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THE ITALIAN JOB WHERE TO DINE

IF YOU BLEED RED, WHITE, AND GREEN WHEN IT COMES TIME TO DINE, WE’VE SELECTED THE 40 BEST ITALIAN SPOTS IN GREEN COUNTRY.

W H AT TO D O

WHERE TO FIND IT

WHEN IT’S HAPPENING

OCTOBER 2019

TIMELESS TRIBUTE

REDISCOVER ONE OF THE BEST-LOVED CELEBRITIES OF HIS ERA AT THE WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM

CHEERS FOR FEARS

13 PLACES CARVING UP HOLIDAY THRILLS AND FUN THIS HALLOWEEN

SOUND THE ALPHORN

GERMAN CULTURE, BEER, AND BRATWURST CONVERGE DURING OKTOBERFEST

Hold Your Horses NATIONAL HONORS AND $750,000 IN PRIZE MONEY AT STAKE DURING THE U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN & HALF-ARABIAN CHAMPIONSHIP HORSE SHOW

CATS THERESA CAPUTO SAWYER BROWN EXPERIENCE HENDRIX FALL HOME EXPO TABLE 20 BLACK MOON

PREVIEW918.COM J U S T V I S I T I N G ? L I V I N G LO C A L? W E ’ V E G OT YO U C OV E R E D.


M FROM THE MAYOR As mayor of Tulsa, it is my honor to welcome you to our great city. Whether you’re visiting, or have deep roots here, I invite you to take time to explore our beautiful city and discover all the things that set us apart from other cities. I highly recommend Preview 918 as your go-to guide to navigate our incredible city. For more than 30 years, Preview has covered the 918, offering Tulsans and visitors alike the inside scoop to area restaurants and cafés, lodging, local attractions and events, world-class entertainment venues, tourist destinations, and unique shopping venues that are bound to please and delight. Our city is home to the world’s greatest collection of western art at the Gilcrease Museum as well as Italian Renaissance displays at the Philbrook Museum. It’s a treasure trove for lovers of architecture from mid-century modern housing to the downtown Art Deco District and our iconic BOK Center, designed by the internationally acclaimed architect César Pelli.

Tulsa Roughnecks soccer. Or time a visit to coincide with special events, such as Tulsa Tough bike racing, the Tulsa Run, the Route 66 Marathon and the NCAA basketball tournament. The Tulsa area offers more than 80 miles of pedestrian and bicycle trails for a great way to see Tulsa. Tulsa is also a city on the move. In 2018, we opened the Gathering Place. The Gathering Place is a world class riverfront park designed to welcome all to a vibrant and inclusive public space that engages, educates and excites.

We connect with over 200,000 readers each month covering dining, fitness, retail, services, entertainment, people, events, lifestyles, and the arts. Preview 918 is freely distributed to over 650 locations in the Tulsa and Green Country area including QuikTrip, Reasor’s, over 100 hotels, Tulsa International Airport, casinos, retail shops, boutiques, restaurants, bars, medical offices, salons, gyms, and service providers. And many of those readers tell us that Preview 918 faithfully helps them identify their interests, wants, and needs.

Local advertising and business inquiries: 918-745-1190. To distribute Preview 918 at your place of business: 918‑745‑1190.

Sports spectators can look to the University of Tulsa or Oral Roberts University athletic programs, Tulsa Oiler hockey games, and

G.T. Bynum

FOLLOW US! PREVIEW918

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL, BRAND, AND STRATEGY Chris Greer chrisg@previewgreencountry.com

MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER Marc Rains marc@previewgreencountry.com

MANAGING EDITOR | SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Michele Chiappetta michele@previewgreencountry.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Greer, Michele Chiappetta, Tiffany Duncan, Donna Leahey, Rob Harmon, G.K. Hizer, Gina Conroy, Lindsay Morris, John Tranchina, Jennifer Zehnder, Sarah Herrera, TravelOK.com

CREATIVE TEAM Jared Hood jared@previewgreencountry.com Beth Rose beth@previewgreencountry.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Elizabeth Wollmershauser

4 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

In over 100 area Hotels and Motels

Best regards, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa

For a night on the town, Tulsa serves up family entertainment at the Guthrie Green and Tulsa Drillers baseball at ONEOK Field. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center attracts Broadway musicals, renowned musicians and excellent local theater productions, and is home to the Tulsa Ballet.

FACEBOOK.COM/PREVIEW918

PREVIEW918.COM

A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has remained the most trusted and widely read lifestyle publication in the Tulsa and Green Country area for more than 30 years. While other magazines have come and gone, Preview 918 has not only remained but has achieved unprecedented prestige within our community. It has been, and will continue to be, the magazine the 918 area lives by.

I’m pleased so many of you have made your home in Tulsa. If you’re visiting our city, please enjoy your stay here. I also want to invite you to come back often to experience opportunities you won’t find anywhere else. In the meantime, you can find out more about Tulsa by visiting cityoftulsa.‌org.

Tulsa’s unique entertainment and shopping districts provide enjoyable experiences for the entire family. From an art crawl in the Tulsa Arts District, to a concert at the historic Cain’s Ballroom, to a trip to the Tulsa Zoo or a leisurely drive along Route 66 — there’s no end to what you can experience here.  

LIKE US!

PREV EW

VOL. 33, NO. 10

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Marc Rains, Sarah Eliza Roberts, Sarah Herrera, Jennifer Zehnder, Valerie Wei‑Haas, Kelli Greer

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@PREVIEWTULSA FIELD OPERATIONS MANAGER Stephen Hurt stephen@previewgreencountry.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ann Murphy ann@previewgreencountry.com ROUTE DISTRIBUTION Rachel Blanchard, Cory Blanchard, Garrett Rinner SENIOR CONSULTANT Randy Dietzel PUBLISHERS Robert and Amy Rinner robert@previewgreencountry.com

Preview 918 is published 12 times a year. Reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited.

READ US!

WWW.ISSUU.COM/PREVIEWMAGAZINETULSA While the information has been compiled carefully to ensure accuracy at the time of publication, all content is provided for general guidance only and is subject to change. The publisher can’t guarantee the accuracy of all information or be responsible for omissions or errors. Preview 918 claims no credit for any images published in this issue unless otherwise noted. Images are copyright to their respective owners. Health, small business, and financial advice provided in Preview 918 and preview918.com are for educational and entertainment purposes only. Always consult with a qualified professional for health, small business, and financial advice. Preview 918, 10026-A S. Mingo, Suite 322, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Copyright 2019 by Preview 918. All rights reserved. Preview 918 is an affiliated publication produced by Fore Today Publications LLC.  


S ’ E I L L E N C M N U R B PU

Probably Tulsa’s Best run

NOVEMBER 9

TH

Downtown Tulsa 3:00 pm

Register .caot m McnelliesPubRun

See our feature on page 44

NEW!

3-PERSON RELAY WITH GUINNESS CHALLENGE

THIS EVENT IS FUELED BY:


84 T TABLE OF CONTENTS OCTOBER 2019

FEATURES 16

46

CONVERSATION STARTER: SAWYER BROWN

An A-list of musicians from the rock, blues, metal, and fusion genres pay homage to the influence of Jimi Hendrix with Experience Hendrix Tour.

22

CONVERSATION STARTER: THERESA CAPUTO

The Long Island Medium will share personal stories about her life and explain how her gift works while delivering hellos from heaven.

26 GUITAR HERO

Three decades after the heyday of ‘80s hard rock, people still like to bang their heads, raise their fists, and have some fun. And local businessman Doug Burgess is doing his best to provide plenty of metal memories.

28 GOANDABODE BEYOND

32

52 TIMELESS TRIBUTE

MEOW WOW

Based on one of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s favorite childhood books, Cats proves to have as many lives as its costumed characters while providing plenty of memories.

At the Will Rogers Memorial Museum, you’ll find plenty of unexpected things to do and ways to enrich your mind while expanding your knowledge of one of the bestloved celebrities of his era.

36 CREEP IT REAL

Hoping for a harrowing Halloween? Be scareful what you wish for. Keep your adrenaline pumped and candy bags full with this collection of haunts and happenings.

THE 40 SOUND ALPHORN

If you’re looking for a German experience in Oklahoma that includes endless bratwursts, lederhosen, beer, dancing, and cavorting, look no further than Oktoberfest.

The Fall Home Expo offers everything you need to get home projects planned and scheduled, along with some extra features ranging from fun and altruistic to heartwarming.

MANE 42 THE EVENT

30 FRIVOLOUS AND FROTHY

44 READY, SET, CHUG

Described as a Russian nesting doll of a show within a show, Theatre Tulsa’s The Drowsy Chaperone is a love letter to musical theater and people who love musicals.

ON THE COVER

The Harvest Beer Festival is a great way to try new beers you might not otherwise be able to, enjoy McNellie’s Group eats, and meet fellow beer enthusiasts while sipping the fall day away.

Originally a country-pop band that deepened its repertoire with rich ballads, Sawyer Brown continues its successful run as the original “American Idols.”

STARTER: 18 CONVERSATION EXPERIENCE HENDRIX TOUR

BREWS APLENTY

Close to 1,800 Arabian horses ride into Tulsa for the Arabian Horse Association’s largest and most prestigious event in the industry. Whether you’re a horse lover or just curious to see this breed in all its glory, the nine-day event is guaranteed to provide plenty of wow moments.

Celebrating two of Tulsa’s favorite things — running and beer — the McNellie’s Pub Run offers plenty of challenges, running, wacky apparel and charitable goodwill.

84 EATALY

We went on a quest that took us through mountains of pasta, gallons of gravy, plates of pizza, and more Limoncello than can be healthy. Here are the 40 greatest spots to eat Italian food in Green Country.

CHARM 88 WITH TO SPARE

More than breakfast, more than lunch, and more than a quiet little coffee room upstairs, midtown’s Table 20 is gourmet done casually at a wallet-friendly price inside a little bit of history.

92 IMAGINATION ENGAGEMENT

A collective of like-minded black artists in the Tulsa area, Black Moon is breaking standards, pushing innovation, and cultivating creativity among the local community.

Arabian horses are known for their refinement, beauty, intelligence, and stamina. Not only are they considered one of the most beautiful and recognizable breeds in the world with a distinct dish face, big eyes, and high tail carriage, but Arabians make up most of the endurance racing horses worldwide. But it’s not just their physical attributes and impressive championship track record in the arena that sets them apart from the rest. Spectators to the U.S. National Arabian & HalfArabian Championship Horse Show can sit ringside and witness the versatility of Arabians as they take center stage. Riders compete and show their beloved horses in a multitude of events including halter, reining, sidesaddle, English hunter, working cow, cutting, and so much more.

COVER CREDIT Photographer: Hannah Draughan Model: Ashley Lounsberry with her horse Colt Forty‑Five CCR

DEPARTMENTS 16 Conversation Starter

58 Sports Central

70 Restaurant + Bar Finder

82 Food for Thought

26 Sound Check

63 Sports Schedule

72 Launch Pad

92 Get to Know

13 Happenings

49 Downtown Locator

64 Green Country Scene

76 Health + Fitness

94 Shelf Life

15 Street Talk

50 Tulsa Locator

68 Beyond Tulsa

78 Eats + Treats

96 Showtime

8 $91.80 in 48 Challenge

10 Music + Concerts + Comedy

6 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019


The only catch was that they had to spend it at places, events or shops profiled in the September 2019 issue of Preview 918.

918 $91.80 IN 48 CHALLENGE The mission posed to Hillary Hamilton and Kevin Dean was to spend $91.80 (we used the local area code for the amount) in two days. And if they could find fun and free activities … bonus. I was excited for the challenge because I hadn’t been to downtown Tulsa in a long while and my longtime friend, Kevin, recently moved to Tulsa and didn’t know anything about this wonderful town.

SO, PROVIDING AN ENVELOPE OF CASH AND TELLING PEOPLE TO SPEND IT IN 48 HOURS ISN’T EXACTLY A CHALLENGE, BUT IT MAKES THIS ASSIGNMENT MORE INTERESTING.

STOP #2

STOP #1

I’ve always heard great things about Dilly Diner but have never been. We ordered The Meg and the breakfast sandwich with the idea we would share both. When the meals were brought to us, it was apparent we couldn’t eat everything. Two ladies next to us ordered The Meg, Green Eggs and Ham, and a side of breakfast potatoes. Everyone’s food looked amazing.

Across the street from Dilly Diner is Boomtown Tees. We went to check out the $10 T-shirts they advertised in the magazine. They were out of the T-shirts because the owner had been very busy over the past week making shirts for all of the upcoming races, and hadn’t had time to make more. She still had some great items and T-shirts, but since I was on the lookout for something as a gift for a family friend’s 78th birthday, I didn’t purchase anything. I will be back. COST: $0

COST: $38.95

The day was getting hotter, and it was time for something sweet, so we dropped into Antoinette Baking Co. There was so much to choose from that narrowing it down was not easy. We settled on some ice water, a chocolate croissant, and two salted chocolate chip cookies. I noticed they serve brunch as well with a crepe of the month, so I want to make another trip here soon.

STOP #4

u Think yo our can blow cash in g interestin ways?

STOP #3

COST: $9.77

STOP #6

I’ve been to The Boxyard twice, but there are some new shops I have wanted to visit. Having a liquor store, restaurant/bar, and a variety of shops in one place downtown where conveniences are scarce is brilliant. It was nearly 11 a.m., and only the liquor store was open, but we were not disappointed. Riley’s Wine and Spirits has a great selection of everything from wine and liquor to cigars. Since we were looking for a birthday gift for an older gentleman, we chose a 750ml bottle of Jameson Irish Whiskey. COST: $36.88

STOP #5

I have wanted to show Kevin the Decopolis store because browsing in there makes me feel like a kid. This store is magic, and the owner, William, is always there with a smile. I purchased some pyrite and a crystal. I also bought a great Golden Driller magnet that was on sale to add Route 66 bling to my refrigerator. COST: $5.97

Next, we visited the Tulsa Flea Market at River Spirit Expo. This Saturday stop was not new for me as I love coming. Entrance is free, and there are often other events combined with it. On the day we were there, the Tulsa Bead Market was also occurring. This show was a jewelry maker’s paradise, whether creating for yourself, friends, or your own business. I did not spend any money, but there was plenty of temptation. COST: $0

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AND DROP A MESSAGE WITH SOME OF YOUR IDEAS. WE MIGHT JUST LACE YOUR POCKETS WITH GREEN AND TURN YOU LOOSE. 8 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019


PREVIEW918.COM 9


H HAPPENINGS OCTOBER LIVE MUSIC VENUES 5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa

BLACKBIRD ON PEARL

1336 E. 6th St. | Tulsa

BOK CENTER

200 S. Denver Ave. | Tulsa

BRADY THEATER

105 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

CAIN’S BALLROOM

423 N. Main St. | Tulsa

CROW CREEK TAVERN

3534 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa

GUTHRIE GREEN

111 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

IDL BALLROOM

230 E. 1st St. | Tulsa

INNER CIRCLE VODKA BAR 410 N. Main St. | Tulsa

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

01

OKLAHOMA JAZZ HALL OF FAME

1000 Buffalo Run Blvd. | Miami

RABBIT HOLE

116 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa

REDS

325 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

RIFFS | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

LOVELYTHEBAND

Tulsa State Fair | Expo Square | Tulsa

951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa

KONGOS

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

SOUL CITY

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa

SOUNDPONY

409 N. Main St. | Tulsa

JUDAH AND THE LION

SWAMPHOUSE

1529 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

Brady Theater | Tulsa

THE COLONY

520 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE HUNT CLUB

224 N. Main St. | Tulsa

THE JOINT | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

THE VANGUARD

222 N. Main St. | Tulsa

TRACK 5 | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

102 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

10 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

03 05 Tulsa State Fair | Expo Square | Tulsa

PEORIA SHOWPLACE | BUFFALO RUN CASINO & RESORT

THE FUR SHOP

BOK Center | Tulsa

CHRIS JANSON

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

2809 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa

LAUREN DAIGLE

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

Brady Theater | Tulsa

PARADISE COVE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

SKYLINE EVENT CENTER | OSAGE CASINO HOTEL

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

02-05 DAN CHOPIN

SUBLIME

5 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

04 SNARKY PUPPY

Tulsa State Fair | Expo Square | Tulsa

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa 1747 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

BOK Center | Tulsa

RIVAL SONS

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT MERCURY LOUNGE

HEART

02

J BALVIN

BOK Center | Tulsa

BERT KREISCHER

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

BONE THUGS-NHARMONY

Tulsa State Fair | Expo Square | Tulsa

THE OAK RIDGE BOYS

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

MOJOFEST ON THE ROW East Village District | Tulsa


FRIDAY

10.11

SATURDAY

10.19

THURSDAY

10.31

AIR SUPPLY

8PM

EXPERIENCE HENDRIX

8PM

JAMEY JOHNSON

8PM

TURN IT ON, TURN IT UP SCAN TO PURCHASE TICKETS

Schedule subject to change.

10.17

THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND

SUNDAY

ROY ORBISON

THURSDAY

8PM

10.20 AND BUDDY HOLLY 6PM

FRIDAY

11.01

BOBBY BONES & THE RAGING IDIOTS

8PM


H HAPPENINGS OCTOBER

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY CORROSION OF CONFORMITY Brady Theater | Tulsa

WHISKEY MYERS

Tulsa State Fair | Expo Square | Tulsa

08 TYLER CHILDERS 09 JENNY LEWIS Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

12 17 SCOTT MULVAHILL

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

CODY KO AND NOEL MILLER: TINY MEAT GANG Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

ORDINARY ELEPHANT AND K.C. CLIFFORD

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

06

BAD SUNS

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

BRANFORD MARSALIS

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

09-12

10

Tulsa State Fair | Expo Square | Tulsa

Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel | Tulsa

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

OKIE FROM MUSKOGEE 50TH ANNIVERSARY

CHARLIE DANIELS BAND

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Muskogee Civic Center | Muskogee

11

18 GODSMACK

BOK Center | Tulsa

CRAYONS IMPROV COMEDY SHOW LA FIERA DE OJINAGA

SAWYER BROWN

VALARIE STORM

13

LYSANDER PIANO TRIO

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Heritage United Methodist Church | Broken Arrow

CHAD PRATHER

19

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Brady Theater | Tulsa

07

KILLER QUEEN

ANIMAL COLLECTIVE

Brady Theater | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

AIR SUPPLY

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

BILLIE EILISH

BOK Center | Tulsa

12 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

EXPERIENCE HENDRIX

13-14, 16 THE RACONTEURS

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

16-19

PAUL HOOPER

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

LAST IN LINE

IDL Ballroom | Tulsa


HAPPENINGS ALSO IN OCTOBER H

20 CHERUB

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

ROCK ‘N’ ROLL DREAM TOUR: ROY ORBISON AND BUDDY HOLLY The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

21 TENACIOUS D

Brady Theater | Tulsa

ALSO IN OCTOBER 26 THE FLOOZIES

OCT. 3-5 WINE, JAZZ AND WORLD FETE

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Guthrie Green | Tulsa

OCT. 1-6 TULSA STATE FAIR Expo Square | Tulsa

CHANCE THE RAPPER BOK Center | Tulsa

27 NAHKO AND MEDICINE FOR THE PEOPLE Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

DAVID WILCOX Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

22 WILCO 23-26 KEVIN BOZEMAN Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

OCT. 4 FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL Tulsa Arts District | Tulsa

OCT. 1-26 HAUNTED CASTLE HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL The Castle of Muskogee | Muskogee

OCT. 1-NOV. 2 PUMPKIN FESTIVAL

Shepherd’s Cross | Claremore

OCT. 3 W!LD TURKEY

Turkey Mountain Urban Wilderness | Tulsa

EVERYWHERE

DANE COOK

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

CARRIE UNDERWOOD

BOK Center | Tulsa

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

OCT. 4-5 FALL TRADERS ENCAMPMENT

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

24

OCT. 4 ANN KULZE, MD

Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve | Bartlesville

14

29

GOO GOO DOLLS

Brady Theater | Tulsa

COLUMBUS DAY

TOOL

OCT. 4-5 OKLAHOMA INDIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL Downtown Dewey

OCT. 4-6 ANTIQUE AGRICULTURE FESTIVAL

Hunter’s Home Historic Site | Park Hill

BOK Center | Tulsa

OCT. 4-6 BIOBLITZ

31

JAMEY JOHNSON

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

31

Sequoyah State Park and Lodge | Hulbert

HALLOWEEN PREVIEW918.COM 13


H HAPPENINGS ALSO IN OCTOBER OCT. 12 RUN THE STREETS WOOLAROC 8K RACE

OCT. 25-26 CHEROKEE HERITAGE DAY

Har-Ber Village Museum | Grove

1925 Woolaroc Ranch Road | Bartlesville

OCT. 8 OKC THUNDER VS. DALLAS MAVERICKS BOK Center | Tulsa

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Rayola Park | Owasso

OCT. 12 COW CHIP DAY

Rogers Memorial Park | Warner

OCT. 12-13 CHEROKEE ART MARKET

OCT. 5 ZOORUN

OCT. 25, 27 CARMEN

OCT. 12 HARVEST FESTIVAL OCT. 18 WE WILL ROCK YOU

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Tulsa Zoo | Tulsa

OCT. 9-13 TULSA AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL

2205 E. Admiral Blvd. | Tulsa

OCT. 12-13 WINTER SQUASH AND PUMPKIN FESTIVAL

OCT. 5 STARLIGHT RUNWAY

Pleasant Valley Farms | Sand Springs

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

OCT. 9-13 CATS

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

OCT. 5 RIOULT DANCE NEW YORK

OCT. 14-25 NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA ART SHOW Graham Community Center | Pryor

OCT. 18-19 ROUTE 66 FLYWHEELERS GAS ENGINE AND TRACTOR SHOW

OCT. 25-NOV. 3 LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Rogers Point Park | Catoosa

OCT. 18-20 TONATIUH DANCE COMPANY WORKSHOP

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

OCT. 26 TULSA RUN

Downtown Tulsa

OCT. 10-13 PELICAN FESTIVAL

OCT. 26-27 ROUTE 66 PECAN AND FUN FEST

Wolf Creek Park | Grove

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

The Nut House | Claremore

OCT. 15 BABY SHARK LIVE! BOK Center | Tulsa

OCT. 11-13 BIG OM YOGA RETREAT

OCT. 18-26 U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN AND HALF-ARABIAN CHAMPIONSHIP HORSE SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

OCT. 27-31 HALLOWZOOEEN Tulsa Zoo | Tulsa

Sequoyah State Park and Lodge | Hulbert

OCT. 5 MCNELLIE’S HARVEST BEER FESTIVAL ONEOK Field | Tulsa

OCT. 6 MUSCLE WALK

ONEOK Field | Tulsa

OCT. 11-20 THE DROWSY CHAPERONE Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

OCT. 17-20 OKTOBERFEST

River West Festival Park | Tulsa

OCT. 18-26 WHAT THE BUTLER SAW

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

OCT. 31-NOV. 3 TULSA BALLET: GISELLE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Dates, events and times are subject to change.

14 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019


STREET TALK ST

The Blackcoat’s Daughter (2015). It’s horrifying and exceptionally well made. — LUNA

Because it’s based on a true story, I’d have to say The Conjuring (2013). — JADEN

I haven’t seen another scary movie since Poltergeist (1982). I’m the adult who still makes sure my closet door is shut before I go to bed.

The Blair Witch Project (1999). Terrifying without gore or gimmicks, and we all thought it was real.

Salem’s Lot (1979). It was suspenseful because you don’t see the vampire until the end of the movie.

Pet Sematary (1989). As a kid who grew up with animals, that movie messed with my brain.

— JENNIFER

I slept with the lights on after watching The Silence of the Lambs (1991). — VALERIE

— SCOTT

The Grudge (2004). What made it so scary to me was that I believe in spirits — the good and bad ones.

— SHARA

Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds (1963) and Poltergeist (1982). I had nightmares over Poltergeist. Oh, and Wait Until Dark (1967) with Audrey Hepburn. — JANET

The Evil Dead (1981). I usually enjoy scary movies, but this was a horrible idea. — SARAH

I don’t know about scariest, but the most scared I’ve ever been from watching a horror movie was Hellraiser (1987). I was 13 when I saw it. I slept with my parents that night. — SHANNON

The Exorcism of Emily Rose (2005) was pretty scary. I believe demons and stuff like that are very real and demonic possessions happen. That movie was so good. — CHRISTIA

WANT TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION? We’ll post a question on our Facebook each month. Give us an answer and photo, and you might end up in our magazine.

— NANCY

— BRENT

The Exorcist (1973) is the best scary movie, in my opinion. I like the golden oldies. — JOSE

Event Horizon (1997). Now it’s being made into a TV show.

— ALISON

Both of the Pet Sematary movies (1989 and 2019) scared me. I usually don’t like scary movies, but I went with my daughter to the new one. It was so good that we rented it again. — RANDEE Prince of Darkness (1987). I saw it with my boyfriend and his best friend. Both of them walked me to my door afterward because neither of them wanted to walk back alone or stay in the car. It freaked us out.

— SABRINA

PREVIEW918.COM 15


SAWYERBROWN

CS CONVERSATION STARTER

Q.

DO YOU EVER THINK ABOUT HOW WINNING STAR SEARCH CHANGED YOUR LIVES?

A.

You know, we have such great memories from our time on the show, even now. Maybe it was different because almost everyone on the show was already working in their field; the actors were acting, the models were modeling, and the musicians were already playing. We were looking for a way to make that next step. But it was cool meeting a group of people who were roughly the same age and in a similar set of circumstances.

ORIGINALLY A COUNTRYPOP BAND THAT DEEPENED ITS REPERTOIRE WITH RICH BALLADS, SAWYER BROWN CONTINUES ITS SUCCESSFUL RUN AS THE ORIGINAL “AMERICAN IDOLS.”

We had zero ideas about what could happen to us by going on the show. We only wanted the video package from our audition to use to pitch the band. That’s as far as we thought it would go.

BY G.K. HIZER

With televised reality and talent competition shows like The Voice and American Idol having produced stars like Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood, Chris Daughtry, and Adam Lambert, it’s easy to forget that it’s an old concept. In 1984, a band from Florida won Star Search, which launched the group’s nearly 40-year career in country music. As times have changed, so have record labels,

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distribution, and how bands reach the fans, but it’s all part of the same equation for Sawyer Brown. The group has had a couple of membership changes over the years, but they continue to tour and bring back loyal fans while winning over new ones. Sawyer Brown has released over 20 studio albums and has charted over 50 times on the Hot Country Songs charts,

including three No. 1 singles: “Step That Step” (1985), “Some Girls Do” (1992), and “Thank God for You” (1993). With Sawyer Brown’s current tour bringing the group to the Skyline Event Center Oct. 12, keyboardist Gregg “Hobie” Hubbard discussed the band’s history, what keeps them going, and what’s in the foreseeable future.

The one enormous difference was when we won, we knew we wanted a record deal. But Nashville was very suspect of television and anything that came from it. They weren’t sure what to do with us.

Q.

DID SOUNDING DIFFERENT FROM MOST COUNTRY ACTS AT THE TIME PRESENT CHALLENGES FOR THE BAND?


A.

I do think the boundaries started to expand, but I haven’t thought about us changing that at all. I think listeners are probably more open and accepting now than they were then, but the market has changed. Now you’re freer to make the music you’re comfortable with and let people find it. As a listener, that’s a great thing. Back then, you only heard new music by listening to the radio and what they would

A.

It’s worked fine for us. In 1983 or ‘84 you had to have a label, publicist, and booking agent to do anything. Now, you can make your music and get it out to the fans and it kind of goes from there. Anything that puts the control back in the hands of the fans is a good thing in my book. I tell people to buy the music that you like — that’s how you support the artists. It’s about finding what and who you like and then supporting those people.

Q.

HOW IMPORTANT IS THE CONCERT EXPERIENCE TO SAWYER BROWN?

A.

I love when you see bands work and play shows to build an audience, then put out music. That’s what it’s all about. We’ve done over 5,000 shows. Sure, the financial aspect is critical as well, but getting out there playing and connecting with the audience is what it’s all about. Now, playing live is the

key to keeping the lights on, but it’s important to make sure to give people a reason to see you and a reason to return. That’s what we always try to do.

Q.

SAWYER BROWN HAS HAD A SUCCESSFUL RECORDING CAREER, BUT IT SEEMS LIKE YOU’RE CONSTANTLY TOURING.

A.

It’s a big deal for us, but that’s also because we’re all music fans. I still see live music, even when I’m not on tour because I love the collective experience. It draws people together and makes a connection. It’s kind of funny to me, because I’ve played a lot of shows, but it’s hard for me to process sometimes that people buy and listen to our music, just like I’ve always listened to other artists. I know that when I go to see my favorite bands, I get stoked beforehand and I have goosebumps when they play, so it’s kind of funny to think that our fans have that

same kind of experience with what we do.

Q. A.

IS THERE NEW MUSIC ON THE WAY?

We just finished up a new album, or record, or whatever you want to call it these days. We’ll probably get it out early next year. We waited until the songs felt strong enough and we had enough material to put together something we’re proud of. We’re making this one for the sake of making music and doing what we love.

SAWYER BROWN Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel 951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa 877-246-8777 osagecasino.com

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HOW MUCH INFLUENCE DO YOU THINK YOUR MUSIC HAD ON CHANGING THE COUNTRY SOUND?

HAVE RECENT CHANGES IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY WORKED FOR OR AGAINST YOU?

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Q.

Q.

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They weren’t sure what to do with our sound, but we knew it would sell because we played live constantly and knew there was an audience for it. Now, we laugh at what gets on the radio and what we caught grief for, but at the time, what we were doing was new to country radio, and we had a hard time finding our place. Even so, we knew our fans loved what we were doing, so we kept at it and stayed true to ourselves.

play. With streaming and digital music, you can find new music so much easier, and I think the listeners determine what radio plays a bit more now.

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A.

Oh, for sure. What we were doing was very different. When we played Star Search, we had already showcased every label in Nashville. After we got on Star Search, the Los Angeles labels were calling their Nashville offices and asking, “Why haven’t we seen these guys yet?”

CONVERSATION STARTER CS

Oct. 12: 7 p.m. Must be 18 or older to attend

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EXPERIENC HENDRIX

CS CONVERSATION STARTER

AN A-LIST OF MUSICIANS FROM THE ROCK, BLUES, METAL, AND FUSION GENRES PAY HOMAGE TO THE INFLUENCE OF JIMI HENDRIX WITH EXPERIENCE HENDRIX TOUR. BY G.K. HIZER

CHRIS LAYTON

For fans of Jimi Hendrix, it’s both a shot of nostalgia and a staggering display of talent when the all-star collective hits the stage to share its translations of the Hendrix catalog. And for the musicians? Well, it may be a paid gig, but it seems to be as much for them, as they’re ready and willing to put their careers on pause to take part in this extraordinary tour. What began as a single show tribute at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2000 has blossomed into a full-fledged concert experience that has thrilled countless fans across the U.S. The tour, which the Chicago Tribune called, “a testament to the legacy of the iconic guitarist,” presents a host of great artists collaborating and interpreting Hendrix’s legendary repertoire as part of a dynamic, nonstop three-hour concert experience.

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It is worth noting that this is the only tour and celebration of Hendrix’s music that is both approved and endorsed by the Hendrix Family Trust. Perhaps more notable, however, is the list of musicians who have participated over the years, with most returning for repeated tours, even as the lineup rotates to inject a sense of freshness to the tour. Although the lineup rotates slightly from tour to tour, this fall’s roster includes Jonny Lang, Dweezil Zappa, Joe Satriani, Dug Pinnick, Eric Johnson, Kenny Aronoff, Doyle Bramhall II, Buddy Guy, Calvin Cooke, Kevin McCormick, and more. Billy Cox, the bassist for both Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys and the Jimi Hendrix Experience, has been the backbone of the tour since its inception, providing a spiritual connection between the past and present. Critics have been gushing about the Experience Hendrix Tour since its inception. “Hendrix’s classic songs came one after the next, and the electric licks were delivered by a who’s who of modern guitar greats,” noted Loudwire, which went on to call it “the guitar tour of the year.” Charleston City Paper stated, “Jimi’s

spirit and music could not have been honored more.” “At the very end of the night, all the participants came back out for a final bow,” Consequence of Sound observed this past March. “And one thing you couldn’t help but realize by this point — the music of Jimi Hendrix will seemingly live on forever, and continue to inspire future generations.”

JIMI HENDRIX

If you’re a Jimi Hendrix fan, chances are you look forward to the annual Experience Hendrix Tour. For those who are unaware, the tour compiles a who’s who list of artists who come together for a two-month tour every spring and fall to celebrate the music of Hendrix.

With the tour headed to The Joint: Tulsa for a stop Oct. 19, we got a chance to catch up briefly with drummer Chris Layton. Layton is best known as the drummer in Double Trouble, Stevie Ray Vaughan’s backing band.


BUDDY GUY

CONVERSATION STARTER CS

AFTER SO MANY TOURS, WHAT KEEPS YOU COMING BACK?

A.

Well, it’s a pretty low-key thing. It’s kind of like a summer camp for us. It’s straightforward to do, and everybody knows the music and is influenced by Jimi in one way or another. It’s a lot of fun. I keep coming back for all the right reasons.

BILLY COX

A.

I leave all of that alone, partly because that’s not my job, but also because that leaves things so wide open. It’s interesting to think of the effect Jimi Hendrix has had on people. I don’t know that there’s a single guitar player out there who he didn’t have some influence on.

Q.

OUTSIDE OF THE EXPERIENCE HENDRIX TOUR, YOU PLAY WITH KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD AND KEEP BUSY WITH OTHER

A.

There were talks about the Arc Angels possibly doing a few shows, but that’s not happening. I’ll be doing a few shows with Shepherd in Europe for a couple of weeks, and then I’ve got a few shows around the holidays. At one point it looked like Billy Gibbons [ZZ Top] was going to be a part of the tour, but that didn’t work out.

EXPERIENCE HENDRIX TOUR The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa 777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa 918-384-ROCK (x7625) hardrockcasinotulsa.com

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I remember seeing Mitch Mitchell, Dave Navarro, Slash, Noel Redding, and a lot of big names who were there and backstage. For me, it was a

Q.

IS THERE ANYONE YOU’D LIKE TO SEE INCLUDED WHO HASN’T BEEN A PART OF THE TOUR?

TO

A.

Initially, I got a call from John McDermott, asking me to guest on this experimental set he was doing at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. He asked if I’d be interested in playing Hendrix songs for the opening of the Jimi Hendrix exhibit. It was supposed to be a one-off type of thing, but there was a talent buyer from San Diego there who offered to buy the concept and put it on the road.

When I was a kid, Mitchell was a big hero of mine. He reminded me of a jazz drummer with his style and playing, and I was always fascinated by that.

Q.

PROJECTS. WHAT ELSE DO YOU HAVE COMING UP?

CA

YOU’VE BEEN A PART OF THIS TOUR SINCE THE BEGINNING. HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED?

chaotic mess, but I liked working with John, and I get along well with Janie Hendrix [Jimi’s sister, and CEO of Experience Hendrix], so when I was asked to do the tour, it was pretty easy to say yes.

LO

Q.

JONNY LANG JOE SATRIANI

DWEEZIL ZAPPA

ERIC JOHNSON

Oct. 19: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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J JENKS

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J JENKS

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THERESACAPUTO

CS CONVERSATION STARTER

THE LONG ISLAND MEDIUM WILL SHARE PERSONAL STORIES ABOUT HER LIFE AND EXPLAIN HOW HER GIFT WORKS WHILE DELIVERING HELLOS FROM HEAVEN.

Teresa Caputo says she was just 4 years old when she woke to find a spirit standing next to her bed. When she was in her 20s, she says she learned to communicate with spirits. Now, she uses her gifts to bring

22 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

BY DONNA LEAHEY

messages of love and healing to her crowds of fans. Undeterred by skeptics and doubters, Caputo has made a lucrative career out of her television show Long Island

Medium, packed live shows, and books including There’s More to Life Than This, You Can’t Make This Stuff Up, and 2017’s Good Grief: Heal Your Soul, Honor Your Loved Ones, and Learn to Live Again.


YOU’VE BEEN SENSING SPIRITS SINCE YOU WERE 4. DO YOU REMEMBER THAT CONTACT?

A.

A.

Coming to one of my live shows is a life-changing experience. Spirits will take us on an emotional rollercoaster of feeling pain, sorrow, loss, and grief, and then in the next moment have us laughing. Whether someone understands what I do or has never seen my show, Long Island Medium, it will be an evening filled with faith and peace.

Q.

DO YOU HAVE ANY NEW BOOKS PLANNED?

Q.

A. Q.

A.

A.

I remember seeing a woman standing at the edge of my bed. It wasn’t until my early 30s that I found out the woman was my great grandmother who died before I was born.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO YOU TO HELP PEOPLE COMMUNICATE WITH THEIR LOVED ONES?

It means the world to me to be able to share my gift with people. I consider it an honor and a privilege to be able to channel someone’s loved one’s departed soul to deliver healing messages of faith and peace.

I’m always thinking about writing a new book.

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT A PARTICULARLY MEMORABLE CLIENT OR TIME YOU’VE HELPED SOMEONE?

All my clients have a special place in my heart, and there are so many memorable moments that I could go on forever. One memory that particularly stands out was when I channeled a little boy whose mother never left his side, except this one day when she attended her daughter’s dance recital. He

drowned in the family’s pool. His message to his mother was, “Don’t blame dad. I got out of that sliding door many times, and if you were home and this happened, you never would’ve been able to forgive yourself. This was dad’s journey to carry this burden.” With this message he repaired a broken family.

Q. A.

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO YOUR DOUBTERS?

What I do is not about people believing in what I do. I want people to believe in themselves and to know that the soulbond can never be broken, and they still have a connection with their departed loved ones. I want them to know that all those things that go on around them that they think are odd, weird, or just a coincidence, to know that that’s a little hello from heaven. Spirit also talks about things that you witness with your own two eyes, things that no one else would know about. Whether you doubt mediumship or not, you can’t doubt what you experienced.

Q. A.

Q.

ANYTHING ELSE I SHOULD HAVE ASKED, OR YOU WANT ME TO KNOW?

A.

Well not sure if you know this, but I still live next door to my parents; talk about separation anxiety. No, but seriously, I love what I do and couldn’t imagine myself doing anything but channeling souls of the departed and helping people move on with their lives after the loss of a loved one.

Q.

DO YOU THINK THERE ARE OTHERS LIKE YOU, WHO MAYBE DON’T REALIZE THEY HAVE THIS GIFT?

A.

I believe that every one of us can connect with our own departed loved ones and embrace those little hellos from heaven. Everyone is different in how they connect with the souls of the departed.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT LONG ISLAND?

I was born and raised on Long Island, so I don’t know anything different. We have the best of everything — the beautiful beaches, great people, fabulous restaurants and close to the best city in the world.

THERESA CAPUTO

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort 8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 888-748-3731 riverspirittulsa.com

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Q.

WHAT CAN PEOPLE EXPECT FROM YOUR EVENT?

TO

A.

When I communicate with a spirit, I sense and feel the bond and relationship they shared with the person as well as how they died.

Q.

CA

CAN YOU DESCRIBE WHAT YOU FEEL WHEN A SPIRIT IS COMMUNICATING WITH YOU?

LO

Q.

CONVERSATION STARTER CS

Nov. 2: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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Where Tulsa’s Aviation heritage takes Flight!

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SC SOUND CHECK

Three decades after the heyday of ‘80s hard rock, people still like to bang their heads, raise their fists, and have some fun. And local businessman Doug Burgess is doing his best to provide plenty of metal memories. BY G.K. HIZER PHOTOS BY MARC RAINS

Over the past two and a half years, classic and ‘80s hard rock fans have found an oasis at the corner of First Street and Detroit Avenue in Tulsa at the IDL Ballroom. The multi-use venue has hosted a parade of artists such as Lita Ford, Tom Keifer (Cinderella), Dokken, Saxon, Slaughter, L.A. Guns, and Stryper. And the person inviting the former Sunset Strip stars to T-Town is Doug Burgess through his DEB Concerts group. If you were a fan of the original Rocklahoma format, chances are you’ve been to at least one or two of these shows. Yes, the focus has been primarily ‘80s driven, but that’s not to say the vision isn’t expanding. What started as something of a passion project is growing into something bigger that’s drawing the attention of

26 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

national booking agents and promoters, with the genuine potential to turn into something more significant for the Tulsa market. When you speak with Burgess, however, he’s got his feet planted firmly on the ground with no delusions of grandeur. Above all else, he’s just looking to put on some great rock shows and enjoy the music, just like everyone else. Perhaps the biggest misconception about these shows is that they’re somehow affiliated with 2016’s Streets Gone Wild festival. Although there are a few ties, that’s not the case. After building DEB Concerts as something of a partnership with Tom Green, who runs IDL Ballroom and Lotus Sandwich Eatery and Bar, the lines can admittedly be a little blurry.

Burgess was initially a title sponsor for the festival, writing a check to put his name on the promotional materials. When the festival producer fell into financial difficulties and disappeared without paying expenses, Burgess stepped up to help pay the local vendors, such as the staging company, sanitation, and such.

that page, he still uses it to announce shows.”

“I told Tom, ‘I might want to do this myself next time, so let’s make sure these people get paid.’ Once we looked at it and ran the numbers, we opted not to do another Streets Gone Wild format. It just didn’t make sense. We thought we might do a one-day show with a couple of national acts and some local bands at some point, but that would be about it.

With heavy metal in his blood and business, it only made sense for Burgess to expand upon his musical fandom.

“As far as the Facebook page [Streets Gone Wild] goes, that’s Tom’s fan page. Because he’s got so many fans tied to

Before he rode to the financial rescue of Streets Gone Wild, Burgess had already proved to be an astute businessman with his company D&B Processing. The Broken Arrow-based company provides cut and bent steel plate.

“After Streets Gone Wild, I called Tom and said, ‘I want to start promoting shows. If you show me the ropes, I’ll keep the shows with you, so you’ll get all the bar sales, and I won’t ask for a percentage.’ He got me in contact with the booking agencies, and after doing a few shows that went well, I developed a good reputation as an independent promoter,”


A big part of these shows and their promotion has been bringing in Eddie Trunk for each event. Trunk is best known as the host of several hard rock and heavy metalthemed radio and television shows. He also serves as host for Rocklahoma that is held in Pryor during Memorial Day weekend. “Eddie and I have become good friends. He knows and loves these bands and the genre. He has promoted the hell out of these shows on his radio show and podcast, and he loves Tulsa,” says Burgess. “The bigger deal, though, is that the fans love him coming here. People love that he comes to this little club in Tulsa and he’s in the crowd and not acting any better than anyone else.” Looking forward, Burgess has his eyes on something more significant than staying at IDL Ballroom. DEB Concerts

“People think I’m just a fan of ‘80s bands and that’s not the case; I’m not stuck in the ‘80s. I like the ‘90s and a few of the current bands, but I still want to rock. Looking forward, I want to book bands I’m a fan of, but if a country show comes up and it’s a slam dunk, I’m in.” Mostly, however, Burgess is looking to book the bands and music that he loves. “They say, ‘never meet your heroes,’ but I’ve been pretty lucky so far,” Burgess says. “Most people have been exactly what I thought they were; very authentic and appreciative. “I’ve never had a bad experience with an artist. I’ve had a couple of run-ins with tour managers, but that’s a different story. Most bands are just appreciative to have a career still. They know the clock is ticking and they’re happy to be still playing.”

So Good.

the oak ridge boys oct 5 we will rock you oct 18 dane cook oct 24 theresa caputo nov 2 rascal flatts nov 7 zz top nov 8 i love the 90’s nov 14 jim gaffigan nov 16 three dog night nov 21

ron white dec 31 Live Music

7 Nights a Week

And at 9 pm in 5 o’Clock Somewhere Bar and 10 pm every day in Margaritaville! Complete schedule at margaritavilletulsa.com.

IDL BALLROOM 230 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-551-7447 idlballroom.com

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When suggested that this is as much a labor of love, catering to his passion, as much as anything else, Burgess agreed. “You hit the nail on the head. I only book bands I’m a fan of,” he says. “I know what these bands draw, and I know I’m going to lose some money, but I make enough money with my business that it’s not going to hurt us if I lose a little bit on these shows. My wife has been very understanding and supportive in all of this.”

paradise never sounded

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“I like the artists I book and the genre,” he says, “but there’s no money to be made in this unless you’re booking bigger bands with a larger draw.”

“That show made money,” Burgess says, “and it was cool to work with the BOK Center. They’ve been rated the No. 1 arena in the country. I’m going to continue to book shows at IDL Ballroom, but now I’m looking at bigger shows, maybe doing something at Cain’s Ballroom and working on some big shows at the BOK Center.

CA

Burgess brought his first show to the IDL Ballroom in February 2017. Since then, DEB Concerts has brought a steady stream of shows to Tulsa. His group averaged one show a month last year, and about one every other month in 2019.

got its first taste of the BOK Center when presenting the “Carnivàle Icône” tour with Snoop Dogg, Nelly, and Chromeo in April 2019.

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says Burgess. “Now agents are calling me to pitch shows.”

81st & RIVERSIDE • 888-748-3731 • RIVERSPIRITTULSA.COM

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go abode and beyond

THE FALL HOME EXPO OFFERS EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO GET HOME PROJECTS PLANNED AND SCHEDULED, ALONG WITH SOME EXTRA FEATURES RANGING FROM FUN AND ALTRUISTIC TO HEARTWARMING. BY DONNA LEAHEY Owning a house is great. Making it look how you want, turning it from a house into a home, from a home into your castle, is so satisfying. But sometimes planning for these projects — finding contractors, materials, budgeting, deciding when to do the work, figuring out if you can do it on your own, or if you need to hire someone — can be stressful. If only you could find all the answers in one stop. How great would that be? The Fall Home Expo offers everything you need to get home

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projects planned and scheduled, along with some extra features ranging from fun and altruistic to heartwarming. Best of all, there’s no charge to enter. The expo’s show director, Frank W. Sawyer, has been directing it since 2014 and added a spring show in 2016. He’s also been involved with home shows since 1989. “I’ve been part of probably hundreds of shows. Ours is the only locally owned and family operated home show in Tulsa,” he says. “We’re personally concerned about you having

a good time as an exhibitor or guest.

home shows have standalone websites just for the shows.”

“We’re the only fall show, and it’s 60,000 square feet filled with exhibits. There’ll be about 150 exhibitors there.”

You can find exhibitors ranging from roofing and garage doors to homebuilders and drywall experts as well as companies focused on air conditioning, painting, pools, pest control, hot tubs, windows, lawn care, and more.

If you want a preview, you can check out the event website, which includes info for last year’s show as well. If there’s a vendor you saw last year and you want to contact them, you can still find their info on the website. “Each show has a standalone website,” says Sawyer. “No other

“Fall is a good time to work on energy efficiency, your home interior, and to preplan your spring projects,” Sawyer says. “Too many people wait until spring


Sawyer planned the fall expo not just to appeal to homeowners and project planners, but to the whole family. “We’ve got features to hold the interest of the whole family,” Sawyer says. “No need for babysitters. And there’s free parking, free events, and free admission.” There are events to help keep the interest of younger children. One of those features is the

One of the not-to-be-missed features at this year’s expo is the Tulsa Garden Railroad Club. “They have larger-scale electric trains that run through gardens outside,” he says. “They’ve got a huge assortment of trains.” As if that wasn’t enough, there are daily prizes available and a grand prize to be given away Sunday.

FALL HOME EXPO Expo Square 4149 E. 21st St. | Tulsa fallhomeexpo.com

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The show guide will help you find your way around the expo and right to the exhibitors you need. “The show guide is a 24 to 32 page, full -color magazine,” explains Sawyer. “It’s got descriptions of the exhibitors, contact information, and website addresses. No other home show has as nice a guide.”

The American Red Cross will be there conducting a blood drive, and you can even sit in on discount travel seminars so you can save some money on vacations and have more to put into your home.

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Sawyer also encourages empty nesters to attend. If your house is suddenly much bigger than you need for just two, come to the show and see what you need to do to get ready to sell. “Why wait until the last minute? Figure out what needs to happen between now and selling the house,” he says.

CA

There are also some cash-andcarry options at the expo, so you can get some shopping done while you’re attending. “The Shopper’s Markets are pointof-purchase exhibitors offering gift items, small items, food products, gift baskets, and more.”

Rescue Roundup. It’s made up of local rescue groups to facilitate the adoption of rescue dogs. So, while you’re planning your spring landscaping project, you can bring home a new family member to share the love. And you know you’re doing a good deed because adopting a rescue pet helps the fight against pet overpopulation.

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to book contractors, and they’re already booked out into spring.”

Nov. 1: Noon-8 p.m. Nov. 2: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Nov. 3: 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Described as a Russian nesting doll of a show within a show, Theatre Tulsa’s The Drowsy Chaperone is a love letter to musical theater and people who love musicals. BY GINA CONROY

What do you get when a lonely, anxiety-ridden middle-aged man plays his favorite record in his dreary apartment as he sits in his favorite chair while the audience listens along to his commentary? Not only do you get a heartwarming glimpse into one man’s humanity, but you’re taken on an outrageously fun nonsensical journey through a 1920s-style musical comedy which comes to life in his mind. “It’s not a typical Broadway show of our era,” says Mike Pryor, who plays Man in Chair. “What’s funny

30 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

and

is it’s a sendup of the early 1900s jazz age. It’s frivolous and frothy. It lovingly pokes fun at people who are musical theater fanatics.”

Frothy

it’s also “a love letter to musical theater and for people who love musicals.”

Performed by Theatre Tulsa, The Drowsy Chaperone won’t put you to sleep. If you’re not careful, it just might have you falling out of your chair with laughter.

Initially created by a group of theater actors as a bachelor party gift for their friend, this sleeper hit and winner of five Tony Awards has been entertaining audiences since 2006.

“The musical within the play is so ridiculous, and the characters so cut and paste, but there’s a reason for that,” says Pryor. Described as a Russian nesting doll of a show within a show,

“Bob Martin’s theater friends created this spoof as a gift to him and his bride,” says Pryor. But it wasn’t until Martin cowrote the show for the 1999 Toronto Fringe Festival, adding

the character Man in Chair, that this story awakened to what audiences know and love today: a little-known, but well-loved musical comedy full of heart and humanity. “They’re all very stock characters which is part of the fun,” says Pryor. Pryor, who has been doing musical theater since 1985, fell in love with the recording when it first came out. “I had seen the show a few times, and I always thought it was the most charming, hysterical show.”


“I think it does an excellent job of setting the tone that draws you in,” says Pryor. “There’s something very human right off the bat, and that is the kind of thing that puts it a notch above as a small unheard-of show.” While all the other characters are funny stereotyped caricatures, they’re a stark contrast to Man in Chair. “The heart of the show is this agoraphobic gentleman who is the narrator for the evening,” says Pryor. “He talks directly to the audience and does a running commentary as the musical comes to life.” Through all the silly antics of the 1920s musical, the more

As he follows the characters in the musical, he finds the strength to pull himself out of his depression. “It’s such a sweet turn at the end with all the silly, nonstop ridiculousness that goes,” says Pryor. “He chooses to go on like the characters in the musical.” Underneath all the outrageous fun, The Drowsy Chaperone is heartwarming. “Even though there’s silliness, there’s something very human about it,” says Pryor. “You’re rooting for the Man in the Chair right off the bat. You don’t have to be a theater fanatic to enjoy it.”

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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But you don’t have to be a musical theater fanatic or lover of 1920s style musicals to enjoy The Drowsy Chaperone.

As the Man in Chair opens himself up to the audience in an honest way, you begin to see he’s not just the narrator. “You get to know my character as a human, not just a weirdo who plays musicals in his apartment,” says Pryor. “It gives him some humanity, and he ends up growing.”

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Pryor didn’t realize how typecast he might have been until he started looking around for a prop of an album cover for the show. “I wondered if they would need an open-up vinyl cover album,” says Pryor. “So I went looking in my minimal collection of vinyl. I had a lot of very obscure two-record albums.” That’s when Pryor thought maybe he was more like this character than he cared to admit.

“He’s not supposed to be specific. He’s a universal character we can all be,” says Pryor. “He says things like ‘I’m feeling a little blue myself. A non-specific sadness, a little anxiety.’ He’s every man, and that’s why he’s The Man in the Chair.”

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“More than one person has indicated maybe I was typecast as the Man in the Chair because of my tremendous love of musicals and a little knowledge of them in an obscure way,” he says.

profound message shines through as the audience connects with humanity through the Man in Chair. And the character Man in Chair is named so for a reason.

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Although Pryor played a variety of roles throughout his career — including Forever Plaid, a musical about four old high school friends killed on their way to their first big show, then have to wait in limbo as they try to sing their way into heaven; Polar Opposite which covers darker psychiatric issues; children’s theater with A Year with Frog and Toad; and Little Shop of Horrors — he feels typecast as Man in Chair.

Oct. 11: 8 p.m. Oct. 12: 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Oct. 17-19: 8 p.m. Oct. 20: 2 p.m.

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BASED ON ONE OF ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER’S FAVORITE CHILDHOOD BOOKS, CATS PROVES TO HAVE AS MANY LIVES AS ITS COSTUMED CHARACTERS WHILE PROVIDING PLENTY OF MEMORIES. Domesticated or stray, each cat is unique in personality, but united in attitude that usually says they’re going to live life on their terms. You either love them or hate them. Or love to hate them. Grumpy, funny, real or cartoon, cats star in memes, comics, and videos. Some have even risen to the ranks of internet sensations. But no feline collective has had more influence on multiple generations than the Jellicle cats. Based on the 1939 collection of poems in Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Elliot, Cats the musical first debuted in the United States at Broadway’s Winter Garden Theatre in 1982. Just like the real felines, who are often stereotyped and

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misunderstood, the unusual premise of the show caught audiences and critics off guard. A Broadway show based on larger-than-life cats strutting, dancing, and singing to the music of Andrew Lloyd Webber with no dialogue between the songs? It didn’t seem to add up to a hit musical. But the combination was magical, enchanting audiences young and old. Cats mesmerized Broadway audiences for 18 years with a record-breaking run of 7,485 performances and seven Tony Awards including best musical. Besides playing on Broadway, Cats has been seen by over 73 million people worldwide in over 30 countries and 15 languages.

BY GINA CONROY PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MURPHY

After closing on Broadway in 2000, the Cats revival debuted in 2016, then went on tour with new choreography, direction, and sound design, reborn for a new generation.

unique personality and story, in song and dance, to convince their wise leader why they should be chosen. As each cat tries to prove his or her self-worth, a more prominent theme shines bright.

“It’s the same message, the same music, but the choreography has a bit of a new spark and a different life to it,” says Brandon Michael Nase, who plays Old Deuteronomy and considers it an honor to get to bring the role to life again on the revival tour.

Underneath the purring, prancing, and preening, Cats tells the story of one cat’s fall from grace and her tribe’s decision whether to welcome her back into the fold.

The story follows the Jellicle tribe on the most sacred night of the year. Old Deuteronomy, the leader of the tribe, must choose one cat to ascend to the Heaviside Layer to be reborn into a new life. Each cat presents its

“Cats is really about Grizabella trying to gain acceptance back into the tribe,” says Nase. “They feel she’s not worthy of being part of their tribe and so it becomes a story about forgiveness.” This story of redemption, told in such a creative and engaging way,


“I want to be there for the younger African American actors and actresses to help them maneuver the business,” says Nase. He tries to be present in the theater community for African American males who are coming into the world of theater after graduation and realizing they may be pigeonholed and told “these are the roles you play. And everything else is the luck of the draw.”

“It’s funny to hear people say they have memories of seeing this show in the ‘80s, hearing Betty Buckley singing ‘Memory,’” says Nase. “And now they are taking their kids and grandkids to see the show.”

Best known for the song “Memory” performed by Grizabella, this beloved musical is bringing back memories for

As a father, Nase knows how precious these memories can be and looks forward to making his memories with his young children.

Traditionally, Old Deuteronomy is played by African American men, and Nase says it’s an honor to follow people like Brian Blessed and Ken Page in the role. As a father, it hasn’t been a significant leap for Nase to play the leader of the tribe. But he also sees his role and position in the industry as a way to give back to younger people of color.

CATS

Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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“You move through life and look back at the choices and decisions you made,” says Nase. “You want that moment of acceptance and redemption and forgiveness so you can start over and start new. I think that’s at the core of why it has survived.”

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the old and creating new ones for the young.

“Every single person who has seen the show before says they’ve never seen it like this,” says Nase. “It’s new and yet still holds so much truth and stays so close to the original. The changes are so slight, but they add a spark to the production and the storytelling.”

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might be the biggest reason why this musical has had nine lives.

While on tour playing the part of the leader of the tribe, Nase is discovering the kind of father he wants to be. “Old Deuteronomy is a gracious, humble, and loving leader. If he has to correct someone, he does it through his language and his voice,” says Nase. “He lets people stumble and learn from their mistakes, but also shows that whenever you fall, I’m going to be there; not to say I told you so, but to say, maybe next time we should do it this way. That’s 100% the kind of parent I want to be.”

To date, Cats holds the honor of the fourth-longest-running Broadway show and continues its unprecedented success on tour across America.

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“As the only member of the cast with children it’s been a challenge being away from home,” says Nase. “It’s very, very hard being away from my children, to be living at a hotel, and having to pack up every two to three weeks.” But he counts himself lucky to be on tour, something most actors hope to do at least once in their lifetime.

“I think it’s important for those coming up in the business to say, ‘Yes I’m an African American, and it’s such a unique lens to look through, but there are other roles that can be seen through my lens,’ ” says Nase. “It’s a hard business for everyone. It’s especially difficult for people of color. Things are moving in a great direction, and we are making strides, but we still have a long way to go.”

Oct. 9: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 10: 1 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Oct. 11: 8 p.m. Oct. 12: 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Oct. 13: 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m.

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CREEP

IT REAL

HOPING FOR A HARROWING HALLOWEEN? BE SCAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR. KEEP YOUR ADRENALINE PUMPED AND CANDY BAGS FULL WITH THIS COLLECTION OF HAUNTS AND HAPPENINGS. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA

Do you feel that crisp chill in the air? Notice the scent of pumpkin spice everywhere? Tempted by the bags of candy on shelves, and the costumes on the racks at the local box stores, inviting you to remember the days when you were a kid, trick or treating and dressing up to play holiday games?

area offer a lot of spooktacular entertainment. The great variety of what Green Country serves up this time of year for kids, families, and adults alike is enough to persuade just about anyone to do the “Monster Mash,” watch Bela Lugosi movies, and howl at the harvest moon.

That’s right — it’s time for Halloween fun. And boy, do Tulsa and the surrounding

Whatever you can imagine, our area probably offers it. So, whether you want

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to get your heart pounding, or you want a relaxed taste of autumn cheer, you can find it. Ghostly visitations, zombie chases, unearthly monsters trying to grab you, corn and hay mazes to get lost in, kid-friendly games and prizes, or fun for the whole family, we’ve got you covered with a list of some of our favorite Halloween haunts in Green Country this month.


BARTLESVILLE GHOST WALK

BARN OF HARM PAWNEE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS | PAWNEE OCT. 25-26, 31, NOV. 1-2

Located at the Pawnee County Fairgrounds, the Barn of Harm has been a haunted attraction destination for over a decade. This scary barn houses over 30,000 square feet of terror, including live monsters lurking around every corner with the intent to make your heart race. Navigate through this haunted indoor attraction, and meander around uneven surfaces, tight spaces, and grotesque sights for a truly thrilling adventure. By the time your horrifying fun is complete, you’ll leave with your nerves frayed from the barn amenities, sounds, and smells.

HILTON GARDEN INN | BARTLESVILLE OCT. 23-24

Listen to the ghost stories surrounding historic downtown buildings on the Bartlesville Ghost Walk. Starting at the Hilton Garden Inn, this tour will encompass seven different buildings, all within walking distance. Hear haunting tales in each location to find out sordid secrets from the past. The Bartlesville Ghost Walk gives visitors a glimpse of the history and the mystery of these local landmarks.

HARVEST CARNIVAL RHEMA BIBLE CHURCH | BROKEN ARROW OCT. 25

Treat the kids to an action-packed, candyfilled fall party at Rhema Bible Church in Broken Arrow. Infants, pre-K, kindergarten, and elementary school kids are invited to come in costume. Inside the Ninowski Recreation Center, children will find 80 game booths and 5,000 pounds of candy. Concessions like pizza, nachos, popcorn, and soda will also be available to keep stomachs satisfied while engaging in all the Halloween-themed fun.

HALLOWZOOEEN TULSA ZOO | TULSA OCT. 26-31

Looking for spooky but not-too-scary fun for the whole family, especially the kiddos? Then it’s time to take a trip to the Tulsa Zoo for their annual HallowZOOeen extravaganza. Children enjoy a host of entertaining things to do — candy stops, haunted house, activity areas, hay maze, pirate ship, dance party, and pumpkin decorating, all while surrounded by animal exhibits.

HUNTER’S HOME GHOST STORIES HUNTER’S HOME HISTORIC SITE | PARK HILL OCT. 25-26

Catch spooky tales told in Oklahoma’s only surviving antebellum home this Halloween season in Hunter’s Home. Held in Park Hill at what was formerly known as the George M. Murrell Home, the Hunter’s Home Ghost Stories event features storytellers in period clothing relaying spooky events in and around the home, as well as other bewitching tales. Enjoy cider and cookies in the smokehouse, then embark on a 90-minute tour of the 1845 plantation home. Visitors will enjoy the recounting of mysterious events revolving around the mansion and northeastern Oklahoma. Learn about the mysterious black dog that suddenly appeared along the local creek behind the home one night more than 150 years ago, the woman who appears in the home’s attic window or the little girl who appears on the stairs. During ghost story nights, visitors are ushered into the front hall decorated with candles, jacko-lanterns, cobwebs and other ghostly decor. Participants will move from room to room, with storytellers recounting different legends in each location. Keep your eyes peeled and listen for spooky noises as local storytellers recount the oral traditions of the historic home. Reservations are required. This event is not recommended for children under 8 years.

HAUNTED CASTLE HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL THE CASTLE OF MUSKOGEE | MUSKOGEE SEPT. 27-OCT. 26

One of the premier Halloween events in Green Country, The Castle of Muskogee is in its 24th year of Haunted Castle Halloween Festival fun. The Castle’s Halloween started as two haunted house areas, says Matt Hiller, vice president. Over the years, it has expanded, and today there are 11 events at the Castle, ranging in levels of spookiness so there’s something for everyone. It’s free to get into the Halloween Village, which is where you’ll find food booths, shops offering Halloween-themed items, cotton candy, drinks, live shows, and more. Once you’re there, you can choose to attend as many paid events as you can fit into your time there. This approach allows the whole family or groups of friends to come together, then split up to take part in the events that fit them. Kids ages 8 and under will enjoy the carnival of fun, a kid zone with bounce houses, games, inflatable slides, obstacle courses, and prizes. Those wanting some active entertainment can take on zombie paintball. There are a variety of haunted events to choose from including Casa Morte, Domus Horrificus, torture chamber, Trail of Blood and a haunted hayride. The Castle provides a “skull rating” for each attraction; the more skulls, the scarier. And if you’ve been in the past, Hiller says come again, because they’re always making changes to keep things interesting. “We have altered our train route,” says Hiller as one example of what’s new. “It used to be completely non-scary. Now it’s going to be medium scary, good for kids up to teens, with special effects and lighting. It takes you through the center of the village and loops around through woods. It’s not just for the kiddies anymore.”

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MUSKOGEE’S HAUNTED HISTORY TOURS

KILLING FROST PRODUCTIONS 1109 N. DELAWARE ST. | DEWEY OCT. 4-5, 11-12, 18-19, 25-26, 30-31

In its 13th year of providing scares and dares in Dewey, Oklahoma, Killing Frost is offering up some Halloween entertainment this year in a presentation called 13/31 — At Death’s Door. With plenty of ghouls and ghosts and live actors in fright-inducing costumes, you’ll be sure to feel your heart racing at this haunted house experience.

THREE RIVERS MUSEUM | MUSKOGEE DATES TO BE ANNOUNCED ON FACEBOOK

Love an excellent ghost tour? Oklahoma has its fair share of spooky stories and places that are rumored to be haunted. And one of the best ways to enjoy a ghost-inspired time is to head down to Muskogee for their Haunted History Tours. You’ll stroll through beautiful, historic areas that are said to be home to ethereal ghosts that creep and sneak and spook you out. While you walk, you’ll learn some history too. Not a bad deal.

PUMPKIN FESTIVAL SHEPHERD’S CROSS | CLAREMORE SEPT. 24-NOV. 9

Celebrate fall with pumpkins, hayrides and harvest educational activities at Shepherd’s Cross, an authentic working farm in Claremore. Come out and select a pumpkin from truckloads available in all shapes and sizes. Guests can also take home straw bales and corn stalks for fall decorating. At this annual pumpkin festival, walk the hay maze, create a scarecrow, take a hayride, pet the animals in the petting zoo, and make memories. Enjoy lots of fun games and activities for the whole family, farm demos, and festive fall storytime while celebrating the harvest season.

SPOOK-A-RAMA

THE HEX HOUSE

KIDDIE PARK | BARTLESVILLE OCT. 17-19

5610 W. SKELLY DR. | TULSA SEPT. 20-NOV. 2

Celebrate the Halloween spirit at Spook-A-Rama, a three-night event at Kiddie Park in Bartlesville. Kids can dress up in their favorite ghost, goblin or superhero costume to participate in the costume parade, and each participant will receive a small prize. Witness a mad scientist perform his wild experiments in a live show, with the first show starting at 6 p.m. each evening and performances every 30 minutes after.

With 18 nights of terror on the calendar, Tulsa’s Hex House promises to be a place you can return to repeatedly for scary entertainment … if you have the nerve. Their events are dark and frightening, not suitable for children under 13, those with medical conditions, or women who are pregnant. In other words, this is not your typical haunted house. There are no barriers between visitors and actors. Be prepared to be touched, spooked and creeped the heck out.

At Spook-A-Rama, explore the haunted house full of creepy creatures and spooky ghouls, where you never know what’s around the next corner. Tour the funeral room, the funhouse room, the pirate room, the hall of horrors and the rest of the rooms in the haunted house for a scary good time.

THE NIGHTMARE 4300 S. 91ST E. AVE. | TULSA EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY IN OCTOBER

Put on by GUTS Church, The Nightmare is a tradition for Tulsans. Unlike other haunted houses, this one takes visitors on a walk-through presentation of real-life, modern-day struggles challenging our world today. Be warned: it will feel real, and it will be graphic. No one under the age of 12 is permitted. The goal of the event is to find elements of hope among the lost, focusing on the price Jesus paid on the cross. Dates and times are subject to change.

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PSYCHO PATH 1517 E. 106TH ST. N. | SPERRY CHECK THEIR WEBSITE FOR DATES AND TIMES

Following the epic flooding that hit Green Country in May, the Psycho Path was greatly affected. Many of their props were destroyed, buildings were overturned, and electronics were ruined. The group has been working since then so that they can open for their 15th season. When you arrive, you’ll enter woods shrouded by fog and venture deep into the darkness where ghoulish creatures are waiting behind every twist and turn. Psycho Path offers visitors Hollywood-caliber scenes and over 40 acres of wooded terror. This haunted house attraction features high-intensity scares in an outdoor haunted experience. Take a 20-minute journey through the woods as you pass scenes filled with custom props, buildings, and creatures that will spring when you least suspect it. Psycho Path incorporates elements of a theme park ride as visitors ride from scene to scene in a custom vehicle called the scareage. Take the signature Psycho Path Dark Ride and travel into a haunted forest on a dark and mysterious path for nearly a mile where there’s no turning back. All visitors that brave the Psycho Path are in for a thrilling haunted adventure with stunning audio and visual effects. Put your courage to the test as you and your friends encounter ghostly creatures that roam the woods outside of Sperry. Next, take a walk through the on-site haunted house and participate in the additional attractions that are sure to leave your spine tingling. When terror works up an appetite, concessions are available.


Get Advice from 100’s of Home Pros Family Activities Shopper’s Market Spring Project Pre-Planning Free Parking & Admission Daily & Grand Prize Giveaway

November 1-3, 2019 in the Exchange Center Visit

FallHomeExpo.com For Complete Details

See our feature on page 28

Exhibitor Registry: TulsaHomeShows.com


— THE —

Sound Alphorn

If you’re looking for a German experience in Oklahoma that includes endless bratwursts, lederhosen, beer, dancing, and cavorting, look no further than Oktoberfest. By Lindsay Morris While many national Oktoberfest events claim to be wunderbar, Tulsa’s has been named a topfive Oktoberfest in the United States by USA Today and Condé Nast Traveler magazine. So, prepare to have your lederhosen blown away by this genuinely magnificent German experience that is celebrating its 41st year.

festival entrance amazes firsttime guests with an authentic Bavarian village complete with yards of ribbon, cloth, banners, flags, and beads decorated by loyal Oktoberfest volunteers.

“We make it a goal to produce an event that looks, feels, tastes, and sounds as much like the original Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany, as possible,” says festival director Tonja Carrigg.

One of the most memorable, eye-catching attractions at Oktoberfest each year is the glockenspiel — a giant, twostory cuckoo clock with live performers who emerge from within and perform every hour on the hour. The first story of the clock features a bar, and the second story hosts a giant stage.

Oktoberfest takes place Oct. 17-20 at River West Festival Park. The

“It is the anchor performance element,” Carrigg says. “Every

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hour, these people pop out and perform, skit, ring a bell, and throw beads and T-shirts.” Speaking of entertainment, Oktoberfest features plenty of live bands, including two coming from Germany.

Performers include Dorfrocker, which blends polka, rock, pop, and folk sound; Alex Meixner, a Grammy Nominee known for his wild, energetic shows that include polka versions of Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” and Ozzy Osbourne’s “Crazy


With all the beer being consumed, you’ll need some delicious, hearty food to balance things out. German-style food

Activities for children include sand art with mini vintage glass bottles, Perler beads and painting, LEGO creation station, ring toss, sandbag toss, and

“We try to make it as easy as possible for families to stick together,” Carrigg says. “We’ve grown to have so many things happening that keep everybody entertained and active at all times.” With the ever-growing popularity of Oktoberfest, many people make it an annual tradition and have even invested in German costumes to wear to the event. “It’s simple to find Bavarian items to wear — a hat, beads, a dirndl (dress) or lederhosen,” Carrigg says. She says German items are available at Ehrle’s in Tulsa or online. Of course, plenty of German items are available to purchase at Oktoberfest as well. The event hosts a large arts and crafts market house, with everything from woodworking, and packaged food products, to Bavarian hats, pins, and scarves. Everything for purchase is authentically German-style. While Oktoberfest officially opens to the public Oct. 17, Gemütlichkeit Corporate Night ushers in the event Oct. 16. Companies can purchase tables of 30 for their employees, and they will get an exclusive preview of everything Oktoberfest has to offer. “We want people to have the most authentic Bavarian experience in Oklahoma,” Carrigg says.

Oktoberfest wouldn’t be possible without the support of the community through corporate sponsorships and volunteer support, Carrigg says. “It takes hundreds of volunteer hours to produce this thing. It takes a huge, dedicated team, and we’re fortunate to have that.”.

OKTOBERFEST River West Festival Park 2100 S. Jackson Ave. | Tulsa tulsaoktoberfest.org

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One of the goals of Oktoberfest is to teach people a little German, and one of the first phrases guests will learn is “bier bitte,” meaning “beer please.”

the chance to meet and ride Hertog Jan von Paddentsteeg, an imported Dutch Friesian horse.

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“There’s not a beverage we don’t have,” Carrigg says. This includes root beer for the kiddos.

Keep in mind that Oktoberfest is also family-friendly. While the adults mix and mingle over libations, the kids can get their fill of activities. Aside from amusing events like the Dachshund Dash, Bier Barrel Race, MassKrug Relay, and Chicken Dance, Oktoberfest features an entire youth area (KinderPlatz) dedicated to activities for children. Just outside of the JugendZelt tent area is a carnival filled with all the favorite rides and games.

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Probably the first thing that comes to mind when most people think of Oktoberfest is beer. The beer is indeed flowing in abundance at Oktoberfest. With nearly 80 beer brands available, there is something for everyone. Carrigg says Oktoberfest also offers ciders, gluten-free options, wines, and spirits.

is in abundance, with delicacies such as apple and cherry strudel, Bavarian cheesecake, bratwurst sauerkraut, and potato pancakes. Some local vendors such as Siegi’s and the German-American Society of Tulsa feature food booths, and some food vendors come from as far away as Ohio.

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Train;” and Bavarski, an interesting blend of a jazz organist, a versatile drummer and an opera singer.

Oct. 16: Corporate Night Oct. 17: 5-11 p.m. Oct. 18-19: 11 a.m.-1 a.m. Oct. 20: Noon-6 p.m.

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TheMane Event CLOSE TO 1,800 ARABIAN HORSES RIDE INTO TULSA FOR THE ARABIAN HORSE ASSOCIATION’S LARGEST AND MOST PRESTIGIOUS EVENT IN THE INDUSTRY. WHETHER YOU’RE A HORSE LOVER OR JUST CURIOUS TO SEE THIS BREED IN ALL ITS GLORY, THE NINE-DAY EVENT IS GUARANTEED TO PROVIDE PLENTY OF WOW MOMENTS. BY GINA CONROY

The Arabian horse is the oldest domesticated purebred dating back over 4,000 years to the Middle East. Once considered sacred by Islamic prophet Mohammed, Arabians were bred for war and highly valued as a commodity. Arabians are known for their refinement, beauty, intelligence, and stamina. Not only are they considered one of the most beautiful and recognizable breeds in the world with a distinct dish face, big eyes, and high tail carriage, but Arabians make up most of the endurance racing horses worldwide. But it’s not just their physical attributes and impressive championship track record in the arena that sets them apart from the rest. “Arabians have an innate ability to bond with humans as a result of centuries of breeding,” says Glenn Petty, who’s been executive vice president of the Arabian Horse Association (AHA) for the last 11 years. “They’re a horse that was courageous in battle and yet gentle enough to share the family tent.” Kris Davis, vice president of AHA’s local affiliate Green Country Arabian Horse Association (GCAHA), agrees with Petty and has experienced this unique bond firsthand.

“Over my life, I’ve worked with a lot of different horses. Arabians love people more than any other breed,” says Davis, who was first introduced to the breed when she joined the GCAHA at age 17. “I worked for a lady who had Arabian horses. She said to me, ‘You’ll never want to own anything else.’” Being a lover of all breeds, Davis didn’t believe her until she started working with them and then later owned an Arabian of her own. “My horse is quirky and has lots of personality, but would rather spend an hour or two a day working for me than out in the pasture playing with playmates,” says Davis. “That’s just who they are. They love to work for their owner.” Their personality isn’t the only quality that makes them a loveable breed. It’s also their versatility. “I’m never bored with them because there’re so many things I can do,” says Davis, whose Arabians have not only been show horses but ridden on trail rides and parades, as well as worked the grounds checking the fence line. “They’re an all-around horse, and I love that.” There’s no arguing there are many reasons Arabians are a show favorite of owners, trainers, and even Las Vegas entertainer Wayne Newton, who’s been breeding Arabians for decades. In 2014 Newton brought his colt

to Tulsa to compete in the U.S. National Arabian & Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show. While the AHA can’t guarantee Newton will attend this year, they promise close to 1,800 of these majestic creatures, both purebred and half-breed, will ride into Tulsa Expo Square Oct. 18-26 for AHA’s largest and most prestigious event in the industry. The nine-day event is free to the public and guaranteed to thrill all ages, whether you’re a horse lover or just curious to see this breed in all its glory. Spectators can sit ringside and witness the versatility of Arabians as they take center stage. Riders compete and show their beloved horses in a multitude of events including halter, reining, sidesaddle, English hunter, working cow, cutting, and so much more. But you don’t have to be a horse lover or Arabian enthusiast to enjoy the show. “One of the most popular events for spectators is the Arabian native costume,” says Petty. The pounding of hooves and traditional Arabian music collide in a rhythm that can transport you to another time and culture. Riders and their horses dress in colorful, ornamental flowing fabrics in the Bedouin fashion. Petty recalls the time he sat with friends from Egypt, watching and

enjoying the colorful costumes and cheers of the crowd. His friends started pointing at costumes, saying they were from various countries like Turkey, Qatar, and other Arab nations. “They pointed to one horse and said, ‘That costume is from Saudi Arabia and is a version of a wedding dress.’ I had never thought about it that way,” he says. “When Arabians went to war, they wore bright-colored garb to represent their tribe as they galloped across the sand,” says Davis. “Arabians are natural showoffs, especially with horses at this level.” And these show horses are no different in the level of pride they exhibit for their owners. “When I used to show Native Costume, the more the crowd cheered, the higher my Arabian’s feet went, and the more I could feel him poke his chest out and love what he was doing.” Native Costume isn’t the only class filled with music and excitement. Some of the popular performance classes include Western Pleasure and Working Western — both of which have roots in the Old West. In both classes, judges look for a calm, obedient demeanor, and horses that can cover ground adequately. In Working Western Cattle classes, spectators experience an added thrill watching riders and their Arabians work a cow around the arena.

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September 27th - October 26th Every Friday & Saturday

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“It’s important to have active members to support what we’re doing, so these Arabian shows don’t go away,” says Davis. The public can support the showing of Arabians by stopping by their online auction. Attendees can stop by the GCAHA booth to pick up a flyer with a list of items and the web address for the auction. “We have beautiful Arabian paintings and costumes for sale, and a limited edition Korbel champagne set,” says Davis. All funds brought in help offset the cost of the GCAHA shows, which help local members compete on the national level.

“When you watch an Arabian trot in a field, they have what is known as ‘the float,’” says Davis. “When they are excited or showing off, they look like their feet are not touching the ground. The English Pleasure brings that into a class.”

Both Petty and Davis are excited about the local talent in Tulsa who have qualified for nationals and agree that Eddie Ralston, a regional trainer for the last couple of decades, and his clients, are competitors to watch.

Qualifying for nationals is no small feat, and one way the

“Eddie is a primary supporter of GCAHA and will ride several

If the competitions aren’t exciting enough, the public is invited to tour the stables, which are open to the public. “Some of the stable setups are really exotic and nicely decorated,” says Petty. “The front stalls are like houses with nice seating areas, bars, and couches.” As you wander the grounds, you can even visit the farriers and see a horse shod. Children get an added treat through the Total Arabian Interactive Learning (T.A.I.L.) tour. Led by an AHA representative, children tour backstage to learn about the history of Arabians, visit different barns, and meet the horses and participants of the show. “They get a one-on-one experience and introduction to the breed,” says Davis. While these T.A.I.L. tours are free to the public, you need to make a reservation to attend.

Petty says when they first came to Tulsa people grumbled because it wasn’t Las Vegas. But over the years they saw Tulsa had a lot to offer in the way of quality hotels, restaurants, museums, and entertainment. Besides, with an event so large, not every venue could accommodate them. “Tulsa has almost 4,000 stalls, three indoor competition rings in different buildings, and 13 indoor schooling rings,” says Petty. But it’s not just the venue, city amenities, and Tulsa’s central location that keeps the U.S. Nationals coming back year after year. “We’ve had a great relationship with Expo Square and Mark Andrus, Ray Hoyt and Visit Tulsa, the mayor’s office, city council members, and county commissioners,” says Petty. “It’s like coming to a family reunion once a year.”

U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN & HALF-ARABIAN CHAMPIONSHIP HORSE SHOW

EXPO SQUARE 4145 E. 21st St. | Tulsa arabianhorses.org

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Davis encourages anyone interested in Arabians or curious about their club to stop by their booth for more information.

Over $750,000 in prize money will be awarded to amateurs and professional adults. “Our awards room, located with our commercial exhibitors, is spectacular and a must-see,” says Petty. While roaming the exhibits, you can get a bite to eat or visit the many vendors who travel to Tulsa from all over the United States showcasing horse souvenirs, toys for the kids as well as hats, saddles, clothing, art, and more.

Held in Tulsa the past 11 years, last year the U.S. Nationals attracted owners, riders, and trainers from 45 states and provinces with 1,772 horses filling approximately 3,750 stalls.

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Davis describes this class as an early American or English ride to the park when it was a friendly competition of who had the prettiest, highest stepping horse. Judges look for animated horses with a brilliant high-stepping stride that draws the eye and makes people wow. Although some may think this class encourages artificial devices around their feet to achieve this effect, that’s not necessarily true.

“Besides the Class A shows we put on, we do two one-day Working Western shows that allow members to go to nationals,” says Davis. “These are warm-up shows for our members because they get to show in the same facility as nationals.”

horses in the Working classes,” says Davis. Meg Lucas, who has placed in champion or reserve for years is also expected to compete in the Trail Class. Riders in the Western Class to look for are Kelly Harmon, Kathie Hart, Cecily Smith, and Barb McCalip.

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Audiences also delight in the Driving classes where riders sit in a small carriage harnessed to their horses as they ride around the ring. The English Pleasure class, a more casual style of English riding, features riders in long coats and top hats as their horses canter around the ring.

GCAHA helps members get to nationals is by putting on shows where their members have the opportunity to place.

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“The horse faces the cow and shows how it can run the cow back and forth on one end of the arena and then chase the cow down the long side in full gallop,” says Davis. The rider and horse have to turn the cow toward the center of the ring and contain the cow in a tight circle to demonstrate they have control over its direction. “It’s exciting to watch because the movements of the cattle are unpredictable and almost everything is done at a high rate of speed,” he says.

Oct. 18-26

PREVIEW918.COM 43


, t e S , y d a e R

that can be had during the Pub Run. All you have to do is finish three Guinness beers during the run. Sound insane? Need to be reminded of the earlier quote? It’s all for fun and a cause, with some of the proceeds of the run going to the Hearts of Steel Foundation, a Tulsa organization that supports families experiencing long-term hospital stays due to congenital heart defects.

The McNellie’s Pub Run is a light-hearted race that goes through downtown Tulsa and past many of the city’s iconic buildings. Starting in front of the Fleet Feet Blue Dome on Second Street and Frankfort Avenue, it weaves through a 4-mile downtown course, ending in front of McNellie’s Pub, where the party continues.

Running enthusiasts Alicia and Joseph Evans do their best to be a part of the race every year. “It’s super fun,” says Alicia. “We always do the challenge, of course, but I’m a slow drinker. I was nervous the first time, never drinking and running an actual race at the same time. It turns out, it wasn’t that bad.”

Those who take the infamous Guinness Challenge during the race know all about the good times

Even the people who don’t do the challenge part of the annual race have a blast. It’s a carefree race

44 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

The idea for the Pub Run was hatched in the latter part of 2005 during lunch, not long after McNellie’s Pub opened. “As we enjoyed our lunch,” says Dreiling, “and perhaps a second beer, I presented an idea to Elliot [Nelson, McNellie’s Pub owner]. To make this thing interesting, we needed to have beer, or beers, during the race. Elliot, of course, thought that was a great idea. He figured he could get Guinness to sponsor the beer. And so, the Guinness Challenge was born.” The first year of the Pub Run saw over 380 finishers who partied for hours in Tulsa’s then-burgeoning downtown. Fifteen years later, organizers expect close to 1,500 participants crossing the finish line, with over 1,100 accepting the Guinness Challenge. Of course,

New in 2019 is a three-person relay option, where you and two friends can run as a team. The more, the merrier, right? Each team member runs a third of the race. At the end of each leg, the runner must finish a pint of Guinness before the next runner on the team can start their leg of the race. A 1-mile fun run is available for runners who don’t want to make everyone else look bad. For registration information, visit the McNellie’s Group website.

MCNELLIE’S PUB RUN mcnelliesgroup.com

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We’re pretty sure it was Ernest Hemingway who said, “When you stop doing things for fun, you might as well be dead.” It’s with this spirit in mind that one of Tulsa’s most fun annual racing events has made its way back to the calendar. And it’s just as alive and well as ever, promising to be a whole lot more fun than any of the previous years (if that’s even possible).

“It’s a fun, party vibe,” says Tim Dreiling, owner of Fleet Feet Tulsa, the organization that partners with McNellie’s to put on the event.

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Celebrating two of Tulsa’s favorite things — running and beer — the McNellie’s Pub Run offers plenty of challenges, running, wacky apparel and charitable goodwill. BY ROB HARMON

There are serious runners as well. But for the most part, Alicia says, it’s a big party that one can’t miss.

both Evans and Dreiling say that just because the race is over doesn’t mean the frivolity ends there. After all these years, runners still stick around as long as they can to enjoy Tulsa’s beautiful downtown scene and maybe a pint or two more of Guinness or one of the many amazing Oklahomabased brews.

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with all sorts of runners wearing wacky costumes and other outlandish apparel, including Joseph, who, according to his Alicia, wore the most “disgusting” pair of Daisy Dukes during one race.

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Nov. 9


Free Wi-Fi Internet Access!

Molly’s Landing Open Since 1984

Steak & Seafood Only 3 1/2 miles from Hard Rock Casino on Highway 66 (Route 66)

918.266.7853

www.mollyslanding.com

PREVIEW918.COM 45


about Oktoberfest, you’re not exactly wrong, but don’t limit your thinking. There’s more than one beer-related event happening this month, thank the beer gods. Trust us, you need to plan to get to downtown’s other beloved brew lover’s dream — the Harvest Beer Festival, sponsored by McNellie’s Pub. The Harvest Beer Festival got its origins after McNellie’s saw the taste for ale and celebration that crowds brought to their everpopular St. Patrick’s Day block party. They decided to do a similar event in the second half of the year, and thus the Harvest Beer Festival was born. This year, the event is being hosted at ONEOK Field, nestled underneath the covered concourse of Driller Stadium.

46 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

Among the brewers being featured will be local favorites, like Prairie Artisan Ales, Marshalls, and plenty of others. If you want or need a gluten-free beer, be sure to stop by the New Era Fine Fermentations booth. Among newer names, says Sipes, you can expect to see brewers like Erie Ales, which specializes in Belgian ales, and Rapture Brewing, which has set up shop at Prairie Creek Farms in Kellyville. There will be classic national brands too, like Samuel Adams, Evil Twin Brewing, and Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales. And that’s just a drop in the old beer stein. Sipes promises a selection of ciders too. Forbes has reported on the resurgence of hard ciders, due to new flavors and blends like rosé ciders. And craft ciders are especially popular too. So, guests of the festival can

It depends on your preferences, but there will be plenty of flavors and styles to choose from. “The good thing about Harvest Fest is there’s a whole range of beer,” says Sipes. “If you’re into one particular style, this is a great way to branch out. Every beer style will pretty much be represented. Tulsa has a great palate; they like all kinds of stuff.” Attendees can choose tickets for one of the day’s two tasting sessions, one earlier in the afternoon, one later. Each session lasts three hours, and ticket holders are welcome to all the beer samples they want to enjoy. For those who want a more in-depth experience that goes beyond beer samples, opt for one of the two VIP tickets. As a VIP guest, you enjoy either brunch before the day’s early sampling session, or a buffet during the second sampling session. The VIP tickets are limited, and the brunch usually sells out. This year, the buffet is new, a trial run, so to speak, to test the waters and see how well attendees are interested. Of course, you can expect tasty McNellie’s Group food options at the VIP brunch and buffet. And there will be Elgin Park pizza available for regular festival-goers as they wander the event. And the event itself is close to the other McNellie’s Group downtown eateries including Yokozuna, Dilly Diner, Fassler Hall and The Dust Bowl.

Those who attend the second session also receive a free Tulsa Roughnecks ticket to that night’s soccer game. (The Tulsa Roughnecks play the Sacramento Republic at 7 p.m.) It makes for a fun night out. If you’re concerned about how you’ll get home after the festival, consider all the options — staying in the nearby Hotel Indigo, taking a taxi, using Uber or Lyft. Or use the old reliable method of bringing along a driver who isn’t imbibing. “Designated drivers are welcome,” says Sipes. If you’re the designated driver, you get in for free — and you get a designated driver wristband which identifies you. You might not be drinking, but imagine the people-watching potential. “It’s a great atmosphere,” says Sipes of the festival, because it brings together people who are passionate about brews. “It’s a lot of fun, and it’s a lot of beers.”

MCNELLIE’S HARVEST BEER FESTIVAL ONEOK Field | Tulsa

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“It’s a great way to meet the people behind the beers. And it’s a great way to taste a variety of beers,” explains Scott Sipes, general manager of McNellie’s. All the brewers are encouraged to create and serve up specialty and one-off beers. “It’s something you don’t normally get at the brewery.”

expect to have several ciders to sample, such as Schilling, Stem, and Austin Eastciders.

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Festival-goers, who must be 21 and over for obvious reasons, don’t have to worry about the weather, because the show can go on rain or shine. The breweries represented, more than 80 in all, will be set up festival style, serving samples to visitors, who receive a commemorative drinking mug for the event.

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When the weather turns to fall, when October delivers that crisp chill in the air, Tulsans’ hearts turn to dreams of tasting beer. If you’re thinking we’re talking

—Brews Aplenty —

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The Harvest Beer Festival is a great way to try new beers you might not otherwise be able to, enjoy McNellie’s Group eats, and meet fellow beer enthusiasts while sipping the fall day away. By Michele Chiappetta

Oct. 5 (Session 1): Noon-3 p.m. Oct. 5 (Session 2): 5-8 p.m. Tickets: Available at McNellie’s Pub, Elgin Park and beerfests.com


See our feature on page 88

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Whimsical art for over 20 years! New Location! 1326 E. 3rd St. Tulsa, OK 74120 Store Hours Monday - Friday 10-5 Saturday 10-3 info@gardendeva.com 918-592-3382 48 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019


PREV EW 16

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BOK Center | C2-6 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Tulsa Performing Arts | D3-15 Tulsa Drillers | 3E-15 Tulsa Roughnecks | 3E-15

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Caz’s Pub | D2-16 Club Majestic | D2-19 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 MixCo | C2-17 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41

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ICAN HATFIE ER LD M QUALITY GOODS

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OFFERING TULSA A SELECTION OF INDIE AND SUSTAINABLE DESIGNERS

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51

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34

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41

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TULSA LOCATOR TL

DOWNTOWN TULSA

30

TH

3

2 4

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THE BOXYARD Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 Jason’s Deli | A5-30 Juniper | D3-1 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 Mexicali | D2-11 MixCo | C2-17 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41

PRHYME | D2-12 Sisserou’s | D2-20 SMOKE. | A5-32 The Tavern | E2-37 Tavolo | C3-3 Ti Amo | C2-4 Yokozuna | D3-38

SHOPPING American Hatfield | D3-33 Boomtown Tees | D3-14 Garden Deva | D5-37 Modern Mess | D3-33

32

51

Rosegold | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33

American Hatfield | D3-33 Blank Med Spa | D3-33 Blue Sky Bank | D3-33 Modern Mess | D3-33 Riley’s Wine & Spirits | D3-33 Rosegold | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33 Tonsorial | D3-33

EVERYTHING ELSE The Bond | D4-39 Blank Med Spa | D3-33

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TL TULSA LOCATOR

G

TULSA AND SURROUNDING AREAS

PREV EW

SPERRY

40

7

7

86TH N

OWAS

76TH N

56TH N

F

75

38 Tulsa Zoo

36 N TH

17

129TH E.

51

61ST

48

28

2

64

ST

111

TH

72

18

81ST

91ST

7

32 5

46

20

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BIXBY 71 47

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29

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71 GARNETT

4

44 65

MEMORIAL

121ST

70

30

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43 101

64

MINGO

15

40

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MEMORIAL

3

36

23

62

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SHERIDAN

2

66

42

26

41ST

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59

Between 111th & 121st 1

Oral Roberts Univ. Mabee Ct. 58

Oklahoma Aquarium

JENKS

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97

21 32 48

83

61 24

SAPULPA

2

LaFortune 80 Park

St. Francis Hospital

41

A

31ST Hicks Park

56

72

169

31

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Jones Airport

44

68

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23

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ARKANSAS RIVER

UNION 75

93 21ST

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44

72

51

MIDTOWN

3

39

6

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29

Philbrook Museum of Art7

94

Tulsa State Fairgrounds

GARNETT

Chandler Park

11TH

MINGO

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244

APACHE

48 SHERIDAN

Of 21 1Univ. Tulsa

2

50

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DOWNTOWN BOK Ctr. 30

75

HARVARD

OSU Tulsa

11

SAND SPRINGS

11

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Crawford Park

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412

36TH N

Tulsa Air & Space Museum

26TH N / APACHE

PEORIA

51

GILCREASE MUSEUM

Gilcrease Museum

GILCREASE EXPY

MARTIN LUTHER KING

KWY ALE P TISD E

46TH N MINGO

19 Tulsa Botanic Garden

C

Mohawk Park Lake Yahola


TULSA LOCATOR TL 96TH N PRESENTED BY:

72

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SHOPPING Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

52

CATOOSA 10

412

66

244

DINING

COUNTY LINE / 193RD E. 209TH E.

BROKEN ARROW 26

ST

1

53 177TH E.

161ST E.

145TH E.

1ST

1

360 Home | D4-21 Antique Restoration | D4-11 Bella’s House | B5-32, A5-32 Children’s Orchard | A5-18 Edible Arrangements | C4-7, A5-7, G6-7 I-44 Antique Mall | C4-3 Landella | D5-45 Miss McGillicutty’s Antiques | A4-54 Secret Gardens | A6-47 Tulsa Stained Glass | C5-56 Ziegler Art & Frame | D4-17

40

72 ASPEN

23

63 COUNTY LINE

LYNN LANE

MAIN ELM

est. 20 13

7

8

Albert G’s Bar & Q | C4-91 Amazing Thai Cuisine | B7-63 Brownies Burgers | D4-29, B5-29 Celebrity Restaurant | C5-68 Chimi’s | B5-2, C4-2, D4-2 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 El Chico | D6-93 El Guapo’s | B4-15 Elmer’s BBQ | C4-39 Fat Daddy’s Pub and Grille | B5-64 Flo’s Burger Diner | D4-1, D8-1 Fuji | B5-20 George’s Pub | A4-61 Goodcents Deli Fresh Subs | A5-9 In The Raw | C4-23, B5-23, B7-23 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Jason’s Deli | D4-30, B5-30 Kirin | B6-28 Kitch | A4 -42 Lanna Thai | B5-71 Los Cabos | G6-40, A4-40, B7-40 Los Mariachis | B5-26, A4-26 Maryn’s Taphouse and Raw Bar | A4-58 McAllister’s | B4-72, B5-72, B6-72, D5-72, G6-72 McNellie’s Pub | B5-16

Miami Nights Restaurant & Lounge | D5-5 Molly’s Landing | E8-52 Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano | C4-94 Ricardos | C5-31 Rincón Mexican Grill & Cantina | B5-13 SMOKE. | D4-27 Steak Stuffers USA | C5-14 Table 20 | D4-35 Ti Amo | B5-80 The Tropical |C5-62 Waterfront Grill | A4-70 Yokozuna | A5-43 Yutaka Grill Sushi & Buffet | C5-12

ENTERTAINMENT Cinergy | B5-55 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 Got Wood | A4-24 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Tulsa Air and Space Museum | E5-38

CASINO Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | D7-10 Osage Casino Hotel | E3-19 OTHER OSAGE CASINO LOCATIONS: 222 Allen Road | Bartlesville 301 Blackjack Dr. | Sand Springs 5591 W. Rogers Blvd. | Skiatook 39 Deer Ave. | Hominy 2017 E. 15th St. and Hwy. 99 | Pawhuska

River Spirit Casino Resort | B4-83

EVERYTHING ELSE Blue Cottage | A4-59 Carey Clinic | B5-36 Kuts 4 Kids | B4-48, B6-48 New Life Massage & Bodyworks | C4-22 Shears | A4-41

PREVIEW918.COM 51


AT THE WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM, YOU’LL FIND PLENTY OF UNEXPECTED THINGS TO DO AND WAYS TO ENRICH YOUR MIND WHILE EXPANDING YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF ONE OF THE BESTLOVED CELEBRITIES OF HIS ERA. By Donna Leahey Photos by Marc Rains

52 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

Will Rogers once said, “You must judge a man’s greatness by how much he will be missed.” By his standard, then, Rogers was a very great man indeed. Oklahoma’s favorite son drew his first breath Nov. 4, 1879, before Oklahoma was even a state. Born on his family’s ranch in Cherokee Territory near what is today Oolagah, William Penn Adair (better known as Will Rogers) would go on to become friends with seven U.S. presidents, be the highest-paid movie actor of his time, a beloved humorist, and a tremendous booster of the fledgling aviation industry. His daily and weekly

columns were published by more than 500 newspapers across the country. Not quite 56 years old, Rogers died Aug. 15, 1935, in another U.S. territory that was not yet a state: Alaska. Rogers and his good friend, aviator Wiley Post, were killed when an engine failed on Post’s hybrid Lockheed seaplane. Rogers’ death left behind not just a grieving widow and children, but a grieving nation as well. In 1911, Rogers bought a 20-acre ranch overlooking Claremore, Oklahoma. He intended it to be his retirement home. “Will had a reputation for buying land

with a view,” says Pat Reeder, who manages public relations for the Will Rogers Memorial Museum. “He always believed land was a good investment.” Rogers’ wife, Betty Rogers, donated the property to the State of Oklahoma in 1937, and in 1938, Rogers’ sister, Sallie Rogers McSpadden, turned the ceremonial first spade of earth on the site that would become the Will Rogers Memorial Museum. Everything about the museum is beautiful, even before you see the building itself. Sweeping green hills surrounded by an elegant fence of brick and wrought iron and thickly dotted with


lush trees frame the evocative “Riding into the Sunset” sculpture of Rogers on his favorite horse, Soapsuds. The native limestone building is lovely and peaceful enough to be a cathedral. The exterior is quiet, and the tributes to Rogers start before you enter. A likeness of his smiling face grins through an arched window. A stone likeness of him lounges in front of the stairs, so casual and comfortable you can almost see him nod a welcome to you. A series of stained-glass windows memorialize the roles Rogers was known for: stage, Indian, cowboy, movies, thinker, husband,

father, aviator, and writer. A plaque from the Cherokee Nation pays homage to Rogers, acknowledging him as a quarter Cherokee and listing his roll number. Once inside, take Reeder’s advice and use your phone to access the virtual tour. Author and actor Michael Wallis is your guide on this tour through the museum, offering insights, additional images, and information about Rogers, his life, his family, and his work. The first room, the west gallery, is a stunning collection of paintings, sculpture, and several displays from Rogers’

extensive collection of saddles. “He loved the South American countries,” says Reeder while studying a particularly lovely Nicaraguan saddle. The room is dominated by a near-lifesize painting by Wayne Cooper of Rogers at his birthplace ranch in Oolagah, mounted on a golden palomino. The image is so vivid you can easily imagine Rogers is moments away from joining you. The rotunda is home to the most famous statue of Rogers, “I Never Met a Man I Didn’t Like,” by Jo Davidson. This iconic piece of Rogers, wearing a suit, hands in pockets, and glancing down to his left was placed in the rotunda in 1938.

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Down a flight of stairs is a delightful surprise: the children’s museum. The walls

54 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

Even 80-plus years after he died, many of Rogers’ observations and theories still hold true.

“Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” “The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it in your back pocket.” “Ten men in our country could buy the whole world and 10 million can’t buy enough to eat.” “Everything is funny, as long as it’s happening to somebody else.” “When I first started to write and misspelled a few words, people said I was plain ignorant. But when I got all the words wrong, they declared I was a humorist.” “It’s great to be great, but it’s greater to be human.” “You know horses are smarter than people. You never heard of a horse going broke betting on people.” “The difference between death and taxes is that death doesn’t get worse every time Congress meets.” “Never miss a good chance to shut up.” “Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people that they don’t like.” “Rumor travels faster, but it don’t stay put as long as truth.” “When you find yourself in a hole, quit digging.” “Eventually you reach a point when you stop lying about your age and start bragging about it.”

WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM

“This would be a great world to dance in if we didn’t have to pay the fiddler.”

1720 W. Will Rogers Blvd. | Claremore 918-341-0719 willrogers.com

“Everybody is ignorant only on different subjects.”

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One gallery not-to-be-missed is “The View Through.” Beautiful dioramas take you on a trip through Rogers’ life, from his birth, through his career, and finishing with a stark view of the downed Lockheed. The dioramas are not just beautiful works of art, but an intriguing look into life a century ago.

One of the last stops on your museum tour is “The Final Journey,” which counts down the last days in Rogers’ life as he and Post traveled to Alaska in search of new topics for Rogers to write about. The gallery includes paintings, newspapers, and a few items recovered from the crash. One of the most impactful things on display is Rogers’ typewriter, which he took with him everywhere. The sturdy metal is bent, the keys locked together as if to show that Will Rogers will type no more insight or humor to entertain America.

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There are two theaters. The smaller theater plays his 21 feature-length movies while the larger allows you to choose from a selection of documentaries. A replica of his office in California occupies one gallery, while another is devoted to Rogers’ family, including his Cherokee heritage, his parents, his siblings, his wife, and his children.

Another hidden treasure is the library and archive with more than 2,000 books written by or about Rogers as well as information on Native Americans, genealogy, vaudeville, early motion pictures, and the history of Rogers’ time. The library and archives are available for researchers.

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There are 11 galleries in the museum. Artwork in the form of paintings and sculpture is displayed on every wall and in every corner.

are hand-painted to resemble Claremore in the 1900s. Children can build, climb, and play. There’s a stage with hats, boots, and costumes. There’s a replica of Rogers’ radio studio and another of the stage of the Ziegfeld Follies.

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There were only two castings of this statue. The other casting stands in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol, overlooking Congress. “It’s right outside the Speaker’s office,” says Reeder. “It may have more TV time than anything else in Washington. People often stop there to be interviewed, and you can see his boots and his hands in his pockets.” The statue was commissioned before his death and legend has it that Rogers agreed on the condition that it be placed facing the House Chamber so that he could keep an eye on it.

March 1-Nov. 10 (10 a.m.-5 p.m.)


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modern mess

Boxyard | Tulsa @mymodmess

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

ON THE BALL A WELL-SKILLED ATHLETE TRAPPED INSIDE A 6-FOOT-5, 295-POUND BODY, BROKEN ARROW’S ANDREW RAYM HAS LIVED UP TO HIS NO. 1 PROSPECT RANKING, GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL EARLY AND COMMITTING TO OU FOR FOOTBALL by john tranchina photos by marc rains

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It’s a testament both to how intense Andrew Raym’s determination is to be an elite football player, as well as how much emphasis he has always placed on excelling academically, that he will be graduating from Broken Arrow High School a semester early, in December. The outstanding offensive lineman, who helped lead the Tigers to the Class 6A-I state championship last year, the school’s first, will enroll in January at the University of Oklahoma. That will give

him a head start learning and assimilating into the Sooners’ football program for the 2020 season. The decision to attend OU took a few twists and turns but was ultimately not surprising. Leaving high school early demonstrates Raym’s commitment to his dream of playing college football, even as it costs him one last season of high school baseball. “Leaving early is all for myself,” Raym says. “In my head, I want to be great, and I want to get

to a great program like OU and continue to get bigger and get better and become the best that I can be. I’m ready to get down there as quick as I can.” His advanced academic standing enabled him to complete all the requirements to graduate a semester early and then some. “Luckily, I started taking high school-type courses in eighth grade, so I’m ahead,” Raym says. “I only need six credits to graduate, and I’m taking three college courses this semester


that will add up to six credits. So, not only am I graduating early, but I’m getting some college done as well.” His father Gerald, a former football player at Syracuse University, had a significant influence on Andrew’s attitude toward his schoolwork. “I’d say it came from how I grew up, or how my father raised me, and now it’s just a part of me,” Andrew says of his inner drive. “I like to do the best that I can at everything I do. I don’t want anything to make me look bad. No matter what it is, do your best.” “He’s an outstanding student and academics are very important, which has put him in a great position,” adds Broken Arrow head football coach David Alexander. “That doesn’t happen very often. And the football part, he was born super gifted. He’s big. He’s got great athleticism for any size. At 6-foot-5, 295 pounds, he can run, throw, catch, punt, kick and block. He’s a well-skilled athlete trapped inside a 6-5, 295-pound body.” Raym, who also played defensive tackle while growing up and hinted he might see some action there again this season, gives a lot of credit for his development into a dominant offensive lineman to two of Alexander’s assistant coaches — co-offensive coordinator Rowdy Harper and offensive line coach Mark Broyles. “I’d say it’s having the coaches I have,” he says of the key to his success. “I was surrounded by two coaches I think are probably the best coaches in Oklahoma when it comes to the kids and getting us better. And not only are they pushing us, but they make it fun to play for them. They help me critique the tiny things which help me get even better at my game. Honestly, I owe almost everything to Coach Harper and Coach Broyles.” The presence of Alexander, a former BA graduate who played

at the University of Tulsa before spending 10 years in the NFL with the Philadelphia Eagles and New York Jets as an offensive lineman, has also been beneficial. “It’s always been a little more focus with our position coaches, but when Coach A sees something that could be tweaked a little bit, he’ll let you know,” Raym says. “That man’s got 10 years of NFL experience, so I better listen to him.” As Raym made an immediate impact in his first couple of high school seasons, word traveled quickly, and he began to get besieged by colleges scouting him. Having been a fan of OU as a kid, Raym committed to the Sooners midway through his sophomore season. But as he continued to progress on the field, he also gained more and more. He’s considered the No. 1 recruit in Oklahoma for 2020. And it was all a bit overwhelming, especially at first. “I had a meeting with him and his dad about 18 months ago, and I gave them a headsup about what was going to happen,” Alexander says. “But it’s one thing, in a 30-minute conversation, for the head coach to tell you, and the reality. There for a while, it was a little overwhelming getting that much attention from that many places. “No 17-year-old is ready for the avalanche of attention that you get when you’re a national recruit. It’s tough to fathom. You can’t carry your phone with you. He’d leave it in his backpack during school last year, and he’d come out, and there would be 400 messages. I told him, ‘It’s not fair; it’s just one of the burdens that come with being an exceptional athlete.’” Raym admits he was a bit shell shocked at first, but he gradually adjusted his mindset about it all. “The first couple of years were hectic,” Raym says. “I wasn’t caught up in it, but I gave it

Andrew Raym

a little too much than I wish I would have. Honestly, the last two years, I scaled it back, and I just started living my life again. I’d respond to all the stuff whenever I had the time to do so, but I’m in high school, so I’m going to enjoy it while I’m here. “I’m a down-to-earth type of guy, too, so I didn’t make too much of it.” As his profile skyrocketed, he decided to see what other college options were available. He de-committed from Oklahoma toward the end of his sophomore year. That meant last season, as a junior, just about every highlevel football program in the nation was seeking his services (and texting him all day). After a thorough process of evaluating all his options, including multiple visits around the country, Raym ended up sticking with OU, recommitting to the Sooners in July over Georgia and Michigan.

“I de-committed at a time when I was starting to think about things from a different perspective, and I realized that there was so much more out there,” Raym says. “So I just wanted to give myself a chance to look and make sure that I was doing what was going to be best for my future. But after all the visits to every school, nothing could topple the dream of mine and make me switch up from OU.” Now that the decision is made and his future path is set, Raym is excited to enjoy his last few months of high school, which includes helping the Tigers take another shot at a state championship. “It was a great experience, obviously, but it’s a new mindset. I don’t remember last year,” says Raym. “We’re ready to go win another one this year. We can’t let ourselves get caught up in the past.”

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

CIRCLE OF LIFE AS PAINFUL AS LAST YEAR’S KNEE INJURY WAS, THE MOST CHALLENGING PART FOR PRYOR’S OLIVIA CUMMINGS WAS THE MENTAL ASPECT OF NOT BEING ABLE TO PLAY WHILE THE TEAM THRIVED WITHOUT HER. AS A SENIOR, SHE’S RETURNED TO THE SOFTBALL PITCHING RUBBER WHILE STILL FILLING THE ROLE OF ENTHUSIASTIC CHEERLEADER.

by john tranchina photos by sarah eliza roberts

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It’s taken a lot of hard work and mental fortitude, but Olivia Cummings is back in the softball pitching circle for her senior year. She is pitching well and serving as an influential leader on a young, reloading Pryor High School fastpitch softball squad that came agonizingly close to a state championship last season without her. Following a severe knee injury suffered early in the 2018 season, Cummings missed virtually the entire year, eventually battling

back in time for track and field last spring. It was difficult enduring a season watching from the sidelines as her teammates compiled a 32-6 record that included separate winning streaks of 17 and 11 games, and advanced to the Class 5A state final before falling 7-5 to Carl Albert. “It was heartbreaking, but I think it made us want it even more this year,” Cummings says of the gut-wrenching defeat in the title game. “It gave me a new love for

the game. It was tough [not to play], but I focused on cheering my teammates on and helping them improve, and try to give them as much advice as I could.” After undergoing surgery for a torn ACL, Cummings worked hard on her rehabilitation and was happy to be able to participate in track, where she does the sprinting events, although she hadn’t yet regained her trademark speed. The knee still isn’t quite 100%, but she has been cleared to play and is back in the circle.


Olivia Cummings

“It’s been good,” she says of the knee. “It still hurts me a little bit, but it’s way stronger than it was. Last spring, I had track, and I was back for that. It took me a while, and my speed’s not back yet, but it’s getting there. I’m still working on it.” She could even see a bit of a silver lining from the whole situation, as it relates to her pitching. “It honestly has helped me, because I had to get my knee stronger and it’s on my push-off leg, so it’s helping me push off harder,” she says. “It’s making my pitches a little easier to control and making me pitch faster.” As painful as the injury was, the most challenging part for Cummings to deal with was the mental aspect of not being able to play, all while the team thrived without her. She adjusted her focus to determining how else she could still help the Tigers and became somewhat of an enthusiastic cheerleader. “At first, it was really, really hard,” she says. “I cried a lot in the beginning when I first figured out I wasn’t going to be there to help my teammates, but I realized I could help them in other ways, and I could work on getting that back and trying to absorb as much as possible for this next year. So I feel like

this year, I know everything a little bit more because I paid attention last year.”

a different feeling for me, like nothing I get with any other sport or any other things I do.”

Now as a senior, Cummings has continued to fulfill even more of a leadership role, and with several key contributors to last season’s success graduating, her presence is even more vital to Pryor’s fortunes. Through the first three weeks of the season, the Tigers owned a 9-7-1 record, including an unbeaten 4-0 mark in District 5A-3, although they did stumble through a difficult stretch in which they went 1-5-1.

While she played multiple positions as an underclassman for Pryor when she wasn’t the No. 1 starting pitcher, and she still lines up at second base for the Bombers on occasion, Cummings enjoys pitching the best.

“I feel that I need to be more of a team leader, and I’ve been trying,” Cummings says. “It’s been a little bit harder with this team. It’s different from last year. Over half the team is new, so it’s like we’re learning everything new from the beginning. We’ve been struggling a lot, but I’ve been trying to work on us, on every individual part. We’re working on the things we need to fix.” Cummings has been playing softball since she was 6 years old, and has always loved it. She also plays on a club travel team based out of Tulsa called the Oklahoma Bombers-Sheldon. “I love the competitiveness, and I love the feeling I get when I just step on the field,” she says. “It’s

“I like to be doing stuff at all times on the field, and I feel more control in the game,” Cummings says of pitching. “When I’m at that position, I feel like I’m the leader, and I feel like I have to work harder to prove that I am the leader. I started pitching when I was 8 or 9 years old, and I’ve been there ever since.” In addition to softball, Cummings has also played many other sports. Growing up, she played basketball but stopped when her commitment to softball got in the way. “I quit basketball after my freshman year, just because I played softball at the end of the summer, and they had a lot of basketball stuff during the summer,” Cummings says. “And they told me I wouldn’t get to play very much if I didn’t come to any of the summer stuff. I was like, ‘I want to play, but if I’m not going to get to, I should probably just quit.’”

Cummings has also run track since the seventh grade. “I enjoy it a lot,” she says. “Last year, it was just to stay in shape a little bit, because I was slower [after the knee injury], but I’ve enjoyed it because I just love the competitiveness.” And this year, for a change, she also decided to join the Pryor Pom Squad, which performs dance routines at halftime of the Tigers’ football games. “I like music, and I just like to dance to music, so I thought it might be fun, for my senior year, to just try something new,” she says. Outside of sports, Cummings is a regular teenager, enjoying spending time with her friends, as well as her 15-year-old sister, Claudia. “I like to swim and I hang out with my sister and my friends a lot,” she says. And like many teenagers, she has yet to make up her mind about her plans. Cummings is still deciding if she is going to play softball in college next year and where she wants to enroll. “I don’t know what I want to do,” Cummings says. “I know I want to go to college, but I don’t know where or what I want to do in college. I’ve been trying to figure that out. I think I do want to play in college.”

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Hockey is back Fri oct 11 vs. Kansas City @ 7:05pm sat oct 12 vs. Allen @ 7:05pm sun oct 13 vs. rapid city @ 4:05pm sat oct 19 vs. rapid city @ 7:05pm sun oct 20 vs. rapid city @ 4:05pm tue oct 22 vs. Kansas city @ 7:05pm wed oct 30 vs. greenville @ 7:05pm thurs oct 31 vs. greenville @7:05pm

JOIN US AT ONEOK FIELD

UPCOMING HOME GAMES

Sep. 24th 7:00pm

Oct. 12th 7:00pm

call (918)-632-7825 to purchase tickets now 62 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

Oct. 5th 7:00pm

Oct. 19th 3:00pm

PH. 918-297-6808 ROUGHNECKSFC.COM


SS SPORTS SCHEDULE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FOOTBALL Home games played at Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium (Norman, Okla.)

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL

Home games played at Boone Pickens Stadium (Stillwater, Okla.) Oct. 5 | @ Texas Tech | TBA Oct. 19 | vs Baylor | TBA | Homecoming Oct. 26 | @ Iowa State | TBA –––––––––––––––––– Nov. 2 | vs TCU | TBA Nov. 16 | vs Kansas | TBA Nov. 23 | @ West Virginia | TBA Nov. 30 | vs Oklahoma | TBA

Oct. 5 | @ Kansas | TBA Oct. 12 | vs Texas* | 11a Oct. 19 | vs West Virginia | TBA Oct. 26 | @ Kansas State | TBA –––––––––––––––––– Nov. 9 | vs Iowa State | TBA Nov. 16 | @ Baylor | TBA Nov. 23 | vs TCU | TBA Nov. 30 | @ Oklahoma State | TBA –––––––––––––––––– * Dallas, Texas

TULSA ROUGHNECKS

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA FOOTBALL

Home games played at ONEOK Field (Tulsa, Okla.)

Home games played at Chapman Stadium (Tulsa, Okla.)

Oct. 5 | vs Sacramento Republic | 7p Oct. 12 | vs New Mexico United | 7p Oct. 19 | vs Reno 1868 FC | 7p

Oct. 5 | @ SMU | TBA Oct. 12 | vs Navy | TBA Oct. 19 | @ Cincinnati | TBA Oct. 26 | vs Memphis | TBA –––––––––––––––––– Nov. 2 | @ Tulane | TBA Nov. 8 | vs UCF | TBA Nov. 23 | vs Houston | TBA Nov. 30 | @ ECU | TBA

TULSA OILERS

Home games are played at BOK Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Oct. 11 | vs Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p Oct. 12 | vs Allen Americans | 7:05p Oct. 13 | vs Rapid City Rush | 4:05p Oct. 18 | @ Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p Oct. 19 | vs Rapid City Rush | 7:05p Oct. 20 | vs Rapid City Rush | 4:05p Oct. 22 | vs Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p Oct. 25 | @ Wheeling Nailers | 6:05p Oct. 26 | @ Kalamazoo Wings | 6p Oct. 29 | vs Greenville Swamp Rabbits | 7:05p Oct. 30 | vs Greenville Swamp Rabbits | 7:05p

Nov. 3 | vs Rapid City Rush | 4:05p Nov. 5 | vs Allen Americans | 7:05p Nov. 8 | @ Wichita Thunder | 7:05p Nov. 15 | vs Rapid City Rush | 7:05p Nov. 16 | vs Idaho Steelheads | 7:05p Nov. 20 | @ Rapid City Rush | 8:05p Nov. 22 | @ Rapid City Rush | 8:05p Nov. 23 | @ Rapid City Rush | 8:05p Nov. 27 | @ Wichita Thunder | 7:05p Nov. 30 | vs Allen Americans | 7:05p

DALLAS COWBOYS

KANSAS CITY CHIEFS

Home games played at AT&T Stadium (Arlington, Texas)

Home games played at Arrowhead Stadium (Kansas City, Mo.)

Oct. 6 | vs Green Bay Packers | 3:25p Oct. 13 | @ New York Jets | 3:25p Oct. 20 | vs Philadelphia Eagles | 7:20p –––––––––––––––––– Nov. 4 | @ New York Giants | 7:15p Nov. 10 | vs Minnesota Vikings | 7:20p Nov. 17 | @ Detroit Lions | Noon Nov. 24 | @ New England Patriots | 3:25p Nov. 28 | vs Buffalo Bills | 3:30p

Oct. 6 | vs Indianapolis Colts | 7:20p Oct. 13 | vs Houston Texans | Noon Oct. 17 | @ Denver Broncos | 7:20p Oct. 27 | vs Green Bay Packers | 7:20p –––––––––––––––––– Nov. 3 | vs Minnesota Vikings | Noon Nov. 10 | @ Tennessee Titans | Noon Nov. 18 | vs Los Angeles Chargers* | 7:15p –––––––––––––––––– * Mexico City, Mexico

OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER

Home games are played at Chesapeake Energy Arena (Oklahoma City, Okla.) Oct. 23 | @ Utah Jazz | 8p Oct. 25 | vs Washington Wizards | 7p Oct. 27 | vs Golden State Warriors | 2:30p Oct. 28 | @ Houston Rockets | 7p Oct. 30 | vs Portland Trail Blazers | 7p –––––––––––––––––– Nov. 2 | vs New Orleans Pelicans | 4p Nov. 5 | vs Orlando Magic | 7p Nov. 7 | @ San Antonio Spurs | 7:30p Nov. 9 | vs Golden State Warriors | 7p

Nov. 10 | vs Milwaukee Bucks | 6p Nov. 12 | @ Indiana Pacers | 6p Nov. 15 | vs Philadelphia 76ers | 7p Nov. 18 | @ Los Angeles Clippers | 9:30p Nov. 19 | @ Los Angeles Lakers | 9:30p Nov. 22 | vs Los Angeles Lakers | 7p Nov. 25 | @ Golden State Warriors | 9:30p Nov. 27 | @ Portland Trail Blazers | 9p Nov. 29 | vs New Orleans Pelicans | 7p

ALL TIMES CENTRAL // GAME DATES/TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

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GC GREEN COUNTRY SCENE

HealHounds

A NONPROFIT IS HELPING VETERANS REGAIN SHATTERED LIVES WHILE PROVIDING SECOND CHANCES TO DOGS FROM SHELTERS, RESCUES, AND THOSE NEEDING TO BE REHOMED. BY JENNIFER ZEHNDER

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GREEN COUNTRY SCENE GC

“We don’t care what the outside looks like,” he notes. “We care about the heart and soul of the dog.” Sallisaw residents Steph Nelson and her husband Rusty chose to donate their Australian

There is no cost of any kind for qualifying veterans, other than monthly maintenance of food, flea and tick treatment, and heartworm medication. SDOD provides the dog, collars, leash, crate, vest, bowls, wellness vouchers, and training equipment for each team. To be considered for the program, veterans must supply a letter from their doctor/therapist and a copy of their discharge papers. They then have an oral interview and must pass a background check. If a veteran desires to bring their dog, SDOD will evaluate the dog and decide if it’s suitable for service dog training. The veteran then undergoes 4-6 weeks of pre-pairing training to introduce them to SDOD training protocol and to go over a multitude of dog health and care info, service dog responsibilities, legalities, and team expectations. During this time, trainers have the veteran

Veterans must attend weekly training and must live within a 90-minute drive from Fayetteville or Rose Bud, Arkansas. The 12-14 months of training will include weekly attendance at SDOD training centers, regular outings with the trainers for socialization, exposure and periodic leisure activities with the dogs, such as the movies, bowling, and dining out. Each team receives weekly homework and will have regular tests that establish the team’s training accomplishments. Graduation only occurs when the dog and the veteran have met all training requirements. Certificates of accomplishments are provided for each training level, including Canine Good Citizen and Public Access certifications. “Our program requires a high level of commitment on behalf of the veteran and their family,” Wyatt admits. “However, the results of the training and the dog will give the veteran their life back, a sense of pride, independence, and an ability to navigate their world without constant fear and anxiety.”

SERVICE DOGS OF DISTINCTION servicedogsofdistinction.org

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SDOD co-founders and trainers Don Gardner and Marsha Wyatt bring 60-plus years of experience to their nonprofit founded in 2015. Gardner’s resume includes K-9 security, explosives, and drug detection training and handling, training dogs for the public, as well as breeding American pit bull terriers and British Labradors. In addition to her animal science and veterinary technician background, Wyatt has spent over 15 years in animal welfare and more than 30 years in the recovery community. She

SDOD canine prospects come from people needing to rehome dogs, shelters, and rescues. According to Gardner, their organization looks for very calm, confident, and easygoing dogs that range between 50 to 80 pounds, are 1 to 3 years old, and have as few negative behaviors as possible. Understandably, dogs that show people or animal aggression, high prey drive, excitability, destructive behaviors, and phobias are avoided. Prospects must be wellsocialized house dogs.

SDOD dogs perform many tasks depending on what the veteran requires. In addition to excellent obedience, they can provide balance, retrieve dropped items, push buttons for wheelchair doors, remind the vet to take medication, provide space in a crowded area, watch the veteran’s back, interrupt anxiety behaviors and nightmares, turn on/off lights, and carry items.

work with different service dogs in training who are waiting for pairing. They look for suitable matches among the SDOD canine trainees, but if none are found, they will look outside the program.

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Besides interrupting anxiety behaviors, reminding Bise to take his medication, and serving as a brace to steady his veteran, Tonka will spend several hours a day lying across his owner’s chest to quiet him and allow his blood pressure to come down.

“People simply don’t understand how difficult it is for many veterans to cope with their responsibilities, relationships, and loss of support from other military personnel after separation,” Wyatt explains. “Our program helps create a new normal for these veterans by engaging them through learning the training protocol, the introduction to and promise of a dog, attendance to weekly training, requiring accountability in order to receive a dog, and helping them depend on our program and the dog for relief and direction when PTSD and life are overwhelming.”

Shepherd, Ruby, to the program. The couple learned about SDOD from a pair of graduates they met in the community. A loved member of a multidog household, Ruby always seemed to be searching for more purpose and her “own” person, Steph says. Today, the dog and her veteran are proud graduates of the program, enjoying life to its fullest.

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“A lot of my issues are being in public,” Bise shares. “You can’t watch everyone, so the unexpected worries me. Tonka helps me with that. He keeps me focused on him so I don’t think about my surroundings.”

owns and operates a natural horsemanship facility, as well as equine psychotherapy business for alternative counseling. Part-time trainer Jennie Dolph completes the volunteer trio, which uses Assistance Dogs International training standards for its program.

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A mob of meerkats curiously track the man and canine combo on the other side of their enclosure. Toddlers shriek with delight at the scene as their parents and passersby meander through the zoo courtyard. Tonka, a German rottweiler, pays them little attention. His focus is on Dustin Bise at the other end of the leash. Tonka is reading his handler for signs of anxiety in the crowded area. It’s just one of his specialized duties as a Service Dogs of Distinction graduate. Before Tonka and their SDOD training, this seemingly ordinary family outing would not have been possible for the veteran Marine sergeant, who suffers from PTSD and high-blood pressure.

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Tulsa's #1 Antique Mall Since 1996! I-44 Antique and Collectibles Mall has been Tulsa's #1 Antique Store since 1996. Come and see what our more than 50 vendors have to offer in our 9,000 square feet of dealer space.

Celebrating + Years!

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BT BEYOND TULSA

Google may have helped put Pryor on the map, but don’t miss out on the great pizza, beer, movie watching, geeking out, and golf that this Mayes County community offers. By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Rob Harmon Some interesting towns in Green Country are only a stone’s throw away from Tulsa. So many of them don’t get the attention they deserve. A short 45-minute road trip, heading northeast of Tulsa, will take you to Pryor Creek (or Pryor, for short). It’s named after Nathaniel Hale Pryor, a U.S. Army sergeant who received permission to trade with the Osage Nation. He established his trading post on the Grand River in 1820, where Pryor Creek is today. Pryor once served as a stop along the famed Texas Road cattle trail, and later became a railroad stop in 1870. But over time, Pryor Creek experienced what many former railroad towns across the Midwest have experienced. The railroads became less active, trade moved, and highways shifted. But Pryor has survived these changes because it has become home to several prominent firms. The MidAmerica Industrial Park is one of the most significant industrial complexes in the U.S., housing more than 80 firms, including Fortune 500 companies like Google, which has a large data center there. Also, Pryor Creek offers cultural events that appeal to the surrounding areas — such as the annual Pryor Creek Comic Convention, held in January; Oklahoma’s massive rock festival, Rocklahoma, which takes place yearly in May; and the DAM J.A.M. Bicycle Tour, held annually in September. Here are some other attractions you can check out any time of the year you’re in the Pryor area.

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keys t the city Fat Toad Brewing Company 3 986 W. 530 Pryor Open on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, Fat Toad is one of many breweries in Green Country. But with most of those local ale makers located in Tulsa proper, it’s nice to know that other towns are serving up their own brews too. Pryor resident David Miller owns Fat Toad. The vibe of the place is welcoming and laid back, with a touch of rural class. Be sure to try their French-style

Saison de Crapaud and their American Black Ale, which are rich in homemade flavor. They don’t serve food, but you can bring your own in.

Pryor Creek Nature Trail Pryor Creek Road Chouteau Though it has a Choteau address when you Google it, the Pryor Creek Nature Trail wanders, as its name indicates, through the Pryor area. Constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the 6-foot-wide path is ideal for walkers, joggers, and bikers looking to get a workout in the beauty of the outdoors. It’s also suitable for mountain biking. There are several access points to the trail from both Pryor and Chouteau, so if you’re interested in checking it out, visit the trail’s website for more information.


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Pryor Creek Golf Club  24 E. 530 7 Pryor If you’re a golfer, it’s worth considering a trip to Pryor to test out the golf club. This 18-hole, par 72 municipal course, located in the town’s Earl Ward Park, offers a variety of putting and practice greens as well as a full course. Play a full round of golf, hit a bucket of balls on the driving range, or swing by the pro shop to add a few golfing tools to your collection. The club is also available to host tournaments, making it an excellent spot to consider for corporate or fundraising events.

Allred 5 Theater  . Graham Ave. E Pryor Most towns have a theater of some kind. What’s cool about the Allred is that it has been in existence since 1917. So, when you walk in, you feel a bit like you’ve traveled into the past, just with plenty of popcorn available. Visitors enjoy the building’s vintage feel, as well as the friendly staff. No, you won’t have the amenities you get at the Warren Theater in Broken Arrow, but you get something else worth having — a taste of historic charm and a connection to generations past.

Sam & Ella's Chicken Palace  209 S. Elliott St. 2 Pryor Yeah, we know… This one plays a bit of a joke on your eating habits. But you won’t get sick of eating here when you’re in the Pryor area. Sam & Ella’s Pryor location is essentially a little hole-in-the-wall, takeout only joint. You’ll feel like you’re visiting a small mom-and-pop eatery. They have several tasty sub sandwiches and salads, but what you want to go for is the pizza, which is decadent, thick, and filling. We like the specialty Meatza pie, topped with sausage, bacon, and ham. But you can always create your own from a whole list of topping options. (Hint: Take it over to Fat Toad, and eat it there with a flight of beer.)

Mayes County Cultural Center/Graham Community Center  N. Adair St. 6 Pryor Formerly Pryor’s city hall building, the Mayes County Cultural Center is home to the Pryor area’s Arts and Humanities Council. The Council hosts art shows and galleries, provides art classes to the community, and offers rentable studio space for artists to use. Right next door is the Graham Community Center, which hosts many local events both big and small. This is where the Pryor Creek Comic Convention is held, and if you’re a fan of geeky things, this small but vibrant convention provides an affordable experience highlighting local creators and collectors.

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RB RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER

We are tapped into what’s trending and delicious, giving you a first-hand look at where to go, what to eat, where the best cocktails are, and how to map out your culinary adventures in the 918. Whatever your mood, whatever you crave, the 918 has a restaurant or bar sure to satisfy. From local classics to chain favorites, a variety of options catering to every palate and pocketbook are available.

FEATURED LISTINGS ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

2748 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-747-4799 SEE AD | PAGE 67

ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

421 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-728-3650 SEE AD | PAGE 67

AMAZING THAI CUISINE

For those on the move, search our website database with over 200 restaurants and bars in nearly 20 categories.

1232 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-258-8424

PREVIEW918.COM/DINE-DRINK

717 S. Houston Ave., Suite 100 | Tulsa 918-585-3134

CATEGORIES AMERICAN ASIAN BAKERY BARBECUE BARS + PUBS BREAKFAST BRUNCH COFFEE DELI FINE DINING GLOBAL ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN MEXICAN PIZZA SEAFOOD SPECIALTY STEAK SWEETS 70 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

SEE AD | PAGE 45

BAXTER’S INTERURBAN GRILL

SEE AD | PAGE 47

BROWNIES

2130 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-0320 422 Plaza Court, Suite B. | Sand Springs 918-514-0222 SEE AD | PAGE 91

CAZ’S CHOWHOUSE

18 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-588-2469 SEE AD | PAGE 80

CAZ’S PUB

21 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-585-8587 SEE AD | PAGE 80

CELEBRITY RESTAURANT 3109 S. Yale Ave. | Tulsa 918-743-1800 SEE AD | PAGE 74

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

1304 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-587-4411 5320 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-749-7755 6709 E. 81st St. | Tulsa 918-960-2723 SEE AD | PAGE 91

DAVE & BUSTER’S

6812 S. 105th E. Ave. | Tulsa 918-449-3100 SEE AD | PAGE 45

DILLY DINER

402 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-938-6382 SEE AD | PAGE 5

DUST BOWL

211 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-430-3901

GOODCENTS DELI FRESH SUBS

8222 E. 103rd St. | Tulsa 918-364-7827 SEE AD | PAGE 25

HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa 800-760-6700 SEE AD | PAGE 11

BUFFET

SEE AD | PAGE 5

EL CHICO

9825 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-663-7755 SEE AD | PAGE 47

EL GUAPO’S

332 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-RITA 8161 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-728-7482

FLIP SIDE HWY. 66 DINER MCGILL’S ON 19

SEE AD | PAGE 5

ELGIN PARK

325 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-986-9910 SEE AD | PAGES 5, 63

REPLAY RIFFS SALSA

ELMER’S BBQ

4130 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-6702 SEE AD | PAGE 91

FASSLER HALL

304 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-7898 SEE AD | PAGE 5

FAT DADDY’S PUB AND GRILLE

8056 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa 918-872-6206 SEE AD | PAGE 74

FLO’S BURGER DINER 19322 E. Admiral Place | Catoosa 918-739-4858 2604 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-398-7102 SEE AD | PAGE 45

FUJI

8226 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 918-250-1821 SEE AD | PAGE 25

GEORGE’S PUB

108 N. 1st St. | Jenks 918-296-9711 SEE AD | PAGE 21

SLICE THE PERFECT CUP TRACK 5. TOBY KEITH’S I LOVE THIS BAR & GRILL

IN THE RAW

3321 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-1300 6151 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-524-0063 216 S. Main St. | Broken Arrow 918-893-6111 SEE AD | PAGE 67

INCREDIBLE PIZZA

8314 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 539-302-2681 SEE AD | PAGE 3

JASON’S DELI

8321 E. 61st St. | Tulsa 918-252-9999 1330 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-599-7777 SEE AD | PAGE 25


RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER RB JUNIPER

324 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa 918-794-1090 SEE AD | PAGE 7

KIRIN

8041 S. Mingo Road | Tulsa 918-893-8006 SEE AD | PAGE 73

KITCH

377 E Main Street | Jenks 918-528-6766 SEE AD | PAGE 21

LANNA THAI

7227 S. Memorial Drive | Tulsa 918-249-5262 SEE AD | PAGE 98

LOS CABOS

300 Riverwalk Terrace #100 | Jenks 918-298-2226 151 Bass Pro Drive | Broken Arrow 918-355-8877 9455 N. Owasso Expressway | Owasso 918-609-8671 SEE AD | PAGE 9

LOS MARIACHIS

2534 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-251-0370 11476 S. Union Ave. | Jenks 918-296-5352 SEE AD | PAGE 21

MARYN’S TAPHOUSE AND RAW BAR

400 Riverwalk Terrace, Suite 180 | Jenks 918-946-2796

MCNELLIE’S PUB

409 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-7468 7031 S. Zurich Ave. | Tulsa 918-933-5250 SEE AD | PAGE 5

MEXICALI BORDER CAFÉ 14 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-582-3383 SEE AD | PAGE 81

MIAMI NIGHTS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

6510 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-835-4522 SEE AD | PAGE 75

MIXCO

3rd and Denver | Tulsa 918-932-8571

4951 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-392-3373 8102-B S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-392-3354 8955 S. Memorial Drive | Tulsa 918-392-0770 720 N. Aspen | Broken Arrow 918-258-3354 8529 N. 129th E. Ave. | Owasso 918-376-9000

5629 E. 41st St. | Tulsa 918-622-2668 SEE AD | PAGE 75

RINCON MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA

6219 E. 61st. St | Tulsa 918-340-5520 SEE AD | PAGE 75

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa SEE AD | PAGES 27, 100

5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR FIRESIDE GRILL

SEE AD | PAGE 7

MOLLY’S LANDING

3700 N. Old Hwy 66 | Catoosa 918-266-7853

MONDO’S RISTORANTE ITALIAN

3410 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-561-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 25

OSAGE CASINO HOTEL 951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa 877-246-8777 SEE AD | PAGE 2

THUNDER BAR & GRILL

RONI PEPPO’S

MARGARITAVILLE

232 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-936-4395 SEE AD | PAGE 75

PRHYME: DOWNTOWN STEAKHOUSE

111 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-794-7700

SEE AD | PAGE 67

SWEET BOUTIQUE

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St., #13 | Tulsa 918-900-2238 SEE AD | PAGE 56

TABLE 20

1927 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-986-9120 SEE AD | PAGE 47

TAVOLO

427 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa 918-949-4498 SEE AD | PAGE 7

201 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-949-9801

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO

918-995-8080

6024 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-499-1919

R UTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

219 S. Cheyenne Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-5151

918-995-8600

S COREBOARD SPORTS BAR TIKI DINER VISIONS BUFFET

SEE AD | PAGE 74

TROPICAL RESTAURANT & BAR 8125 E. 49th St. | Tulsa 918-895-6433 SEE AD | PAGE 98

WATERFRONT GRILL

120 Aquarium Drive | Jenks 918-518-6300

SISSEROU’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT 107 N. Boulder Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-6800 SEE AD | PAGE 81

PRAIRIE BREWPUB

7846 E. 51st. St. | Tulsa 918-743-7474

SEE AD | PAGE 5

LANDSHARK BAR

NINE BAND BREWING CO. STONECREEK KITCHEN

STEAK STUFFERS USA

THE TAVERN JOHNNY ROCKETS

SEE AD | PAGE 45

SEE AD | PAGE 21

MCALISTER’S DELI

RICARDOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL

1542 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-949-4440 201 S. Main | Owasso 918-401-4343 SEE AD | PAGE 55

SEE AD | PAGE 9

YOKOZUNA

309 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-508-7676 9146 S. Yale, Ste. 100 | Tulsa 918-508-7676 SEE AD | PAGE 5

YUTAKA GRILL AND SUSHI BUFFET

6560 E. 51st St. | Tulsa 918-921-3400 SEE AD | PAGE 67

SEE AD | PAGE 7

SEE AD | PAGE 31

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LP LAUNCH PAD

Plan to

Plan

So, you’ve started a business. Perhaps it’s a side hustle you do in your spare time. Maybe it’s a hobby that has grown into something more profitable. Perhaps it’s a full-fledged business you want to grow. But that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve positioned yourself to be as effective as you can be. Success happens only if you have a plan. A business plan. Did you feel a shiver run down your spine? That’s no surprise. The

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THE IDEA OF CRAFTING A BUSINESS PLAN OFTEN GIVES NEW BUSINESS OWNERS A SENSE OF DREAD, EVEN IMPENDING DOOM. BUT IT’S NECESSARY. By Michele Chiappetta

idea of crafting a business plan often gives new business owners a sense of dread, even impending doom. Doing strategic planning isn’t high on many people’s lists. But it’s necessary. Yes, you read that right. These days, it may be common to hear people say business plans are out of date, old school, or unneeded. Others say you only need a business plan if you’re looking for a loan or investor funding. But there are plenty of other advantages to writing

down your vision, setting some goals, and establishing strategies that can help you move forward in business. Here’s a look at some of those advantages, and how you can use them to help your small business soar in the coming year.

WHAT EXACTLY IS A BUSINESS PLAN, ANYWAY? A business plan is an overview of where you’re going. It’s something you put in writing, spelling out your business goals, the methods

you plan to use to reach those goals, and the time frame you’re giving yourself to accomplish those goals. There are several forms this type of strategic plan can take. You can make it lengthy and detailed, or big picture and limit it to one page. The point, though, is to make it tangible by putting it on paper in some form. In a sense, it’s a lot like an entrepreneurial application of the adage, “Write the vision and make it plain so that people can pursue it.” If you


make it clear to yourself and those who work for you what you’re doing, how and when, it’s more likely you’ll arrive at your destination — or recognize when you’ve gone off-road and need to backtrack.

THINK OF IT AS A ROADMAP Have you seen Pirates of the Caribbean? As soon as someone invokes the rules of parlay, the pirate captain reminds everyone, “It’s more of a guideline than a rule.” This isn’t just true of sailing the Seven Seas; it’s also true of your business plan. Those notes you make on paper are meant not to lead you every step of the way, but rather to help you cast a vision so you’ll have a sense of where you want to go. Like any map, you may realize the route you planned to take has roadblocks or perhaps fails to take you someplace you wanted to visit. Business plans aren’t set in stone. You can always change your goals, adapt to the needs of the marketplace, or pivot to ensure you stay profitable.

USE IT TO STAY ON TRACK The day-to-day business grind can be rough. Deadlines, client meetings, questions from employees, supplier problems, and a whole lot more can easily distract you. Even personal stuff, like a family emergency or car problems, can derail you and get you off-track. Keep gathering those molehills, and you end up with a mountain to climb, right? This is why a business plan comes in handy. You can always look to it and use it to help you recognize when you’re at risk of failing to meet your revenue goals. So, don’t just write it down. Review it regularly, too, so you can assess how well you’re doing and where to make tweaks. Those little corrections, over time, keep you heading in

the right direction so you can achieve long-term goals.

LET IT CLARIFY YOUR MARKETING STRATEGY Your business plan looks at who you are, how you compare to your competitors, how you stand out, and where you’d like to be in the next five to 10 years. The old, “where do you see yourself in five years” question doesn’t just happen in job interviews. It occurs in entrepreneurship too. The point is, to get where you want to be in five years, you have to be able to articulate what you do, who you serve, what makes you unique, and how you can beat your competition. It helps to do a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats). And you can use all this information to craft your elevator pitch so you can effectively connect to potential clients.

LET IT KEEP YOU ACCOUNTABLE If you own a small business, its success or failure mainly lies in your own hands. Mentors and coaches are great, and so are spouses, friends, and business partners. But accountability to your business goals is something that is ultimately up to you. When you have something in writing that you’re heading toward, and you check in regularly to see how you’re doing, it’s a lot easier to recognize when you’re not keeping your word to yourself to be successful. After all, you’re in business to be a success. Why not equip yourself to be as productive and effective as possible? Use your business plan to remind yourself, when the going gets tough, that your goals matter and your success is waiting for you.

A nice and comfortable christian enviroment for the children and parents.

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Experience an Arabian horse during an educational T.A.I.L. tour — then stay for the show. Free admission! T.A.I.L. Tour Hours: Friday, Oct. 18 – 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 – 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20 – 2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21 – 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22 – 6 p.m. RSVP: Youth@arabianhorses.org

2019 U.S. National Arabian & Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show October 18-26, 2019 Expo Square - Tulsa, OK ArabianHorses.org/usn

74 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

See our feature on page 40


Where the locals have been going since 1975!

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www.ricardostulsa.com 5629 E. 41st • Tulsa, OK PREVIEW918.COM 75


HF HEALTH + FITNESS

Office IF YOU’RE STUCK BEHIND A DESK ALL DAY, IT CAN BE HARD TO FIND TIME TO EXERCISE. BUT FAILING TO DO SO CAN HAVE SERIOUS CONSEQUENCES. BY LINDSAY MORRIS Many people work desk jobs, which is not an ideal situation for your health. And nearly half of America has gained weight at their current job with 26% having gained more than 10 pounds, and 11% having gained more than 20 pounds. That’s proof enough that it’s time to start paying attention to what your sedentary body is trying to tell you. Sitting all day can lead to a higher chance of developing heart disease, joint pain, and other health-related problems. According to WebMD, in a study between transit drivers, who sit most of the day, and conductors or guards, who don’t, those who sat were about twice as likely to get heart disease as those who stood. Sitting all day has also been tied to a shorter life

76 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

span and a greater likelihood of developing dementia, diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. But we have to make money, and many of our jobs entail work on a computer. How can we stay healthy even when we’re tied to a desk? TAKE HOURLY BREAKS Hours of working at your desk can take a toll on your body. Taking breaks helps you improve focus, so they actually can help your job performance. Long stretches of work can be rough on your body. Take short breaks to ensure you maintain focus and keep you from feeling drained. You’ll get more done and have more energy to stay active when you’re not behind the desk the entire day.

If you’re someone who experiences headaches or blurred vision after staring at your computer screen for too long, your eyes are craving a severe break. Try taking a break every 20 minutes by looking at something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds. This helps your eyes relax after looking at a digital screen or reading for an extended period of times. STRETCH OR MOVE IN PLACE Stretching at your desk can eliminate stress and offers many health benefits, according to the Mayo Clinic. If you’re unsure how to stretch while sitting, Google “deskercise,” and you’ll find plenty of great stretch and movement ideas you can do right

at your desk. Your co-workers may think it’s a little weird at first, but maybe eventually they’ll join you. And your body will thank you later. GET MORE STEPS IN Are you walking 10,000 steps a day? That is the ideal goal for healthy adults. Getting 10,000 steps can be challenging to achieve if you’re sitting at your desk all day. A great way to get closer to 10,000 steps is to take the stairs. You can also park in a spot further from your office. Take the “scenic route” when you’re going to a meeting or going to talk to a colleague. WORK STANDING UP A Los Angeles Times study revealed that a person who works at a desk job might burn 300


HEALTH + FITNESS HF calories during a workweek, while those in jobs that require physical effort can burn 2,000 calories more. Standing desks are a growing trend, and some people even enjoy working at a treadmill desk. Even if you opt for a traditional desk, standing frequently and taking standing stretch breaks will help you burn more calories. EAT SMALLER MEALS MORE OFTEN Hunger is your worst enemy when trying to stay healthy. When you’re hungry, you can quickly lose focus and become more prone to gorging on lousy food. When you’re at the office, junk food is often readily available and can lead to a loss of energy and overall declining health. When you’re starving and rushed to finish up an assignment or make it to a meeting on time, you’re more likely to settle for a quicker and less healthy lunch. This is where meal prepping and planning comes in handy. Additionally, try not to eat lunch alone at your desk. Instead, find a conference room and eat lunch with a co-worker. STRIVE FOR GOOD POSTURE Good ergonomics and posture are vital to good health. To check your posture, stand against a wall and make sure your neck, spine, and lower spine all touch the wall. Sitting for long periods can compress your lumbar spine, the portion of spin in your lower back. It can start to bend and flex, leading to strain or weakness. To counteract that, try to sit with your stomach tucked in. That works your stomach muscles, and strong stomach muscles help strengthen the back.

When sitting, make sure your thighs are parallel to the floor, and the armrests are just slightly below your elbows (measure this by sitting in the chair and dropping your arms to your sides). Keyboard height should be 1 to 2 inches below your elbows so that your hands while typing, are in a neutral position. Additionally, although it’s a hard habit to break, try not to cross your legs — instead keep both feet flat on the floor in front of you. MAKE EXERCISE A WORK ACTIVITY Are there ways you can integrate exercise into your career? Some companies have competitive exercise programs that reward you if you walk a certain amount or lose weight. If your job includes networking, is there a way to incorporate exercise, such as golf or tennis, into your networking game? DRINK PLENTY OF WATER Your mom has been telling you this your whole life. But you need to hear it. When it comes to water intake, shoot for twice your body weight in ounces each day. Water serves as an appetite suppressant, helping you say no to those office doughnuts with more confidence. Trips to the water cooler will also give you an excuse to get up from your desk. USE YOUR LUNCH BREAK It can be tempting when you’re overloaded with tasks to work through your lunch break. But you’ll be more productive after getting a mental and physical break away from your desk. Go outside or take a stroll around the building. For many, lunchtime is the only time of the day you have for yourself. Take advantage of it.

PREVIEW918.COM 77


ET EATS + TREATS

e f i L t ’ n i A eet? w S by SARAH HERRERA photos by SARAH HERRERA

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EATS + TREATS ET

TRY THESE SNACKS ON A CHILLY DAY OR AT A HARVEST‑THEMED PARTY. THERE IS SOMETHING FOR EVERY FALL FANATIC TO MUNCH ON AND ENJOY AS THEY SAY GOODBYE TO THEIR SUMMER BODS.

KRISPY FALL LEAVES There’s nothing like taking a classic and adding a little seasonal spin. Whether you love Rice Krispy Treats for the sweet or the sticky, this autumn version won’t disappoint. INGREDIENTS:  cups butter 3 3 cups of Rice Krispies cereal 3 cups of mini marshmallows Food coloring Leaf cookie cutter(s)

DIRECTIONS:

Fall means apples, pumpkins, and everything you can make out of them. Plus, comfort food dishes and warm drinks. But it’s also a time to kick-start your upcoming diet cheat with tasty treats and seasonal goodies. Whether your days are full of classrooms and snacking, autumn décor and festive party preparations, or even spooky adventuring and childish whimsy, there are endless opportunities to find the right dish for the right day. Don’t know where to start? We’ve got you covered. Some prefer ooey-gooey goodies, others enjoy sweet and salty snacks, and some may favor specifically seasonal creations. No matter your hankering, craving, or aching, there is a fall eat and treat for you. Once you find one (or two, or 10), enjoy it alongside festivities like chilly hayrides, afternoons of pumpkin carving, or even harvest festivals. Or stick with the simple, and spruce, season, or spice up any one of the otherwise monotonous days of the week. Fall should be fun, so choose a treat and enjoy yourself.

PEANUT BUTTER PUMPKINS For seasons such as this, we’ll take any excuse to turn a treat into a “pumpkin.” Pair it with peanut butter, and you’ve officially perfected autumn. INGREDIENTS:  cup creamy peanut butter 1 ½ cup butter, softened 3-4 cups powdered sugar

 range food coloring O Chocolate chips, optional

DIRECTIONS:

1. Beat the butter and peanut butter until smooth. 2. Add powdered sugar until dough forms. 3. Add orange food coloring and mix until you reach the desired color. 4. Scoop out tablespoons of the mixture and roll into balls. Place on a tray lined with baking paper. 5. Using a toothpick, press into the sides of the balls making creases to get a pumpkin shape. 6. Repeat for all balls. 7. Use chocolate chips for stems. 8. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

1. Melt the butter in a large pan on medium heat. Add the marshmallows and stir until melted. 2. To tint the Rice Krispies mixture, add food coloring to the melted marshmallow mixture before you add the cereal. 3. Once the mixture is cool enough to handle, flatten mixture and cut pieces using leaf cookie cutters. 4. Press the treat out of the cookie cutter and repeat until you have the desired amount of leaves. 5. Place the treats on a piece of parchment paper to cool.

HARVEST HASH Sugar, spice, and everything nice is an understatement when it comes to this treat. Not only is this snack mix full of sweet and salty excellence, but it can be tweaked to your liking. INGREDIENTS:  eese’s Pieces (or M&Ms) R Bugles Chex Mix

Candy corn Puppy chow Any other preferred goodies

DIRECTIONS:

1. Pour contents of each bag of goodies into a large bowl. 2. Mix with hands or utensils and enjoy.

PREVIEW918.COM 79


TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

80 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019


TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

Live Music

Check Website for Dates!

PREVIEW918.COM 81


FT FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Pasta-bilities All the

BECAUSE OF ITS VERSATILITY, THERE’S A PASTA DISH FOR EVERYONE OUT THERE FROM ZITI TO SPAGHETTI AND FROM LASAGNA TO LINGUINE. DO YOU NEED MORE REASONS TO LOVE PASTA? BY TIFFANY DUNCAN

Why are there so many different types, anyway? The first fundamental to grasp about the pasta world is that the way most Americans view and consume pasta is vastly different from the way it is and has been viewed in Italy for centuries. In America, pasta is likely just the dried, cheap package of noodles that gets thrown in the basket for a quick weeknight meal. But in Italy, pasta is seen with almost religious reverence, as the preparation and consuming of it is synonymous with family and tradition.

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As we head into October and the fall season, that means it’s time to start getting excited about comfort foods again — all the rich, creamy, cheesy dishes that just sounded too heavy in the hotter months of the year. For most of us, that

means dishes made with pasta, pasta, and more pasta.

Many commercially familiar dried pastas (pasta secca) originated from their fresh counterparts (pasta fresca) in various regions from around Italy, dependent upon the variances and customs of the area. For example, ziti — which looks a bit like penne pasta, but with the ends cut off in a straight line rather than diagonally — comes from the word “zitelle,” that means “single woman,” or “spouse.” In some parts of Italy, it is often served as the first course at a bridal banquet. It also derives its shape from a time when there weren’t pots big enough to fit long ribbons of pasta in, thus accounting for

their “broken” or “cut” shape. In southern regions of Italy, the breaking of this pasta is still done today as a traditional family ritual.

But with over 350 different pasta types and about four times that many different names, how does one make sense of it all? We are here to help you.

In Italy, pasta is “slow food,” something to be labored over surrounded by family, laughing and talking and gossiping together in the kitchen. It is also important to note that in Italy, the noodles are the real focus rather than the sauce. Pasta is seen as an art form like anything else, and families take great pride in their recipes and pasta shaping abilities. Once you start to view pasta in this way, one can begin to understand how

molding and shaping pasta in different shapes and sizes is no different than a painter setting himself apart by painting in a particular style, or a poet utilizing a unique meter to achieve a melodic cadence. Another reason that accounts for the many different kinds of pasta is that some noodle shapes hold chunkier, heartier sauces better, whereas others are more suited to a thinner sauce. For example, a simple noodle like fettuccine or angel hair is good for showing off a high-quality olive oil or wine sauce, while something chunkier like cavatappi has nooks, ridges, and crannies to court a hearty meat sauce well.

When was pasta introduced in America? The introduction of pasta to America is often credited to Thomas Jefferson. During his travels in France, he encountered a dish called


“macaroni,” which had been the generic inventory word that Sardinian shipping agents used for all kinds of dried pasta that was shipped throughout Europe. (Incidentally, this is also the same “macaroni” that is tied up in the meaning of the ditty “Yankee Doodle.” Google it sometime; it’s pretty interesting.) Jefferson was so taken with the dish that he had boatloads of it dispatched back to America, and ordered many pounds of it annually after that.

Becoming a pasta apprentice Just in case you are having some Eat Pray Love fever dream of quitting your day job to rush off to Italy and become a pasta apprentice in some quaint Italian village … not so fast. You’ll have to get in line. Author Bill Buford, who spent a lot of time working in elite New York City restaurants, recounts in his memoir Heat that it’s not as easy as one might think to show up and be a pasta “slave” in Italy. He writes, “Slavery is so much the rage that you now need permission to be one: there are slave regulations, slave visas, a protocol, and a slave stamp you get in your passport that you get only by applying to the Italian immigration authorities, supported by a written ‘contract’ with a restaurant that includes a pledge not to pay you for the work it has already agreed to make you do.”

Popular pasta dish origins PASTA PUTTANESCA:

This dish might sound fancy, but roughly translated, “puttanesca” actually means “lady of the night,” or “prostitute.” Popular lore holds that it’s so fast and easy

to make that it could easily be prepared between — ahem — clients. But food historians say that this is unlikely and that the real reason behind the name is probably that the smell of this dish is so pungent and tempting that it is likened to the scent of a “lady of the night.” (Now you have a fun little dinner anecdote the next time you see it on the menu somewhere.)

LIVE ON STAGE!

TORTELLINI: Given their small, delicate round shape, it perhaps isn’t surprising to learn that an alternative name for these little guys is “ombelico,” meaning “belly button.” One legend holds that an innkeeper provided lodging to Venus, the goddess of love. This voyeuristic innkeeper peeked at her through the keyhole to her room and was so struck by what he saw that he immediately rushed to the kitchen to create pasta in the shape of her perfect naval.

Another urban legend from the 17th century says that tortellini’s suggestive shape came from a cook who used the naval of a Bolognese woman to mold the pasta in. Whatever the truth is, this pasta holds an extraordinary place in the heart of many Italian families, as it takes a full day in the kitchen elbow to elbow with each other to roll out, shape, stuff, and cook. Traditionally, this dish was prepared and eaten in Bologna and other regions of Northern Italy only at Christmas and other major holidays. This was because in times of hardship, the ingredients used to make the stuffing — like pork, chicken, and prosciutto — were costly and hard to come by. Many old-world tortellini recipes also call for mortadella, which is a fatty-pork mousse stuffed into a casing (this is also where we get Americanized “bologna” from).

See our feature on page 32

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Andolini's Pizzeria 1522 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA 500 RIVERWALK TERRACE | JENKS 12140 E. 96TH ST. | OWASSO 222 S. MAIN ST. | BROKEN ARROW

Uniquely and exceptionally crafted pizza and pasta are what you get with every visit to any of the Andolini’s locations. Of course, their outstanding food truck is fantastic as well. The sensational pizzas contain the choicest ingredients, matching an already fantastic dining experience with exceptional service. Mouthwatering garlic knots or fresh bruschetta, for starters, are wonderful in and of themselves. Baked pasta, strombolis, calzones, and more fill the menu to the brim, which is how you’ll always feel at this incredible restaurant.

BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA AND ROB HARMON

We went on a quest that took us through mountains of pasta, gallons of gravy, plates of pizza, and more Limoncello than can be healthy. Here are the 40 greatest spots to eat Italian food in Green Country. America’s insane love affair with its Italian cuisine is as alive and kicking as ever. Green Country’s enthusiastic restaurant scene is evidence of that. If you don’t think Tulsans appreciate Italian cooking, think again. We love it all — pizza out the wazoo; plate after plate of bruschetta; lasagna layer upon layer; spicy meatballs; veal parmigiana — all served with tons of zesty Italian sausage and garlic, garlic and, dare we say, more garlic. Let’s not forget all our favorite cheeses piled on top — provolone, gorgonzola, ricotta, and mozzarella, to name just a few. Is your mouth watering yet? Well, let us tempt you with what comes after you eat your

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dinner. We’re talking the good stuff, like cannolis, gelato, and zeppoles. These are desserts we thank the heavens for. And remember, you can top it all off with excellent Italian wine, amaretto, Sambuca or a quick shot of espresso. So what were our classifications for an Italian restaurant? A prevalence of Italian or Italian-inspired dishes on the menu? Of course. We were OK with pizzerias. We were also good with restaurants that are Italian-inspired. A great Italian restaurant has many of the same standards that make any restaurant great: impeccable service, high-quality food

sourced from the finest purveyors, creative-yet-classic preparation and craftsmanship, and an overall experience that leaves you happy and content in the fact that you just ate a world-class meal. Some of our favorite Italian restaurants made their reputations on outstanding wine lists. Others go beyond Tuscan or Roman cuisine to acquaint diners with the pleasures of culinary traditions from other regions of the bootshaped country. What’s certain is that each of these 40 restaurants is a destination worth checking off your list.

Elgin Park 325 E. M.B. BRADY ST. | TULSA

You’ll enjoy watching sports to your heart’s content on any one of Elgin Park’s huge televisions, but don’t think that’s all this place is about. The pizza and Italian dishes rival anything else in town. Among our favorites is the white clam pizza, a clam and pecorino delight. The traditional New Haven or barbecue bacon pizzas are just as fabulous. Grab yourself an Italian sandwich with mortadella, capicola, salami, pepperoni, pepperoncini aioli, lettuce, tomato, onion, all on toasted sourdough bread and you will be in heaven. Try any number of local brews and, baby, you’re set.


Bobby O's Slices + Pies 1502 E. 11TH ST. | TULSA

A vital part of Tulsa’s Meadow Gold District, Bobby O’s took an auto shop built in 1939 and transformed it into a lively restaurant that serves up classic pizza. You’ll enjoy huge slices cut from thin-crust 24-inch pies, just like you might in New York City. What makes Bobby O’s stand out is the great variety of toppings to choose from, a plethora of meats, veggies and cheeses from the traditional red sauce, pepperoni and mozzarella to andouille sausage, capocollo, blue cheese, carrots, and more. There are also gluten-free options, calzones, breadsticks, and salads to enjoy. Signature topping combos include the Roasted Root 66 (caramelized onions, Italian sausage, and feta), Homeslice (pepperoni, roasted red peppers, Romano, spinach, and feta), and Queen of Savoy (Roma tomatoes, basil, Romano, and mozzarella).

Carrabba's Italian Grill

Incredible Pizza

11021 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

Any day of the week is special at Carrabba’s Italian Grill, but check this out: After 3 p.m. on Mondays, you can have your choice of three different entrées, along with a salad and a dessert for a great price. On Tuesdays, Carabba’s breaks out some of the restaurant founder’s favorite dishes, including the succulent chicken piccata with lemon sauce. Serious yum. Try Wednesday evening’s hard-to-beat deals on pizza and wine. Then, of course, there’s Sunday, where you can enjoy endless glasses of blackberry, peach or red sangria all day for $12.99 when you purchase an entrée.

8314 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

Cheri Ann's Trattoria 423 N. MAIN ST. | BROKEN ARROW

In Broken Arrow’s Rose District, Cheri Ann’s Trattoria awaits your visit. Its charming, colorful building with its cozy seating is reminiscent of what you might find in a little village in Europe, but the meals are what you’d expect anywhere in modern America. The menu is simple and reliable, with choices like spaghetti and meatballs, farfalle with white cream sauce, a house flatbread, chicken parmigiana, and a few other treats you’ll want to try. It’s only open for dinner Tuesday through Saturday, and during the afternoon on Sundays, so be sure to plan your visit carefully so that you don’t miss out.

How much fun can a person have eating pizza and playing games in one place? We’re pretty sure you already know if you’ve tried America’s Incredible Pizza before. Not only do they have a crazy-cool arcade of electronic games, but these guys also have an indoor roller coaster, for goodness’ sake. The entire 150-item food buffet is full of all kinds of American-style Italian food, including their incredible pizza. Special order a glutenfree pizza with all the toppings of your choice and you will thank us. It’s so good. Enjoy birthdays and special events all while eating fantastic pizza and having an absolute blast.

Hideaway Pizza 100 SW FRANK PHILLIPS BLVD. | BARTLESVILLE 7877 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA 1150 N. 9TH ST. | BROKEN ARROW 1419 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA 5966 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA 12903 E. 96TH ST. | OWASSO 10461 S. MEMORIAL DR. | TULSA 7549 S. OLYMPIA AVE. | TULSA

A Tulsa favorite of locals, Hideaway Pizza is a staple restaurant when you want reliable pizza and Italian food that sticks closely to American standards. The sauce is made fresh daily, and you can choose from 26 specialty and seasonal pies, meaning there’s something tempting for just about everyone. Fans love the fried mushroom appetizer. Beyond classics like pepperoni and Sicilian pizzas, you can enjoy Tulsa-area specials like the Hurricane, which tops thick crust with Hideaway red sauce, cheddar, mozzarella, regular bacon, Canadian bacon, green bell pepper, jalapeno, and pineapple. Or try some of the baked pasta dishes, like the Bac’n Chick’n Mac’N’ Cheese — an Oklahoma classic if ever there was one.

Mondo's Ristorante Italian 3410 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Does it get any better than feeling like you just sat down to an authentic Italian dinner on the Lower West Side of New York City? At Mondo’s family-run restaurant, that’s pretty much what you get in Tulsa’s “Lower” Brookside on Peoria. Mondo’s homemade ravioli or baked tortellini are sure to take your taste buds straight back to the old country, or at the very least, the Big Apple. Customer favorites include the hero sandwiches, lasagna, the antipasto (which is generously portioned), and the pizzas, which are wood-fired and tasty. Don’t forget a cannoli for dessert. The filling is authentically Italian in style, and the pastry is filled just before serving so that it retains its crispy exterior. The meal portions are ample and satisfying, just like you’d get from an Italian grandmother. Menu items like salad and bread are included with meals, rather than extras.

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Napa Flats Wood-Fired Kitchen 9912 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA

Napa Flats is casually elegant, warmly sophisticated, and ideal for a night out with friends or loved ones. Located on the east bank of the Arkansas River, across from the Jenks Aquarium, the scenery provides diners with a peaceful view. There’s even an outdoor seating area which features lush landscaping and an up-close outlook onto the river. Owner John Crancer actively walks the dining room floor to make sure his customers are happy. That adds up to impeccable service, a beautiful and comfortable dining area, and delicious pizzas, pasta and more. Most dishes feature something baked or seared in the kitchen’s wood-fire pizza oven and grill. Pair anything with a fabulous Chianti, pinot noir, Prosecco or other Italian wine, and you’ll be golden. The Angus steaks at Napa Flats are grilled to perfection and served with delicious garlic mashed potatoes, roasted green beans, and Argentine-style chimichurri sauce.

Prossimo Ristorante 1550 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

ol'Vine 3523 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

In the heart of Tulsa’s Brookside District, ol’Vine offers California-inspired, seasonal food prepared on a wood-fire grill, all in a pleasantly open, bright dining room sandwiched between two of the best patios in town. It’s a surefire recipe for a great dining experience. Every recipe on the menu is influenced by owner Don Jones’ approach to cooking, meaning you get “layers of flavors” in every bite. Customers can expect fresh takes on classic Sonoma dishes like citrus and garlic chicken, tomato bisque, and pasta primavera, as well as wild mushroom gnocchi, woodgrilled Angus filet, and salmon tamales served with sweet corn relish. Customers can mix and match the main dish of their choice with selections from a sizable list of tasty sides, so that every time you sit down, you can craft the meal of your choosing. The wine and drink selection has been carefully curated by Jones and his team to pair well with meals.

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The mood is intimate, making Prossimo Ristorante a perfect spot for a date night or special family gathering, and the food is all made to order. The emphasis on high-end service and preparation is beyond fabulous. No matter what you order, know that the chefs use authentic cooking methods. The menu provides a tour of Italy, with meats, fish, and veggies inspired by the country’s Amalfi Coast. Before you dig into the entrée selections, you need to try the tableside fresh mozzarella. In addition to beautifully presented and tasting pasta dishes, including duck confit ravioli and spaghetti with Sunday gravy, the Cherry Street destination has plenty of options from land and sea. For those looking for something not found in many of the area’s Italian restaurants, check out the grilled octopus with sausage or giant prawn with jalapeno pesto. Meat dishes include veal chop parmigiana, pork chop marsala, and roast chicken verde.

Naples Flatbread Kitchen and Bar 201 S. DENVER AVE. | TULSA

Want sandwiches done a notch above the average deli? Head on over to Naples, which serves up delightfully inventive flatbreads with Italian flair. Try some cheesy Alfredo bread or Italian chili for starters, and then explore the flatbread menu, which features options like the Spinarti (spinach, marinated artichokes, caramelized onions, blistered grape tomatoes, ricotta, mozzarella, and balsamic glaze). They also serve pizzas, calzones, salads, paninis, burgers, mac ‘n’ cheeses, and pasta dishes.

Roni Peppo's OSAGE CASINO HOTEL | 951 W. 36TH ST. | TULSA

Next time you take a trip out to Tulsa’s Osage Casino Hotel for some gaming or a concert, why not make time for a meal at one of their restaurants? When you’re craving pizza, visit Roni Peppo’s. It’s fun for the whole family. Design a custom pizza with your choice of regular or gluten-free crust topped with a variety of options in cheeses, sauce, meats, and veggies. You can also choose from soups, salads, and sub sandwiches. And you can fit in plenty of fun before and after because the casino has so much to offer.


Slice HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA | 777 W. CHEROKEE ST. | CATOOSA

Grab yourself some pizza by the slice or snag an entire pie for you and your friends at Slice, Hard Rock Casino’s delicious pizza parlor. Ask anyone who’s tried it; this pizza is darn good. The crust has just the right amount of both crunch and doughiness to it. The sauce tastes so fresh, you’d think they grow the tomatoes out back. And the meat and cheese have so much flavor, you’ll have a hard time eating one piece.

Also Check Out Andolini's Sliced 114 S. DETROIT AVE. | TULSA

28 E. BROADWAY ST. | SAND SPRINGS

Biga 4329 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Dalesandro's 1742 S. BOSTON AVE. | TULSA

DaVinci Italian Restaurant

Tavolo 427 S. BOSTON AVE. | TULSA

The freshly made pasta will make you a Tavolo believer. Try it in the linguine and meatballs, one of the most popular dishes on the menu. The fresh pasta adds a hearty texture, and the meatballs must be seen — and tasted — to be believed. Fantastic is a word that can get overused fast when discussing the menu at Tavolo. Crispy chicken Marsala? Fantastic. The spaghetti Bolognese? Fantastic. The flatbreads? Fresh and fantastic. For another dish as beautiful as it is delicious, consider the linguine carbonara. A generous serving of Tavolo’s fresh linguini with pancetta and broccolini in a rich, creamy carbonara sauce surround a perfect, golden egg yolk. It’s like a sunrise you can eat, and every bit as warm and pretty. Another standout menu star is the garlic herb chicken.

Napoli's Italian Restaurant NYC Pizza 4775 S. HARVARD AVE. | TULSA

Oliveto Italian Bistro 8922 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | TULSA

Pete's Place 120 S. WEST 8TH ST. | KREBS

1958 OK-66 | CLAREMORE

Pie Hole Pizzeria

East Village Bohemian Pizzeria

2708 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

818 E. 3RD ST. | TULSA

Roseanna's Italian Food 205 E. WASHINGTON ST. | KREBS

201 S. BRADY ST. | CLAREMORE

Russo's Coal-Fired Italian Kitchen

Gino's

Savastano's Pizzeria

Francesco's

139 W. SHAWNEE ST. | MUSKOGEE

Jimmy's New York Pizzeria

8941 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA 8211 E. REGAL BLVD. | TULSA

Stonehorse Cafe 1748 UTICA SQUARE | TULSA

Tucci's

7123 S. 92ND E. AVE. | TULSA

Johnny Carino's

1344 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

6364 E. 41ST ST. | TULSA

Umberto's

La Roma

3147 S. HARVARD AVE. | TULSA

6027 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA

Uncle Vinny's 322 W. KENOSHA ST. | BROKEN ARROW

Leona's Italian Restaurant 200 S. BROADWAY ST. | POTEAU

Luigi's Italian Restaurant 104 E. ROGERS BLVD. | SKIATOOK

Upper Crust Wood Fired Pizza 9110 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA

Villa Ravenna 6526 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA

Luigi's Italian Restaurant

Zio's Italian Kitchen

3822 E. FRANK PHILLIPS BLVD. | BARTLESVILLE

7111 S. MINGO ROAD | TULSA 8112 S. LEWIS AVE. | TULSA

Ti Amo Ristorante 6024-A S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA

219 S. CHEYENNE AVE. | TULSA

Tulsans are quite familiar with Ti Amo’s award-winning cuisine and top-shelf wait staff. Whichever location you choose, the dining experience is just what you can expect from a high-end Italian kitchen. Some of the best bruschetta you’ll ever eat is brought out the moment you sit down, compliments of the house. Try the outstanding linguini pescatore or the delicious shrimp scampi. Any of their perfectly cooked and presented menu items will make your day. With a wine list that complements the menu, this is quite a choice for anyone wishing to have a truly Italian experience.

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MORE THAN BREAKFAST, MORE THAN LUNCH, AND MORE THAN A QUIET LITTLE COFFEE ROOM UPSTAIRS, MIDTOWN’S TABLE 20 IS GOURMET DONE CASUALLY AT A WALLETFRIENDLY PRICE INSIDE A LITTLE BIT OF HISTORY. By Donna Leahey Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

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Cliches and phrases like “hidden gem,” “charming,” “friendly,” “unique,” and “special” get thrown around a lot in describing restaurants. Then you come upon a place that reminds you what those words mean. Head to midtown, to 21st Street and Harvard Avenue. It’s a casual and unassuming area. There’s a QuikTrip on the corner. And, one block north, there’s a little two-story brick house with a wooden sign in front proclaiming “Table 20.” And

there it is. A hidden gem in midtown. A little restaurant that’s charming, friendly, unique, and special.

progression. The house was perfect for a sandwich shop,” she says. “And being raised in Tulsa, this area is home to me.”

Nicole LaFortune, Table 20’s chef and co-owner, always wanted a sandwich shop. She’s been in the foodservice industry for 30 years. “I’ve been a dishwasher, a baker, and when I was raising a family, I worked as a lunch lady.” LaFortune earned a degree in culinary arts from OSU Tech in Okmulgee. “It seemed a natural

The house is what gives Table 20 much of its character. It was built in the 1920s and has been in LaFortune’s family for a long time. “It was a tearoom before us,” says LaFortune. “Before that, it was a hair salon. It’s been a jewelry store. And a family lived here before that.” The age of the house shows in the beautiful details like


Harvard Breakfast

the ceramic rose inlays on the brick fireplace in the dining room. “I’ve been told Frankoma did the inlay.” The walls are decorated with family art created by LaFortune’s mother, including a picture of a younger Nicole that hangs above the fantastic fireplace. The atmosphere is casually classy, not stuffy. It’s laid back and friendly. You’re a guest. Make yourself comfortable. Inside, stairs lead to the coffee room, while dining rooms on

the main level to the left and right provide seating for fullservice dining. The seating in the rooms to the left includes custom-built pews, while the larger space to the right, the one with that fireplace, has more traditional tables and chairs. Just past the larger dining room is the full barista bar, serving both handmade coffees and unique alcoholic beverages. The bar offers signature mimosas like the green Irish mimosa or the vacation-

inspired tropical mimosa. Try their flavorful Dirty Wildcat, a chai tea with espresso and vanilla vodka. Or they combine the work of a barista and a bartender for a bourbon kiss, a cold brew coffee with rich bourbon cream. “The coffee is unique,” says LaFortune. “It’s a blended Tanzanian peaberry. No place else in Tulsa offers it.” Table 20 is open daily for breakfast and lunch, with the

full menu available. Sounds like a brunch place, right? It’s so much more than brunch. Open at 8 a.m on weekdays, Table 20 is an excellent option for a breakfast meeting, for a bit of self-care after dropping the kids off at school, or a treat for a day off. LaFortune has a hard time picking a favorite menu item. “I’m biased, but everything’s amazing. Nothing bad on the menu,” she says. “I don’t have a favorite; I’m partial to it all.”

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Tarragon Chicken

Nicole LaFortune Breakfast Burrito

Chicken Chili Relleno

“It’s a home-cooked meal in a comfortable atmosphere, at a good price point. The highest-priced item is $9. We’re what was missing in midtown. Outside of Utica Square, there’s nothing else like us.”

TABLE 20

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1927 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-986-9120

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“We have healthy choices in mind,” says LaFortune. “All the sandwiches can be served as a lettuce wrap if you prefer.” Even that hearty burger can be wrapped in lettuce to cut out carbs. “We make

everything in-house. We outsource very rarely. It’s all local, made in Oklahoma.

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If lunch is more your style, try the midtown grilled burger. It’s a hearty

natural raised burger grilled to order. Or try the grilled Italian sausage sandwich, served with poblano slaw, roasted red bell peppers and red onions. The baked chicken chile relleno is a treat for those who love a little Southwest flair to their meal. The pepper is filled with Monterey Jack cheese and chicken verde, then topped with more cheese and baked to savory, tangy perfection. Be sure to consider the tarragon chicken. This flavorful chicken dish is served in a light cream sauce atop cremini mushrooms, red onions, and red bell peppers on a bed of fresh spinach.

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One of the most popular breakfast items include the cinnamon roll waffle, which is a golden-brown waffle with a rich taste of cinnamon, drizzled with icing and served with Vermont maple syrup. It’s a sweet, decadent treat. For something a little more savory, check out the 21st Street Omelette. It’s a generous three-egg omelet with Colby jack and your choice of toppings like cremini mushrooms, sautéed red onions, ham, sausage, or bacon. The Harvard Breakfast is a hearty traditional morning plate of two eggs, bacon or sausage, skilletherbed potatoes, and toast. Table 20 also offers a quiche of the day, served in a classic French style flaky crust. For something a little lighter, try the granola served with yogurt and fresh fruit.

Monday-Friday: 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

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GK GETTING TO KNOW

Imagination Aundria Braggs

by MICHELE CHIAPPETTA photos by SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS A collective of like-minded black artists in the Tulsa area, Black Moon is breaking standards, pushing innovation, and cultivating creativity among the local community. One of the things that makes Tulsa amazing is its dedication to its arts scene. Sure, Tulsa is smaller than places like New York City and Los Angeles, but that doesn’t mean artists are absent here. Just the opposite. Green Country is continually finding ways to bring the love of all the arts — music, painting, sculpture, multimedia, performance, writing, and more — to anyone and everyone in the area. Of course, there is always room to grow too, to welcome new, vibrant, diverse voices

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to the forefront. That’s one of the goals of Black Moon, a collective of black artists in the Tulsa area breaking standards, pushing innovation, and cultivating creativity among the local community. Elizabeth Henley, a painter and Black Moon’s founder, formed the group with several like-minded creatives in March 2018. “I was involved with some other art groups and collectives in showing art around town, and I realized there wasn’t a strong presence of artists of color in Tulsa,” Henley says. “I kept meeting amazing black artists who didn’t have any way to show their work.” Henley found seven other artists to participate in what was to be Black Moon’s first showing, a First Friday Art Crawl. But that day, the weather went south, as it often does in Oklahoma, and the art crawl wasn’t doable. Thankfully, Tulsa Artist Fellowship

Christina Henley

came to Black Moon’s rescue, helping them find indoor space for their art show. Since that fateful, successful day, Black Moon’s artists have never looked back. “This is something that our community needed, that we needed,” she says. The name of the group, explains Henley, is a play on many things — Tulsa’s oil history and its local black artists, for example. “The moon is a new moon, a new beginning,” she says. “We cultivate artists of color in the area.” The group’s current membership includes 10 local artists who work in varying mediums — Henley (a painter); her sister Christina Henley (painter, sculptress, printmaker); Alexander Tamahn (painter, muralist, bead artist); Aundria Braggs (painter, digital media artist); Erica Martez ( fabric designer, fabric artist); Melody Allen (painter); MOLLYWATTA (painter, fabric artist); nosamyrag (photographer); Summer Washington (drawing, painting); and Tai Tindall (painter, sculptress, printmaker). “We want to open up the group to other artists too,” says Henley. They’ve done this already once, asking for artists to apply, just as they would have to apply for a gallery show, with a CV and portfolio. It can be a


Engagement

In keeping with Black Moon’s goal of opening up the local arts scene for artists of color, Black Moon has shown their works at different spots around Tulsa and Oklahoma City. One notable show, My Black Life, was a great success this past July. “We took Americana and pop culture references and flipped them to interpret what it means to be a person of color in America today,” Henley says. The group created a timeline around all four walls of the TAC Gallery — listing things as innocuous as their birthday, and as emotionally charged as the first time one of them was called the ‘N’ word. They also touched on the first time a person felt their hair without asking, the first time someone made fun of them for dating outside of their race, and other things they’ve experienced.

One of the powerful results of the show was how it brought people together through the experience. “It didn’t matter what people’s backgrounds were,” she says. “So many could relate [to it all]. It was so amazing to hear people’s stories and how they navigate being a minority in America.” Black Moon has also been participating in the Conciliation Series, a set of art shows at the Black Wall Street Gallery in the Greenwood District. The shows paired up two artists each — one black, one white — to display their works at the same time, to encourage collaboration. It’s the kind of project, says Henley, that focuses not just on the tragedy and pain of what happened to Black Wall Street in 1921, but also on the dream that was there. “A whole community of black people got together and created something,” she notes. “It’s the kind of camaraderie and support and motivation that you don’t get if you’re just out there by yourself.” In many ways, that sense of mutual support and collaboration is what makes Black Moon shine. In addition to holding group art shows, Black Moon’s members critique each other’s work, offer creative support to each

MOLLYWATTA

other, and host a website that includes an e-commerce store where artists can connect with those who want to buy their work. “With the collective, we all push each other to do better,” says Henley. “My productivity has improved so much.” The group, she says, looks forward to promoting others too, especially in north Tulsa. And the value of that collective effort is mighty. “There’s an old proverb that says, if you want to go alone, you’ll go fast, but go together, and you’ll reach your destination,” Henley says. “If we want our community to grow — artists and Tulsa alike — then we have to do it together.”

BLACK MOON blackmoontulsa.com

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“We hope that we keep getting artists confident to go out on their own. Artists, in general, often feel not talented enough or intimidated to participate. It’s important that they keep being creative, keep practicing whatever artistic skills they have,” Henley says.

Summer Washington

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scary prospect for some artists at first, but it’s a healthy way to get used to the rigors of promoting one’s work.

Alexander Tamahn

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Erica Martez

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Elizabeth Henley

GETTING TO KNOW GK

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SL SHELF LIFE

NONFICTION/MEMOIR

LITERARY CONTEMPORARY

MYSTERY, THRILLER AND SUSPENSE

ROMANCE/WOMEN’S FICTION OCT. 15

OCT. 22

OCT. 1 OCT. 15

OUT LOUD

BY MARK MORRIS AND WESLEY STACE

Before Mark Morris became “the most successful and influential choreographer alive” (The New York Times), he was a 6-year-old in Seattle, Washington, cramming his feet into Tupperware glasses to practice walking on pointe. Often the only boy in the dance studio, he was called a sissy — a term he wore like a badge of honor. Moving to New York at the age of 19, he launched the famed Mark Morris Dance Group.

CILKA’S JOURNEY

CHRISTMAS IN VERMONT

Cilka is just 16 when she is taken to Auschwitz, where the commandant immediately notices how beautiful she is. Forcibly separated from the other women prisoners, Cilka learns that power equals survival. When the war is over, and the camp is liberated, Cilka is charged as a collaborator and sent to a Siberian prison camp. But did she have a choice?

When Emma comes across the engraved watch she gave her college boyfriend, Fletcher, years ago, her best friend, Bronwyn, believes it’s magic. Fletcher was the one who got away, and Emma never entirely moved on. When Bronwyn finds out Fletcher is in snowy Vermont at a romantic inn, she signs Emma up to help the innkeeper as the children’s activity coordinator.

BY HEATHER MORRIS

ALSO LOOK FOR:

BY ANITA HUGHES

ALSO LOOK FOR:

POEMSIA BY LANG LEAV OCT. 1

OCT. 29

Billions of years ago, the universe exploded into being, creating galaxies and stars. In a sort of heavenly survival of the fittest, planetary bodies smashed into each other until solar systems emerged. The planets, comets, asteroids, satellites, and rings in our solar system are bewitchingly distinct. So, too, the halves of our moon.

BY NICHOLAS MEYER

Holmes and Watson are summoned by Holmes’ brother, Mycroft, to undertake a clandestine investigation. An agent of the British Secret Service has been found floating in the Thames, carrying a manuscript smuggled into England at the cost of her life. The pages purport to be the minutes of a meeting of a secret group intent on nothing less than taking over the world. ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

WHEN THE EARTH HAD TWO MOONS BY ERIK ASPHAUG

THE ADVENTURE OF THE PECULIAR PROTOCOLS

THE TRUTH WILL SET YOU FREE, BUT FIRST IT WILL PISS YOU OFF! BY GLORIA STEINEM OCT. 29

Covering topics from relationships to patriarchy and activism, this is the definitive collection of Steinem’s words on what she feels matters most. Steinem sees quotes as “the poetry of everyday life,” and she also has included a few favorites from friends, including Flo Kennedy and Michelle Obama.

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Verity dreams of being a poet — not that she’d ever admit it to anyone. Her best friend, Jess, thinks she’s got what it takes. As for the cute boy she’s just met, he’s about to discover her bestkept secret.

COUNTRY BY MICHAEL HUGHES OCT. 1

It’s 1996 in Northern Ireland. After years of vicious conflict, the IRA and the British have agreed to an uneasy cease-fire. But when an IRA man’s wife turns informer, he and his brother gather their comrades for an assault on the local army base. Old grudges boil over, and the squad’s feared sniper, Achill, refuses to risk his life to defend another man’s pride.

THE HOUSE OF BRIDES BY JANE COCKRAM OCT. 22

Desperate to get away from it all, Miranda receives a mysterious letter from a young cousin in England that plunges her into a dark family mystery involving her deceased mother’s famous book The House of Brides — a chronicle of the generations of women who married into the infamous Summers family and made their home in the rambling Barnsley House, the family’s estate.

WHAT HAPPENS IN PARADISE BY ELIN HILDERBRAND OCT. 8

When Irene Steele’s loving husband dies in a helicopter crash, she finds out he was leading a double life on the island of St. John. Now, Irene and her sons are back on St. John, determined to learn the truth about the mysterious life and death of a man they thought they knew.

AGENT RUNNING IN THE FIELD BY JOHN LE CARRÉ

BOOK OF BONES BY JOHN CONNOLLY

OCT. 22

On a lonely moor in England, the body of a young woman is discovered. In the south, a girl lies buried beneath a Saxon mound. To the southeast, the ruins of a monastery hide a human skull. Each is a sacrifice. And something in the darkness has heard the call. Charlie Parker has also heard it, and he will track those who would cast the world into darkness.

Nat, a veteran of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service, believes his years as an agent runner are over. He is back in London with his wife, the longsuffering Prue. But with the growing threat from Moscow Centre, the office has one more job for him.

OCT. 15


SHELF LIFE SL

SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY AND HORROR

SELF-HELP AND INSPIRATIONAL

YOUNG ADULT AND MIDDLE GRADE

CHILDREN

OCT. 1 OCT. 8 OCT. 29 OCT. 8

NINTH HOUSE

BY LEIGH BARDUGO

Galaxy “Alex” Stern is the sole survivor of horrific, unsolved multiple homicides. When she is offered a chance to attend Yale on a full ride, she wonders what the catch is. Still searching for answers, Alex arrives in New Haven tasked by her mysterious benefactors with monitoring the activities of Yale’s secret societies, whose occult activities are sinister. ALSO LOOK FOR:

FAIR PLAY: A GAMECHANGING SOLUTION FOR WHEN YOU HAVE TOO MUCH TO DO (AND MORE LIFE TO LIVE) BY EVE RODSKY

Tired of being the parent responsible for all aspects of her busy household, Eve Rodsky counted all the unpaid, invisible work she was doing for her family. She needed a solution to this universal problem. Her sanity, identity, career, and marriage depended on it. The result is Fair Play: a time- and anxiety-saving system that offers couples an entirely new way to divvy up domestic responsibilities.

THE LIGHT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE WORLD

MAGICAL LAND OF BIRTHDAYS

When 16-year-old submersible racer Leyla McQueen is chosen to participate in a prestigious annual marathon, she sees an opportunity to save her father, who was arrested on false charges. But she must brave unfathomable waters and defy a corrupt government, all while dealing with a guarded, hotheaded companion she never asked for.

Amirah is transported to the Magical Land of Birthdays, where she meets three of her birthday buddies from different corners of the world — kids who share her exact birthday and are also about to turn 11. As they explore the land, Amirah and her new friends learn about each other and discover exciting and wonderful birthday traditions from around the world.

BY LONDON SHAH

ALSO LOOK FOR:

BY AMIRAH KASSEM

ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

GOOD NIGHT, LITTLE BLUE TRUCK BY ALICE SCHERTLE THE LOST CAUSES OF BLEAK CREEK BY RHETT MCLAUGHLIN AND LINK NEA OCT. 29

When the shoot for their low-budget horror masterpiece, PolterDog, goes awry — and their best friend, Alicia Boykins, is sent to Whitewood reformatory school as punishment — Rex and Leif find themselves battling an evil beyond their wildest imaginations.

IMAGINARY FRIEND BY STEPHEN CHBOSKY OCT. 1

Single mother Kate Reese flees an abusive relationship with her son, Christopher. At first, their new home in Mill Grove seems perfect. Then Christopher vanishes. For six awful days, no one can find him until Christopher emerges from the woods at the edge of town, with a strange mission only he can complete: Build a treehouse in the woods by Christmas, or his mother and everyone in the town will never be the same again.

SUPER HUMAN BY DAVE ASPREY

THE WAY OF THE WOODSHOP BY ALEKSANDRA ZEE OCT. 22

From choosing It is possible to the right lumber make changes to to understanding extend lifespan different woods, dramatically. along with tips Using simple on decorating interventions, like with wood and diet, sleep, light, curating a space exercise, and little- that you love, Zee known but powerful encourages readers hacks from ozone to relish the joys of therapy to proper working with their jaw alignment, hands while sharing you can decelerate her empowering cellular aging journey as a and supercharge woman carving your body’s out her space in ability to heal a stereotypically and rejuvenate. male profession. OCT. 8

THE LAST TRUE POETS OF THE SEA BY JULIA DRAKE OCT. 1

Tall, funny, musical Violet can’t stop partying with the wrong people. Until the day her brother, Sam, attempts to take his own life. Violet embarks on a wild mission to find a part of her family’s history — a lost shipwreck her great-greatgrandmother survived. The search may help Violet find her way to survive too.

THE DRAGON WARRIOR BY KATIE ZHAO OCT. 15

Twelve-year-old Faryn Liu dreams of becoming a warrior. When she stumbles into a battle with a demon and helps defeat it, she realizes she might be the fabled Heaven Breaker; a mighty warrior meant to work for the all-mighty deity, the Jade Emperor.

CAN YOU HEAR THE TREES TALKING? DISCOVERING THE HIDDEN LIFE OF THE FOREST BY PETER WOHLLEBEN OCT. 1

Did you know that trees have parents? Or that tree kids go to school for hundreds of years? That there is such a thing as the forest internet? Discover the mysteries and magic of the forest in language kids will love and understand.

OCT. 15

A storm is brewing as Little Blue Truck and his good friend, Toad, go to bed. But who can sleep with all that racket? Thunder and lightning sure can be scary, but it’s easy to be brave together. When the clouds roll on, and the sky is clear, it’s all aboard for a bedtime ride.

Release dates are subject to change.

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LOCATOR

S SHOWTIME

ADMIRAL TWIN DRIVE-IN 7355 E. Easton St. Tulsa | 918.878.8099 AMC SOUTHROADS 20 4923 E. 41st St. Tulsa | 888.AMC.4FUN B&B CLAREMORE 8 1407 W. Country Club Claremore | 918.342.2422

OPENS

B&B CINEMA 8 1245 New Sapulpa Road Sapulpa | 918.227.7469

OCT. 4

CINEMARK BROKEN ARROW 1801 E. Hillside Drive Broken Arrow | 918.355.0427 CINEMARK SAND SPRINGS 1112 E. Charles Page Blvd. | Sand Springs 918.894.6888

GEMINI MAN

OCT. 11

Henry Brogen, an aging assassin seeking to exit his career, finds himself going against a younger clone of himself who can predict his every move.

OPENS

OCT. 18

CAST: WILL SMITH, CLIVE OWEN, MARY ELIZABETH WINSTEAD RATING: PG-13

CINEMARK TULSA 10802 E. 71st S. | Tulsa 800.FAN.DANG (#1128)

JOKER OCT. 4

In 1981, a failed stand-up comedian turns to a life of crime and chaos in Gotham City, slowly rising to become a frightening legend.

directions by impending nuptials, unexpected allies, and dark new forces at play. CAST: ANGELINA JOLIE, ELLE FANNING, MICHELLE PFEIFFER RATING: NR

CAST: JOAQUIN PHOENIX, ROBERT DE NIRO, ZAZIE BEETZ RATING: R

THE LIGHTHOUSE OCT. 18

THE ADDAMS FAMILY OCT. 11

The Addams family’s lives begin to unravel when they face-off against a treacherous, greedy, arrogant, and sly reality TV host while also preparing for their extended family to arrive for a major celebration.

THE CURRENT WAR

CAST: OSCAR ISAAC, CHARLIZE THERON, CHLOE GRACE MORETZ RATING: PG

CINERGY 6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918.894.6888

MALEFICENT: MISTRESS OF EVIL OCT. 18

Maleficent and her goddaughter Aurora begin to question the complex family ties that bind them as they are pulled in different

Chronicles the gritty adventures of two lighthouse keepers as they are faced with loneliness, friendship, and their worst fears. CAST: WILLEM DAFOE, ROBERT PATTINSON RATING: R

CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. Tulsa | 918.592.3456 ETON SQUARE 6 CINEMA 8421 E. 61st St. Tulsa | 918.286.2618 AMC CLASSIC OWASSO 12601 E. 86th St. N. Owasso | 918.376.9191 STARWORLD 20 10301 S Memorial Drive Tulsa | 918.369.7475 WARREN BROKEN ARROW 18 1700 W. Aspen Creek Drive Broken Arrow | 918.893.9798

OCT. 4

The dramatic story of the cutthroat race between electricity titans Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse to determine whose electrical system would power the modern world. CAST: BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH, MICHAEL SHANNON, NICHOLAS HOULT RATING: PG-13

96 PREVIEW 918 OCTOBER 2019

OPENS

OPENS

OCT. 11

OCT. 18


SHOWTIME S

MONOS

OPENS OCT. 4

On a faraway mountaintop, eight kids with guns watch over a hostage and a conscripted milk cow.

OPENS

OCT. 18

CELEBRATING MERYL STREEP WITH ERIN CARLSON OCT. 5 TALK IS FREE. THE MOVIE IS REGULAR PRICE OR $5 WITH BOOK PURCHASE.

A captivating and inspiring portrait of legendary actress Meryl Streep and her work, Queen Meryl explores the fearless icon’s trailblazing roles in film, her feminist activism, and the indelible mark she’s left on pop culture.

TULSA AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL

OPENS

OCT. 25

OCT. 9-13

The 5th annual Tulsa American Film Festival (TAFF) returns with new independent works, with particular focuses on Latino American, Native American, Oklahoma-based, and student filmmakers.

CANDYMAN (1992)

OCT. 11-12

The Candyman, a murderous soul with a hook for a hand, is accidentally summoned to reality by a skeptical grad student researching the monster’s myth.

ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAP OCT. 18

Amid the Russian Revolution of 1905, the crew of the battleship Potemkin mutiny against the brutal, tyrannical regime of the vessel’s officers. The resulting street demonstration in Odessa brings on a police massacre.

Columbus, Tallahassee, Wichita, and Little Rock move to the American heartland as they face off against evolved zombies, fellow survivors, and the growing pains of the snarky, makeshift family.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM PRESENTED BY NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE OCT. 17

CAST: WOODY HARRELSON, JESSE EISENBERG, EMMA STONE RATING: NR

BATTLESHIP POTEMPKIN (1925)

OCT. 12

A feuding fairy king and queen of the forest cross paths with four runaway lovers and a troupe of actors trying to rehearse a play. As their dispute grows, the magical royal couple meddles with mortal lives leading to love triangles, mistaken identities and transformations with hilarious, but dark consequences. Shakespeare’s most famous romantic comedy will be captured live from the Bridge Theatre in London. Gwendoline Christie, Oliver Chris, David Moorst, and Hammed Animashaun lead the cast as Titania, Oberon, Puck, and Bottom.

LUCY IN THE SKY

OPENS OCT. 25

Natalie Portman stars as astronaut Lucy Cola, who returns to Earth after a transcendent experience during a mission to space and begins to lose touch with reality in a world that now seems too small.

SPECIAL MONDAY IS

FREE POPCORN DAY *Circle Cinema members only

CIRCLE CINEMA

10 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-3456 circlecinema.com

Check the Circle Cinema website for times, costs, additional events, and more details. Release dates, showings, and ratings are subject to change.

JOJO RABBIT

OCT. 18

During World War II, lonely German boy Jojo “Rabbit” Betzler has his worldview turned upside down when he discovers that his single mother, Rosie, is hiding a young Jewish girl in their attic. Aided only by his imaginary friend in the form of an idiotic version of Adolf Hitler, Jojo must confront his blind nationalism. CAST: ROMAN GRIFFIN DAVIS, SCARLETT JOHANSSON, TAIKA WAITITI RATING: PG-13

BLACK AND BLUE OCT. 25

THE LAST FULL MEASURE OCT. 25

A Pentagon investigator works to have the sacrifice of a Vietnam War pararescueman honored. CAST: SEBASTIAN STAN, CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER, SAMUEL L. JACKSON RATING: NR

OPENS

OCT. 18

NOPD rookie Alicia West captures the murder of a drug dealer on her bodycam. What’s more disturbing is that the crime has been committed by her partner and a squad of dirty police officers. Unable to get help from her former community or the police department she’s sworn to, West allies herself with a stranger in an attempt to expose the murder while a local gang puts out a bounty on West’s life. CAST: NAOMIE HARRIS, TYRESE GIBSON, FRANK GRILLO RATING: NR

RELEASE DATES AND RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

LO

NR = A RATING WAS NOT AVAILABLE AS OF SEPT. 20, 2019

CA TO R

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October 2019 (Vol. 33, No. 10)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...

October 2019 (Vol. 33, No. 10)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...