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WHAT THE SUGAR BUZZ IS ALL ABOUT AT 49 RESTAURANTS SERVING POST-MEAL HOW SWEET IT IS SEE DOSES OF ALL THINGS DECADENT, INDULGENT, AND SINFULLY DELICIOUS

WHERE TO DINE

W H AT TO D O

WHERE TO FIND IT

WHEN IT’S HAPPENING

MARCH 2020

BRAIN10TRUST TIPS FOR KEEPING YOUR MIND FIT

CRAFT CRAWL HAVE A THIRST FOR ADVENTURE? WE’VE GOT A PLAN.

Is hay fever putting a damper on spring fever? If so, nip seasonal allergies in the bud with strategies from Carey Clinic.

THE ART OF THE ESCAPE PUT YOUR WITS TO THE TEST AT CINERGY

PREVIEW918.COM

STOMP CANDLEBOX COMMODORES WILLIE NELSON AND FAMILY VENDETTA: A MAFIA STORY PRICE TOWER GEORGE’S PUB ROCKING “R” RANCH HOUSE

J U S T V I S I T I N G ? L I V I N G LO C A L? W E ’ V E G OT YO U C OV E R E D.


At Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa, we love a standing ovation. Play one of the over 2,400 games on our massive casino floor. With three entertainment venues, including our Replay Sports Bar with 50 TVs and Track 5., Tulsa’s newest honky-tonk two-stepping dance hall, there’s never a dull moment. Then, unwind at The Spa and relax in one of our rooms or suites. From our stages to our suites, we’re the ultimate crowd pleaser!

I-44 Exit 240 | 800.760.6700 | HARDROCKCASINOTULSA.COM

Know your limits. Gambling problem? Call 800.522.4700.


M FROM THE MAYOR As mayor of Tulsa, it is my honor to welcome you to our great city. Whether you’re visiting, or have deep roots here, I invite you to take time to explore our beautiful city and discover all the things that set us apart from other cities. I highly recommend Preview 918 as your go-to guide to navigate our incredible city. For more than 34 years, Preview has covered the 918, offering Tulsans and visitors alike the inside scoop to area restaurants and cafés, lodging, local attractions and events, world-class entertainment venues, tourist destinations, and unique shopping venues that are bound to please and delight. Our city is home to the world’s greatest collection of western art at the Gilcrease Museum, as well as Italian Renaissance displays at the Philbrook Museum. It’s a treasure trove for lovers of architecture, from mid-century modern housing, to the downtown Art Deco District, and our iconic BOK Center, designed by the internationally acclaimed architect César Pelli.

Tulsa Roughnecks soccer. Or time a visit to coincide with special events, such as Tulsa Tough bike racing, the Tulsa Run, the Route 66 Marathon, and the NCAA basketball tournament. The Tulsa area offers more than 80 miles of pedestrian and bicycle trails for a great way to see Tulsa. Tulsa is also a city on the move. In 2018, we opened the Gathering Place. The Gathering Place is a world class riverfront park designed to welcome all to a vibrant and inclusive public space that engages, educates, and excites.

To distribute Preview 918 at your place of business: 918‑745‑1190.

G.T. Bynum

FOLLOW US! PREVIEW918

MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER Marc Rains marc@previewgreencountry.com

MANAGING EDITOR | SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Michele Chiappetta michele@previewgreencountry.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Greer, Michele Chiappetta, Donna Leahey, Rob Harmon, G.K. Hizer, Gina Conroy, Lindsay Morris, John Tranchina, Jennifer Zehnder, Sarah Herrera, Ashton Greer, TravelOK.com

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Elizabeth Wollmershauser

4 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

In over 100 area Hotels and Motels

Local advertising and business inquiries: 918-745-1190.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL, BRAND, AND STRATEGY Chris Greer chrisg@previewgreencountry.com

Beth Rose beth@previewgreencountry.com

A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has remained the most trusted and widely read lifestyle publication in the Tulsa and Green Country area for more than 30 years. While other magazines have come and gone, Preview 918 has not only remained but has achieved unprecedented prestige within our community. It has been, and will continue to be, the magazine the 918 area lives by.

We connect with over 200,000 readers each month covering dining, fitness, retail, services, entertainment, people, events, lifestyles, and the arts. Preview 918 is freely distributed to over 650 locations in the Tulsa and Green Country area including Reasor’s, over 100 hotels, Tulsa International Airport, casinos, retail shops, boutiques, restaurants, bars, medical offices, salons, gyms, and service providers. And many of those readers tell us that Preview 918 faithfully helps them identify their interests, wants, and needs.

Sports spectators can look to the University of Tulsa or Oral Roberts University athletic programs, Tulsa Oiler hockey games, and

CREATIVE TEAM Jared Hood jared@previewgreencountry.com

PREVIEW918.COM

Best regards, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa

For a night on the town, Tulsa serves up family entertainment at the Guthrie Green and Tulsa Drillers baseball at ONEOK Field. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center attracts Broadway musicals, renowned musicians and excellent local theater productions, and is home to the Tulsa Ballet.

FACEBOOK.COM/PREVIEW918

VOL. 34, NO. 3

I’m pleased so many of you have made your home in Tulsa. If you’re visiting our city, please enjoy your stay here. I also want to invite you to come back often to experience opportunities you won’t find anywhere else. In the meantime, you can find out more about Tulsa by visiting cityoftulsa.‌org.

Tulsa’s unique entertainment and shopping districts provide enjoyable experiences for the entire family. From an art crawl in the Tulsa Arts District, to a concert at the historic Cain’s Ballroom, to a trip to the Tulsa Zoo or a leisurely drive along Route 66 — there’s no end to what you can experience here.  

LIKE US!

PREV EW

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Marc Rains, Sarah Eliza Roberts, Sarah Herrera, Jennifer Zehnder, Valerie Wei‑Haas, Kelli Greer

FOLLOW US!

@PREVIEWTULSA FIELD OPERATIONS MANAGER Stephen Hurt stephen@previewgreencountry.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ann Murphy ann@previewgreencountry.com ROUTE DISTRIBUTION Rachel Blanchard, Cory Blanchard, Garrett Rinner SENIOR CONSULTANT Randy Dietzel PUBLISHERS Robert and Amy Rinner robert@previewgreencountry.com

Preview 918 is published 12 times a year. Reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited.

READ US!

WWW.ISSUU.COM/PREVIEWMAGAZINETULSA While the information has been compiled carefully to ensure accuracy at the time of publication, all content is provided for general guidance only and is subject to change. The publisher can’t guarantee the accuracy of all information or be responsible for omissions or errors. Preview 918 claims no credit for any images published in this issue unless otherwise noted. Images are copyright to their respective owners. Health, small business, and financial advice provided in Preview 918 and preview918.com are for educational and entertainment purposes only. Always consult with a qualified professional for health, small business, and financial advice. Preview 918, 10026-A S. Mingo, Suite 322, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Copyright 2020 by Preview 918. All rights reserved. Preview 918 is an affiliated publication produced by Fore Today Publications LLC.  


THE TRANSFORMATION IS COMPLETE

COME REDISCOVER THE

CULINARY QUEEN OF THE CORNER T U L SA A R T S D I ST R I C T • 2 01 N. M A I N ST. TAV E R N T U L SA .C O M


T TABLE OF CONTENTS MARCH 2020

FEATURES

76 38

SNEEZE SEASON

ON THE COVER

If you battle seasonal allergies, then you understand how congestion, a runny nose, headaches, and other bothersome symptoms can make you miserable. While navigating allergies can be difficult, many options can help treat, prevent, and alleviate symptoms.

STARTER: WILLIE NELSON AND FAMILY 16 CONVERSATION

26 BRINGING THE NOISE

40 THE GREAT ESCAPE

STARTER: 20 CONVERSATION CANDLEBOX

28 A MATTER OF CRIME

80 SUGAR RUSH

30 THE WRIGHT WAY

84

Despite his easygoing image, Willie Nelson might be the hardest-working man in country music. And at nearly 90 years old, he is as relevant as ever and enjoying the elderstatesman phase of his career.

Hailing from the iconic Seattle music scene, early 1990s alt-rock band Candlebox still rocks an eclectic collection of songs that sets them apart from many of their grunge peers.

22

CONVERSATION STARTER: COMMODORES

No Lionel Richie is no problem for the Commodores, who continue to build off the “Brick House” foundation established more than 50 years ago.

Wielding everyday objects like brooms, garbage cans, and wooden poles to create a wordless percussive explosion onstage, Stomp continues to prove that one man’s trash really can be another man’s treasure. 

A mash-up of Broadway with a West Side Story flair and a dab of Moulin Rouge, the Mafia-themed Vendetta is different in many ways from other Tulsa ballet productions — but that’s the point.

The Price Tower in Bartlesville serves to remind visitors of architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s style and the 1950s period in which the tower was built, but the amenities are rooted firmly in the present.

34 MAGNIFICENT MENUS

Elliot Nelson enjoys finding ways to bring the world to Tulsa in exciting, food-related ways. But it takes finesse and a bit of luck to push the boundaries without going too far beyond the customers’ comfort zones.

24

SOUND JUDGMENT

36 TOP DOCS

Moving outside of the “millennial comfort zone” led Matthew Adams into building his DJ business around social dancing, and finding a niche few DJs explore.

Beyond the standard physicals and well-person exams you’d expect at a clinic that offers primary care, the Carey Clinic provides other services that zero in on some of the most common issues families face, especially in Tulsa.

Mental puzzles played out in real-world 3D glory, Cinergy’s escape rooms require teams to find hidden clues, discover keys, figure out mysteries, and above all, work together to complete the task in under an hour.

Memorable meals just aren’t complete without that little something extra to sweeten the deal. And Green Country does not disappoint when it comes to all things decadent, indulgent, and sinfully delicious.

BRITISH INVASION

Taking a heavy cue from English tradition while mixing in a modern American style, Jenks’ cozy drinking and dining den, George’s Pub, has a lot in common with its counterparts across the Atlantic: exceptional meals, beer, and plenty of football.

88 SOUTHERN COMFORT

Combining country-style cooking with twists of modern flavors for superior dishes both in taste and presentation, the Rocking “R” Ranch House offers private country club appeal in an open-tothe-public paradise.

92 GAINING GROUNDS

CoffeeFirst is impacting people recovering from mental health illnesses, incarceration, or addiction, all while serving up sensational Topeca Coffee.

If you’re like millions of Americans this month, your nose is running, your eyes are itching, and your brain is fuzzy. Welcome to spring. As much as you’d love to just curl up with a box of tissues, you have a life to live. While it’s easy to trivialize these annoying symptoms, they’re nothing to sneeze at. We talked to doctors at Tulsa’s Carey Clinic and have some allergy-fighting actions you can take so that you can enjoy the fresh air outside.

COVER CREDIT Photographer: Marc Rains Models: Sarah Hutcherson and Claire Marie Draeger

DEPARTMENTS 8 $91.80 in 48 Challenge 10 Music + Concerts +

Comedy

16 Conversation Starter 24 Sound Check 44 Sports Central

13 Happenings

49 Downtown Locator

15 Street Talk

50 Tulsa Locator

6 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

59 Sports Schedule

68 Launch Pad

76 Eats + Treats

60 Green Country Scene

70 Restaurant + Bar Finder

92 Get to Know

64 Beyond Tulsa

72 Health + Fitness

94 Shelf Life

66 Style + Shopping

74 Cocktail Confidential

96 Showtime


See our feature on page 88

PREVIEW918.COM 7


The only catch was that she had to spend it at places, events or shops profiled in the February 2020 issue of Preview 918.

918 $91.80 IN 48 CHALLENGE The mission posed to Dawna Wright was to spend $91.80 (we used the local area code for the amount) in two days. And if she could find fun and free activities … bonus. My husband and I decided to do a couple’s weekend, and we got to do some things we wouldn’t normally do thanks to Preview 918.

SO, PROVIDING AN ENVELOPE OF CASH AND TELLING PEOPLE TO SPEND IT IN 48 HOURS ISN’T EXACTLY A CHALLENGE, BUT IT MAKES THIS ASSIGNMENT MORE INTERESTING.

1 We started the challenge at Flo’s Burger Diner in Tulsa. I had the classic deluxe cheeseburger while my husband, Tim, enjoyed his favorite barbecue bacon cheddar burger. We love to sit at our favorite table and enjoy the classic ‘50s music playing. COST: $20

2 With plenty of food in our stomachs, we headed to the Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium. Tim got on an airplane for the first time, and that was only because it had no engine and was bolted to the ground. We flew in a hot air balloon simulator and crashed. In the gift shop, Tim bought an astronaut ice cream sandwich, and I got a 3D magnet ( for the fridge collection) and a Route 66 keychain. COST: $45

3

u Think yo our can blow cash in g interestin ways?

For our last stop, we went to the Tulsa Zoo. We lucked out, as it was a beautiful day and half-price admission. We love to see the chimpanzees, and we got there right before feeding time, so they were chattering and chattering. After purchasing a train ticket, we had lunch at the Macaw Landing Grille. We came home with a souvenir cup that has pink flamingos on it. COST: $23

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AND DROP A MESSAGE WITH SOME OF YOUR IDEAS. WE MIGHT JUST LACE YOUR POCKETS WITH GREEN AND TURN YOU LOOSE. 8 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


PREVIEW918.COM 9


H HAPPENINGS MARCH LIVE MUSIC VENUES 5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa

BLACKBIRD ON PEARL

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

08

1336 E. 6th St. | Tulsa

BOK CENTER

200 S. Denver Ave. | Tulsa

CAIN’S BALLROOM

423 N. Main St. | Tulsa

CROW CREEK TAVERN

3534 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa

GUTHRIE GREEN

111 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa

IDL BALLROOM

230 E. 1st St. | Tulsa

INNER CIRCLE VODKA BAR 410 N. Main St. | Tulsa

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT 8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

MERCURY LOUNGE

1747 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

OKLAHOMA JAZZ HALL OF FAME

11

5 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

PARADISE COVE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

PEORIA SHOWPLACE | BUFFALO RUN CASINO & RESORT

1000 Buffalo Run Blvd. | Miami

RABBIT HOLE

116 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa

REDS

325 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

RIFFS | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

SKYLINE EVENT CENTER | OSAGE CASINO HOTEL

951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa

SOUL CITY

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa

SOUNDPONY

409 N. Main St. | Tulsa

SWAMPHOUSE

1529 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

TCC VANTREASE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 10300 E. 81st St. | Tulsa

THE COLONY

2809 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa

THE FUR SHOP

520 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE HUNT CLUB

04-07

DESI BANKS

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

BRENDAN EYRE

07 The Loony Bin | Tulsa

PURPLE XPERIENCE

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

11-14

MCGILL/MCHALE TRIO

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

09

TOM PAXTON AND THE DONJUANS

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

STEVE MCGREW

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

224 N. Main St. | Tulsa

THE JOINT | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

THE VANGUARD

BOB WILLS’ TEXAS PLAYBOYS

222 N. Main St. | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

TRACK 5 | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

DORI FREEMAN

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

TULSA THEATER

105 W. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

102 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa

10 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

10 ASHLEY DAVIS BAND Duet | Tulsa

12 KISS

BOK Center | Tulsa


PREVIEW918.COM 11


H HAPPENINGS MARCH

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

13 18 21 15 19-21 26 14 SAMMY MILLER AND THE CONGREGATION Duet | Tulsa

BEETHOVEN 5

TREVOR NOAH Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

JIM JEFFERIES

TCC VanTrease Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

MICK FOLEY

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

RHEA BUTCHER

TOBYMAC

Duet | Tulsa

BOK Center | Tulsa

19

EASTON CORBIN

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

CJ STARKS

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

WILLIE NELSON AND FAMILY

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

REMEMBERING HEE HAW WITH T. GRAHAM BROWN

NAPOLEON DYNAMITE Tulsa Theater | Tulsa

12 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

20 DAN + SHAY

BOK Center | Tulsa

ALAN JACKSON BOK Center | Tulsa


HAPPENINGS ALSO IN MARCH H

RAILROAD EARTH

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

MARCH 1 AKDAR SHRINE CIRCUS Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 5 LIFE SENIOR SERVICES PRESENTS CELEBRATE LIFE

CANDLEBOX

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

MARCH 1 TROLLS LIVE!

BOK Center | Tulsa

MARCH 1 TULSA OPERA: MADAMA BUTTERFLY

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Cox Business Convention Center | Tulsa

MARCH 5-8 GRAND LAKE BOAT AND SPORT SHOW Grove Civic Center | Grove

EVERYWHERE

27

CLINT BLACK

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

6

8

MARCH 6 FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL MARCH 1-7 JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS

Tulsa Arts District | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME STARTS

17

28

MARCH 1, 7-8 THE FACE OF EMMETT TILL

COMMODORES

Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel | Tulsa

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

19

SPRING BEGINS

29 MARY GAUTHIER

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

NCAA DIVISION I MEN’S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT BEGINS

MARCH 6 MOON MOUSE: A SPACE ODYSSEY

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

MARCH 6-7 EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN CONFERENCE Mabee Center | Tulsa

MARCH 4-8 OKLAHOMA REINING HORSE ASSOCIATION RIDE AND SLIDE Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 6-8 STOMP

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

PREVIEW918.COM 13


H HAPPENINGS ALSO IN MARCH MARCH 14 SHAMROCK THE ROSE

MARCH 20-22 SUNNY SIDE UP FILM FESTIVAL

Coleman Theatre | Miami

Rose District | Broken Arrow

MARCH 27-29 GREEN COUNTRY SPRING FLING Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 12-15 GREATER TULSA HOME AND GARDEN SHOW MARCH 7 WILL EISNER COMIC FEST

Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 14 STAR WARS IN CONCERT

Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art | Tulsa

MARCH 12-APRIL 26 TULSA BOTANIC BLOOMS Tulsa Botanic Garden | Tulsa

Cox Business Convention Center | Tulsa

Bedouin Shrine Temple | Muskogee

Buffalo Run Casino & Resort | Miami

MARCH 7 BRAINIAC BALL

MARCH 13-14 TULSA IRISHFEST Guthrie Green | Tulsa

MARCH 14-15 R.K. GUN AND KNIFE SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 14-15 ATHLETIC CHAMPIONSHIPS GOLD CHAMPIONSHIP Cox Business Convention Center | Tulsa

MARCH 21-22 PREMIER PINTO CLASSIC Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 22 NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA AUTOCROSS

MARCH 28 CARNIVALE

Cox Business Convention Center | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 23-24 TULSA CYBER SUMMIT Cox Business Convention Center | Tulsa

MARCH 28 FINDING NEVERLAND

MARCH 7-8 BIG 12 WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIPS BOK Center | Tulsa

MARCH 27-29 STAGE ONE TULSA REGIONALS

MARCH 14 FLYING FEZ WINE TASTING FESTIVAL MARCH 14 WFC BOXING

Cox Business Convention Center | Tulsa

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

MARCH 7 SHAMROCK THE ‘VILLE Downtown Bartlesville

MARCH 20-22, 26-28 THE HUMANS

Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center | Broken Arrow

MARCH 28 RUN THE VILLE

MARCH 13-15 TULSA DOG TRAINING CLUB AGILITY TRIAL

Downtown Bartlesville

Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 15 HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS BOK Center | Tulsa

MARCH 7-8 OKLAHOMA BIGFOOT SYMPOSIUM CC Camp | Stilwell

MARCH 11-23 WORLD SERIES OF POKER Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

MARCH 13-15, 20-22 A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

MARCH 14 CBB SHAM-ROCK BASH Cabin Boys Brewery | Tulsa

MARCH 18-21 ROUTE 66 MORGAN CLASSIC

MARCH 26-29 TULSA BALLET: VENDETTA, A MAFIA STORY Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

BOK Center | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 20-21 TULSA BEAD MARKET Expo Square | Tulsa

MARCH 28-29 MONSTER JAM

MARCH 27-29 C.S. LEWIS’ THE GREAT DIVORCE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

MARCH 28-29 CELEBRITY CLASH OF CHAMPIONS

Oral Roberts University | Tulsa

Dates, events and times are subject to change.

14 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


STREET TALK ST

WOULD YOU RATHER BE RICH OR FAMOUS? I want to be rich. You can do more with money if it's used to make society a better place.

—JOE

Rich. I can buy fame. —CONNOR

Most definitely famous. People who are famous for even the stupidest reasons can still get rich. —TABITHA

Rich. Fame seems awful. I enjoy my privacy. —JENNA

Rich. I prefer to stay under the radar.

— SUSAN

I would rather be rich than famous. It seems that fame would limit your privacy, but having wealth would increase freedom, security, and peace of mind.

Rich so that I could help out my family financially.

—LINDA

I would choose famously rich or richly famous. Or a mix between the two. —RANDY

—SPENCER

Being rich would give me plenty of money as a tool for solutions.

—MARIA

I’d rather be rich.

—MELVIN

It depends. Am I famous for curing cancer or saving people from starvation, or famous for holding a convenience store at gunpoint and getting caught? I’d pick famous if and only if it was because of something good.

—TASHA

I’d love to be an actress.

—KATELYN

Famous, of course. I don’t need money because my mom and dad buy me everything I need.

—BENNY

I’d rather be rich. I’m insecure in the way I see myself, so if money weren’t an issue, I would fix my “imperfections” to be more confident. Also, I would like to use my wealth to spread joy to others. —TERRIE

WANT TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION? We’ll post a question on our Facebook page each month. Give us an answer and photo, and you might end up in our magazine. PREVIEW918.COM 15


CS CONVERSATION STARTER BY DONNA LEAHEY PHOTOS BY JAMES MINCHIN AND JACK SPENCER

willie nelson and family

DESPITE HIS EASYGOING IMAGE, WILLIE NELSON MIGHT BE THE HARDEST-WORKING MAN IN COUNTRY MUSIC. AND AT NEARLY 90 YEARS OLD, HE IS AS RELEVANT AS EVER AND ENJOYING THE ELDER-STATESMAN PHASE OF HIS CAREER. Willie Nelson retired in 1972 and moved to Austin, Texas, to enjoy his life of leisure. He was 39 years old. Fortunately for country music, his retirement didn’t last long. At the 2020 Grammy Awards, Nelson won his latest Grammy for Ride Me Back Home. Born during the heart of the Great Depression, Nelson was raised by his grandparents. His talent for songwriting bloomed early, writing his first song at 7 years old. He wrote Faron Young’s 1961 hit “Hello, Walls,” Roy Orbison’s 1963 hit “Pretty Paper,” and Patsy Cline’s eternal “Crazy” in 1962.

16 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

Nelson settled into Nashville in 1960 and began recording albums, starting with …And Then I Wrote in 1962. Chafing under the thumb of the conservative Nashville sound and enjoying the fruits of his success, Nelson settled in Austin. His choice of retirement spots enjoyed a vibrant music scene and an enthusiastic hippie scene. Energized, he came out of retirement and claimed the outlaw country style as his own. His acclaimed album, Red Headed Stranger (1975), made it

clear that Nelson was back. And he hasn’t stopped since.

Music Awards, Rolling Stone, and The Library of Congress.

He’s lit up the big screen in over 30 movies, written nine books, and is known for his activism and philanthropy. He’s recorded 69 solo albums; won multiple Grammy Awards for Best Male Country Vocal Performance, Best Country Performance by Duo or Group with Vocals, and Best Country Song; earned a Legend Award; accepted a Lifetime Achievement Award; and more. The American Country Music Awards have honored him, as has the Country Music Association, the American

The plight of the American farmer inspired Nelson to start Farm Aid in 1985 with Neil Young and John Mellencamp. One of the first things Nelson did when he came out of his shortlived retirement was to bring a harmonica player into his band. Mickey Raphael has been playing with Nelson ever since. Raphael spoke with Preview 918 about all things Nelson before their March 15 appearance at River Spirit Casino Resort’s Paradise Cove.


Q

CONVERSATION STARTER CS

Musically, the biggest takeaway I’ve learned is to listen. When you’re playing in a band like this with a singer/songwriter, there’s a give and take. When we’re playing the songs, there’s an unspoken communication between the musicians: when to play, when to come in and out, and when to not play, which is probably the most important thing that we’ve got going. Because the voice and the lyrics are the most important thing to take into consideration, you want to complement the singer musically.

Q.

TALK TO US ABOUT THE USE OF THE HARMONICA IN COUNTRY MUSIC.

Q. A.

IS IT HARD TO PLAY THE HARMONICA?

Yeah, it’s a niche instrument. I mean, everybody can play a few notes on a harmonica, and you can fake it well. There are guitar players who might double on harmonica, but there’s just a handful of harmonica soloists.

Q. A.

HOW MUCH DOES NELSON TOUR?

We did about 90 cities last year. It’s about two weeks out of

Q.

NELSON IS KNOWN FOR HIS DEVOTION TO FARM AID. TELL US ABOUT THAT.

A. Q. A.

We do concerts for it every year. I have my charities, as well.

WHAT ARE YOU INVOLVED IN?

I do this Musicians on Call thing where you’re in town, and you go to a hospital and play. You go from room to room and, when they’re accepting, you play a song or two for the patients.

HOW DO YOU, AS A BAND, GO ABOUT PICKING OUT A PLAYLIST WITH SUCH A LONG CAREER OF GREAT MUSIC TO CHOOSE FROM?

A.

It’s all spontaneous. There’s no setlist; it’s all stream of consciousness. Willie kicks off every song, so it’s not like we have to know an intro to a song. I mean, it follows a certain pattern, there’s a certain group of songs he picks from, but he throws in new songs, or an old one we haven’t played in a while.

WILLIE NELSON AND FAMILY Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort 8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 888-748-3731 riverspirittulsa.com

R

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM HIM?

Q.

TO

Q. A.

the month. We go out for two weeks and play maybe eight or nine dates.

CA

A.

Since 1973. He was almost 40 at that time, so he had a career, and he was a successful songwriter in Nashville. This was when he left Nashville and moved back to Texas. His career blossomed after that.

A.

It’s not used that much in country music. There were a couple of Charlie McCoy songs coming out of Nashville in the late ‘60s and ‘70s. But the steel guitar and fiddle were more prevalent in the songs. I mean, there’s really nobody traveling with just a harmonica player as a supplement. I think I’m the only one doing that. Waylon [Jennings] had Donnie Brooks playing with him. With Willie, his steel guitar player had left the band, and Willie was not going to replace him. I just happened on the scene with Willie at that time, so he brought me in.

LO

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WITH WILLIE NELSON?

MICKEY RAPHAEL

Q.

March 15: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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A nice and comfortable christian enviroment for the children and parents.

4936 W. Kenosha St 8122 S Lewis Ste A Broken Arrow OK 74012 Tulsa, Ok 74137 (918)994-6888 (918)299-1220

Getting your child's hair cut can be scary, but I have put the fun in it for you and your child!

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CS CONVERSATION STARTER

BY DONNA LEAHEY

candlebox HAILING FROM THE ICONIC SEATTLE MUSIC SCENE, EARLY 1990S ALT-ROCK BAND CANDLEBOX STILL ROCKS AN ECLECTIC COLLECTION OF SONGS THAT SETS THEM APART FROM MANY OF THEIR GRUNGE PEERS. When you think of bands coming out of Seattle, you probably think of grunge or alternative rock. Seattle-based Candlebox isn’t into that scene at all. They’re into rock ‘n’ roll. And they don’t want you to forget it. Their self-titled first album, Candlebox, was released in 1993 with hits “Far Behind” and “You.” It’s been certified platinum four times. The success of their debut effort put them on the main stage

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at Woodstock ‘94, and earned them a Metal Edge Readers’ Choice Award for Best New Band. Follow up albums — Lucy (1995) and Happy Pills (1998) — did well, but in 2000 the band ran into disagreements with their label, and the members of Candlebox went separate ways while contract disputes ran their course. Lead vocalist Kevin Martin performed with The Gracious

Few and Hiwatts during the break. With legal entanglements cleared up by 2006, Candlebox reunited and began touring and releasing new music. Into the Sun, Candlebox’s fourth effort, was released in 2008, Love Stories & Other Musings in 2012, and Disappearing in Airports in 2016. Looking at those dates, you might think another album was due any day, and you’d be right.

Candlebox’s as-yet-unnamed seventh album will be released this spring. The lineup has changed over the years, with Martin remaining as the only original member, but the band’s commitment to rock ‘n’ roll remains. Martin is looking forward to a return to Tulsa, as he shared when he spoke to Preview 918 ahead of Candlebox’s March 26 visit to River Spirit Casino Resort’s Paradise Cove.


Q DOES THE ALBUM HAVE A TITLE?

Still working on a name. I wait until the eleventh hour to name the albums. I have done that since the beginning, and that’s why the debut album is just named Candlebox. I’m always kind of waiting and waiting and waiting for the title to come to me by listening to the songs and finding out what they’re trying to say to me as an album.

Q.

THERE’S A QUOTE ASSOCIATED WITH YOU: “IT’S CALLED ROCK ‘N’ ROLL; LOOK IT UP.”

Years ago, I had this side project [The Gracious Few] with the guys from [alternative rock band] Live — Patrick [Dahlheimer, bass], Chad [Taylor, guitar], and Chad [Gracey, drums] — along with fellow Candlebox member Sean Hennesy [guitar]. We were playing rock ‘n’ roll, with basic blues chords, strong song structure, and complexities and stuff like that. We were a blisteringly rock ‘n’ roll band. We weren’t spoon-feeding people that crap that radio stations were playing.

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WHAT IMPACT DID COMING OUT OF SEATTLE HAVE ON THE CANDLEBOX SOUND?

A.

I don’t think it had any substantial effect on us. We were about five years younger than most of the guys who were playing that style, like Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, Nirvana, Mother Love Bone, and Mudhoney. I think the city’s influence affected them, and that’s why those songs sound the way they sound.

WHO ARE SOME OF YOUR MUSICAL INFLUENCES?

ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO BEING BACK IN TULSA?

Q. A.

My main influences are late-’60s rock ‘n’ roll and mid-to-late-’70s punk rock. I love the Clash; they’re my favorite band. I grew up listening to Iggy and the Stooges, Led Zeppelin, The Who, and Jimi Hendrix. When I moved to Seattle, I started realizing there was a lot of different music out there. I got into a lot of new wave. My father is a jazz musician, so I started listening to a lot of jazz. I think my tastes in music were changing and growing.

Q.

WHAT CAN YOUR FANS EXPECT FROM THIS SHOW?

Q. A.

We love Tulsa. I remember when we first came to Tulsa in 1993. I knew that I was going to have a relationship with the city. I have a lot of friends there. It’s kind of weird to think we’re playing casinos now, but I guess everyone is doing it now.

CANDLEBOX Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort 8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 888-748-3731 riverspirittulsa.com

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Q. A.

So, I just started saying the quote onstage.

So, how did it affect me personally or Candlebox? I’d say zero. The only member of the band who would have been listening to it and learning from it would have been Bardi [Martin], our bass player. He spent some time in Ireland on an exchange program for school. And he had been growing up listening to bands like The Pogues and some of that great Irish rock ‘n’ roll, like Thin Lizzy and stuff.

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A.

I had to go to Houston to finish vocals for it. Now, I’m in practice mode to make sure we can play the album live. It comes out in late March or early April. It’s our seventh record, so we’re not the most prolific of bands, as it takes us 25 years to make seven records. It’s a different record for Candlebox. There’s no real direction to the album; it’s just songs that we loved and wanted to record. I’m pretty stoked that it is so different for us. It has 11 songs, and none of them is anything like the song before.

A.

There will be a lot of the new album in the set. This year is the 25th anniversary of Lucy, so we’ll probably be playing more songs from that album. We have a lot of really cool bands opening up for us. We love to introduce people to the music we’re listening to, the bands we love. That’s what happened with us when we toured with Living Colour and Rush back in 1994. They told us always to take bands that you want to listen to, and don’t take bands you think are going to sell tickets. So, come early, because you’re going to see a great group before we come out.

CA

TELL US ABOUT THE UPCOMING SEVENTH ALBUM.

I moved there from Texas when I was 15, so it wasn’t my scene. It wasn’t anything I was attracted to musically. I grew up on punk rock, but not the acid rock thing that was going on in Seattle. So, it took me a little while to get acclimated to the taste of that music. It wasn’t something I gravitated toward as an artist.

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Q.

A.

Musically, even from the 2000s on, there has been a somewhat lackluster effort in the production of great songs. Not to say there haven’t been any great songs, but it’s not like it was in the ‘60s or the ‘70s. The ‘80s? That’s always an argument. In the ‘90s, there was some brilliant music produced that has continued to mold an entire world of musicians.

CONVERSATION STARTER CS

March 26: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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CS CONVERSATION STARTER BY G.K. HIZER

commodores NO LIONEL RICHIE IS NO PROBLEM FOR THE COMMODORES, WHO CONTINUE TO BUILD OFF THE “BRICK HOUSE” FOUNDATION ESTABLISHED MORE THAN 50 YEARS AGO. It’s hard to believe that the Commodores have been around for more than half a century. The group, which signed to Motown Records in 1972, formed at Tuskegee University in 1968 and released its debut album, Machine Gun, in 1974. In the decades since, the group has evolved through funk, soul, R&B, and pop to become part of the fabric of American pop music. Although most people may think of Lionel Richie’s voice on ballads

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like “Easy,” “Sail On,” and “Three Times a Lady,” his departure in 1982 to pursue a solo career didn’t derail the group. Lead vocals had been alternated between Richie and Walter Orange since the band debuted, with Orange providing the voice for iconic funk/dance hits such as “Brick House” and “Too Hot ta Trot.” Orange went on to sing lead on the group’s signature single, “Nightshift,” which went on to not only land atop the singles charts in 1985 but also win a Grammy Award in 1986.

After parting ways with Motown, the Commodores proved to be ahead of the curve, forming their label in 1990, primarily to take control of the masters of their songs. And although the group hasn’t released a new studio album since 1993’s No Tricks, the band has stayed active, continuing to tour. Regardless of changes in membership and changes in the music industry, the Commodores have remained

an icon of pop, soul, and R&B for over five decades. With over 70 million albums sold, seven No. 1 singles, 20 top-10 singles, and 15 top-10 albums, they continue to draw fans young and old to dance to a lifetime of hits. Founding member William King talked to Preview 918 about the group’s history, evolution, and what lies ahead before heading out for a 2020 tour that will bring the band to Osage Casino’s Skyline Event Canter March 28.


Q CONVERSATION STARTER CS

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Q.

THROUGHOUT THE BAND’S CAREER, YOU’VE GONE THROUGH MEMBERSHIP CHANGES. HAS THAT CHANGED THE CHEMISTRY?

A.

I think the main thing is, Walter [Orange] has been with us since we got signed. He sings “Brick

Most people don’t realize we started as pure instrumentalists before we started singing. We were the band and had girls or guys do the singing in front of us when we first formed. Our first hit, “Machine Gun,” was an instrumental. It didn’t do much in America at first, but it took off in Asia, then came back and became a hit during the disco movement. We’ve weathered the storms — and I do mean storms, with a capital S. We’re the guys who’ve spent our lives doing this, and now we’re looking forward to bringing our kids into it. We’ve got two of our kids in the band, and they’re amazing musicians, so hopefully, we can pass it on to them.

Q.

DID YOU FORM YOUR RECORD LABEL TO GAIN MORE CREATIVE

The music business has changed so much over the years. We’re still getting used to streaming and getting paid from streaming. Not to beat up on the record companies, because they are useful, but you have to go after them to get your money sometimes.

Q.

HOW HAS SAMPLING EXTENDED YOUR CAREER, AND DOES IT FEEL LIKE IT’S HELPED YOU AT ALL?

A.

For us, it works in two ways. It does keep our sound and

Q.

WHAT SHOULD FANS EXPECT FROM THE LIVE SHOW?

A.

There will be the songs that everyone recognizes and a lot that they didn’t even realize we played. It will be a great night for everyone to come out and enjoy themselves.

COMMODORES Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel 951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa 877-246-8777 osagecasino.com

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HOW HAS THE GROUP EVOLVED THROUGH THE YEARS?

We went back and recut our masters, using the same instruments, playing everything note for note. They sounded the same. We did that so that any time someone wanted to use our music for a movie or commercial, we were able to license the songs for a little lower than the record company. We did renegotiate with the record company, and I don’t believe we’ve stepped on each others feet too often. The label was able to license our music out, and our people were able to license it out, and we got paid either way.

On the other hand, it does keep our music out there, and when they do realize who it is, people come back to our original stuff. Our audience has people of all ages and a lot of teens. So many of them heard us initially through other songs or listened to us because of their parents. That’s what I’m proud of. I think we came from a time when music was shining, people were playing their instruments, and bands were really creative.

TO

Q.

A.

It was more than one area. We found that to control your music you needed the masters, and Motown owned our master recordings.

our music out there because they’re usually using our original recordings, but you have to catch them. Often, they sample small parts that people don’t recognize, but we’ve got people to watch for that, and so does our old record company. Most of it goes on overseas, but once we catch it, the judges don’t usually smile on that.

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The bottom line is it’s me, Walter, and J.D. at the core. We’re a five-piece band, and everybody sings, and everybody plays instruments.

CONTROL AND FREEDOM OR MORE FOR THE FINANCIAL CONTROL?

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House” and a number of our hits, and sometimes I think he still gets a little frustrated when people think he’s singing [Lionel] Richie’s parts when it was him on those songs to begin with. I think the most significant change was when Richie left, and J.D. [Nicholas] came in almost 40 years ago.

March 28: 7 p.m. Must be 18 or older to attend

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SC SOUND CHECK

Sound Judgment Moving outside of the “millennial comfort zone” led Matthew Adams into building his DJ business around social dancing, and finding a niche few DJs explore. BY GINA CONROY PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS

With his signature dreads, eclectic sense of style, and creative streak with an entrepreneurial spirit, you may think 27-year-old Matthew Adams is a “typical” millennial. There’s nothing typical about millennials, those born between 1980-94. Lumping them characteristically into one group does them a grave injustice. Sure, some millennials and postmillennials have been labeled delicate, pampered, entitled, easily offended, and nonconformists, but they’re also innovative, tech-savvy, counter-culture, confident, compassionate, focused, and dream chasers. Not having bought into their parents’ and grandparents’ ideologies, millennials can, and often do, dream bigger than the generations before them. They’re not afraid to go against the status quo and try

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something new. Maybe that’s been part of Adams’ success. “As a person who lives in an ever-changing generation, older people would say this generation doesn’t stick to anything,” says Adams. “The roadmap used to be you go from high school to college, then work a job, and you stay at that job. It’s not that this generation can’t stick to one thing, it’s just they’ve grown up where things change all the time. From about 2010 to 2020, we went through 10 different versions of cellphones, our social media has changed, and the way we consume information has changed.” Even how people can earn a living has changed. “Sometimes how you make money on the side is way more than you would ever make at a job,” says Adams, who admits he was never good at sitting around asking someone to pay him. Even before he was 16, he never waited for someone

to say, “That’s how you do it.” He just figured it out on his own. So, it was no surprise he never saw working for someone as a longterm career path. Instead of college, Adams tried designing T-shirts and working at Hodges Bend, a popular coffee, wine, and cocktail spot in Tulsa’s East Village. “I started trying different things and figuring it out,” he says. And figure it out he did. Adam’s side hustle is now his full-time career with his DJ business — Eclectic Disposition, or DJ Ecog for short. Adams never intended to be a DJ. “To be completely honest, it chose me,” he says. Before DJing, his passion was sound design — the art of making the sounds that go into each song — and he did it for a year. “Every time I would try to explain what I did, they would say I’m a DJ. As much as it wasn’t true, I started looking into how to DJ,” Adams says.

After attending DJ events and listening to what others were playing, he thought he could do better. He decided to take online courses, learned to DJ, and discovered it was fun. “I loved putting mixes together, and electronic music, but Tulsa didn’t have a large electronic scene,” says Adams. “I started with a dance night catering to stylized dances like salsa, bachata, and West Coast swing.” This type of dance music was something he was familiar with, having discovered his love for dance years ago when he stumbled on to dancing by happenstance. “The [Jenks] Riverwalk used to have a weekly dance that was connected to ORU, and I found the group one Sunday while wandering around,” says Adams. “That was that. I’ve been dancing ever since.” When he started DJ Ecog, his only goal was to do dance events and maybe make a little money on the side. “I just wanted to do something different from a club central top 40s every weekend,” says Adams. “It became different, and it let me be able to do the songs I enjoyed.” Soon he realized it wasn’t a question of whether or not his DJing would be a big thing. People were gravitating toward his events. Adams says, “The question was to figure out how long it would be relevant and run with it.” He found that offering something few DJs did, an alternative to club music through his dance-friendly events, was not only different but popular. His dance music seemed to fill a niche in the community. “I can’t tell you how many people have shown up to my events over the last three years and have been looking for a way to get involved in either a dance community or have accidentally fallen into one of the dance events that I was doing,” says Adams. People who wanted to dance, but never found an outlet for it


As his DJ business grew, he began to understand more aspects of stylized dancing and music. The people who attended his dance events introduced him to the music he didn’t know. Soon he started picking up private gigs and playing in bars where he was able to take this new music, like popular Latin songs, to the clubs. “It allowed me to expand what I was doing and not have to do the same thing every week,” says Adams. “Latin music had become the forefront of a lot of dance music.” By playing this new music, he was able to stay ahead of the curve, generally two to three weeks before it was consistently blasted on the radio or Spotify. Despite his success, as with any business growth, Adams faced challenges. Unlike his dance events, his bar and club gigs attracted a different crowd. Distinguishing his diverse styles of DJing from one event to the next

“If someone was asking me what kind of night it was, I tried to put it in the title,” says Adams. That seemed to work. Last year his bigger events were First Friday Strictly Latin, the Rooftop Party that turned into the Patio Dance Party at New Era Fine Fermentations (NEFF), Afro Beats, and his hip-hop brunch. Now Adams relies on his Facebook events and his website to let people know whether it’s a dancer-friendly event or more of a top 40s event. While Adams loves what he’s doing now, he admits he craves new experiences. “The goal hasn’t changed; it’s just evolved and gotten bigger,” says Adams, whose future goals include booking more private gigs and weddings, doing a monthly dance, playing at a festival, hosting his events, and progressing in his DJing. “The more I learn, the more I can do. I’ve had a lot of ideas I’m playing around with since the beginning, but now I’m in a position to do an event with 200-300 people and have the means to do that.”

DJ ECOG

918-640-1119 eclecticdisposition.com facebook.com/ecogtulsa

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Although Adams started DJ Ecog playing music people could social dance to, it wasn’t long before he started playing in bars and picking up private gigs like corporate parties and weddings.

Most of the time, they couldn’t dance their steps to the music he was playing. Adams knew he needed to figure out how to differentiate the type of gig he was doing to keep everyone happy and coming back.

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“It’s a lot more fun when I get to interact with people, especially when it comes to dance events,” Adams says. “Having the person who’s running the event be able to dance with you, for me, that is what adds value.” It’s also one of the things that set his events apart from the rest.

“My dance community would come to the bar or club and stand on the side looking for some songs to dance to.”

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Not only was Adams meeting a need in the community, but his dance sets became a way for him to connect with people and gave him a creative outlet for playing more complex music and styles. It also allowed him to leave his DJ post and join in the dance to mix and mingle with the people.

so that the right audience would show up was a learning curve.

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were showing up at his events. Others found his music and dances by chance, joining in the fun through this no-pressure way to get their feet wet in the dance community.

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bringing the WIELDING EVERYDAY OBJECTS LIKE BROOMS, GARBAGE CANS, AND WOODEN POLES TO CREATE A WORDLESS PERCUSSIVE EXPLOSION ONSTAGE, STOMP CONTINUES TO PROVE THAT ONE MAN’S TRASH REALLY CAN BE ANOTHER MAN’S TREASURE. By Gina Conroy //// Photos by Steve McNicholas Stomp: The name says it all. Or does it? If you think Stomp is a high-energy, innovative, grungy percussion troupe that utilizes ordinary and not so ordinary objects to create music in an explosive display of sights and sounds, you’d be right… and wrong. Described as having a tribal vibe, Stomp uses familiar, everyday “instruments” such as brooms, trashcans, cups, utensils, and even the kitchen sink to make rhythms and an unforgettable evening of entertainment. One of the charms of the show is how people are pulled into this delightful musical frenzy because the instruments are part

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of everyday life. While most of us have used many of these objects, we haven’t created rhythms that make others want to move or tap their feet. So, where does the musical inspiration come from? Jasmine Joyner, who has been with the show for three years, says the inspiration comes from the pitch or sound emitted from each “instrument.” A spoon or metal utensil has a high pitch, whereas plastic has a bass or dull sound. Drumming your hand on plastic gets a different sound, as does the scraping of a broom across the floor. Put them all together in a rhythm filled with explosive movement and silent comedy (there’s no

talking in the show), and you’re starting to catch a glimpse of the phenomenon that is Stomp. Stomp got its start in England 26 years ago before it moved off-Broadway to the Orpheum Theatre in New York City, where it’s been playing ever since. Back then, it was grungier, and the performers were more militant and focused on the music because they mostly hired musicians. With the newer generation, they started auditioning people with different backgrounds like acting and dance. “They were willing to invite more people [to audition] who had different talents for a more well-rounded show,” says Joyner. They even had people audition who just drummed on the train for fun. Joyner, who is from Queens, New York, joined the show right after graduation from SUNY Fredonia in upstate New York. She was a dance major, not a musician. “That was my first and only audition,” says Joyner. “Being a

part of Stomp for three years, I’ve grown so much. Every year is something new, and that’s why I stay around.” Over the years, Stomp has evolved into a multisensory experience that’s been described as “provocative, witty, and utterly unique.” One of the added layers to the show is the comedy aspect. While Stomp has always had a comedic element in the show,


and cast, Joyner believes Stomp’s success is due to the cast’s ability to connect with the audience. “They connect because we allow them to join us,” says Joyner.

What Joyner enjoys about the flexibility of her roles is that there are times she can play Cornish differently. “The main way to play Cornish is to play her quirky. As you’re working, you’re doing things with the cast, but they move to the next thing, and you’re the last one. It’s almost like a little sister role,” says Joyner. But she can switch it up. “Because I’ve played Bin for so long and that character is stern and in charge, I can take my Cornish, and I can be sassy with it, but I don’t have to be as mean or grungy.” it was more deadpan and sarcastic. “They would make a certain facial expression like ‘I am the comedy person, and everyone else is frustrated by what I’m doing because I’m not following the rules,’” says Joyner. “Now, we have more than one comedic role.”

Joyner never knows how she’ll play a part until she’s onstage. “It depends on how the audience reacts from the very beginning and how your day is going,” says Joyner, who admits that’s also the fun part. “Even though we end up playing the same numbers, it’s a new show every day.”

Joyner plays one of the comedy roles, called Cornish. “She’s a quirky girl who is down with the seven other people,” says Joyner. “She follows up behind everyone.”

In contrast to Sarge, the one the crew looks up to and listens to, is Particle, the smooth operator of the group. “He plays too cool around everyone,” says Joyner.

“While everyone is doing the number, Particle is adding his flavor and style. When we start up with the brooms, he’s doing tricks with the brooms. He draws the audience’s attention because of how cool he looks and the way he makes nice shapes and is still able to play the music, but then do other things with the objects.” Potato Head plays more of a musical role and can play on anything. “With all the pieces we have in the show, he has more of the choppier numbers,” says Joyner. “He will play this amazing outstanding solo in almost all the numbers because he’s such a great drummer.” Not only are the roles diverse in the group, so is the age range. Although you have to be 18 years old, the oldest person Joyner’s met who has played in Stomp has been 50. “There’s someone who’s been in the show for 23 years,” says Joyner. And being that the show is only 26 years old, that’s proof you don’t have to be any particular age to be in the show. Or enjoy the show.” Joyner loves the diversity of the group, and they feel more like family than co-workers.

Joyner appreciates the improv and that the three girls in the cast play the same roles, but play them differently and make the roles their own. “There’s no competition because everyone is doing their own thing,” says Joyner. “That’s what keeps it fresh because even though we play the same role, we play it differently, so we have a different dynamic to show.” Not only does that make it fun and fresh for the performers, but since every show has a unique flavor, even if you saw the show last year or last week, you’re sure to have a new experience the next time around.

STOMP Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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In addition to the musicality and diversity in the characters

If Stomp were a traditional Broadway show with a strict script, they wouldn’t be able to connect with the audience and draw them in as they do. Even though they have a script, it allows each character to do what they want.

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“We spend most of our time with each other at home in the city or on tour,” Joyner says. When on tour, they go out to eat after shows, and when they have a couple of days off, they take excursions together and wind down from doing the shows. “I love that we enjoy being around each other.”

The members of the cast don’t ignore the audience even though it’s easy to drown out the audience when they get on that stage. Joyner and the rest of the crew want people to come to the show and get what they asked for. “We try to get one-on-one with the audience and make sure we draw their attention to keep them uplifted and focused so that we won’t lose them,” she says.

March 6: 8 p.m. March 7: 2 p.m., 8 p.m. March 8: 6:30 p.m.

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Angelini, who, if you couldn’t tell from the name, is a native-born Italian. Before he came to the United States in 1987, he grew up in Napoli, where they have the Camorra. “Camorra is way more violent than Mafia,” says Angelini. But you don’t have to know anything about the Mafia or have even seen a Godfather movie to enjoy the performance and be able to follow the story. “Vendetta is not meant to be a show that requires preparation, special research, or understanding,” says Angelini. “It’s a bit like Hamilton; just follow the story as it’s told from the stage, and you’ll have a good time.” Inspired by Chicago’s infamous crime families, extensive research from documentaries went into bringing this lyrical mob story to life. This two-act ballet, with an impressive 28 scenes including an Italian wedding, picnic, and seedy Las Vegas casino, accurately captures the love, passion, anger, and revenge of the American Mafia culture.

A MATTER OF CRIME A MASH-UP OF BROADWAY WITH A WEST SIDE STORY FLAIR AND A DAB OF MOULIN ROUGE, THE MAFIA-THEMED VENDETTA IS DIFFERENT IN MANY WAYS FROM OTHER TULSA BALLET PRODUCTIONS — BUT THAT’S THE POINT. Picture it: Chicago in the 1950s. Rosalia Carbone, the only daughter of the Carbone crime boss, is getting married — white dress, no less. The only problem is she’s marrying into a rival family. And you never take sides against “the family,” or break the Godfather’s heart, especially when he’s your father.

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When her wedding day is soiled by murder, it reignites a multifamily feud, and vendettas break loose. Rosalia is left seeing red because her brothers have no heart to do anything about it. What’s a mob daughter to do in Chicago, where women can be more dangerous than shotguns?

BY GINA CONROY

What ensues in the aftermath is a dazzling, red-hot, passionate modern ballet that will have you on the edge of your seat, laughing, smiling, and wishing you were part of the family. “This is one of those pieces that can be enjoyed by everybody,” says artistic director Marcello

With such a vast undertaking, an expansive set is imperative. This is accomplished by an elevated walkway across the back of the stage, which highlights the urban, gang-infested mob world. Audiences get a front-row seat to the “split-screen style action” where gangsters conduct “business” in the violent and seedy underworld. But despite its dark subject matter, Vendetta is “fun, funny, and hardly ever dark,” says Angelini. It’s a mix between ballet and vaudeville. “There is also a love story that bonds all the pieces together, so you go from a Godfather being shot by a rival family to a Romeo and Juliet duet, says Angelini.” It’s the character development of Rosalia from a loving, naïve daughter to a hardened member of “the family” that adds to the


depth of the story and thrill of the performance. While Angelini wouldn’t want to kill the ending for you, he says it has a twist that is very much in tune with our times. Described as a mash-up between Broadway and film noir with a West Side Story flair and a dab of Moulin Rouge, Vendetta is different in many ways from other productions the Tulsa ballet has done in the past; but that’s the point. It fits Angelini’s vision to expose more people to this art form who might not attend a more traditional ballet. His vision also includes bringing the best choreographers in the world to Tulsa and creating new works and exporting them all over the world. When Angelini first came to Tulsa, he had big dreams. “People laughed in my face and said, do you realize this is not possible in Tulsa?” says Angelini in an interview on RSU public television. He was told he was never going to get the works of the great masters and export the ballets and tour internationally. “Twenty–five years later and every one of those items has been

accomplished,” says Angelini. “The reviews have called us one of the five most influential companies in the United States and one of the top 10 ballet companies.”

Angelini jumped from his chair. “Les Grands is a company where Daniela [Angelini’s wife] and I were principal dancers for many years, so it’s close to my heart, and it produces great work.”

For those who love classical ballet, Vendetta brings something fresh and new to Tulsa.

Even though Vendetta is not your typical ballet, the language and the steps, are deeply rooted in ballet. “Annabelle is a classically trained ballet dancer who uses her knowledge of ballet as a tool to craft her movements,” says Angelini. “She twists and bends classical technique, and then blends it with contemporary dance and her movements and sense of aesthetics, but it’s still in the realm of ballet/ contemporary dance.”

“It’s the most innovative full evening work I have seen in a long time,” says Angelini, who saw the premier with his wife in Montreal. “We loved it, and I knew I had to bring Vendetta to Tulsa.” Angelini is especially thrilled to have Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, “named the most in-demand female choreographer in the world by Dance Magazine,” as choreographer of the production. “She is a power to reckon with,” says Angelini. A few years back, Ochoa came to the Tulsa ballet to work on Shibuya Blues. It was so successful that Angelini toured it in Europe last spring. After the premiere of Vendetta in Montreal, when Ochoa told Angelini she was doing new work for Les Grands Ballets Canadiens based on the Mafia,

When it comes to the ballet, proper expression of the movement is critical in storytelling. Audiences will recognize signature Mafia moves, like a toss of the head and a thrust of a chin and shoulder. Those moves, coupled with the powerful poetic movement of the dances, bring this tale to life with mystique and charm. “As dancers, we have no words,” says Angelini. “Our movement and body language have to be so strong and clear that we can let you see the words coming out of our hands or our feet or our body.” As if the dancing wasn’t dazzling enough, the look of the show has a classic Broadway feel, adding to the ambiance of the production. That’s because projections create the background images of the story.

music of the times through famous songs of the era sung by the original recording arts. “Annabelle wanted to take us to different times and decades through the very famous songs of that particular time,” says Angelini. “I am sure it was a painstaking affair to find the recordings and piece the score together.” But the effort was worth it, adding a dimension to the show that not only sets the stage but helps transport the audience back in time through music. “[Vendetta] is a great representation of how ballet has evolved from Giselle [1834] to 2018 when it premiered,” says Angelini. “The building blocks of storytelling are the same; the format follows the same guidelines. However, today’s ballet isn’t your grandma’s ballet anymore.” Angelini says everyone “will enjoy the humor, visuals, choreography, duets, and plot of this truly groundbreaking work.” “Ballet lovers will enjoy great storytelling told in a somewhat familiar medium with captivating looks and a contemporary feel to it,” says Angelini. “Newcomers to ballet will be exposed to a story they can understand and follow, told in a language without words that is as eloquent as the spoken word.”

“The projections take you from one place to the other in the blink of an eye,” says Angelini. “We go to a street in Chicago to the strip in Las Vegas and to interior settings.”

VENDETTA Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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The visuals are not the only elements that are innovative in this ballet. Instead of a full orchestra accompaniment, audiences are absorbed in the

March 26: 7 p.m. March 27-28: 7:30 p.m. March 29: 2:30 p.m.

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THE WRIGHT WAY The Price Tower in Bartlesville serves to remind visitors of architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s style and the 1950s period in which the tower was built, but the amenities are rooted firmly in the present. By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

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“It is important for people to know and recognize this is a jewel we have in our area,” says Rick Loyd, executive director. A striking piece of architecture, the tower rises above the pavement — 19 stories, 221 feet high. “It’s known as the tree that escaped the crowded forest — escaped New York City and ended up on the prairie here in Oklahoma,” says Loyd. That tree description is apt. The elevator shafts at the center of the building are the core — the trunk — of the tower. Out from that trunk extend the building’s “branches,” the rooms on each floor which extend over open air in an impressive, cantilevered style. “It’s a pretty innovative and mind-bending design.” Wright was an American architect, interior designer, writer, and educator, who designed more than 1,000 structures, 532 of which were completed. Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. His creative period spanned more than 70 years. So how did something this cool end up in Bartlesville? The story goes back nearly a century to the late 1920s, when the Price Tower was originally designed (in 1928) as one of three towers Wright expected to see built in New York City. But then the Stock Market Crash of 1929 happened, and the Great Depression, and Wright couldn’t get anyone to build what he’d created. “Wright sat on that design for 20 years, until a client here in Bartlesville was interested,” explains Loyd. The client, oilman Harold C. Price, commissioned the building to house his company. The Price Tower opened to the public in 1956, and like many Wright projects, this architectural wonder was ahead of its time.

The floorplan of the Price Tower centers upon an inlaid cast bronze plaque, bearing the logo of the Price Company and marking the origin of a parallelogram grid upon which all exterior walls, interior partitions and doors, and built-in furniture are placed. The resulting design is a quadrant plan — one quadrant dedicated to doubleheight apartments, and three for offices. The materials for the Price Tower are equally innovative for a mid-20th century skyscraper: cast concrete walls, pigmented concrete floors, aluminum-trimmed windows and doors, and patinated embossed and distressed copper panels. As a historic site, the Price Tower serves to remind visitors of Wright’s style and the 1950s period in which the tower was built. “What we’re about is respecting the building and architectural design,” says Loyd. “We’re not into changing any of the elements.” Of course, the Price Tower isn’t stuck in the past. The style may hearken back to 1956, but the amenities are rooted firmly in the present, such as the beautiful Copper Restaurant and Bar located on the 15th floor. With two dining areas and a bar, this small, intimate environment draws people from far and near. The Price Tower holds a competition every year to offer an up-and-coming chef an opportunity to work at Copper and live at the Price Tower during their year’s tenure. After narrowing down the field of 730 applicants and hosting a three-day cookoff, the current winner was selected. “Chef Nook is from New Orleans, and he’s brought a real Southern flavor to his menu. He’s popular with hotel guests and locals who dine here,” says Loyd.

The hotel portion of the tower hosts 19 rooms — a few two-story suites with an upstairs loft; the others are standard double- or king-sized rooms. “We get a lot of Frank Lloyd Wright enthusiasts coming through and staying,” says Loyd. But locals also use the hotel as a place to host out-of-town guests or come for a special stay. There’s also an art gallery, featuring touring exhibits four times a year, plus a permanent exhibit that displays items related to either Wright or Bruce Goff, a protégé of Wright who lived at the Price Tower for six years. The gallery will host a special Goff exhibit in connection with OU’s Architectural Department through March 22. The Gala, which is the Price Tower’s main fundraiser, is being held March 6. The black-tie event will feature a VIP reception at the tower, then move over to the performing arts center where a fourcourse dinner will be served, with musical entertainment by Zodiac. Oklahoma artist Tim Kenney, who started painting at the age of 52, will also be present to complete a set of 19 paintings of the Price Tower he is working on. A portion of each painting’s profits will be donated to the Price Tower. In 2020, The Tower Center at Unity Square will be opening up just south of the tower. This outdoor green space will feature a performing pavilion with live events and concerts. In conjunction with this outdoor space, the Price Tower will also be opening up outdoor seating on the ground floor, where breakfast, lunch, and coffee will be available.

PRICE TOWER 510 S. Dewey Ave. Bartlesville 918-336-4949 pricetower.org

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“Wright wanted the outside to be brought in, which is why windows are wrapped around the building,” says Loyd. Glass was an important element in Wright’s designs. So, too, were the decorative elements in Cherokee red and turquoise, and the 30- and 60-degree angles and equilateral triangles evident everywhere in the tower’s interior design.

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Yes, we’re talking about Bartlesville’s Price Tower. As Wright’s only realized skyscraper, the tower is on the National Register of Historic Places, and when you visit, it’s clear why.

The menu items change seasonally, and there’s always something delicious to be had. Diners can dress up or down as they please. And the tower has two 16th-floor outdoor terraces — one facing the sunrise, one the sunset, both offering spectacular views — with access to restaurant and bar service.

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“The concept of the tower was to create a place where people could live, shop and work, and be all-inclusive,” says Loyd. While multiuse properties are all the rage today, this wasn’t the case in 1956, and certainly not in 1928 when Wright first designed his concept. The tower includes an art gallery, office space, a restaurant, and hotel rooms.

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Green Country may be located smack dab in the middle of the nation, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have its share of treasures. Less than an hour’s drive north from downtown Tulsa, you’ll find something that no place else in the United States can brag about having — an actual skyscraper designed by one of America’s most famous architects, Frank Lloyd Wright.

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Where Tulsa’s Aviation heritage takes Flight!

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MAGNIFICENT

MENUS ELLIOT NELSON ENJOYS FINDING WAYS TO BRING THE WORLD TO TULSA IN EXCITING, FOOD-RELATED WAYS. BUT IT TAKES FINESSE AND A BIT OF LUCK TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES WITHOUT GOING TOO FAR BEYOND THE CUSTOMERS’ COMFORT ZONES. By Michele Chiappetta The right concept at the right location can make for a successful restaurant. But Elliot Nelson of the McNellie’s Group of Restaurants will also tell you a restaurant that stays a success comes down to two things: “Ultimately, it’s providing really good food and really good service,” he says. You may or may not recognize the McNellie’s Group name, but if you’ve been in Tulsa long enough, you’ll surely recognize the well-loved food joints that Nelson and his company have launched — El Guapo, Dilly Diner, Fassler Hall, Yokozuna, McNellie’s, The Tavern, Bull in the Alley, Dust Bowl, and Elgin Park. It might be surprising to realize that this restaurant juggernaut started just a little over 15 years ago. That’s when Nelson got his inspiration to launch McNellie’s Pub in downtown Tulsa. At the time, downtown didn’t have much going on, and pubs weren’t exactly on people’s radar. Nelson, though, had developed a fondness for the local neighborhood pubs he’d enjoyed in Ireland. So, he launched McNellie’s in downtown, which wasn’t hip in 2004. Since then, downtown has been having a revival, and the McNellie’s Group has been a big part of it. “Whenever you start something, you think, ‘This is going to be great; this is going to last forever.’ But I don’t believe you ever envision what that’s like,” says Nelson.

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McNellie’s has become a fixture; it’s hosted many a first date, engagement party, and more. “People have met their spouses there,” Nelson says. “A lot of things have happened in that pub, and that’s cool.”

The sense of community is something Nelson loves, and it’s evident in everything he touches. “I still go to Ireland once a year to experience the pub culture,” Nelson says. “It’s a living, breathing thing where a community gathers, and it is part of people’s everyday life.” In creating restaurants people love, Nelson is dedicated to things that draw people in, and it’s not always what you might think it is. While the restaurant business could seem focused on following the latest trends, Nelson believes it’s essential to find a balance. “I think, so often, people have overthought this industry,” he says. “The reality is, people want a place where they feel comfortable, where they enjoy the food and can have a good conversation. They want a place to come back to over and over.” In practice, what that means is finding the balance between Nelson’s love for food and creativity with Green Country residents’ need to feel comfortable and at home in the places they go to eat. Nelson enjoys traveling, and he likes finding ways to bring the world to Tulsa in interesting, foodrelated ways. But it takes finesse and a bit of luck to push the boundaries without going too far beyond the customers’ comfort zones. “When we first built Yokozuna, we wanted a ramen bar, something I’d seen in my travels and thought, ‘This is going to be great.’ But we were too early,” he says. Yokozuna switched gears and became more about sushi in part because Tulsa wasn’t ready for a ramen bar yet. “Whatever’s happening on the coasts takes a while to migrate in,” says Nelson. “If we’re going to go out ahead on something, we have to tailor it and educate people.” As an example, he points to Elgin Park, a sports

bar with plenty of familiar menu items like domestic beers and chicken wings, but also with some things you won’t find anywhere else in town — like the thin-crust, parmesan-heavy New Haven pizza, and the thick, cheese-infused crust of their Detroit Pizza. Both are stellar meals, and both are not usual fare in Tulsa.

Bull in the Alley is another example of Nelson mixing his sensibilities when it comes to food with an understanding of what people want, to create a concept that is lively and inventive, yet still also relatable and classic. “I like old-school steakhouses,” he says, explaining what inspired Bull in the Alley. “I like the throwback, classic kind of restaurant. A lot of fine dining now is fussy. Everyone is trying to get the next obscure thing, but people want the classic stuff. We put enough on the menu that people can choose something comfortable if they prefer it. Our porterhouse and the way we cook it is incredible, but we still serve a lot of filets. Our service is great, our martinis are great — there’s a simplicity to it that is beautiful.” Nelson credits a lot of the group’s success in concept development to their executive chef, Ben Alexander. “A lot of times, we’ll have a space available and develop a concept for it, then give it to Ben and his team to develop the menu,” says Nelson, who also likes to take Alexander and other staff to visit restaurants in cities like New York, Los Angeles, and Dallas, looking for inspiration they can bring back here. Ultimately, though, a restaurant’s success comes down to knowing what your customers want. And it’s something Nelson keeps in mind and reminds his staff all the time. “People have a lot of places they can go to eat,” he says. “We need to appreciate they came here. All our service at all our restaurants needs to feel warm. Tulsa is a friendly city, and no matter what we’re doing, we need to embody that — and greet them with a smile.”


ELLIOT NELSON

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care top docsy clinic

at the prestigious, respected Mayo Clinic before being drawn to Tulsa to work at the City of Faith Medical and Research Center. When that closed in 1989, Carey remained in Tulsa in the private practice realm. But his commitment to treating the whole person — body, soul, and spirit — has never wavered.

Beyond the standard physicals and well-person exams you’d expect at a clinic that offers primary care, the Carey Clinic provides other services that zero in on some of the most common issues families face, especially in Tulsa.. By Michele Chiappetta /// Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

Dr. Terence L. Carey

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The mission of the Carey Clinic, says Todd Jackson, chief operating officer, “is to provide personalized, high-quality care on an as-needed or preventative basis. We have created a practice that we believe in and choose for our family members. We believe in working with our patients to maintain and improve their health. We work together to serve your entire family for all of your medical needs in all stages of life.”

Finding a physician who truly cares and makes you feel like a person, not a number, has to be every patient’s dream. Much of the country's medical system is designed not to do that, but the knowledgeable, dedicated doctors and nurses who serve at the Carey Clinic — a full-service family, pediatric, and sub-specialty office — practice that in Tulsa.

It’s easy to see this multigenerational, family approach in every inch of the clinic. The reception and waiting area is warm, clean, and inviting, easing patients into relaxing — a must for any doctor’s visit. The staff ’s friendly faces add to the welcoming atmosphere. And you’re likely to see all ages of Tulsa residents being served.

If you’ve lived in Tulsa for a while, you may have run into the clinic’s founder, Dr. Terence L. Carey. He’s a tall, memorable gentleman, a doctor whose patients enjoy his honest, compassionate care. Born, raised, and schooled in medicine in South Africa, Carey then came to the U.S. and trained

“We have a lot of families that we’re taking care of, several generations,” says Jackson. “Parents will bring their child in, and then they end up coming here as well. We do everything from treating your sick child, to a sports visit, to well-woman exams, to everything in between.”


The clinic offers a mix of primary care, allergy and asthma care, immunology, pediatrics, adult and pediatric immunizations, physicals, and preventative health care. But medicine isn’t just providing treatment. It involves how you care for the patient too, and that’s something the entire staff cares deeply about. “One thing that makes us stand out is the amount of time our providers spend with their patients and the level of contact

STEPHANIE MYERS, APRN including people with immunodeficiencies, arthritis, and certain gastrointestinal diseases. “Most patients will go to a hospital for infusions,” says Jackson. “But we can do it here. We have four suites set up like living rooms, with flat-panel TVs, and workstations for laptops. We tried to make it much more inviting and comfortable to the patients. A lot of these issues can be life-threatening or life-altering. We’re providing antibodies to people so they can go out and function.”

The Carey Clinic specializes in addressing those issues to improve the quality of life of allergy sufferers of all ages. “We treat patients with seasonal-

To make medical care convenient for all patients, the clinic provides several services beyond office visits. There is an in-office CT machine so that patients can get in-office images right there with the provider. There are also four infusion suites, offering a comforting private space for those who need such services,

CAREY CLINIC

7125 S. Braden Ave. | Tulsa 918-481-8100 careyclinic.com

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“There are lots of allergy and lung issues in the Tulsa region,” notes Jackson. What that means, of course, is that there’s a reason why you or those you know seem to cough, sniffle, sneeze and wheeze a lot. Oklahoma

Also, Carey treats many patients with pulmonary issues, and not just locally. “Dr. Carey has established a reputation of successfully treating very medically complex cases. His patients drive from all over the state and out of state to see him,” says Jackson.

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Beyond the standard physicals and well-person exams you’d expect at a clinic that offers primary care, the Carey Clinic provides other services that zero in on some of the most common issues families face, especially in Tulsa. For example — allergies and asthma.

typically makes the list of most allergy-prone places in the U.S. — primarily due to our warm weather, our warmups that breed pollen throughout the year, and winds that not only blow allergens around our area but even invite them up from Texas to make matters worse for allergy sufferers. The symptoms cause a lot of problems for people in our state, from missed work and school, to lowered athletic performance and just general misery.

In addition to helping Tulsans, Carey often travels to other countries in Central America, South America, and Africa to provide medical care to those in need. “It’s all part of his giving back,” says Jackson. “It’s a lot of work, but it’s very, very rewarding.”

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and care,” says Jackson. “It’s more than just seeing you in the office.”

The clinic also provides mental health services, family and individual counseling, with a particular emphasis on helping those with chronic illnesses, which can affect not only the patient but their family members too. “It helps give patients tools to cope and excel,” Jackson says.

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allergy issues, allergic reactions to different allergens like peanuts and insects, through treatments such as desensitization and medication so that people can confidently go out into the world and enjoy life,” says Jackson. Treatments are personalized for each patient, of course, and you can expect to work with caring doctors and nurse practitioners who listen and problem-solve.

Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: Closed

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If you battle seasonal allergies, then you understand how congestion, a runny nose, headaches, and other bothersome symptoms can make you miserable. While navigating allergies can be difficult, many options can help treat, prevent, and alleviate symptoms. BY MIC HE LE C HIAP P E TTA Spring officially begins this month. Lawns get lush, and flowers bloom with color. Temps warm up, and we start to get outside more often. It’s a great time of year, but if you’re one of the millions of people who have seasonal allergies, spring also means grabbing the tissues and eye drops to deal with sneezing, congestion, a runny nose, itchy eyes and other symptoms that can interfere with your daily life. If you’re suffering from hay fever or allergic rhinitis, you’re not alone. One study from 2012 reported that a whopping 17.6 million adults were diagnosed with hay fever within the previous year. To make that worse, Tulsa usually ranks in the top 10 of most allergenic cities in the U.S. Unfortunately, our warm climate can stir up pollen even in winter, meaning many of us don’t get a break on those allergy symptoms. “Seasonal allergies have a huge impact on folks,” says Dr. Michelle Montalbano, a board-certified allergy, asthma, and immunology specialist at the Carey Clinic in Tulsa. “They can have a huge impact on how someone feels and how they function. Allergies can lead to lost productivity at work. Over 2 million absences in school days annually are attributed to allergic rhinitis. So, the burden is substantial.” Fortunately, if you deal with seasonal allergies, rest assured — some solutions can improve your daily life when the pollens are high. Here are some

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suggestions to help you find the fixes that work best for you.

IDENTIFY THE CAUSE Seasonal allergies are caused by what’s blooming at a given time of year. Different things bloom at different times, so your allergy is probably pretty specific. Knowing your triggers can tell you when symptoms are likely to worsen or improve. “We have a lot of tree, weed, and grass pollen here in Oklahoma, and that’s typically spring into summer and fall,” says Dr. Montalbano. Ragweed is a major pollinator in our area too, she says, and it typically blooms in the late summer to fall. But even in winter, you might have problems, because while it may be cold here, it’s warmer to the south. And those pesky winds that buffet our state bring cedar tree pollen and other allergens right to us from 200 miles away or more.

RINSE YOUR NASAL PASSAGES Wondering about neti pots and sinus rinses? It may be worth giving them a try. Using a simple, over-the-counter sinus rinse daily will wash the pollen out of your nasal passages and help reduce inflammation. If you opt for a neti pot, use only distilled or sterilized water to create a salty solution that won’t put allergens or other contaminants into your sinuses.

KEEP ALLERGENS OUT OF THE HOUSE Another way to lessen the impact of pollen on your body is to keep those pesky allergens where they belong — outdoors. Keep your home as much of a pollen-free zone as you can by removing shoes when you come inside, closing windows and running the air conditioning, and wiping down the dog and cat when they come inside to remove pollen from their fur.

MEDICATE WITH CAUTION Antihistamines and nasal steroid sprays can help alleviate symptoms. But use

them carefully. Nasal congestion sprays, such as Afrin and other brands, can be problematic. They don’t address the underlying cause of your allergies, and extended use can cause rebound congestion — meaning your symptoms will only get worse over time. Your doctor can help you find a better treatment if you need one.

TAKE YOUR BEST SHOT If you want to try to lessen your symptoms or even eliminate them, immunotherapy may help. More commonly known as allergy shots, this technique uses the patient’s immune system to cure the allergies over time by helping your body develop tolerance to the allergen. “This can be a life-changing therapy for people,” says Dr. Montalbano.

STAY ALERT TO ASTHMA A complicating factor with seasonal allergies worth mentioning is asthma. Seasonal allergies and allergic rhinitis serve as a risk factor for developing asthma, and around 38% of patients with allergies will have asthma as well. Some patients will only have asthma when they have seasonal allergies. If you’re having asthmatic symptoms due to your allergies, it’s smart to see a specialist.

TALK WITH YOUR DOCTOR “Part of what we do as allergists is identify what the triggers are so that we can provide precision care for that specific patient,” says Dr. Montalbano. “How you would treat someone who is allergic to cat hair is different from how you would treat an athlete who is suffering symptoms from the grass when they’re out on the field. That’s one of the benefits of seeing a specialist. We can help with precise treatment.” Dr. Montalbano recommends making an appointment when you have long-lasting symptoms that have no relief; complications such


as sinus infections, ear infections, and nasal polyps; side effects from medications that interfere with your ability to function; problems sleeping; inability to smell; or other sinus issues that aren’t resolving.

DON’T GIVE UP HOPE If Dr. Montalbano has one message for the allergy-prone to remember, it’s this: “Patients don’t need to suffer. A lot of times, they have become so accustomed to a degree of symptoms that they don’t remember what it’s like to not have them. And there’s a lot that an allergist can offer in terms of improving quality of life. I think it’s a message of encouragement and hope that we can make this better.”

WAYS TO CLEAN INDOOR AIR Keep your windows shut. You may think you are letting in a refreshing breeze, but an open window also invites allergens into your home. Change furnace and air conditioner filters every three months. Replace them with high-efficiency versions that trap small particles in dust and the pollen that may be circulating in the air. Relocate plants. Houseplants may be a breeding ground for mold, a possible irritant that can worsen your allergy symptoms. Keep them in an open space, such as your living room. Pollen can hitch a ride on your shoes and clothes and be deposited throughout your home. Change as soon as you walk through the door. Wash your hair before bed. If you skip the suds, any pollen stuck to your strands will accumulate on your pillowcase. To be safe, wash bedding in hot water at least once a week. Skip air fresheners. Tiny particles from air fresheners can irritate your respiratory tract, making allergies worse. Vacuum and mop floors often.

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MENTAL PUZZLES PLAYED OUT IN REAL-WORLD 3D GLORY, CINERGY’S ESCAPE ROOMS REQUIRE TEAMS TO FIND HIDDEN CLUES, DISCOVER KEYS, FIGURE OUT MYSTERIES, AND ABOVE ALL, WORK TOGETHER TO COMPLETE THE TASK IN UNDER AN HOUR. By Michele Chiappetta / Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

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There are five rooms to choose from, each game lasting an hour, with six to eight players in the room. Choices include Haunted Mansion with a paranormal mystery to solve; Captain’s Cove, featuring a search for treasure while escaping a wrathful ghost;

If you’ve done escape rooms before and found them easy, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to discover that Cinergy’s options are more demanding and heartpoundingly fun. “Most escape rooms are well lit, and you have to find a key or a word or letters to get a padlock unlocked. It’s basic stuff,” he says. “Not this. You’ve got to find a certain hidden phrase in the dark. You’ve got to find flashlights. You’ve got to shoot things in a certain order. You’ve got to find stuff to weigh the right amount to trigger this thing over here, which then triggers this thing. Yeah, it’s awesome.” People who have tried Cinergy’s escape rooms already are loving the experience. And as might be expected, the rooms tend to

Those who excel at crossword puzzles and number games tend to love escape rooms since it brings their skills to bear as part of solving a larger puzzle. But unlike doing an acrostic or Sudoku, or even a labyrinth or maze, escape rooms aren’t a solo solve-it experience. Escape rooms are a popular teambuilding activity for corporations because the exciting nature of the activity is entertaining as well as requiring collaboration. It puts a more modern, creative spin on the old “trust fall” — without the threat that your co-worker won’t catch you. For groups, Cinergy offers some excellent package pricing. If you opt for the business package, appetizers are included. If your group is large enough — 20 people or more — you might want to consider upgrading your experience to include a business buffet as well, giving employees or a group of clients you want to entertain a day full of fun and food. Of course, Cinergy’s escape rooms are just one activity in an entertainment center that is full of options. If your group wants to make an afternoon or evening of the thrills, you can finish up

No matter what you choose to check out, you’ll enjoy the professional service offered by their enthusiastic staff. “I love guests,” says Latus, explaining why customer service matters so much at Cinergy. “I’ve always been in the hospitality industry, and I love taking care of people. When you can make them smile, have a great time, and get to know them better, that’s what makes the job enjoyable.” Ultimately, as with everything at Cinergy, the key is pleasing those who walk in the doors. And at that, Cinergy is brilliant, and people are noticing. “The response has been great,” says Latus. “People love us.”

CINERGY

6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918-894-6888 cinergy.com/locations/tulsa

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“They did an amazing job,” says Latus. “It is so immersive, from the floor to the ceiling. As you move, things move. It changes the lighting to make it feel like what part of the day it might be in.”

“You have to have a team in there. It’s not a solo run,” says Latus. “There are so many different puzzles to solve.”

Some of the rooms work for teens and other rooms for adults. For families who want to bring younger children along, Latus recommends renting out a private escape room, so the experience is guaranteed to be a fit for the entire group.

the escape room experience and move onto the gaming floor. Try the Hologate VR game or the exciting XD Dark Ride, both of which create adrenaline-filled good times. Take a little time for some HyperBowling, a glitzy, gamified version of the game that is fun for all ages. Check out the full-service dine-in movie theater, or mosey over to the bar area for drinks, appetizers, and games on the enormous TV screens.

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“Our escape rooms are unique for us because we went with a different company called Chills for Thrills,” says Aaron Latus, general manager. “They’re a group that used to build Hollywood set designs.” Chills for Thrills has taken that set design know-how to create escape rooms that look impressive and feature interactive moments that make players forget they are in a game and feel like they’re living a real adventure.

Each adventure starts with a story to set the scene, and then you and your team get to work solving the puzzle, all while the clock is ticking away. To win, players must find hidden clues, discover keys, figure out mysteries, and above all, work together to complete the task before time is up.

sell out quickly. Reservations are recommended, ideally a week or more in advance if you’re planning to play in the evenings or on weekends.

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Like everything else in the entertainment-laden Cinergy experience, these escape rooms rise to a whole new level of play that brings in tougher puzzles, more action-based problemsolving, and high-end set design that’ll make you feel like you’re in a movie. And for a good reason.

Bunker 57, a creepy apocalyptic adventure in which you must find a vaccine before the infected undead zombies capture you; Water Landing, in which you must escape the cargo hold of a plane before it sinks into the deep; and Gold Rush, in which you and your gang of Old West outlaws must carry out a bank robbery.

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Ready to solve a mystery while working against the clock and cooperating with a group of people to get the job done? If you want a fun, collaborative puzzle-solving game in a highly interactive space, then it’s time to play the cuttingedge, challenging mystery games at Cinergy’s escape rooms.

Monday-Friday: 11 a.m.-Midnight Saturday-Sunday: 9 a.m.-2 a.m.

PREVIEW918.COM 41


POPS

Apr. 3–4, 2020

918-595-7777 SignatureSymphony.org

YOU’RE DOIN’ FINE, OKLAHOMA! Tulsa Sings Rodgers and Hammerstein Oklahoma! is the place to be for an evening of Rodgers and Hammerstein musical favorites performed by a group of Broadway’s top vocalists and the finalists of the Signature Symphony’s 3rd annual Tulsa Sings! competition.

42 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


Free Wi-Fi Internet Access!

Molly’s Landing Open Since 1984

Steak & Seafood Only 3 1/2 miles from Hard Rock Casino on Highway 66 (Route 66)

918.266.7853

www.mollyslanding.com

PREVIEW918.COM 43


SC SPORTS CENTRAL

PLAYERS AND COACHES ARE EXCITED ABOUT THE MIX OF TALENT ON THE FIELD, AND THE CHANGES OFF IT AS THE FORMER ROUGHNECKS ORGANIZATION BEGINS A NEW ERA AS FC TULSA.

Then came the bombshell in early December: the team would now be called FC Tulsa, with a new logo and team colors introduced. It was a major transformation for a team name that had a great legacy and tradition in this city. “We’ve done focus groups, listening sessions, surveys, and had town halls with our supporter groups. For the past five months, we have been trying as much as possible to listen to what people want,” says J.W. Craft. “We wanted to place Tulsa at the center.”

by John Tranchina After the Craft brothers (J.W., Ryan, and Kyle) took over ownership of the Tulsa Roughnecks FC in August in the middle of an awful 2019 season, significant changes were promised, both on the pitch and off. The team immediately started to show signs of renewed life, finishing last season with a 4-3-3 mark over its final 10 games after the purchase, although it still ended up

44 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

16th (out of 18 teams) in the Western Conference. In November, the next significant change came as the club hired James Cannon as team president, after nearly three years as the vice president of marketing for Nashville SC, a

fellow United Soccer League squad that experienced impressive growth during his tenure. They went from being granted a USL expansion squad in 2017 to the point that they have been admitted as an MLS expansion side in 2020.

While some old-school fans were initially upset about losing the Roughnecks name, thinking that somehow the club was erasing the city’s rich soccer history that includes membership in the original NASL from 1978-84 and a Soccer Bowl championship in 1983, the reaction has grown more positive over the past couple of months, especially regarding the logo. The new colors are gold and white, accented by patina green and black, with the logo featuring a scissor-tailed flycatcher soaring upward into rays of sunshine.


RYAN CRAFT

KYLE CRAFT

“I think it’s been positive, the feedback we’re getting,” Cannon says. “I think people love the color scheme. I think they’ve understood the initiative in the change was just to put Tulsa at the heart. And it’s fun to see magnets all around, and stickers all over the place. Our merch is selling well.” Another change this season is that the team is altering the field configuration for home games at ONEOK Field, which they share with baseball’s Tulsa Drillers. In the previous five seasons, since the Roughnecks joined the USL, the soccer field stretched from the first base line out to left field. This year, they are flipping it 90 degrees so that the pitch goes from third base to right field. This will allow more fans to be closer to the action. “As we looked at the field, we knew we were retro-fitting something in there that’s not supposed to be there,” Cannon says. “The design of ONEOK, out there by third base, has two sections that are angled in to give you a perfect view of home plate and the infield. The problem is when you angle that way, and our game extends out into left field, that means you’re watching almost half the game kind of askew in your seat. “Because we

J.W. CRAFT

genuinely believe we’re going to be selling this thing out very quickly, we need those seats to be functional. We also had a surveyor with GPS equipment come out and lay the field out. “We wanted to bring the field as close as possible to the fans, and that new orientation gets the most amount of fans the closest to the field as possible. It brings those third base seats back into play because it’s now looking at the entirety of the field. And on the upper level, rather than being an end line seat, where we’ve had like a club-type seat with food hospitality and ticket package, it now is a midfield viewing opportunity. It just poses a lot of advantages for us.” And perhaps most importantly, the ownership investing more resources into the team has resulted in coach Michael Nsien being able to secure some important, high-level players for the 2020 season, as well as retaining some of their key guys from last year. “I would say in the past, Tulsa has had some teams that have had a couple of good players that got on people’s radar, and then right away, you lose them the following year,” Nsien says. “So, what we were able to do this year is retain the players that

Head Coach MICHAEL NSIEN we liked, like Marlon [Santos], Cristhian [Altamirano], guys we feel are special, and then we were able to go out and compete for players, recruiting-wise. Guys like Lebo [Moloto] would have been outside of Tulsa’s realm before. You see some guys who fit your profile and you want to negotiate with, and sometimes you win, and sometimes you lose. And this year, we were able to win some.” Some of the newcomers who Nsien recruited are expected to be crucial contributors, like attacking midfielder Moloto, as Nsien mentioned, who arrived from Cannon’s former team in Nashville after they moved up to MLS. Former Roughnecks defender Bradley Bourgeois also played in Nashville the past two years and is back. Other new arrivals whom Nsien is excited about include veteran Cuban forward Ariel Martinez and Nigerian defensive midfielder Raphael Ayagwa. They will be joined by key returning players such as Brazilian forward Santos, who joined the squad last August and promptly delivered five goals and three assists in the final nine games. Also coming back is Rodrigo Da Costa, who led Tulsa with nine goals and 13 assists last season;

Altamirano, who scored seven goals and had seven assists; and defenders Cyprian Hedrick and Matt Sheldon. Players and coaches are excited about the mix of talent on the field and the changes off it. “A lot has changed, starting with the quality of players we’re bringing in, to the gear we’re wearing. Everything is just more world-class and on a higher level,” says Hedrick, the team captain last season. “It’s just the little details, the lunch, training room, what they’re investing in. As far as us taking care of our bodies, those things — for us, they go a long way. It makes it easier to show up and give it everything we have.” “The new owners have a vision, the new president has a vision, and that’s to compete at the top four or five spots in the league,” Nsien says. “The investment and resources have been provided. We expect that our players will be able to compete at the highest level in this league. I think the rebrand has been positive. You can see on social media there’s lots of activity, and you can see the quality of the people who were hired. I think people are waiting to see the product on the field, and we’re waiting to see the fans in the stadium.”

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

PLAYERS ARE UNPAID, AND THE TEAM DRAWS FEW FANS. BUT FOR THE TULSA GATORS SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL PLAYERS, THEY LOVE EVERY MINUTE OF THE CHANCE TO PLAY THEIR FAVORITE GAME IN ITS PUREST FORM. by John Tranchina photos by Marc Rains You might not have heard of them, but the Tulsa Gators are back for their second season of semi-pro football, and the unique blend of former college and high school stars, many of them with

46 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

local ties, are looking to take another step forward in 2020.

looking for another opportunity at the collegiate level.

The Gators, which will play home games at the Broken Arrow Freshman Academy (301 W. New Orleans St.) this season, are locally owned and play in the Four States Football League (4SFL). There are four other teams in Oklahoma this season, including the Tahlequah Vipers, Muskogee Monstars, and a couple in Oklahoma City, in addition to squads in Kansas, Arkansas, and Missouri, totaling 13 in the league overall.

“The team is made up of guys who either didn’t get a chance out of high school, or are trying to get a chance to get some video, and guys who went to college and didn’t make it in pro for whatever reason,” says Gators co-owner Levi Currier, 34, who also plays on the squad as a defensive lineman. “There are professional-caliber players in our league. We have veteran players who have played college. We have players fresh out of high school who are looking to go to college. We have ex-professional indoor players, and that’s where we really pull our guys from. We like a good mix of young and veteran players.”

The 4SFL is considered an AA league that doesn’t pay its players, so current high school and college players can compete in it and still retain NCAA eligibility. Many players participating in the 4SFL are trying to move up to a professional AAA league, or are high school and ex-college players

Operating out of Inola last season, the Gators went 9-3 and advanced to the 4SFL’s semi-finals

before losing to the eventual champion Oklahoma Bears from Oklahoma City. Another 4SFL team that played at Broken Arrow’s Nienhuis Park, the TriCity Panthers, which is the squad that Currier played on before forming the Gators last year, will not be operational this season. Some of the former Panthers have ended up on the Gators this season, and most of their key players have local roots. In addition to Currier, who played at Skiatook High School, the squad includes cornerback Eric Shannon, who went to Coweta High School; linebacker Michael Abernathy, who went to Bixby; defensive end Frankie Davis who played at Broken Arrow and the University of Tulsa; returning veteran quarterback Steven Hamilton, who has won nine semi-pro championships and went to


Head Coach GARY JOICE Union; and key receiver Daniel Knighten, who went to Nathan Hale in Tulsa. Other local players include Princz Jones (Union) and receiver Stefan Davis (Central). Currier, who has played semi-pro football for about 10 years, including stints with past local teams such as the Oklahoma Thunder and Tulsa Stampede, believes the Gators are ready to take the next step this season. “The ultimate goal is to win a championship and get that championship ring,” says Currier, who also played at Coffeyville Community College. “I fully believe that this year, we have a team that can do that. You never know what’s going to happen, but we have added more key players, and we also have returning key players. We went from four coaches last year to 12 coaches this year, so we have a full coaching staff.” Like virtually all minor league sports, the goal of most of the players competing is to

LEVI CURRIER eventually move up the ladder to a higher level of play. “There is a vast majority, I would say over 50%, of our guys doing this to get exposure so that they can go to some league, whether it be European, Canadian, indoor; somewhere they can get paid to play,” Currier says. “There’s quite a bit of opportunity. We got two guys scholarships back to colleges after last season. We got another guy a contract to play professional football in Austria. And our kicker went to play professional indoor and won a national championship this past season. We can send guys to the next level. We provide the services to help get them to that point. We have a professional scout who is affiliated with our team.” The Gators are seeking more visibility and would like to see their games generate more attention in the area, eventually getting on par with other more established local minor league teams. “Semi-pro has not expanded past what it is because it’s hard to get sponsorships and schools to let us play at their fields,

or just really the fan support,” Currier says. “That’s one thing that we’ve focused on, trying to be a part of the community, a staple of the community, and try to get our name out there, for kids, families, to be able to come to like a Drillers game. That’s ultimately our goal, to see us get to, that level.” To that end, and to help increase their visibility and generate more attention in the area, the Gators have tried to get more involved in the community, committing to causes like the Broken Arrow Special Olympics, for which they helped raise $12,500 during their chili cook-off last year. They have also been working on securing sponsorships with local businesses. One of their principal sponsors is Safari Joe’s H2O, which is owned by Gators co-owner Joe Estes. Other coowners are Carson Smallwood (who plays), and Gators coach Gary Joice, who coaches Chelsea High School. Joice, who was the original owner of the Oklahoma Thunder and coached the Oklahoma Defenders, owns a 135-24 semi-pro career record.

And while they don’t pay their players, the owners do still have quite a few bills to cover. “We have travel expenses, helmets, shoulder pads — we don’t give them to the players, but we allow them to have a pair to play in,” Currier says. “We don’t pay the players, but the players don’t pay a fee to play; we ask the players to show up and play. We ask that they bring their cleats, a good attitude, get that playbook learned, and come show everybody what you got.” The commitment to playing on the Gators is significant, even if they aren’t being paid. The players may only practice once a week, but it is a lengthy one, and they still have film-watching meetings during the week. Games are on Saturdays, starting with the Gators’ season-opener March 14, a road game in Oklahoma City, with the home opener March 21 against the Wichita Skyhawks. The season runs through June. Veterans and first responders, like police officers and firefighters, are admitted to games for free.

PREVIEW918.COM 47


Whimsical art for over 20 years! 1326 E. 3rd St. Tulsa, OK 74120 Store Hours Monday - Friday 10-5 Saturday 10-3 info@gardendeva.com 918-592-3382 48 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


PREV EW Cain’s Ballroom

16

DY

LANSING

KENOSHA

75

5TH 6TH

ORT

IN

T

CIN

ROI

CIN

7TH

NAT I

33

MAI

8TH TH

PEORIA

N

8

TH

9

TH

7

11TH

1H

TCC

23

10

TH

11

12TH

TH

64

KA

NS

RI V

13TH

75

13TH

AS

14

R

15 2

ENTERTAINMENT

DINING

BOK Center | C2-6 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Tulsa Performing Arts | D3-15 Tulsa Drillers | 3E-15 FC Tulsa | 3E-15

Albert G’s Bar & Q | D3-13 Baxter’s Interurban Grill | B1-23 Caz’s Chowhouse | D2-10 Chimi’s | A5-2 Dilly Diner | D3-18 Dust Bowl | D3-21 El Guapo’s | D3-22

BARS Caz’s Pub | D2-16 Club Majestic | D2-19 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41

64

51

TH

E

1

14

4TH

NKF

ELG

35

TON

R

6

LDE

A

TH

Courthouse

39

3RD

12

75 AR

5

Central Library

NE

OSU Medical Center

TH

YEN

B

H

BOU

Cox Business Center

4T

CHE

Civic BOKCenter

RD

3

4

BOS

BOK Center

HRIE GUT N STO HOU

C

2

O

6

2ND

14

15

DET

ND

21

E BLUM18E D38O

Jazz Hall of Fame

Performing Arts Center

DEC

1

36

22

FRA

City Hall

ST

R

13

10

N

20

VER

OOD ELW

244

MAI

DEN

51

D

Brady Theater

244

ONEOK Field

CHE

Woody AR Guthrie Center

5

OOD ENW GRE

37

N ERO CAM Guthrie Green DY BRA

OOD

11

BRA

64

19

Greenwood Cultural Center

34

ENW

412

GRE

41

E

TULSA LOCATOR TL

DOWNTOWN TULSA

SHOPPING Boomtown Tees | D3-14 Garden Deva | D5-37 Sweet Boutique | D3-33

30

TH

3

2 4

32

51

CHERRY 5

THE BOXYARD Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 Jason’s Deli | A5-30 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 Mexicali | D2-11 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41 Sisserou’s | D2-20 SMOKE. | A5-32

The Tavern | E2-37 Ti Amo | C2-4 Yokozuna | D3-38

Blue Sky Bank | D3-33 Riley’s Wine & Spirits | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33

EVERYTHING ELSE The Bond | D4-39

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TL TULSA LOCATOR

G

TULSA AND SURROUNDING AREAS

PREV EW

SPERRY

40

7

86TH N

OWAS

76TH N

27 56TH N

F

75

Mohawk Park

46TH N MINGO

Lake Yahola

38 Tulsa Botanic Garden

Tulsa Zoo

36 N TH

71

44

66

48

10

TH

18

32 MEMORIAL

5

81ST

91ST

7

ST

46

20

9

BIXBY 47

6

129TH E.

64

72

MEMORIAL

4

2

SHERIDAN

121ST

61ST

GARNETT

16

111

65

49

42 70

44

51

71

43 101

30

55

23

15

40

14

MINGO

59

36

64

12

YALE

3

Oral Roberts Univ. Mabee Ct.

HARVARD

48

83

26 2

41ST

13

21 32

72

Between 111th & 121st 1

LaFortune 80 Park

97

Oklahoma Aquarium

JENKS

31ST

31

St. Francis Hospital

61 24

SAPULPA

2

169

Hicks Park

56

41

A

44

91Whiteside Park

LEWIS

Jones Airport

93 21ST

45

5

23

PEORIA

B

Turkey Mountain Park

72

51

MIDTOWN

3

39 75

RIVERSIDE

94

UNION

244

Expo Square

29

Philbrook Museum of Art7 ARKANSAS RIVER

C

Woodward Park St. John Med. Ctr.

6

129TH E.

Tulsa State Fairgrounds

2

50

50 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

11TH

27

GARNETT

Of 1Univ. Tulsa

48 MINGO

30

Chandler Park

APACHE

PINE

MEMORIAL

SAND SPRINGS

169

PINE

SHERIDAN

DOWNTOWN BOK Ctr.

17 YALE

OSU Tulsa

75

LEWIS

D

Crawford Park

UTICA

412

11

26TH N / APACHE

PEORIA

51

36TH N

Tulsa Air & Space Museum

HARVARD

Gilcrease Museum

GILCREASE MUSEUM

E

GILCREASE EXPY

MARTIN LUTHER KING

KWY ALE P TISD


TULSA LOCATOR TL 96TH N PRESENTED BY:

72

SSO

52

CATOOSA 66 412

244

1

53 COUNTY LINE / 193RD E.

177TH E.

161ST E.

209TH E.

1ST

Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

145TH E.

1ST

SHOPPING

BROKEN ARROW 26

40

72 ASPEN

23

11

63 COUNTY LINE

LYNN LANE

MAIN ELM

est. 20 13

21

7

8

Bella’s House | B5-32, A5-32 Children’s Orchard | A5-18 Edible Arrangements | C4-7, A5-7 I-44 Antique Mall | C4-3 Landella | D5-45 Miss McGillicutty’s Antiques | A4-54 Secret Gardens | A6-47 Tulsa Stained Glass | C5-56 Ziegler Art & Frame | D4-17

Rincón Mexican Grill & Cantina | B5-13 Rocking “R” Ranch House | B7-11 SMOKE. | D4-27, G6-27 Steak Stuffers USA | C5-14 Ti Amo | B5-80 Waterfront Grill | A4-70 Yokozuna | A5-43 Yutaka Grill Sushi & Buffet | C5-12

DINING

ENTERTAINMENT

Albert G’s Bar & Q | C4-91 Amazing Thai Cuisine | B7-63 Brownies Burgers | D4-29, Chimi’s | B5-2, C4-2, D4-2 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 El Chico | D6-93 El Guapo’s | B4-15 Elmer’s BBQ | C4-39 Famous Steakhouse | A5-10 Fat Daddy’s Pub and Grille | B5-64 Flo’s Burger Diner | D4-1, D8-1 Fuji | B5-20 George’s Pub | A4-61 Goodcents Deli Fresh Subs | A5-9 Habaneros Mexican Grill| A7-21 In The Raw | C4-23, B5-23, B7-23 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Jason’s Deli | D4-30, B5-30 Kitch | A4 -42 Los Cabos | G6-40, A4-40, B7-40 Los Mariachis | B5-26, A4-26 Manos Peruanas | B5-49 McAllister’s | B4-72, B5-72, B6-72, D5-72, G6-72 McNellie’s Pub | B5-16 Miami Nights Restaurant & Lounge | D5-5 Molly’s Landing | E8-52 Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano | C4-94 Ricardos | C5-31

Cinergy | B5-55 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 Gathering Place | C3-71 Got Wood | A4-24 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Tulsa Air and Space Museum | E5-38

CASINO River Spirit Casino Resort | B4-83

EVERYTHING ELSE Blue Cottage | A4-59 Carey Clinic | B5-36 Kuts 4 Kids | B4-48, B6-48 Shears | A4-41

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

GRIEF WILL EDWARDS

52 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


JENKS’ WILL EDWARDS ALWAYS LOVED SOCCER, HAVING PLAYED IT SINCE HE WAS 3 YEARS OLD. BUT AFTER THE DEATH OF HIS TWO SIBLINGS, HE TOOK HIS GAME TO ANOTHER LEVEL. by John Tranchina photos by Marc Rains It may merely be a coincidence, but Will Edwards doesn’t see it that way. To him, there is a direct correlation between the tragic loss of his 13-year-old sister and 10-year-old brother two and a half years ago in a devastating car accident and his ascension to becoming one of the top high school soccer players in Oklahoma for Jenks High School. Edwards always loved the sport, having played it since he was 3 years old, but after the death of his two siblings, he took his game to another level. “I had always been good, but after that happened, my love for the game grew, because it was just such an escape for me,” says Edwards, now a senior midfielder who is committed to play at the University of Tulsa next year. “And after that, I just put all my focus on that and school. I think sports are a great way to help people get over things.” The first season after the accident, his sophomore season, Edwards scored 12 goals and added eight assists as he helped the Trojans advance to the Class 6A state final, where they lost 4-0 to Union. He was named to the Tulsa World’s AllWorld First Team. Then last year as a junior, Edwards took it up another notch, contributing 14 goals and 12 assists as Jenks put together a perfect 18-0 record, getting back to the 6A

state final and defeating Union 2-1 on penalty kicks to claim the state championship. On top of all that, he was named a Tulsa World Player of the Year finalist and was awarded the Gatorade Player of the Year as the top high school soccer player in the state. “It was a picture-perfect ending, just because not a week went by last year that we weren’t talking about a state championship and beating anyone in the final. It was even sweeter to get a little bit of revenge on Union,” recalls Edwards. “It was a very surreal experience. I didn’t think that all [the individual awards] would come. I was solely focused on going out every game and winning, getting a state championship for my team and everyone in the program, from the freshmen on up.” Believing that his sister and brother are still watching over him, Edwards notes that the tragedy has brought his extensive collection of two blended families, which includes an older sister and three additional younger sisters, closer together. He’s also learned a lot about himself in the process. “Every day it gets a little bit easier,” he says. “It taught me that I’m a lot more capable of dealing with things than I would have ever imagined. I know things can be a lot worse, and if I deal with it now, I essentially won’t have to do it later.” His impressive junior season also brought the offer from TU, something he’d long been dreaming of. “I’ve always gone to their camps ever since I can remember, and I’ve always had a good relationship with their head coach, Tom McIntosh,” says Edwards, who also played basketball through his freshman year before concentrating solely on soccer. “Going to TU was one of my goals going into high school. My junior year, that happened, and I was extremely excited.” The fact that Edwards, who is a student council officer this year at Jenks, is seeing some

rewards for his outstanding soccer performance seems fitting, based on what he’s gone through and the strong character he exudes. “He’s an outstanding young man outside of the soccer pitch, so that kind of makes what he does on the field even more special to me,” says Trojans coach Eric Marshall. “Because he can handle himself academically and be an upstanding citizen, he is a perfect model for Jenks soccer and the overall Jenks community.” As the Trojans prepare to defend their title this season, Edwards is ready for the difficult challenge ahead, both individually and as part of a team. “I put a lot of pressure on myself to go out and be the best player I can be every game, so it’s not pressure because I love the game,” he says. “We expect to have targets on our back, but our team doesn’t expect anything less than a state championship this year. We’ve added a bunch of sophomores this year who have matured and can play.” Marshall will rely on Edwards quite a bit, both for his skill on the field and in his new capacity as a team leader, mentoring his younger teammates. “He’s one of the key pieces in the cog for our wheel,” Marshall says. “He sets things in motion. Everything does not go through him, but he kind of sets our tempo. When things aren’t going our way, we can expect him to create a goal himself, which is a luxury to have for a high school coach. “We talked before the season that his role would be a little bit different as opposed to the past. As a senior, he’s taken more people under his wing, able to talk to them and set them in the direction that we want, like a liaison for us coaches. He’s accepted that role, and it’s going to benefit himself and us this season.”

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J JENKS

54 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


J JENKS

See our feature on page 84

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

RIGHT TRACK ELLA EURESTE

56 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


NOW THAT SHE IS HEALTHY AGAIN, BISHOP KELLEY DISTANCE RUNNER ELLA EURESTE IS LOOKING FORWARD TO THE OPPORTUNITY TO SHOW WHAT SHE CAN DO ON THE BIG STAGE AND AWAY FROM CROSSCOUNTRY. by John Tranchina photos by Marc Rains Ella Eureste has some unfinished business to attend to during the upcoming track and field season. The Bishop Kelley sophomore endured a problematic freshman season, suffering from illness and injury, and was unable to compete at her best during the Class 5A state tournament last spring. Now that she is healthy again, the exceptional distance runner is looking forward to the opportunity to show what she can do on the big stage. “Last season, I got the flu, and I got pneumonia, and then something in my back tweaked, which set me back, so I wasn’t able to fully run my best last season,” says Eureste, who ended up finishing 14th in the 800-meter dash and fourth in 1,600 meters at last year’s state meet as a freshman. “I think it was mid-season, and breathing was getting hard, and my body was aching all the time. I lost a lot of my fitness mid-season.” That she still managed to fare so well in the 1,600

under such circumstances demonstrates just how much potential she has. She also won the Class 5A individual state championship in crosscountry in both her freshman year and again this season in November 2019, completing the 5K course in 19:15, winning by 10 seconds, and helping the Comets win the team title for the second straight year. Eureste indicates that she excels in the longer distances, so this track season will focus on the 3,200-meter race, as well as participating in the 4x800 relay. As successful as she has been in cross-country, Eureste points out that she prefers the predictability of track, because every location has the same parameters, as opposed to different crosscountry courses that each have unique paths and terrain to navigate. “For track, I think the main thing is, you know your exact pace,” she says. “Every lap, you can get your split, and you can be like, ‘OK, I am on this pace. I need to go faster or go slower.’ It’s more precise, while cross-country is more about placing rather than times because there are hills, there are conditions, and there’s a lot of variables.” Eureste has been running since the fifth grade, having been a competitive swimmer before that. After trying it out, she got hooked and has been running ever since. “My friends were like, ‘You should join the cross-country team,’ so I joined in middle school and I liked it,” says Eureste, who also played soccer through eighth grade. “Instead of doing swimming that summer, I decided I

wanted to run instead. So I joined a track club, Personal Best Athletics, trained the whole summer, and went to the Junior Olympics with them. It’s just something that I fell in love with.” To her, part of the appeal of running is the chance to push herself to new limits, as well as the camaraderie amongst the team. “It’s hard because a lot of people don’t like to run,” acknowledges Eureste, who gave up swimming competitively but still does it sometimes for crosstraining purposes. “The hard workouts, they kind of test you, but I like the rush of pushing your body as far as it can go.” The mental aspect of running, forcing herself to keep going no matter how unpleasant it feels, is something that Eureste took a while to figure out, but she feels like she’s got it under control now. “It is a mental thing. I’ve gotten to the point where I have it down,” she says. “It takes a few years to get used to being comfortable with being uncomfortable, in those long runs where you have to go faster, or where you have to push yourself. I clear my mind and focus on running, and I don’t overthink anything. I try not to get overwhelmed with how fast I try to run and stay clean and have good form.” Her powerful mental game is a major component of what makes her so unique, according to Bishop Kelley track coach Lane Frailey, as well as her overall character. “The thing that sets her apart, I think, is her competitiveness,” Frailey says. “She does not like to lose. And

for a sophomore, she’s a very mature girl. Her priorities are straight. She’s also a good teammate.” That part of her personality extends off the track, too, as she excels in the classroom, as well as several other extra-curricular endeavors. In addition to serving on the student council and the sophomore class student board, Eureste is a member of the FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes) and a board member for Little Light House, a group that mentors little kids. And she is also part of the exclusive Brother Bernadine Scholars program at Bishop Kelley, which only the very top students can get into. “You have to take a certain amount of honors classes,” she says. “And you have to do a research paper sophomore year, and then you have a capstone project your senior year.” “To be in the Brother Bernadine program, you’ve got to be in the upper level,” Frailey confirmed. “It is a big deal around here. Brother Bernadine is one of the founders of the school many years ago, and there’s an elite group of scholars that is named after him, so you have to be up at the very top to get into it. You’ve got to do a lot of things.” Eureste is very busy, but just like she’s gradually controlled the mental aspect of running, she has adapted to her hectic schedule and manages her time well enough to get all her schoolwork completed. “I’ve got a lot going on, and I like having things to do,” she says. “It’s taught me how to work, how to be efficient, and how sometimes to stay up late and get things done.”

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LET’S GO OILERS tue mar 3rd vs. allen @ 7:05pm sat mar 14th vs. kansas city @ 7:05pm sun mar 22nd vs. rapid city @ 4:05pm sat april 4th vs. allen @ 7:05pm

call (918)-632-7825 to purchase tickets now 58 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020


SS SPORTS SCHEDULE

TULSA OILERS Home games are played at BOK Center (Tulsa, Okla.) March 1 | @ Rapid City Rush | 5:05p March 3 | vs Allen Americans | 7:05p March 7 | @ Allen Americans | 7:05p March 13 | @ Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p March 14 | vs Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p March 15 | @ Kansas City Mavericks | 4:05p March 20 | vs Rapid City Rush | 7:05p March 24 | vs Wichita Thunder | 7:05p March 28 | @ Allen Americans | 7:05p –––––––––––––––––– April 1 | @ Wichita Thunder | 7:05p April 3 | @ Wichita Thunder | 7:05p April 4 | vs Allen Americans | 7:05p April 5 | @ Allen Americans | 4:05p

FC TULSA Home matches are played at ONEOK Field (Tulsa, Okla.) March 7 | @ Sacramento Republic FC March 14 | vs New Mexico United March 17 | vs Rio Grande Valley FC Toros March 21 | vs Las Vegas Lights March 28 | @ Real Monarchs SLC –––––––––––––––––– April 4 | vs Phoenix Rising FC April 11 | @ Austin Bold FC April 18 | vs El Paso April 25 | @ Orange County SC –––––––––––––––––– May 2 | vs Portland Timbers 2 May 12 | @ OKC Energy FC May 16 | vs Colorado Springs Switchbacks FC May 23 | @ Reno 1868 FC May 30 | vs Tacoma Defiance –––––––––––––––––– June 6 | @ USL San Diego June 17 | vs Real Monarchs SLC June 27 | @ San Antonio FC –––––––––––––––––– July 8 | vs Orange County SC July 11 | vs USL San Diego July 18 | @ Rio Grande Valley FC Toros July 25 | vs Austin Bold FC –––––––––––––––––– Aug. 1 | @ Phoenix Rising FC Aug. 8 | vs Reno 1868 FC Aug. 15 | @ Las Vegas Lights Aug. 22 | vs San Antonio FC Aug. 26 | @ LA Galaxy II Aug. 29 | @ Portland Timbers 2 –––––––––––––––––– Sept. 5 | @ El Paso Sept. 12 | @ Colorado Springs Switchbacks FC Sept. 18 | vs LA Galaxy II Sept. 26 | vs Sacramento Republic FC –––––––––––––––––– Oct. 3 | @ New Mexico United Oct. 10 | @ Tacoma Defiance Oct. 17 | vs OKC Energy FC

OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER Home games are played at Chesapeake Energy Arena (Oklahoma City, Okla.) March 3 | vs Los Angeles Clippers | 7p March 4 | @ Detroit Pistons | 6p March 6 | @ New York Knicks | 6:30p March 8 | @ Boston Celtics | 5p March 11 | vs Utah Jazz | 7p March 13 | vs Minnesota Timberwolves | 7p March 15 | @ Washington Wizards | 5p March 17 | @ Memphis Grizzlies | 7p March 18 | @ Atlanta Hawks | 6:30p March 20 | vs Denver Nuggets | 7p March 23 | @ Miami Heat | 6:30p March 26 | vs Charlotte Hornets | 7p March 28 | @ Golden State Warriors | 7:30p March 30 | @ Denver Nuggets | 8p –––––––––––––––––– April 1 | vs Phoenix Suns | 7p April 4 | @ Los Angeles Clippers | 2:30p April 5 | @ Los Angeles Lakers | 8:30p April 7 | vs Brooklyn Nets | 7p April 10 | vs New York Knicks | 7p April 11 | @ Memphis Grizzlies | 7p April 13 | vs Utah Jazz | 7p April 15 | @ Dallas Mavericks | 6:30p

TULSA GATORS Home games are played at Broken Arrow Freshman Academy (Broken Arrow, Okla.) March 14 | @ OKC Titans March 21 | vs Wichita Skyhawks March 28 | @ Oklahoma Bears –––––––––––––––––– April 4 | vs Missouri Ravens April 18 | @ Tahlequah Vipers April 25 | vs Joplin Crusaders –––––––––––––––––– May 2 | vs Arkansas Hawks May 9 | @ Little Rock Patriots May 30 | @ Muskogee Monstars –––––––––––––––––– June 6 | vs Arkansas Raging Ducks

ALL TIMES CENTRAL // GAME DATES/TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

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GC GREEN COUNTRY SCENE

WHITLOCK'S NEARNUFF CRAYFISH

WHITLOCK'S SHEEP MINNOW

FLY FISHING PROS DAVE AND EMILY WHITLOCK SHARE THEIR LOVE OF THE SPORT AND THEIR FAVORITE FLIES FOR GREEN COUNTRY FISHING. BY JENNIFER ZEHNDER Take it from fly-fishing pros Dave and Emily Whitlock, Green Country is a prime area for fly fishing with its many streams and rivers, as well as miles of pond, lake and reservoir shorelines. The Welling, Oklahoma, couple should know. For them, fly fishing is more than a career — it’s a lifestyle. “We are devoted to fly fishing both professionally and personally,” Dave says. “The sport has taken us around North America, South America, New Zealand, and even Europe where we’ve lectured, taught, and demonstrated fly-fishing techniques

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and hosted groups to some incredible flyfishing destinations.”

you really can’t think of anything else while you are there — a very healthy thing these days.”

According to the couple, fly fishing is simply the most enjoyable way to catch any fish, especially in waters that are between 1-10 feet in depth.

In addition to its mental health benefits, fly fishing tends to awaken a person’s inner conservationist, she says.

“Almost any fish can be caught on a fly rod, and we think that any fish is more fun when caught on a flyrod. Often, anglers who take up fly fishing seldom use any other methods to catch fish,” Emily says. “The act of fly fishing is often compared to the benefits of meditation. When you are on and in the water, casting and searching,

“As fly fishers visit the waters and improve their skills, they seem to become natural conservationists,” she says. “They begin to understand how critical pristine waters are, especially to many of the underwater food forms that fish rely on. They also see the necessity of good riparian areas [shoreline vegetation] and how fast the


GREEN COUNTRY SCENE GC fishery is damaged when the protective trees and plants are removed. “Fly fishers are often the first to see when something is affecting the health of the water. We always say our waters need all the fly-fishing friends they can get.” Once you make the fly-fishing leap, don’t limit yourself. Dave reminds his troutseeking fly fishers not to discount the area’s natural streams and rivers, which provide a wide variety of wild fish species. “Most of these waters are classed as cool and warm water fisheries and are home to three species of bass, seven species of sunfish, crappie, white bass [sand bass], hybrids, striped bass, walleye, golden eye gar, drum and catfish. “All these hard-fighting fish will strike flies that imitate their foods: minnows, crayfish, worms, aquatic, and terrestrial insects. And even better, the majority of these waters are seldom ever fly fished, so these species are usually easily caught with flies and fly-fishing methods they have never encountered.” The art of fly fishing is not only in its casting technique but the crafting of its most important tool — the fly. Did you know that all flies are tied by hand — even those that are purchased? For Dave, learning how to tie your flies is the other half of fly fishing. He contends that once you learn how to tie your flies, it easily doubles your satisfaction with fly fishing. And many can learn to tie some very effective fly patterns in just a short time.

fly-tying kits that include the basic tools, materials, and instruction book or DVD — a great way to start. Don’t forget to take care of those flies, Emily cautions. Storing materials in sealed boxes or containers — after they are completely dry — will help them last longer. Mothballs and pungent herbs can also keep moths and mice at bay. Ready to try your luck? Dave and Emily suggest investing in an excellent instructional manual or DVD. And if possible, seek instruction from a qualified professional, fly fishing school, or local flyfishing club to learn to cast correctly. “If you are fortunate enough to have a fly club in your area, we suggest you take advantage of what they have to offer,” Dave says. “There are usually many members who would be most happy to share their knowledge, teach casting techniques, and even include you in fly fishing outings. Men, women, and children are all welcome.” For more information about the Whitlock’s fly-fishing schools held in April, May, September, and October, as well as their books, videos, flies, or Dave’s aquatic art, visit davewhitlock.com.

Dave’s Top5 Oklahoma flies for cool and warm water Dave’s Diving Frog: I originally

designed this fly color pattern to entice smallmouth living in darkly stained waters, but soon discovered that it was equally effective in clear water. It’s also just a lot of fun to fish with. My largest smallmouth on a surface diver came to this fly pattern and was an incredible 23 ¾ inches. It is also very effective for largemouth, stripers, snook, pike, and most aggressive feeders.

Whitlock’s NearNuff Crayfish: The

NearNuff Crayfish is my most consistently productive, year-round smallmouth fly both for lakes and streams. It’s also the fly that I get the most positive feedback on from other fly fishers than any other I’ve designed for smallmouth, large sunfish, and carp.

Whitlock’s Sheep Minnow: Pick DAVE'S HOPPER

“Basic fly-tying tools include a fly-tying vise, small scissors, thread bobbin, whip-finish tools, and a small pair of pliers,” he says. Materials to tie flies are sold at fly-fishing tackle shops and online stores, and can be collected from hunting, and even fresh road kills. Hobby shops can also be productive sources of fly-fishing tying materials. Colors can be chosen to closely match the food form to bright, colorful attractor materials, especially when fishing for bass and sunfish. Fly shops often sell complete

DAVE'S DIVING FROG

colors for the head, back, and belly that match those of the minnow you wish to imitate. Great bass, striper, and hybrid fly and any fish that feeds on minnows.

Dave’s Hopper: This is a fantastic trout

fly, and we’ve used it all over the world. Any fish that take terrestrials will go for this tried and true pattern.

Dave’s Sponge Spiders: This is a great

Emily and Dave Whitlock

fly to use when smallmouth are feeding on terrestrials, as well as emerging dragonfly nymphs. For me, this fly consistently gets good results with smallmouth in both streams and lakes, and it’s excellent tied in black or brown, too. Trout, sunfish, and largemouth also eagerly take this fly.

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TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

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TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

Live Music

Check Website for Dates!

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BT BEYOND TULSA Sand Springs features treasured old haunts, niche shops, specialty doughnuts, and wine — all worth checking out when you look just a bit further west of Tulsa across the Arkansas River. By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Rob Harmon At the end of the classic movie The Wizard of Oz, after a whirlwind of adventures and life lessons, Midwestern paragon Dorothy Gale observes, “If I ever go looking for my heart’s desire again, I won’t look any further than my backyard.” There’s a lot of truth in that idea, one that is easy to forget as we go about our regular routines. Sometimes, what we need is a chance to explore what’s right around the corner and see it with new eyes. A trip around Sand Springs is a lot like that. For those who live in Tulsa, spots along the west side of the Arkansas River can seem so far away that we don’t think about venturing there. And if you’re elsewhere, you probably think of a trip to Tulsa as a chance to visit its downtown. Yet Sand Springs offers some unique places to visit, well worth a few hours’ exploration. Incorporated in 1912, Sand Springs was first envisioned as a haven for widows and orphans, a city with social welfare on its mind. Today, it’s home to places like the Keystone Ancient Forest, a 1,360acre nature preserve featuring 500-year-old cedars, 300-year-old post oak trees, deer, mountain lion, bobcat, American eagles, migratory birds, and over 80 varied species of butterflies. (It’s open on select Saturdays for hiking.) Sand Springs also features some treasured old haunts and new niche shops, all worth checking out when you look just a bit further than your backyard. Here are some suggestions to get you started.

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Cr ssing the River Old Town Cafe 2 07 N. LINCOLN AVE. | SAND SPRINGS

Small-town charm and delicious food will be waiting at the door of this old-school diner. Upon entering, take a look to the right, and you’ll see an entire wall of booths dedicated to Marilyn Monroe. There’s plenty of other vintage memorabilia — Elvis, James Dean, and more —to make you smile. Have a seat and chat with the friendly wait staff and food. The boneless fried chicken with mashed potatoes and vegetables are a delight — juicy inside, crispy outside,

the way they should be. Or opt for their perfectly cooked bacon cheeseburger with fries. But don’t quit there— ask about their pies. Choose any one of them and prepare to be rolled out of the place.

real deal. Every Tuesday, they host an all-day sewin. Use their machines and work on your latest project while sharing ideas and tips with other quilters and sewing enthusiasts. Around the shop, you’ll discover patterns, cool fabrics, samples of quilted pillows and toys, new machines, and anything else quilt-related you can think of. Occasional classes are offered to help quilters learn new skills and let the creative juices flow. Located right across the street from a cute little park called Charles Page Triangle Park, you can’t miss it.

information associated with your newfound collectors’ item. In the backroom is where Rod’s books are kept. Old and new books are carefully categorized and are offered at reasonable prices, too. From a decent amount of children’s books to an extensive sci-fi section, there will undoubtedly be a book or two you’ll take home.

Rod's Books & Relics and The Yesterday Shop 1 0 E. 2ND ST. | SAND SPRINGS

Quilt Nuts 2 16 N. MAIN ST. | SAND SPRINGS

The friendly owners of this fabric and sewing specialty shop know how to keep their customers coming back. If you’re into sewing and other fabric arts, this is the

This bookstore and vintage collectibles combination shop on the corner of Main Street and Second Street is an excellent venue for anyone who loves finding that one-of-a-kind item that they don’t make anymore. In the front of the store, small and large knick-knacks and rarities line the store’s shelves. Helpful staff will answer any questions you have, maybe even give additional trivia

Whispering Vines Vineyard 7 374 W. 51ST ST. | TULSA

Minutes away from the Sand Springs downtown area, via Highway 97, you’ll find Whispering Vines Vineyards. It’s a great way to top off a few hours of exploring Sand Springs. Hiding just minutes from I-44, the vineyard produces wine varieties sure to please anyone. There is a tasting


BEYOND TULSA BT bar manned by cheerful staff who are a delight to chat with, and all the sampling wines are also available for purchase. Through their adopt-a-plant program, anyone can adopt a grapevine for four years at the cost of $100. You’ll receive four bottles of wine and one free admission to the annual harvest party for four years. Pick any grape plant variety you like, prune it in March, and harvest it in late July to early August.

Livi Lee's Donuts 4 106 S. 113TH W. AVE #100 | SAND SPRINGS 4 11 E. BROADWAY ST. | SAND SPRINGS

There are doughnut shops, and then there are specialty doughnut shops. Tulsa has both, but Sand Springs’ original Livi Lee’s started the whole “specialty” thing, around here at least. Just one visit, and you’ll be driving there every chance you get for a handcrafted doughnut, a delicious sausage roll, and a hot coffee, no matter what side of Tulsa you live

on. Regulars rave about the s’mores and fruity pebbles flavored doughnuts, but who doesn’t love the classic chocolate with sprinkles or the lemon-filled Bismarck? Whatever you get, know it’ll be warm, delicious and baked fresh every morning.

Sand Springs Cultural and Historical Museum 9 E. BROADWAY ST. | SAND SPRINGS

Inside of the historic Page Memorial Library, a building listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the museum contains artifacts from the area’s past and present. The stucco and concrete building is a bit of art itself, being designed in the art deco style, like many of the structures throughout the Tulsa area. The gorgeous design of the building inside takes you on tours about the museum itself, the town’s triangle park, the “Sand Springs Home” for widows and orphans founded by Charles Page, the Sand Springs’ historic powerhouse, and a whole lot more. Other rotating exhibitions are available too. An entire afternoon can be spent learning about the extraordinary people who have lived in the area of Sand Springs.

Tulsa's #1 Antique Mall Since 1996! I-44 Antique and Collectibles Mall has been Tulsa's #1 Antique Store since 1996. Come and see what our more than 50 vendors have to offer in our 9,000 square feet of dealer space.

Celebrating + Years!

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918.712.2222 | www.i44antiquemall.com Mon-Sat 10am-5pm • Sunday 12-5pm 5111 S. Peoria • Tulsa, Oklahoma

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SS STYLE + SHOPPING

CARLEY JOHNSON

open and cloth -es THE CONTINUING RISE IN E-COMMERCE, AS WELL AS A DESIRE TO SHIFT HER LIFESTYLE, MADE CARLEY JOHNSON RECONSIDER THE BUSINESS STRUCTURE OF MODERN MESS AS IT MOVES FROM A PHYSICAL TO AN ONLINE EXISTENCE. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA & PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS

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When it comes to dressing Tulsa, Carley Johnson does it with a love of fashion and flair for style that has gained her clothing boutique, Modern Mess, a strong following. Modern Mess first opened in 2016 as a brick-and-mortar store at The Boxyard in downtown Tulsa, a spot that is a bit of an incubator for new businesses. It was a perfect location in many ways for Johnson as she built her business from the ground up. Modern Mess, she says, all started with a passion for fashion. “For as long as I can remember, I have loved dressing myself and others. It has always been my creative outlet,” she says. When Johnson was around 14 years old, she visited a local clothing boutique and experienced what it was like to have her love of fashion embraced and encouraged, a moment she’ll never forget. “The owner made me feel so special. I left the store knowing this is how I wanted to impact others someday,” she says. Johnson developed the business concept for her clothing boutique while in college, pursuing a degree in business with a focus on marketing. Though online retail was and is a viable alternative to storefronts, Johnson wanted a physical store. “It was a risk I was willing to take to establish real relationships with customers. I love customer service, and I love building an experience with the physical existence of a store,” she says. Between Johnson’s love of people and lots of unique clothing that is hard to find elsewhere in Tulsa, Modern Mess has grown in popularity. So, even she was surprised at first to find herself thinking about going all online as her next move. “If you had told me that I would be moving Modern Mess online three years ago when I opened, I would have laughed,” she says. But the continuing rise in online shopping, as well as a desire to shift her lifestyle, made Johnson reconsider her business structure.


Like a lot of small-business owners, she found herself working long hours and was always on call. So, when she decided to launch a second venture, a bridal shop known as Bryde, she didn’t realize how quickly her strenuous schedule would catch up with her. And catch up it did. “Learning how to put my happiness and well-being before the business is what ultimately led me to the decision to move the Modern Mess store online,” she says. “When we opened Bryde, I committed myself to a seven-day workweek. That’s right, no days off. I thought I could do it for as long as it takes to get Bryde off the ground, but it caught up with me quickly. I knew a change in my lifestyle was needed, which ultimately led to the tough decision to discontinue the physical presence of Modern Mess.”

I am hopeful this will allow me to get more creative and interactive with the brand,” she says. Even though the boutique is shuttering its brick-andmortar location, Modern Mess’s customers will still be able to enjoy the same great products they’ve always loved. The online store officially launches March 10, and Johnson says she has been diligently working to make sure the online experience is

STYLE + SHOPPING SS unique so that customers can still enjoy everything that makes Modern Mess so special. The online Modern Mess will curate different style collections each month, built by Johnson around a theme and reflecting the eclectic, eye-catching tastes that her clients have come to

a lifestyle blog with less posing in outfits and more showing you how we live every aspect of our lives as a Mod Mess,” she says. “Think topics anywhere from the playlists we love to some solid personal budgeting advice. We are keeping it real over here. We want to provide useful content to our followers that

By moving online, Johnson realized she’d have more leeway to work from anywhere and have more freedom. “With the online store, I will have the ability to schedule my time more freely, and will enhance and benefit their everyday lives.”

MODERN MESS

TO

R

mymodmess.com

CA

Johnson is looking forward to expanding her offerings as time goes by, branching into areas such as personal styling and closet consultations, as well as a style blog. “We’re talking about

LO

enjoy. “Each collection will be small and thought out. They will range anywhere from five to 15 different styles. Every single piece will serve a purpose to both the collection and the Modern Mess wardrobe,” she says. “Every new collection will be released on the second Tuesday of each month with a physical pop-up as it goes live on the website. This will allow me to indulge in my joy that is interacting with customers and assisting their styling needs in-person.”

That’s ultimately what Johnson cares about: the people she serves. “I adore my customers,” Johnson says. “They have been so supportive of this change, and they have been even more understanding than I anticipated. I can’t wait to show them what the online experience will look like. I think they are going to love it. We will not shy away from the unique styles that made us who we are as a storefront.”

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LP LAUNCH PAD

Training for Longevity WHETHER YOUR BUSINESS IS STRUGGLING OR YOU WANT TO INCREASE THE LEVEL OF PROFITABILITY, A MENTOR OR BUSINESS COACH CAN DRAMATICALLY INCREASE YOUR ODDS OF SUCCEEDING LONG-TERM. — By Michele Chiappetta According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, over 400,000 new businesses will launch this year. But statistics from groups such as SCORE and the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate that one in five businesses will fail in their first year, one in about three will fail in their second year, and one in two will close their doors by year five. Those numbers may sound depressing, especially if

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you’re among the people who own a small business or are planning to start one. But there’s a solution that can help you avoid the pitfalls and keep going. Getting a little help by finding yourself a mentor or business coach can dramatically increase your odds of succeeding long-term. What exactly is a business coach? Margo Bush, owner of small business coaching and consulting firm Don’t

Do Business Alone, says, “We help move the needle for business owners so that the actions they’re taking, and the principles that they’re doing, will create revenue and increase their profits.” A passionate believer in helping entrepreneurs achieve their goals, Bush knows firsthand how much a mentor can help business owners succeed. “I didn’t come from a family of successful business owners,

so I didn’t see what successful business looked like,” she says. Over the years, Bush has successfully run several businesses, spurred by entrepreneurial vision. Her drive to excel has always been strong, but when she turned to a mentor for business coaching, she found herself stepping up to a higher, more productive level in business. And now, she wants to share what she has learned to help


other business owners move past the days of living hand to mouth and struggling to make payroll. “People who have small businesses are passionate about something they do,” Bush says. “Maybe they had a hobby and turned it into a business, or they lost their job and needed to start their own. They created businesses because they knew that it was better for their families.” The problem, for many, is that they operate under the assumption, “If I build it, they will come.” But often, that’s not the case, and many business owners don’t know where they are missing it. “It begins to be a cycle that they work hard,” Bush says. “I know because I was a business owner who did the very same thing before I got real principles and real education about how to do business. It’s not rocket science, but it is principles that you must put into practice as a business owner to create the kind of money that you want to create.” This is where finding an experienced mentor or business coach can make a difference. Mentors and coaches can help business owners by taking in the big picture, seeing what’s missing, identifying wasted efforts, and retargeting toward what will work better. “There are practical principles that create results,” says Bush. “It’s like a bowl of water. Just tapping the water, it’s going to ripple out. But it doesn’t create a splash. What we’re looking for in business is to create a splash, because when you have an overflow, everybody’s blessed. If you slap the top of the water, what’s going to happen? It’s the reaction to an action. So, I make all of our business owners evaluate the actions they’re taking.”

So, how do you recognize a good coach? First of all, find a coach who has created a great business. “No. 1, have they been successful? Ask them,” says Bush. “I was struggling in one of my businesses years and years ago. I could have quit, but I didn’t, because if I closed, and I couldn’t make it happen, how could I teach somebody else how to make it happen?” Another sign of a good coach is that they understand the psychology of people. This is an essential tool in the business owner’s toolkit, something that can help you have smooth, productive interactions with employees, customers, and vendors. And if your coach understands your personality, they can better coach you in ways that work specifically for you. If you opt in to coaching, be sure to get the most out of it by being open to the process. “They need to come with an open mind, and it’s even better if they come with an open slate,” says Bush. “Coaching and mentorship in business are about changing the way that we think about how to do business and then doing the principles and creating the kind of business that is thriving.” Whether your business is struggling or you simply want to rise to a higher level of success, a good coach can help. And there are many places you can go to find a mentor. There are coaching companies, such as Don’t Do Business Alone. There are incubators such as 36 Degrees North, which offers monthly classes in business topics. Organizations like SCORE offer to set businesses up with mentors. And with groups on Facebook and LinkedIn dedicated to helping business owners, you can also connect online to fellow entrepreneurs and share insights.

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RB RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER

We are tapped into what’s trending and delicious, giving you a first-hand look at where to go, what to eat, where the best cocktails are, and how to map out your culinary adventures in the 918. Whatever your mood, whatever you crave, the 918 has a restaurant or bar sure to satisfy. From local classics to chain favorites, a variety of options catering to every palate and pocketbook are available. For those on the move, search our website database with over 200 restaurants and bars in nearly 20 categories.

PREVIEW918.COM/DINE-DRINK

FEATURED LISTINGS ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

2748 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-747-4799 SEE AD | PAGE 79

ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

421 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-728-3650 SEE AD | PAGE 79

AMAZING THAI CUISINE 1232 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-258-8424 SEE AD | PAGE 33

CATEGORIES AMERICAN ASIAN

BARS + PUBS BREAKFAST

BAXTER’S INTERURBAN GRILL

717 S. Houston Ave., Suite 100 | Tulsa 918-585-3134

DELI

ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN MEXICAN PIZZA SEAFOOD SPECIALTY STEAK SWEETS 70 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

6709 E. 81st St. | Tulsa 918-960-2723 SEE AD | PAGE 78

SEE AD | PAGE 91

FAMOUS STEAKHOUSE 8922 S. Memorial Drive, Ste. C3 | Tulsa 918-459-7870 SEE AD | PAGE 7

FASSLER HALL

304 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-7898 SEE AD | PAGE 5

DAVE & BUSTER’S

6812 S. 105th E. Ave. | Tulsa 918-449-3100 SEE AD | PAGE 69

FAT DADDY’S PUB AND GRILLE

8056 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa 918-872-6206

DILLY DINER

402 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-938-6382 SEE AD | PAGE 5

DUST BOWL BROWNIES

2130 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-0320

211 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-430-3901

18 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa 918-588-2469 SEE AD | PAGE 62

9825 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-663-7755

21 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa 918-585-8587 SEE AD | PAGE 62

2604 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-398-7102 SEE AD | PAGE 33

8226 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 918-250-1821 SEE AD | PAGE 91

SEE AD | PAGE 18

GEORGE’S PUB EL GUAPO’S

332 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-RITA

CAZ’S PUB

19322 E. Admiral Place | Catoosa 918-739-4858

FUJI EL CHICO

CAZ’S CHOWHOUSE

FLO’S BURGER DINER

SEE AD | PAGE 5

SEE AD | PAGE 69

FINE DINING GLOBAL

5320 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-749-7755

SEE AD | PAGE 91

BRUNCH COFFEE

1304 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-587-4411

4130 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-6702

SEE AD | PAGE 87

BAKERY BARBECUE

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

ELMER’S BBQ

108 N. 1st St. | Jenks 918-296-9711 SEE AD | PAGE 55

SEE AD | PAGE 5

ELGIN PARK

325 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-986-9910

GOODCENTS DELI FRESH SUBS

8222 E. 103rd St. | Tulsa 918-364-7827 SEE AD | PAGE 43

SEE AD | PAGES 5, 59

HABANEROS MEXICAN GRILL

4640 S. Elm Place | Broken Arrow 918-940-7272 SEE AD | PAGE 7


RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER RB IN THE RAW

3321 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-1300 6151 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-524-0063 216 S. Main St. | Broken Arrow 918-893-6111 SEE AD | PAGE 33

INCREDIBLE PIZZA

8314 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 539-302-2681 SEE AD | PAGE 3

MCALISTER’S DELI

4951 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-392-3373 8102-B S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-392-3354 8955 S. Memorial Drive | Tulsa 918-392-0770 720 N. Aspen | Broken Arrow 918-258-3354 8529 N. 129th E. Ave. | Owasso 918-376-9000 2330 SE Washington Blvd. | Bartlesville 918-333-6614 SEE AD | PAGE 33

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa SEE AD | PAGES 25, 100

1330 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-599-7777 SEE AD | PAGE 87

1542 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-949-4440 201 S. Main | Owasso 918-401-4343

5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR

SEE AD | PAGE 79

STEAK STUFFERS USA FIRESIDE GRILL

7846 E. 51st. St. | Tulsa 918-743-7474 SEE AD | PAGE 78

JOHNNY ROCKETS

JASON’S DELI

8321 E. 61st St. | Tulsa 918-252-9999

SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL

SWEET BOUTIQUE

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St., #13 | Tulsa 918-900-2238 SEE AD | PAGE 18

MCNELLIE’S PUB

LANDSHARK BAR

409 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-7468 7031 S. Zurich Ave. | Tulsa 918-933-5250 SEE AD | PAGE 5

THE TAVERN MARGARITAVILLE 918-995-8080

201 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-949-9801 SEE AD | PAGE 5

KITCH

377 E Main Street | Jenks 918-528-6766 SEE AD | PAGE 55

MEXICALI BORDER CAFÉ 14 W. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa 918-582-3383

R UTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

918-995-8600

SEE AD | PAGE 63

LOS CABOS

300 Riverwalk Terrace #100 | Jenks 918-298-2226 151 Bass Pro Drive | Broken Arrow 918-355-8877 9455 N. Owasso Expressway | Owasso 918-609-8671 SEE AD | PAGE 9

LOS MARIACHIS

2534 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-251-0370 11476 S. Union Ave. | Jenks 918-296-5352

MIAMI NIGHTS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

6510 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-835-4522 SEE AD | PAGE 87

MOLLY’S LANDING

3700 N. Old Hwy 66 | Catoosa 918-266-7853

SCOREBOARD SPORTS BAR

TIKI DINER

232 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-936-4395 SEE AD | PAGE 42

SEE AD | PAGE 55

VISIONS BUFFET

6703 E. 81st St., Ste. D | Tulsa 918-340-5379 SEE AD | PAGE 7

SEE AD | PAGE 91

SEE AD | PAGE 79

WATERFRONT GRILL

SEE AD | PAGE 9

309 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-508-7676

ROCKING “R” RANCH HOUSE

7501 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-357-2719

RICARDOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

5629 E. 41st St. | Tulsa 918-622-2668

219 S. Cheyenne Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-5151

YOKOZUNA

SEE AD | PAGE 7

MANOS PERUANAS

6024 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-499-1919

120 Aquarium Drive | Jenks 918-518-6300

SEE AD | PAGE 43

PRAIRIE BREWPUB

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO

SISSEROU’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT

9146 S. Yale, Ste. 100 | Tulsa 918-508-7676 SEE AD | PAGE 5

YUTAKA GRILL AND SUSHI BUFFET

6560 E. 51st St. | Tulsa 918-921-3400 SEE AD | PAGE 87

107 N. Boulder Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-6800 SEE AD | PAGE 63

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HF HEALTH + FITNESS

Mentally Fit

JUST LIKE YOUR MUSCLES NEED EXERCISE, YOUR BRAIN NEEDS MENTAL WORKOUTS TO STAY IN SHAPE. BY ASHTON GREER

GO BACK TO SCHOOL Your brain is the most amazing part of your body. Not only does it manage your memory, thoughts, and behavior, but it controls breathing and your heart. But it’s easy to take it for granted. Many people don’t start thinking about brain health until they notice some cognitive changes and memory loss in their 60s or 70s. Everyone has the occasional “senior moment.” Maybe you’ve gone into the kitchen and can’t remember why, or can’t recall a familiar name during a conversation. And who hasn’t misplaced car keys? Memory lapses can occur at any age, but aging alone is generally not a cause of cognitive decline. While it is true that the brain will begin to slow down due to aging, our brains are still able to be reshaped because of the brain’s ability to change. And that’s why it is crucial to get a head start in keeping your mind running at peak levels. This will increase your thinking skills and strengthen the bond between brain cells. The truth is, there’s no single “miracle cure” for memory problems or other brain changes that come with aging. But there is cause for optimism. Studies have shown that you can help prevent cognitive decline and reduce the risk of dementia with some basic health habits. Science points to a combination of social factors and healthy habits that — taken together — can help you build, preserve, and protect your brain’s function over time.

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Returning to school may sound dreadful, but a higher level of education is associated with better mental functioning in old age. Experts think that advanced education may help keep brains healthy by getting a person into the habit of being mentally active. Challenging your brain with mental exercise is believed to activate processes that help maintain individual brain cells and stimulate communication among them.

GIVE YOUR BRAIN A BREAK Taking work breaks during our day isn’t being lazy; it’s about working with our brain the way it was designed. We have peaks and troughs of energy cycling through 90-minute periods during our day. Taking a 20-minute break between each of these allows us to get more done, at a higher level, in less time and with energy left to

spare. Take a look at your daily schedule and see when you can next give your brain the break it deserves.

STAY FIT Both cardio and weight-bearing exercises have positive effects on the brain for learning and memory. It can even help your brain create new cells. Exercising as little as 15-30 minutes a day can improve your brain health. As you exercise, more blood can flow to the brain, which is crucial for brain function. Make physical activity fun and go on a walk, take a bike ride, or even do some laps in the pool.

MEDITATE Not only will 5-10 minutes of mindful meditation calm your brain and make it easier to sleep, but meditation has also been shown to reduce anxiety,


HEALTH + FITNESS HF depression, fatigue, and confusion. Meditation can benefit people with insomnia by helping them fall asleep and stay asleep. It also helps with inflammation in the brain. Most people find not only do they sleep better, but they can also focus better and are not as anxious.

STAY ENGAGED SOCIALLY Loneliness is a quick route to mental decline. While we may not realize it, simply going to eat with a friend, enjoying time with family, and even having a conversation with a stranger can stimulate our brains. Socializing is one of the best kinds of brain exercises because having a more social life has a positive correlation with slower memory decline. But, if you are more of an introvert, pets too can aid in this stimulation.

USE YOUR OTHER HAND If you’re right-handed, use your left hand (or vice versa) for daily activities such as brushing your teeth and eating. Doing such activities can drive your brain to make positive changes. Think of millions of neurons learning new tricks as you finally establish better control of that other hand.

EAT BRAINHEALTHY FOODS When you are fueling your body, you are also feeding your brain. This is very important to know because if you engage in an unhealthy diet, you are at risk for temporary or even permanent brain damage. To prevent this type of damage from occurring, try to include brain-healthy foods such as fruits, vegetables, fish that contain omega-3 fatty acids, and whole grains.

GET A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP Whether you are someone who works late or is a night owl, it is important to make sure that you are receiving at least seven to nine hours of sleep each night. This allows your brain to take a break and consolidate all of the learning that occurred during the day. Studies have shown that people who don’t sleep enough have more trouble learning new information while sleeping well after learning something new helps the brain effectively put that information into longterm memory.

GET MENTAL STIMULATION The key to increasing the brain’s function of neuroplasticity is to make your brain sweat from time to time. Provide your brain with a workout by engaging in a variety of different activities such as puzzles, reading, drawing, and taking courses. Although, when you do these exercises, don’t get too comfortable with one. It’s just like when working out a muscle. You are not going to become stronger if you use the same amount of weight. Always try to participate in something new so that your brain can continue to grow and develop.

REDUCE STRESS Managing your stress can be one of the most crucial things you can do when trying to keep your brain healthy. Chronic stress comes with brain cells being destroyed, and the hippocampus is affected, which aids in providing new memories in the brain. So, take some action to manage your stress by focusing on one task at a time, creating an organized schedule, and even merely communicating with your friends and family about your feelings.

See our feature on page 36

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CC COCKTAIL CONFIDENTIAL

D i scover You r Hoppy Plac e

With plenty of breweries in Green Country, where’s a beer-lover to start? How about with a brewery crawl. By Rob H a rm o n a n d M i c h e l e C h i a ppe t ta • Ph oto s by Ro b Har mon

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As long as there has been beer to drink, visiting local watering holes to spend a couple of hours unwinding, having fun, and enjoying a couple cold ones has been a favorite pastime. These days, there’s something even more interesting about experiencing a glass or two of your favorite craft beer, right where it was made. And you can also take that experience up a notch (or three) by planning a brewery crawl, gathering some friends, and enjoying visits to multiple local breweries over a few hours. During the last few decades, thousands of small, unique breweries have popped up all over large cities and small towns nationwide, each one with their take on various styles of craft beer and their taproom atmosphere. Green Country breweries are filled with some of the nicest brewery and taproom staff and, of course, some of the most interesting and flavorful beers the nation has to offer. It’s hard not to want to visit them all. And while you can’t visit every single taproom of the fantastic breweries in Tulsa in one sitting (well, at least you probably shouldn’t), you can make plans to visit more than one in an afternoon or evening, with a little planning.

that person do the driving the whole evening. Many places offer free nonalcoholic drinks to designated drivers. Just ask the staff. If everyone wants to drink, then plan to share the cost of an Uber from one location to the next. Safety for yourself and those around you is of the utmost importance. Do not wait until the brewery crawl has already started to choose a driver. Figure it out ahead of time.

Get others involved A great beer tour is often its own reward, of course, but you can add some extra excitement to the mix by making it into an event, adding a theme, or otherwise spicing things up. Ask friends or family to sponsor your trip and donate the proceeds to a local charity. The beer just tastes better when you know you’re drinking for a good cause.

CABIN BOYS BREWERY

Embrace social media

A brewery crawl is not just about drinking at as many breweries as possible. It’s also about having a great time. If you know someone won’t be able to hit four or five breweries without being a pain to hang around, try some other activity with that friend. Don’t do a beer crawl with people who are going to make trouble for you and the other people in the breweries. Brewery crawls are best done with people who have each others back.

Leave your car keys at home This is not the time to drive. Who will be the designated driver? If someone is willing to take one for the team and not drink, then let

BROKEN ARROW BREWING COMPANY

If you’re visiting multiple breweries, don’t get several flights (five-ounce samples) to try everything at your first brewery. This is more of a marathon than a sprint. Maybe just try one flight and share it with someone, or perhaps even only one beer.

Prepare yourself

Don’t go to a brewery crawl on an empty stomach. One nice thing to do at the beginning of a beer crawl is to have a light brunch before visiting your first brewery. Find a cool restaurant near your first stop to have breakfast or lunch. Go over the details while enjoying some food.

AMERICAN SOLERA

1801 S. 49th W. Ave. | Tulsa 108 E. 18th St. | Tulsa 333 W. Dallas St. | Broken Arrow

Hashtags are like sober friends you can lean on throughout the day. They’ll help track your progress for folks who want to join, but more importantly, they’ll collect all your favorite moments in one place so you can remember them later.

Know which breweries you plan to hit and at least have a vague order of how you’re going to hit them. That way, if things start to unravel along the way, everybody in your group will at least have a general idea of where to go to try to get things back on track.

In the Tulsa area, there are a few hotels close in proximity to breweries. The Nine Band Brewery is actually inside the Osage Casino Hotel. It’s nice to take a brief walk or ride to a hotel room from your last stop on a brewery crawl. It’s a way to reward yourself for being such a craft brew warrior. Give yourself an extra-special way to recoup the next morning by staying in a nice, clean, cushy hotel room like downtown’s Hotel Indigo. Meeting that following day again in the hotel restaurant or lobby to discuss the exploits from the previous day is also a fun way to memorialize the whole event.

Pace yourself

The guidelines for a brewery crawl are similar to the run-of-the-mill pub crawl, but because you’re visiting the taprooms of breweries where the beer is made, there are some unique things to consider. To keep things fun, safe, and informative, check out these tips for making your time memorable. As the old saying goes, fail to plan, and you plan to fail. Being prepared for a successful brewery crawl means thinking as much through as possible.

Get a hotel room

Drink with people you know and trust

Drink lots of water Drink plenty of water before, during, and after a brewery crawl. Water is always available at breweries. They’ll either provide a fountain you can use yourself, or they will fill up a cup from behind the counter. Broken Arrow Brewery Company even offers complimentary bottled water. Who cares if you have to visit the bathroom a few more times? It’s better to stay as hydrated and sober as possible so you can enjoy the beers in the next brewery. You’ll honestly have more fun if you’re not wasted after the first stop. As stated earlier, this is more of a marathon than a sprint.

1717 E. 7th St. | Tulsa

DEAD ARMADILLO BREWERY

1004 E. 4th St. | Tulsa

ELGIN PARK BREWERY

325 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa

EMERSUMNICE BREWERY

102 S. Main St. | Owasso

FAT TOAD BREWING COMPANY

3986 W. 530 | Pryor

HEIRLOOM RUSTIC ALES

2113 E. Admiral Blvd. | Tulsa

MARSHALL BREWING COMPANY

618 S. Wheeling Ave. | Tulsa

MUSKOGEE BREWING COMPANY

121 S. 2nd St. | Muskogee

NEW ERA FINE FERMENTATIONS

321 S. Frankfort Ave. | Tulsa

NINE BAND BREWING COMPANY

951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa

NOTHING’S LEFT BREWING COMPANY

1502 E. 6th St. | Tulsa

PEARL BEACH BREW PUB

418 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa

PIPPIN’S TAPROOM AT HIGH GRAVITY

6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 144 | Tulsa

PRAIRIE BREWPUB

223 N. Main St. | Tulsa

RENAISSANCE BREWING COMPANY

1147 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa

WELLTOWN BREWING

114 W. Archer St. | Tulsa

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ET EATS + TREATS

oo as old by SARAH HERRERA photos by SARAH HERRERA

AS POPULAR AS GUINNESS, SODA BREAD, CORNED BEEF, AND CABBAGE MAY BE, THERE ARE PLENTY OF TASTY NON-IRISH TREATS FOR YOUR ST. PATRICK'S DAY CELEBRATION. A happy St. Paddy’s Day to you. The day for green wearing, good luck wishes, and beer glass clinking is near. And with the celebrations of the Irish holiday comes the need for festive

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eats and treats. We’ve got your staple meats and cheeses, your carb-loading basics, your sweet-n-salty options, and, of course, plenty of opportunities for alcohol.

Whether you’re celebrating with friends or staying close to home with family, the recipes for this holiday can be altered to please just about anyone. So, make

yourself a meal, or munch and snack at your leisure, indulge in the cheese and enjoy the sweet treats, and celebrate the day with a full belly and a happy heart.


PRETZEL CHUNKS AND BEER CHEESE DIP

BUFFALO CHICKEN BITES

Adapted from gypsylifeofrme.com Love pretzels, but never thought you could make them? Well, think again. These pinchable pretzel chunks are easy to make and even easier to eat.

Adapted from madaboutfood.com If you like a little bit of spice in your sauce and a whole lot of sauce on your chicken, you’ll love these spicy buffalo chicken bites. Sweeten them with honey or lower the heat with some ranch dressing, and you’re set.

PRETZEL CHUNKS INGREDIENTS: 2 1/4 tsp. active dry

yeast 1 1/4 cups warm milk 2 Tbsp. honey 4 cups flour

1 tsp. salt 1 /2 cup baking soda 1/2 cup egg whites 1 Tbsp. water 1 Tbsp. coarse sea salt

DIRECTIONS:

1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. 2. L  ine a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. 3. Pour milk into a mixing bowl. Top with honey and the yeast and stir to combine. Allow to sit for 10 minutes until foamy. 4. Fill a large pot half full with water and allow to come to a boil over medium to high heat. 5. Mix the egg whites and water. 6. Add flour and salt to the mixing bowl. Mix on low for about 3 minutes until dough forms. 7. Place dough on the counter and form dough into a ball. (No need to flour your counter.) Section the dough into four parts and roll each part into a long strand. Cut each strand into 1-inch sections. 8. Slowly add baking soda to boiling water. Place dough bites into boiling water about 10 at a time, and flash cook for 20-30 seconds for each batch. 9. Using a slotted spoon, take the dough out of water and place on the baking sheet. 10. Arrange all cooked pretzel bites on the baking sheet so that they are not touching. Brush each bite with egg white mixture and sprinkle with sea salt. 11. Bake for approximately 10 minutes or until the tops are browned. Remove from the oven. BEER CHEESE DIP INGREDIENTS

2 Tbsp. butter 2 Tbsp. flour 1/4 cup milk 1/2 cup beer 8 ounces of shredded cheddar cheese

1/2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tsp. paprika 1/4 tsp. cayenne Salt and pepper to taste

EATS + TREATS ET

INGREDIENTS:

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts 2 eggs 3 /4 cup almond flour 1 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper 1/4 cup butter 1/3 cup hot sauce 2 Tbsp. Ranch dressing 1 Tbsp. scallions DIRECTIONS:

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Cube chicken breasts into bite-size pieces. 3. In a bowl, beat two eggs until fluffy. 4. In a separate dish, combine almond flour, salt, and pepper. 5. Dip the chicken bites into the egg wash and then roll them into the almond flour mixture. 6. Place breaded chicken cubes on a lined baking sheet and bake for 25 minutes. 7. While the chicken is baking, heat a 1/4 cup of butter in a saucepan over low heat. When butter is fully melted, mix in 1/3 cup hot sauce and keep warm until chicken is cooked. 8. Take Buffalo sauce mixture off the heat and toss in cooked chicken cubes. 9. Drizzle ranch dressing and scallions over the top and serve.

SHAMROCK SHAKE Adapted from tablespoon.com This classic ice cream treat is minty, creamy, and oh-so-boozy. Feel free to make it kid-friendly, but if you don’t have to, you won’t want to. INGREDIENTS:

1.5 quart mint chocolate chip ice cream ¼ cup Irish cream Whipped cream (desired amount) Sprinkles for topping DIRECTIONS:

1. Place ice cream and Irish cream in a blender. Blend until smooth. 2. Pour into serving glasses, and top with whipped cream and sprinkles.

DIRECTIONS:

1. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat and whisk in the flour. Let it cook for a few minutes. 2. Gradually add milk and beer, continually whisking to prevent clumping. 3. Once you have a smooth liquid, stir in the shredded cheese until it melts. 4. Stir in Worcestershire sauce, cayenne, paprika, and season with salt and pepper to taste.

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sugar rush BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA AND ROB HARMON

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Memorable meals just aren't complete without that little something extra to sweeten the deal. And Green Country does not disappoint when it comes to all things decadent, indulgent, and sinfully delicious.


Let’s not pretend those resolutions are still in play. Who are we kidding? It’s March, for goodness’ sake. Be done with letting the health nuts guilt you out of your sweet tooth urges. No more angels on your shoulders telling you to eat in moderation every time your desire for the sweet stuff pops up. Enough is enough. There’s nothing wrong with being a dessert connoisseur. Somebody’s got to do it. After all, isn’t it important to know what you love and go after it? It’s just as much about feeding the soul as it is the stomach.

Andolini's Pizzeria 1552 E. 15TH ST. TULSA 500 RIVERWALK TERRACE, STE. 100 JENKS 222 S. MAIN ST. BROKEN ARROW 12140 E. 96TH ST. OWASSO

Andolini's Sliced 114 S. DETROIT AVE. TULSA

Albert G's Bar-B-Q 2748 S. HARVARD AVE. TULSA

421 E. 1ST ST. TULSA

Albert G’s does what they do well, and desserts are a bigger part of it than you might think. The banana pudding is just the way grandma made it. The Key lime pie will make you think you’re sitting on the back deck of the Key West Hemingway home, enjoying every bite in perfect weather. The chocolate bourbon pecan pie is one of the tastiest and most unique desserts you’ll ever have, and Albert G’s chocolate caramel lava cake, available only at the downtown location, is a sensational treat of epic proportions.

Tulsa’s restaurants understand. If you’ve been struggling with cravings for chocolate, cake, pie, strawberry shortcake, and everything else, the good news is that eating establishments in these parts have got your back. Besides, eating dessert doesn’t mean you completely abandon selfcontrol. It just means you know what you want, and you know how to honor those desires. If it works for you, make a pact with yourself to eat the dessert, but then make up for it with a nice walk outside as things warm up this spring. Do yoga indoors. Choose only to eat desserts on Fridays. Do what works for you, and for dessert’s sake, don’t cheat yourself out of the sweets you love and cherish. Here are some fantastic desserts waiting for you at some of your most willing accomplices, Green Country’s restaurants.

You can be sure that any of the desserts available at Andolini’s are handmade and as fresh as can be. Try the Oreo cheesecake brownie, because this decadent dish of pure pleasure will simply rock your world. Served with whipped cream, chocolate, cream cheese, and strawberries, this dish will win you over for life. But don’t overlook the restaurant’s Italian Buttercake. A cheesecake and pound cake combo, this tasty dessert deserves all the praise and adoration it has ever received. The gelato at select locations comes in so many fantastic flavors, you’ll have a hard time choosing.

El Chico 9825 E. 21ST ST. TULSA

Either go as basic as a sopapilla with honey or as complex as the triple chocolate brownie skillet sundae; whatever you choose at El Chico to satisfy the sweet tooth will be just right. If you try the fried ice cream, you’ll wonder why you’ve deprived yourself of its sugary goodness this whole time. Vanilla ice cream, inside a cinnamon sugar shell, with hot fudge dripping off the side, all topped with a cherry and whipped cream — it’s the stuff dreams are made of.

Famous Steakhouse 8922 S. MEMORIAL DR., STE. C3 TULSA

Tulsans are familiar with Mediterranean steakhouses, which means they’re acquainted with the wonders of baklava. If you’ve been in Oklahoma long enough, you’ve had it the traditional way. Here’s the thing, though — Famous Steakhouse takes baklava to warp speed with their earthshattering baklava sundae. We’re talking chewy baklava crumbles, baked just right, with the creamiest ice cream, rich chocolate syrup, and nuts. Also, the kitchen makes a mean chocolate mousse, and the cheesecake pairs well with the restaurant’s smooth, aromatic after-dinner coffee.

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Kitch

Also Check Out

377 E. MAIN ST. JENKS

Amelia's Wood Fired Cuisine 122 N. BOSTON AVE. | TULSA

Antoinette Baking Co. 207 N. MAIN ST. | TULSA

Baxter's Interurban Grill 717 S. HOUSTON AVE., #100 | TULSA

Biga

4329 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Bird & Bottle

3324-A E. 31ST ST. | TULSA

Bread and Butter Kitchen + Bakery 3837 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA

Brownies

2130 S. HARVARD AVE. | TULSA

Habaneros Mexican Grill 4640 S. ELM PLACE BROKEN ARROW

With an extensive menu of authentic Mexican beef, chicken, pork and shrimp dinners, quesadillas, soups, fajitas, and even vegetarian meals, it’s no surprise that the dessert menu is wide-ranging as well. Choose flan, the creamy Mexican custard you only get at authentic establishments. Try a bowl of nieve, the tasty, sugary Mexican sorbet. The sopapilla suave is another authentic dessert you can’t get just anywhere — a fluffy tortilla, sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar, drizzled with your choice of caramel or honey. Three leches cake, churros, fried nieve, and the cheesecake chimi are some of the other amazing options.

A breakfast and lunch restaurant rarely has this kind of dessert menu. Next door to Cookiedoodle, another food endeavor of owner Bernadette Feickert, Kitch is one of the smartest places to enjoy a top-notch dessert. Constantly arriving from the kitchen are appetizing fresh pies and lip-smacking cakes in so many delicious flavors. Huge portions are served warm and fresh. Try the Death by Chocolate, and you’ll be completely satisfied. Enjoy the apple maple cake, and every bite will impress the taste buds. Whatever you choose from the shop’s dessert menu will be a special treat since it’s all made fresh daily.

Caz's Chowhouse

18 E. RECONCILIATION WAY | TULSA

McNellie's Pub

Cherry Street Kitchen 1441 S. QUAKER AVE. | TULSA

409 E. 1ST ST. TULSA

Clanton's Cafe

319 E. ILLINOIS AVE. | VINITA

MAD Eats Dave & Buster's

6812 S. 105TH E. AVE. | TULSA

Dilly Diner

402 E. 2ND ST. | TULSA

Duet

108 N. DETROIT AVE. | TULSA

Hammett House

1616 W. WILL ROGERS BLVD. | CLAREMORE

Incredible Pizza 8314 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

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201 S. MAIN ST. OWASSO

Owasso’s modern American diner shines bright in the dessert department. Sure, shakes go along with any meal from beginning to end, but these MAD shakes are so good, you truly have to consider them as dessert options. The Willy Vanilly is deliciously creamy. The Sloth Strawberry and Truffle Shuffle Chocolate shakes are so yummy, they warrant a visit on their own. The scratch pies in classic flavors are fantastic, as well as the uniquely designed pies like the Fruity Pebbles Cheesecake and the Blueberry Buttermilk. Now, the boozy shakes—they genuinely take the cake. These bourbon, rum, and vodka infused shakes are simply unreal.

7031 S. ZURICH AVE. TULSA

Start to finish, this restaurant understands just how important a dessert is. At McNellie’s, it’s the crowning finish on an already exceptional meal. The white chocolate brownie, for example, is simple but comes out looking like a work of art. The huge walnutfilled brownie comes fresh out of the oven, with an equal-sized scoop of top-choice Tillamook vanilla ice cream covered in sinfully sweet chocolate syrup, and it’s stunning to look at. It’s just as fulfilling to eat, trust us. It’s a killer dessert.


Prairie Brewpub 223 N. MAIN ST. TULSA

Everything this place does is classy. The beer, in its many flavors and styles, is exceptional and a wonderful representative of Tulsa’s burgeoning craft brew community. The dining area is always uniquely and exquisitely decorated. The wait staff is quick to serve guests, making a visit well worth it every time. The desserts available are some of the most spot-on, appropriate, and tasty ones you’ll get anywhere. The pumpkin crème brulee is simply delectable. Try the cranberry bread pudding with vanilla ice cream, and you’ll thank us for the suggestion.

The Tavern 201 N. MAIN ST. TULSA

The desserts at The Tavern are truly delicious. The simple, yet rich German chocolate and coconut cake, served with pecan ice cream, is so tasty, you’ll savor every last bite. The banana and toffee bread pudding isn’t found anywhere else we know of in the Tulsa area, and it is so scrumptious you’ll be tempted to order another one to go. Just to keep things interesting, no single style or flavor of pie is on the menu permanently. Choose whatever the chef has chosen as the pie of the day, and you can be sure it was baked with love and lots of sugary goodness.

Also Check Out Jason's Deli

8321 E. 61ST ST. | TULSA 1330 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

JINYA Ramen Bar 416 E. 2ND ST. | TULSA

Juniper

324 E. 3RD ST. | TULSA

Kilkenny's Irish Pub 1413 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

Knotty Pig BBQ, Burger & Chili House 6835 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

Melting Pot

300 RIVERWALK TERRACE, STE. 190 | TULSA

Michael V's

8222 E. 103RD ST. | TULSA

Napa Flats Wood-Fired Kitchen

9912 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA

Nelson's Buffeteria 4401 S. MEMORIAL DR. | TULSA

Old School Bagel

6805 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA 3723 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Oren Restaurant

3509 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Palace Cafe

1301 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

PRHYME: Downtown Steakhouse 111 N. MAIN ST. | TULSA

Russo's Coal-Fired Italian Kitchen 8941 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA

Tavolo 427 S. BOSTON AVE. TULSA

Inside the historic Philtower building, in the heart of Tulsa’s Deco District, Tavolo offers authentic Italian cuisine and desserts to die for. Just like the other Justin Thompson awardwinning restaurants, PRHYME and Juniper, the chocolate pie sort of makes you forget anything else for the rest of the evening. It begins with a rich, sugary Oreo crust that has hints of coffee. Then add an even richer chocolate mousse, with an incomparable chocolate ganache slathered everywhere. It’s an unfair fight for other desserts out there.

Ti Amo Ristorante Italiano 6024 S. SHERIDAN ROAD TULSA 219 S. CHEYENNE AVE. TULSA

Ti Amo is a favorite to many, for many different reasons. The atmosphere, the service, the wine, the entrees — everything at this fine-dining establishment is first-class. The dessert you choose at Ti Amo will simply be the continuation of an already exceptional experience. Whether you select the outstanding crème brulee cheesecake, the luscious mocha velvet cheesecake, or the phenomenal tiramisu, you will never be underwhelmed. If you love excellence the way we do, you’ll agree that having a dessert at Ti Amo is nothing less than exhilarating.

Ruth's Chris Steak House 8330 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA

Savoy

6033 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA

Shiloh's

2604 N. ASPEN AVE. | BROKEN ARROW

Stonehorse Cafe

1748 UTICA SQUARE | TULSA

The Bistro at Seville 10021 S. YALE AVE., #103 | TULSA

The Vault

620 S. CINCINNATI AVE. | TULSA

Waterfront Grill 120 AQUARIUM DR. | JENKS

Yutaka Grill and Sushi Buffet 6560 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA

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HONEY SRIRACHA CHICKEN SANDWICH

TAKING A HEAVY CUE FROM ENGLISH TRADITION WHILE MIXING IN A MODERN AMERICAN STYLE, JENKS’ COZY DRINKING AND DINING DEN, GEORGE’S PUB, HAS A LOT IN COMMON WITH ITS COUNTERPARTS ACROSS THE ATLANTIC: EXCEPTIONAL MEALS, BEER, AND PLENTY OF FOOTBALL.

in food, atmosphere, and sports fandoms. “We’re an American and English pub,” says owner Corey Crandall. “We serve burgers, wings, and fish and chips. We’ve won awards for them. It’s like pub food, but good pub food.”

BY DONNA LEAHEY PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS

Crandall’s King George’s flag has been waving over Jenks for 10 years. “The first three years were tough,” he says. “The last seven have been great.”

The chicken sandwich war is over. Who won? A southern fried chicken place? A nationwide nugget place? Nope. A little English pub in Jenks has one of the tenderest, crispiest, most flavorful chicken sandwich you ever ate. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves here.

“Great” is an understatement. During George’s Pub’s 10 years, it’s earned plenty of awards. NBC Sports named George’s Pub one of the top 35 places in the USA to watch sports.

Downtown Jenks is charming, with a small-town feel and big-city conveniences. Park and do some antique shopping, walk around, look in windows, and enjoy the atmosphere of a hidden little resort town. And when you’re ready to eat, or enjoy a brew and watch a game, find your way to George’s Pub on First Street. You can’t miss it. The building has a bright white flag with a red cross right in the middle painted on the outside. Step through the door, and you find yourself transported directly to the border between Jenks and London, England. It’s a unique kind of fusion: American and English

What makes this little pub so unique? Crandall. Crandall and his pub are laid back, funny, likable, easy to get along with, and dedicated to great food. “We make all our dips, sauces, and batters here,” he says. “We hand-cut our fries, make our own Guinness batter, and hand patty our burgers. We have our secret wings recipe; they’re No. 1 sellers.” Crandall came by his pub know-how honestly: he worked as a bartender at places like The Grey Snail and The Brook for more than 20 years, saving up money and business savvy along the way. He took

everything he’d learned, and, in 2010, he poured it into George’s Pub. “I didn’t know a soul in south Tulsa,” he says. “I named the place after an old regular of mine named George Streetman. He died in 2005, but I always promised him if I ever opened a bar, I’d name it after him. We’ve been working our butts off ever since.” That work has paid off handsomely. George’s Pub is fast becoming a multigenerational place. “Our clientele is everything from 21-80 years old,” he says. “We’re starting to see grandchildren now. Three generations.” What is it that keeps bringing people back for 10 years? There are a lot of answers to that question, but the food is one of the big ones. Remember that chicken sandwich? This tender and juicy generous chunk of chicken breast is coated in Guinness batter and fried to crispy perfection. It’s tossed in a

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MARGARITA

ULTIMATE BURGER

sweet, spicy, and tangy Sriracha sauce and topped with a slice of creamy pepper jack cheese. Served on a soft and toasted bun, it’s a bite so perfect and flavorful, you’ll love it whether or not you care for spicy food. Believe this: the burn is worth it.

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Crandall. “We have three live bands, a special menu, and fun games for adults. We tent the whole thing, so it’s on, rain or shine. It’s the second biggest party in Tulsa.”

GEORGE’S PUB

108 N. 1st St. | Jenks 918-296-9711 georgespubs.com

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George’s isn’t just a pub, and it’s not only home to deliciously upgraded pub food; it’s one of the best sports bars around. NFL games, baseball, basketball, you name it. But there’s one sport in particular George’s is known for: football. No, not that game played with the pads and helmets. The original football with a round white ball. George’s Pub is home to the Tulsa Gooners, the official Arsenal bar of America. Who are the Gooners, you may ask? They’re the fans of Highbury, London’s Arsenal Football Club. “My family’s from Highbury,” says Crandall. “It’s in my DNA.” Why Gooners? Say “gunners” with an English accent, and you’ll get something that sounds a lot like “gooners.”

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Want to bring a little Tex-Mex into the American/English fusion? Try the deepdish nachos, a popular favorite A pile of fresh chips is covered in melted cheese,

tomato, onion, lettuce, and jalapenos and drizzled with sour cream. It’s a dish every bit as pretty as it is tasty. Not only are the colors beautifully contrasting, but the textures and flavors also meld perfectly: crunchy, creamy, tangy, and salty.

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If you want more traditional American fare, you can’t go wrong with a burger. Your options range from an ultimate burger to a classic patty melt. All the burgers are shaped by hand and cooked to order. The burger is juicy and full of beefy flavor. The ultimate burger is topped with cheddar, ham, and crispy, smoky, salty bacon. If you want a meatless option, the black bean chipotle burger is hearty and every bit as tasty.

GUINNESS BATTERED FISH AND CHIPS

For Saint Patrick’s Day, George’s will continue its traditional giant St. Paddy’s party. “We block off the street,” says

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If chicken isn’t your thing, try a pub staple: fish and chips. Crandall’s take on this classic dish is crispy, crunchy, flavorful, and perfect. Fresh and flaky cod plus Guinness batter makes for a golden-brown, hearty dish that crunches between your teeth and makes your taste buds sing. It comes with some delicious made-in-house tartar sauce. And that’s good, but be sure to try it as God intended it with malt vinegar. Splash some on the fish and the chips, sprinkle some salt, and you might as well be in London watching the Arsenal F.C. play soccer.

DEEP DISH NACHOS

Monday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Sunday: Noon-2 a.m.


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CHICKEN-FRIED STEAK

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comfort COMBINING COUNTRY-STYLE COOKING WITH TWISTS OF MODERN FLAVORS FOR SUPERIOR DISHES BOTH IN TASTE AND PRESENTATION, THE ROCKING “R” RANCH HOUSE OFFERS PRIVATE COUNTRY CLUB APPEAL IN AN OPEN-TO-THE-PUBLIC PARADISE. By Gina Conroy

Most people who drive past the white picket fence and sprawling driveway think Forest Ridge Golf Club is a private country club because of the luxurious feel; they don’t realize they too are invited to play and dine.. “We’ve been fighting that [private] country club stereotype for years,” says Lance Allen, general manager of Forest Ridge Golf Club. “But we’re open to the public. No membership required to dine, drink, or golf.” While the serene country setting is a breath of fresh air, another benefit is there’s always plenty of parking. Wednesday through Saturday, a chauffeured golf cart will pick you up from your car and drop you off at the entrance of the Rocking “R” Ranch House restaurant. The décor inside reflects the ranch life, but don’t worry, you won’t be eating in a barn; it’s not that rustic. Instead, you can expect a polished, upscale ranch house feel with Southern hospitality and charm in the décor, service, and food. From the stunning cypress ceilings known for their texture

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Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

and oblong holes to the wagon wheel chandeliers and solid wood tables, the ranch and southern influences are everywhere. Gather the family around the large community table that seats 10 made from one slab of wood right off the Robson Ranch or dine more intimately at one of the candlelit tables. When the weather is nice, take your party outdoors on the patio voted one of the best patios for dining. Throughout the year, they host several outdoor events, including live music, food, and drink specials. While the view and rustic charm will entice you to dine at Rocking “R” Ranch House, it’s the food that will keep you coming back. Serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner, there’s no need to go hungry. The chefs at Rocking “R” Ranch House combine Southern-style cooking with twists of modern flavors for superior dishes both in taste and presentation. When in season, fresh herbs from their onthe-premise garden add to the rich ranch house flavor. The public is encouraged to spend the entire day at Forest Ridge Golf Club.

“We want them to enjoy the facility as a whole,” says Allen. “Come in, eat, grab a couple of beers, go play, come back in, and eat afterward.” Whether you come early before tee time to grab a bite to eat, have a hankering for eggs and waffles for dinner, or bring the family for brunch, the Rocking “R” Ranch House serves up breakfast just the way you like it. They offer Saturday and Sunday morning breakfast buffets from 8-10:30 a.m. that include scrambled eggs, breakfast potatoes, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, and fresh fruit. The Sunday brunch buffet from 10:30 a.m.–2 p.m. serves an omelet and waffle bar cooked to order, breakfast, and lunch offerings from the buffet. Kids age 4 and under eat free. For Easter and Mother’s Day, Rocking “R” Ranch House goes the extra mile. “We carve prime rib, have omelets and waffles, and different fish dishes as well as chicken,” says food and beverage director Brad Rockholt. The smorgasbord-style buffet also includes different styles of potatoes like mashed and oven-roasted, two to three different vegetables, and more.

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“We use fresh produce instead of frozen, and Black Angus beef, but we source as much as we can with local companies,” says Rockholt. Perhaps you’re more in the mood for chicken or fish. You can’t go wrong with the sautéed trout, salmon, chicken-fried steak, fried chicken, blackened chicken pasta, braised beef gnocchi, or anything else on the menu. If you leave hungry, it’s your fault since there’s something on the menu for everyone. Just off to the side of the dining room is a door leading to the Rocking “R” Bar. Open to the public with five TVs and a full bar serving cocktails, beer, wine, and

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“We have a couple of stud bartenders who’ve been out here for nine or 10 years,” says Allen. “They know how to make about every drink you can imagine.” Whether you’re taking the kids or grandkids out on the green to play three or nine holes, or treating them to a meal from the kid-friendly menu, you’ll enjoy special family time at Forest Ridge Golf Club. Family golf nights are planned for this season, so check the website for days and time, but every Wednesday is family night at Rocking “R” Ranch House. For that extra-special occasion for a crowd of up to 150 people, you don’t have to be a member of the golf club to rent the event space with a glass wall overlooking the picturesque golf course. Newly renovated with an old-world chandelier, wood floors, and stylish yet comfortable interior grand room, it’s the perfect space for your event. Whether you’re hosting a wedding reception, office or Christmas party, reunion, proms, or other special occasions, the Glass Veranda event space has everything you need, including audiovisual equipment and private bathrooms for guests. “We can do different plated and buffetstyle meals,” says Rockholt. “If you have something in particular that you want, we’re always flexible to make it happen.” While it’s always best to book your event well in advance (at least two weeks out,) they will do their best to accommodate last-minute bookings. “Typically, we can put it together pretty quick,” says Allen, who in the past has put together an event in 48 hours.

TROUT

PRIME RIB

ROCKING “R” RANCH HOUSE

7501 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-357-2719 forestridge.com/restaurant ranchhouseba.com forestridge.com

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Sure, they have all the soup, salad, sandwich, burger, and even taco favorites, but why not enjoy the signature dishes like the meatloaf with beef and sausage seared with a tomato glaze, the succulent smoked baby back ribs lightly glazed in tangy barbecue sauce, or the chargrilled steaks including rib-eye and filets with roasted prime rib served Saturday nights.

menu items from the restaurant, it’s a great place to unwind after golf or work.

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Complimentary bread and caramelized cornbread (served at dinner) top every table. But don’t fill up, because you’re going to want to choose from one of their many savory appetizers like the sweet heat shrimp; loaded housemade chips topped with pulled pork, onions, peppers, feta cheese, and honey chipotle; or the tobacco onions, thinly sliced onion rings served with housemade remoulade sauce.

RANCHER’S BREAKFAST

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Of course, weekends and special occasions aren’t the only reason to dine at Rocking “R” Ranch House, which is open to the public for breakfast and lunch seven days a week, and Wednesday through Saturday for dinner.

CHOCOLATE BROWNIE SUNDAE

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BLACKENED CHICKEN PASTA

Sunday: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Tuesday: 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday: 7 a.m.-9 p.m.


Where the locals have been going since 1975!

Daily ls Lunch Specia am 11 at n Ope Saturday Monday thru ay nd Su d Close

918.622.2668

www.ricardostulsa.com 5629 E. 41st • Tulsa, OK

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GK GETTING TO KNOW

Gaining CoffeeFirst is impacting people recovering from mental health illnesses, incarceration, or addiction, all while serving up sensational Topeca Coffee.

What happens when a coffee shop opens for the dual purpose of giving back to its community and making a great cup of coffee? From the sound of it, that question may have already been answered in the short life of the Mental Health Association Oklahoma’s (MHAOK) newest social enterprise. CoffeeFirst is a sleek, full-service coffee kiosk, impacting people recovering from mental health illnesses, incarceration, or addiction, all while serving up sensational coffee. Since setting up shop in a lobby corner of Legacy Plaza, the response has been overwhelming. Community partners, community members, and employees within the complex have all expressed tremendous support for the coffee destination. They love the product and the social impact it makes. The adjacent Hoover neighborhood has begun to show appreciation, with praises through comments on their social media page. Additionally, Cass Fahler, the city councilor for District 5, where CoffeeFirst resides, showed his support by enthusiastically attending the grand opening this past December. MHAOK and the program’s supervisor, Clara Correa, see CoffeeFirst as a form of therapy. “A lot of times, people achieve mental wellbeing through employment,” Correa says. “We operate from the principle that work is therapy.”

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Correa, who has overseen the project since its inception, has met all financial and other challenges with an exuberant spirit of positivity. A recent graduate of the Oral


Grounds

“We are not trying to renew the grants,” Correa says, “because, just as we stress financial self-sustainability with our employees, as part of the program, we want to be able to echo that in our business practices.” Aside from expected challenges, CoffeeFirst has experienced other surprises along the way. “A lot of the surprises have been positive,” Correa says. “I expected to be more tired. People always talk about how exhausting it

One of CoffeeFirst’s baristas was recruited from a 2-year-old program, A Better Way. That program is a combined initiative of MHAOK and the City of Tulsa aimed at helping panhandlers and people experiencing homelessness find gainful employment. Not only has she found work as a barista, but she has also secured permanent housing as a result of being a part of the program. “It just goes to show how our programs interact and bolster each other,” Correa says. CoffeeFirst’s other barista experienced a justice system hiccup after culinary school, says Correa, but has been a considerable part of CoffeeFirst’s early success, truly a home-run hire. “She brings on a lot of talent, knowledge, and skill that has been a big part of why we’ve been successful,” says Correa. “She was able to pick up on how to steam milk and help me learn. On top of that, she is good at cooking and baking, so she is helping us develop a menu for CoffeeFirst.” Correa says that perhaps the most surprising development throughout the entire process is the overwhelming response people have had to their main product, Topeca Coffee.

COFFEEFIRST

5330 E. 31st St. | Tulsa

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A $50,000 Bank of America Neighborhood Champions grant and another grant of $20,000 from the Starbucks Foundation will allow CoffeeFirst to meet its first financial goal of staying afloat for the first year. However, in spite of such a robust beginning, Correa isn’t satisfied. The next business goal for the midtown endeavor is to become self-sustaining. Since before they opened, the coffee kiosk has looked for ways to become viable within the first six to eight months.

“I have been shocked at how this has been such a positive experience on my life,” she says. “Yes, it is tiring at times, mostly at the beginning stages, but it has been shocking how not only does this impact the community but those directly involved.”

“People not only believe in what we’re doing, but they love the product,” says Correa. “That’s important because social enterprises need to do something good for the community and serve a good product. The fact that we get to do that is really special, and people see it.”

Topeca Coffee handpicks the ripest coffee cherries from their farms in El Salvador

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To improve her learning curve, Correa got in touch with individuals who had started successful businesses. The crew from another social enterprise, T-Town Tacos, provided information on offering an excellent product while reaching and employing underrepresented populations. Justin Carpenter from Foolish Things and Topeca Coffee trainer Tyler Duncan lent their expertise in the area of coffee brewing. “They were a giant help,” Correa says.

The incredible reward of working alongside her two baristas and the inspiring stories they bring daily has been another remarkable experience, Correa says.

and roasts them right here in Tulsa, creating some of the richest aromatic coffee around. Locals and visitors to Tulsa have enjoyed their coffee at the Philcade Building and Hyatt Regency locations, as well as Hodges Bend.

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“One of the main challenges was getting capital,” she says. “For a nonprofit, it is a little bit different because we relied on grants. We applied for some local grants, as well as national grants. We did get the ones that we wanted, but that was a difficult process.”

is — starting your own business — but with my degree, I know the importance of taking care of your brain.”

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Roberts University social work program, Correa has enjoyed applying her education to the project but has also taken an on-the-job fasttrack course in social entrepreneurship.

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SL SHELF LIFE

NONFICTION/MEMOIR

LITERARY / CONTEMPORARY

MYSTERY, THRILLER AND SUSPENSE

ROMANCE/WOMEN’S FICTION

MARCH 17

MARCH 3

MARCH 24

RUST: A MEMOIR OF STEEL AND GRIT

THE EVERLASTING

BY ELIESE COLETTE GOLDBACH

Fresh out of college, eager to leave behind her conservative hometown, Eliese found herself applying for a job at the local steel mill. The mill is everything she was trying to escape, but it’s also her only shot at financial security in an economically devastated and forgotten part of America. ALSO LOOK FOR:

MARCH 31

BY KATY SIMPSON SMITH

Spanning 2,000 years, The Everlasting follows four characters in Rome whose struggles resonate across the centuries. Twelve-year-old Prisca defiles the scrolls of her father’s library. Felix, a holy man, watches his friend’s body decay. Giulia de’ Medici, a beauty with dark skin and limitless wealth, wants to deliver herself from her unborn child. Tom, an American biologist studying the lives of the smallest creatures, can’t pinpoint when his marriage began to die. ALSO LOOK FOR:

THE WOMAN OF A THOUSAND NAMES

BY ALEXANDRA LAPIERRE

Born into wealth and security, Moura never had any reason to worry. But in the upheaval of the Bolshevik Revolution, her entire world crumbles. As Lenin’s ruthless police persecute her family and friends, she falls into a passionate affair with British secret agent, Sir Robert Bruce Lockhart. But when he’s abruptly deported, Moura is left vulnerable. She must find new paths for survival, even if it means shedding her past and taking on new identities. ALSO LOOK FOR:

THE WOMAN IN THE MIRROR BY REBECCA JAMES

In 1947, Londoner Alice Miller accepts a post as governess at Winterbourne, looking after Captain Jonathan de Grey’s twin children. But the twins’ adoration becomes deceitful and taunting. Their father turns spiteful and cruel. Something malicious resents her presence, something clouding her senses and threatening her very sanity. In presentday New York, art gallery curator Rachel Wright has learned she is a descendant of the de Greys and heir to Winterbourne. But what she finds in Cornwall is a devastating, tragic legacy that has afflicted generations of de Greys. ALSO LOOK FOR:

HOW I BROKE UP WITH MY COLON BY NICK SELUK MARCH 24

Mysterious illnesses. Freakish injuries. X-rays revealing something weird stuck in your foot. These strange but true stories are among 24 medical tales retold hilariously by New York Times bestselling author and illustrator Nick Seluk. How I Broke Up with My Colon is an educational and highly entertaining tour through the bizarre workings of the human body.

EVERYTHING IS BEAUTIFUL, AND I’M NOT AFRAID BY YAO XIAO MARCH 3

This graphic novel explores the poetics of searching for connection, belonging, and identity through the fictional life of a young immigrant. Inspired by the creator’s own experiences, the book has an undeniable memoir quality to its recollection and thought-provoking accounts of what it’s like to navigate the complexities of seeking belonging — mentally and geographically.

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SEPARATION ANXIETY BY LAURA ZIGMAN MARCH 3

Life hasn’t gone according to Judy’s plan. Her career as a children’s book author offered a glimpse of success before taking an embarrassing nosedive. Her teenaged son, Teddy, treats her with some combination of mortification and indifference. Her best friend is dying. And her husband, Gary, has become a potaddled professional “snackologist” who she can’t afford to divorce.

ENTER THE AARDVARK BY JESSICA ANTHONY MARCH 24

Early one hot day in August, millennial Congress-bro Alexander Paine Wilson is planning his reelection campaign when a mysterious FedEx delivery arrives at his townhouse. Inside is a gigantic taxidermied aardvark. What does it mean?

THE MOONGLOW SISTERS BY LORI WILDE MARCH 3

Moonglow Cove was the home of the Clark sisters — brought up by their grandmother at the Moonglow Inn. As children, they were inseparable. Then, a wedding-day betrayal tore them apart, and they scattered across the globe and away from each other. But the sisters have at last come home.

IT’S NOT ALL DOWNHILL FROM HERE BY TERRY MCMILLAN MARCH 31

On the eve of her 68th birthday, Loretha has a booming beauty-supply empire, a gaggle of lifelong friends, and a husband whose moves still surprise. She’s not one of those women who think her best days are behind her. But when an unexpected loss turns her world upside down, Loretha will have to summon all her strength, resourcefulness, and determination to keep on thriving.

THE K TEAM BY DAVID ROSENFELT MARCH 24

Corey Douglas and his K-9 partner, Simon Garfunkel, have recently retired from the police force. Not ready to give up the life yet, they come up with a business proposal for fellow former cop, Laurie Carpenter, and her investigating partner, Marcus.

HOUR OF THE ASSASSIN BY MATTHEW QUIRK MARCH 31

Agent Nick Averose poses as a threat, testing the security around high officials to find their vulnerabilities before enemies can. His latest assignment is to assess the security surrounding the former CIA director at his DC area home. Nick finds himself entangled in a vicious crime— and all the evidence points to Nick.


SHELF LIFE SL

SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY AND HORROR

SELF-HELP AND INSPIRATIONAL

YOUNG ADULT AND MIDDLE GRADE

CHILDREN

MARCH 17

MARCH 10

MARCH 1

MARCH 17

HELP WANTED, MUST LOVE BOOKS

BY JANET SUMNER JOHNSON

88 NAMES

HOW TO BE FINE

BY MATT RUFF

John Chu is a Sherpa — a paid guide to online role-playing games. Chu’s new client, Mr. Jones, claims to be a “wealthy, famous person” with powerful enemies, and he’s offering a ridiculous amount of money for a comprehensive tour of the world of virtual-reality gaming. For Chu, this is a dream assignment, but as the tour gets underway, he begins to suspect Mr. Jones is North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un.

BY JOLENTA GREENBERG AND KRISTEN MEINZER

In their podcast By the Book, Greenberg and Meinzer take a deep dive into different self-help books. From diet and productivity to decorating to social interactions, they try it all, then share what they’ve learned. They synthesize the lessons and insights they’ve learned and share their experiences with everyone. ALSO LOOK FOR:

YOUR LIFE IS A LIFE OF HOPE! BY LORD BIRTHDAY MARCH 24

MARCH 31

Seven years after the first contact, Providence Five launches — a warship built to protect humanity from its greatest threat. On-board is a crew of four, tasked with monitoring the ship and reporting the war’s progress to a mesmerized global audience by social media. But while pursuing the enemy across space, their communications are cut, their ship decreasingly trustworthy.

BY KENNETH OPPEL

The invasion begins with rain. Rain that carries seeds. Seeds that sprout overnight, everywhere. These new plants take over crop fields, twine up houses, and burrow below streets. They bloom, release toxic pollens, and form Venus flytrap-like pods that swallow animals and people. They bloom everywhere, unstoppable. Or are they? Three kids on a remote island seem immune to the toxic plants. Can they somehow be the key to beating back this invasion?

Shailey loves bedtime, especially reading with her dad. But her dad starts a new job, and it gets in the way of their bedtime routine. So, Shailey takes action. She fires her dad, posts a Help Wanted sign, and starts interviews immediately. She is thrilled when her favorite characters from fairytales line up to apply. But Sleeping Beauty can’t stay awake, the Gingerbread Man steals her book, and Snow White brings along her whole team. Shailey is running out of options. Is bedtime ruined forever? ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

PROVIDENCE BY MAX BARRY

BLOOM

THE HOUSE IN THE CERULEAN SEA BY TJ KLUNE MARCH 17

Linus Baker is a by-the-book case. He’s tasked with determining whether six dangerous magical children are likely to bring about the end of the world. Arthur Parnassus, the master of an orphanage, would do anything to keep the children safe, even if it means the world will burn.

The internet’s favorite mustachioed king presents a series of short, illustrated essays in which he argues for hope by way of absurdity and transcendence by way of the mundane. In his signature childlike, dryly humorous style, Lord Birthday explores the things that make life so great, including jackets, bags, and “bopping someone on the nose.”

HELLO HOUSE BY NICOLA SLATER MARCH 3

THE GENIUS LIFE BY MAX LUGAVERE MARCH 28

Discover the critical link between your brain and the food you eat in this cutting-edge, practical guide to eliminating brain fog, optimizing brain health, and achieving peak mental performance. Gain insights into the nutrients that can boost your memory and improve mental clarity; foods and tactics that can energize and rejuvenate your brain, no matter your age; and foods that can improve your happiness, both now and for the long term.

BE NOT FAR FROM ME BY MINDY MCGINNIS MARCH 3

Ashley is more at home with trees overhead than a roof. When she goes hiking in the Smokies with her friends for a night of partying, the falling dark and creaking trees are second nature to her. But when she catches her boyfriend with another girl, drunken rage sends her running into the night, stopped only by a nasty fall into a ravine.

COO BY KAELA NOEL MARCH 3

Coo has lived her entire life on the rooftop with the pigeons who saved her. But then a hungry hawk nearly kills Burr, the pigeon she loves most, and leaves him gravely hurt. Coo must make a dangerous trip to find Tully, a retired postal worker who can heal injured birds.

Alex the cat wants his friends to come out and play, but where are they? Toddlers will love following Alex as he visits one house after another, collecting a new friend or two at every stop. Busy as real toddlers, rabbits, dogs, hedgehogs, squirrels, and bears join Alex outside to play catch with a touch-and-feel big, red ball.

DANNY AND THE DINOSAUR RIDE A BIKE BY SYD HOFF MARCH 31

There’s a new bicycle exhibit at the museum, and Danny is inspired to learn how to ride a bike with help from his buddy, the dinosaur, of course. From running over his friend’s tail to falling off the bike, Danny learns it takes a lot of tries to learn something new.

Release dates are subject to change.

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LOCATOR

S SHOWTIME

ADMIRAL TWIN DRIVE-IN 7355 E. Easton St. Tulsa | 918.878.8099 AMC SOUTHROADS 20 4923 E. 41st St. Tulsa | 888.AMC.4FUN

OPENS

MAR. 6

CINERGY 6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918.894.6888

MARCH 6

Hired to steal a rare painting from one of most enigmatic painters of all time, an ambitious art dealer becomes consumed by his greed and insecurity as the operation spins out of control. MARCH 6

Two teenage elf brothers, Ian and Barley Lightfoot, find themselves embarking on a quest to see if there is still some magic left in the world so that they can spend one day with their father, who had died shortly before Ian was born, and when Barley was too young to remember him clearly.

OPENS

CINEMARK TULSA 10802 E. 71st S. | Tulsa 800.FAN.DANG (#1128)

MAR. 6

CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. Tulsa | 918.592.3456 ETON SQUARE 6 CINEMA 8421 E. 61st St. Tulsa | 918.286.2618

CAST: CLAES BANG, ELIZABETH DEBICKI, DONALD SUTHERLAND RATING: R

AMC CLASSIC OWASSO 12601 E. 86th St. N. Owasso | 918.376.9191 STARWORLD 20 10301 S Memorial Drive Tulsa | 918.369.7475 WARREN BROKEN ARROW 18 1700 W. Aspen Creek Drive Broken Arrow | 918.893.9798

CAST: TOM HOLLAND, CHRIS PRATT, JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS RATING: NR

THE WAY BACK

STARGIRL

MARCH 6

A former high school basketball phenom struggling with alcoholism is offered a coaching job at his alma mater. As the team starts to win, he may have a reason to confront his old demons. But will it be enough to set him on the road to redemption? CAST: BEN AFFLECK, AL MADRIGAL, MICHAELA WATKINS RATING: NR

FIRST COW MARCH 6

A loner and cook travels west and joins a group of fur trappers in Oregon Territory, though he only finds a connection with a Chinese immigrant. The men collaborate on a business, although its longevity is reliant upon the participation of a wealthy landowner’s prized milking cow. CAST: JOHN MAGARO, ORION LEE, RENE AUBERJONOIS RATING: PG-13

SPENSER CONFIDENTIAL MARCH 6

An ex-felon and former police detective return to Boston’s criminal underworld to unravel a twisted murder conspiracy. CAST: MARK WAHLBERG, WINSTON DUKE, ALAN ARKIN RATING: R

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MAR. 6 96 PREVIEW 918 MARCH 2020

B&B CINEMA 8 1245 New Sapulpa Road Sapulpa | 918.227.7469 CINEMARK BROKEN ARROW 1801 E. Hillside Drive Broken Arrow | 918.355.0427

THE BURNT ORANGE HERESY

ONWARD

B&B CLAREMORE 8 1407 W. Country Club Claremore | 918.342.2422

MARCH 13

Leo Borlock is an average teen who blends in with others at Mica High School in Arizona. Susan “Stargirl” Caraway, a previously homeschooled, colorful, ukulele-playing force of nature, arrives to enter 10th grade. Most of the kids at school shun her because of her uniqueness, but Leo falls in love with her. CAST: GRACE VANDERWAAL, GRAHAM VERCHERE, GIANCARLO ESPOSITO RATING: PG

BLOODSHOT MARCH 13

A hardened CIA operative finds himself at the mercy of a precocious 9-year-old girl, having been sent undercover to surveil her family.

After he and his wife are assassinated, Marine Ray Garrison is reborn by a team of scientists. Enhanced with nanotechnology, he becomes a superhuman, biotech killing machine — Bloodshot. As Ray first trains with fellow supersoldiers, he struggles to recall anything from his previous years. But when his memories flood back, he remembers the man who killed both him and his wife.

CAST: DAVE BAUTISTA, KRISTEN SCHAAL, PARISA FITZ-HENLEY RATING: PG-13

CAST: VIN DIESEL, ELZA GONZALEZ, SAM HEUGHAN RATING: PG-13

MY SPY

MARCH 13


SHOWTIME S

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MAR. 20 #ANNEFRANK. PARALLEL STORIES MARCH 3

The film features Academy Award-winning actress Dame Helen Mirren. It intertwines Frank’s story with that of five Holocaust survivors, who as girls also shared the same ideals, the same desire to live, and the same courage: Arianna Szörenyi, Sarah Lichtsztejn-Montard, Helga Weiss, and sisters Andra and Tatiana Bucci.

WENDY

OPENS MARCH 6

The classic story of Peter Pan is wildly reimagined in this ragtag epic from Benh Zeitlin (Beasts of the Southern Wild). Lost on a mysterious island where aging and time have come unglued, Wendy must fight to save her family, her freedom, and the joyous spirit of youth from the deadly peril of growing up.

PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE

OPENS MARCH 13

On an isolated island in Brittany at the end of the 18th century, a female painter is obliged to paint a wedding portrait of a young woman.

THE ROADS NOT TAKEN MARCH 13

HARD TARGET

MARCH 13-14

A woman hires a drifter as her guide through New Orleans in search of her father, who has gone missing. They discover a deadly game of cat and mouse behind his disappearance in the process.

THE GREAT K&A TRAIN ROBBERY (1924) MARCH 14 FREE

This Tom Mix western tells the tale of a Texas railroad detective assigned to bust up a band of train robbers.

A turbulent 24 hours in the life of a daughter grappling with the challenges of dealing with her father’s chaotic mental state. CAST: JAVIER BARDEM, ELLE FANNING, SALMA HAYEK RATING: R

I STILL BELIEVE

MARCH 13

Celebrating French culture by screening new and classic films from France.

The true-life story of Christian music star Jeremy Camp and his journey of love and loss that looks to prove there is always hope.

PRAISE THE LORD AND PASS THE BALL

CAST: KJ APA, BRITT ROBERTSON, GARY SINISE RATING: PG

OKLAHOMA FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL

MARCH 23‑-25

MARCH 28

A documentary focused on the Oral Roberts University basketball teams from 1969-74 culminating in ORU playing in the Elite 8 in 1974. The film focuses on the players, coaches, sportswriters, family members, and significant others who were involved in this historic period of success. A panel discussion follows the screening.

SPECIAL MONDAY IS

FREE POPCORN DAY *Circle Cinema members only

CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa

SHOWTIMES: 918-592-3456 TICKETS: circlecinema.com

Check the Circle Cinema website for times, costs, additional events, and more details. Release dates, showings, and ratings are subject to change.

LOST GIRLS

MARCH 13

Mari Gilbert relentlessly drives law enforcement agents to search for her missing daughter and, in the process, sheds light on a wave of unsolved murders of young female sex workers on the South Shore barrier islands of Long Island.

A QUIET PLACE: PART II MARCH 20

Following the deadly events at home, the Abbott family must now face the terrors of the outside world as they continue their fight for survival in silence. Forced to venture into the unknown, they quickly realize that the creatures that hunt by sound are not the only threats that lurk beyond the sand path. CAST: EMILY BLUNT, MILLICENT SIMMONDS, NOAH JUPE RATING: NR

MULAN MARCH 27

When the Emperor of China issues a decree that one man per family must serve in the Imperial Chinese Army to defend the country from Huns, Hua Mulan, the eldest daughter of an honored warrior, steps in to take the place of her ailing father. She is spirited, determined, and quick on her feet. Disguised as a man by the name of Hua Jun, she is tested every step of the way and must harness her inner strength and embrace her true potential. CAST: LIU YIFEI, DONNIE YEN, JASON SCOTT LEE RATING: NR

CAST: AMY RYAN, THOMASIN MCKENZIE, DEAN WINTERS RATING: R

RELEASE DATES AND RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

LO CA

NR = A RATING WAS NOT AVAILABLE AS OF FEB. 20, 2020

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March 2020 (Vol. 34, No. 3)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...

March 2020 (Vol. 34, No. 3)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...