremost a health spa, offering an all-inclusive healthy fit-

ness and weight loss program with up to 15 optional fitness classes every day; hikes; three surprisingly tasty calorie-conscious meals per day, plus snacks and beverages; an on-site health advisor; evening activities and wellness lectures; and complete use of all resort facilities. Other than spa treatments (which are included with some of the package deals), you won’t have to open your wallet for anything additional at The Oaks. Everything is included, which makes it a perfect time to try out new types of fitness classes. In just a couple of days, I was able to take classes in yoga, aqua cardio, Qigong, stretching, Zumba, aqua tone, Pilates and world grooves dance. Hiking, cardio/sculpting, balance, ballet/barre, dance Beliu and ball & band

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A DAY AWAY


toning are also offered, along with other classes. There’s also a pool and a nicely outfitted weight room, for those who can’t get enough fitness! The pampering side of the spa experience is also well done, with a nice steam room and sauna available, as well as any spa treatment your heart desires. I had an excellent Skin Authority Signature Facial, as well as a pedicure that lasted several weeks beyond my spa experience. The food was also surprising tasty. Quinoa was once a dirty word in our house, but after trying Chef Christine Denney’s clever incarnations, I’m hooked and have tried several ideas from her Recipes From the Heart cookbook. All in all, the 1,200–1,500-calorie-per-day menu was balanced and tasty, inspired by an abundance of fresh vegetables and fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and lean protein featuring wild fish and poultry—all without a touch of additional salt or refined sugar used in the preparation. Sure, my friend and I brought in our own wine to reward ourselves at night after all of those exercise classes—but it wasn’t because we were actually hungry! An active and inspiring presence at the resort is founder Sheila Cluff, an internationally known fitness expert who created cardiovascular dance in the 1950s, later known as “aerobics,” and pioneered the concept of the modern destination spa in the 1970s. Now an 80-year-old mother of four and grandmother of seven, Cluff still leads some of the brisk morning walks and hikes at The Oaks and absolutely embodies the lifestyle she teaches. Cluff has said that she created the retreat to fit the needs of women over 40, and we certainly make up the bulk of the clientele these days. That’s not to say that all ages (and men) are not welcome. The Oaks at Ojai is truly a great place for a girlfriend getaway, but the spa’s approach is casual and welcoming to all, as well as affordable and fun. Plus the charming 1920s Spanish Mission Revival-style hotel fits right in with the artsy laid-back vibe of the town and is right on the main drag of Ojai, within walking distance to boutiques, restaurants, galleries and more. It’s an excellent place to regenerate—or spring clean—your mind, body, and spirit.  The Oaks at Ojai, conveniently located in the heart of downtown Ojai, offers a stress-free, serene spot to get in shape with both indoor and outdoor activities, pamper yourself in the spa or just enjoy a weekend away with friends.

The Oaks at Ojai, 122 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai, 800/753-OAKS (6257), oaksspa.com.

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RE AL ESTATE FE ATUR E

Santa Barbara Ocean View Ranch 360ยบ ocean and mountain views $17,777,000 3 separate homes 110 acres self-sustaining property Bucolic nature for horseback riding 5.5 bedrooms main house Gate House with 2 master suites Creek House with 2 bedrooms

Terry Ryken 805/896-6977 terry.ryken@compass.com terryryken.com

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his is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire a self-sustaining, ocean-view Santa Barbara property with over 110 acres and three separate homes. Rich, fertile soil supports 3,000 citrus, 7,000 avocado and other fruit-bearing trees. Ride your horse on the vast expanse of bucolic nature. The main residence, a Tuscan-style ranch house, sits on a hilltop and provides all the luxuries of life, including the newest amenities and unparalleled views of picturesque mountains and the Pacific Ocean. The light and airy master suite has an impressive fireplace, spacious walk in closet, a master bath complete with separate tub and shower, and offers spectacular ocean views as well. A fully equipped gourmet kitchen, lustrous hardwood floors and ornate lighting bring elegance to ranch living. Adjoining the three-car garage of the main house is the ultimate sequestered enclave, which features living room, study and a lightfilled bedroom with French doors that open to a stunning view of orchards and mountains. The Gate House with two master suites is an income-producing rental, while the two bedroom, one bath Creek House has a professional-quality gym. This perfect family or business compound is located minutes from the Santa Barbara Airport, the Bacara Resort & Spa and Glen Annie Golf Club. Visit SBOceanViewRanch.com S U M M E R 2 016

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THEY LOVE HORSES, don’t they SANTA BARBARA COUNTY’S EQUESTRIAN LIFESTYLE

BY C HERY L C R ABTREE PHOTOGR APHED BY A MY BARNARD

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n August 1769, a land expedition led by new Spanish governor of California Gaspar de Portolá and Father Junipero Serra arrived in Santa Barbara, traveling with a collection of horses that played an important role in the group’s travel and survival. Horses and humans continued to live, work and play together throughout Santa Barbara’s Spanish, Mexican and American eras. Although horses’ services diminished with the advent of stagecoaches and motorcars, local residents have maintained close connections to these magnificent animals in numerous ways. The annual Old Spanish Days Fiesta—which includes the nation’s largest equestrian parade—has celebrated our equestrian heritage since 1924. Some of the finest horses in the nation are born and trained here, and buyers travel from all over the world every year to choose among the most illustrious examples of particular breeds. National horse shows take place at Earl Warren Showgrounds, and ranchers, rangers, even sheriffs and police regularly roam the trails in valleys, mountains and beyond. Equestrian traditions thrive here today, as evidenced by these four shining examples of families whose daily lives are closely entwined with the equine members of our colorful community.

The Bruce Family home overlooks the training area at Sunnybrook Farm & Ranch. S P R I N G 2 017

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RANCHO SANTA BARBARA FEW RANCHES REFLECT as much early California character as Rancho Santa Barbara, an 800-acre enclave that straddles both sides of Highway 154 on the eastern shores of Cachuma Lake. Although it’s just 16 miles north of Santa Barbara, the site is a world away from the city scene. Panoramic vistas of sun-dappled mountains, hills and meadows sweep along the river valley as the water flows to the ocean. This idyllic scene captivated legendary Santa Barbara equestrian and philanthropist Dwight Murphy in the early 1900s and inspired him, through lease and purchase of Mexican grant land, to create the vast 47,000-acre Rancho San Fernando Rey. The same scene—along with the opportunity to live the equestrian life—also captivated Lee Carr, who continues, along with his wife, Julia, as steward of the historic property, now known as Rancho Santa Barbara. Lee hails from Texas and worked for many years as an engineer for Ford Motor Company doing automotive testing and design. He subsequently became an independent consultant and still commutes to work at his Houston office when necessary. “I always wanted to have horses,” says Lee of his interest in living on an equestrian ranch. “My first wife—who has passed away—was a hunter and a jumper. She was very passionate about the horses. Ranches in Texas were too far away from civilization, so we looked out here, as we had discovered on visits that properties in Santa Barbara have a connection to history, people, community.” They discovered an ideal site on the north side of Highway 154 and purchased it in 1998. “The feeling that you’re in the middle of nowhere is a wonderful thing—and in 20 minutes, you can be in Santa Barbara.” Lee was also attracted to the ranch’s rich history. Dwight Murphy came to visit his family’s new home in Montecito (on what is now the Westmont College campus) in the early 1900s. From 1905 to 1907, Murphy served as a ranger in the Los Padres National Forest backcountry and discovered prime ranching land, which he eventually leased and developed. He raised Holstein cattle and bred golden palominos, his favorite hobby. 54

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Murphy invited the U.S. Olympic Equestrian Team to train at the ranch in the 1920s and built an outdoor arena and bungalows to house them. Renowned architect Cliff May built a schoolhouse for trainers’ children, and Murphy lured several instructors from Stanford University to live and teach on the ranch. Murphy also hired legendary local architect Joseph Plunkett to design a sprawling hacienda in the hills overlooking the valley, and a Spanish-Mediterranean barn, completed in the 1930s. In 1934, Murphy bought 6,771 acres of the historic San Marcos Ranch. He renamed it Rancho San Fernando Rey after his two most prized stallions, Fernando and Rey de los Reyos (King of Kings). Murphy was passionate about equestrian pursuits and helped establish and fund the Santa Barbara National Horse Show and Old Spanish Days Fiesta. His internationally renowned palominos led the first Fiesta Parade in 1924—a tradition that continues today, here and in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena. In the early 1950s, John Galvin purchased part of the ranch for his daughter Patricia, who was on the Olympic Equestrian Team in the 1920s and became a very accomplished horsewoman. John Galvin upgraded and expanded the equestrian facilities, including construction of a huge indoor arena. Film producer Mike Nichols and his wife, television journalist Diane Sawyer, bought Rancho San Fernando Rey in the 1980s and partnered with trainer Don de Longpre to breed, train and sell Arabian horses. “This was one of the most pristine, coveted ranches for Arabians,” says Joel Chauran, who worked as a trainer for Nichols in the late 1970s through the 1980s. Chauran recalls many celebrities—including Cher, Kurt Russell, Warren Beatty, Shirley Maclaine, Jack Nicholson and Burt Reynolds—in attendance at lavish events at the giant barn. This was the ranch Lee Carr purchased in 1998. A decade later, he was able to purchase the part of Dwight Murphy’s original ranch on the other side of Highway 154 that included the Plunkett-designed hacienda and blended the two properties into a single entity, Rancho Santa Barbara. Around that


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The interior (left), front exterior (above right) and looking out through the back (above) of what was originally Dwight Murphy’s Spanish-Mediterranean barn, designed by Joseph Plunkett and completed in the 1930s. Winner of multiple equestrian championships, Joel Chauran, pictured with Roy, has been affiliated with the ranch since the 1970s.

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time, Lee met Julia Wynn. Julia recalls that the ranch setting on her visit in 2002 astounded her: “Wow, I felt goose bumps and thought ‘what a beautiful and enchanting property!’” They married nine years ago at the ranch, in the historic hacienda. Over the years, the couple has restored much of the original historic character while adding a bit of their own throughout. Julia says, “We kept lots of things original to this house, artifacts, artworks. Both sides of the property were furnished with several different owners’ possessions. I kept and arranged the best, disposed of the rest and bought new furnishings as needed. I continue to add mementos of our life together, making it more and more ‘our home.’ We got married in our living room, so that was a big step in the right direction toward supporting that.” Julia adds that her husband is the key to making ranch life easy and enjoyable. “Lee is amazing. He is as smart and kind as they come. He can and does fix anything and everything. I would not be as comfortable living, as relatively remotely as we do, on an equestrian property without such a capable person by my side. He says (all the time) I am the best thing that ever happened to him; I feel exactly the same about him. We claim to be the two luckiest people on earth!”

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Although the ranch no longer maintains large stables of horses, the animals are still very much a part of the Carrs’ daily life. A herd of about 40 to 45 wild horses roam the range, and domestic horses train and perform in the arenas. The Carrs open the ranch to horse communities for events and to groups that come to train and convene for various activities, including the Sheriff’s mounted patrol unit, Santa Barbara Trail Riders, Santa Ynez Valley Penning Association and Therapeutic Riding Academy. The Carrs also enjoy their own personal connection with the lifestyle. Julia grew up in Phoenix, AZ, where one of her favorite activities was to rent a horse and go trail riding in the mountains. “There were no guides back then. You could do as you pleased. One time the bareback pad came loose and off I flew. I got up, put it back on and continued my ride. Exhilarating!” Here in Santa Ynez Valley, she feels a similar thrill. “ I love the peace, quiet and being totally engulfed in nature. We love taking a ride around the property—we call it ‘taking a twirl.’ We check everything out and look for as many animals as we can find. It’s like a treasure hunt every time! It’s especially delightful when the wild horses decide to follow us.”


“I LOVE THE PEACE, QUIET, AND BEING TOTALLY ENGULFED IN NATURE. WE LOVE TAKING A RIDE AROUND THE PROPERTY—WE CALL IT ‘TAKING A TWIRL.’ WE CHECK EVERYTHING OUT AND LOOK FOR AS MANY ANIMALS AS WE CAN FIND. IT’S LIKE A TREASURE HUNT EVERY TIME! IT’S ESPECIALLY DELIGHTFUL WHEN THE WILD HORSES DECIDE TO FOLLOW US.”—Julia Carr Lee and Julia Carr stroll around 800-acre enclave, which includes the main house (above) designed by Architect Joseph Plunkett (who, with William Albert Edwards, designed the historic Arlington Theatre and Santa Barbara Airport), and a schoolhouse (left) designed by Architect Cliff May, who is considered the father of the California ranch house.

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Arabian horses live the sweet life at Hilliard Bruce, where the stables go hand-in-hand with the vineyards

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HILLIARD BRUCE VINEYARDS AND HORSES are the quintessential Santa Barbara County pairing, but Hilliard Bruce’s roots are actually in Texas. Native Texans John Hilliard and his wife, Christine Bruce, were living in Houston when they met and began to pursue their passions together. They took winemaking classes and earned master gardener certifications, cultivated gardens and studied viticulture, and started a small Arabian horse breeding business at their Houston-area ranch. Eventually they began searching for a larger property where they could grow grapes and make wines, as well as expand their breeding operations. But where? Initially the couple scouted properties in Texas Hill Country between Austin and Houston, but the area simply didn’t provide the environment they needed.

“It’s either hot and humid or too cold,” explains John. So they turned their sights west, to Santa Barbara County. “We knew this area because it’s a great Arabian community and a great winemaking community,” says Christine. They purchased a 101-acre estate off Highway 246 in the western Santa Rita Hills and moved there in 2002. They planted 21 acres of chardonnay and pinot noir vines and, in 2008, celebrated their first vintages made in Santa Barbara. They completed a light-filled contemporary tasting room in 2014. Christine makes the chardonnay wines, and John recently passed his red winemaking duties over to well-known area winemaker Greg Brewer. Production is small—2,500 cases a year, available in the tasting room or via the wine club. S P R I N G 2 017

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ON THE EQUESTRIAN SIDE , the estate devotes six small paddocks and four large pastures (two to five acres) to their horses. About 16 to 18 horses typically live in the stable at a time. All are purebred Arabians, ranging in age from five months up to 30 years. A gelding, Hadrian, is the only male on the property. Christine breeds Arabian horses for purposes other than racing. “I breed for halter,” she says, explaining that this is similar to the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, where horses are judged for their physical reflection of the Arabian breed. But some horses are equally or better suited for performance (e.g., English). “I like to wait until the horse tells you ‘this is what I’m good at,’” says Christine, who watches the developing babies carefully as they mature and experience ground work, handling and touching and learn to pick up their feet. “A halter horse could be a perfect performer. They let you know eventually.” This 60

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period typically lasts about six to eight months if they are going into training. Christine’s horses have gone to owners around the globe, including England, Saudi Arabia, Italy and the United Arab Emirates. Several of her horses are multiple regional and U.S. and Canadian national champions. Today the Hilliard Bruce estate reflects the perfect balance that the owners sought to create—a close-knit community of humans, animals, plants and other creatures living in a mutually beneficial natural environment. Humans play bocce while the family poodles visit the horses. Grapevines, vegetable gardens, fruit orchards, pastures and landscaping thrive, nurtured by compost generated by heaps of horse manure. Guests savor wines in the tasting room, and family, friends and club members gather twice a year by the fireplace in the great room next to the stables—an ideal setting for experiencing the estate’s unusual synergy.


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The horses have plenty of room to roam on the 101-acre Hilliard Bruce property, where Christine Bruce’s horses include several regional, U.S. and Canadian national champions. S P R I N G 2 017

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HOPE RANCH RIDING & HUNT CLUB

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AT A GENTLE CURVE on Las Palmas Road, across from Laguna Blanca School, stands a modest wooden sign near the gate of a private estate. It says “Hope Ranch Riding & Hunt Club”—a small but important marker of the equestrian legacy that the current residents have vowed to preserve. That legacy dates back to the late 1800s, when riders convened to ride and compete at what was then a sheep ranch, and to the early 1900s, when Harold S. Chase began to develop the private, upscale Hope Ranch community. The new La Cumbre Golf and Country Club was already attracting members, and Chase hoped to complement the services with equestrian pursuits, thus luring potential residents to the exclusive enclave. He built a racecourse and founded a club—originally called Santa Barbara Riding & Hunt Club—and sold residential lots in the community. Famed architect and avid horseman Reginald Johnson designed a magnificent Spanish Colonial Revival-style clubhouse, along with stables and outbuildings, in 1929. The clubhouse property remained a community equestrian hub until World War II, when the club went out of business. In 1959, Judy Whiting (Harold S. Chase’s granddaughter) and her husband, Peter, revived the historic tradition, operating an equestrian business where they trained horses, gave riding lessons and boarded about 60 horses. The Whitings moved to the north county to raise thoroughbreds in 1973. From the mid-1970s until the 1980s, trainer Tommy Lowe kept the facility’s acclaimed international reputation alive, running a high-profile stable that produced many champions. Today, Hope Ranch Riding & Hunt Club is

a private residence, co-owned by the ThieserNick and Heierling-Humbel families since 1994. Hilo Thieser-Nick and her husband, Andre, are from Germany; Susanne Heierling-Humbel is from Switzerland. Susanne and Hilo grew up riding horses in Europe and met at Portuguese Bend Riding Club in Palos Verdes back in the late 1980s. Their families have been close friends ever since. “We loved the Portuguese Bend Riding Club so much that we dreamed of owning an old Spanish-style riding facility one day,” Hilo recalls. “In 1994, we found our dream in Santa Barbara.” The families renovated the clubhouse and restored much of its original character while converting it into a private home. The families do not board horses but it is still home to many happy horses who live on the property. Although Hilo no longer competes, she and her husband Andre run a thriving equestrian business: Footing Solutions USA, which builds horse arenas nationwide and imports world-class equestrian products from Germany to build high-quality equestrian facilities. Due to lot splits in the 1970s, the heart of the former 40-acre property, where the clubhouse and stables still stand, is now just 3.5 acres. And the current owners insisted on keeping the wooden sign at the entrance. “We’re preserving this special place. It’s like living on a horse island in the city,” says Hilo. “It’s important for us that Hope Ranch Riding Club continues to be the heart of Hope Ranch and a symbol that it is still a ranch with an equestrian community. More and more people with horses are moving into Hope Ranch again.”

Clockwise from top left: Hope Ranch Riding & Hunt Club’s rich history is evident throughout the property; the main house, designed by famed architect Reginald Johnson, is an iconic Hope Ranch property; Hilo Thieser-Nick returns a horse to one of several stables.

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Clockwise from top left: after school is a busy time at the Sunnybrook Farm & Ranch training ring; Rebecca Bruce has won many honors in the hunter, equitation and jumper rings; animals of all shapes and sizes are at home on the farm; the facility offers boarding, grooming and training services.

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SUNNYBROOK FARM & RANCH WANT TO LEARN TO RIDE for fun or performance? Head to Sunnybrook Farm & Ranch, a six-acre estate on Toro Canyon Road, on a gentle slope at the base of the Santa Ynez Mountains and overlooking the sea. They provide selective lessons and coaching at all levels, from beginner to top-level jumpers, as well as equitation, boarding, training and sales.

“We’re primarily a show barn—we specialize in hunters and jumpers,” says owner Erin Bruce. Erin thinks horses and riders would be hard-pressed to find a better spot to interact in the area. “These horses are pretty lucky—not many get to have an ocean view.” Erin’s parents bought the Sunnybrook Farm property in 2000 and built an expansive home on the upper slope above the training facility. After her parents passed away, Erin and her dentist husband, Michael, moved into the main house; daughter Rebecca and son Spenser also live at the family compound. “It’s a very European way of life, multigenerational, horses and family business all on the same site,” says Erin. “We love it here.” Erin was raised riding horses on a family ranch in Utah and developed a passion for equestrian life early on. Erin has passed on her passion to her daughter, Rebecca, who has visited the Utah ranch many times. “Becca has been horse crazy since she was young,” laughs Erin. Rebecca has won many events and championships throughout the years in the hunter, equitation and jumper rings. Most recently, on her own mount Pizzazz, she won the $25,000 Huntington Grand Prix and $15,000 Scarlet Derby at Summer Classic at Oaks Blenheim in San Juan Capistrano. Last spring, Rebecca competed in the Bronze Series in Oliva, Spain. Rebecca works closely with many top professionals throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe. Rebecca is very optimistic and excited about a new Grand Prix mount she recently imported from Europe, Dollar Girl, whom she hopes will take her far in the Grand Prix jumper field. Over the years, Sunnybrook riders, such as supermodel sisters Gigi and Bella Hadid, Elizabeth McGovern and Katie Browne, have achieved regional and national success. They earned year-end awards such as PCHA Leading Equitation and Hunter Championships and won numerous year-end medal finals. The Sunnybrook Farm facility sets itself apart from others with a distinctive European approach and one of the best arenas in the area. Fulltime employees include four grooms plus four trainers, who work with about 30 clients. Horses condition at various inclines on a treadmill, with warm up and cool down on a Euro-Walker— both European training machines. Erin says they have specialty footing called GTT. “There’s a saying, ‘no hoof, no horse.’ The GTT environment helps cushion the horses’ feet in all weather.” Erin and Rebecca travel several times a year to Europe to select and import horses, all warm bloods bred to jump, mostly from Ireland, Germany, Holland and Spain. Why Europe? “It’s almost like a lifestyle there,” says Rebecca. “They’re all family businesses that have been doing this for hundreds of years.” 

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The Fess Parker Family Tree Sprouts Deep Roots in Santa Barbara County

PHOTOS: COURTESY PARKER FAMILY

BY WENDY THIES SELL

Before he was a beloved Hollywood star and real estate developer, 20-year-old Fess Parker hitched a ride up the California coast while on furlough from the Navy. When his boots hit the ground and he laid eyes on Santa Barbara, he was determined to return and make it his home.

Clockwise from top left: Rodney’s Vineyard at Fess Parker Winery; a young Fess Parker as Davey Crockett; Fess Parker Winery (3) and Fess’s son Eli Parker (inset). S P R I N G 2 017

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Clockwise from above left: Marcy and Fess Parker; Eli and Ashley Parker; the tasting room at Epiphany Cellars; The Bubble Shack; The Fess Parker Experience at the Fess Parker Doubletree by Hilton Resort; Fess Parker Winery President Tim Snider pours at a winery event.

PHOTOS: COURTESY PARKER FAMILY

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ore than 70 years later, seven years after his death, the descendants of Fess Parker carry on his legacy in Santa Barbara County, even fulfilling some of his abandoned dreams. Parker found fame when Walt Disney cast him as Davy Crockett in TV’s first mini-series. A decade later, he gained millions more fans while portraying Daniel Boone. Parker permanently moved his young family—wife Marcy, son Eli and daughter Ashley—to Santa Barbara in 1968. At the time, he was increasingly captivated by real estate; he built mobile home parks and with his wife, an interior decorator, flipped houses long before it was trendy. “We lived in nine houses in the first 13 years of my life!” recalls Eli Parker. An enthusiastic tennis player, Parker started looking for property in Santa Barbara in the early 70s to build a tennis club. He negotiated a deal with Southern Pacific, buying the railroad’s 32-acre waterfront property along East Cabrillo Boulevard. After a 13-year approval process, he built Fess Parker’s Red Lion Inn, now The Fess Parker, a Doubletree by Hilton Resort. At age 63, Parker purchased a 714-acre ranch in Los Olivos, thinking he would raise cattle, but he planted a vineyard instead. “When they told me he was going into the wine business, frankly, I thought he was kind of nuts,” Eli admits. “He was at an age when most people are thinking about slowing down and retiring.” Parker asked Ken Brown, then owner of Byron Winery, to design a business plan for a “fairly modest” 7,000 case winery. “Ken sat down with Dad and said, ‘Okay, this is going to be about a $3.5 million investment.’ I still remember the look on Dad’s face. It was like, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me! We’re not going to spend three-and-a-half million dollars to do this!’ Over the course of the next 10 years, it was probably three times that amount,” Eli recalls. “People used to say, it’ll be 10 years before you make a nickel in this business, which seemed absurd to Dad as well. But it was every bit of 10 years before there was any profitability.” Both Eli and Ashley switched careers to work alongside their dad. Their efforts have paid off; today, Fess Parker Winery produces 65,000 cases and enjoys respect from both critics and consumers. Winery visitors who had the good fortune to meet Parker tell similar “Fess stories,” of how the soft-spoken, surprisingly approachable


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Clockwise from top left: Fess Parker Wine Country Inn & Spa; Third Window Brewing Co.; Ashley Parker and daughter Greer Shull; Katie McDonald; Fess Parker Wine Country Inn & Spa; Fess Parker and his grandson Kris (inset). 70

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PHOTOS: KATIE MCDONALD PHOTO BY WENDY THIES SELL, ALL OTHERS COURTESY PARKER FAMILY.

“He gave me an autographed picture that said, ‘My wish for you is to take Davy [Crockett’s] saying to heart: Be sure you’re right, then go ahead.’ There’s a certain courage in pursuing your dreams and your beliefs that I think is central to my perspective of who I am. That came from him directly.” —Kris Parker

and larger-than-life celebrity (Parker stood 6’6”) had an extraordinary ability to remember everyone. “He would meet people that he had met once and remember their names,” shares granddaughter Tessa Marie Cody. “He had a love for people, entertaining people, sharing everything he had with people. He was a very great man!” Tessa, one of Eli’s seven children, started her own label, Tessa Marie Wines, at age 17. “[Grandpa] really did set a high standard for us,” she says. “I still ask myself, what would Grandpa Fess do?” Several Parker grandchildren have worked at the family’s winery and tasting rooms: Epiphany Cellars, The Bubble Shack and the new Tasting Experience at the Doubletree. Ashley, who operates Fess Parker (FESPAR) Enterprises with Eli, has three children—Spencer, Greer and Henry Shull—with her late husband, Rodney. Ashley’s husband, Tim Snider, is president of Fess Parker Winery. Greer, who graduates from Westmont

College in June, aspires to work with her family promoting the winery. “My grandpa was such a hard worker, and he taught us to do the same,” she says. “We all really miss him. He was such a family guy, and he totally cherished that over anything else.” Parker’s widow, Marcy, age 88, resides in Santa Barbara. “I’m a little surprised that she is still with us, just because losing Fess was pretty rough on her, but she is a very tough cookie,” says Ashley. Parker and his wife purchased The Grand Hotel in Los Olivos in 1998, renaming it Fess Parker Wine Country Inn & Spa and undergoing an extensive renovation. Parker referred to the inn as “the Texas Embassy” because at any time so many of his buddies would assemble there. The family unveils the inn’s new restaurant, The Bear and Star, in March. The name is a blend of California and Fess’s home state of Texas. Acclaimed chef John Cox, formerly of Sierra Mar at Post Ranch Inn, is chef/partner for the ambitious new project, the concept of which is “refined ranch cuisine.” Much of the organic vegetables, herbs, fruit, eggs, honey, beef and wines come from the Parker family’s ranch on Foxen Canyon Road. “We’re trying to take the farm-to-table thing one step further, more like from our farm to table,” says Eli. The family’s cowgirl, Katie McDonald, raises the restaurant’s beef. Eli’s daughter founded Fess Parker Cattle Company in honor of her grandpa. They often rode horses together on the ranch; Parker bequeathed his saddle and bridle to Katie when he passed away in March 2010. “My grandpa and I were really close!” Katie says with emotion. “Every day, we’d walk to lunch and talk about all my crazy

ideas. He could take nothing and turn it into something so amazing! He was a genius.” The horseback stuntwoman used to raise rodeo bucking bulls. Today, she owns cattle ranches in New Mexico and Texas with husband, professional bull rider Rocky McDonald. Her 110 head of Wagyu cattle are out to pasture on the family’s Los Olivos ranch, while Katie and her dad build a feedlot where the exceptional beef cattle are sustainably fed grape pomace and distillers’ grains. “We like to set the bar high and go get it!” exclaims Katie. Another grandchild fulfilling one of Parker’s dreams is Eli’s oldest son, Kris Parker. “I was very, very close to him! He was like a father figure to me in a lot of ways,” says Kris, whose beer-loving grandpa inspired him to walk away from the financial world and renovate an old feed mill on East Haley Street (in the Mill development) into Third Window Brewing Co. “He loved craft beer. Grandpa and I talked a lot about starting a brewery,” says Kris. “My grandfather had incredible vision and the determination to see that vision achieved. The thing I try to emulate is being fearless in the pursuit of a vision.” One of Kris’s first memories of his grandfather has provided lifelong inspiration. “He gave me an autographed picture that said, ‘My wish for you is to take Davy [Crockett’s] saying to heart: Be sure you’re right, then go ahead.’ There’s a certain courage in pursuing your dreams and your beliefs that I think is central to my perspective of who I am. That came from him directly. There are easier paths to sow, but when you look back on your life, hopefully there won’t be any regrets for the opportunities you didn’t take.” Perhaps the Parker family legacy is more than show business, wine or real estate; it is the confidence to pursue one’s true passion, no matter how lofty the dream.  S P R I N G 2 017

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COUNTRY STYLE Driving down the tree-lined grove of sycamores as you enter the grounds of the historic Alisal Guest Ranch & Resort, it’s hard not to take a deep breath and just gawk at the majestic beauty of this secluded gem.

PH OTO G R A PH E D BY M E H OS H S T Y L E D & W R I T T E N BY J U DY F O R E M A N M O D E L : O L E S YA O F H E L L O G O R G E O U S H A IR & M A K E-UP BY SHANNON LOAR- COTÉ , BLUSH AND L A SHE S O N LO C AT I O N AT T H E A L I S A L G U E S T R A N C H & R E S O R T


Opposite: Paisley turquoise prairie skirt, jeans jacket and white tee from Wendy Foster Los Olivos; Majo over the knee black boots with rear lace up from Romp; a beaded long necklace with ceramic disk by Santa Ynez artist Kristen Cramer; and an Iris Disanto vintage Stetson hat in white with turquoise velvet ribbon, both from Global Eye Art Collective. This page: Cotton and lace long dress, earrings and silk neckerchief from Wendy Foster Los Olivos; a straw and suede hat from First Street Leather and saddle over the knee boots from Romp.

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FRAMED BY THE SANTA YNEZ MOUNTAINS, the Alisal property features rolling grassy hills (thanks to late winter showers), a lake, two 18-hole championship golf courses, a spa, a swimming pool, tennis courts, 50 miles of riding trails, and horses and cows on this working 10,000-acre ranch, making this romantic getaway a little bit of heaven on earth. The “back at the ranch” ambience, which has welcomed guests since 1946, is perfect to showcase this spring’s country fashions. Add a beautiful model, clothes and accessories, and, of course, Western boots, fringe vests, suede jackets, jeans and cotton lace dresses that are a little bit western and a little bit wine country—from several local boutiques—and you have the makings of a very special fashion feature.

Opposite: Olesya wears a Lauren faux suede white fringe vest from The Outpost Trading Co.; saddle brown leather booties by Area Forte from Romp; Big Star jeans from American Colors by Alex Lehr; and earrings from Wendy Foster Los Olivos. This page: Gingham design off-the-shoulder crop shirt with pom poms, jeans by Acne, gold hoop earrings with blue agate drop and beaded necklace with fringe tassel, all from Wendy Foster Los Olivos; brown leather with turquoise cuff by Calleen Cordero from Romp; and snakeskin sandals from American Colors by Alex Lehr.

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This page: Gentlefawn sweater dress, embellished brown leather belt: long leather suede trench coat by Linea Pelle Collection Los Angeles and light brown embroidered cowboy/ girl boots by Old Gringo, all from Wildflower Women Boutique; silver bangle bracelet by Brighton Collectibles from First Street Leather; and Calleen Cordero leather and studded clutch (with holder) from Romp. Opposite: Navajo sequin grey dress by Love Sam, suede bootie with wood heel and cut outs and assorted beaded bangle bracelets by An Old Soul, all from Wildflower Women Boutique; and ivory moto jacket from First Street Leather.

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Golf

Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara County is one of America’s most desirable golf destinations, with splendid courses designed to maximize enjoyment of the region’s splendor and moderate climate.

Glen Annie Golf Club

GOLETA

Sandpiper Golf Club

GOLETA

In the rolling foothills of Goleta, 15 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara, this meticulously maintained and challenging layout offers panoramic ocean, Channel Island and mountain views from nearly every hole. The tee shot from #16, for example, decends 150 ft. in elevation to land softly on a manicured landscape near an adjacent lake with a cascading stream. The clubhouse complex includes Frog Bar & Grill and scenic patios with excellent facilities for gatherings of up to 300. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 71.1; slope rating, 122. 405 Glen Annie Rd., 805/968-6400, glenanniegolf.com.

Established in 1972 as the county’s first resort course open to the public, Sandpiper is an inspiring 18 holes of seaside golf on an extraordinary terrain, with an acclaimed layout named by Golf Digest as one of the top 25 public golf courses in the U.S.. Designed by renowned architect William F. Bell, the links-style layout features rolling fairways leading to enormous greens with ocean views from nearly every hole. The stretch of holes 10–14 is one of the most memorable experiences of any golfer’s life. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 74.7; slope rating, 136. 7925 Hollister Ave., 805/968-1541, sandpipergolf.com.

River Course at the Alisal

Rancho San Marcos

SOLVANG

Opened for public play in 1992 on land owned by and adjacent to the renowned Alisal Guest Ranch, River Course provides a layout to be enjoyed by golfers of all levels of skill. Set along the Santa Ynez River, the course features panoramic views, mostly wide fairways and accessible greens. Several holes, however, will challenge even the low handicap golfer, especially any of the river holes. The clubhouse has an excellent restaurant with comfortable, inside seating and a vieworiented patio. Par 72. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 150 Alisal Rd., 805/688-6042, rivercourse.com. 78

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SANTA YNEZ MOUNTAINS

Twelve miles from Santa Barbara, up scenic Hwy 154—the historic road winding off State Street into the Santa Ynez Mountains that leads to the charming Santa Ynez Valley wineries—“Rancho” has been acclaimed as one of the finest experiences in Southern California. This historic land challenges with sand, lakes, the Santa Ynez River, fields of native grasses, oak tree-lined chaparral and changes in elevation. A comfortable clubhouse has a grill with food to go or to enjoy at tables inside or outside on scenic patios. Par 71. Stroke rating from men’s tees: 73.1; slope rating, 135. 4600 Hwy. 154, 805/683-6334, rsm1804.com.


FEATURED GOLF COURSES

FEATURED FOR SPRING

La Purisima Golf Course from Santa Barbara, and a half-hour from the charming Danish town of Solvang and Santa Ynez Valley wineries, “La P” is pure golf—no real estate, no commercial development for miles, just long, twisting fairways bordered at times by oak and eucalyptus groves and protected by sand, water and out-of-bounds stakes, finishing with huge, lightning-fast greens. In the afternoon, wind often becomes an additional factor, making the closing holes our own “Amen Corner.” Designed by world-renowned golf architect Robert Muir Graves, a round at this beautiful, challenging course will not soon be forgotten, and is worth the scenic drive up the coast and into the pastoral countryside. A big, hacienda-style club house complex includes a substantial retail display and, in a separate building, Piranha Grille for breakfast through lunch.

LESS THAN AN HOUR

Yardage and stroke rating from men’s tees: Black (7,105 yards), 75.6/143; Blue (6,670 yards), 73.1/136; White (6,187 yards), 71.1/131. 3455 E. State Hwy. 246, 805/735-8395, lapurisimagolf.com

SPRING 2017

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MAP KEY Visitors Centers 1 Garden St. 113 Harbor Wy., 4th FL 45 Hartley Pl., Goleta

D.


E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

in California, called presidios. In addition to being Santa Barbara’s birthplace, El Presidio de Santa Barbara, the neighborhood is also home to the historic Lobero Theatre, one of the city’s architectural jewels, as well as Casa de la Guerra historic house museum. El Paseo, a charming adobe plaza built in the 1820s, houses several nice shops and restaurants, along with The Wine Collection of El Paseo, an upscale array of six excellent wine tasting rooms open daily from noon to 6 p.m. (located off of the 800 block of State Street).

8. Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

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Santa Barbara Historical Museum exhibits fine art, costumes and artifacts from Santa Barbara’s colorful history. Gledhill Library houses photographs and historic documents. | 136 E. De la Guerra St. Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/966-1601, santabarbaramuseum.com.

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El Presidio de Santa Barbara was founded in 1782 to offer protection to the mission and settlers, provide a seat of government and guard against foreign invasion, and is now a state historic park. | 123 E. Canon Perdido St. 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. daily. 805/9650093, sbthp.org.

D OW N TOW N S TAT E S T R E E T defines the city’s center—and its heart. The intersection of State and Carrillo streets is where Captain Salisbury Haley hammered an iron stake in 1850 to designate the future midtown area. The self-guided Red Tile Walking Tour is a great way to get your bearings (map is available at Santa Barbara Visitor Center, 1 Garden St.). Don’t miss the historic Arlington Theatre, a notable example of both Mission Revival and Spanish Colonial Revival architectural styles. Also worth visiting is the beautiful Alice Keck Park Memorial Garden, named after the benefactor who donated the prime property.

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Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a National Historic Landmark in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, was dedicated in 1929. Its immense landscaped courtyard and sunken garden are the site of public celebrations year round. | 1100 Anacapa St. Docent tours Mon.–Fri. 10:30 a.m.; Daily 2 p.m. 805/962-6464, santabarbaracourthouse.org.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s outstanding permanent and special collections, housed in a stately building constructed in 1914 as the city’s first federally funded post office, include the only remaining intact mural by Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros, Portrait of Mexico Today. | 1130 State St. Tues.– Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 805/963-4364, sbma.net.

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La Arcada, designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1926, is home to a wealth of galleries, shops and restaurants. Dotted along the way are historical curios and sculptures, with all roads leading to the much-loved central fountain inhabited by turtles and fish. | 1100 block of State Street.

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Paseo Nuevo is a charming outdoor destination to shop, dine, relax, stroll and people watch. Featuring Spanish-style architecture, Paseo Nuevo is also home to Center Stage Theater, a black box venue showcasing live performances, and MCA Santa Barbara, a museum dedicated to exhibiting the highest quality of contemporary art while recognizing the artists of tomorrow with innovative exhibitions. | 651 & 653 Paseo Nuevo. paseonuevoshopping.com, mcasantabarbara.org.

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Santa Barbara Public Market offers foodies an impressive collection of purveyors focused on handcrafted, regionally sourced and sustainably made foods. The LEED-certified space also has a commissary kitchen, featuring cooking classes, winemaker dinners, pop-up chefs and more! | 38 W. Victoria St. at Chapala, Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 7:30 a.m.-11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.-10 p.m., sbpublicmarket.com.

PRESIDIO NEIGHBORHOOD is a vibrant section developed around the historic site of the last remaining Spanish fortresses built

MISSION DISTRIC T, identified by Mission Santa Barbara, is among the oldest residential neighborhoods in the city. Characterized by revival-style architecture, it is also home to the Mission Historical Park and rose garden.

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Santa Barbara Botanic Garden’s 78 acres, accessed by five and a half miles of trails, record the history of the state’s rare and indigenous plants. From the dramatic opening view through the meadows, chaparral and forest to the sweeping ridge-top views of the Channel Islands, the garden is a skillful display of California’s natural bounty. | 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Mar.–Oct. 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Nov.–Feb. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/682-4726, sbbg.org.

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Mission Santa Barbara was dedicated in 1786 by Father Fermin Lasuén. Known as “Queen of the Missions” for its twin belltowers, it remains the only California mission to be continuously occupied by the Franciscans. | 2201 Laguna St. Daily tours 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 805/682-4713, sbmission.org; santabarbaramission.org.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History celebrates its 100th birthday in 2016, and provides science and nature education to generations of visitors, from toddlers to seniors. The museum, located along Mission Creek, reconnects more than 100,000 people each year—including 5,700 members—to nature indoors and outdoors. | 2559 Puesta del Sol Rd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/682-4711, sbnature.org.

PHOTO: MERCEDES LOWE PHOTO:

Santa Barbara 


WAT E R F R O N T, running the length of Cabrillo Boulevard from East Beach to the harbor, is a feast for outdoor enthusiasts. A paved pathway runs the full distance—by Stearns Wharf and along West Beach to the harbor.

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Andree Clark Bird Refuge—an artificial freshwater lake and marsh pond adjacent to the zoo —provides one of the best biking/jogging/skating paths in the area around its perimeter. | 1400 E. Cabrillo Blvd. 805/564-5418.

Four Centuries of Botanical Illustration February 9 – April 2, 2017 John and Peggy Maximus Gallery

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Santa Barbara Harbor and Breakwater is a working harbor, home to fishing boats, private yachts and nearly 1,200 excursion and sightseeing boats. It is always a busy and interesting place to walk, skate, bike, eat and purchase fresh catch at Fisherman’s Market every Saturday morning. | Off Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, situated on the harbor’s scenic waterfront, presents the region’s rich local maritime history. From ancient seafaring Chumash to modern-day deep-sea research, the emphasis is on human interaction with the sea. | 113 Harbor Way. Memorial Day–Labor Day 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Labor Day–Memorial Day 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; closed Wed. 805/962-8404, sbmm.org.

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Stearns Wharf, a Santa Barbara icon, was built by a Vermont native in 1876 to accommodate ocean-going vessels. Once owned by Jimmy Cagney, its dramatic views of the city and the hills beyond, as well as its mix of shops and restaurants, have charmed visitors for more than a century. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd.

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Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Sea Center on Stearns Wharf engages visitors of all ages with interactive exhibits, opportunities to work like scientists, a theater showcasing the wonders of Santa Barbara Channel, a live shark touch pool and a 1,500-gallon tide pool tank, to discover the fun in science and the wonders of the natural world. | State St. at Cabrillo Blvd. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/962-2526, sbnature.org.

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Santa Barbara Arts & Crafts Show is the longest-running public weekly art show in the country, with more than 250 exhibitors, all there in person and carefully screened to ensure originality of work. | Cabrillo Blvd. between State and Calle Puerta Vallarta streets. Sun. 10 a.m. to dusk. 805/8972519, santabarbaraca.gov.

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The Mill is a distinctively modern spin on the original feed mill constructed in 1904, which is now an artisan marketplace, featuring a production winery, craft brewery k

Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History

2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara, 805.682.4711


E XPLORE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

and farm-to-table barbecue restaurant, as well as some unique retail offerings. | 406 E. Haley St., 10 a.m.-10 p.m., 805/965-9555, themillsb.com.

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Santa Barbara Zoo opened to the public in 1963 with only seven residents. Now more than 500 animals live here, and 30 acres of lush gardens spread across a knoll overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Committed to conservation, species survival and education, the zoo is an enlightening and entertaining place to visit. | 500 Niños Dr. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. daily. 805/962-5339, sbzoo.org.

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Urban Wine Tasting Although you won’t find any vineyards in this area, these unique and eclectic wineries and tasting rooms are a great way to begin your wine-tasting journey through the area on foot, as an introduction to local wines. Many of the urban wineries have northern Santa Barbara County vineyards that are also open to visitors. A Area 5.1

137 Anacapa St., Unit B, 805/770-7251

B Au Bon Climat

813 Anacapa St., 805/963-7999

C Armada Wine

& Beer Merchant 1129-A State St., 805/770-5912

D AVA Santa

Barbara 116 E. Yanonali St., 805/453-6768

E Carr Vineyards

& Winery, 414 N. Salsipuedes St., 805/965-7985

F Cebada Vineyard

& Winery 8 E. De La Guerra St., 805/451-2570

G Corks & Crowns

32 Anacapa St., 805/845-8600

H Corktree Cellars Wine Bar & Bistro 910 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, 805/684-1400 I Cottonwood

Canyon, 224 Anacapa St., 805/963-1221

J Deep Sea Wine

Tasting Room 217 Stearns Wharf, 805/618-1185

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K Foley Food

U Municipal

L Giessinger Winery by the Sea 210 State St., 805/568-0820

V MWC32

M Grassini

205 Anacapa St., 805/962-5857

& Wine Society 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta, 805/968-1614

Family Vineyards, 813 Anacapa St., 805/897-3366

N Happy Canyon

Vineyard, 30 El Paseo, 805/232-3549

O Jaffurs Wine

Cellars, 819 E. Montecito St., 805/962-7003

P Jamie Slone

Winemakers, 22 Anacapa St., Ste. D, 805/931-6864

813 Anacapa St., 805/845-8435

W Oreana Winery

X Pali Wine Company, 116 E. Yanonali St., 805/560-7254 Y Riverbench

137 Anacapa St., Ste. C, 805/324-4100

Z Sanford Winery 1114 State St., 805/770-7873

Wines, 23 E. De la Guerra St., 805/5606555

AA Sanguis Wines 8 Ashley Ave., 805/845-0920

Q Kalyra by the

BB Santa Barbara

Sea, 212 State St., 805/965-8606

Winery, 202 Anacapa St., 805/963-3633

R Kunin Wines Tasting Room 28 Anacapa St., 805/963-9633

CC Silver Wines

S LaFond Winery

Wines, 2330 Lillie Ave., 805/565-9463

T Margerum Tasting

EE Whitcraft Winery & Tasting Room, 36-A S. Calle Cesar Chavez, 805/730-1680

111 E. Yanonali St., 805/845-2020

Room, 813 Anacapa St., 805/845-8435

724 Reddick St., 805/963-3052

DD Summerland

MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, is an awe-inspiring experience to inspire a new generation of innovators and problem-solvers. The new museum space includes 17,000 square feet of interactive educational exhibits focused on science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM). | 805/708-2282, moxi.org.

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Funk Zone is a hotbed of homegrown artistic production. The Funk Zone is known for its eclectic wall murals, ateliers, galleries, alternative exhibition spaces, trendy artist shops and the lively Urban Wine Trail. Half the fun is each surprise that awaits you down the alley or painted on the wall in front of you! | funkzone.net.

Montecito and Points South Montecito’s densely wooded, lightly populated residential area between Santa Barbara and Summerland has attracted the privileged for more than a century, but its genesis was agrarian. Remnants of this rich heritage are still in use. The 500-acre property, on which Harleigh Johnston grew citrus trees until 1893, became San Ysidro Ranch. With the ranch’s completion in 1935 and the Montecito Inn’s in 1928, it

wasn’t long before well-known captains of industry built estates, many of them incorporating the farms and ranches that had originally settled the area.

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Casa del Herrero, designed for George Steedman by the “father of the Santa Barbara style,” George Washington Smith, offers a glimpse into Montecito life in the 1930s. A splendid example of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture, the house—and the gardens—are National Historic Landmarks. The gardens, covering 11 acres, were designed by noted landscape architects Ralph Stevens and Lockwood de Forest and horticulturist Frances T. Underhill. | 1387 E. Valley R. Tours Wed. and Sat. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reservations required. 805/5655653, casadelherrero.com.

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Ganna Walska Lotusland is a 37-acre garden estate, prized for its rare and exotic plants and providing new perspectives on sustainability of nature’s offerings. Themed gardens include topiary, bromeliad, succulent, cycad, cactus, fern, Japanese, Australian, water and a blue garden, among others. | Reservations required. Tours Wed.–Sat. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. between Feb. 18 and Nov. 15. Reservations required. 805/969-9990, lotusland.org.

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Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art educates students and the community about the power and value of the visual arts through physical, critical and spiritual engagement with the creative process and its results. | Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Mon.–Fri. 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 805/5656162, westmontmuseum.org. S U M M E R L A N D is just a stone’s throw off Hwy. 101 and two minutes south of Montecito, and offers the rural charm of an earlier California beach town while maintaining the spirit of an artists’ colony via plentiful antique, home and garden shops, art galleries, boutiques and unpretentious eateries.


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Lookout County Park, off Lillie Avenue at Evans Avenue, is on the bluffs above the beautiful Summerland Beach. From this vantage point, where full picnic facilities await, there are spectacular views of the Channel Islands. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Evans Ave. CARPINTERIA is five minutes south of Montecito and Summerland. Although the city advertises itself as home to the “world’s safest beach,” visitors also come to roam the avocado-laden hills in search of the orchid fields and hothouses, for which Carpinteria is well known.

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Goleta Beach Park, adjacent to UCSB, is favored by families and groups for its white sands and expanse of lawn with numerous barbecue and picnic table areas. The 1,500-foot-long pier accommodates boat launching facilities, fishermen and strollers. | Exit Hwy. 217 at Sandspit Rd. 805/568-2461.

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Art, Design & Architecture Museum at University of California Santa Barbara holds an impressive fine art collection with one of the largest architectural archives in North America. In addition, it engages contemporary artists in exhibits and programs. | UCSB. Wed.– Sun. Noon–5 p.m. 805/893-2951, museum.ucsb.edu.

of professional actors and advanced students, as well as other concerts and events. Open June through October. | 420 2nd St. 805/686-1789, solvangfestivaltheater.org.

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Old Mission Santa Inés is the 19th of 21 missions built in California from 1769 to 1836 by Spanish Franciscan priests. Founded September 17, 1804 by Padre Estevan Tapis, it was the first European settlement in Santa Ynez Valley and still displays artifacts preserved from the Mission era. | 1760 Mission Dr. at Hwy. 246. 805/688-4815, missionsantaines.org.

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Carpinteria State Beach and Bluffs are among California’s most popular destinations—the result of a broad beach and good sunning, tidepooling and fishing. Most any sunny weekend, you’ll find loads of families settled in for the day. For hikers and birdwatchers, it doesn’t get much better than the Carpinteria Bluffs. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. Continue through town to the beach. Park on Linden Ave. or in the Carpinteria State Beach lot.

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Santa Ynez Mountains and Valley Areas

Salt Marsh Nature Reserve, a 230acre salt marsh, is home to local and migratory waterfowl and fish and is a birder’s dream. | Exit Hwy. 101 at Linden Ave. at Sandyland Rd., turn right and drive three blocks to Ash Ave.

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Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club was admitted to the U.S. Polo Association in 1911 and moved to its present location shortly thereafter. The club welcomes visitors for Sunday games from May through October, with the high-goal season capped by the Gulfstream Pacific Coast Open. | 3375 Foothill Rd. 805/684-6683, sbpolo.com.

Goleta and Points North The city of Goleta and several of the area’s well-known institutions and landmarks are just 10 minutes north of Santa Barbara, including University of California Santa Barbara and two championship golf courses.

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Rancho La Patera, one of the oldest landmarks in Goleta Valley, is home to historic Stow House, a beautiful example of Carpenter Gothic architecture, and Cavalletto History Education Center, which focuses on Goleta’s ranching and agricultural history. | 304 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/681-7216, stowhouse.com.

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South Coast Railroad Museum, housed in a restored train depot, is a magnet for train buffs. Tours of the Victorian depot, rides on the “Goleta Short Line” miniature train and exhibits are part of the experience. | 300 N. Los Carneros Rd. 805/964-3540, goletadepot.org.

El Capitan and Refugio State Beaches, the mixed sand and rock beach at El Capitan links Refugio—a palmlined crescent of sand with tide pools—by beach, bluff and bike trails. Both are popular beach campgrounds. | From Hwy. 101, exit the northernmost El Capitan exit and/or Refugio Rd. 805/968-1033, parks.ca.gov.

Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes, the Dunes Center at 1055 Guadalupe St. should be the first stop in the exploration of the largest dune complex in the state. | Wed.–Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 805/343-2455, dunescenter.org.

The valley is historically rich and geographically diverse. In the valley, vineyards dot the landscape, many with tasting rooms. Please refer to our winery guide.

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Cachuma Lake Recreation Area provides 750 campsites just 25 minutes from downtown Santa Barbara. Full marina, boat launch, rental boats, fishing equipment and licenses are available. Nature cruises led by park naturalists provide an educational look at the wildlife, birds (including bald eagles) and plants that make Cachuma such a rich habitat. | Hwy. 154. 805/686-5055, sbparks.org.

Solvang With a population of nearly 5,000, Solvang (“sunny field” in Danish) is the largest city in Santa Ynez Valley. Founded in 1911 by Danish educators from the Midwest, Solvang is the “Danish Capital of North America.”

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Solvang Festival Theater, a 700-seat historic outdoor theater, presents excellent productions staged by Pacific Conservatory of the Performing Arts (PCPA), a combination

Elverhøj Museum of History & Art is housed in a historic handcrafted structure built in a style derived from the large farmhouses of 18th century Denmark. Visitors can view Solvang’s history through photos, artifacts and video displays; enjoy exhibits celebrating the Danish-American pioneer spirit and the colorful heritage of Denmark. | Wed.Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 1624 Elverhoy Way. 805/6861211, elverhoj.org.

Wildling Art Museum, an educational institution dedicated to presenting art of America’s wilderness, is a place to gain a greater appreciation of art and a better understanding of the importance of preserving our natural heritage. | 1511-B Mission Dr., 805/6881082, wildlingmuseum.org.

Santa Ynez and Los Olivos These small, charming towns look like they belong in the pages of a book on the history of the west and are world-renowned for their vineyards, equestrian culture, art galleries, inns and restaurants that epitomize the region’s signature wine country cuisine.

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Los Olivos melds California history with modern-day wine tasting rooms, restaurants, art galleries and upscale shops in this picture-perfect country town dating back to the 1860s, when stagecoaches passed through. Centered by an iconic flagpole, the serenity of vineyards, lavender farms, orchards, ranches and horse trails surround Los Olivos. This is a charming place to visit for a one-stop wine country experience. | Approximately 40 min. north of Santa Barbara via Hwy. 154, losolivosca.com.

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Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum celebrates the rich history of the Santa Ynez Valley, its pioneering settlers and the five early townships that formed the foundation of this unique region. | Open Wed.– Sun. noon–4 p.m. 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. 805/688-7889, santaynezmuseum.org.  SPRING 2017

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WINE SA NTA BA RBA R A COUNT Y

Los Alamos Santa Barbara County vineyards grow exceptional grapes, and now, after more than 40 years of experimentation with an incredible diversity of microclimates and soil types, growers and winemakers know a lot about what to plant and where those vines thrive best—and a host of talented vintners transform those grapes into world-class wines. The best way to explore this authentic wine-producing and wine grape growing region is by visiting the tasting rooms and speaking directly to the people. Here are more than 100 that offer the wine tasting experience.

Western hospitality meets world class wine in the picturesque Western town of Los Alamos. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Martian Ranch & Vineyard

9110 Alisos Canyon Rd., 805/344-1804 IN-TOWN TASTING

Bedford Winery

448 Bell St., 805/344-2107 Casa Dumetz Wines

388 Bell St., 805/344-1900 Municipal Winemakers

423 Bell St., 805/931-6864

Santa Maria Valley

Los Alamos Valley

The Santa Maria Valley American Viticulture Area was the third AVA established in the United States (in 1981) and the first in Santa Barbara County. With its east-west valley and river lands, this scenic area has a climate that leads to early bud break and a long ripening season for the grapes.

Lompoc The ever-growing numbers of urban wineries and tasting rooms in Lompoc are Santa Barbara County’s most western tasting region and are primarily located in the area affectionately known as the “Wine Ghetto,” a bustling industrial park with world-class wines. IN-TOWN TASTING

Ampelos

312 N. 9th St., 805/736-9957 Arcadian Winery/Bratcher Winery

1515 E. Chestnut Ave., Ste. B, 805/737-3900 Brewer-Clifton

329 N. "F" St., 805/735-9184 Cebada Vineyard

4001 Forbidden Fruit Ln., 805/735-4648 Fiddlehead Cellars

1597 E. Chestnut Ave., 805/742-0204 Flying Goat Cellars

TASTING AT THE VINE YARD 1

Presqu'ile Winery & Vineyards

Presqu'ile (press-KEEL), Creole for “almost an island,” was a haven and refuge on the Gulf Coast for generations of the Murphy family. Presqu’ile Winery, named in honor of that place, produces elegant Santa Maria Valley pinot noir, chardonnay, sauvignon blanc and syrah. Enjoy these estate grown wines, food pairings and views of the valley in the relaxed, yet refined tasting room. Open Fri. 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Cambria Winery & Vineyard

5475 Chardonnay Ln., 805/937-8091 Cottonwood Canyon Vineyard & Winery

3940 Dominion Rd., 805/937-8463 Foxen Winery & Vineyard

7600 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/937-4251 Kenneth Volk Vineyards

5230 Tepusquet Rd., 805/938-7896 Presqu'ile Winery & Vineyards

5391 Presquile Dr., 805/937-8110

5391 Presquile Dr., 805/937-8110 presquilewine.com

1520 E. Chestnut Ct., Unit A, 805/736-9032 La Montagne Winery

1509 E. Chestnut Ave., 805/291-6643 Longoria Wines

415 E. Chestnut Ave., 866/759-4637 Pali Wine Co.

1501 E. Chestnut Ct., 805/735-2354 Palmina

1520 E. Chestnut Ct., 805/735-2030 Scott Cellars

316 N. "F" St., 805/736-6161 Stolpman Vineyards

1700 Industrial Way, 805/688-0400 Transcendence

313 N. “F” St., 805/689-5258 Zotovich Cellars

300 N. 12th St., Ste. 1D, 805/736-1600

Lompoc/Sta. Rita Hills The eastern gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills appellation is Buellton, while Lompoc lies

as the western gateway. Sta. Rita Hills is home to the most extreme cool-climate vineyards in the area, growing primarily pinot noir and chardonnay, along with other interesting cool-climate wines. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Babcock Winery & Vineyards

5175 E. Hwy. 246, 805/736-1455 Foley Estates Vineyard & Winery

6121 E. Hwy. 246, 805/737–6222 Huber Vineyards & Cellars

4892 Hapgood Rd., 805/736-3854 Melville Vineyards & Winery

5185 E. Hwy. 246, 805/735-7030 Sanford Winery & Vineyards

5010 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/735-5900 IN-TOWN TASTING

Dierberg/Star Lane/Three Saints

1280 Drum Canyon Rd., 805/693-0744

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Lafond Winery & Vineyards

Long known as Santa Barbara’s tastemaker, Pierre Lafond founded Santa Barbara County’s first winery since prohibition (now located in downtown Santa Barbara, two blocks from the beach). His 65 acres in the Sta. Rita Hills and 30 acres across the river have produced medal-awarded syrah, chardonnay, and a pinot noir that “is truly an expression” of the Sta. Rita Hills appellation. Open 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 6855 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/688-7921 lafondwinery.com

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Rancho Sisquoc Winery

Koehler Winery

6600 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/934-4332

5360 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/693-8384

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery

Zaca Mesa Winery

6020 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/937-8340

6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/688-9339

Tres Hermanas Winery

IN-TOWN TASTING

IN-TOWN TASTING

2933 Grand Ave., Ste. A, 805/686-1144

9660 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/937-8451

Alta Maria Vineyards

Ca’ Del Grevino

Alexander & Wayne

2510 E. Clark Ave., Santa Maria, 805/621-5889

2922 Grand Ave., 805/688-9665

Costa De Oro

1331 S. Nicholson Ave., Santa Maria, 805/922-1468 Core Wine Co.

105 W. Clark Ave., Old Orcutt, 805/937-1600

Santa Ynez Valley Ballard This charming wine country inn offers a selection of difficult to find boutique wines produced locally by family owned, small production wineries.

Arthur Earl Winery

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Fess Parker Winery & Vineyard

“After celebrating our 25th anniversary as a family owned and operated winery, the Fess Parker family recently completed an upgraded hospitality venue on our property. We invite you to visit and enjoy the outdoor fireplace, tasting bar, expanded seating area, and an array of elevated tasting options presented by our wine educators.” —Tim Snider, President, Fess Parker Winery. Open 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 6200 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/688-1545 fessparkerwines.com

2436 E. Baseline Ave., 805/688-7770

Buellton The largest custom-crush operation in the area shares geography with tasting rooms in Buellton, located just off Highway 101, it's the eastern gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills area. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Lafond Winery & Vineyards

6855 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/688-7921

Artiste Winery & Tasting Studio

2948 Grand Ave., Studio E, 805/686-2626 Barbieri Wine Co.

2369 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/688-8882 Bernat Vineyards & Winery

2879 Grand Ave., 805/688-7265 Bien Nacido Vineyards

2963 Grand Ave., Ste. B, 805/691-9913 Blair Fox Cellars

2902 San Marcos Ave., Ste. B, 805/691-1678 Byron

2367 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/938-7365

IN-TOWN TASTING

Ballard Inn Tasting Room

2922 Grand Ave., 805/693-1771

Mosby Winery

9496 Santa Rosa Rd., 805/688-2415 IN-TOWN TASTING

Alma Rosa Winery

181 Industrial Way, Ste. C, 805/691-9395 Cold Heaven

92 Second St., Ste. A, 805/686-1343 Crawford Family Wines

92 Second St., Ste. G & H, 805/698-3889 Hartley-Ostini Hitching Post Winery

Carhartt Vineyard

2990 Grand Ave., 805/693-5100 Carina Cellars

2900 Grand Ave., Ste. A, 805/688-2459 Cinque Stelle Wineries

2982 Grand Ave., 805/686-4101 Consilience, Marianello & Tre Anelli Wines

2923 Grand Ave., 805/691-1020 Coquelicot Estate Winery

2884 Grand Ave., 805/688-1500

406 E. Hwy. 246, 805/688-8403 Ken Brown Wines

157 W. Hwy. 246, 805/688-9400 Point Concepción

420 E. Hwy. 246, 805/691-1300 Terravant Wine Co. (24 wineries under one roof)

35 Industrial Way, 805/686-9400

Los Olivos

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Andrew Murray Vineyards

Andrew Murray—a grape-growing pioneer and Rhône varietal visionary in Santa Barbara County—founded his winery in 1990, planting a hillside vineyard dedicated exclusively to Rhône varieties. Murray and his team look forward to sharing the AMV experience at their newly remodeled winery and visitor center along Foxen Canyon Road. Open 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/686-9604 AndrewMurrayVineyards.com

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The historic village of Los Olivos is a hub for tasting rooms, interspersed with art galleries, boutique shops and cafés. It's a great place to stroll and relax, or drive north to enjoy the bucolic Foxen Canyon Wine Trail. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Andrew Murray Vineyards

5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/686-9604 Beckmen Vineyards

2670 Ontiveros Rd., 805/688-8664. Brander Vineyard

2401 N. Refugio Rd., 805/688-2455 Fess Parker Winery & Vineyard

6200 Foxen Canyon Rd., 805/688-1545 Firestone Vineyard

5017 Zaca Station Rd., 805/688-3940

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Artiste Winery & Tasting Studio

Combining a reverence for tradition and a philosophy of winemaking as an artistic expression, this unique tasting room and art studio makes wines—all blends, like many wineries do in France, Italy and Spain—and labels them with beautiful works of impressionist art, each named after the title of the painting that graces its bottle. As owner and winemaker Bion Rice conveys in a video on his website, “people first arrive at Artiste, they are surprised.” The place is indeed special, so are the wines. Open 11 a.m.–5:30 p.m. 2948 Grand Ave., Studio E, 805/686-2626 artiste.com


Toretti Family Vineyard

2933 San Marcos Ave., Ste. 101, 805/688-8002

Santa Ynez Peaceful and rolling vistas of ranches and farms mingle with vineyards and tasting rooms along the country roads in this region, which is anchored by the town of Santa Ynez. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Bridlewood Estate Winery

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Sunstone Vineyards & Winery

Committed to growing wine grapes without the use of herbicides, pesticides, or synthetic fungicides, Sunstone’s 28-acre certified organic estate vineyard produces wine from “a vineyard in harmony with Earth’s cycles throughout the year.” Known for its Provenceinspired ambience and private event venues, Sunstone is the perfect destination for tastings and luxurious group experiences. Open 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 125 N. Refugio Rd., 805/688-9463 sunstonewinery.com

Daniel Gehrs Wines Dragonette Cellars

2445 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/693-0077 Dreamcôte Wine Co.

2933 San Marcos Ave., Ste. 107, 805/691-1200 Epiphany Cellars

2974 Grand Ave., 805/686-2424

Lincourt Vineyards

1711 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/688-8554 Rideau Vineyards

1562 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/688-0717 Rusack Vineyards

1819 Ballard Canyon Rd., 805/688-1278 Shoestring Vineyard & Winery

800 E. Hwy. 246, 805/693-8612

3555 Roblar Ave., 805/688-9000

IN-TOWN TASTING

Gainey Vineyard

Carivintas Winery

3950 E. Hwy. 246, 805/688-0558 Kalyra Winery

343 N. Refugio Rd., 805/693-8864 Roblar Winery & Vineyards

3010 Roblar Ave., 805/686-2603 Sunstone Vineyards & Winery

125 N. Refugio Rd., 805/688-9463 Vincent Vineyards

2370 N. Refugio Rd., 805/691-4200 IN-TOWN TASTING

Carr Vineyards and Winery

3563 Numancia St., Ste. 101, 805/688-5757 2939 Grand Ave., 805/693-9686

Buttonwood Farm Winery

1500 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/688-3032

Solvang "The Danish Capital of America,” Solvang is a quaint village full of shops, parks, hotels, bakeries, restaurants and wine tasting rooms. TASTING AT THE VINE YARD

Blackjack Ranch

2205 Alamo Pintado Rd., 805/686-4492

476 First St., 805/693-4331 Casa Cassara

1607 Mission Dr., Ste. 112, 805/688-8691 Dascomb Cellars

1659 Copenhagen Dr., Ste. C, 805/691-9175 The Good Life/Baehner Fournier

1672 Mission Dr., 805/688-7111 Lions Peak

1659 Copenhagen Dr., 805/693-5466 Lucas & Lewellen Vineyards

1645 Copenhagen Dr., 805/686-9336 Presidio Winery

1603 Copenhagen Dr., Ste. 1, 805/693-8585 Royal Oaks Winery

1582 Mission Dr., 805/693-1740 Sevtap Winery

1622 Copenhagen Dr., 805/693-9200 Sort This Out Cellars

1636 Copenhagen Dr., 805/688-1717 Toccata

1665 Copenhagen Dr., 805/686-5506

Evans Ranch (Gainey)

2901 Grand Ave., 805/688-0558

Presqu'ile Vineyard, Santa Maria

J Ludlow Vineyard

2890 Grand Ave., 805/688-8989 Kaena

2890 Grand Ave., 805/688-4069 Larner Wines

2900 Grand Ave., 805/688-8148 Qupé, Verdad & Ethan

2963 Grand Ave., Ste. B, 805/686-4200 Refugio Ranch

2990 Grand Ave., 805/688-5400 Saarloos & Sons

2971 Grand Ave., 805/688-1200 SAMsARA

2466 Alamo Pintado Ave., Ste. A, 805/331-2292 Semler Wines

2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/688-8105 Stolpman Vineyards & Winery

2434 Alamo Pintado Ave., 805/688-0400 Tensley Wines

2900 Grand Ave., Ste. B, 805/688-6761 Tercero Wines

2445 Alamo Pintado Ave., Ste. 104, 805/245-9584 Tessa Marie Wines (E&TWines)

2901 Grand Ave., Ste. C, 805/688-6081

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The restaurants listed here are selected for quality of food, service, ambiance and variety. Star Symbols (-) highlight our supporting advertisers. Dollar ($) symbols are provided for comparative pricing. Please call for hours of operation and reservations. For expanded listings visit sbseasons.com/blog/restaurant-guide.

O U R F AVO R I T E R E S TA U R A N T S I N S A N TA B A R B A R A , M O N T E C I T O, G O L E TA A N D S A N TA Y N E Z VA L L E Y

Montecito Bella Vista (Contemporary Italian) at the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore commands panoramic ocean views across Montecito’s Butterfly Beach and promises top notch cuisine and impeccable service. Guests enjoy a contemporary Italian menu showcasing fresh California ingredients inspired by Executive Chef Marco Fossati. Bella Vista has the distinction of being one of only 12 restaurants in California (the only one in Santa Barbara) licensed to cure its own meats and the shared charcuterie plate is the most popular appetizer on the menu. In addition, the restaurant is home to one of the most celebrated Sunday brunches in the United States. 1260 Channel Dr., 805/969-2261. $$$–$$$$

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Cava (Mexican) serves the bold flavors of Spain, Mexico and Latin America in a charming setting with classic margaritas and martinis from the bar amid the sounds of Spanish guitar. Enjoy the vibrant outdoor patio, romantic dining room or cozy fireplace—the décor, menu and staff reflect the sophisticated yet casual character of Montecito. 1212 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-8500. $$–$$$ Lucky’s (American) offers steaks, chops and seafood as well as chicken entrées, wonderful salads, six different potato dishes and beautiful desserts. The wine list runs to the extravagant. The adjacent bar is a favorite among locals. 1279 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-7540. $$$–$$$$

Montecito Wine Bistro (Californian) is a casual yet sophisticated spot to sit on the outdoor patio or cozy up to the fireplace and nibble wine-friendly food, including flatbreads from the wood-burning oven, grilled steaks and chops, roasted chicken, savory pot pies and juicy burgers, along with fresh salads and sandwiches. Sip wines by the glass or the flight, or a cocktail. 516 San Ysidro Rd., 805/969-7520. $$–$$$ 90

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Pane e Vino (Italian) is a charming ristorante and a favorite among the community’s elite and their guests. Homemade pastas are near perfection and the fresh fish dishes are superb. 1482 E. Valley Rd., 805/969-9274. $$$$

Stella Mare’s (French) pairs a beautiful Victorian building with stylish, Normandy-inspired cuisine. The glass-encased greenhouse’s panoramic view and fireside couches make it a perfect spot for listening to Wednesday night jazz. 50 Los Patos Way, 805/969-6705. $$$–$$$$

Full bar and regional wine list. 2981 Cliff Dr., 805/898-2628. $$–$$$

Brophy Bros. (Seafood) has long been one of Santa Barbara’s most popular eateries and is located at the harbor, with excellent views. You’ll find great shellfish cocktails and fresh fish here. 119 Harbor Way, 805/966-4418. $$

- Santa Barbara FisHouse (Seafood) serves fresh local fish in a lively setting. Gathering with friends on the dining terrace with ocean views is the perfect way to start the weekend. Be sure to order lobster during the season from these “lobster specialists.” 101 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/966-2112. $$$

Santa Barbara Shellfish Co. Chuck’s Waterfront Grill (Steaks and Seafood) serves prime-grade top sirloin steaks and Australian lobster tail among many other delicious offerings. The restaurant’s lively upstairs extension,

(Seafood) is a fun, no-frills seafoodlover’s paradise. Select your dinner fresh from the tanks or that day’s catch just steps from the ocean. 230 Stearns Wharf, 805/966-6676. $$

The Endless Summer bar-café

- Stonehouse Restaurant (American) is located in a 19th-century citrus-packing house on the grounds of San Ysidro Ranch. Stonehouse has a full bar and a menu that emphasizes local fish and produce. Open daily for dinner only $$$$. Plow and Angel (American) is a cozy restaurant attached to the bar at San Ysidro Ranch and is well-known for its comfort food. 900 San Ysidro Ln., 805/565-1720. $$$

(Seafood), has two terraces for al fresco dining on more casual fare. 113 Harbor Way, 805/564-1200. $$–$$$

Trattoria Mollie (Italian) is a

Convivo (Italian) across from East Beach on the ground floor of the historic Santa Barbara Inn, draws its inspiration from Santa Barbara’s bounty of seafood and meats prepared “Nomad Italian” style by Chef Peter McNee. Sit on the outdoor patio for al fresco dining with a view of the Channel Islands. 901 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/845-6789. $$-$$$

charming standby for locals-in-theknow. The dynamic cuisine consists of recipes that Mollie gathered during her years of training with “the best chefs in Italy.” 1250 Coast Village Rd., 805/565-9381. $$$

Eladio’s (Californian) is opposite the entry to Stearns Wharf and offers casual California comfort cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 1 State St., 805/963-4466. $$$

Tre Lune (Italian) offers a delicious menu that isn’t afraid of flavor. The high quality, genuine Italian cuisine includes excellent minestrone soup, fall-off-the-fork ossobuco, basil pesto, lobster ravioli and more. 1151 Coast Village Rd., 805/969-2646. $$$

Santa Barbara Waterfront

- Boathouse at Hendry’s Beach (Seafood) serves locally caught, fresh seafood specialties. Dine inside or al fresco with one of the best ocean views in Santa Barbara.

The Harbor Restaurant and Longboard’s Grill (Seafood) on Stearns Wharf are two different experiences from one great vantage point. The Harbor is a romantic oceanview restaurant and Longboard’s is a noisy, energy-packed bar and grill. 210 Stearns Wharf, 805/963-3311. $$–$$$

Rodney’s Grill (American) Located in the Fess Parker A Doubletree by Hilton Resort, Rodney’s menu spotlights naturally raised meats and poultry, seasonal produce and sustainable seafood—all paired with wines from the finest local vineyards. 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/884-8535. $$$

Shoreline Beach Café (Seafood) is a lively, open-air beach restaurant. Salads, burgers, fish tacos, fresh seafood and vegetarian items are served daily. Breakfast served on weekends. 801 Shoreline Dr., 805/568-0064. $$

Toma Restaurant and Bar (Italian) is a romantic spot to savor excellent Italian and Mediterranean dishes from Santa Barbara’s seasonal bounty while enjoying warm and attentive service and a view of the enchanting Santa Barbara harbor. 324 W. Cabrillo Blvd., 805/962-0777. $$-$$$

Downtown Arigato Sushi (Japanese) provides designer sushi from inventive chefs. Daily specials explore the limitless varieties of this Japanese delicacy. 1225 State St., 805/965-6074. $$$

Arnoldi’s Café (Italian) specializes in traditional homestyle Italian cuisine, featuring the freshest local produce and seafood, imported Italian meats, cheeses and olive oils, as well as an extensive wine list, bocce courts and a heated patio. 600 Olive St., 805/962-5394. $$$ Benchmark Eatery (Seafood, American) is a casual eatery that does American fare proud, with everything from soul-satisfying pastas, pizzas, grilled ahi and fish and


chips to fresh salads to juicy burgers and generous sandwiches. 1201 State St., 805/845-2600, $-$$

Black Sheep (Californian) has a cool, casual vibe, but serves seriously good farm-to-table food. Try scallop crudo, roasted bone marrow or reconstructed chicken stuffed with walnuts and dried apricots. 26 E. Ortega St., 805/965-1113, $$$

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bouchon (Californian) serves “Santa Barbara Wine Country” cuisine complemented by a remarkable wine list that includes more than 50 Central Coast wines by the glass. Open for dinner nightly. 9 W. Victoria St., 805/730-1160. $$$ Ca’Dario (Italian) promises fine Italian cuisine, whether pasta, fish or fowl—don’t miss the ravioli pillows with brown butter and sage sauce and, when in season, grilled asparagus wrapped with pancetta—and an extensive wine list. A few doors down, Ca’Dario Pizzeria features a tasty array of pizzas, including gluten-free options. 37 E. Victoria St., 805/884-9419. $$$ Carlitos Café y Cantina (Mexican) offers exciting regional Mexican cuisine and 100% blue agave Margaritas, along with fresh, imaginative Mexican grilled specialties that borrow from Pueblo, Mayan and Aztec cultures. 1324 State St., 805/962-7117. $$ Casa Blanca Restaurant & Cantina (Mexican) is a fun Mexican hot spot with killer Margaritas, tasty tacos, ample enchiladas and other classic south-of-theborder inspired fare. 330 State St., 805/845-8966. $$ China Pavilion (Chinese) features highquality traditional Chinese food, as well as a delicious dim sum brunch on weekends. 1202 Chapala St., 805/560-6028. $$

- Downey’s (Californian) is an intimate restaurant that has received numerous accolades and is widely considered one of California’s finest. With just 14 tables and a menu that changes daily, owner/chef John Downey creates matchless nouvelle cuisine. Open for dinner only, Tues.–Sun. 1305 State St., 805/966-5006. $$$$

Enterprise Fish Co. (Seafood) is one of Santa Barbara’s largest and busiest seafood restaurants. In an exhilarating, nautical atmosphere are an oyster bar and a variety of fresh fish that are mesquite-broiled and served at reasonable prices. 225 State St., 805/962-3313. $$

Finch & Fork (Californian) in the Canary Hotel offers hearty items like buttermilk fried chicken and lighter fare, complete with farm-fresh salads, fresh oysters and yummy flatbreads. 31 W. Carrillo St., 805/879-9100. $$–$$$ Intermezzo Bar/Café (Californian) serves local wines on tap, craft cocktails and light fare

E

XECUTIVE

CHEF MARCO FOSSATI

INVITES YOU TO EXPERIENCE A TRUE TASTE OF ITALY AT

BELLA VISTA, SANTA BARBARA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL OCEAN FRONT RESTAURANT. WWW.FOURSEASONS.COM/SANTABARBARA


DINING OUT

Breakfast • Lunch Dinner • Cocktails

such as burgers, flatbreads, salads and desserts ‘til late. An array of small plates to share—including cheese and charcuterie offerings, oysters, mussels, steak bites and the most amazing crispy cauliflower—make this a perfect pre- or post-theater stop. 819 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$–$$$

Jane (Californian) offers upscale, fresh, tasty fare that runs the gamut from huge seasonal salads and gourmet burgers to fish and chips with chipotle ketchup and creamy dill. The delicious goat cheese pancakes with smoked salmon and caviar are crafted from a family recipe. 1311 State St., 805/962-1311. $$ Joe’s Café (American) is a Santa Barbara icon known for its stiff cocktails and raucous atmosphere. The menu of American classics includes steaks, sandwiches and Mexican specialties. Lunch and dinner served daily; breakfast served weekends. 536 State St., 805/966-4638. $$

2981 Cliff Drive (805) 898-2628 www.boathousesb.com

The Lark (American) delights with Chef Jason Paluska’s sophisticated family-style plates designed to share and made with the freshest possible local “farm-to-fork” ingredients, along with creative cocktails and a wonderful wine selection. Dinner, Tues.–Sun. 131 Anacapa St., 805/284-0370. $$–$$$

- Loquita (Spanish) specializes in authentic Spanish food including hot and cold tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats, and three types of paella. Executive Chef Peter Lee’s innovative cuisine has a California twist and is complimented with a full bar of Spanish and local wines and spirits. 202 State St., 805/880-3380. $$-$$$

Louie’s (Californian), located inside Santa Barbara’s oldest operating hotel, The Upham, reflects the charm and tradition of its location. You’ll find extraordinary fresh seafood, pastas, filet mignon and a changing menu of specialties, with options to dine outside on a beautiful wrap-around porch or inside at tables next to paned windows or booths, several of which are tucked into intimate alcoves. 1404 De La Vina St., 805/963-7003. $$–$$$ Nectar (Californian) focuses on small and shareable plates using fresh and international flavors. Featuring an extensive local wine list and inventive cocktail flights to pair with luscious food, Nectar is great new spot for a quick bite or a long and lingering evening. Open 5:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. daily, 20 E. Cota St., 805/899-4694. $$$ Olio e Limone (Italian) uses only the freshest ingredients for simply delicious preparations. Tuck into a plate of housemade ravioli filled with roasted eggplant and goat cheese, topped with a fresh tomato and basil sauce and shaved ricotta salata. Olio Pizzeria offers a casual pizza bar, wine and cocktails next door, while Olio Crudo Bar offers cocktails and sashimi with an Italian accent! 11 W. Victoria St. #17, 805/899-2699 ext. 1. $$$

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Opal (Californian) is a classic European-style bistro serving eclectic California cuisine complemented by a wood-burning pizza oven, an extensive wine list and full bar. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 1325 State St., 805/966-9676. $$ Oveja Blanca (South American) is a labor of love for the Perez family, who capture the essence of many Latin cultures and countries through food and drink in this innovative new restaurant. Dig into creative cuisine like Deep Fried Frog Leg Tamal and Ham and Chocolate Croquettes for a taste adventure you won’t forget. 30 E. Ortega St., 805/963-1012. $$$$ The Palace Grill (Cajun) is a place resonating with jazz music that creates the perfect setting for spicy food and spirited service to chase the blues away. Features authentic Louisiana specialities like jambalaya, crawfish etouffée and blackened steaks and seafood. 8 E. Cota St., 805/963-5000. $$–$$$

S INCE 1982

“We found Downey’s, hands down, to be the best bet in town. This small, serene restaurant offers meticulous and artful cooking... ” —FOOD AND WINE MAGAZINE EXAMPLES FROM OUR DAILY CHANGING MENU

Seared Ahi

with Fresh Mango-Cucumber Salsa

Downey’s Smoked Black Cod with Avocado, Chiles, Lime & Cilantro

Mary’s Farm Duck

with Cabernet Sauce, Baby Turnips, Scallions & Exotic Grains

Natural Angus Filet Mignon with Wild Mushrooms & Celeriac

2013

Paradise Café (American) is located downtown in a unique old building with wall murals from the 1940s. It has one of Santa Barbara’s favorite patios for dining and a bar that will take you back in time with cocktails of your choice and a well-selected wine and beer list. 702 Anacapa St., 805/962-4416. $$

Petit Valentien (French), with its quaint atmosphere and intimate setting, is hidden away in a small corner of La Arcada. Be sure to check out the prix fixe menu only available on Sundays. 1114 State St. #16, 805/966-0222. $$

Petros (Greek) is home to Hellenic-California cuisine and one of the prettiest patios in town. Owner Petros Benekos gives traditional Hellenic recipes a contemporary California spin. Entrée hits include tender feta-crusted rack of lamb and fresh sautéed sea bass, along with Greek classics. 1316 State St. 805/962-1455. $$-$$$

28 POINTS FOOD 27 POINTS SERVICE

1305 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA DINNER TUESDAY–SUNDAY FROM 5:30 F O R R E S E R VAT I O N S C A L L : 8 0 5 . 9 6 6 . 5 0 0 6

O R V I S I T: w w w. d o w n e y s s b . c o m

B E L M O N D E L E N C A N T O , S A N TA B A R B A R A

COME RAISE A GLASS. WE’LL RAISE THE BAR. CELEBRATE YOUR SPECIAL OCCASION WITH US—IN UNFORGETTABLE STYLE. FROM A BIRTHDAY LUNCH WITH FRIENDS TO A ROMANTIC DINNER FOR TWO, WE WILL CREATE A MEMORABLE EVENT. LINGER IN OUR GARDENS OR ON OUR TERRACE, AND LET US SPOIL YOU WITH SUPERB CUISINE AND WINES.

Somerset (European) an old-world-style grand café created by Steve Hermann Hotels and Restaurants, has gorgeous décor that pairs well with Chef Lauren Herman’s menu, emphasizing the bounty of the Santa Barbara coast. 7 E. Anapamu St., 805/845-7112. $$$$

Viva (Mexican) indulges your senses with its modern Mexican cuisine, beautiful courtyard patio and inviting dining room in the historic La Arcada. Taco happy hour (Mon.-Fri. from 3-6 p.m.) is a perfect time to sample creative tacos and other antojitos, or “small cravings,” along with the raw bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh shellfish. 1114 State St., 805/965-4770. $$

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Wine Cask (Californian) in the historic El Paseo complex offers a beautiful spot to enjoy fine dining and exceptional service in a relaxed setting. Don’t miss the stellar wine selections, including an impressive variety of local wines on tap. 813 Anacapa St., 805/966-9463. $$$

800 Alvarado Place

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Santa Barbara, California 93103

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+805 845 5800

HOT E L S | TR A I N S | R I V E R C R U I S ES | JO U R N E YS | B E L M O N D.CO M

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Uptown

- Belmond El Encanto (Coastal-Californian) presents California coastal cuisine and seasonal favorites from executive chef Johan Denizot, featuring specialties like fresh local oysters, pan seared diver scallops and short ribs sous vide alongside stunning Santa Barbara views. Sit under the stars on the terrace or in the elegant dining room. 800 Alvarado Pl., 805/845-5800. $$$-$$$$

Chuck’s of Hawaii (American) is the home of California’s first salad bar and offers award-winning steaks and fresh seafood right from the grill. A local favorite hangout since 1967. 3888 State St., 805/687-4417. $$

TAPAS PINTXOS PAELLA 202 State Street Santa Barbara, Ca 93101 (805) 880-3380 loquitasb.com

Crocodile Restaurant (Italian/Californian), a local’s secret found at the Lemon Tree Inn, offers a chic, relaxing atmosphere with a full cocktail bar and kitchen. A great spot for a sporting match or catching up with a friend. Breakfast, lunch and dinner served daily. 2819 State St., 805/687-6444. $$–$$$­ Le Café Stella (French-American) is perched across from Santa Barbara Golf Club and is a neighborhood hot spot for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour— try the juicy burgers on brioche buns or heart-warming coq au vin. 3302 McCaw Ave., 805/569-7698. $$ The Tee-Off (American) is a friendly uptown

The Black Sheep

Happy Hour 5-6 pm daily

25% off

42 varieties of beer Discounted Wine — $10 Shoyu Ramen

GLOBAL LATIN CUISINE "let's celebrate life" The Black Sheep, and sister restaurant Oveja Blanca offer... CRAFT COCKTAILS | SPECIAL EVENTS | CATERING GROUP DINING | WEDDINGS & MORE

The Black Sheep

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steak and seafood restaurant and lounge with a long history of local appreciation that features a short but sweet menu of steaks, chops, chicken and seafood. 3627 State St., 805/687-1616. $$$

Goleta Angel Oak (French-Californian) ) is a modern steak and seafood restaurant housed at Bacara Resort & Spa. Angel Oak showcases the culinary knowledge and classical training of Parisian Executive Chef Vincent Lesage, featuring classic steakhouse dishes with a uniquely Santa Barbara interpretation as part of a diverse menu of locally-sourced fare—including Santa Barbara’s famously fresh uni and the restaurant’s certified Kobe and dry-aged beef program. 8301 Hollister Ave., 805/571-4240. $$$-$$$$ Beachside Bar Cafe (Seafood) on Goleta Beach is well-known for excellent fresh fish, serving lunch and dinner in the tropical-style dining room or on the glass-walled patio. Pair your cocktail with the fish tacos, excellent clam chowder or Caesar salad for memorable seaside dining. 5905 Sandspit Rd. 805/964-7881. $$-$$$

Jane at the Marketplace (Californian) presents flavorful fare for lunch and dinner including steak, chicken and pasta in cozy surroundings. This is a bright, sunny space known


DINING OUT for its friendly service and authentic family recipes. 6940 Marketplace Dr., 805/770-5388. $$

Outpost (Californian) is a casual, hip spot at the Goodland Hotel. The excellent seasonal menu includes shareable plates, entrees and fresh salads, as well as fish tacos with battered halibut, flat iron steak with salsa verde, pork bao buns and a caper-studded Caesar salad with grilled romaine. 5650 Calle Real, 805/964-1288. $$-$$$

Santa Ynez Mountains Cold Spring Tavern (American) is an iconic establishment virtually unchanged since the days of the stagecoach run that has served excellent food—including wild game—to hungry locals and travelers alike for more than 100 years. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 5995 Stagecoach Rd., 805/967-0066. $$$

Santa Ynez Valley Ballard Inn Restaurant (Californian), inside the charming Ballard Inn, this distinctive little restaurant features wonderfully prepared “creative wine country cuisine” and fine wines. 2436 Baseline Ave., Ballard, 805/688-7770 or 800/638-2466. $$$

the town’s original Main Street buildings. The thoughtful menu of homemade pizzas and California cuisine is complemented with an enormous list of wines from the adjacent store. 2879 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-7265. $$ Root 246 (American), located at Hotel Corque, features innovative cuisine emphasizing local, seasonal ingredients to create the ultimate in farm-to-table cuisine. In addition to a full menu of craft-based cuisine, Root 246 has one of the area’s most extensive selections of local wines, whiskey and craft beers, as well as refreshing signature cocktails. Try the Sunday brunch for a delicious weekend experience. 420 Alisol Rd., Solvang, 805/686-8681. $$-$$$ Sides Hardware & Shoes—A Brothers Restaurant (American) is located in a restored 1901 building where chef-owners and brothers Jeff and Matt Nichols turn out hearty American favorites with original gourmet twists. 2375 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805/688-4820. $$–$$$ S.Y. Kitchen (Italian) is a charming “California version of a little Italian farmhouse” with a focus on unfussy rustic Italian food made from fresh local ingredients. Expect inventive salads, woodfired

pizzas and house-made pastas with everything from seasonal seafood to duck ragu. Open daily for dinner and for lunch on weekends. 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez, 805/691-9794. $$-$$$ Trattoria Grappolo (Italian) is a great destination for gourmet pizzas from a woodburning oven, housemade pastas, fresh salads made with local produce and nightly specials. Grappolo features a list of more than 150 wines from around the world. Open daily for dinner and for lunch Tues.-Sun. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-6899. $$-$$$ The Vineyard House (American) offers local farm fresh cuisine in a charming Victorian house that dates back to the days when the Santa Ynez Valley’s world-class vineyards were just a dream. 3631 Sagunto St., 805/688-2886. $$$

- The Willows at Chumash Casino Resort (American) is a AAA Four Diamond Award-winner specializing in mouthwatering prime steaks and seafood. The elegance of this exquisite dining room is matched by incomparable views of the rolling Santa Ynez hills. 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez, 805/686-9855. $$$–$$$$

Brothers Restaurant at the Red Barn (American) offers innovative “made from scratch” cuisine in this exquisitely refurbished barn. The hearty menu offers American classics like chops, prime rib, and chicken-fried steak. Lunch and dinner served daily.  3539 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-4142. $$-$$$$ First & Oak (Fusion) distinguishes itself with beautifully prepared, elegant small plates designed to pair with fine wines and allow guests to taste multiple, exciting dishes in a single sitting. Housed in the charming Mirabelle Inn, this modern American restaurant has a European influence as well as a Californian emphasis on food that is seasonal, local and sustainable. 409 First St., 805/688-1703. $$$

modern american cuisine LOUNGE OPEN DAILY

|

DINING NIGHTLY

reservations recommended

Dos Carlitos Restaurant & Tequila Bar (Mexican) brings bold Mexican and Latin flavors to the valley. An open-fire grill imparts a smoky essence to authentic grilled specials, delicious salsas and the aroma of fresh handmade tortillas. 3544 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez, 805/688-0033. $$ The Hitching Post (American) is an old-fashioned, western-style steakhouse and lounge just a few minutes off Hwy. 101. In addition to Newport Meat Company beef, there are also ribs, quail, turkey, duck and ostrich plus seafood on the menu. 406 E. Hwy. 246, Buellton, 805/688-0676. $$$–$$$$ Los Olivos Café and Wine Merchant (Californian) is a casual restaurant in one of

3400 East Highway 246, Santa Ynez | ChumashCasino.com | 800.248.6274

SPRING 2017

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MY SANTA BARBARA

UNSEEN SANTA BARBAR A

Celestial PHOTOGR APH BY PATRICIA HOUGHTON CLARKE

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PASEO NUEVO SHOPS & RESTAURANTS Your premiere shopping destination at the heart of downtown Santa Barbara HOURS Monday – Friday: 10 am – 9 pm Saturday: 10 am – 8 pm Sunday: 11 am – 7 pm

CONNECT Call or text 805-900-7385 PaseoNuevoShopping.com @ShopPaseoNuevo

Located on State Street between Canon Perdido and Ortega Streets • Convenient Parking • Valet Available


ITO CA

°26’12"

N

55

34

" W MONT

EC

11 9° 37'

Ocean View Contemporary Villa $7,700,000

3 Bed | 7 Bath | Glass Pool House Seamless Indoor/Outdoor Lifestyle

Ocean and Mountain Views Experience a James Bond 007 Lifestyle in this Montecito contemporary masterpiece. Golden Quadrangle location and sweeping ocean views with 2 story glass pool house, infinity pool and spa and 5 car garage.

Colleen Beall 805.895.5881 colleen.beall@compass.com colleenbeall.net CalBRE 01201456

805.253.7700 | compass.com

Compass 1101 Coast Village Road Santa Barbara CA 93108

Montecito

Compass is a licensed real estate broker (01991628) in the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. To reach the Compass main office call 805.253.7700

Santa Barbara SEASONS Magazine, Spring 2017  

Santa Barbara Seasons is a resource for locals and visitors alike with lush visuals, engaging features and invaluable information on events,...

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