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SDRC MISSION VALLEY SDRC

MISSION HILLS PUBLICATION 5 | ISSUE LO CA LUM B RE L L A N E WS.C O M WWW.LOCALUMBRELLANEWS.COM LO C A L L I F E S T Y L E P U LOCAL B L I C ATLIFESTYLE I O N I VOLUME 5 I ISSUE| VOLUME 3 I MARCH 2020 9

FISanGHT I NG TO S UR V I V E Diego Events Adapt To The Pandemic As The Industry Fights To Survive See Page 4

Sarah DiMartile (Courtesy photo)

Customers on blind dates are in good hands when Sarah DiMartile works the bar. Read about one of her memorable observations, plus other workplace anecdotes by local bartenders.

MEET

SARAH DIMARTILE STARLITE 3175 India St., Mission Hills

BITES

BEVS

Attendees enjoy cocktails and sportscars at the 2019 Dine Diego Event. Organizers of area events are struggling with 2020 event planning due to COVID-19.

TALES FROM BEHIND THE BAR YOUR REAL ESTATE EXPERT IN MISSION HILLS Gina Barnes

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REALTOR® | DRE# 01075249

gina@kengina.com

Cell: 619.347.4415 Your Real Estate Expert in Mission Hills 655 W Broadway STE 1650, CA 92101 Ken Pecus kengina.com Realtor®

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VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

The Studio Door Now Open

Local art gallery continues to evolve with a variety of special exhibits that benefit local artists with local exhibitions and coronavirus protocols

T

he Studio Door, art gallery in Hillcrest with artists studios, continues to keep its storefront open to the public with a range of fine art. The gallery presents an exhibition of the Human Figure as Art with select works by artists Roy de Vries, Leah Sarah Bassett and Khalid Alkaaby. These artists offer three different realistic approaches to celebrate the human form. Roy de Vries explores the male body in surrender and repose. Leah Sarah Bassett dives into the mystery of mythological female characters of her own making. Khalid Alkaaby balances contemporary work with classical structure. A mature showing of work. Additionally, the gallery has obtained a selection of 30 watercolors by Ally Benbrook. A familiar face in the local art community, Ally passed away last year from metastatic lung cancer. Though she didn’t start to paint until well after 50, she quickly developed her own style that was recognized as she was juried into countless exhibitions and with top awards, including Best in Show prize at the New York Arts League and the prestigious Shenzhen Biennial. Proceeds will benefit her family and the gallery. Next Month, The Studio Door will showcase 20 local artists. This exhibition was created to replace the planned biennial 50 To Watch. One of the foundations of the gallery, the exhibition brings national attention to regional artists. With art galleries closing, temporarily and permanently, due to COVID-19, the program would have had a diminishing impact for San Diego’s art community. The gallery plans to bring it back in 2022. Continuing a focus on local artists in October, The gallery will feature Natural Shift–Transformations in Clay/Paper/Tree. This collaborative exhibit has been a year in the making by artists Pierre Bounaud, Sue Britt, and Vanessa & Bruce Backer. “ This year has been quite a challenge for everyone. It was imperative to respond quickly to Coro-

navirus with ecommerce, gallery videos and safe access to the art. The Studio Door is not only a small business on its own but it is also a source of income for local artists,” said Patric Stillman, Owner. “With workshops, receptions and community events off the table, I’m thankful that we are still able to keep our storefront open to make art sales. For many of our artists and the gallery itself, its the only revenue stream that has kept us afloat.” The Studio Door is located at 3867 Fourth Avenue in Hillcrest. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday from Noon–7 PM. Social distancing and masks are required. Information on The Studio Door activities are distributed to the

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public through its social media sites, including Facebook and Twitter. For more information on The Studio Door, its program and

services, please visit www.thestudiodoor.com and sign up for the monthly newsletter at http:// eepurl.com/0q59H.

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Annual Starry Starry Night Benefiting Voices for Children Is Going Virtual Event Celebrates Nonprofit’s 40th Anniversary of Service to Youth in San Diego County Foster Care Starry Starry Night, one of San Diego’s premier fundraising events, is moving to a virtual format in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. The event will be held on Saturday, October 3, 2020, and will benefit Voices for Children (VFC), a local nonprofit organization which transforms the lives of children in foster care by providing them with volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASAs). CASAs advocate for foster children in the courtroom, at school, and in the community to ensure their needs are prioritized. The live-stream program will feature a celebration of VFC’s CASA of the Year, impact stories from the organization’s CASA program, a live auction, and virtual paddle raise. There is no cost to register, and attendance is open to the entire community. Since its inception in 2002, Starry Starry Night has grown from an intimate event in a private home to one of the most anticipated events in our community. Last year’s gala grossed more than $1 million. As this event transitions to an online format, its purpose remains the same: to raise crucial funds to provide foster youth in San Diego County with a trusted advocate. The evening will begin with a 7:00 p.m. preevent show including special performances by the the Mainly Mozart Youth Orchestra and the San Diego Children’s Choir, followed by a compelling program at 7:30 p.m. Voices for Children is offering a variety of opportunities for attendees to participate in and support the event. Attendees can purchase a Gala-on-the-Go box, which includes champagne, event branded cocktail napkins, an event guide, and more to help celebrate in style. Customizable catering packages are available through Waters Fine Foods & Catering, and a percentage of food and beverage purchases will be donated back to Voices for Children. An opportunity drawing, live auction, and paddle raise will all provide support to the organization’s CASA program. For those unable to attend, community members can make a direct donation or pledge toward Starry Starry Night, which will help recruit and train more volunteers to advocate on behalf of youth in foster care. Although the event is free, registration is required. The community is encouraged to register today at www.voicesforchildrenSSN. org. Event Sponsors: George Lai and the Lily Lai Foundation, Annette and Daniel Bradbury, Genentech, MG Properties Group, Qualcomm, The Rose Foundation, Capstone

Advisors, Bill and Dorian Sailer, The San Diego Foundation, Alphacore Wealth Advisory, Finch Thornton & Baird, LLP, Perkins Coie,

Sempra Energy, Silvergate Bank, California Bank & Trust, City National Bank, Coastal Payroll, Dowling & Yahnke Wealth Advisors, Kaiser Permanente, Paul Plevin Sullivan & Connaughton LLP, bkm OfficeWorks, Briefcase Studios, Cadence, Glendalough Distillery, Joy Culture Events, Las Patronas, McCulley Design Lab, We Drink Bubbles, Giving Back Magazine, KPBS, and Ranch & Coast Magazine. The Starry Starry Night Honorary Committee includes Mac and Casey Armstrong, Kathryn Ashworth, Esq., and the Hon. Thomas Ashworth III (Ret.), Bruce and Gail Bailey, Mary and Rolf Benirschke, David Bialis and Diana Breister, Sue and Mike Bieker, Robert Borthwick and Lee Parnell, Annette and Daniel Bradbury, Patty and Marc Brutten, Nancy and David Doyle, Gina and Ray Ellis, Lisette and Mick Farrell, Cambra and Randy Finch, AnneElise and Andrew Goetz, The Hon. Susan D. Huguenor (Ret.) and Thomas Huguenor, Yolanda and Jimmy Janacek, Erbin and Melissa Keith, Linda and Dick Kintz, George Lai, Marina Marrelli and Bob Anslow, Andrea and Greg Moser, Jennifer and Tim O’Connell, Nancy and Michael Pfeiffer, Kristi and Dick Pfister, Lauree and Monte Sahba, Bill and Dorian Sailer, Sheryl and Bob Scarano, Kar-

en and Mike Stone, Katie and Dan Sullivan, Jill Skrezyna and Alex Sun, Haeyoung Kong Tang, Dr. Alice Mo and Ted Tchang, Lise

Wilson and Steven Strauss, Julie and Dale Yahnke, and Lany and Alex Zikakis For more information about Starry Starry Night, to become a sponsor, or to join the Honorary Committee, please contact events@speakupnow.org or 858-5982271.

ABOUT VOICES FOR CHILDREN Founded in 1980, Voices for Children (VFC) transforms the lives of abused, neglected, and abandoned children in foster care in San Diego and Riverside Counties by providing them with trained, volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASAs). CASA volunteers advocate for a foster child or sibling group in Court, school, and in the community to ensure their needs are met. VFC believes that every child deserves a safe and permanent home, striving to provide a CASA volunteer to every child in the foster care system who needs one. Last year, VFC CASAs and staff advocated on behalf of more than 2,600 foster children across San Diego and Riverside Counties. For more information, visit www.speakupnow.org.

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VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

San Diego Events Adapt To The Pandemic As The Industry Fights To Survive

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s each week progresses, small businesses are closing and more employees are facing layoffs. With over 12 million workers nationally and nearly 200,000 in San Diego alone, the industry which contributes $1.2 trillion annually to the US Economy is overwhelmed by irreparable destruction. San Diego event businesses are working to adapt festivals into virtual experiences while also fighting for awareness and governmental support to navigate the mandated closure period, which has no timeline for expiration. Without entry fees, vendor fees and beer garden revenues and with a significant reduction in sponsorship contributions, event producers are often creating experiences solely to keep brands alive and with little financial profit. And while facing insurmountable challenges, people who work in events, are fueled by the opportunity to create one-of-a-kind experiences and magical moments for eventgoers. Activities will be re-structured and entertainment will come through new mediums but San Diego can still expect a packed year of unique festivities including a reimagined La Mesa Oktoberfest, a month-long Dine Diego culinary celebration, and a world-renowned Concours exhibition. COMMUNIT Y FESTIVALS BRING EXPERIENCES TO YOUR HOME WHILE SPONSORING LOCAL BUSINESSES Since 1973, the La Mesa Oktoberfest has been attracting Oktoberfest revelers from across San Diego and Southern California for three, free days of festive live music, top-notch German food,

and of course, steins filled to the brim with German & Craft Beer. In light of current events, the La Mesa Oktoberfest will create a reimagined weekend of festivities with just as much community spirit and prost-ing as you

your lederhosen or spending this time isolating out of San Diego, you will get to participate in the La Mesa experience from your phone or computer, tablet or tv! Meet us on screen and-Oans, zwoa, drei, g’suffa!

pretzel or brat? We have German foodie favorite boxes for order so you can bring the flavors of the Fest to your home! All weekend long Friday, October 2nd through Sunday, October 4th, the quaint businesses of

would expect from this beloved La Mesa tradition. Oktoberfest heads to you at home with the FREE La Mesa Oktoberfest Online! On Saturday, October 3rd from 4 PM to 7 PM enjoy an afternoon of Oompah bands, bier tastings, craft demos and friendly competitions. We are bringing the best of the La Mesa Oktoberfest right to you! Whether you are lounging in your backyard blow up pool in

We are streaming the chicken dance and German sing-a-longs with plenty of time for the polka but if you are looking for an upgrade, reserve a Party Pack filled with Deutche goods! Grab your steins and get ready to “Prost!” (Cheers!) with the Prost Pack of German Biers paired with oneof-a-kind Brewmaster tastings, a commemorative stein and a party making Chicken Hat. Craving the salt of a warm Bavarian

the La Mesa Village will offer dynamic deals and specials in true Oktoberfest style! Visit your favorite shops and save as you get holiday shopping started early or enjoy some of your favorite community cuisines. Utilize the new search functionality of the LaMesaOktoberfest.org website to find local businesses and unique offerings. The La Mesa Oktoberfest has a reputation for topping its tradi-

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Stay Safe, San Diego tions and creating dynamic community based Bavarian festivities for San Diegans of all ages! Traditionally featuring over 100 vendors, a ferris wheel and kids carnival, three beer gardens and interactive games, the legacy of the La Mesa Oktoberfest will be even more apparent when it is rebirthed in 2021. For 2020, the La Mesa Oktoberfest will stream to you live and boast a host of deals in La Mesa businesses. All the while, our team of lederhosen clad creators will be working on ways to bring the 2021 festival back to the streets of La Mesa. As the signature event for La Mesa, Oktoberfest is vital to promoting the City as an event destination and driving business to local restaurants and retailers. Although the format will look different this year, our community will once again join together to celebrate La Mesa, its businesses and the beloved Oktoberfest tradition. For more information, to see the full La Mesa Oktoberfest Online schedule, purchase Party Packs or check out the local La Mesa Dine & Shop Deals, visit LaMesaOktoberfest.org. FOODIE EXPERIENCES PIVOT TO THE CURRENT RESTAURANT CLIMATE Dine Diego hits the San Diego scene this Fall for a blowout month of dining deliciousness. The one-time only Dine Diego will run September 15 through October 15, 2020 and will feature a diverse line-up of top San Diego eateries showcasing their safe dining offerings for alfresco, to go and in-house promotions. Dine Diego takes the place of San Diego Restaurant Week for 2020 in an effort to support the unique and timely needs of the San Diego restaurant indus-

try that is facing dynamic and ongoing challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. While traditionally San Diego Restaurant Week requires restaurants to pay participation and membership fees, the San Diego Chapter of the California Restaurant Association has waived all fees for Dine Diego, opening up this foodie extravaganza to all San Diego County restaurants free of charge and with minimal time needed to register and be involved. “Dine Diego is giving both of our restaurants additional traffic and marketing support during these times of uncertainty in our industry, due to COVID. With the campaign focus on outdoor dining, to-go options and targeting weekday business we are looking forward to an extra boost in business!” Susie Baumann, Owner of Tom Ham’s Lighthouse

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and Bali Hai Restaurant With the month-long Dine Diego, diners can expect over 300 participating restaurants to choose from that span across the County. There is no better place for outdoor dining than Sunny San Diego and with expanded patio spaces and Curbside dining, there is more space than ever before for you to enjoy a meal basking in the sun or under starry skies every day of the week! Prefer your dinner with a side of Netflix? Use SanDiegoRestaurantWeek.com’s search capabilities to find a new hotspot near you offering take out. More than just a meal-Dine Diego invites you to play! SanDiegoRestaurantWeek.com hosts an interactive Bingo-style game board with dining options and the opportunity to win a San Diego Staycation package.

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Snap and post a photo as you enjoy brunch with friends or take a selfie as you pick up togo lunch-complete 5 in a row, submit your Game Board and be entered to win! Looking to up your chances to win!? How does A Year of Dining sound? Post a photo on Instagram of your Dine Diego experience, follow @SDRestaurantWk & the restaurant you posted about, use #52WeeksOfDineDiego in your post-just like that you have put your name in the pot for 52 gift certificates to San Diego restaurants to enjoy for the next year! Game Board and Year of Dining winners to be announced on October 15th to close out the month of Dine Diego and diners are encouraged to enter multiple times to increase their chances! With more days, more restaurants and more opportunities to play, Dine Diego is more than a one & done! Tickets are not necessary for this mouthwatering month of dining, but reservations are recommended! Visit SanDiegoRestaurantWeek.com for more information or to register as a participating restaurant. DISPLAY-ST YLE EVENTS TRANFORM INTO EXHIBITIONS WITH A PRIORIT Y OF “ SAFET Y” The La Jolla Concours d’Elegance presented by LPL Financial and Pacific Sotheby’s International Realty returns as the jewel of the West Coast on Friday April 16th, Saturday April 17th, and Sunday April 18th, 2021 to celebrate its 16th year of automotive excellence. Earning the reputation as one of the finest internationally renowned classic automobile showcases in the United States, the La Jolla

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Concours d’Elegance has a reputation for attracting discerning car enthusiasts from around the globe for an incredible weekend of prestigious events. The producers of the La Jolla Concours d’Elegance are planning an exhibition-style event that will honor the rich history and established elegance of the show, while providing a safe, sanitized and distanced space for car lovers to enjoy. The Sunday Concours will provide large walking spaces to allow for ample social distancing for viewing the automotive art alongside breathtaking views of La Jolla. Traditional VIP parties and social clubs will become seated pop-up dining experiences repackaged into formats appropriate for the current times. The La Jolla Concours has made it a standing tradition to select a marque each year to honor throughout the weekend of events. The La Jolla Concours d’Elegance is pleased to announce that Bugatti has been chosen as the 2021 honored marque. Celebrating 111 years since the first Bugatti automobile was produced for the public, the La Jolla Concours will showcase Ettore Bugatti’s impact as a designer and founder of the small family-run company in Molsheim, which is in the Alsace district of

North Eastern France that rose to become the legendary brand it is today. In addition to Bugatti, we will also celebrate the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing dubbed the sportscar of the century along with an exquisite showcase. The 16th Annual La Jolla Concours d’Elegance proceeds will go towards La Jolla Historical Society, which preserves the history of the gem known as La Jolla. In addition to the La Jolla Historical Society, the La Jolla Concours d’Elegance benefits several additional local community non-profit partners each year. For more information, please visit www.lajollaconcours.com. As the event industry navigates new spaces and invites people to join experiences in new formats, San Diego has joined in a Nationwide effort to push for the much needed assistance that will keep businesses and individuals’ afloat while navigating the massive impact and changes to the industry. The San Diego Event Coalition was founded in June 2020 by Laurel McFarlane of McFarlane Promotions, Inc. in response to the ongoing Pandemic. Her goal was to unite the industry locally to fight for regional and National aid to help businesses

and unemployed event workers. Through a series of demonstrations including an Empty Event Rally (featuring 48 empty tables each representing 250,000 unemployed event workers), Red Alert Restart Campaign (lighting dozens of San Diego iconic buildings red) and Case March (taking to the streets of Downtown with empty roller cases from Waterfront Park to the San Diego Convention Center), the Coalition is starting to gain support of local officials as they become aware of an industry that still has 80-90% of its workers unemployed. The events industry in San Diego County previously made up over $329 million to the local economy. The rippling impact of cancelled events, closed businesses and unemployed workers will be tremendous and has been negligently overlooked. Without immediate government aid for the event industry, small businesses will close and skilled event workers will find other careers. When events are permitted again, the industry will not be in place to support events at the same scale it once did. The current loss of events in our communities, with no foreseeable change until well into 2021 and no enhanced support for our businesses and workers,

will lead to dramatic impacts on our economy, serious threats to our local non-profits and their year-round programs that rely on event fundraising and the suffering of our cultural diversity. The San Diego Events Coalition stands with an alliance of events industry professionals in requesting relief in the following key areas to keep the industry alive: An updated and improved PPP program allowing for second round forgivable funding and designed with special consideration for the events industry and industry workers. The San Diego Event Coalition united a collective of event planners, venues and vendors to provide input and create the Essential Practices for Reopening Outdoor Community Events, a roadmap for how to produce events of varying types in a safe and sanitary manner. Working closely with the San Diego Department of Health this document has now been submitted to the California State government for further review and guidance. Visit SanDiegoEventCoalition. com for more information on how you can support their efforts and for easy tools for contacting your local legislator.

Dine Al Fresco. Dine To Go.

Dine Diego. September 15 - October 15

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Helping Kids with Their School Work, Even If You’re Still Figuring Out Zoom By Simona Valanciute, President and CEO, San Diego Oasis

Kids may have a very different “back to school” experience this year, and most likely they will need help with their school work more than ever with virtual learning. Older adults and grandparents can help the school-aged children in their life succeed in school—and in fact, intergenerational tutoring can have serious benefits for both. You might be very well-versed in homework help already, especially if you’re one of the millions of grandparents in the U.S. raising their grandchildren. But some seniors might have some understandable hesitations about assisting a child with school work right now. If you’re not 100% confident about your own skills with videoconferencing technology, it can feel intimidating to even try to help a grandchild or other loved one with distance learning homework. Or, perhaps, you might simply feel like you’re out of the loop or fear you don’t have the patience or knowledge to help them out. However, by following a few simple tips, you can be an excellent tutor for the student in your life, no matter how old you are. Tips for Successful Intergenerational Tutoring Remember your advantages: time and life experience. If you’re

retired, or working less, you have a precious resource that many parents and teachers lack: time. Just spending the time to give kids one-on-one help with their schoolwork gives them something they don’t often have access to, even during a normal school year. And no matter how different the technology kids use to learn might be from what you used growing up, you have valuable life experience to offer. Tell them how you overcame difficult problems at their age. Some struggles, like feeling confused by a homework assignment or being afraid of reading aloud in class, are timeless. Draw from all that life experience you have to tell them about a time you faced a similar difficulty when you were their age and inspire them with a story about how you overcame it. Admit when you don’t know something, then use your “village.” You can’t be an expert on everything, but there’s likely someone in your network of friends and family members who might know more about a particular subject. For example, if you are truly baffled by a math problem, freely admit you don’t know the answer—then, call up your friend who became a math professor, and ask them for tips on how to explain the concept to

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a child. It takes a village, right? Build your own skills while you help kids build theirs. If you’re still figuring out Zoom, and want to help your grandchild remotely, it’s easy to find free or low-cost resources for learning about videoconferencing. At San Diego Oasis we have many classes that are free or low cost that help older adults improve their technology and other skills all from the comfort of their own homes. Tutoring can give older adults a sense of purpose and help them build bonds with kids who might not be able to get individualized attention in school. If you’re inspired to use these intergenerational tutoring tips, but don’t have a school-aged child in

your life, consider becoming an Oasis tutoring volunteer. The San Diego Oasis tutoring program matches senior citizens with students in kindergarten through 4th grade who need one-on-one support with reading and writing—and many of our volunteer tutors say that the experience has helped them as much as it helped the child. During this pandemic, our tutors have been superstars helping students virtually, especially as students and parents navigate distance learning. Kids who were already struggling risk falling even farther behind because of COVID-19 school closures—and many older adults who are separated from their families may be experiencing the negative health effects of social isolation. Tutoring a child, whether in your home or remotely, can make a major difference in both of your lives. Simona Valanciute is the president and CEO of San Diego Oasis, an award-winning nonprofit organization serving people age 50 and better, who pursue healthy aging through lifelong learning, active lifestyles, and community service. For more information about the tutoring program at San Diego Oasis, go to www.sandiegooasis.org.

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VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

Comforting Broken Hearts Marcella’s Story

Neighborhood Publications Reaching Over 125,000 San Diego Area Mailboxes Per Month! Follow & Like Us Online! @LocalUmbrellaMedia

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HYPER-LOCAL COMMUNITY PUBLICATIONS Local Umbrella Media publishes hyperlocal, positive, upbeat, community publications, focusing on supporting local businesses, lifestyle articles, upcoming events, talents and contributions of the locals who live and work in our communities. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES BRAD WEBER 619-375-2889 BRAD@LOCALUMBRELLA.COM

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In 1999 I became pregnant with my fourth child. We were elated! However, when I was six months along, doctors told my husband and I that our baby had a life-limiting disease and if we were lucky enough to make it to term, he would most likely die during the birth. The best-case scenario was that he would be born alive but would die shortly thereafter.

Blessedly, on April 11, 1999, we gave birth to our beautiful baby boy, George. Shortly after birth, he died peacefully in my arms. It was incredibly hard, but we felt so blessed to have been able to hold him, kiss him, hug him, look into his big blue eyes, and tell him that we loved him. During my grief process I experienced acute aching in my heart and a real physical aching in my arms. During this time, I learned about Takotsubo Syndrome, or Broken Heart Syndrome, a physical condition often brought about due to extreme emotional loss. I discovered that holding a weighted potted plant my father handed to me helped ease my physical pain. It was a miracle. In an effort to reach out to those in similar situations, we invented The Comfort Cub, a specially weighted therapeutic teddy bear. Over time, we have discovered the healing abilities of the Comfort Cub go beyond the loss of an infant. We now help those who have suffered the loss of a loved one including the loss of a beloved pet who has become part of the family. If you would like to support the work of The Comfort Cub, please consider making a donation. Visit https:// www.The ComfortCub.org To learn more about Marcella’s tips for moms who want to make a positive impact in the world, visit MomsTown.com

©2020 COPYRIGHT BY INSPIRED MEDIA, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Local Umbrella Media Newspaper Publications are printed monthly and distributed freely throughout San Diego County. Opinions expressed in articles or advertisements do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher. Local Umbrella Media is not responsible for omissions or information that has been misrepresented in the newspaper. Local Umbrella Media Newspaper Publications are produces and published by Local Umbrella Media, and no part of this

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DON’T MISS THIS EVENT!

Visit www.SanDiegoOasis.org and click on Classes, then search for Town Hall.

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Sponsored by Sponsored by

In a rare, virtual, interactive dialogue that will be moderated by Lindsey Pena of ABC10, San Diego Mayoral Candidates Barbara Bry and Todd Gloria join us to talk about the issues that matter to seniors. With the election just weeks away, come learn more about these candidates.

beamoderated Lindsey Pena of ABC10, In rare, virtual,by interactive dialogue that will Sanmoderated Diego Mayoral Candidates be by Lindsey Pena of Barbara ABC10, Bry and Todd Gloria join us to talk about San Diego Mayoral Candidates Barbara the that Gloria matter join to seniors. With the Bry issues and Todd us to talk about election justthat weeks away, come learn the issues matter to seniors. Withmore the about these election just candidates. weeks away, come learn more about these candidates.

TODD GLORIA

California State Assembly California State Assembly

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2020 MAYORAL 2020 MAYORAL PHONETOWN PARTICIPATION HALL TOWN HALL Call-In Number: (669) 900-6833

DON’T MISS THIS EVENT! DON’T MISS THISdialogue EVENT! In a rare, virtual, interactive that will

TODD GLORIA California Assembly TODD State GLORIA

VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

Wednesday, September 23 11:00 – 12:00 | Online Wednesday, September 23 11:00 – 12:00 | Online

ID: 924 0133 5061 | Password: 718742 Questions? Email Info@SanDiegoOasis.org TWO WAYS TWO WAYS TO PARTICIPATE VIDEO PARTICIPATIONTO PARTICIPATE Visit www.SanDiegoOasis.org and click on VIDEO PARTICIPATION Classes, then search for Town Hall. Visit www.SanDiegoOasis.org and click on Classes, then search for Town Hall. PHONE PARTICIPATION PHONE Call-In PARTICIPATION Number: (669) 900-6833 ID: 924Number: 0133 5061 Password: 718742 Call-In (669)| 900-6833 ID: 924 0133 5061 | Password: 718742 Questions? Email Info@SanDiegoOasis.org Questions? Email Info@SanDiegoOasis.org

LINDSEY PENA LINDSEY PENA ABC10 Reporter/Anchor LINDSEY PENA

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BARBARA BRY

BARBARA BRY Councilmember BARBARA BRY

Councilmember Councilmember

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10 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

“OK, Karen.” K

Where Entrepreneur Meets Advocate

arens get a bad rap these days, so we thought we’d shine a light on a good one. We met up with Clean Beauty Advocate, Karen Friend Smith–entrepreneur and long-time resident–to learn more about the clean beauty movement and how it’s making waves from San Diego to Sacramento. So, what ’s your story? I have been a serial entrepreneur from the moment I graduated from college. I love starting businesses and helping other small businesses succeed. This passion is what led me to build a publishing company here in San Diego that created community newspapers and magazines (a lot like this one) for many years. There are so many great stories behind every local business. How did you get involved in advocacy and the clean beauty movement? About six years ago, someone came to me to advertise her new business with Beautycounter–a clean beauty brand based out of Santa Monica. The company name said it all. They were ‘countering’ the beauty industry by increasing awareness about harmful ingredients and how what we put on our skin matters for our health. This caught my eye because I had been on a health journey myself. My husband and two daughters had recently made some major changes in our

lifestyle–starting with our food (shifting away from processed foods to more whole foods). From there, we moved into changing our cleaning products. Reducing the plastic in our house. Using glass for food storage. Swapping out our cookware for cleaner options. But, at the time, I had never stopped to think about our personal care products–like skincare, lotions, makeup, deodorant, haircare. Learning about Beautycounter started me down that rabbit hole. As a mother of two girls, I started to realize we used more products than I thought. Turns out the average woman uses about 12 products every day and this translates into well over 100 different chemicals. I was really shocked to see how many harmful ingredients are in these products–ingredients that are directly linked to infertility, endocrine issues, allergies and cancer. I had no idea we hadn’t updated legislation on ingredient safety for these products here in the U.S. since 1938! Needless to say, the more I learned, the more I had to get involved–not only in sharing this information with others so they can choose safer products, but also helping advocate for change. California Bills Signal Nationwide Change Last summer, I had the opportunity to join Breast Cancer Prevention Partners, Women’s Voices for the Earth, Black Women

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for Wellness and Beautycounter in Sacramento to lobby for a bill that would provide more transparency and empower consumers to choose safer products. After multiple attempts, it has been exciting to see the progress made since then. Two bills just passed here in California–the Safer Fragrance bill (SB 312) and the Toxic-Free Cosmetics Act (AB 2762). These bills are the biggest step forward in this industry in over 80 years! And, even though these are California laws, they affect more than just residents here. Companies are not going to want to make two versions of the same product. So, they will likely default to making the one that is allowed in California–which means safer products in all 50 states.

Does Advocacy Really Work? Advocacy is key! I’ve witnessed it the last few years. We are making big strides and the industry is taking notice. Beautycounter was named the Most Innovative Beauty Brand of the Year by Fast Company in 2020, the #1 Trending Beauty Brand in 2018 by Refinery 29, has been featured in everything from Forbes to Vogue to the New York Times and has won multiple product awards from Allure, Glamour and Cosmopolitan, among others. It’s been so fulfilling to be part of meaningful change–building a business that is both financially rewarding and has such significant social impact. We are growing fast and looking for more voices to add to our movement. If you’ve thought about starting your own business or maybe just a side hustle, Beautycounter is a great place to make that happen. There’s tremendous opportunity and flexibility for anyone who wants to jump in and get involved. Reach out and I’ll get some information to you. Want to Learn More? Start by choosing safer products. Local Umbrella Media is partnering with Beautycounter to support the clean beauty movement and to help you make some clean swaps. Visit us at https:// www.beautycounter.com/bradweber to get 10% off your first order and to learn more about how to get involved.

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Stay Safe, San Diego

VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

THE BENEFITS OF CBD By Michael Patterson NHA, OTR/L, CEAS new study in the August 2020 Journal of Psychopharmacology reports an increase in blood flow to the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex after one 600mg dose of Cannabidiol (CBD). A link to the study is below: https://journals. sagepub.com/doi/ full/10.1177/0269881120936419 CBD and Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are both derived from the cannabis plant. Together, they are part of the cannabinoid group of compounds found in cannabis and hemp plants. However, the USA definition of hemp is containing less than 0.3% THC. THC is the psychoactive compound responsible for the euphoric, ‘high’ feeling often associated with cannabis. The compound interacts with CB1 receptors in the central nervous system and brain and creates the sensations of euphoria in higher doses. However, CBD is non-psychoactive and does not fit the CB1 receptors well. CBD is also believed to be responsible for some of the therapeutic effects of cannabis such as pain relief. The study was performed by a team at the University College of London (UCL). The goal of the study was to understand the relationship of CBD with the human brain. The research team studied 15 participants, with no history of cannabis use, ingest a capsule of 600 mg of CBD on different occasions for one week, then 600mg of a placebo. Then, seven days later, participants were given the capsule they did not take. Participants didn’t know which capsule they were taking on each occasion. Next, researchers used an MRI brain scanning technique called arterial spin labeling, which measures blood oxygen level changes. The results showed that CBD significantly increased blood flow in the hippocampus and the orbitofrontal cortex. The orbitofrontal cortex area within the brain plays a role in decision-making, and the hippocampus is involved in memory. “Cannabidiol is one of the main constituents of cannabis and is

A

gaining interest for its therapeutic potential” said lead author Dr. Michael Bloomfield, a professor of Psychiatry at UCL. “ There is evidence that CBD may help reduce symptoms of psychosis and anxiety. There is some evidence to suggest that CBD may improve memory function. To our knowledge, this is the first study to find that CBD increases blood flow to key regions involved in memory processing, particularly the hippocampus. This supports the view that CBD has region-specific blood flow effects in the human brain, which has previously been disputed.”

Analysis

This study is a positive start to provide definitive proof that CBD can benefit blood flow to the areas of the brain which control decision making, memory, and potentially pain. This new insight can give physicians and researchers new evidence to facilitate larger studies of the use of CBD on patients suffering from memory disorders (Alzheimer’s Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Parkinsonian dementia, Alcohol related Dementia) as well as potential other ailments. The more research that is performed on the cannabis plant that can demonstrate the use of cannabis is safe and effective as a medicine, the more widely prescribed/ recommended it will be in domestically and globally.

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Army Veteran AJ Williams “So now, here I am, in the biggest battle of my military career, fighting for not only my life but for

the lives of my fellow veterans across the state and country who may be facing this same situation.” Written by AJ Williams in August 2020, lightly edited by inewsource. I am Angela Lynette Williams, but I prefer to be called AJ. I am a U.S. Army veteran who enlisted two years after high school, on Feb. 15, 1995. When I joined the Army, I had so many plans for what I wanted to do, what I wanted to be, who I wanted to become. I was going to be an interrogator linguist, learn how to speak a different language, and then get shipped off to school to learn counterintelligence work. Then after my tour, I was going to join the FBI, because that was my ultimate goal. Most of my Ramona High School classmates at the 20-year reunion reminded me about how much I bragged about it. I had the blinders on. I was working hard, and then - BAM! My world went topsy turvy. I’ve never been the same since. Yes, the drill sergeants are tough on you, and for good reason. Your training may mean the difference between life or death to the man or woman next to you on the front lines. That’s what you sign up for. But what you don’t sign up for, what you don’t expect, what you should never have to do is be afraid of staying silent after being raped by your drill sergeant just after you come off of a four-hour watch in the middle of the night during bivouac. You should be able to go to your company commander and tell them what’s been done to you and have them believe you without questioning you, mocking you, calling you a liar, or even just merely dismissing you from their office without a word. And for the life of me, I can’t remember the drill sergeant’s name. And at this point in my life, I don’t want to be reminded of it either. It’s difficult enough to sleep at night. I still have nightmares and memories of what he did to me over 20 years ago. What he did kick-started what would become the whole premise of my downward spiral into major depressive disorder, bipolar depression, anxiety and the rest of this story about the VA.

Army veteran AJ Williams leaves her El Cajon home just after 6 a.m. for a ketamine treatment at the San Diego VA Medical Center in La Jolla, Aug. 11, 2020. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

After I graduated boot camp, I was attached to the 120th Military Intelligence Battalion at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC for the enlisted folks), in Monterey in Northern California. When I signed up, I originally told my recruiter that I had learned Spanish in high school but flunked AP Spanish my senior year. I mentioned that I could hold a decent conversation, and with some more training I could easily and quickly pick it up. But the Army had other plans for me. They needed more people in the Asian languages, and I was appointed to the Korean language division. I wasn’t doing very well with it. Korean is based on symbols rather than letters. Although I’m a visual learner, the Korean language was just flying over my head. So I asked my platoon leader if it was possible to ask for a transfer to the Spanish division. He told me I needed to speak to their platoon leader in person and ask if there was a “possible position open.” That should have given me a clue. I should have learned from boot camp that I should never be caught alone with a male senior ranking officer or noncommissioned officer in an enclosed space and no way out. It took less than 10 minutes for the man to have his way with me. He just left the room, adjusting his tie like nothing ever happened. I ended up being late for my company’s run that day, and I

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was reprimanded for it. I tried to muster the courage to tell my captain why I was late, but he didn’t want to hear it. He was in a really bad mood. I was at the end of the list for reprimands, and I got the brunt of his anger. A few days later, I scheduled an appointment to see medical staff because I was still in physical pain from the assault. I was going to tell them what had happened and see what could be done, if anything. But I arrived, literally, two minutes too late. They had closed for the day, and again I was late for the company run. This time, I asked for a formal hearing with my platoon sergeant, the company commander and my squad leader. As I entered the room, all of the individuals I had requested to be present were already seated in the office. Plus one more. The platoon leader from the Spanish division. I could immediately feel the blood drain from my face, my heart pounding in my throat. The hearing started and ended without me saying anything but “Yes, sir,” saluting my captain and leaving the room. I then went to my barracks room and cried my eyes out. I was charged with dereliction of duty, but my captain spared me and decided that I would be discharged under honorable conditions. I never got to tell my side of the story at all. I was discharged on April 18, 1996. Fast forward to 2007, and I’ve

just graduated from broadcasting school in Denver. I’ve gotten my first job at a news station in North Platte, Nebraska. I was doing a story about veterans and the American Legion, and I just happened to ask the subject of my interview some questions as to whether I would be able to qualify for disability from the VA due to what happened to me. We made plans to speak later, and he got me disability benefits for PTSD. It took many years after that and several moves out of state, including back to Colorado, a brief stint in Arizona, and then finally back home to California, before I was finally rated 100% disabled by the VA for PTSD, bipolar disorder and a few other ailments. I was also rated 30% disabled due to my migraines, because the combination of medications I was usually prescribed would generate a blinding headache so severe it would require a visit to the ER. I finally made it home to California in 2012, and I immediately began to seek treatment at the VA Medical Center for mental health. That’s where I met psychiatrist Dr. David J. Printz. Eight years later, this humble, knowledgeable, quirky, affable but extremely caring and kind man is still my psychiatrist. We’ve been through the entire repertoire of antipsychotic medications and antidepressants. You name them, I’ve tried them at least once, if not twice. He even suggested ECT. That’s electro-convulsive therapy, aka, electric shock therapy. After screaming a few choice expletives at him, and then replying, “No, thank you,” I made my position clear. But Dr. Printz showed his stubbornness matched my own. He had me reading articles on the internet, two books by Carrie Fisher on the subject, and it still didn’t sway me. Finally, with my sister sitting beside me, he told me he had determined a while ago that I had drug-resistant depression. I didn’t even know that was even possible. So I finally relented and tried ECT for a year. I would come home from those sessions like a literal vegetable.

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Stay Safe, San Diego It would take almost the rest of the week for me to recover, just in time for me to go back to the VA Medical Center for another session. I was slurring words, unable to complete a sentence, unable to remember names or why I walked from one room to another. It bothered me that I wasn’t remembering things. But when I tried to tell Dr. Printz something wasn’t going right, I couldn’t even tell him what it was! My sister had to do it for me. And that’s when Dr. Printz suggested ketamine therapy. I was authorized to go see Dr. David Feifel at Kadima Neuropsychiatry, which just happens to be directly across the street from the VA. There I was introduced to the incredible experience of ketamine therapy. After just two sessions, I felt like a completely new person. I was a functioning, productive, and a pleasant member of the household and society again. No more teary-eyed breakdowns, no more violent, erratic mood swings. I was actually able to stop taking over 10 different medications that Dr. Printz had previously prescribed me. I didn’t need them anymore. It was great! I began ketamine therapy in April 2019. It’s an intramuscular shot in one arm, and then a booster shot in the other arm after 20 minutes. You end up going on a “trip” for about an hour, and then you go home. You can listen to your own music, relax in a recliner in a dark room, all by yourself while you’re monitored by the nurses on closed-circuit TV. You’re safe, relaxed and you come out feeling better than when you walked in. At least that was the case for me, until last October, when I started getting letters from the VA., investigative journalism delivered Bottom of Form The letters stated that the VA wasn’t going to pay for my ketamine therapy at Kadima because they weren’t authorized. I was getting one for each session I was receiving at Kadima. With a flurry of emotions swirling through me, curiosity won and I started my own fact-finding mission. At one point, I was told there was a problem with getting the

authorization paperwork back from the VA accounting office in Florida so the funds could be released to Dr. Feifel’s office. I wasn’t buying that line, so I dug deeper but hit a brick wall. Then, in late April, after my last session at Kadima, I made my appointments for the following month, just to stay on top of things. Tuesdays at 5 p.m. Perfect. Or so I thought, until I got a call from Dr. Printz at the VA two days later. He told me that I was “not allowed” to go back to Kadima anymore for my ketamine therapy treatments. That I was to start going to the VA to begin the newest drug, called Spravato, and that I had to show up on Tuesday at 10 a.m. He was sending me paperwork via email to electronically sign due to FDA regulations prior to the procedure. Spravato was a nasal inhaler filled with glow-in-the-dark green fluid, and one was supposed to depress the nozzle once into each nostril to get the full effect of the drug. I tried Spravato five times. It did absolutely nothing positive for me. It only made my migraines worse and more frequent. But it was either get my “ketamine” treatment this way or no way at all. Dr. Printz had NO say in the matter. He was just doing what he was told, and all other questions/answers on the subject were above his pay grade. Flabbergasted, I called Kadima and told them about the situation, and they told me that I wasn’t the only one who had called that day to cancel their appointments. All of their veteran patients had been calling in to cancel with the same story. I ended up calling the hospital director’s office — what was formerly known to me as the “patient advocate office.” For some reason, they had changed the name and the administrative duties of the office. Because COVID-19 had hit, they would only talk to me over the phone. I had to actually tell the woman handling my call to stop, shut up and listen to me for one minute. This was an off-script topic, and I needed her full attention on this matter. Once my story was

BRAD RACINO bradracino@inewsource.org Brad Racino is the assistant editor and senior investigative reporter at inewsource. He’s a big fan of transparency, whistleblowers and government agencies forgetting to redact key information from FOIA requests. Brad received his master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri...

told, she guaranteed that I would be contacted by the head of the mental health department within 48 to 72 business hours. Since it was late on Thursday, May 7, I wasn’t expecting anything that day. It wasn’t until May 20, when I had to call the same office back and leave a nasty voicemail message, that I got any type of response. And it was in the form of a return phone call the very next morning on May 21 at approximately 11:45 a.m. The man on the phone identified himself immediately as a doctor, what his position was and his phone number. I won’t name him here, to save him from embarrassment due to the mere fact of the way he treated me over the phone. Which, to be kind, was extremely rude. He ended the call leaving me feeling incredulous and discounted as a veteran. The same doctor called me back at the beginning of June “to follow up on a complaint I had,” and didn’t even remember that we’d spoken previously! I retrieved my notes from our previous conversation (The eternal journalist still resides within me. Write everything down!) and refreshed his memory. This doctor recalled the conversation and said, “I guess I need to learn how to treat people better when speaking to them on the phone.” And then hung up. The gall of the man, I thought! Army veteran AJ Williams becomes distressed as she discusses her switch from receiving ketamine treatments at Kadima

VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 13 Neuropsychiatry Institute to receiving Spravato treatments at the San Diego VA, May 27, 2020. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource) I called Dr. Feifel and asked if he knew what was going on. He told me the story about Marine veteran Jodi Maroney, and how she took her own life because the VA did the same thing to her that they were doing to me and others. And Jodi couldn’t live without the miracle that ketamine was working for her. In addition to getting blowback of some type from the VA, I was still getting letters for “unauthorized sessions” from the VA Medical Center in San Diego. Dr. Feifel and I put two and two together and figured out something was not only amiss but someone outright had lied to both of us. And we had the documents to prove it. Dr. Feifel told me about how this story was already making the local news through inewsource.org. And stubborn though I may be, I’m not one who will back down from a fight. Nor will I stand for bullying. From ANYONE. Not anymore. So now, here I am, in the biggest battle of my military career, fighting for not only my life but for the lives of my fellow veterans across the state and country who may be facing this same situation. It took me a while, but I’ve stepped up to the front line. As difficult as it may be sometimes, I’m not going to let anyone knock me down.

Army veteran AJ Williams lies in bed with her dog Sherlock at her home in El Cajon, May 27, 2020. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource) ZOË MEYERS zoemeyers@inewsource.org Zoë Meyers is a photo and video journalist at inewsource. Zoë loves working as a visual journalist because it gives her the privilege of witnessing moments in people’s personal lives and in our community that can enhance our understanding of important stories. When she’s not behind the camera,..

inewsource is a nonprofit, independently fundednewsroom that produces impactful investigative and accountability journalism in San Diego County. Learn more at inewsource.org.

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Stay Safe, San Diego

14 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

SONOMA ROOM SERVICE FROM

Rosé the Robot Butler

Before wine tastings, getting some face time with Hotel Trio’s “Social Distancing Ambassador” By Ron Donoho osé the robot butler is at the door. My wife and I have just arrived at Hotel Trio Healdsburg. We’re eagerly anticipating a day of wine tasting here in Sonoma County. While we’re unpacking the phone rings, which is how guests are notified of a visit from the hotel’s popular “social distancing ambassador.” You never forget your first room service delivery from a robot butler. Rosé is about three feet tall, cylindrical and has a stainless-steel exterior. Her “face” is a touchscreen. Her “head” has a compartment that can be loaded with whatever you’ve ordered— towels, treats, a bag of ice. In this case, Rosé is delivering a bottle of 2014 Comstock Zinfandel, a welcome gift for my wife and I, who are celebrating our wedding anniversary. Jules, my always-gracious spouse, verbally invites Rosé inside. But this roving robot butler is only programmed to make trips from the lobby desk to the outside of guest rooms. We’re both tickled to be interfacing with a ‘bot. A flurry of selfies and videos ensues. It occurs to me that this delivery droid’s name perfectly fits the Billy Joel narrative of our anniversary (or “corona-versary”) vacation. My wife and I are Joel fans. I popped the question at his San Diego Petco Park concert— during the song “Scenes from an Italian Restaurant.” We got married in an Italian restaurant. As in the song’s lyrics, we “decided the marriage would be at the end of July.” And following along with his lyrics and our wine-tasting adventure, we’re now confronting- “A bottle of white, a bottle of red, perhaps a bottle from Rosé instead.” Snicker. All due apologies to the legendary singer/songwriter.

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Hotel Trio Healdsburg Rosé has been serving and entertaining guests since Hotel Trio opened in 2018. The pandemic was an appropriate cause to rebrand the robot butler as a social

distancing ambassador. The hospitality industry has taken a huge hit due to coronavirus, but when the state of California mandated that hotels could reopen, business has ticked upward. To entice staycations, Hotel Trio is offering packages that help celebrate anniversaries and celebrations, as well as indoor camping experiences and outdoor picnics in historic downtown Healdsburg. To meet coronavirus safety challenges, Hotel Trio has Marriott’s Commitment to Clean program in place. Guests and staff are masked. One notable modification: Since no indoor dining is allowed, the property’s free breakfast amenity is “grab-and-go.” All 122 of the extended-stay hotel’s suites have full kitchens. After a guest checks out, all the in-room dishes, flatware and glassware get swapped out and deep cleaned. Traveling with kids? Some suites have bunk beds. The property also has a family-friendly pool, and outdoor firepits where you

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might opt to gather for a round of s’mores. There’s even a bocce ball court— with glow-in-the-dark balls available for casual nighttime fun. (Try as I might, I can’t think of any Billy Joel lyrics that reference bocce ball.) Hotel Trio is named in honor of Healdsburg’s three wine-producing regions—Russian River, Dry Creek and Alexander Valley. The area is quaint, picturesque and filled with country roads that would’ve inspired John Denver.

Driving Service We road tripped to Sonoma from San Diego by car. We’re here to do wine tastings and have no intention of drinking and driving on Sonoma’s country roads. I researched a few car services and almost went with a company that offers a super cool Model X Tesla with wing doors. Pro tip: Check out a business called Valet of the Moon. This company (backed by business liability insurance) provides a driver who will chauffeur you around in your own car. The fee

is nearly half the price of competitors who offer their town cars and SUVs. The Valet of the Moon owner’s daughter, Colleen Garrow, arrives at Hotel Trio wearing a face mask below smiling eyes. I give her my keys. She’s a delightful human being, an excellent driver and a font of local information.

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Stay Safe, San Diego

VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 15

I preplanned and booked three winery visits. It was no small feat to select the locations and arrange timing for our anniversary itinerary. Note: Most tour companies will take on this chore for you.

Sonoma Wine Tasting First stop: Jordan Winery. I picked the French bistro lunch offering here called “Paris on the Terrace.” We dine—socially distanced from other couples— under the shade of an oak tree a few yards from the winery’s ivy-covered chateau. French accordion music fills the air. Warm, fresh focaccia bread comes straight out of a pizza oven. Chef Todd Knoll’s food pairings are sublime. The experience starts with a 2018 Jordan Chardonnay and salmon rillettes on a bed of avocado mousse with a shaved carrot salad mixed with carrot puree and a raspberry vinaigrette. The two-hour encounter includes five delicious courses, including a savory charcuterie plate and a mixed-fruit tart for dessert. J Vineyards and Winery is an

unintendedly intriguing choice for stop number two. Turns out J Winery was founded by Judy Jordan, who broke away from Jordan Winery to launch her own sparkling wine brand. The music soundtrack at J is up-

beat: “Yeah, rock and roll!” Served on a contemporary, garden-lined terrace, J Winery offers tastings of preselected or custom-chosen small-lot wines. Paired with artisan cheeses, we pick the five-glass flight of

sparkling wines, ranging from a berry-friendly Brut Rosé to the citrusy 2011 Vintage Brut Magnum. Last stop: The Francis Ford Coppola Winery reminds me of an amusement park for oenophiles. There’s a giant swimming pool filled with frolicking kids. There’s no hotel—though a poolside bartender spills the tea that the winery’s namesake owner/director maintains a cozy suite. To reach the outdoor patio where tastings are currently allowed, guests must pass through—but not linger in—an impressive gift store brimming with merch. The centerpiece is an apple-red replica car from Coppola’s 1988 movie Tucker: The Man and His Dream. Yes, the director’s cut wine here is entertaining, too. Billy Joel would likely be simpatico with Coppola’s “bottle of red, bottle of white-whatever kind of mood you’re in tonight” vibe. J&J Ron Donoho is a San Diego-based freelance writer whose travel stories appear on JunketsAndJaunts.com.

San Diego Fire-Rescue Battalion Chief Receives Prestigious Award for Service International Association Of Fire Chiefs Bestows National Award To Sdfd’s Health And Safety Officer

In recognition of his work to support fellow employees with peer support programs and emotional health resources, San Diego Fire-Rescue Department (SDFD) Battalion Chief David Picone is being recognized with a prestigious honor from the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC). On Sept. 1, 2020, Chief Picone was notified that he was selected to receive the Chief Sandy Davis Safety Officer of the Year award. He was selected from a large group of nominees representing fire agencies across the country. The recipient of this award is recognized for making a significant contribution to their organization or the fire service. Chief Picone serves as SDFD Health and Safety Officer. “We are very proud of Chief Picone and his team’s efforts to expand behavioral health and other support services offered to our employees,” said Fire-Rescue Chief Colin Stowell. “He has made such a major impact on our workforce, which has really allowed individuals who may not have asked for help in the past to feel more comfortable and secure in reaching out for assistance. Chief Picone and his team have helped reduce the stigma of asking for help not only at our department but at other agencies as well.”

Since starting in his position as Health and Safety Officer three years ago, Chief Picone has expanded the peer support and chaplaincy programs to add more volunteers and improved training opportunities. He also initiated the concept of including employees’ spouses as peer support volunteers. He is credited with implementing several other initiatives, including: The Family Support Network and the Chaplain Crisis Canine Program. A joint wellness resource website for SDFD and San Diego Police Department personnel. Collaboration between the City’s Risk Management Department and private behavioral health facilities to serve first responders. Assisting other local first responder agencies with their behavioral wellness programs, cancer prevention methods and injury prevention programs. Creating the Injury and Illness Prevention Program which includes more than 20 specific policies for the safety (physical and behavioral) of the SDFD workforce. These policies also address physical injury prevention among many other employee safety topics.

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Prior to competing for the health and safety officer position, Chief Picone was troubled by the high number of divorces in the fire service and wondered what was causing them. He also began to witness and understand the concept of first responders experiencing post-traumatic stress. As a result, he started finding ways to help firefighters, lifeguards and dispatchers navigate stresses of their jobs and find balance, emotionally and physically. Chief Picone is a 21-year veteran of SDFD. He volunteers at his local church as a musician and works with his wife, Judy, to mentor other couples. The IAFC has been in existence since 1873 and has provided a forum for fire and emergency service leaders to exchange ideas, develop professionally and uncover the latest products and services available to first responders. The mission of the IAFC is to provide leadership to current and future career, volunteer, fire-rescue and EMS chiefs, chief fire officers, company officers and managers of emergency service organizations throughout the international community through vision, information, education, services and representation to enhance their professionalism and capabilities.

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16 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

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Jill G. Hall Releases Wildest Book Yet!

The

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J

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ill G. Hall is a busy woman. Not only is she a writer, but she is also a visual artist and a group facilitator and instructor for creatives of all types. As an arts patron she has served on multiple nonprofit Boards of Directors and is currently on the San Diego Arts and Culture Challenge Steering Committee raising funds for local arts organizations and artists impacted by Covid-19. She shares her insights about creative living on her popular blog Crealivity. Five years ago, Hall added another credit to her artistic resume when she launched her first novel The Black Velvet Coat, a dual timeline novel about two women from different eras connected by a vintage coat. The book soared to the top of bestseller lists from independent booksellers like Warwick’s to online retailer Amazon. Readers demanded a sequel. Fortunately, Hall was already at work on her follow up novel, The Silver Shoes. This month, Hall will release her third novel, The Green Lace Corset, which reviewers are calling her finest – and wildest – tale yet! Hall is launching her book online through Warwick’s on Saturday October 24 at 4 PM. The Point Loma native sat down with us at her ranch in Descanso to discuss The Green Lace Corset. Tell us why you wanted to explore the Wild West in your third novel? Growing up, I loved spending time in nature and watching TV westerns. Even though it would have been perilous or maybe because of it, I liked to imagine what it would have been like to live back then. I didn’t want to be a pioneer girl like on Little House on the Prairie, wearing a good-girl bonnet and white pinafore. Instead I dreamed of being a flirty saloon dancer who wore brazen outfits. Now, as a writer, I get to vicariously experience many female types through my characters. As an adult I mourned the encroaching intrusion of development and fantasized about purchasing my own backcountry property free from traffic and noise. Twenty years ago, I was able to buy such a place in Descanso, a 45-minute drive from downtown San Diego. Below Cuyamaca peak these peaceful forty acres border the Cleveland National Forest and are filled with oaks, manzanita and sage. Deer, rabbits, and other animals run wild. I built myself a studio here where I write, make art and host occasional day-retreats for other creatives in a variety of genres and at all levels. The nature has inspired a lot of my poetry and novel scenes. Like Anne, you are a mosaic and collage artist. How did your experience as an artist help you develop Anne? Many of the art pieces Anne creates in my novels are ones that I made in real life, and later realized they fit my story. So, I wrote scenes describing Anne making those mosaics and collages to move the story along or maybe as a clue to help solve a historical character’s mystery. Sometimes it was the other way around—I’d write a scene with Anne making a piece and later fashion it in reality.

Lots of my collages are text-based. I take a dramatic line or phrase from one of my drafts and create a piece around it incorporating vintage postcards, magazine photos and even some found objects to make assemblages. Studying these I am able to dive deeper into my writing by describing the details I can see in the artwork. Many of these can be viewed on my website.

The Green Lace Corset is the third in a trilogy. Do people need to read the first two books before cracking open your upcoming novel? Even though this is a trilogy, each of the novels standalone and can be read in any order. Artist Anne McFarland’s story begins in The Black Velvet Coat and runs through the other two novels but the threads are only hinted at and not necessary to enjoy the book. I often tell readers they may choose the historical era that interests them the most; noir 1960s in The Black Velvet Coat, 1929-1930s flappers in The Silver Shoes or 1885 Wild West in The Green Lace Corset. If they start with my second or third book, and if they like Anne and my writing style they can read the others as prequels. Tell us about your writing process. Most mornings, I make a cup of Chai tea and crawl back into bed with my journal. I don’t check my phone or turn on my computer until after I’ve filled a few pages. I let myself write whatever I want. It might be my dreams, stream of consciousness thoughts, a poem inspired by nature I see outside my window, or if I’m lucky my characters are with me and show up on the page. Weekly I attend Tuesday Brown Bag a prompt writing drop-in group at San Diego Writer’s, Ink. I’m now one of the facilitators and we’ve moved it to Zoom so we can keep meeting. Writing in community helps me keep going even when I want to stop or when something scary

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VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 comes up. After I’ve finished filling journals, I put stickies on the worthy pages and type them up. Do you tell your characters what to do or do they tell you? I’m an intuitive writer who believes in the heart-hand connection. In first drafts I put pen to paper without an outline and let my characters tell me where they want to go and what they want to do. I have to keep writing to find out what happens next. My characters come to me in dreams and through my soul onto the page. I let them be who they want to be. I don’t edit them if they’re too sassy, sappy or sexy. I guess it is a type of unconditional love. The characters lead the story not me. I get the first drafts down in my journal and later type up pages. I don’t do any fact checking or historical research until I have an entire draft. Then I begin to color in the story with more details from my investigations. What ’s on your nightstand right now? I’m reading The Falling Woman by Richard Farrell. He’s also a local writer friend and instructor at San Diego Writers, Ink. The novel is about a plane crash survivor who disappears. Rich is a pilot, so the details are very interesting, credible and suspenseful. It’s a real page-turner, so I hope I’m able get some sleep tonight. I look forward to posting 5-star reviews for him on Amazon, Goodreads and BookBub when I’m finished. What ’s the best writing advice you’ ve ever received? It was to find my tribe, a community of writers who can support one another along the way and help nourish each other’s work. San Diego Writers, Ink, whose mission is to nurture writers and foster a literary community, has been in business for over fifteen years and that is where I discovered my tribe. I’m a founding member, take and teach workshops and volunteer there. We offer a plethora of classes, workshops, drop-in writing sessions, and readings. There’s something for everybody no matter the type of writing you do or skill level. We have excellent read and critique groups with expert author facilitators. Even though right now we aren’t able to meet in our spaces at the Arts District at Liberty Station, the organization has pivoted most offerings to Zoom. Now people from all over the country have been able to join us for sessions. Without SDWI I don’t know if my books would have happened. What ’s the most surprising feedback you’ ve ever received from a reader? Last year I was a virtual guest at a New York book club through OWLS (Older-Wiser-Learning-Seniors) program. One of the women thanked me for “not going down smut alley.” This was a big compliment to me. I go out of my way to appeal to readers of all ages. My own book club doesn’t like foul language or TMI. I believe scenes are sexier if authors leave out certain details and let readers use their own imaginations to continue with dalliances. That’s what I try to do.

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Stay Safe, San Diego

18 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

Advocating For Hospitalized Loved Ones During COVID-19 By Kie Copenhaver MA, RHIA, CSA, RCFE

Sitting bedside and visiting with a loved one while they are hospitalized or in a skilled nursing facility (SNF) has been suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many patients are having to navigate the healthcare continuum without the comfort of a loved one or family member physically with them. This lack of real-time patient support, comfort and advocacy is raising concern and may be resulting in negative health outcomes. Here are two important ways you can remain in touch and stay informed of your loved one’s plan of care during COVID-19: Phone calls are vital – at least daily and more than once a day, based on your loved one’s health condition and situation. If your loved one is unable to communicate (e.g., stroke, coma, respirator), ask for the case manager or social worker assigned to their case. Video chats when and where possible – FaceTime on iPhones, Google Chat, Skype, Zoom video chats and even Marco Polo (which allows you to send and receive video clips) allows you to see and hear your loved one. If the patient does not have the technology necessary or the ability to work the technology, ask the social worker/case manager if they can provide it and assist your

son when calling. Appoint one person to be the “point person” for the hospital or SNF to communicate with. Multiple calls to the healthcare facility by numerous family members or friends will only confuse the situation and potentially create a “he said” “she said” environment.

loved one in using it. Here is information you will want to gather if your loved goes into the hospital or SNF: What room number and/or bed is your loved one currently in? What is the direct phone number for your loved one’s room (or bed, if more than one patient to a room)?

Julie Derry MBA, CSA

Who is the attending physician? Who is the case manager, social worker or discharge/ transition planner assigned to your loved one’s case? If this person changes daily (which does happen), ask for the main phone number for the Social Work/Case Management department so you can speak directly to a per-

Kie Copenhaver

MA, RHIA, CSA, RCFE

Create a binder where you can document the important things: diagnoses, dates, times, any procedures and conversations; make notes, create reminders and keep track of any additional and pertinent information regarding your loved one’s care. Keep this handy when speaking to anyone at the hospital or SNF. Request a daily call from someone – either the attending physician or social worker/ case manager – providing that “point person” a regular update. Don’t be afraid to ask questions! Your hospitalized loved ones do not have to be alone during this time of no-visitation policies. A phone call does wonders to shift the mood; a video chat can lift both the sender and receiver’s spirits, allowing you to see how your loved one is doing while away from you. With a few additional logistics and a comprehensive plan to stay in touch and informed, your loved one will hopefully be discharged in no time!

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VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 19

Tapping Away Your Troubles Hafez- “I wish I could show you when you are lonely or in darkness the astonishing light of your own being”

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ooze Flery is an Emotional Wellness Coach and Wellpreneur. Her practice; Heart Centered Living, focuses on helping individuals who are held back by their negative emotions. Sooze explains that she “ works with people to dig deep and explore their emotions, while opening their heart to love and forgiveness.” She says, “We all carry the pain of unresolved trauma, limiting beliefs and toxic relationships, which can produce negative thoughts causing a disruption to the bodies energy and nervous system. Talking and tapping helps to clear blocked energy and bring the body back to its natural state of rest.” Her practice’s goal is to guide clients in discovering the power they already have in healing and centering themselves through the practice of Emotional Freedom Technique Tapping. Emotional Freedom Technique Tapping or EFT is often referred to as psychological acupuncture without the needles. It’s an amalgamation of acupuncture, traditional Chinese Medicine, acupressure and modern psychology that combines both cognitive and somatic elements in its therapy. EFT focuses on the body’s energy pathways, known as meridians. These ‘energy highways’ carry vitality throughout the body. Each meridian and its coordinating partner have acupuncture points dotted along their channels. In traditional Chinese medicine, the energy that flows through these pathways is known as qi. If qi is stagnate or blocked it causes an imbalance in the body that can result in a myriad of symptoms, both physical and psychological in nature. Its movement can be restored using various types of pressure at points along the meridians. EFT is a technique that involves using the fingertips to softly tap on the meridian points of the head, torso and hand while visualizing and vocalizing the specific issue you seek to address. By voicing the negative thoughts while tapping the affected meridian, the body is able to clear the blocked energy in the system and “restore balance for optimum health.” Once the blocked energy is cleared, the parasympathetic nervous system can resume

normal functioning and alert the brain to turn off the fight or flight response to stress, thus eliminating the negative feeling associated with that event. Each time you recall the disruptive event the emotional distress and physical discomfort associated with it will gradually dissipate. Sooze Flery is a native born Californian and has lived in San Diego for the past 22 years. She has a Master of Science degree in Human Services and Community Psychology and is a student in “A Course in Miracles.” Sooze believes it is her natural sense of intuition and her ability to truly listen to people’s needs that enables her to excel at her calling as an Emotional Wellness Coach. She says, “Mindfulness is so important right now and that {individuals} need to be aware of what it is they’re feeling and then be able to let it go.” She hopes that when

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clients visit Heart Centered Living for a few sessions, she is able to “to listen and let them know they have the skills and the strength to be able to do the work. [I’m] just

guiding them to get to the place they want to be.” Making the decision to come in for an appointment at any new office is often one filled with anxiety. Knowing what the visit will consist of often helps quell those worrisome emotions. Sooze’s technique is centered on the theory of “Talk it Out, Tap it Out and Work it Out”. Pre visit: When you first call the clinic, you’ll receive a pre-intake form to fill out so the Sooze can get an idea of what is happening in your life and get a bit of a background on you and your concerns. Talk It Out: When you arrive for your session, you’ll discuss the issue at hand along with where you’d like to be at this point in your life. You’ll identify what specific concerns or issues you’d like to address through EFT. Tap It Out: Next she will tap on various meridian points of the head, upper torso, and hands while you vocalize and repeat a phrase that refers to the problem you’re addressing. This reminder phrase helps you remain engaged as she uses a tapping sequence on various acupoints until your level of distress with the feeling decreases. Work It Out: Following the somatic tapping therapy, you’ll work to develop an action plan to continue to maintain your physical and emotional balance and learn how to use EFT at home. This technique has been used in a variety of situations such as removing negative emotions, reducing pain, reducing food cravings, repairing relationships and reframing the way an individual perceives themselves. Most individuals can achieve emotional well-being and healing after only one to three sessions. Sooze shares the idea that, “We have the ability to control our thoughts; our angst, anxiety, and worry and we have the ability to let them go.” To find out more about EFT and Heart Centered Living you can visit the website at www.heartcenteredlive.com or call the office at 619-985-3595.

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VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 21

Santa Barbara

A Welcome Distraction From 2020

Soothe your soul at the luxurious Ritz-Carlton Bacara; have some fun in the Funk Zone By Ron Donoho Any hotel stay is an ideal opportunity to chillax at the pool. Especially in Santa Barbara during the unrelenting year that is 2020. It’s late July and I’m swimming laps in the adults-only spa pool at The Ritz-Carlton Bacara. The sky is cloudless. Water temperature in the cross-shaped, saline pool couldn’t be more ideal. A swimming pool is a swimming pool. Yet, I can close one eye, focus on the piped in music of Bobby Darin and Frank Sinatra, and instinctively recognize this as a Ritz-Carlton pool. Ritz amenities are pristine, clubby, ele-

moguls like Oprah and Warren Buffett have mansions, second homes and yachts spread all over the county, from Goleta to Montecito. This just in: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle just moved into Montecito! Ahem. Still, Santa Barbara is chill. Even tightly wound Angelenos are apt to drop Hollywood pretension when stopping in for a weekend getaway. Jules and I have sailed and hiked here. Shopped and dined. Drank fine wine. This visit, we want to survey the State Street main drag. And I want to introduce my wife to the Funk Zone. Due to COVID-19 safety restrictions on indoor

ra. The resort is built on a beautiful, coastal stretch of Goleta, about 12 miles from downtown. We are satisfied with safety precautions— like self-parking and checking in at a plastic-shielded front desk. Nearly every traveler, and all hotel staffers, are masked and conscientiously practicing social distancing. Our one-bedroom suite at Bacara is fully loaded. It has a living room area and a bedroom commanded by a classic four-post bed. There are two full bathrooms, fireplace and a sizeable patio offering a romantic ocean view. Our Bacara suite is a classy respite firewalled

gant and upscale. Small details matter. This pool goes to 11. The spa pool is farther from my ocean-view suite than the larger, family-friendly main pool. I didn’t trek halfway across the property’s 78acre, grassy grounds to avoid kids. Actually, the main pool, with its postcard-like funnel view of the Pacific Ocean, and more up-tempo music soundtrack, is an attraction. I do want to make the scene. However, COVID-19. The main pool is cleared to be disinfected three times a day. You have to register in advance for a chaise lounge. I’m essentially passing time at the spa pool until my reservation at the main pool. At the appointed afternoon time slot, I stand in an appropriately social-distanced line, have my temperature taken and am led by a pool attendant to the sunny chaise of my choice. It all works out for the best. The spa pool was conducive for a little exercise. At the main pool, it’s time for sun bathing and metaphysical reflection—to unwind, enjoy and temporarily slip out of the societal omnipresence of corona.

dining, parts of State Street have been converted to a pedestrian promenade. Restaurants, and bars partnering with eateries, have expanded seating onto sidewalks and streets. State Street actually looks festive—detailed attention has gone into sprucing up the outdoor dining areas with leafy plants and string lighting. One block of Victoria Street has been closed as a “Restaurant Row.” It includes popular restaurants bouchon Santa Barbara, Olio e Limone Ristorante, Scarlett Begonia and the entirety of the Santa Barbara Public Market. My wife goes gaga over the Funk Zone. It’s an up-and-coming section of downtown between the ocean and Highway 101. It used to lean industrial. Now it’s contemporary and artsy—filled with boutique wine-tasting rooms, cafes and art galleries. Outdoor dining “parklets” are buzzing in the Funk Zone. In particular, the converted parking lot between the Lucky Penny and The Lark restaurants is doing a steady business by pulling in family diners. A fun aspect of the Funk Zone is that it continues to evolve. I was here just two years ago. Though acting as a tour guide to my wife, there are storefronts and additions to an Urban Wine Trail that are new to me.

from the rest of the world. It’s a well-appointed cloud; a safety bubble that also happens to offer high-end Mediterranean-style décor. We’re scheduled for dinner at the resort’s contemporary steakhouse. All dining at Angel Oak is on the outdoor patio that overlooks the ocean. Instead of paper menus, guests are instructed at the host stand how to download menus to phones. We’re sated by herb-butter-topped filet with seasonal summer veggies, and a pan-seared bass atop potato puree with wild mushrooms. My wife and I order a chocolate-mocha dessert to go. Finishing dessert in the room during hotel stays has become a dining tradition. Tonight, we’ll call it “something sweet in the suite.” We take the chocolate-mocha cake out onto our suite patio. There’s a cool summer breeze. It’s dark, but swirls of light bob on ocean waves. High tide has arrived so the beach below has disappeared. The sound of the surf caressing the shoreline sounds like an ethereal backbeat to a soothing lullaby. Dessert on the balcony becomes a glorious reality, defined only by the moment. I’m baking this memory into my brain and plan to recall it, as necessary, over the remainder of 2020. J&J Ron Donoho is a San Diego-based freelance writer whose travel stories appear on JunketsAndJaunts.com.

Downtown Santa Barbara My wife and I have road-tripped to Santa Barbara from San Diego half a dozen times over the years. Amtrak is also a convenient way to arrive, and Alaska Air is actually adding new direct flights later this year. Santa Barbara is a status-imbued region that holds cultural cachet. Celebs and business

Back to Bacara After getting Funkified in downtown Santa Barbara, it’s back to The Ritz-Carlton Baca-

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22 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

San Diego Author Ona Russell Releases Her Most Powerful Novel Yet Chicanos, Nazis and 1940s Los Angeles converge in this unique psychological ride

Local author and educator, Ona Russell, will release her fourth novel Son of Nothingness, a literary and historical fiction hybrid that explores themes of identity, acceptance, and justice to name a few. Russell, PhD., is an author, educator, lecturer, and mediator, who has written multiple award-winning books: Rule of Capture (Silver Medal winner, 2015 IPPY Awards); The Natural Selection (Finalist, 2009 California Commonwealth Club Book Awards, San Diego Book Awards, Next Generation Indie Awards); and O’Brien’s Desk (Pen/Faulkner nominee). Russell also lectures throughout the west coast on her original, interdisciplinary course, Literature and the Law. As she prepared for her book launch, Russell took time from her busy schedule to chat with us about her upcoming release. Tell us what inspired you to write Son of Nothingness. I have always been drawn to the margins of history, to the people, places and events that are forgotten, overlooked, or consciously suppressed. Like marginalia in a book, it is there that different voices and stories emerge, enhancing, illuminating or undercutting the dominant narrative. Since my first novel, O’Brien’s Desk, in which I introduced Sarah Kaufman—a real but unsung 1920s civic leader I adopted as my fictional sleuth—I have continued to create works that reposition the marginalized, turning them into the main event. In Son of Nothingness, a little known but significant historical fact becomes the driving force behind the protagonist’s journey. Andrés Martinez is a man at odds with his Mexican-American identity, with his place in the world, even with his own body. He is handsome, bright and successful, but feels like an outsider. As the son of a central character in my last book, Rule of Capture, Andrés was a peripheral figure, a troubled young man whose father, Carlos, abandons him. It may sound a little crazy, but I felt it my duty to tell his story, to not repeat Carlos’ mistake. My own mother also inspired me to write Son of Nothingness.

She spent time in the home for unwed mothers portrayed in the story and, as a Jewish woman, was marginalized even more than her so-called disgraced roommates. The real Sarah Kaufman, advocate for many Jewish and other minority causes, was inducted into the Toledo Civic Hall of Fame as a result of O’Brien’s Desk. This is the honor in my writing career about which I’m the most proud. Sarah devoted her life to the notion of tikkun olam, a calling to repair the world. In giving voice to those like Andrés and my mother, I do what I can to follow her lead. What are the themes you wanted to explore? There are many interrelated themes in the book, some of which I consciously addressed, some that surfaced on their own. They include: cultural assimilation, family dynamics, ethnic and gender identity, place as a character, representation of the Other, war as metaphor, justice, women and salvation. There are probably others. Reader response theory, a critical approach to understanding the diversity of opinions about a book, asserts that readers bring their own subjectivity, assumptions, expectations and so forth to the reading experience. Thus, a theme that might be invisible to one reader may be clear as day to another. This includes the author, by the way. It is tricky to try and decipher the intent of the author, as she (or he) doesn’t always exactly know herself what she intended. When I said above that some of the themes surfaced on their own, I wasn’t being purposefully vague. The unconscious works through the writer, appearing as words on a page but not always with her full understanding of how they got there. Okay, enough about the mystical. Basically, everyone sees different things in a book and that’s what makes literary discussions so intriguing. Who do you see this book appealing to? I didn’t write Son of Nothingness for any particular type of reader. I hope the appeal is broad. But certainly fans of history and historical fiction would be con-

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sidered a target group. The story takes place in 1949 Los Angeles, so anyone drawn to that particular time and place would likely be interested. Since the book is written from a first-person, male perspective, men might be curious (those that have read it thus far have complimented me on the portrayal) to see if I got it right. But it is also a woman’s book, since it is the female characters that save the day. People with an interest in Homer’s Odyssey, film and literary noir, mysteries (as it is connected to my prior and future work in this genre) Latinx and Jewish issues, birds—since one of the main characters is a parrot—and stories of redemption would all find something to like—or pick apart—in it as well. What type of research did you do to write from the perspective of a Chicano protagonist? Research is my passion. My doctoral dissertation was on 19th century American literature, so I’ve spent years in the archives, way before the digital age. Celebrated author Henry James despised historical fiction because, as he put it, it was impossible to “capture the consciousness” of a former era. And that’s true. So what does one do as a writer of such works? You try your damndest to get as close to that consciousness as possible. That means getting the details right. So, in the case of Son of Nothingness, I read everything I could get my hands (pre-Covid, of course) on, much of which I had already done for Rule of Capture. In particular, I combed through countless books and articles on Chicano history, such as Whitewashed Adobe (by my former dissertation committee member, William Deverell, current director of the American literary collection at the Huntington Library). It was in Deverell’s work, for example, that I learned about a pneumonic plague that occurred in a 1924 Los Angeles Chicano neighborhood. Similar to our own time, this plague was racialized, attributed to Mexican genetics rather than the inhabitants’ impoverished living conditions. I also read numerous novels by Latinx authors and conducted interviews with the Chicano/Latinx community and

family members and watched representations of Chicanos in film. And I have written and had articles published about Mexican-American issues, including “Crossing Borders,” a piece I

son of nothingness

L A N OV E A NCE S

AR OF A PPE

O NA RU S S E L L wrote for Orange County Lawyer Magazine several years ago. What has been the early feedback on Son of Nothingness? Thus far, the response has been enthusiastic from both Latinx and non-Latinx readers. While there is not one kind of man, or one kind of Chicano, I am particularly honored by KPCC and former KPBS reporter Adolfo Guzman-Lopez’s comment that the book rings true when it comes to representation of historical L.A. and the relationship between Chicanos and whites. What else would you like readers to know about Son of Nothingness? Writing this story was a challenging labor of love. No other book has demanded as much from me nor been as gratifying. I’m excited to send it out into the world and look forward to getting feedback from readers, whether individually or at (for now, virtual) events and book clubs. For a list of independent bookstores or to purchase online: onarussell.com To connect with the author | @ ona-russell (Twitter) | Ona Russell (Facebook) For bookings and more information: info@onarussell.com

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VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 23

Artist Couple

Meet JoAnn and Bob Mogg, San Diego Oasis members and donors since 2016, who have taken over 400 classes, most of them together.

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like being on a “land cruise” with so much to do and great food.

hey tell us they think aging is an opportunity to pursue things you never had time to investigate. Since retiring a few years ago, their stress levels are down and they believe it’s important to continue learning, to find new interests and to manage your health. Bob says, “When you decide to retire, you have to determine whether you can afford it and what you want to do to enjoy it.” Favorite classes? They love Peter Bolland and Mark Carlson’s lectures, as well as Amy O’Connor’s craft classes because they say she teaches crafts “that anyone can do.” JoAnn, a native Californian and Bob, who hails from Minnesota, met when they attended UC Davis. She calls it cosmic destiny. They went to see a Harold & Maude movie that explored aging issues and realized they had similar interests. They eloped to

designs. Becoming involved with costume-related conventions and fairs, he designed costumes for the Renaissance Faire, Steampunk Convention, Clan Maclaren Society of North America, and Comic-Con in San Diego. He teaches costume design online and provides tips for being involved in the costume design world on his blog called TheIronTailor.blogspot.com. Bob believes that costume design intersects with technology, politics and social change in the world. In one experience, Bob worked

When JoAnn’s mom decided to be closer to them, they suggested she try Casa de las Campanas in Rancho Bernardo. They liked it so much, Bob moved his parents there. They both say that is where they will move when they are ready because it feels

With the Covid “home arrest,” they say they have had a lot of time for crafts, costuming, and Oasis Zoom classes! “It’s nice to be able to learn about metaphysics, from the comfort of your couch. For some reason, it is easier to contemplate Eastern Philosophy with a good supply of snacks on hand!” says Bob. “We’ve embraced Zoom meetings so much that we use them not only for Oasis classes, but also for catching up with friends, and I’ve even started a Dungeons & Dragons group via Zoom, and have used Zoom to do our annual Costuming Panel for Comic-Con, which was part of this year’s Virtual Comic-Con in July!” They are loving every minute of their retirement, and we are grateful to have them as part of our Oasis Family as donors, as students and as ambassadors.

GUIT GUITAR ART AUCTION AUC BENEFITING ARTREACH ARTRE E

Lake Tahoe the day before graduation and have been together ever since. JoAnn had a career with JP Morgan Chase, starting in subprime loans where people called her the “fixer.” Bob says, “She could nice you to death,” as she had to deal with various people in situations where she had to coordinate with people she had never met and find a way to get things done. He is an engineer by training, a historian by education, a teacher by experience, a costumer by preference. His mother taught his sisters to sew, so when he was able to take over his mother’s 1942 sewing machine, he rewired it and used it to create period costumes, competing in contests for his

ONLINE AUCTION OCTOBER 1 - NOVEMBER 8 on a British royalty outfit for two months. The day before they were to present the outfit, he decided to design something for his dog, a pit bull. Hence, a doggie pram for the Dickens Festival that became a big hit. JoAnn and Bob have both witnessed the impacts and opportunities of aging well first hand.

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Register to bid online now:

charityauction.bid/artreachguitars Take home one of 31 artfully transformed, playable guitars while supporting free visual arts education programs for San Diego youth. Follow us for updates on the auction @ArtReachSD

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24 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

This is an example of a moveable tiny home sold by Zen Tiny Homes in Encinitas. These units are now legal in San Diego if rented for at least 30 days. (Courtesy of Zen Tiny Homes)

Who Wins When San Diego Adds Granny Flats And Tiny Homes? Residents Or Tourists? by Cody Dulaney | inewssource an Diego continues to encourage adding small units to single-family properties in a push to increase the affordable housing stock, but where city officials struggle is in keeping these units from becoming short-term vacation rentals. Even with the steps they are now taking, they won’t catch those who operate underground and rent in areas where short-term rentals are restricted. The need for this kind of housing is great. A report last year from the California Housing Partnership says San Diego County needs more than 136,000 affordable rental units — which is considered $1,600 or less a month for one person — to meet the current demand.

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Why this matters How to fix San Diego’s shortage of affordable housing is a problem that has dogged city leaders for years. Tiny homes and granny flats are seen as tools to increase affordability for San Diegans. To bridge that gap and increase affordable housing, the city’s elected leaders have made it easier and cheaper for property owners to add granny flats to their lots. In return, the owners who received permits after

John Thickstun

Gary London

2017 have to rent them for 30 days or more. They can’t be used as short-term rentals. And now, the city is allowing property owners to park a tiny home on wheels in their yards. The City Council voted unanimously this month to legalize these movable tiny homes, and Mayor Kevin Faulconer approved it. As with granny flats, the tiny homes aren’t to become short-term rentals.

An inewsource investigation in January found the city wasn’t doing much of anything to make sure granny flats — officially called accessory dwelling units or companion units — weren’t being rented out on Airbnb, Vrbo and other short-term rental websites. Our investigation involved comparing two sets of city data — tax certificates that allow someone to rent a property for less than 30

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Stay Safe, San Diego days and granny flat permits issued after 2017. What inewsource uncovered was the two departments responsible for keeping this public data weren’t sharing the information with each other, so neither knew that several owners who got financial breaks to build granny flats as new affordable housing had converted them to short-term rentals. In February, after our story published, the City Treasurer’s Office began sharing a monthly list of addresses that can be rented for less than 30 days with Development Services, which issues granny flat permits. That allows them to catch those who might be violating the rental law. So far, code enforcement has opened cases against about 30 property owners, city spokesperson Scott Robinson said. The list includes some inewsource identified. Code enforcement’s goal is gaining compliance, Robinson said, so staff first tries to work with the property owners. If unsuccessful, they could be assessed daily fines of up to $10,000 for a maximum of $400,000.

the unit is booked every day for a month. That compares to an average monthly rent for a one-bedroom apartment in San Diego of $1,795, according to Zumper, a San Francisco-based apartment listing marketplace. City Attorney Mara Elliott has said short-term rentals are illegal in San Diego’s residential zones, but city officials don’t enforce that.

Two San Diego real estate experts, Norm Miller and Gary London, say granny flats and tiny homes do provide a benefit by adding to the region’s housing supply. The units also increase affordability — for the property owner with additional income and for the tenant with relatively low rents for small spaces.

A granny flat built at this Normal Heights home, shown here on Jan. 22, 2020, also has a certificate to rent it for less than 30 days. (Zoë Meyers/ inewsource)

Short-term rentals lucrative for owners This system, however, does little to catch property owners who might be illegally operating short-term rentals, which includes everything from granny flats issued permits since 2017 to some apartment buildings. As of July, the City Treasurer’s Office maintains a list of 6,669 active tax certificates for properties that are rented for less than 30 days and pay a daily transient occupancy tax — or room tax. These could be a Best Western motel or a granny flat in someone’s backyard. But nearly 9,200 San Diego addresses were posted on Airbnb with less than 30 days as a minimum stay, according to data collected in mid-June by Inside Airbnb, a tech start-up that gathers information from Airbnb listings. Although Airbnb collects room taxes from guests and pays the city in a lump sum, the city doesn’t check if those units are allowed to be used as short-term rentals. John Thickstun, a board member from Save San Diego Neighborhoods, is shown in this undated photo. (Courtesy of John Thickstun) Save San Diego Neighborhoods, which lobbies for vacation rental regulations, is skeptical that granny flats and moveable tiny homes will make any sizable difference in the city’s housing shortage. These units will wind up benefitting tourists on vacation more than San Diegans looking for affordable housing, said John Thickstun, a board member with the group. “If (property owners) can make two or three times as much money renting it out as a short-term vacation rental, that’s what they’re going to do. And when you have a city run by people that don’t enforce the law, this is what happens,” Thickstun said. Inside Airbnb’s data shows an average night’s stay for a San Diego unit with one bed costs $138, which adds up to $4,140 if

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The City Council also has failed at attempts to impose strict regulations on short-term rentals. Today, the city sets no restrictions on how long a primary dwelling in a single-family residential zone can be rented, but those in multi-family zones are limited to a minimum of seven days. Meanwhile, granny flats permitted since 2017 and moveable tiny homes on single-family lots have a 30-day minimum.

Caution urged against overregulation Councilmember Scott Sherman was behind the city allowing tiny homes on wheels and including them with laws regulating granny flats. He also thinks the city can keep them from being turned into short-term rentals. During the council meeting when the tiny homes were approved, Sherman called them a “small bite of a large elephant” when it comes to increasing the affordable housing stock in San Diego. Sherman has said the city’s lack of regulation on short-term rentals has made San Diego the “wild, wild West.” Even so, he told inewsource in an email: “Moveable tiny homes are a great option that naturally increases affordable housing at no cost to taxpayers and I am confident the Mayor and city staff can effectively enforce the ordinance.” Faulconer declined to comment on what more the city can do to prevent housing intended for San Diegans from becoming rooms for tourists.

But whether people should be allowed to turn them into short-term rentals comes down to property rights, said Miller, a University of San Diego real estate finance professor. People should not be prevented from renting out units on their property just because neighbors object. “At the same time, we do need more housing, so I can see putting some minimum rental terms on the units,” he said in an email. London, a real estate analyst with London Moeder Advisors, said he believes the vast majority of people who have these units rent to long-term tenants, so he doesn’t see the need for restrictions on short-term rentals. “I think we have to tread very carefully in overregulating (granny flats) for short-term vacation rentals, because there’s a lot of good that comes from them as well,” London said. Vacation platforms like Airbnb and Vrbo benefit the economy and don’t significantly impact the hotel sector, he said. And unlike apartment developments, London said, adding these types of units to existing lots is rarely seen or felt by neighbors because they’re in people’s backyards. If there are problems with loud partying or parking violations, he said, “perhaps we need to concentrate our efforts in better enforcing the rules that are already on the books.” inewsource intern Sofía Mejías-Pascoe contributed to this story.

inewsource is a nonprofit, independently fundednewsroom that produces impactful investigative and accountability journalism in San Diego County. Learn more at inewsource.org.

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Stay Safe, San Diego

26 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

OCTOBER 15 –18 2020

ANNOUNCING THE RE-IMAGINED 2020 SAN DIEGO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ONLINE AND AT THE DRIVE-IN MOVIES The re-imagined and COVID appropriate 2020 San Diego International Film Festival will present more than 70 features, documentaries and shorts online at the San Diego International Film Festival Virtual Village and on the big screen at the Festival Drive-In Movies @ Westfield UTC.

The San Diego International Film Festival Virtual Village Enjoy 4 days of live streaming and on demand viewing for all of the Festival films plus industry panels and live chats with filmmakers from around the world.

Festival Drive-In Movies @ Westfield UTC Drive-ins are back big time! It’s the preferred 2020 version of watching films on the big screen. We’re taking our new Drive-In Movies partnership out for a spin with 4 nights in September and 4 nights at the Festival. Pre-Festival Dates: Friday & Saturday, September 18 & 19 Friday & Saturday, September 25 & 26 Festival Dates: Thursday – Sunday, October 15, 16, 17 & 18

SDFILMFEST.COM

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Stay Safe, San Diego

VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 27

EMERGENCY EVACUATIONCHECKLISTS 15-minute warning: 1. Wallet, purse, keys, glasses 2. Cell phone(s), charger(s) 3. Emergency cash, credit card 4. Pets, carriers, leashes, meds 5. Clothes, shoes, hats for season 6. Hearing aids, medications 7. Flashlights, extra batteries 8. Safety deposit box key(s) 9. Checkbooks, bills to pay 10. ___________ 11. ___________ 30-minute warning: (The above, plus);

1. Pillows, sleeping bags, blankets 2. Address book, phone list 3. Jewelry & most valuable possessions 4. Personal hygiene items 5. Other meds, supplements 6. First aid kit, medical items 7. Pet food, dishes, bedding, litter 8. Children’s items, toys, books 9. Battery radio, extra batteries 10. Toilet paper, hand wipes, soap 11. Clothing for 3 days, shoes 12. Computer, monitor, laptop

13. Gal. jugs of driking water 14. __________ 15. __________ 1-hour warning: 1. Take or safeguard guns, ammo 2. Ice cooler w/ice, food, drinks 3. Genealogy records, files 4. 3 days food, special diet items 5. Gloves, dust mask for smoke 6. Paper plates, cups, utensils 7. School items, homework, pen, pencil, books, calculator, paper 8. Licenses, vehicle titles, deeds 9. Insurance, financial, medical data, Wills, Powers of Attorney 10. Personal property list, photos & appraisals, documentation 11. __________ 12. __________ 2-hour+ warning: 1. Albums, photos, home videos 2. Family photos on display

3. Military decorations, records, mementoes, plaques 4. Luggage (packed) 5. Valuable items, cameras 6. Heirlooms, art, collections 7. Primary cosmetics 8. Secondary vehicles, RV 9. Camping equipment, tent 10. Journals, diaries, letters 11. __________

Additional Items to Consider Adding to an Emergency Supply Kit:

q Prescription medications and glasses q Infant formula and diapers q Pet food and extra water for your pet q Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies,

identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container

q Cash or traveler’s checks and change q Emergency reference material such as a first aid book or information from www.ready.gov

q Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider additional bedding if you live in a cold-weather climate.

q Complete change of clothing including a long sleeved shirt, long

pants and sturdy shoes. Consider additional clothing if you live in a cold-weather climate.

q Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper – When diluted nine parts water

to one part bleach, bleach can be used as a disinfectant. Or in an emergency, you can use it to treat water by using 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water. Do not use scented, color safe or bleaches with added cleaners.

q Fire Extinguisher q Matches in a waterproof container q Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items q Mess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils, paper towels q Paper and pencil q Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children

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Emergency Supply List

www.ready.gov

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Stay Safe, San Diego

28 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

SEPTEMBER 2020

ROCK ‘N’ ROLL SAN DIEGO

BY BART MENDOZA © MUSICSCENESD // MUSICSCENESD.COM

Battle of the Bands

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F

ounded in 2011 there is no doubt that Point Loma based Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego has had a huge impact on the area’s music scene. More than just a place to rehearse or record, it’s a one stop, housing video and audio studios, music school, musical repair shop and much more. While San Diego artists are a mainstay, it’s a world class operation, with many touring acts using it’s facilities, including The B-52’s, Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top), Ace Frehley, Steven Tyler (Aerosmith) and The Beach Boys. Recently Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego expanded it’s capabilities and will be hosting a Battle of the Bands to help get the word out. “When Covid-19 hit we realized quickly we needed to get into streaming our bands so that they have an opportunity to still perform and get their art out to the world,” said Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego founder, Mark Langford. “We have invested heavily into hiring the finest techs to help build the best streaming service in San Diego. We were successful in acquiring the best professional equipment available and have designed multiple rooms that allow us to stream bands or other content back to back. It is really something special to have that capability.” Bands entered in the contest will find a stage with multiple cameras for a unique video. “Each room is equipped with a sound system that connects to our main control room, has stage lights and a nice vibe to them,” Langford said. The contest will run on concurrent Saturdays from October 10 through December 12. Langford sees the event as pragmatic. “We needed a way to get the word out and a Battle of the Bands seemed like a good idea to have to help with that. It will also just be a lot of fun!” He notes the contest is open to bands worldwide. “We are accepting bands from any anywhere. All types too, such as original, tribute and cover bands. All styles are welcome! We are hoping for a diverse pool of entrants.” Prizes include a virtual NYE headline spot, press and much more TBA, but “at the very least each band will get a live stream so they have a new video with the top video producer and sound man around,” Langford said. “So even if a band doesn’t care about winning, it’s something any band should participate in just to get a fresh video at a frac fraction of the cost it would normally be.” The new upgrades in streaming, video and editing at Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego have been a massive undertaking, but Langford considers the changes needed and important in going forward. “We really have no choice, bands need an outlet to perform, people want music and we need to stay in business,” he said. The venue will celebrate it’s first decade next year and Langford couldn’t be happier with Rock ‘n’ Roll san Diego’s progress. What’s he proudest of ? “Bringing our community together to create new art and fellowship is what really has been fulfilling for me,” he said. “New bands get formed often here at RRSD, its so cool to see the de development as they get better and better. We have seen children come in never playing an instrument before and later they are in great bands performing awesome music,” Langford said good naturedly. www.rockandrollsandiego.com /LocalUmbrellaMedia

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Stay Safe, San Diego

VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 29

Kate Delos Santos Soul and R&B fans will want to hear Rancho Bernardo/4s Ranch based singer Kate Delos Santos, who debuts her album, Note to Self, this month. Perhaps best known to date as singer with R&B band, decent people, Delos Santos has a sweet soul voice, with a wonderful knack for arranging backing vocals “I would describe my music as a fusion of R&B and Bedroom Pop,” Delos Santos said. “I’m inspired by Stevie Wonder, SZA, Amy Winehouse, and any ‘90s / early 2000 R&B like Aaliyah or Brandy!” Santos has released five singles to date, performing at varied spots from Lestat’s Coffeehouse to Kate Sessions Park, all part of a life-long love of music. She gave her first public performance at the age of six. “I performed at my elementary school talent show,” she recalled. “I sang “Hopelessly Devoted to you” from the musical Grease. I was so nervous but everyone told me after I did a wonderful job. I’m pretty sure the performance lingers somewhere on Youtube,” Delos Santos joked. Not long after Santos decided to learn an instrument. “I taught myself guitar in the 6th grade,” she recalled. “I’ve always wanted to become an amazing pianist, but I learned very quickly at a young age after taking piano lessons, that I didn’t have the patience. I can play some chords on the piano but never learned it fully because the teachers always bored me with music theory.” While Delos Santos had a bit of help from her younger brother Chris, Note to Self is practically a one woman project. “David Olivo mixed the entire EP, but I pretty much wrote, recorded, and produced the entire project in my bedroom,” she said. Delos Santos is looking forward to

e t No lf e S to

getting back onstage and future recording, but in the meantime she’s happy to simply be crecre ating music. “I love how you’re able to feel emotions through sound,” she remarked. “Writing and creating music is such a cathartic activity and I am so blessed to have this outlet of expression.”

Note To Self is available on all Streaming platforms, more info at @katedelossantos Local News > LocalUmbrellaNews.com

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30 VOL. 5 ISSUE 9

T

Stay Safe, San Diego

twenty New Records!

here are plenty of musical duo’s out there, but nothing like Satanic Puppeteer Orchestra aka Michael Buchmiller, aka Professor B. Miller, and his robot, SPO20. A mixture of electronica, performance art and humor, each performance is a unique experience and a heck of a lot of fun. The duo has embarked on a series of twenty themed EP’s to be released on limited edition vinyl over the next few years, complete with inspired videos and top-notch packaging. The latest in the series, Lost at Sea, comes in a laser-etched vinyl edition limited to 42 copies with the cover artwork etched into the disc. Why a series of EP’s? “After the release of our last full-length record, Experiments with Auto-Croon (2014), I took about three years off from recording new music,” explained Buchmiller. “During that time, I wrote down a ton of ideas for song lyrics. Some were just song titles or enough to help me remember the idea. No music at that point.” When he was ready to start working on new material again in 2017, he combed through my archive and noticed a lot of the ideas kind of fit within themes. “Initially I thought I should just pick the best song that deals

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with that theme, because it’d be weird to have two songs about the grocery store on one record,” he explained. “ Then I thought, maybe I got it backwards... maybe the whole album should be about the grocery store and I need a couple more songs to fill it out. And that’s how this project started.” The next themed record, “Race to Space,” will be out by the end of the year. “We got noted astrophysicist Dr. David Collins writing the liner notes for it, and each copy will come with our version of a NASA mission patch,” Buchmiller explained. “It explores music genres tied to space ranging from orchestral string-based compositions and synth pop, to spacey dub. I’m not sure who else out there needed to hear a mash up of lines said by the robot, HAL 9000, from

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“2001: A Space Odyssey” with lyrics from Paul Simon’s “You Can Call Me Al,” but your wait for “You Can Call Me HAL” is almost finally over,” be said good naturedly. As for the EP format, Buchmiller jokes that it’s part of a plan. “I also like the idea that our first release was a massive five disc box set, then our next album was a regular full length, and now we’re working on EPs... it’s sort of the reverse trajectory of every other band. I guess our last release is going to have to be a demo tape.” The same sort of logic applies to the amount of EP’s to be released. “I like to set outlandish goals for myself. It keeps me focused and motivated,” he said. “ The robot’s name is SPO20, so it seemed fitting to shoot for twenty. We’re not above novelty (we have a robot for a singer, after all), and it’s fun to tell people we are working on twenty records.” www.satanicpuppeteer.com

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Stay Safe, San Diego

VOL. 5 ISSUE 9 31

Local Music News Cathr yn Beek s has a third edition of her Listen Local Cook s books due out in November. Featuring recipes from San Diego musicians, submissions for the cookbook are open through the end of September. www.listenlocalradio. com/cookbook

Former Mount Carmel High School student Adam Lamber t has been singing with Queen for nearly a decade. On October 2, the first ever album from the collaboration will be released, Live Around The World, featuring 20 tracks recorded on tour over the last six years. The Sk yler Lutes Band just issued their Pacific Records debut, but the prolific performer already has a new album out on October 30. Titled Blue the album is a song by song recasting of the classic like titled album by Weezer.

Cindy Le e Be r r y hill has released a new two track single, “ Wok e Up Fr om A Dr eam” / “ Empe r or : Litt le Boot s ,” via Omnivore Records. The new recordings feature Be r r y hill, Re nat a Bratt on cello, violin, mandolin; Dav id Schwar t z on upright bass; Danny Frank e l on drums and percussion; and Deane Cote on pedal steel and mandolin.

Legendary bluegrass band The Dillards will release their first album in 25 years this month, Old Road New Again. You are likely to know them best as The Darlin’ Family on “The Andy Griffith Show” – the new album includes a guest appearance from former BarkScottsville Squirrel Bark er, Eagle and San Diegan, Bernie Leadon Jax x combo GTF has a new single, “Some Things Happen.” Featuring 2020 SDMA Lifetime Achievement Award Winner, guitarist Richard Livoni, Livoni the song recently entered the Smooth Jazz Charts at #2. Actress and singer Cass an andra Kubinsk i has released a cover of Jason Mraz’s “Back To Earth”

Moves Colle c tive frontman Tim Nor ton has a new solo EP, Live Vol. 1. “It’s all original tunes, the first being a track my father wrote back in the 80s, “Alpine Ride’ before I was even born.” I revamped it from it’s original ‘Little Feat’ sound yet Pops still approves,” Norton said good na na-turedly. Ever prolific, Norton has also just released his second sinsin gle of the year, “ Holding on to a Dr eam.” “It’s a far cry from my SDMA for best Americana, but I’m certainly enjoying this new direction towards indie rock, soul and psych bedroom pop, and it seems others are too,” he said.

Badfinger guitarist Joey Molland’s upcoming album, Be True To Yourself, includes guest appearances from Julian Lennon, Mick y Dolenz and former Chicago bassist / Point Loman Jas on Scheff .

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edition, limited to a hand numbered 1,000. New albums / EP’s include reggae combo New Leaf with Feels Like, The Original Star fires with Fly Me Away

A Beat le covers a classic San Diego band: The upcoming John Le nnon compilation, Gimme Some Truth, includes his version of the Rosie and the Originals 1960 classic “Angel Baby.”

Reggae Hit Masters new single is a remake of Hall & Oates classic “Maneater,” featuring musical cameos from Safet y Orange and 2020 San Diego Music Award “Best Pop” Winner, Jonny Tarr.

New singles out recently or soon include returning hitmakers The Monr oes with “Rosemary’s Daughter,” K halil Nas h’s “Saturn’s Ring” comes out in advance of a new EP due October 14, rockers Sor r y It ’s Ove r with “Ghost Inside,” Falling Doves with their Pacific records debut, “Be My Lover,” and Ke n Dow with a cover of “Eye in the Sky” featuring a guest appearance by his son Har ley on backing vocals.

Schizophonics have a new 7” vinyl single out featuring two cover songs, “Black to Comm” originally by the MC5 MC5,, and “Remake Remodel” originally by Rox y Music. Music . It’s a limited

Ris ton Diggs latest album, The Second Coming, is being reissued on September 28th in a deluxe edition, featuring a new cover and six bonus tracks.

Writer / musician Mik e St ax is keeping busy! The Loons frontman / bassist has just published a new issue of Ugly Things (#54), easily one of the best music reads on the planet, while also working on various writing projects, including extensive liner notes for a Q65 box set, and up upcoming archival releases by the Mis unde r s tood and the Be l fas t Gy ps ies . He also recently compiled an album of solo material by Ke it h Re l f of the Yar dbir ds , for European label Repertoire Records.

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Mission Hills

N HILLS IO

117.182

2021

N,

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7490° 32.

MIS S

HISTORICAL CALENDAR PHOTO SUBMISSION

© San Diego History Center

Proud supporters of the Mission Hills Community 619.347.4415 | www.kengina.com

It’s about that time of year again!

Believe it or not it is our 15th year producing the Mission Hills Calendar!

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If you have any historical photos that you would like to share and have featured in the calendar please email Gina Barnes at gina@kengina.com. We love Mission Hills for its history, architecture, and sense of community. Be a part of history by donating your photos.

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Mission Hills - SEP 18, 2020  

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