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OPPOSITES ATTRACT WHERE TO DINE

W H AT TO D O

23 PLACES TO FIND THE ORIGINAL SWEET-ANDSALTY ODD COUPLING OF CHICKEN AND WAFFLES

WHERE TO FIND IT

WHEN IT’S HAPPENING

JANUARY 2020

TRUE COLORS

NEW YEAR, NEW JOB

BLUE MAN GROUP SERVES UP BALD, BOLD, AND BEAUTIFUL

READY TO JUMP-START YOUR JOB SEARCH?

L O O C

A S ICE

PREVIEW918.COM

TICS, AND ATING, ACROBA BLENDING ICE SK AXEL IS A UE DU SOLEIL’S LIVE MUSIC, CIRQ ASE FOR LOVE HIGH-SPEED CH ZATION AND SELF-REALI

COME ON, GET HAPPY 18 SIMPLE STEPS TO BETTER LIFE SATISFACTION

FRANK CALIENDO MCALISTER’S DELI MOTHER ROAD MARKET SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL THE MUSIC MAN CHILDREN’S ORCHARD ALEXA

J U S T V I S I T I N G ? L I V I N G LO C A L? W E ’ V E G OT YO U C OV E R E D.


M FROM THE MAYOR As mayor of Tulsa, it is my honor to welcome you to our great city. Whether you’re visiting, or have deep roots here, I invite you to take time to explore our beautiful city and discover all the things that set us apart from other cities. I highly recommend Preview 918 as your go-to guide to navigate our incredible city. For more than 34 years, Preview has covered the 918, offering Tulsans and visitors alike the inside scoop to area restaurants and cafés, lodging, local attractions and events, world-class entertainment venues, tourist destinations, and unique shopping venues that are bound to please and delight. Our city is home to the world’s greatest collection of western art at the Gilcrease Museum, as well as Italian Renaissance displays at the Philbrook Museum. It’s a treasure trove for lovers of architecture, from mid-century modern housing, to the downtown Art Deco District, and our iconic BOK Center, designed by the internationally acclaimed architect César Pelli.

Tulsa Roughnecks soccer. Or time a visit to coincide with special events, such as Tulsa Tough bike racing, the Tulsa Run, the Route 66 Marathon, and the NCAA basketball tournament. The Tulsa area offers more than 80 miles of pedestrian and bicycle trails for a great way to see Tulsa. Tulsa is also a city on the move. In 2018, we opened the Gathering Place. The Gathering Place is a world class riverfront park designed to welcome all to a vibrant and inclusive public space that engages, educates, and excites.

To distribute Preview 918 at your place of business: 918‑745‑1190.

G.T. Bynum

FOLLOW US! PREVIEW918

MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER Marc Rains marc@previewgreencountry.com

MANAGING EDITOR | SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Michele Chiappetta michele@previewgreencountry.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Greer, Michele Chiappetta, Donna Leahey, Rob Harmon, G.K. Hizer, Gina Conroy, Lindsay Morris, John Tranchina, Jennifer Zehnder, Sarah Herrera, Ashton Greer, TravelOK.com

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Elizabeth Wollmershauser

4 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

In over 100 area Hotels and Motels

Local advertising and business inquiries: 918-745-1190.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL, BRAND, AND STRATEGY Chris Greer chrisg@previewgreencountry.com

Beth Rose beth@previewgreencountry.com

A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has remained the most trusted and widely read lifestyle publication in the Tulsa and Green Country area for more than 30 years. While other magazines have come and gone, Preview 918 has not only remained but has achieved unprecedented prestige within our community. It has been, and will continue to be, the magazine the 918 area lives by.

We connect with over 200,000 readers each month covering dining, fitness, retail, services, entertainment, people, events, lifestyles, and the arts. Preview 918 is freely distributed to over 650 locations in the Tulsa and Green Country area including QuikTrip, Reasor’s, over 100 hotels, Tulsa International Airport, casinos, retail shops, boutiques, restaurants, bars, medical offices, salons, gyms, and service providers. And many of those readers tell us that Preview 918 faithfully helps them identify their interests, wants, and needs.

Sports spectators can look to the University of Tulsa or Oral Roberts University athletic programs, Tulsa Oiler hockey games, and

CREATIVE TEAM Jared Hood jared@previewgreencountry.com

PREVIEW918.COM

Best regards, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa

For a night on the town, Tulsa serves up family entertainment at the Guthrie Green and Tulsa Drillers baseball at ONEOK Field. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center attracts Broadway musicals, renowned musicians and excellent local theater productions, and is home to the Tulsa Ballet.

FACEBOOK.COM/PREVIEW918

VOL. 34, NO. 1

I’m pleased so many of you have made your home in Tulsa. If you’re visiting our city, please enjoy your stay here. I also want to invite you to come back often to experience opportunities you won’t find anywhere else. In the meantime, you can find out more about Tulsa by visiting cityoftulsa.‌org.

Tulsa’s unique entertainment and shopping districts provide enjoyable experiences for the entire family. From an art crawl in the Tulsa Arts District, to a concert at the historic Cain’s Ballroom, to a trip to the Tulsa Zoo or a leisurely drive along Route 66 — there’s no end to what you can experience here.  

LIKE US!

PREV EW

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Marc Rains, Sarah Eliza Roberts, Sarah Herrera, Jennifer Zehnder, Valerie Wei‑Haas, Kelli Greer

FOLLOW US!

@PREVIEWTULSA FIELD OPERATIONS MANAGER Stephen Hurt stephen@previewgreencountry.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ann Murphy ann@previewgreencountry.com ROUTE DISTRIBUTION Rachel Blanchard, Cory Blanchard, Garrett Rinner SENIOR CONSULTANT Randy Dietzel PUBLISHERS Robert and Amy Rinner robert@previewgreencountry.com

Preview 918 is published 12 times a year. Reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited.

READ US!

WWW.ISSUU.COM/PREVIEWMAGAZINETULSA While the information has been compiled carefully to ensure accuracy at the time of publication, all content is provided for general guidance only and is subject to change. The publisher can’t guarantee the accuracy of all information or be responsible for omissions or errors. Preview 918 claims no credit for any images published in this issue unless otherwise noted. Images are copyright to their respective owners. Health, small business, and financial advice provided in Preview 918 and preview918.com are for educational and entertainment purposes only. Always consult with a qualified professional for health, small business, and financial advice. Preview 918, 10026-A S. Mingo, Suite 322, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Copyright 2020 by Preview 918. All rights reserved. Preview 918 is an affiliated publication produced by Fore Today Publications LLC.  


THE TRANSFORMATION IS COMPLETE

COME REDISCOVER THE

CULINARY QUEEN OF THE CORNER T U L SA A R T S D I ST R I C T • 2 01 N. M A I N ST. TAV E R N T U L SA .C O M


76 T TABLE OF CONTENTS JANUARY 2020

FEATURES 16

52

CONVERSATION STARTER: FRANK CALIENDO

Performing impressions of a range of famous people, Frank Caliendo is especially adept at imitating sports figures, and being a character all his own.

22 THRILLS AND CHILLS

Embark on the rock opera journey of Axel, whose passion for live music and graphic arts comes to life in an exhilarating Cirque du Soleil ice adventure that reminds us that dreams are within reach.

32

FRAME CHANGER

Cinergy offers bowling that’s highly interactive and fun, thanks to a new twist that turns lanes into a hightech, glitzy, gamified environment.

36 SAVORING SUCCESS

With a clever mix of local food and retail concepts, the Mother Road Market is a vibrant community space that draws in Tulsans and tourists to support local businesses while having a great time on Route 66.

The Blue Man Group explores the absurdity of modern life via multimedia content, audience participation, homemade instruments, live painting, and a surprising amount of snack foods, all combined into a surreal pop-culture performance.

30 GETTING INTO TREBLE

There’s trouble in River City when a fast-talking salesman gets his heart stolen by the town librarian. The Tony Award-winning musical, The Music Man, will march into your heart with its funny, romantic, and family-friendly story.

ON THE COVER

Everyone wants to be happy, but many aren’t. Even if you’re genetically disposed to be a Debbie Downer, you can still take steps to make yourself a lot happier.

80 BIRD’S THE WORD

It’s a classic dilemma: savory or sweet? Fortunately, the inspired combination of fried chicken piled on top of waffles means there’s no need to choose.

ME A 84 DOFLAVOR

OR 40 FIGHT FLIGHT? ME 26 COLOR CURIOUS

COME ON, GET HAPPY

Job burnout is something that just about everyone faces, especially when routines are stiff. But it’s important to remember that you don’t need to be suffering through the 9-to-5.

A great restaurant is all about balance. Appetizers and desserts. Steak and potatoes. Fish and veggies. SMOKE. Woodfire Grill nails the “and” by artfully bringing together all the elements for the perfect experience.

44 TRANSITION TIME

88 FRESH PERSPECTIVE

In many industries, January and February are the peak hiring months. If you’re looking to start 2020 with a new position or vocation, it might be time to talk to a recruiter.

HEART 46 AND SEOUL

With her influences as varying as Janet Jackson, David Bowie, and K-Pop artists, South Korea-based (and former Tulsa resident) AleXa found herself drawn to performing as not only a dancer but a singer too.

The Germans might have invented the delicatessen, but McAlister’s Deli has made the concept its own with sandwiches and wraps overstuffed with choice cuts, iconic ice tea, nextlevel spuds, and a brookie.

92 RECLAIMED RENEGADE

Vinita Cooper has taken her growing love and appreciation of Tulsa’s Greenwood District, along with her energetic love of retro sneakers, and fanned it into a passionate endeavor.

Cirque du Soleil’s Axel is a stunning production with gravity-defying feats and an element of ice skating combined with live music and multimedia projections that mirror the flavors of a graphic novel. As the title character, Axel is a musician and artist who falls in love with Lei. The show follows his journey as he pursues Lei and chases his dream of becoming a star.

DEPARTMENTS 16 Conversation Starter

54 Sports Central

68 Style + Shopping

76 Eats + Treats

20 Sound Check

61 Sports Schedule

70 Restaurant + Bar Finder

92 Get to Know

13 Happenings

49 Downtown Locator

62 Green Country Scene

72 Launch Pad

94 Shelf Life

15 Street Talk

50 Tulsa Locator

66 Beyond Tulsa

74 Health + Fitness

96 Showtime

8 $91.80 in 48 Challenge

10 Music + Concerts + Comedy

6 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020


The only catch was that she had to spend it at places, events or shops profiled in the December 2019 issue of Preview 918.

918 $91.80 IN 48 CHALLENGE The mission posed to Christia Simmons was to spend $91.80 (we used the local area code for the amount) in two days. And if she could find fun and free activities … bonus. 1

SO, PROVIDING AN ENVELOPE OF CASH AND TELLING PEOPLE TO SPEND IT IN 48 HOURS ISN’T EXACTLY A CHALLENGE, BUT IT MAKES THIS ASSIGNMENT MORE INTERESTING.

We started off at Mondo’s Ristorante Italian on Brookside. Mondo’s was amazing, the staff was great, and the atmosphere was very nice. We ordered the spinach artichoke dip appetizer and a cup of clam chowder and minestrone. All were absolutely amazing. The meals also came with fresh garlic bread. We even had leftovers to take home. COST: $25

4

u Think yo our can blow cash in g interestin ways?

While at The Boxyard, I wanted to check out Rosegold. The boutique had some very beautiful jewelry, and I found a great pair of earrings.

2 Next, we went to Dilly Diner in downtown Tulsa. We had a Caffè Americano, chai tea latte, and shared an incredible cherry oatmeal cookie. The cookie was so soft, like it was just baked. The drinks were wonderful on a nice, cool day. Dilly Diner was packed with people, but we were seated immediately.

With the weather so nice, we decided to walk to The Boxyard to check out Sweet Boutique. This place is amazing. The owner let us sample many things, and we ended up getting some chocolatecovered espresso beans, chocolatecovered almonds, a tiramisu truffle, and some malted milk balls.

COST: $8

COST: $12

3

5 With shopping on the mind, we headed to Boomtown Tees. This place is so cool and is so much more than just T-shirts. From drinking glasses and jewelry, they have so many Oklahoma-themed items. I ended up getting one of their monthly $10 tees which was holiday themed. It’s so soft. I also got a pair of Oklahoma earrings. COST: $19

COST: $16

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AND DROP A MESSAGE WITH SOME OF YOUR IDEAS. WE MIGHT JUST LACE YOUR POCKETS WITH GREEN AND TURN YOU LOOSE. 8 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020


PREVIEW918.COM 9


H HAPPENINGS JANUARY LIVE MUSIC VENUES 5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa

BLACKBIRD ON PEARL

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

11

1336 E. 6th St. | Tulsa

BOK CENTER

200 S. Denver Ave. | Tulsa

BRADY THEATER

105 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

CAIN’S BALLROOM

423 N. Main St. | Tulsa

CROW CREEK TAVERN

3534 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa

GUTHRIE GREEN

111 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

IDL BALLROOM

230 E. 1st St. | Tulsa

INNER CIRCLE VODKA BAR 410 N. Main St. | Tulsa

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT 8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

MERCURY LOUNGE

1747 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

OKLAHOMA JAZZ HALL OF FAME 5 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

01

HANGOVER BALL

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

02-04 JOHN WESLEY AUSTIN The Loony Bin | Tulsa

PARADISE COVE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

FLATLAND CAVALRY

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

PEORIA SHOWPLACE | BUFFALO RUN CASINO & RESORT

STRAUSS AND SCHUMANN

1000 Buffalo Run Blvd. | Miami

RABBIT HOLE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

116 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa

REDS

325 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

RIFFS | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

SKYLINE EVENT CENTER | OSAGE CASINO HOTEL

951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa

SOUL CITY

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa

SOUNDPONY

409 N. Main St. | Tulsa

SWAMPHOUSE

1529 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE COLONY

2809 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa

THE FUR SHOP

520 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE HUNT CLUB

224 N. Main St. | Tulsa

THE JOINT | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

THE VANGUARD

222 N. Main St. | Tulsa

TRACK 5 | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

102 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

10 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

05

PARTHENIA

Saint John’s Episcopal Church | Tulsa

09

RICK SPRINGFIELD

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

BADFISH

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

10

FRANK CALIENDO

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

17 RECKLESS KELLY

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa


See our feature on page 22

Where Tulsa’s Aviation heritage takes Flight!

See our feature on page 26

PREVIEW918.COM 11


H HAPPENINGS JANUARY

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

24

30 T.I.

Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel | Tulsa

IAN DAVID ROSENBAUM

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

CHRIS TUCKER

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

23

CHAKA KHAN

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

31

BRET MICHAELS

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

DAEDALUS QUARTET ahha Tulsa | Tulsa

MIKE EPPS

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

19

26 LETTUCE

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

MANDOLIN ORANGE Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

MIKE RYAN

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

12 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020


HAPPENINGS ALSO IN JANUARY H

JAN. 1-4 TULSA SHOOT-OUT Expo Square | Tulsa

JAN. 1-5 MISS SAIGON

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

JAN. 1-5 WINTERFEST

Downtown Tulsa

JAN. 10-26 THE MUSIC MAN

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

JAN. 11-12 MID-CONTINENT KENNEL CLUB OF TULSA DOG SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

EVERYWHERE JAN. 13-18 CHILI BOWL

1

Expo Square | Tulsa

JAN. 3 FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL

JAN. 16-18 WORLD OF WRESTLING TULSA NATIONALS

Tulsa Arts District | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

NEW YEAR’S DAY

20 JAN. 4-5 OKLAHOMA GUN SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

JAN. 10-11 OKLAHOMA CLASSIC

JAN. 11 CELEBRITY CHEER AND DANCE REGIONALS Expo Square | Tulsa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY PREVIEW918.COM 13


H HAPPENINGS ALSO IN JANUARY

JAN. 27-FEB. 2 TULSA BOAT, SPORT AND TRAVEL SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

JAN. 16-19 CIRQUE DU SOLEIL: AXEL BOK Center | Tulsa

JAN. 18 MAD DOG DEMOLITION DERBY Claremore Expo Square | Claremore

JAN. 21 THE COLOR PURPLE

Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center | Broken Arrow

JAN. 18 SCOTTISH CLUB OF TULSA’S ROBERT BURNS NIGHT

JAN. 31 WWE FRIDAY NIGHT SMACKDOWN LIVE

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame | Tulsa

JAN. 17-19 AIM HIGH GYMNASTICS Cox Business Center | Tulsa

JAN. 18 TOYLAND BALL

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

JAN. 20 DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. PARADE Downtown Tulsa

JAN. 20-22 BLUE MAN GROUP

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

BOK Center | Tulsa

JAN. 24-25 CHRIST IN YOUTH “BELIEVE”

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

JAN. 24-26 AMERICAN FINALS RODEO Expo Square | Tulsa

JAN. 30-31 MARK NIZER: 4D AND SCIENCESPLOSION

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

JAN. 31 SHANNON MILLER / JUNIOR LEAGUE OF TULSA MENTORSHIP LUNCHEON Southern Hills Country Club | Tulsa

JAN. 31-FEB. 1 HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN IN CONCERT

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

JAN. 31-FEB. 1 2 FRIENDS AND JUNK CRAFT SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

JAN. 24-26 GREEN COUNTRY HOME AND GARDEN SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

Dates, events and times are subject to change.

14 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020


STREET TALK ST

WHAT ARE YOUR RESOLUTIONS FOR

?

I want to learn to run.

— MIRANDA

Eat out less and cook more.

— EMILY

To help those less fortunate more often, and to be grateful in all things.

Double my income.

I have professional, financial, and personal goals, but my focused goal is learning to live fully and deliberately in each moment, like [Star Trek’s] Captain Picard’s A Perfect Moment in Time.

Eat healthy and take care of my health because I want to see grandchildren.

Improving my Spanish and having a successful wedding.

Continue to let go of disappointments, do my best to be content, and to show kindness to all.

— AMY

— MARCIA

— TONY

— WENDY

Drink more water.

— NICKIE

I want my first tattoo.

— BILAL

— LOLLIE

Start writing.

— LUKE

— TAMMEY

I want to take a minivacation at least once a month.

— CARLA SUE

WANT TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION? We’ll post a question on our Facebook each month. Give us an answer and photo, and you might end up in our magazine. PREVIEW918.COM 15


CS CONVERSATION STARTER

frank callendo BY DONNA LEAHEY

16 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020


Q I liked watching people doing impressions too. Seeing Rich Little or someone like that on The Love Boat or Muppet Show always intrigued me.

Q.

WHO WAS YOUR FIRST CELEBRITY IMPRESSION?

A.

I would say it was Jay Leno. There may have been something I mimicked from television, but in terms of the actual person and not a character, it would be Jay Leno.

Q.

WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE IMPRESSION TO DO?

A.

That’s like trying to pick a favorite child, which at the moment is my daughter. Whenever they’re new, they’re fun. Robert Downey Jr. is always fun. He’s a human Twitter feed. He talks in 140 characters or less, and everything’s about himself. He could be presenting an Academy Award, which is supposed to be about the nominees, and turn it back to himself. You find the cadence of the person, and that’s what makes it work.

Q.

IS THERE ANYONE YOU CAN’T GET THE IMPRESSION RIGHT?

A.

There are hundreds, if not thousands. If I don’t do it, I probably tried and can’t. I’m more of a magician than a sorcerer. People think you can conjure these things up. But a magician works on a magic trick over and over and over until you can’t figure out how they’re doing it. That’s the same thing with an impression as opposed to some magic, and just all of a sudden, you’re able to do something. It’s repetition and just practice.

Q.

IS IT MORE IMPORTANT TO GET THE MANNERISMS OR THE VOICE?

A.

It depends on the audience. I like the whole package of it. The facial expression and the mannerisms can sell it, and then the voice only has to be so good. All you need is the cadence; you don’t always need the pitch. How many Christopher Walkens have you heard? Or old school William Shatner with pauses in the weirdest spots. Or Barack Obama, who talks slowly at the beginning and speeds up at the end. You can be close to the tone or pitch, but it doesn’t matter as long as you have the cadence. Then you add in the facial expressions and the mannerisms.

Q. A.

WHAT CAN WE EXPECT FROM YOUR SHOW?

It’s very clean. It’s a lot of fun. There is a lot of storytelling. My act has been evolving to be more storytelling instead of a puppet show.

FRANK CALIENDO Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort 8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 888-748-3731 riverspirittulsa.com

R

He’s got an eponymous podcast, The Frank Caliendo Cast, and partners up with Al Jackson for the Try To Be Serious podcast as well. Caliendo has released six comedy albums, including National Lampoon Live: Unleashed.

A.

I think I did it back in grade school. I think everyone does a little bit of that. Everybody mimics people around them or people from TV or tries to do things they see on television. I watched a lot of television as a kid. I think that’s where it started. Then, when I got into grade school and middle school, I started doing impressions of teachers and friends and finding the little things they did. I watched Dana Carvey on Saturday Night Live, and Jim Carrey on In Living Color.

TO

Born in Chicago and raised in Wisconsin, this funny guy has built a career on impressions, stand up, and personal storytelling. Caliendo has appeared on shows like the Late Show with David Letterman, The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn, and Late Night with Conan O’Brien, among many others, and was a regular on Mad TV.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED DOING IMPRESSIONS?

CA

Who knew that doing a spot-on impression of John Madden could get you a career in television comedy? Frank Caliendo earned a spot on Fox’s NFL coverage as their inhouse prognosticator on the strength of his impression of the Super Bowl-winning coach.

Q.

LO

PERFORMING IMPRESSIONS OF A RANGE OF FAMOUS PEOPLE, FRANK CALIENDO IS ESPECIALLY ADEPT AT IMITATING SPORTS FIGURES, AND BEING A CHARACTER ALL HIS OWN.

CONVERSATION STARTER CS

Jan. 10: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

PREVIEW918.COM 17


B

modern mess

Boxyard | Tulsa @mymodmess

B

18 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

TULSABOXYARD.COM


B

KEEP IT COZY QUALITY WOMENSWEAR FROM INDIE & SUSTAINABLE DESIGNERS

Downtown @ The Boxyard / shoprosegold.com 502 EAST 3RD STREET | TULSA, OK, 74120

B

PREVIEW918.COM 19


SC SOUND CHECK

CHILD’S PLAY For over 18 years, Travis Kidd has been supporting himself and his family as a full-time musician. “The last time I held a real job was 2001,” he shares with both a sense of pride and a touch of wonder. “There’s not many in Tulsa doing that.” And although he might be met with a touch of disdain or mistrust for playing a healthy mix of cover tunes from some of the “purist”

20 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

musicians that focus on original material, it’s nothing that he’s ashamed of. “Yeah, I play casino gigs and a lot of covers, but I also get most of my originals mixed in there as well. Most of those shows are three or four hours and at least three sets so that I can work a bit of everything in,” he says. In reality, there should be no shame in that, especially when he’s been able to

With new music and a creative window opening up for him, Travis Kidd is pushing forward with a heavy dose of country, rock, a touch of blues, and lots of guitars. BY G.K. HIZER PHOTOS BY MARC RAINS

support a wife and three kids as a professional musician. Although he’s been playing regularly the whole time, Kidd has kept a relatively low profile over the past few years, as he focused primarily on cover gigs and paying the bills. His last album of original music came out in 2008, but Kidd has met a new season of creativity, and has an EP of new material set for release in mid to late January.

“I’ve spent a good 10 years focused on raising my family and paying the bills,” he says. “With that, I just haven’t been as creative. Brandon Clark has three kids as well, and I don’t know how he keeps cranking out new stuff every year. I guess he multitasks better, and I have a more singular focus or tunnel vision. Now that I’ve got the kids grown a bit, though, I’m feeling more creative, and I’ve been writing more again.”


That’s good news for Kidd’s longtime fans, but it also promises to open more doors and win new fans. Anyone who remembers his past two releases, Mid America and Anytown USA, knows that his sound is hard to corner. A rocker at heart with distinctive country influences, Kidd incorporates it all into his songs. Touches of classic rock, ‘80s guitar rock, and traditional country all come together in his songwriting. If anything, Kidd’s songs might best be described as sounding like summer in Oklahoma, and the new songs follow suit. A preview of the new tracks reveals a fresh mix of those influences, ranging from guitar-heavy rock to honkytonk country, with just enough to tie it all together without sounding disjointed. “Staying Right Here” is the most country-influenced of the bunch, featuring enough twang to bring visions of two-stepping on honky-tonk dance floors and some tasty pedal steel featuring an appearance by Jamey Johnson’s steel guitar player. On the opposite end of the spectrum, “Jesse Boy” features big guitars and a soaring chorus more reminiscent of an ‘80s rock anthem. That proves to be apropos, as the song is a tribute to Jesse Cooper, the teen guitarist of Tulsa’s breakout band Crooked X, who died in 2016 due to a blood infection that spread to his spinal cord and brain. “I originally wrote that one for Jesse’s parents after he died,” Kidd says. “I was watching some stuff on YouTube after he passed, and I found a video with him sound checking a guitar, so I grabbed those licks from YouTube and transposed them into the right key to use them in the song that I recorded for his family.”

Meeting in the middle, “Loud Guitars and Run Down Bars” may be the best example of Kidd playing to his strengths: a mid-tempo ballad that highlights his storytelling with tight harmonies and a memorable hook. The outlier of the new album may well be the bonus track, “Purple Margarita.” A track that Kidd started playing years ago at fraternity parties in Arkansas, the song has followed him to the point that he finally committed to recording it. A mashup of the music from Prince’s “Purple Rain” with the lyrics to Jimmy Buffett’s “Margaritaville,” it’s a cross-pollination that works incredibly well. It gives a different nuance to Buffett’s lyrics. Kidd has been a regular performer at River Spirit Casino Resort’s Margaritaville and 5 O’clock Somewhere Bar. When the song has come up or been requested, it has gone over incredibly well with both the audience and the staff. The response has been so overwhelmingly positive that Kidd’s version of the song has been passed through channels to get it to Buffett. With new music on the way and a new creative window opening up for him, Kidd is looking forward to a busy 2020. He’ll be headed to Nashville the second week of January for a songwriting session with Pat Savage, whom he’s written with previously (and who co-wrote two songs on Ashley McBryde’s last record). Kidd is also focusing on directing his songs toward television and movie placement, with his eye on a couple of projects that will be filming in Oklahoma over the next year.

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EMBARK ON THE ROCK OPERA JOURNEY OF AXEL, WHOSE PASSION FOR LIVE MUSIC AND GRAPHIC ARTS COMES TO LIFE IN AN EXHILARATING CIRQUE DU SOLEIL ICE ADVENTURE THAT REMINDS US THAT DREAMS ARE WITHIN REACH. By Gina Conroy In a world of conformity, where life often appears black and white, one voice finds the courage to rise above the noise and shine his true colors for the world to see. One company that has been a leading force in the acrobatic industry for decades dares to push the boundaries of their field again. One show mesmerizes audiences with adrenaline-fueled ice skating set to the backdrop of the most visually breathtaking and musical production to date. “Axel is like nothing you’ve ever seen in a Cirque du Soleil show before,” says Fabrice Lemire, the artistic director. “That’s the whole point. We are looking outside the box to inspire audiences, but also

looking to our creative process to continue to be a driving force in this performing art.” Lemire, who’s worked on six shows since joining Cirque du Soleil’s creative team, says when they started expanding their horizons years ago by adding different elements to their shows, people questioned what they were doing. “They thought we were drifting away from what we excelled in,” says Lemire, who loves the challenge of being part of the creative process. “Why do something if you remain the same? At some point, you have to ask yourself, how do you continue to be a driving force in your industry?”

Those are precisely the questions Cirque du Soleil asks before they decide on a show. Bringing the story of Axel to life takes more than a vision; it takes an entire creative team. Many ideas are placed in front of a committee, and then they bring their platform and the elements to a stage director to see if a story can be created around the idea. Next, the stage director brings in designers, and they collaborate with set and lighting design, projections, music, and choreography. Once they know the plot, they can decide what acrobatic elements will support the storytelling.

they needed to find a safe way to protect the acrobats from the potential dangers of performing on a slick surface. “Different elements needed a trust mat so performers can do the acrobatic skills and stunts,” says Lemire. “We added a layer of cushion to give the performers a proper surface.”

When they decided to take their acrobatic show to the ice, they knew there would be some challenges.

With the second ice show, the creative team wanted to blend the ice skating and other elements, as seen through a different lens, while adding creative layers to enhance the storytelling and visuals. In previous Cirque du Soleil performances, the musical score supported the acting, staging, and acrobatics. In Axel, the music is one of the driving forces of the production.

“We needed to explore what elements we could incorporate into the space while respecting the element of ice,” says Lemire. Although there were creative benefits to the ice like speed and a sudden change of direction,

Thankfully, their first ice show (Crystal) was such a success they decided on a second one, but with a different twist, of course. “Crystal was done as a poetic journey of a young lady finding herself and her purpose in life,” says Lemire.

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with his guitar, he sings a popular ballad with a new arrangement.

skating and acrobatic elements dazzle the audience.

colors to your loved ones, and that is what he does.”

“He is completely exposed with a guitar onstage singing a pop song,” Lemire says. “He’s very charismatic onstage but very introverted as a boy.”

“He becomes, on paper, who he wishes to be in real life,” says Lemire. “Maybe sometimes he doesn’t even know those characters are emotions. It’s the way he’s slowly assuming himself and his journey.”

There’s a subtle moment in the finale that illustrates this. “He falls in love with the ‘girl next door’ and what he fantasized about her in his book. In the end, he accepts who she is and brings her closer to him by just being himself,” says Lemire.

Axel also sketches others how he sees them. “If he’s in the city and falls in love with a young girl, he’s going to go into his book and draw a superhero and the way he wants to see himself as well,” says Lemire.

Lemire encourages the audience to let go of their reality for a while, and fully absorb all their senses in the magic of this live show. 

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The bridge from his real life to his fantasy world is captured through short chapters or vignettes. “He turns a clean page and starts a new idea,” says Lemire. “It’s very much a wave of an act after act kind of approach. We wanted it to be different facets, which may be a challenge for some to understand, but that’s the design.” And perhaps the magic of Axel.

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’S AXEL BOK Center | 200 S. Denver Ave. Tulsa cirquedusoleil.com/axel

“Don’t change who you are,” says Lemire. “He runs away from who he is through his fantasies, but at the end of the day, nothing is better than to show your true

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While there’s an overall fantasy arch where good battles evil, displayed in dazzling special effects, skating, and acrobatic brilliance, throughout Axel’s journey, one message shines bright in the end.

“You can take a still shot and put it behind the window, and people passing by can look at it day after day, maybe with a different perspective, but the image remains the same,” says Lemire. “That’s not what we do in live entertainment. We create fantasy worlds that take you away from your real life and present metaphors where you can recognize yourself.”

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As a former dancer, Lemire understands what Axel feels when he performs. “We go into This created an opportunity for what I call a second skin,” says a large-scale performance where Lemire. “The way you hold the music is at the forefront. It yourself onstage and want to also allowed the creative team to escape, and you’re vulnerable and explore visuals and new artistic introverted, but when you come territories it hadn’t tackled before. into the light, you completely own your space and become the Audiences will not only love most confident person.” and relate to the familiar pop songs, but they will also create Throughout the story, Axel new memories with these songs. continues to feel the pressure They don’t just watch the outer of being judged as this upjourney of the lead character; and-coming star. He faces the they are immersed into his challenges of being a public inner world that comes to life figure while dealing with things in spectacular uses of color, other teens deal with, like girls pyrotechnics, and projections; and falling in love. the same elements you’d expect to see at today’s rock concerts.  However, when Axel escapes from his reality through his “It’s a beautiful show with sketches, that’s when the magic gorgeous scenery,” says Lemire, happens. With a stroke of his who sees the white ice as a pen, he creates multi-layered blank canvas that fills with color characters and alter egos that when Axel starts drawing in his come to life in brilliant color, sketchbook. “The projections lighting, skating, and acrobatic and lighting are very vivid on the feats. ice, and it completely changes the landscape.” This creative element not only adds a new layer and depth to the The story of Axel starts on a storyline, but it’s also here, in the strong note. Alone on the ice pages of his sketchbook, that the

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“The inspiration [ for Axel] is the journey of the young, up-andcoming star of tomorrow,” says Lemire. Axel, the lead character, is a singer and musician with a dream of stardom, like what you see on American Idol or The Voice. “We tackled more of a concert approach to this production where the singer is the centerpiece of the cake.”

Jan. 16-17: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 18: 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. Jan. 19: 1 p.m., 5 p.m.


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COLOR

ME CURIOUS

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The Blue Man Group explores the absurdity of modern life via multimedia content, audience participation, homemade instruments, live painting, and a surprising amount of snack foods, all combined into a surreal pop-culture performance. BY GINA CONROY PHOTOS BY JOAN MARCUS

Many describe them as extraterrestrial entertainers. Others say they’re tribal and primal. Some even go as far as to say they’re a variety, sideshow experiment gone terribly right. But using words to describe Blue Man Group would be an extreme injustice. Words alone can’t encompass who they are. Words cannot explain what they do. Words fall short of representing the phenomenon that’s been enthralling audiences for three decades. Maybe that’s why Blue Man Group chooses not to use words at all. “The Blue Man Group doesn’t communicate the way normal people do,” says Mike Brown, who went blue over 10 years ago and has never looked back. “The way I like to see it is it’s not that they can’t talk, but they choose not to.” Instead of speaking, the group explores the world around them, living and

discovering in the moment with childlike curiosity. “There’s a more tangible, universal way to connect rather than speaking,” says Brown. “Whether that be physical or through music to get your body moving or just looking into someone’s eyes.” Although many might not know what the Blue Man Group is, its entrance into the world can be traced back to 1987 and three college friends — Chris Wink, Phil Stanton, and Matt Goldman — who were tired of the theater scene at the time. “They wanted to create something they would want to see themselves,” says Brown. It wasn’t until 1988 when MTV aired their performance that the group captured the attention of the world. The Blue Man Group led a funeral precession to Central Park, burning all the things they wanted to leave behind from the 1980s. Brown says at that time they spoke but soon realized there were better ways to connect with people than with words. In the Blue Man Group’s silence, they discovered music, particularly drumming, was a great way to communicate and feel things. “The music is the entangled metaphor of Blue Man Group,” says Brown. Best known for PVC pipe instruments, which take all three Blue Man to play, their instruments are unlike anything else seen or heard in a rock concert or theater show. “You can feel the sound and energy within the room,” says Brown. “It’s not like anything you have seen.” To say watching Blue Man Group is an experience is an understatement. All three Blue Man members look the same, but each one has different tasks to achieve throughout the night. You will

never see Blue Man in less than three because the group acts as one collective. Blue Man Group explores the world with curiosity and an adventurous spirit. Music is only part of the world they explore. Inspired by abstract artists’ ability to use paint to express their inner state, Blue Man Group also uses paint musically to evoke the audiences’ senses and emotions. Their use of technology, lighting, and lasers, as well as comedy, improv, and audience participation, results in a show that is fresh and always evolving. “People never know what to expect,” says Brown. “It’s 100% fun, and unlike any other theatrical experience you would see.” Blue Man Group always approaches each show as entering the world of the audience. Since each audience is unique and happens in a place they’ve never been, they’re cautious and curious. “Anything can happen at any moment, especially when you add in audience participation,” says Brown. “There’s always an X-factor, and we remain in character to do the best performance possible. We pride ourselves on creating something for that particular audience and that group performing.” One of Brown’s favorite things is that there’s no script for them to memorize or think about. “I can go out there thinking I am a wizard or medieval knight that slays a dragon hovering over the audience,” says Brown. “Once I do, they will be ready to dance and party, but no one else knows what I am thinking.” Experiencing Blue Man Group may feel more like a variety or vaudeville show than a theatrical story with a plot. And that’s the genius of it. They’ve learned the secret to staying afloat in the live

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the creators were inspired by an artist who worked with the color blue. Brown doesn’t know why the Blue Man is blue, but the answer he likes best is it fits with the name. He points out that other colors already have thoughts and emotions associated with them like red for anger or the devil, or green for aliens.

Brown joined the Blue Man family in 2003 after seeing them in 1997 on a college trip. “I completely fell in love with it,” says Brown. “It was something I knew I wanted to be a part of, so it became a goal of mine. I’m lucky enough to say a dream come true.” Brown is excited about the direction the North American Tour has taken under visionary, artistic director, Jenny Koons, and the Cirque du Soleil Entertainment Group.

No one is immune from Blue Man’s curiosity as they create pieces and call upon the audience to help them move the show along. “It’s just so much fun,” says Brown. “Everyone who walks out of the show says they had a blast.” But at the end of the day, through all the fun and zaniness, the main goal of the show is to connect with people.

“Jenny was brought in to help explore areas that Blue Man Group has never tackled before and to get the regular writers and directors out of their comfort zone,” says Brown. “Through Jenny, we were able to find a lot more wonder, a lot more excitement, and base level attributes of the character without having to apply the old, for lack of a better word, rules with the character.”

“It’s to get the audience outside of their normal comfort zone of being alone and realizing there’s a whole world around them,” says Brown.

People who’ve seen Blue Man Group before will notice the differences.

So why, if the show brings such connection, laughter, and joy, is the Blue Man blue?

“The show is about 98% different from what people have seen in a Blue Man Group show. We have our signature

Some people say it’s because “blue man” sounds like human. Others say

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In a day and age where everyone can feel alone on their phones in a room full of people, the show invites people back to a time when there was a broader sense of connection, and people created a shared experience in laughter and being together.

Getting into character takes about 30 minutes. A simple bald cap is held on with glue. Blue grease paint is applied over that and then their entire face. Once the makeup process begins, so does the transformation of Brown to Blue. “It’s incredible how much the bald cap, the makeup, and the costume transforms you,” says Brown. “It changes you when you see yourself in the mirror.” Brown says getting into character is like “stripping away layers of yourself and putting on a different layer of a version of yourself. You get to tap into your more creative self, the fun self, the person who can improvise and go down any path for the beauty and the fun.”

BLUE MAN GROUP

Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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And come back they do. Show after show. Year after year.

Although many people think the Blue Man gets his color from a mask, Brown says, “It’s still grease paint. It’s simple, but it creates something of a complex metaphor for what we do.”

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entertainment industry; to capture an audience and keep them coming back, you have to do something no one else is doing.

“We imagine it’s our workshop. So there’s more inviting into our workspace, the way we work, the way we act, the way we see the world around us,” says Brown. “There’s more audience participation because right from the beginning, we venture out and explore and interact with them. It’s a very different way for the audience to see Blue Man.”

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The set is unlike anything else erected in a Blue Man Group show.

“While we may not be from the typical location, we’re not aliens,” says Brown. “We’re foreign and interact the way most people won’t. The blue makes us different. Blue is also a very creative but calming color. There are some high-energy qualities to it and easy energy quality.”

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pieces that are classic favorites from our old or different shows, but the set is much bigger,” says Brown.

Jan. 20-22: 7:30 p.m.


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GETTING INTO

Treble

There’s trouble in River City when a fast-talking salesman gets his heart stolen by the town librarian. The Tony Award-winning musical, The Music Man , will march into your heart with its funny, romantic, and family-friendly story. By Gina Conroy From social media highlight reels to catfishing and those darn click-bait ads we all fall for, things are never as they appear in our fishbowl society. We’re getting scammed left and right, and it’s not just happening to the naive. Even the “smart ones” are questioning their judgment because the frauds are getting more sophisticated by the minute. How is it then in a world where even the most trusted seem to have ulterior motives, The Music Man, whose “hero” is a bona fide con man, continues to attract crowds? “It’s one of those musicals that stood the test of time,” says Mark Frie, who plays the con man, aka traveling salesman, professor Harold Hill in Theatre Tulsa’s production of The Music Man. “He’s a unique character,” says Frie, who agrees there’s a fine line between Hill being a hero and villain. “The way the role was written, and then the way Robert Preston plays it originally, draws people into the charisma of the character.” Set in 1912, the story follows Hill, who travels by train from state to state selling something he can’t deliver: a boys’ band. Hill winds up in River City, Iowa, trying to hide from his reputation as a con man. Hill’s got his dirty hands busy dodging the mayor and school board, and convincing the townsfolk the new pool table will only cause “trouble” in their quiet town. Also, he must woo the librarian and only music teacher in town, Marian Paroo, so she doesn’t find out the truth. Then he has to skip town with the down payment from the instruments and uniforms he’s collected before anyone catches on he’s a fraud. Eventually, Hill has the people of River City as well as the audience falling under his spell.

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The Music Man is a musical with book, music, and lyrics by Meredith Willson, based on a story by Willson and Franklin Lacey. In 1957, the show became a hit on Broadway, winning five Tony Awards, including Best Musical, and running for 1,375 performances. The cast album won the first Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album and spent an astounding 245 weeks on the Billboard charts. The show’s success led to several revivals, including a long-running 2000 Broadway revival, a popular 1962 film adaptation, and a 2003 television adaptation. “It mirrors what we see in society today with everything we see going on via social media, with people making all kinds of promises,” says Frie. “You can easily fall under the spell of someone or something.” Throughout all the crazy antics and toetapping musical numbers, Paroo softens to the swindler even after she discovers he’s a fake. “I think she starts to see the change in her little brother, Winthrop,” says Frie. “She sees Harold give the cornet to Winthrop and how that brought him such joy. That’s a critical moment right there.” Having her brother go from shy and selfconscious because of his lisp to belting out two of the most popular songs in the show without a care in the world, softens Paroo’s heart to the traveling con man. “I also think as Marian starts to see her town changing, the audience sees the very uptight protected character relax and start to fall in love with this guy,” says Frie. “I think for Harold, once he realizes Marian’s been in on the sham as well, he sees from the get-go she had his back.”


“I did this for a living for a long, long time,” says Frie. “About 12 years ago, I moved back home to open the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center and ran that for nine years.” Now, Frie is the CEO of the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. of their music collection and their memory.”

In the end, the underlying theme of forgiveness and redemption comes through loud and clear. Hill believes in himself, and the impossible happens in pure musical theater magic. “He [Hill] ends up delivering on what he thinks he isn’t,” says Frie. “He gives the town a new spark and new energy. He delivers the instruments, and everything ends up working out.” But the magic of The Music Man wouldn’t be as mesmerizing without the music. “It comes back to great music and some incredible dance scenes,” says Frie. “You think of ‘Marian the Librarian,’ ‘Seventy-Six Trombones,’ and ‘(Ya Got) Trouble.’ For a lot of people, they’re songs that have been a part

As if playing this iconic lead was not challenging enough, Frie directs the musical as well, though that was never the intention when he started talking about playing Harold Hill. “You’d have to be crazy to do that,” says Frie, who, through a set of circumstances, found himself agreeing to both roles. “I’m onstage so much, I’d never be able to keep an eye on everything the way I would if I was just directing it.” To make his jobs easier, he’s put together his dream team of co-directors — Jen Alden, Pete Brennan, and Jeremy Stevens — to bring The Music Man to life. “We have a responsibility to people and a certain duty to stay true to the story and show it respect, but also put new energy and spin on it,” says Frie. Don’t expect to see the story set in modern times or with outlandish costume changes. What you can expect is a fresh set design and choreography. “It’s the best of both worlds,” says Frie. “People will see parts of The Music Man they want to see, what they remember from the movie or the last time they saw it live, but also see a few new things.” Tulsa audiences will be overjoyed to see the reunion of their favorite barbershop quartet performers: the original guys of Forever Plaid. Mike Pryor, Justin Boyd, Tracy Watson, and Mark Powell play the unlikely quartet in The Music Man.

“I didn’t perform or direct for five years until Sara Phoenix of Theatre Tulsa called and offered me the role of Jean Valjean in Les Misérables in 2014,” says Frie. “Since then, I’ve had a great partnership with Theater Tulsa and have played some bucket list roles. At least once a year, I get to spread my wings a bit.” When he’s not acting, directing, or working as CEO of the TPAC, you can find Frie spreading his love of theater through community service. One of his goals as CEO at TPAC was to create access for all Tulsans to enjoy and participate in the arts, whether or not they had the financial means to do so. Along with Stevens, they created an education program called Orbit Initiative that launched to the community last year. “The Orbit Initiative offers free classes in the arts for anyone and everyone,” says Frie. “I’m very proud of that.” Frie is also involved with Kristin Chenoweth’s nonprofit called Broadway Bootcamp. Along with a team of A-list Broadway professionals, they collaborate with students offering insight into the world of performing arts for aspiring entertainers. Whether he’s performing onstage, working with nonprofits, or directing, Frie loves being a part of multigenerational products, and that’s just what The Music Man has. “This show is hard to beat,” says Frie. “At the end of the day, you remember the great songs and will leave whistling, singing, or at least smiling, if we’ve done our jobs right.”

THE MUSIC MAN

“Tulsans love the Plaid. Mark Powell and I worked together at Discovery Land in 1988,” says Frie. “To be reunited with them is a lot of fun.”

Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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Frie grew up in Jenks and was involved in the musical program from an early age; his first role was in fifth grade. After attending the University of Tulsa and the University of Oklahoma, he spent most of his professional career in New York City and Dallas.

Jan. 10-11: 8 p.m. Jan. 12: 2 p.m. Jan. 17-18: 8 p.m. Jan. 19: 2 p.m.

Jan. 24: 8 p.m. Jan. 25: 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Jan. 26: 2 p.m.

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CINERGY OFFERS BOWLING THAT’S HIGHLY INTERACTIVE AND FUN, THANKS TO A NEW TWIST THAT TURNS LANES INTO A HIGH-TECH, GLITZY, GAMIFIED ENVIRONMENT. By Michele Chiappetta / Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

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If you’re looking for an activity that’s fun for the whole family, from young children to grandma and grandpa, you might want to consider a classic game turned modern — the bowling lanes at Cinergy in Tulsa. This old-school sport has gotten an upgrade that takes it right into the 21st century, and it’s all waiting for you at this mega-entertainment spot with activities fit for everyone. Cinergy’s boutique bowling area features 14 lanes, brandnew and beautifully set up to feel comfortable and inviting. There’s none of that grungy, worn-down look that aging lanes often suffer from. Take a seat, put on your bowling shoes (either bring them with you or rent them), and get started on playing some games. But don’t expect to be playing with heavy balls, league style, because Cinergy takes bowling to a whole new level that today’s families are loving. Trust us when we say this isn’t old-fashioned bowling. Cinergy offers a sport that’s highly interactive and fun, thanks to a new twist that turns lanes into a high-tech, glitzy, gamified environment that is like nothing else you’ll find right now in Green Country. That’s because this new

twist, called HyperBowling, is the latest thing to hit bowling lanes. And right now, Cinergy is the only place in the state where you can play it. “The cool thing about HyperBowling is that we’re the only ones in Oklahoma that will have it for probably the next year and a half,” says general manager Aaron Latus. “As people continue to catch onto it, they’re enjoying it, because it’s like video game bowling.” In other words, rather than trying not to slip and fall as you hurl a hefty ball down the lane, trying desperately to hit a pin rather than getting a gutter ball, HyperBowling lightens and brightens the whole experience. The gutters have raised bumpers, featuring LED lights that flash different colors up and down the bumpers. The pattern changes continuously, and you, the bowler, must try to hit the right color on both the bumpers and the pins to score points. It’s a different way to bowl, and it’s a lot of fun. “With HyperBowling, it’s cool,” says Latus. “The game measures your ability and gets harder as you go. It sees how well you do and progressively gets more challenging.”

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Cinergy charges by the lane per hour, not per bowler, making the experience much more affordable for groups, especially families. During off-times (Monday through Thursday before 5:30 p.m.), lanes are just $10 per hour. It goes up to $20 per hour on weekends. And even at peak times (weekend nights), the prices remain reasonable — up to $30 per hour. “You’re still saving a ton of money [compared to traditional lanes],” says Latus, “and you’re going to get several games out of it.”

The whole experience works for all ages, and it’s growing in popularity as Tulsans discover it. “As people are playing HyperBowling, it’s becoming their new favorite,” says Latus. “People are coming out for it. As they play it, they love it.”

To make your time at the bowling lanes even better, Cinergy has TV screens at the top of each lane, as well as some within sight at the nearby food and bar area. The full menu is at the player’s fingertips.

CINERGY

6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918-894-6888 cinergy.com/locations/tulsa

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Of course, the lanes also accommodate traditional bowling for those who want it, as well as cartoons, themed games, and flexibility to change elements like the number of frames per game. “We’ve got a plethora of choices that even if you want to go to

Order at the console and the food will be brought to you.

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Rules for HyperBowling are available at the consoles next to each lane or ask a guest service representative who will be glad to walk you through the details so you know exactly what to do. “We’ll help you navigate the system,” says Latus. “And if you have some trouble, we always add extra time back on, for free.”

your traditional style, it’s not traditional anymore,” says Latus.

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Unlike traditional bowling games, which last 10 frames, HyperBowling moves much faster. There are only five frames each game, no worrying about getting spares or avoiding gutter balls. Players can get through several games of HyperBowling in the time one traditional game would take. For parents, it’s a great way to entertain younger children whose attention spans don’t last long. And having

the bumpers up is part of the game, so no one feels like they can’t bowl.

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By the way, it’s not just the gamified nature of HyperBowling that makes it fun for everyone. It’s also the lightness of the bowling balls, which have to be much lighter than the typical kind to hit the bumpers. Your arms won’t get tired fast, the way they might if you were playing with traditional 6- to 16-pound balls.

Monday-Friday: 11 a.m.-Midnight Saturday-Sunday: 9 a.m.-2 a.m.


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Mother savoring success Road Market With a clever mix of local food and retail concepts, the Mother Road Market is a vibrant community space that draws in Tulsans and tourists to support local businesses while having a great time on Route 66. By Michele Chiappetta /// Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

With initiatives to promote Tulsa as a tourist spot, the revitalization of Route 66, and focused efforts to build up local entrepreneurs, a lot of exciting things are happening in our fair city. Mother Road Market, a food hall-slash-business incubator located at the corner of 11th Street and Lewis Avenue, is a perfect example of how the blend of tourism mindedness and local business support is making Tulsa cooler than ever. Developed by the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to fostering entrepreneurial efforts in the Tulsa area, Mother Road Market launched in 2018 to much success. Conservative estimates put the foot traffic at more than 500,000 visitors in its first year. With a clever mix of local food and retail concepts, the market is a vibrant community space that draws in Tulsans and tourists to support local businesses while having a great time. General manager Jeff Thompson says Mother Road Market’s specific blend of food, shopping, and entrepreneurial spirit makes it unique. “The food hall idea is not new, but the fusion of food hall and business incubator makes it distinctive,” he says. The idea to bring in that startup sensibility ties back to another innovative Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation project, Kitchen 66, which is Tulsa’s first food incubator — a place where budding restaurateurs

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can finetune their ideas before launching a full-on restaurant. This is advantageous, because starting any new business, especially a restaurant, is difficult. The testing period helps ensure the restaurant keeps going, a benefit for the business owner and the local economy. “Kitchen 66 started in 2015,” explains Thompson. “A lot of great successes came out of that program, but one of the needs that surfaced was a place for restaurants to test out concepts longer.” The question was asked: What if there was a low-risk, shared location that offered various levels of options to business owners, to help remove barriers to entry? That’s how Mother Road Market came to be. In the market’s roomy, open space are housed around 20 different retail and food concepts, from recognizable local brands like Andolini’s Slice and Oklahoma Joe’s Barbecue, to newer startups you may not

have tried yet, like Howdy Burger, Big Dipper Creamery, Wel Bar, and Bodhi’s Bowl, to name a few. There’s a great range of food options — burgers, rice bowls, pizza, ice cream, chicken, freshly baked goods, shrimp, tacos, wraps, sandwiches, coffee, beer, and more. While you’re there considering what to eat, remember to see what’s new at the Takeover Café, an extension of the Kitchen 66

program. “There’s a different entrepreneur in that space every day of the week,” says Thompson. It’s an effective way for Kitchen 66 participants to test out menu items and business methods, and for Tulsans, it’s “a great way to support local.” Beyond the food offerings, Mother Road Market has a good set of shops, with plans to expand even more in that arena in response to visitors’ requests

for more retail. Right now, the market includes spaces for retailers like The Nest (kitchen goods, local candles, and such), Decopolis (Tulsa-themed items

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and books), and Mythic Press (local and Route 66-themed merchandise), among others. To expand the merchandise offerings, Mother Road Market held a contest in SeptemberOctober 2019 to allow startups to compete in what Thompson calls “a hybrid Shark Tank meets Iron Chef kind of competition.” From the results, they selected four entrepreneurs to launch their concepts in the upcoming Shops at Mother Road Market development, which will be located next to Mother Road Market on the southwest corner of 11th Street and Lewis Avenue.

recently on the market’s wall by Clean Hands “honors Smith and his creative spirit, as well as the ongoing creative spirit of all the chefs that contribute to Tulsa’s amazing food scene.”

Mother Road Market also gives back to the community. They host many events throughout the year — over 1,000 so far, says Thompson. Upcoming events

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Mother Road Market also is environmentally minded,

Even within the Mother Road Market community, the sense of connection is strong. When chef Seth Smith, owner of Radish, died unexpectedly, the market’s community rallied to the support of his wife. “We brought in grief counselors and went through the grieving process together,” says Thompson. A mural painted

MOTHER ROAD MARKET

1124 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-984-9001 motherroadmarket.com

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include sushi-making classes for children with chef Bill Harris Jan. 11 and 18 (tickets can be obtained online); introduction to sourdough bread class Jan. 25; and OU physicians talk Feb. 6, focused on couples’ communications. More events are being added all the time to the market’s online calendar.

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organic skincare, and nontoxic living; and Oklahoma Distilling Cocktail Co., a bartending supply store that will include a tasting room, mixologists, sommeliers, fun events, and libations for any occasion.

“We’ve diverted four tons [of trash] from landfills to composting in the year we’ve been open,” he says. They’ve also donated over 200 pounds of food so far to Iron Gate, Tulsa’s largest soup kitchen and grocery pantry.

And of course, going there will never get old, because there will always be something new happening at Mother Road Market. “We see people making this their place, making repeat trips,” he says. “There’s always another reason to come back.”

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particularly with all the food made there daily. “There’s a lot of potential to generate a lot of waste,” says Thompson. To combat that, the market partners with groups like Sustainable Tulsa, the Metropolitan Environmental Trust, and others to ensure the market is operating sustainably.

Ultimately, Mother Road Market is very much a way to bring people together, whether it’s the couple who proposes to each other in the market’s demonstration kitchen, birthday parties, cultural events, or just a day of browsing. “You’re supporting mom-andpop, husband-and-wife, small family businesses [here]. You can feel good that you’re supporting locally owned businesses,” says Thompson.

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Expected to open in spring 2020, this additional shopping area will house the winners of the startup contest: Eleanor’s Bookstore — a children’s and young adult bookstore aimed at instilling a lifelong love of reading; Felizsta — a modern, sophisticated collection of Latin American items, including authentic Mexican cookies; Graham Collective — a local wellness and lifestyle shop focused on affordable clean beauty,

Monday: Closed Tuesday-Thursday: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday: 10 a.m.-9 p.m.


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FIGHT ORFLIGHT?

JOB BURNOUT IS SOMETHING THAT JUST ABOUT EVERYONE FACES, ESPECIALLY WHEN ROUTINES ARE STIFF. BUT IT’S IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER THAT YOU DON’T NEED TO BE SUFFERING THROUGH THE 9-TO-5.. BY LINDSAY MORRIS If you’re a fan of The Office or even if you’re not, the quintessential example of job burnout is Stanley Hudson — a man trapped in a job he hates with a boss he thinks is an idiot. Sadly, so many Americans are experiencing job burnout, just like Stanley. A 2018 Gallup study of nearly 7,500 full-time employees found that 23% reported feeling burned out at work very often or always, while an additional 44% reported feeling burned out sometimes. Job burnout accounts for an estimated $125-$190 billion in health-care spending each year, according to the Harvard Business Review. Job burnout can result in type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, gastrointestinal issues, high cholesterol, and even death for those under the age of 45. First coined by American psychologist Herbert Freudenberger, burnout is “a state of fatigue or frustration brought about by devotion to a cause, way of life or relationship that failed to produce the expected reward.” While burnout may be the result of too much stress, it isn’t the same as too much stress. Stress causes you to feel like your emotions are in overdrive, but

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burnout produces the opposite effect: You may feel empty, devoid of motivation, and beyond caring. If you feel a sense of urgency to get work responsibilities and pressures under control, it’s probably stress. If you’re feeling helpless, hopeless, and powerless? It’s likely burnout. A certain amount of stress is inherent in any job, but when the pressure gets out of hand, it’s essential to act quickly. Burnout can negatively affect not only your overall job performance but also your personal life. By taking measures to reduce the amount of stress you’re facing, you can regain your motivation. Despite awareness of the issue and workplaces with good intentions, job burnout continues to rise. Job burnout is a real thing, and we’re here to help you avoid getting fried.

LEARN YOUR STRENGTHS Maybe the root of the issue is that your job is not a good fit for you. If a job doesn’t fit your skill set, it’s easy to become disengaged and jaded. Instead of immediately hopping to a job that you think will suit you better, why not try developing your job description around responsibilities you know well and enjoy? Then schedule a meeting with your supervisor and see if there is any wiggle room to adjust your position around those strengths.

IDENTIFY YOUR STRESSORS Understanding why you are feeling deflated can help you move in a more positive direction. Think about what has contributed to your burnout. Is it the feeling that projects are out of your control? Have your actions made the problem worse? For example, you may have set an overly ambitious timeline for completing an assignment, creating unnecessary stress and obstacles to its success. Even small changes to your routine, such as seeking assistance from your manager when you have too many projects on your plate, can help brighten your outlook.

TAKE A BREAK Make sure to allow time to recharge periodically. Even if you’re working long hours, you can counteract stress and maximize your performance on the job by taking five or 10-minute breaks throughout the day. Stand up and stretch or go for a short walk. Instead of eating lunch at your desk, try the staffroom or step outside the office for some fresh air. Use your annual leave fruitfully as well. Getting away from the office — even for a day or two — can give you a fresh perspective on your situation and allow you to return with new focus and energy.

HAVE CREATIVE OUTLETS Burnout interferes with your ability to perform well, increases rigid thinking, and decreases your ability to

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Already There? WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING JOB BURNOUT

think accurately, flexibly, and creatively. Even if you aren’t able to flex your creative muscles at work, having a creative outlet will keep you engaged and motivated.

VISIT YOUR DOCTOR

GIVE TO OTHERS

SEE A THERAPIST

EXERCISE REGULARLY

Sometimes job burnout can be a sign of a deeper issue. Often employees feel a lack of enthusiasm for things that previously energized them. In this case, it could be indicative of depression. Job burnout can also be associated with insomnia, chest pain, headaches, heart palpitations, and other symptoms that may require the care of a medical professional.

Your doctor may suggest you see a therapist if he or she senses that you have any level of depression or anxiety. Getting counseling can often help you develop healthier thought patterns and help you recognize negative habits. If therapy isn’t an option, consider relying on a trustworthy colleague to share your concerns. Some companies even provide employee assistance programs.

CHANGE YOUR ATTITUDE

A study by the University of Bath showed that job burnout is often linked to perfectionism. Perfectionists tend to think they have to prove themselves and do everything perfectly, or they will be a failure. Recognizing and eliminating selfimposed pressure could help you become less overwhelmed at work and life in general. Recognize that usually, your 110% effort looks the same to outsiders as your 90% effort.

CHANGE JOBS

This is a worst-case scenario option. If you’ve exhausted all the other options and still find yourself wallowing in job woes every moment of every day, it might be time to turn in your notice. Just be forewarned that job burnout can follow you around if you’re not following the aforementioned healthy work habits in the first place.

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It seems counterintuitive, but doing something else for someone at your workplace will energize you, not drain you. Helping your colleagues in small ways or giving them a small gift, like bringing donuts on Fridays, will make you feel better about your job. Plus the whole concept of “I scratch your back; you scratch mine” actually works in a lot of scenarios.

Exercise can help reduce stress and promote a sense of well-being. Regular exercise can also contribute to a good night’s sleep, helping you be more productive and energized at work. You may even be able to exercise at work during lunchtime, and you could create

a workplace walk or fitness challenge to make things more fun.

PRACTICE MINDFULNESS Mindfulness involves focusing on your breath flow and being intensely aware of what you’re sensing and feeling at every moment, without interpretation or judgment. In a job setting, this practice involves facing situations with openness and patience and without judgment. Developing a habit of mindfulness in your job will allow you to experience each situation as it comes versus being overwhelmed continuously by each thing that comes your way.

PERFORM A JOB ANALYSIS If you’re overloaded every day at work, you start feeling like you’re on a treadmill and can never catch up. Discuss with your boss what exactly your job responsibilities are, and decide if there’s anything you can delegate or cut out. Let your boss know that the excessive workload is leading to job burnout.

JOB BURNOUT SYMPTOMS Have you become cynical or critical at work? Do you drag yourself to work and have trouble getting started?  ave you become irritable or impatient with co-workers, customers, or H clients? Do you lack the energy to be consistently productive? Do you find it hard to concentrate? Do you lack satisfaction from your achievements? Do you feel disillusioned about your job? Are you using food, drugs, or alcohol to feel better or not to feel? Have your sleep habits changed?  re you troubled by unexplained headaches, stomach or bowel problems, A or other physical complaints? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might be experiencing job burnout. Consider talking to a doctor or a mental health provider because these symptoms can also be related to health conditions, such as depression.


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Liz Brolick Dixie Agostino

Transition In many industries, January and February are the, peak hiring months. If you re looking to start 2020 with a new position or vocation, it might be time to talk to a recruiter. By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

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Time


So, you want a new job for the new year. You’re not alone. Moving jobs or switching careers is a common New Year resolution. And with an estimated 7 million job openings around the country as of September 2019, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, it’s tempting to think leaving one job and finding another will be easy. But it’s a strategic process, and finding your way through it takes persistence and savvy.

common, so you’ll need to be ready to use the tech. Beyond that, it still pays to prepare answers to common questions. Researching on sites like Glassdoor can help you find out the types of interview questions that may come up at your target employers.

One Tulsa company that helps people find new placements is Switchgear, headed by owner Dixie Agostino and CEO Liz Brolick. A local, women-owned business that celebrated its ninth year in October 2019, Switchgear specializes in recruiting largely for areas such as engineering, manufacturing, and information technology. Its goal, says Brolick, is to put the human back into human resources and be a true partner with the clients and businesses they serve.

your accomplishments

“Many people don’t have a strong understanding of how much money they are bringing home,” says Brolick. This isn’t just the number on your paycheck. Benefits such as how much you pay for insurance and how much is paid for by your employer count too, but many people forget to include that in their calculations. “The last thing you want to have happen is to get an offer that appears to be a huge raise, but it’s not a raise at all,” says Brolick. “Be able to compare apples to apples, and be sure you know what your paycheck looks like.”

Update your resume “This is always the hardest part,” admits Brolick. No

“I love LinkedIn,” says Brolick. “I think it’s a great resource for people who use it well.” Keep your profile up-to-date, and be sure it matches your resume and portrays who you are as a person. It’s smart to do so, because recruiters like Brolick have special access to LinkedIn, and they use it frequently. But to appear in their searches, your profile has to be specific, complete, and up-to-date with the keywords you want your resume to pop up for.

While online applications are easier than ever, it’s not the best approach if you’re looking to switch careers or step into a new role. In those cases, you need to find someone willing to take a chance on you. “These opportunities come about through networking,” says Brolick. “Start talking to people who are doing the job you want to do so you can identify gaps — what you need to learn, certifications you need.” In your current job, if you want to switch departments, find someone who works where you want to work and offer to help.

Freshen your interview skills If it’s been a minute since you last interviewed for a job, you may be surprised by how interview styles have changed. “If it’s been five years or more since you interviewed last, the process looks different,” says Brolick. Phone, Skype, and Xoom interviews are

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So, what should you do if you’re ready to make a job change in 2020? Here are some tips.

Know your true salary

Master the art of LinkedIn

,t Don just apply online

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Right now, she says, the hiring market is competitive, especially for people with specialized skills such as engineers, software developers, and architects. It’s a candidate-driven market at the moment, which means it’s a good time to start looking for something new.

The days of applying for a job and getting hired within a few weeks are, for the most part, long past. Plan for the process to take four to six months. If you want to be in a new job by fall, start looking now, and look at job postings daily. “People can post 24/7, so you need to be looking all the time,” says Brolick. “Use the internet to help you. Set up Google alerts and send yourself notices when positions are posted on sites like LinkedIn or Indeed.”

one enjoys resume writing, probably because it’s hard to put on paper what we’ve done at work. While it’s tempting to just cut and paste in your job description, this doesn’t tell employers much about you. Try to quantify what you’ve done with tangible results. Show what you can bring to the table. Brolick suggests listing accomplishments you’re proud of, things you enjoyed doing and want to do again.

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As a recruiting firm, Switchgear concentrates on working with companies in the Tulsa area that either don’t have an HR person or don’t have a local HR team to handle local hiring. “They come to us with specific needs and skill sets, background requirements, and educational requirements. When companies hire us, it’s because what they need is specific — usually, some trait or skill that makes what our clients are looking for just a little more difficult to find. We go out and find those people who match.”

Expect the process to take time

“When you’re talking about yourself and what you’ve done at work, the things you’ve accomplished, goals you’ve achieved and metrics you’ve met, the majority of people are uncomfortable talking about that,” says Brolick. Why? They worry it’s bragging. But in a job search, you have to talk specifics so employers know what you can do. “The piece of advice I give is, if what you’re saying is true, it’s not bragging; it’s just a fact. It is what it is.”

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Everyone has needed to find a job at one time or another, and the team at Switchgear takes that seriously. “It can mess with someone’s ego and sanity to not have people who are being true partners in their job search,” says Brolick. “We try to talk to candidates we think we can help. Even those we can’t help — we send people out with a toolkit for job searches.”

Share

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Heart and Seoul With her influences as varying as Janet Jackson, David Bowie, and K-Pop artists, South Korea-based (and former Tulsa resident) AleXa found herself drawn to performing as not only a dancer but a singer too. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA

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What do Tulsa and Seoul, South Korea have in common? Both have been home to up-and-coming K-pop sensation, AleXa, whose multilingual, digital single “Bomb” debuted Oct. 21, 2019, and went to No. 7 on Billboard’s world digital song sales chart. AleXa may be living in Seoul right now dropping singles, but she’s a Tulsa girl at heart too. For those who may not be familiar, K-Pop (Korean pop) is a genre of music that originated in South Korea but has roots in a variety of musical styles, including pop, electronica, dance, jazz, hip-hop, and more. It’s a catchy style, and listening to AleXa sing makes it clear why her “Bomb” has done so well. The song is hooky, with a driving beat that makes for an energetic dance track. AleXa is a lifelong dancer, a skill she gained while growing up right here in Tulsa. “I had a fun childhood,” AleXa says, recalling how she spent time with friends at iconic Tulsa places and events like the state fair, Bell’s Amusement Park, Incredible Pizza, Celebration Station, Chuck E. Cheese, and the Tulsa Zoo. She also remembers makeovers at Ladida and fun times working at the Lush store at Woodland Hills Mall. “If I weren’t an artist, I’d say I would probably have tried to be working in the Lush kitchen, making the products by hand.” But become a performer she did. “My mother so graciously enrolled me in Miss Shelly’s School of Dance as soon as I could walk, and for that, I am forever grateful,” AleXa says. She studied every genre of dance she could — ballet, hip-hop, jazz, tap, and lyrical. “Dance is the purest form of expression, to me,” she says. “Without having that experience as a child, the opportunity to express myself through dance at such a young age, I would never be where I am today. Nowadays, when I get to perform for people, dancing lets me step outside of

myself, for however long the choreography may be, and display a different side of myself. Dancing gives me a kind of freedom that can’t be replicated.” With her influences as varying as Janet Jackson, David Bowie, and K-Pop artists Hyuna and SHINee, AleXa found herself drawn to performing as not only a dancer but a singer too. And she was strongly attracted to K-Pop — both in sound and in visual style. “I have always been an avid fan of musical theater,” AleXa says. “The dramatics and grandeur of K-Pop are like a mini-musical packed into a four-minute song and music video. I think that’s one of the key factors that grabbed my attention. I can say that what drew me into K-pop was the visuals. The colorful flashiness of the music video sets and artists’ clothing, the makeup and styling, the fun dance beats, and crazy vocals; discovering K-Pop was such an eyeopening experience.” For AleXa, though, the performance of K-pop wasn’t the only reason she was drawn to it, because she also saw in the performers people who shared some of her ethnic background. “Growing up a Korean-Russian mix in Tulsa, I did not know many other Asian Americans,” she says. “Seeing these K-Pop artists that I could familiarize myself with gave me a sense of belonging. I was a proud K-Pop fan.” Fandom led her to take part in the Rising Legends contest in 2016-17, produced by the online K-Pop news website Soompi. The international talent search contest drew participants from more than 300 countries, showing off their skills in rap, singing, and dancing. The online audience voted for different contestants. “I remember rehearsing my entry choreographies at home, or in the vocal

practice rooms in the hallways of my college,” says AleXa. “I wanted to win so badly.” She won the dance category in 2016, and then won both the dance competition and the most overall votes in 2017. That allowed her to fly out to Seoul to have an inperson audition, as well as film a small webreality show. “To this day, I am still grateful to everyone who shared and supported me through those two years of competitions,” she says. Her successes, talent, and work ethic all drew the attention of Zanybros (a South Korean video production company), and soon, she was signed to a recording deal with the ZB Label. It’s hard work, she says, but exhilarating. “The fun thing about Korea is that every day is a new day,” she says. “My schedule differs from day to day. Some days I am in the dance studio for 17 hours; other days, I am shooting a music video for 48 hours. Some days I do radio DJing for an hour; other days, I can sleep in for a bit. Every day is something different.” Though she misses the open-wide spaciousness of Tulsa, there are some things her hometown and her current home, Seoul, have in common. “I’d say that one of the similarities that Seoul shares with my hometown is good food. So much good food,” she says. “When you go to Tulsa and try things like Elmer’s BBQ, that gives you a genuine taste of Tulsa. Upon coming here and trying one of many Korean restaurants, you get a true taste of Seoul food.” Though she loves the all-night pace of Seoul and her work as an artist, Tulsa still has a special place in AleXa’s heart. “Tulsa is a place where dreams are made,” she says. “I am grateful to all the people back home who kept me on track toward my dream. If you have a dream, you can achieve it. As cheesy as that sounds, with hard work and passion, you can see it through.”

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PREV EW 16

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75

6

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3

TH

8

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9

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10

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13TH

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BOK Center | C2-6 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Tulsa Performing Arts | D3-15 Tulsa Drillers | 3E-15 Tulsa Roughnecks | 3E-15

Albert G’s Bar & Q | D3-13 Baxter’s Interurban Grill | B1-23 Caz’s Chowhouse | D2-10 Chimi’s | A5-2 Dilly Diner | D3-18 Dust Bowl | D3-21 El Guapo’s | D3-22

Caz’s Pub | D2-16 Club Majestic | D2-19 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 MixCo | C2-17 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41

64

51

TH

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BARS

u.s.a. + PRovISIoNS

MERCANTILE

TH

11

14

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11TH

1H

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Downtown @ The Boxyard / shoprosegold.com

2012

8TH

7

13TH

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ICAN HATFIE ER LD M QUALITY GOODS

PEORIA

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OFFERING TULSA A SELECTION OF INDIE AND SUSTAINABLE DESIGNERS

TH

7TH

33

64

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NOW OPEN

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ELG

DET

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35

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OSU Medical Center

39

3RD

EST. RooTS

MAI

Courthouse

R

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6

NE

Central Library

Business Center

B

YEN

TH

5

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4

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Performing Arts Center

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City Hall

DEC

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12

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51

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Brady Theater

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11

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34

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Cain’s Ballroom

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41

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TULSA LOCATOR TL

DOWNTOWN TULSA

30

TH

3

2 4

CHERRY 5

THE BOXYARD Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 Jason’s Deli | A5-30 Juniper | D3-1 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 Mexicali | D2-11 MixCo | C2-17 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41

PRHYME | D2-12 Sisserou’s | D2-20 SMOKE. | A5-32 The Tavern | E2-37 Tavolo | C3-3 Ti Amo | C2-4 Yokozuna | D3-38

SHOPPING American Hatfield | D3-33 Boomtown Tees | D3-14 Garden Deva | D5-37 Modern Mess | D3-33

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51

Rosegold | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33

American Hatfield | D3-33 Blank Med Spa | D3-33 Blue Sky Bank | D3-33 Modern Mess | D3-33 Riley’s Wine & Spirits | D3-33 Rosegold | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33 Tonsorial | D3-33

EVERYTHING ELSE The Bond | D4-39 Blank Med Spa | D3-33

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TL TULSA LOCATOR

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TULSA AND SURROUNDING AREAS

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SPERRY

40

7

7

86TH N

OWAS

76TH N

27 56TH N

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75

38 Tulsa Zoo

36 N TH

17

65

61ST

48

16

64

72

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18

32 MEMORIAL

5

46

10

81ST

91ST

7

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111

2

71

20

9

BIXBY 47

6

129TH E.

29

MEMORIAL

4

44

51

28

SHERIDAN

121ST

70

30

55

43 101

14

GARNETT

23

15

40

64

12

MINGO

36

129TH E.

66

42

26 3

Oral Roberts Univ. Mabee Ct. 58

59

Between 111th & 121st 2

41ST

13

YALE

48

83

Oklahoma Aquarium

JENKS

1

97

21 32

72

61 24

SAPULPA

2

LaFortune 80 Park

St. Francis Hospital

41

A

31ST Hicks Park

56 44

169

31

HARVARD

Jones Airport

44

91Whiteside Park

LEWIS

B

Turkey Mountain Park

93 21ST

45

5

23

PEORIA

75

72

51

MIDTOWN

3

39

6

Expo Square

29

Philbrook Museum of Art7

RIVERSIDE

94

UNION

244

Tulsa State Fairgrounds

GARNETT

35

Woodward Park St. John Med. Ctr.

ARKANSAS RIVER

50

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11TH

MINGO

27

PINE

MEMORIAL

71

APACHE

48 SHERIDAN

Of 1Univ. Tulsa

2 Chandler Park

169

PINE YALE

30

75

HARVARD

OSU Tulsa

DOWNTOWN BOK Ctr.

SAND SPRINGS

11

LEWIS

D

Crawford Park

UTICA

412

36TH N

Tulsa Air & Space Museum

26TH N / APACHE

PEORIA

51

GILCREASE MUSEUM

Gilcrease Museum

GILCREASE EXPY

MARTIN LUTHER KING

KWY ALE P TISD E

46TH N MINGO

19 Tulsa Botanic Garden

C

Mohawk Park Lake Yahola


TULSA LOCATOR TL 96TH N PRESENTED BY:

72

SSO

Bella’s House | B5-32, A5-32 Children’s Orchard | A5-18 Edible Arrangements | C4-7, A5-7, G6-7 I-44 Antique Mall | C4-3 Landella | D5-45 Miss McGillicutty’s Antiques | A4-54 Secret Gardens | A6-47 Tulsa Stained Glass | C5-56 Ziegler Art & Frame | D4-17

52

CATOOSA 66 412

244

1

53

209TH E.

BROKEN ARROW 26

DINING

COUNTY LINE / 193RD E.

177TH E.

161ST E.

1ST

Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

145TH E.

1ST

SHOPPING

40

72 ASPEN

23

63 COUNTY LINE

LYNN LANE

MAIN ELM

est. 20 13

21

7

8

Albert G’s Bar & Q | C4-91 Amazing Thai Cuisine | B7-63 Brownies Burgers | D4-29, B5-29 Chimi’s | B5-2, C4-2, D4-2 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 El Chico | D6-93 El Guapo’s | B4-15 Elmer’s BBQ | C4-39 Famous Steakhouse | A5-10 Fat Daddy’s Pub and Grille | B5-64 Flo’s Burger Diner | D4-1, D8-1 Fuji | B5-20 George’s Pub | A4-61 Goodcents Deli Fresh Subs | A5-9 Habaneros Mexican Grill| A7-21 In The Raw | C4-23, B5-23, B7-23 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Jason’s Deli | D4-30, B5-30 Kirin | B6-28 Kitch | A4 -42 Los Cabos | G6-40, A4-40, B7-40 Los Mariachis | B5-26, A4-26 Maryn’s Taphouse and Raw Bar | A4-58 McAllister’s | B4-72, B5-72, B6-72, D5-72, G6-72 McNellie’s Pub | B5-16 Miami Nights Restaurant & Lounge | D5-5 Molly’s Landing | E8-52 Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano | C4-94 Ricardos | C5-31

Rincón Mexican Grill & Cantina | B5-13 SMOKE. | D4-27, G6-27 Steak Stuffers USA | C5-14 Table 20 | D4-35 Ti Amo | B5-80 Waterfront Grill | A4-70 Yokozuna | A5-43 Yutaka Grill Sushi & Buffet | C5-12

ENTERTAINMENT Cinergy | B5-55 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 Gathering Place | C3-71 Got Wood | A4-24 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Tulsa Air and Space Museum | E5-38

CASINO Osage Casino Hotel | E3-19 OTHER OSAGE CASINO LOCATIONS: 222 Allen Road | Bartlesville 301 Blackjack Dr. | Sand Springs 5591 W. Rogers Blvd. | Skiatook 39 Deer Ave. | Hominy 2017 E. 15th St. and Hwy. 99 | Pawhuska

River Spirit Casino Resort | B4-83

EVERYTHING ELSE Blue Cottage | A4-59 Carey Clinic | B5-36 Kuts 4 Kids | B4-48, B6-48 Shears | A4-41

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Everyone wants to be happy, but many aren’t. Even if you’re genetically disposed to be a Debbie Downer, you can still take steps to make yourself a lot happier. — by Lindsay Morris We all want to be more positive, though very few of us know how to go about bringing more pleasure into our lives. The search for happiness is an age-old quest. However, the advice many wellmeaning people offer to find happiness is downright cheesy. Did your grandma ever tell you, “Count your blessings” … “Do unto others…”? As we enter a new year and a new decade, maybe one of your main resolutions is to be happier. But perhaps you’re not even sure what would make you happy. Not to get all philosophical, but are you even sure what happiness would look like for you? One way to determine this is to ask yourself, “What’s my vision of my best possible self?” says happiness expert Sonja Lyubomirsky, a professor at the University of California at Riverside. In other words, if your life was perfect, what would it be like? That will tell you what’s important to you and what your values are. This can give you a framework to start from on your journey toward happiness. Unfortunately, as with most things in life, there is good and bad news when setting out to find your bliss. Approximately 50% of your happiness

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is determined by mostly hereditary personality traits. Half of how happy you feel is basically outside of your control. The good news is that 50% of your happiness is totally within your control. Though we all want to be more positive, very few of us know how to go about bringing more pleasure into our lives, while pushing aside our negative thoughts. Fortunately, if you follow these tips on how to be happy, you’ll hopefully find that life satisfaction could be more in reach than you think.

BEWITHOTHERS WHOMAKEYOUSMILE Studies show that we are happiest when we are around those who are also happy. There may be certain people in our lives who are perpetually grumpy that we can’t just magically remove from our lives — parents, spouse, children, siblings. However, for those relationships that you get to select, choose to be around happy people. Increasing your number of friends correlates to higher subjective well-being; doubling your number of friends is like increasing your income by 50% in terms of how happy you feel.

ACTIVELYEXPRESSYOUR GRATITUDEANDTHANKFULNESS In one study, couples who expressed gratitude in their interactions with each other experienced increased relationship connection and satisfaction the next day — both from the person expressing thankfulness and the person receiving it. In many cases, gratitude can be like a booster shot for relationships. The same is true at work. Express gratitude for an employee’s hard work, and you will both feel better about yourselves.


Another easy method of fostering thankfulness is to write down a few things you are grateful for every night. Another study showed that people who wrote down five things they were thankful for once a week were 25% happier after 10 weeks. Happy people focus on what they have, not on what they don’t have. It’s motivating to want more in your career, relationships, bank account, etc., but thinking about what you already have, and expressing gratitude for it, will make you a lot happier. It will also remind you that even if you still have huge dreams, you have already accomplished a lot and should feel genuinely proud.

ACTIVELYPURSUE YOURGOALS Goals you don’t pursue aren’t goals; they’re dreams. And dreams only make you happy when you’re dreaming. Pursuing goals, though, does make you happy. If you’re pursuing a huge goal, make sure that every time you take a small step closer to achieving it, you pat yourself on the back. But don’t compare where you are now with where you someday hope to be. Compare where you are now to where you were a few days ago. Then you’ll get dozens of bite-size chunks of fulfillment — and a never-ending supply of things to be thankful for.

DOSOMETHING NEW Maybe you love watching movies, but binging Netflix on the couch has gotten old. Go to the movies. Variety is the spice of life. Try a new restaurant, a new recipe, or ask a new co-worker for lunch. Not sure if you’ll be good at something? That’s OK. Try tango lessons or taekwondo classes. You might surprise yourself … and others.

IMAGINE THEBEST Don’t be afraid to look at what you want and envision yourself getting it. Many people avoid this process because they don’t want to be disappointed if things don’t work out. The truth is that imagining getting what you want is a big part of achieving it. Dare to dream.

TAKE AWALK It’s been proven that exercise can affect your mood. Sure, a sweat session at the gym can serve as a distraction from whatever problems you’re facing. But you don’t need an intense hour of spin class or running on the treadmill to reap the benefits either.

A 2016 study conducted by psychologists at Iowa State University found that going for a 12-minute stroll, even without a walking partner or being outdoors, could improve your mood significantly. You can also exercise while cleaning or doing the laundry. Got a stack of heavy towels or pants? Use them as resistance during a set of lunges or squats, or you can lift your hamper above your head a few times to strengthen your arms and shoulders. We need our physical choices to help our emotional state. Moderate exercise allows the body to get into the balanced state that it needs to stabilize hormones and release endorphins.

DOTHINGS YOULOVE Perhaps you can’t skydive every day or take vacations every season, but as long as you get to do the things you love every once in a while, you will find greater happiness. Try finding a little joy in every day — whether it’s savoring that cup of coffee or pushing your kid on a swing.

FIND PURPOSE Those who believe they are contributing to the well-being of humanity tend to feel better about their lives. Most people want to be part of something greater than themselves, simply because it’s fulfilling. Maybe you’re in a job that feels purposeless. We can’t all go work for nonprofits, but you can carve out time to volunteer for a cause you believe in.

ACCEPT IMPERFECTION Many of us strive for perfection. We desire to push ourselves to be our best. But to be truly happy, you must embrace the imperfection that is part of life. Perfection is impossible, and holding ourselves and others to these standards is futile. We will always end up feeling let down. Accept that life is imperfect and recognize that there is beauty and grace in that imperfection.

TAKE RESPONSIBILITY It’s easy to feel that someone else is responsible for your happiness, but the reality is that it is your responsibility. Stop blaming others or the world, and you’ll find your answers much sooner. This often involves letting go of hurts from the past. You might find it helpful to see a counselor to help you work through your past and present.

BEOPEN TOCHANGE Even if it doesn’t feel good, change is the one thing you can count on. Change will happen, so it’s a good idea to prepare yourself for the experience emotionally. Instead of dreading changes you know are coming, think about the positive things and new relationships that will come out of those experiences.

LIVEIN THEMOMENT Our thoughts and feelings often revolve around the past or the future. Reality is what you are experiencing at this very moment; what you are going through right now. Sometimes we want to escape that reality. But when we stay in the present, we are fully engaged in our lives. Endeavor to live in the moment, and you’ll begin to have a deeper appreciation for your life.

SPENDLESSTIME ONYOURPHONE Disconnecting from technology, social media, and work frees up time to engage in other hobbies and activities that bring you joy. But let’s face it: If you have a job that requires you to check your email frequently, or you can’t resist posting that adorable photo on Instagram, perhaps you can start with the small goal of not checking your phone 20 minutes before bed. One cause of stress and burnout can be the lack of an end to our workday. It isn’t very relaxing to continually check email or respond to texts. We need time to replenish and recharge our batteries.

STOP WORRYING Constantly worrying about everything creates toxic anxiety, where your mind is steeped in negative, spiraling thoughts. Worries plague your mind and make you afraid and apprehensive about things you often have no control over. Sometimes we believe that if we worry enough, we can keep bad things from happening. But the truth is, you can’t experience joy or even contentment when consumed by worry.

BASKINTHE SIMPLEPLEASURES Those who love you, treasured memories, silly jokes, your favorite snack, sitting by a warm fire with a cup of hot cocoa, and starry nights — these are the ties that bind and the gifts that keep on giving. Instead of being tied to your electronic device all the time, work on being fully present in the moment and enjoying those you are with.

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

DRIVING FORCE SAND SPRINGS’ BRENDON WISELEY, WHO HAD THE LOWER PART OF HIS RIGHT LEG AMPUTATED FOLLOWING A LAWNMOWER ACCIDENT WHEN HE WAS 7, HAS NEVER LET HIS DISABILITY LIMIT HIM, WHETHER HE’S ON THE WRESTLING MAT OR A RACE TRACK. by john tranchina | photos by marc rains

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Imagine you’re about to step onto the mat for a big high school wrestling match, and you see your opponent remove a prosthetic leg and hop onto the mat to face you. You’d think you’re about to win easily, right? Well, not if you’re going against Brendon Wiseley of Charles Page High School in Sand Springs. Wiseley, who had the lower part of his right leg amputated following a lawnmower accident when he was 7, has never let his disability limit him, whether he’s on the wrestling mat or a race track. Yes, in addition to being an outstanding wrestler, he’s also a highly-regarded race car driver who will be competing in the 600cc non-winged micros division of the Lucas Oil Chili Bowl Nationals (Jan. 13-18). Wrestling last year as a junior, Wiseley placed second in the 6A state tournament at 106 pounds, recording a 37-12 record on the season. But getting pinned in 2:56 by Edmond Memorial’s Cruz Aguilar in the state final didn’t sit well and fuels his motivation for this year. Wiseley’s determination not to let anything hold him back pushes him to success at whatever he puts his energy toward. “He doesn’t use that as a crutch at all,” says Sandites wrestling coach Jarrod Patterson. “He’s very competitive and always wants to win. At first, it was a surprise [to see what he could accomplish], and at this point now, I honestly forget that he doesn’t have a leg because he does everything pretty well the same, if not better than the other kids in the room. “He’s a hard-working kid, so that helps. He works hard in the practice room, and then it shows when he goes out and competes.”

Wiseley acknowledges that he sometimes recognizes the condescending look on the faces of his opponents before a match when he takes off his leg. “Last year, there were a lot of them. They gave me some looks like, ‘Yeah, I’m going to beat this kid,’” Wiseley recalls. “I’ve had one kid who I’ve beat five or six times, and every single time he looks at me like he’s going to beat me, and tries to get in my head. I don’t have anything against him, but you can’t let anyone get in your head. “Wrestling is a mind game. It’s all about want. If you want it, you’re going to go get it.” That mentally-tough attitude served him well in conquering his devastating injury as a 7-year-old. Wiseley credits his parents with instilling a mindset that nothing could hold him back. “I guess it’s good that I was young enough that I could overcome it,” Wiseley says. “My parents taught me that you should never sit down and feel defeated.” Wiseley, whose father owned a sprint car team when he was little, had already begun car racing at 5, and his relentless dedication had him back on the course just four days after the incident. “I was supposed to race that Saturday after the accident. Since I didn’t have a right foot anymore, the doctor said that I was going to have to change the way I did things,” Wiseley recalls. “And he said, ‘Do you have any questions for me?’ And I said, ‘When can I race again?’ I already had the mindset that I was going to race. When I got out of the hospital, we went right to the race shop and started making some hand throttles. My dad and mom

Brendon Wiseley told me that I should give it some time, and I pulled the, ‘You told me never to sit down, to get right back up and go back at it,’ and they couldn’t argue with it. They were happy that I was trying to do something and not let it hold me back.” He got his first leg prosthetic a month after the accident and continued racing throughout his childhood, eventually switching from the hand throttles to just using his left foot on both the gas and brake pedals. He’s been racing ever since, competing in his first Chili Bowl in 2018. Wiseley didn’t even start wrestling until he was in seventh grade, but he picked it up quickly, placing third in his very first tournament. He adopted a unique style to deal with the natural disadvantage of not being able to stand and use the leverage of two legs to push against his opponent. As Wiseley recalls, the coaches helped him design his wrestling technique to copy that of Anthony Robles, a former collegiate wrestling star from Arizona State. Robles won the NCAA national championship at 125 pounds in 2011 with only one leg. “I’ve had a couple of different coaches help me out, but at the beginning, they always told me never to stand up, always wrestle on one knee as Anthony Robles did in college,” Wiseley says. “This year, we’re trying to change the approach.”

Wiseley is approaching this wrestling season as if he has something to prove. “Last year, I came up short,” says Wiseley, who did win the 6A east regional tournament the week before state. “I’m going to work harder and harder every day to be better this year. The biggest thing is not going into this year with a big head. Yeah, I got second at state, but anyone can still beat me.” He acknowledges that the loss to Aguilar still stings. “Honestly, I look at that video every single day and look at what I could have done to change the outcome,” Wiseley admits. “One little move messed up my whole match.” “He’s competitive, so it’s driven him to want to win it this year,” Patterson says of Wiseley’s state final defeat. “I guess you could say he’s a little bit more motivated. He wants to win a state title his senior year.” As he strives for that, Wiseley continues to weigh his options about next year. He will likely wait until after the wrestling season (the state tournament is in February 2020) to choose between going to college to wrestle or joining the professional racing circuit. “I’ve got offers both ways, so I’m just waiting to see what else I get offered,” Wiseley says. “I would love to wrestle in college. But right now, racing’s fallen in my lap and calling my name.”

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J JENKS

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J JENKS

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

Kendall Stieben

FOLLOWING MONTHS OF GRUELING REHABILITATION, BIXBY SENIOR KENDALL STIEBEN IS HAPPILY BACK IN THE POOL FOR HER FINAL HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING SEASON, SEEKING TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS. by john tranchina photos by marc rains Kendall Stieben started as a runner, but after taking on swimming in middle school to stay in better shape during the offseason, she ended up being better at it and liking it more. Now, after a nagging running injury forced her to have knee surgery in March 2019 and subsequently endure five months of grueling rehabilitation, the Bixby senior is back in the pool for her final high school swimming season, seeking an individual state championship.

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Thankfully, Stieben isn’t feeling lingering effects from the injury and is ready for a strong season, both individually and for the Spartans as a team, which finished third at last year’s 6A state meet. “I’m super excited because I’ve had a few meets already, and my comeback is going great,” she says. “I’m hoping I can win state in the 50 meters and 100 meters, or maybe the 200 meters, and I’m hoping our relays can do well. Last year, we got second at state, and it was pretty close. Our girls are working hard, so I feel like we have a good shot at it. As a team, we got second at the all-state preview meet (November 2019). It’s looking good.” Even though she gave up running cross-country and track during her sophomore year, Stieben dealt with the ongoing nagging pain from her injury throughout the last swimming season. She still enjoyed a strong junior year, placing third at the 6A state meet in both the 50-meter freestyle and 100-meter freestyle races, as

well as helping the Spartans’ 400 freestyle relay squad finish second, and the 200 medley relay take third. After that, Stieben finally opted to undergo surgery. “It was an overuse injury [ from running]. I tore my hamstring tendon where it connects to my knee, so I got it repaired, and I was out the entire summer,” says Stieben. Stieben, who is already committed to attend SMU in Dallas next year, admits that the rehab process was long and arduous, but she’s fully healed and as strong as before. “It was tough. I was in a full-leg cast for six weeks. I couldn’t put any weight on my leg,” Stieben explains. “And then I got out of that and into a brace. My entire summer consisted of PT. I would do physical therapy three times a week in the morning, and slowly but surely, I built up my strength. Starting in August, I got a personal trainer after I graduated out of PT.” Many people rehabbing major injuries have a more difficult

time with the mental aspect of it, but Stieben maintained a positive attitude.

certainly wasn’t Stieben’s intention when she first began it.

Bixby swimming coach Christa Thompson acknowledges she wasn’t concerned about Stieben’s ability to rebound from the surgery and return at full strength.

“I guess I just started swimming in middle school because I wanted an extra sport, and it was good cross-training for running,” recounts Stieben, who also played soccer at the time but gave that up in eighth grade to devote more time to swimming. “Eventually, I stopped running, and I focused on swimming. Best decision I ever made, because I enjoy it a lot.”

“She’s tough mentally,” Thompson says. “She always works hard, and even when she was doing physical therapy, she worked hard at that, and she’s back on track. She’s getting the same times she ended with last season, so I’m not worried about anything with that.” Still, Stieben is glad the whole thing is over, and she can move forward. “It’s good to be back,” she says. “That feeling of racing again, it’s the best feeling ever.” The competitive rush she gets from swimming is similar to what previously attracted her to running, and ultimately is part of why it replaced running as her primary sport. But that

Part of that was because she was so good at it, although she was good at running, too. She placed 11th as a freshman at the 2016 6A state cross-country meet, and then excelled at the 6A state track and field championships later that year, finishing eighth in the 800 meters, 11th in the 1,600 and 12th in the 3,200. She finished 39th at the state cross-country meet as a sophomore. “She does well in school, works hard, and does everything she’s supposed to do to be successful,” Thompson says.

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LET’S GO OILERS fri jan 3rd vs. idaho @ 7:05pm sat jan 4th vs. idaho @ 7:05pm sun jan 5th vs. idaho @ 4:05pm fri jan 10th vs. kansas city @ 7:05pm sat jan 11th vs. utah @ 7:05pm sun jan 12th vs. wichita @ 4:05pm fri jan 24th vs. kalamazoo @ 7:05pm sat jan 25th vs. kalamazoo @ 7:05pm sun jan 26th vs. idaho @ 7:05pm

call (918)-632-7825 to purchase tickets now 60 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020


SS SPORTS SCHEDULE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Lloyd Noble Center (Norman, Okla.) Jan. 4 | vs Kansas State | Noon Jan. 8 | @ Texas | 8p Jan. 11 | @ Iowa State | 7p Jan. 14 | vs Kansas | 8p Jan. 18 | vs TCU | 1p Jan. 20 | @ Baylor | 8p Jan. 25 | vs Mississippi State* | 1p Jan. 29 | @ Kansas State | 7p –––––––––––––––––– * Big 12/SEC Challenge | Norman, Okla.

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Lloyd Noble Center (Norman, Okla.) Jan. 4 | vs Baylor | 4p Jan. 8 | @ Oklahoma State | 7p Jan. 11 | vs Iowa State | 1p Jan. 15 | @ West Virginia | 6p Jan. 19 | vs TCU | 3p Jan. 22 | @ Texas Tech | 7p Jan. 25 | @ Kansas State | 2p Jan. 28 | vs Texas | 7p

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Reynolds Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Jan. 3 | vs Temple | 8p Jan. 8 | @ Cincinnati | 6p Jan. 11 | vs Houston | 3p Jan. 15 | @ ECU | 6p Jan. 18 | @ Tulane | 1p Jan. 22 | vs Memphis | 8p Jan. 26 | @ UConn | 11a

ORAL ROBERTS MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Mabee Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Jan. 2 | @ South Dakota State | 8:15p Jan. 4 | @ Omaha | 7p Jan. 9 | vs North Dakota State | 7p Jan. 11 | vs North Dakota | 7p Jan. 16 | @ Western Illinois | 7p Jan. 18 | @ Purdue Fort Wayne | Noon Jan. 25 | @ South Dakota | 3:30p Jan. 29 | vs South Dakota State | 7p

TULSA OILERS Home games are played at BOK Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Jan. 3 | vs Idaho Steelheads | 7:05p Jan. 4 | vs Idaho Steelheads | 7:05p Jan. 5 | vs Idaho Steelheads | 4:05p Jan. 10 | vs Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p Jan. 11 | vs Utah Grizzlies | 7:05p Jan. 12 | vs Wichita Thunder | 4:05p Jan. 15 | @ Idaho Steelheads | 8:10p Jan. 17 | @ Idaho Steelheads | 8:10p Jan. 18 | @ Idaho Steelheads | 8:10p Jan. 24 | vs Kalamazoo Wings | 7:05p Jan. 25 | vs Kalamazoo Wings | 7:05p Jan. 26 | vs Idaho Steelheads | 4:05p Jan. 30 | @ Allen Americans | 7:05p Jan. 31 | @ Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Gallagher-Iba Arena (Stillwater, Okla.) Jan. 4 | @ Texas Tech | 11a Jan. 6 | vs West Virginia | 8p Jan. 11 | @ TCU | 1p Jan. 15 | vs Texas | 7p Jan. 18 | vs Baylor | 11a Jan. 21 | @ Iowa State | 7p Jan. 25 | @ Texas A&M | 3p Jan. 27 | vs Kansas | 8p

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Gallagher-Iba Arena (Stillwater, Okla.) Jan. 4 | vs Kansas | 2p Jan. 8 | vs Oklahoma | 7p Jan. 12 | @ Baylor | 1p Jan. 15 | @ Kansas State | 6:30p Jan. 19 | vs Iowa State | 2p Jan. 22 | @ West Virginia | 6p Jan. 25 | vs Texas | 1p Jan. 29 | vs TCU | 7p

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Reynolds Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Jan. 4 | vs Temple | 2p Jan. 8 | @ Tulane | 7p Jan. 12 | vs USF | 5p Jan. 15 | @ Wichita State | 6:30p Jan. 19 | @ UConn | 11a Jan. 21 | vs ECU | 7p Jan. 25 | @ SMU | 2p Jan. 29 | vs Tulane | 7p

ORAL ROBERTS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Mabee Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Jan. 2 | @ South Dakota State | 6p Jan. 4 | @ Omaha | 2p Jan. 8 | vs North Dakota State | 7p Jan. 11 | vs North Dakota | 2p Jan. 16 | @ Purdue Fort Wayne | 6p Jan. 18 | @ Western Illinois | 4:30p Jan. 26 | @ South Dakota | 1p Jan. 30 | vs Denver | 7p

OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER Home games are played at Chesapeake Energy Arena (Oklahoma City, Okla.) Jan. 2 | @ San Antonio Spurs | 7:30p Jan. 4 | @ Cleveland Cavaliers | 6:30p Jan. 6 | @ Philadelphia 76ers | 6p Jan. 7 | @ Brooklyn Nets | 6:30p Jan. 9 | vs Houston Rockets | 8:30p Jan. 11 | vs Los Angeles Lakers | 7p Jan. 13 | @ Minnesota Timberwolves | 7p Jan. 15 | vs Toronto Raptors | 7p Jan. 17 | vs Miami Heat | 7p Jan. 18 | vs Portland Trail Blazers | 8p Jan. 20 | @ Houston Rockets | 4p Jan. 22 | @ Orlando Magic | 6p Jan. 24 | vs Atlanta Hawks | 7p Jan. 25 | @ Minnesota Timberwolves | 7p Jan. 27 | vs Dallas Mavericks | 7p Jan. 29 | @ Sacramento Kings | 9p Jan. 31 | @ Phoenix Suns | 8p

ALL TIMES CENTRAL // GAME DATES/TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

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GC GREEN COUNTRY SCENE

9iSk 8 Life THE GREEN COUNTRY SKATEBOARDING SCENE — ESPECIALLY IN TAHLEQUAH — OFFERS PLENTY OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR CAMARADERIE, CARDIO, AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION. BY JENNIFER ZEHNDER

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GREEN COUNTRY SCENE GC Wyley Henson fell in love with skateboarding the moment he stepped on his first board. Nearly two decades later, he is pursuing pro status, is a team sponsor, and the owner of Avenue Skateshop located in his hometown of Tahlequah. Henson, 25, is three years into the business portion of his skateboard life and counts himself blessed to live, work, and skateboard in the 918. “I started to become a solid figure for these local kids around 2014. At the time, I was working at the local skate shop where the skaters liked to hang out. We began going on skate trips every weekend, and a brotherhood of sorts formed,” Henson shares. “After an impressive 13-year run, the previous skate shop owner decided to move on. So, when he offered the business opportunity to me, I knew I couldn’t pass it up.” While Henson’s business venture was perhaps based more on aspiration than numbers, statistics from Grand View Research, Inc. show positive growth with the global skateboard market expected to reach $42.4 billion by 2025 — up 3.1%. North America led the market in 2018, banking 31.7% of the overall revenue — with teens doing most of the buying at 44.1%. “I would classify skateboarding as a sport, hobby, and a lifestyle — because of the amount of dedication and athleticism it takes to be good at it. You have to be crazy about skateboarding to take slams and continue doing it over and over again. It’s pure love for the sport,” Henson explains. “It could be considered a hobby for others because it’s so much fun and is a good source of transportation. The lifestyle aspect is the best part. When a skater walks into a skate shop, it’s a home away from home. Regardless of race or background, skateboarding brings us all together.” Aside from its obvious nod to improved balance and cardio, skateboarding provides an outlet for stress and an expression of creativity, Henson notes. Better yet, skateboarding is also a pretty inexpensive

sport to pick up in comparison to others with a basic skateboard set up costing between $100-$200. Henson is currently sponsoring a team of more than a dozen skaters aged 10 to 30. His skate shop serves as home base for young people to hang out, and he is passionate about providing a positive example and the support and encouragement they need to pursue both their skate and life dreams.

The Tahlequah Skatepark Project was a multi-generational success, he contends. Families, parents, and even the local fire department stood up for the cause. Then mayor, Jason Nichols, actually broke the tie to funding the skatepark. “Skateboarding in the 918 is amazing. We have one of the best skate scenes around. You have to come out and see for yourself !”

“Skaters get stereotyped in with other things. I think this is because people tend to look at skaters negatively. Some of the nicest people I’ve met were skateboarders.” To combat the negative stigma, he regularly organizes volunteer skater groups to clean up and assist in their community. Outside of his shop and work with his team, Henson is most proud of Tahlequah’s $350,000 skate park remodel and expansion, which was completed between winter 2017 and spring 2018. The rehab design was created by Intertribal Development, formerly known as Native Skateparks. According to their website, Hunger Skateparks was able to transform the space into a 17,000 square foot park that is street heavy in design and includes features like an A-frame, a pyramid to rainbow ledge, multiple stages and elevations changes, two stair sets, ledges, extensions, a 70-foot long quarter with an extension, and rails, rails, rails. The extensive existing flats allow for locals to add moveable pieces to change up and add to the park for contests. On the east end of the park is an all-new transition area with a pool coping extension.

Must-Skates

in the 918 NIENHUIS SKATE PARK 3201 N. 9TH ST. | BROKEN ARROW

OWASSO SKATE PARK 456 S. MAIN ST. | OWASSO

RIVER SKATE PARK 474 W 23RD ST. | TULSA

SAND SPRINGS SKATE PARK 1050 W. WEKIWA ROAD | SAND SPRINGS

TAHLEQUAH SKATEPARK 201-261 WATER ST. | TAHLEQUAH

THE GATHERING PLACE

2650 S. JOHN WILLIAMS WAY | TULSA

“We met a lot of resistance for the idea,” Henson admits. “We combated that with the fact that it would generate a lot of revenue for the town and state. It would also bring a lot of people into Tahlequah from out of town — which it does every weekend.”

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TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

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TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

Live Music

Check Website for Dates!

PREVIEW918.COM 65


BT BEYOND TULSA Sapulpa has had its share of ups and downs but remains a thriving smalltown community that offers a getaway for anyone looking to take a unique and satisfying day trip. By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Rob Harmon Approximately 15 miles southwest of Tulsa, in an area some folks have called the “Crossroads of America” where I-44 and Oklahoma highways 75, 66 and 97 meet, is a charming spot called Sapulpa. In the 1930s, Sapulpa’s Frankoma Pottery set the town even more firmly in the Oklahoma history books, creating some of the world’s most distinct sculptures and dinnerware, which is still sought after by collectors today. Named after a Native American from the Lower Creek Tribe, Sapulpa became a thriving city when neighboring Glenpool emerged as the world’s leader in oil and natural gas. Since then, Sapulpa has had its share of ups and downs but remains a thriving community. The town’s main street section, located on Dewey Avenue, has some of the most interesting antique shops, collector stores and candy shops in Green Country. Sapulpa’s parks are surprisingly scenic, as well as enjoyable for children. Although it is the county seat of Creek County, part of the city also falls within Tulsa County, making it connected to the larger metropolis. Yet it’s removed from Tulsa proper just enough to offer a nice little getaway for anyone looking to take a unique and satisfying day trip. Colorful murals, painted on the sides of the quaint, classic main street buildings, give visitors a feeling of Americana you don’t find just everywhere. Happy, helpful, friendly business owners welcome customers to their stores with smiles and greetings only found in small-town U.S.A.

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Crossr0ads f America Sapulpa Historical Museum 1 00 E. LEE AVE. SAPULPA

In the late 1960s, the Sapulpa Historical Society began preserving the history of Sapulpa and the surrounding area with its museum on the bottom floor of a YWCA building. These days, the museum’s collection spans four buildings, literally an entire block. Exhibits tell the many stories associated with this town, going back to the 1800s, the days of the blacksmith, the Frisco railroad, and Indian Territory Oklahoma. A full museum tour, guided by docents, takes around one hour. The Sapulpa Fire Museum, as well as the Waite Phillips-Barnsdall Filling Station Museum, which commemorates the days of the full-service gas station, are also well worth your time during a visit to Sapulpa.

store. A stop at Gigi’s will make you feel like a kid in a candy shop — because Gigi is a throwback to the days when penny or nickel candy jars lit up a child’s eyes with delight. When was the last time you indulged yourself with a handful of candy? The selection is impressive, featuring favorites like cherry sours that give you that twinge at the back of your throat, chocolate malt balls twice as big as usual, gummy peach rings bursting with juicy peach flavor, an entire wall full of both classic and unique Pez dispensers, and more. Plus, there’s homemade fudge (buy four big chunks and get two free) and handmade flavored popcorns all done in-house. Do not visit Sapulpa without stopping here.

Heritage Park 2 3 N. POPLAR ST. SAPULPA

The Purple Rabbit Emporium and Art 1 6 E. DEWEY AVE. SAPULPA

Gigi's Gourmet Popcorn 1 2 E. DEWEY AVE. SAPULPA

There aren’t too many places anymore like this cute little

surprisingly high prices, even for items that have been sitting there for a long time. This place is just the opposite. The friendly staff is quick to answer questions, and from the clean, organized way the shop is set up, it’s obvious the management knows how to make the shopping experience fun and affordable. Take a look around this store; you’ll see something for everyone. And by the way, a fresh pot of coffee is generally on the menu and free to visitors coming in from the cold, looking to browse.

Whether it’s porcelain dolls you’re searching for or gently used cowboy boots, this downtown Sapulpa gem is worth your time. So many antique shops are unorganized, lacking enough helpful staff and featuring

This gorgeous park is small, but so much fun for the kiddos. Swings, slides, indoor bathrooms, and play areas appropriate for all ages are packed into this cute little play park. Tall, castlelike structures make it fun to explore and get lost in playtime. And there are places for parents to sit and relax as they watch their children have a good time. With the entire surface of the park’s ground covered in rubber safety material, trips and falls are easy to recover from. In its 15th year, this child’s park still looks as new as the day hundreds of Creek County residents built it. Designed by a renowned New York


BEYOND TULSA BT playground architect firm, this labor of love has yielded an activity-laden area that every child in the 918 should have a chance to play in at some point.

Free Wi-Fi Internet Access!

Molly’s Landing Open Since 1984

Steak & Seafood Only 3 1/2 miles from Hard Rock Casino on Highway 66 (Route 66)

Gone But Not Forgotten 1 08 E. DEWEY AVE. SAPULPA

Just when you thought the vinyl album resurgence was over, places like the collector and memorabilia shop Gone But Not Forgotten keep the craze going. For those who remember the days when Elvis was king or for any serious sports collector, this store is fantastic and well worth the trip to Sapulpa. Take a step into this magical time machine and find yourself a Life Magazine from the days when Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe were a thing. Snag a Patsy Cline or Elvis Costello vinyl record, and take it home to play it on that record player you got over the holidays. Vintage concert posters, autographed sports memorabilia, and more are all waiting to find their new home.

Dewey Street Market

918.266.7853

www.mollyslanding.com

2 09 E. DEWEY AVE. SAPULPA

An antique lover’s dream, this store is filled with numerous unique vendor booths, every one of them packed with loads of items in excellent condition and appealing prices. On any given visit, expect to find gorgeous wood furniture, oneof-a-kind knickknacks, local and international art, vintage silverware, well-preserved dishes, sports cards, 1950s magazines, and so much more. From retro and vintage kitsch to designer shoes or purses, the quality goods you’ll find at this store will make you come back to Sapulpa again and again. Locals and frequent travelers along the historic Route 66 certainly make this a regular stop.

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SS STYLE + SHOPPING

fashion cents IF YOUR TASTE RUNS TOWARD THE HIGH END, BUT YOUR BUDGET DOESN’T, THE CHILDREN’S ORCHARD IS A CONSIGNMENT MECCA FOR THOSE LOOKING TO BUY QUALITY CLOTHES AND KID-FOCUSED WARES FOR A FRACTION OF THE RETAIL COST. BY GINA CONROY & PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS When Margaret “Margie” Quinlan started working at the Children’s Orchard 16 years ago, little did she know she’d own the business. “The previous owners were looking to relocate,” says

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Quinlan. Having come from a family of business owners, the idea of owning her own business appealed to her. When her youngest daughter reached kindergarten, Quinlan started working at the

Children’s Orchard to offset the financial obligations that came with raising six children and all the pricy gadgets and activities. And the flexible work schedule allowed her to be there for her children. Not to mention, she loved the idea of being green.

“They outgrow their things before they outwear them,” says Quinlan. As someone who shopped retail for her children, it made sense to buy the business and fulfill her dream of joining the family ranks as a business owner. And perhaps it’s her family approach to business that makes the Children’s Orchard stand out. One step inside the shop and you’ll not only see how unique the place is, but you’ll also sense the difference. “We’re a small business that feels more like a comfortable home atmosphere,” says Quinlan, whose children have helped out in the store over the years. Currently, only two work in the shop as most of her children are grown. Now her grandchildren get to benefit from the store. You may think the Children’s Orchard is just another consignment shop, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Unlike consignment stores, the Children’s Orchard pays cash upfront for their merchandise, and they have a 10-day return policy. Another thing that sets them apart is they offer store


STYLE + SHOPPING SS

The Children’s Orchard also stays current on toys and equipment, especially when it comes to safety. They check for recalls, while other pop-up consignment shops may not be as diligent.

If there’s something they’re lacking, they can reach out on Facebook and Instagram for people to bring it in. Quinlan is confident customers will always find what they’re looking for, even those hard-to-find clothing items. “Our reputation speaks for itself,” says Quinlan. “People get more bang for their buck.” People not only come to the Children’s Orchard to buy retail, but they also come for new merchandise.

says Quinlan. Merchandise tags can identify all new clothing. “The conversation in resale has shifted,” says Quinlan. “Years ago it was about being green, and now it’s become more trendy. Still, it is more difficult for brick and mortar retail stores to stay in business with the convenience of online shopping. I find having all these brands under one roof is a bonus because you’re not limited to two brands.”

CHILDREN’S ORCHARD

7820 E. 101st St. | Tulsa 918-369-4642 childrensorchard.com/ stores/tulsa-ok

R

While they tend to get a lot of merchandise during the holidays, before school starts, and as the seasons change, they buy six days a week, so inventory is continually changing. Unlike other big consignment sales that happen a couple of times a year, the Children’s Orchard accepts clothing year-round and has the latest fashions for sale.

TO

The Children’s Orchard prides itself on being an upscale resale

“The bonus of being a franchise is that we’re always up on current pricing,” says Quinlan, who says it takes the emotional attachment off the owners when giving up their favorite

items. “Some people value their items above what they are worth because of the emotional attachment. Clothing is like a car. It depreciates.”

CA

And they offer gift cards people can use to shop in the store. No matter how you look at it, customers who shop at the Children’s Orchard get more product for the money, which makes them very competitive, even with online shopping.

shop. While they buy all brands, you can always find Gap, Polo, Nike, Levi’s, Under Armour, Destin, Matilda Jane, Miss Me, Hunter Rain, and Uggs in stock, and the inventory is never older than four years. At 70% off retail name brands, that’s hard to beat.

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credit for the items that are accepted for resale. “You’re getting 25% more than the cash offer,” says Quinlan.

“We sell hair products, bows, bracelets, jewelry, and neckties,”

Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday: 1-5 p.m.

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RB RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER

We are tapped into what’s trending and delicious, giving you a first-hand look at where to go, what to eat, where the best cocktails are, and how to map out your culinary adventures in the 918. Whatever your mood, whatever you crave, the 918 has a restaurant or bar sure to satisfy. From local classics to chain favorites, a variety of options catering to every palate and pocketbook are available. For those on the move, search our website database with over 200 restaurants and bars in nearly 20 categories.

PREVIEW918.COM/DINE-DRINK

CATEGORIES AMERICAN ASIAN BAKERY BARBECUE BARS + PUBS BREAKFAST BRUNCH COFFEE DELI FINE DINING GLOBAL ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN MEXICAN PIZZA SEAFOOD SPECIALTY STEAK SWEETS 70 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

FEATURED LISTINGS ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

2748 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-747-4799 SEE AD | PAGE 60

DAVE & BUSTER’S

6812 S. 105th E. Ave. | Tulsa 918-449-3100 SEE AD | PAGE 79

FLO’S BURGER DINER 19322 E. Admiral Place | Catoosa 918-739-4858 2604 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-398-7102 SEE AD | PAGE 67

FUJI

8226 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 918-250-1821 SEE AD | PAGE 73

ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

421 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-728-3650 SEE AD | PAGE 60

DILLY DINER

402 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-938-6382 SEE AD | PAGE 5

GEORGE’S PUB

108 N. 1st St. | Jenks 918-296-9711 SEE AD | PAGE 57

AMAZING THAI CUISINE 1232 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-258-8424 SEE AD | PAGE 91

BAXTER’S INTERURBAN GRILL

717 S. Houston Ave., Suite 100 | Tulsa 918-585-3134 SEE AD | PAGE 87

BROWNIES

2130 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-0320 422 Plaza Court, Suite B. | Sand Springs 918-514-0222 SEE AD | PAGE 79

CAZ’S CHOWHOUSE

18 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-588-2469 SEE AD | PAGE 64

CAZ’S PUB

21 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-585-8587 SEE AD | PAGE 64

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

1304 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-587-4411 5320 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-749-7755 6709 E. 81st St. | Tulsa 918-960-2723 SEE AD | PAGE 79

DUST BOWL

211 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-430-3901 SEE AD | PAGE 5

EL CHICO

9825 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-663-7755 SEE AD | PAGE 78

EL GUAPO’S

332 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-RITA 8161 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-728-7482 SEE AD | PAGE 5

ELGIN PARK

325 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-986-9910 SEE AD | PAGES 5, 61

ELMER’S BBQ

4130 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-6702 SEE AD | PAGE 87

FAMOUS STEAKHOUSE 8922 S. Memorial Drive, Ste. C3 | Tulsa 918-459-7870 SEE AD | PAGE 35

FASSLER HALL

304 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-7898 SEE AD | PAGE 5

FAT DADDY’S PUB AND GRILLE

8056 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa 918-872-6206 SEE AD | PAGE 60

GOODCENTS DELI FRESH SUBS

8222 E. 103rd St. | Tulsa 918-364-7827 SEE AD | PAGE 78

HABANEROS MEXICAN GRILL

4640 S. Elm Place | Broken Arrow 918-940-7272 SEE AD | PAGE 35

IN THE RAW

3321 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-1300 6151 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-524-0063 216 S. Main St. | Broken Arrow 918-893-6111 SEE AD | PAGE 35

INCREDIBLE PIZZA

8314 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 539-302-2681 SEE AD | PAGE 3

JASON’S DELI

8321 E. 61st St. | Tulsa 918-252-9999 1330 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-599-7777 SEE AD | PAGE 73

JUNIPER

324 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa 918-794-1090 SEE AD | PAGE 7


RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER RB KIRIN

8041 S. Mingo Road | Tulsa 918-893-8006 SEE AD | PAGE 87

KITCH

377 E Main Street | Jenks 918-528-6766 SEE AD | PAGE 57

LOS CABOS

300 Riverwalk Terrace #100 | Jenks 918-298-2226 151 Bass Pro Drive | Broken Arrow 918-355-8877 9455 N. Owasso Expressway | Owasso 918-609-8671 SEE AD | PAGE 9

MCNELLIE’S PUB

409 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-7468 7031 S. Zurich Ave. | Tulsa 918-933-5250 SEE AD | PAGE 5

MEXICALI BORDER CAFÉ 14 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-582-3383 SEE AD | PAGE 65

MIAMI NIGHTS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

6510 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-835-4522 SEE AD | PAGE 78

MIXCO

3rd and Denver | Tulsa 918-932-8571

RICARDOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

5629 E. 41st St. | Tulsa 918-622-2668 SEE AD | PAGE 91

RINCON MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA

6219 E. 61st. St | Tulsa 918-340-5520 SEE AD | PAGE 87

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa SEE AD | PAGES 21, 100

5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR FIRESIDE GRILL

STEAK STUFFERS USA 7846 E. 51st. St. | Tulsa 918-743-7474 SEE AD | PAGE 91

SWEET BOUTIQUE

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St., #13 | Tulsa 918-900-2238 SEE AD | PAGE 18

TABLE 20

1927 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-986-9120 SEE AD | PAGE 78

TAVOLO

427 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa 918-949-4498 SEE AD | PAGE 7

SEE AD | PAGE 7

THE TAVERN

LOS MARIACHIS

2534 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-251-0370 11476 S. Union Ave. | Jenks 918-296-5352 SEE AD | PAGE 57

MARYN’S TAPHOUSE AND RAW BAR

400 Riverwalk Terrace, Suite 180 | Jenks 918-946-2796 SEE AD | PAGE 57

MCALISTER’S DELI

4951 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-392-3373 8102-B S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-392-3354 8955 S. Memorial Drive | Tulsa 918-392-0770

MOLLY’S LANDING

3700 N. Old Hwy 66 | Catoosa 918-266-7853

2330 SE Washington Blvd. | Bartlesville 918-333-6614

SEE AD | PAGE 5

MARGARITAVILLE

MONDO’S RISTORANTE ITALIAN

3410 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-561-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 91

OSAGE CASINO HOTEL 951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa 877-246-8777 SEE AD | PAGE 2

201 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-949-9801

LANDSHARK BAR

SEE AD | PAGE 67

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO

918-995-8080

6024 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-499-1919

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

918-995-8600

219 S. Cheyenne Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-5151

SCOREBOARD SPORTS BAR

WATERFRONT GRILL

TIKI DINER

SEE AD | PAGE 25

120 Aquarium Drive | Jenks 918-518-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 9

THUNDER BAR & GRILL

VISIONS BUFFET

YOKOZUNA

309 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-508-7676

N INE BAND BREWING CO. STONECREEK KITCHEN

720 N. Aspen | Broken Arrow 918-258-3354 8529 N. 129th E. Ave. | Owasso 918-376-9000

JOHNNY ROCKETS

RONI PEPPO’S

PRAIRIE BREWPUB

232 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-936-4395 SEE AD | PAGE 25

SEE AD | PAGE 35

PRHYME: DOWNTOWN STEAKHOUSE

111 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-794-7700

SISSEROU’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT 107 N. Boulder Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-6800 SEE AD | PAGE 65

SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL

9146 S. Yale, Ste. 100 | Tulsa 918-508-7676 SEE AD | PAGE 5

YUTAKA GRILL AND SUSHI BUFFET

6560 E. 51st St. | Tulsa 918-921-3400 SEE AD | PAGE 29

1542 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-949-4440 201 S. Main | Owasso 918-401-4343 SEE AD | PAGE 25

SEE AD | PAGE 7

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LP LAUNCH PAD

GOOD TO

Grow

THE GOAL OF MARKETING IS TO CONNECT YOUR BUSINESS’ VALUE TO THE RIGHT CUSTOMER BASE. IT MAY SEEM DAUNTING BUT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE HARD OR EXPENSIVE. By Michele Chiappetta

Keeping a small business solvent means more than doing work and getting paid; it also means finding new clients and bringing in leads. That requires marketing. But many small-business owners don’t know much about the art of getting their name out and finding the right customers. Even if they do, the average small business doesn’t have a huge budget to throw at billboards, TV ads, and other options. You have to promote the business somehow. But it’s not always easy to know which marketing method is most likely to get results. And how do you do it in a way that earns

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you a good return on your advertising dollars? That’s where someone like Matthew Maennche of Maennche Virtual CMO can help. Maennche came into marketing by a nontraditional route, using his background as a software developer initially to look at data and trends, and assist people with their websites. But the more he did so, the more he realized how many small businesses needed help with marketing. “For a small business, the moment you hang that, (We’re open) sign, you’re competing with everyone,” he says. In today’s

world, competitors can include anyone from anywhere — the mom-and-pop shop next door, a business in a neighboring state, even global companies doing what you do. “There’s a lot more competition, but small businesses often know the least about marketing because they’re new. So, I focus on helping small businesses understand how all the pieces fit together [ for effective marketing].” A firm believer that small businesses deserve the tools to succeed, Maennche teaches many continuing education classes each year, including how to market a business on a small budget. Here

are some of his tips for low-cost and no-cost actions a business can take to promote themselves and reach more customers.

DEVELOP A CLEAR STRATEGY Marketing is a scary area for most businesses. As a result, many business owners let it slide. That’s a mistake, says Maennche. “A solid marketing strategy is the difference between success and failure for a small business.”

KNOW YOUR IDEAL CLIENT Rather than work for anyone who will pay you, concentrate


on finding your “ideal clients” — the ones you are best suited to serve and who make you the most profit for the least effort. Ask yourself what type of customer would make your life great. That’s who you want to market to.

FOCUS ON YOUR CUSTOMER, NOT YOURSELF “The hardest thing for business owners to understand is that it’s not about them; it’s about their ideal client and what that client is looking for,” says Maennche. For marketing efforts that work, think about who your clients are, what they need, and where they spend their time. Put your marketing efforts there, and focus on helping them.

GET ON THE MAP Many customers search for businesses via online map applications, so it pays to make sure your business is listed correctly. “By far, the most costeffective tool for businesses today is to get registered on Google Maps,” says Maennche. “It’s free. You don’t have to buy their ads.” Bing and Apple also have maps, and your business should be listed on them as well.

DEVELOP AN EMAIL LIST If you’ve heard email is dead, you heard wrong. “People think email is an old-school way of thinking, but it’s still a preferred, cost-effective method for people to get information,” says Maennche. “Email marketing can be effective. Even though people may delete the email, they still saw the brand and the subject you wanted to communicate. They got the message.”

USE FREE ANALYTICS “Google Analytics is completely free and will give you insane amounts of information about the people who are coming

across your brand,” says Maennche. In addition to telling you how many people came to your site, it’ll break down how long they stayed, where they’re from, what percent are male versus female, phrases they used in Google search to find your business and more. If you don’t know how to use Google Analytics, you can learn, and it’s well worth the effort.

GET A MENTOR If you are looking for help learning about business, consider getting a mentor from SCORE, a nonprofit that connects volunteer mentors with small-business owners. SCORE also provides webinars each month, local workshops, on-demand online classes, and other learning opportunities. “I recommend people go to Tulsa’s SCORE website and request a mentor. There are over 50 mentors in Tulsa, all people who have grown and managed businesses, and it’s all free,” he says.

KNOW HOW TO LEVERAGE SOCIAL MEDIA It’s not enough to be on social media. You need an audience. And engaging that audience through comments, shares, and the like is essential to using social media in a way that boosts your business. For example, says Maennche, don’t just run a Facebook ad. Clearly define the audience for the ad, and study the insights to see how to finetune your approach to get more engagement.

STUDY There are many ways to learn more about marketing, and many of them have no cost — YouTube videos, SBA webinars, even articles like the ones on Maennche’s website are free and useful. Continuing education classes at local colleges are also a great option; while they’re not free, they’re usually quite affordable.

PREVIEW918.COM 73


HF HEALTH + FITNESS

Battle f the Bulge WHILE “FAT-BURNING FOOD” SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, YOU CAN ELEVATE YOUR WEIGHT LOSS GOALS BY INCORPORATING MORE FOOD THAT SPIKES METABOLISM, ENHANCES DIGESTION, AND HELPS YOU FEEL FULL. BY ASHTON GREER

EGGS Weight loss can start with shopping. And taking control of what you eat begins with taking control of what you buy. It takes dedication and motivation to shy away from those unhealthy and tasty snacks that are often loaded with sugar or fat, and are high in calories. You can increase your body’s fat-burning power by eating more foods that help your liver (your body’s main fat-metabolizing organ) to burn fat better, resulting in a leaner body. While it can be tempting at times to take the easy route by taking fat-burning supplements, it is important to note that there is little scientific evidence available that proves these effective. Why ingest a supplement when you can consume foods that not only help you lose fat but make you feel good and give you energy? Fresh and natural foods have so many benefits to our health, and one of the most important benefits, when it comes to burning all of that unwanted fat, is the ability to reduce inflammation among our bodies. And when you eat more nutritious foods that have the potential to fight fat, you do not have to restrict your intake as much and can eat throughout the day. Many foods help fight weight gain, but these are some of our picks.

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Get to cracking because eggs are a great way to start your day. Not only do they provide your body with high-quality protein that can increase metabolism, but they help increase satiety ( feelings of fullness) and reduce hunger. Studies show that when you consume a high-protein breakfast that includes eggs, a reduction in weight and belly fat can occur. Who knew that eggs could get rid of muffin tops. Plus, the yolk is a good source of iron, and it’s loaded with lecithin, critical for brain health.

AVOCADOS The cholesterol-lowering monounsaturated fat in these green health bombs can help keep your body strong and painfree. Sports-medicine researchers

found that competitive women runners who ate less than 20% fat were more likely to suffer injuries than those who consumed at least 31%. The problem is linked to extreme low-fat diets, which weaken muscles and joints. Yet a few slices of avocado a day are a great way to boost fat for the fat shy.

BANANAS Thanks to bananas’ high potassium content, peeling one is a speedy solution to that stitch in your side. While a lack of sodium is the main culprit behind muscle cramps, studies show potassium plays a supporting role. Bananas are also packed with energizing carbohydrates. One mediumsized fruit has 400 milligrams of potassium and as many carbs (29 grams) as two slices of wholewheat bread.

DARK LEAFY GREENS Dark leafy greens, such as kale, collard greens, Swiss chard, and spinach, are high in the antistress nutrient magnesium — stress has a direct connection to weight management— and add important fiber and nutrients for overall health, satiety, and fatburning capabilities. With lots of iron in these leaves to help carry oxygen throughout your body, you’ll be more efficient in your workouts and build muscle too. The more muscle you have, the more fat you burn at rest.

QUINOA The new alternative for carb cravings, quinoa is a whole grain food that contains nine amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein that have been shown to improve the synthesis of muscle and the reduction of fat when consumed in a diet. It is also very easy to cook and can become a part of your menu cycle for quick lunches and dinners. Just mix in vegetables and a lean protein for a quinoa bowl or even some fruits and nuts for a delicious and nutritious quinoa salad.


HEALTH + FITNESS HF GARLIC AND ONIONS This dynamic duo of foods contains phytochemicals that break down fatty deposits in the body, while also breaking down cholesterol. The pair also assists in killing viruses, bacteria, and fungi while protecting against heart disease.

FISH As weird as it may sound, eating fatty fish can help you cut out fat. The reason for this phenomenon is that fatty fishes contain omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids work in reducing the amount of LDL (bad cholesterol) that can build up in your bloodstream.

OATMEAL This filling fiber food also promotes the lowering of insulin levels, which researchers have speculated aids in shrinking all of those unwanted fat cells. To receive all of these healthful benefits, be sure to create your oatmeal with steel-cut oats and try to refrain from purchasing the sugary filled packs of oatmeal at the store. Instead, add cinnamon or nutmeg to trick your taste buds for a sweeter taste.

CARROTS Close your eyes, and they almost taste like crunchy candy. Carrots pack complex carbs that provide energy to muscles and potassium to control blood pressure and muscle contractions. And a half cup has just 35 calories.

NUTS Nuts are also good sources of those omega-3 fatty acids. The nuts that contain the highest amounts of fatty acids include walnuts, macadamia, pecans, cashews, pistachios, and

almonds. It is important to note that although nuts do contain health benefits, they also are high in calories. Therefore, limit your portions to about a small handful.

CHICKEN THIGHS Skimp on iron and zinc, and your energy wanes. We’re big on chicken breasts, but for energy, juicy chicken thighs or turkey drumsticks are the best way to get more of both. Dark-meat poultry is significantly lower in fat than red meat yet has all the iron, zinc, and B vitamins that many people need in their diets.

OLIVES AND OLIVE OIL Being rich in healthy fats, olives and olive oil help to reduce cravings for junky foods and keep you feeling full. Research shows that monosaturated fats that are plentiful in these foods also help reduce high blood pressure.

GROUND FLAXSEED These seeds and oil attract fat-soluble toxins that become lodged in the fatty tissues of the body. Once attracted, they help to escort toxins out. That spells fewer fat stores and a trimmer you. Flaxseed is full of fibers called lignans that promote gut health. Since flax lignans contain both soluble and insoluble fiber, they keep you regular as well.

GREEN TEA Green tea is truly one of the only natural fat-burning drinks available. It has a robust antioxidant profile. The high amount of EGCG — epigallocatechin gallate — triggers enzymes that get fat cells to release their stored fat and increase the amount of fat used for energy. Green tea also enhances the liver’s fat-burning capabilities and thermogenesis, a heat-producing process in the body.

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ET EATS + TREATS

by SARAH HERRERA photos by SARAH HERRERA

Slave to the Grind YOU MAY ALREADY DRINK MULTIPLE CUPS OF COFFEE A DAY, BUT WE'VE GOT IDEAS ON HOW YOU CAN GET YOUR JAVA FIX IN SNACK FORM, TOO.

The new year is upon us, and with it come those trusty resolutions. Whether you’re trying to lose a few pounds, build your own business, or make the most of every day, there always

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seems to be a never-ending need for more time and energy. Well, time is a little tricky, but energy is something we can help with. There seems to be a consensus

that coffee is the answer to the need for caffeine, but our energy solution doesn’t stop there. Our curated list of caffeinating remedies covers the gamut of tasty concoctions and

stimulating creations. Whether you like grab-and-go breakfasts, warm and cozy treats, or even just a classic cappuccino, we’ve got you and your caffeine needs covered.


EATS + TREATS ET

COFFEECAKE MINI DOUGHNUTS Adapted from BakerByNature.com What goes better with coffee than cake? These better-thanever coffeecake mini doughnuts are fluffy, crumbly, and unbelievably delicious. CRUMB TOPPING INGREDIENTS:  stick butter ¼ ¼ cup of sugar

 ½ Tbsp. flour 3 ¼ tsp. cinnamon

DOUGHNUTS INGREDIENTS:  cup flour 1 ½ cup light brown sugar ½ tsp. salt 1 tsp. baking powder

 cup full-fat sour cream ½ 2 ½ Tbsp. melted butter 1 large egg

VANILLA GLAZE INGREDIENTS:  cup powdered sugar ½ ½ Tbsp. whole milk

½ tsp. vanilla extract

DIRECTIONS:

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Spray pan (or doughnut maker) with nonstick spray. Set aside. 3. In a bowl, combine sugar, flour, cinnamon, and butter until resembling a coarse meal. Chill in the freezer while preparing the batter. 4. In a bowl, whisk together dry ingredients. 5. In a separate bowl, whisk together wet ingredients, then gently fold the wet mixture into the dry mixture. 6. Spoon or pipe the batter into the prepared doughnut pan (or maker). 7. Divide the crumb topping evenly among the doughnut tops. 8. Bake for 10-11 minutes in the oven. If cooking in a doughnut maker, follow the instruction manual. 9. Allow doughnuts to cool for a few minutes before transferring to a wire rack. 10. In a small bowl, whisk together the powdered sugar, milk, and vanilla. 11. Drizzle the mixture over the doughnuts and serve.

EASY AT-HOME CAPPUCCINO

COFFEE YOGURT PARFAIT

Are you always craving a quality cup of coffee but not always willing to pay for artisan java? You’re not alone, and you’re also not out of options.

Adapted from ClaudiaCanu.com If you’re craving a power snack packed with energy and plenty of flavors, this overnight parfait is for you. It’s easy, delicious, and thoroughly satisfying.

INGREDIENTS:  referred type of milk P Coffee or espresso Cinnamon (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

1. Measure out a 1:1 ratio of coffee to milk. 2. Using a blender, blend the milk for 20-30 seconds. 3. Pour the blended milk into a medium-heated pot for 1-2 minutes. 4. Pour the desired amount of coffee into a mug. 5. Pour the blended milk on top of the coffee. 6. Sprinkle with cinnamon if desired.

INGREDIENTS: 1∕3 cup of oats ½ Tbsp. chia seeds ¼ tsp. cinnamon ½ cup of coffee 4 Tbsp. yogurt Chocolate chips (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

1. Pour the oats into a bowl. Add chia seeds, cinnamon, and coffee. 2. Let it sit overnight in the fridge. 3. In the morning, add yogurt and chocolate chips if desired.

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, Bird s the

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When you’re hungry and need a treat, how can you possibly beat hot, juicy, crispy fried chicken matched with warm, golden waffles, drizzled with sweet maple syrup? And even if you could, do you really want to? There’s magic in the rich, fatty salt of fried chicken, tempered by the sugar of maple syrup and a crispy waffle. And there’s satisfaction in having breakfast and dinner at once—no matter the time of day. It’s a recipe that has stood the test of time, spread across the nation, and gotten only more appetizing. Tulsa’s passionate love affair with chicken and waffles has been going on for decades, and it’s here to stay. So many Green Country restaurants shamelessly offer this decadent Southern comfort dish on their regular menu, it’s hard to imagine not eating it daily. Of course, there are also local eateries that cleverly reserve chicken and waffles for their brunch menu on the weekends, perhaps to tempt us to come back week after week to get our fix. No matter how you look at it, though, restaurants in tune with Tulsa’s diners understand that most of us, when finding our beloved chicken and waffles on a menu, will order them time after time.

BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA AND ROB HARMON

It's a classic dilemma: savory or sweet? Fortunately, the inspired combination of fried chicken piled on top of waffles means there's no need to choose. 80 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

So, let us throw down a goodold-fashioned food challenge: How many different variations of chicken and waffles have you tried in our metropolis? We’re willing to bet you haven’t eaten them all. Sure, that may be good for your waistline. But what about your soul? You have to feed your soul. To help you eat your way around the 918, here are some of our favorite restaurants that continue to carry the torch for this sweet and savory meal. Some take the classic approach, others skew creative, but all do justice to this satisfying comfort food.


Dave & Buster's

Bread and Butter Kitchen + Bakery

6812 S. 105TH E. AVE. TULSA

3837 E. 51ST ST. TULSA

Serving both yummy comfort food and tasty, healthy options, this kitchen/bakery is surprisingly unique. From sweet to savory, these people know what they’re doing, putting it mildly. You will be amazed by the size of their brunch-time chicken and waffles. A mound of five plump and tender pieces of hand-battered fried chicken sits atop one of the sweetest and most flavorful waffles you’ll ever have. Savor the moment as you pour on the restaurant’s delicious maple syrup. You’ll nearly have an out of body brunch experience.

Caz's Chowhouse 18 E. M.B. BRADY ST. TULSA

If you’ve never been to this Tulsa Arts District haven of comfort food, do not hesitate to check it out soon. Whatever you order from the menu, expect to be made to feel at home. Jeff Castleberry and his Chowhouse crew make one of the tastiest chicken and waffle dishes you’ll ever have the pleasure to enjoy. A mouth-watering Belgian waffle with crispy chicken tenders on top, drizzled with syrup from Caz’s is hard to beat. With a side of the kitchen’s delicious black-eyed peas, this meal is sure to be etched into your food memory banks.

Whether you’re looking to find food, drinks, games, sports watching, parties, or a place to house an event, you’ll get all of these and more, done right at Dave and Buster’s. For example, have you ever had a chicken and waffle slider? No? Get ready. They’re fantastic, and it’s nearly impossible not to order a second batch. These crispy chicken tenders, lavishly covered with their smoky, sweet-heat sauce and smoked bacon, all stuffed into mini Belgian waffles for buns, are so, so tasty. Blame us if you have to, but they may just become your favorite sinful indulgence.

Fassler Hall 304 S. ELGIN AVE. TULSA

Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., a trip to downtown Tulsa’s Fassler Hall is one of the best moves you can make for your weekend brunch get-together. If you’ve been there before, you know what we’re talking about. The restaurant’s friendly staff knows how to keep that weekend vibe going with a smile and an order of no-nonsense chicken and waffles. Creamy butter and rich-flavored syrup cover a nice thin layer of pan-fried chicken laying perfectly on top of a spectacular golden waffle. Ask for their raspberry preserves to go along with your Belgian beauty, and you’ll understand the lifechanging experience so many Tulsans before you have had.

Dilly Diner 402 E. 2ND ST. TULSA

Tulsa has some cool places to sit down and eat. Some are cooler than others. Some are the coolest. Dilly Diner fits into that last category without a doubt with killer food, exceptional waitstaff, and a great atmosphere. One of the dishes that regulars like to order every time they visit this outstanding diner is the chicken and waffle. Surely a rival to any version you might have enjoyed in a 1930s Harlem jazz club, this sweet and savory dish will knock you off your keister. Oh, and while you satisfy your sweet tooth, you might as well get a to-go order of the Jed, Dilly’s gigantic cinnamon roll.

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MAD Eats 201 S. MAIN ST. OWASSO

If you’re looking for the modern American diner experience north of Tulsa, Owasso’s MAD Eats is the place to go. Every day of the week, you can experience their allday brunch. With love for comfort food, they’ve got plenty of options you’ll enjoy. But if you want a unique chicken and waffle experience, one you’ve never even thought of, MAD Eats has it. The chicken and waffle benedict is crazy good. Juicy and plump fried chicken breast and over-easy eggs sit atop a marvelous Belgian waffle. Lavishly poured on top of everything is a perfectly concocted maple hollandaise sauce that is seriously out of this world. With a side of yummy hash browns, it’s insane how tasty it is.

McNellie's Pub 409 E. 1ST ST. TULSA

7031 S. ZURICH AVE. TULSA

If there’s any doubt that McNellie’s chicken and waffles would be as good as the rest of their sensational menu items, let’s dispel that notion. There’s nothing McNellie’s does that isn’t done with great attention to detail and a sincere sense of consistency, and that includes their brunch-time menu. Enjoy two perfectly fried chicken tenders, alongside a melt-in-yourmouth waffle, and two eggs, drizzled with their sweet, sweet syrup. It’s as classic as they come. You’ll find yourself having a hard time ordering anything else on your next visit.

New Era Fine Fermentations 321 S. FRANKFORT AVE., STE. 2 TULSA

Nola's Creole and Cocktails

One of Tulsa’s hippest and newest microbreweries, New Era Fine Fermentations, is an award-winning brewpub, serving naturally gluten-free beer with a smile and a twinkle in their eye. With all sorts of events and happenings at this Blue Dome/East Village favorite, there’s never a dull moment. Don’t think that because of NEFF’s superb attention to craft beer that the food is an afterthought. Not so. The menu is full of weekday specials. Leading the way on their tasty brunch menu is, of course, their fantastic chicken and waffles. This lip-smacking, buttermilk-battered fried chicken, on top of a made-in-house waffle, is unquestionably worth the visit.

1334 E. 15TH ST. TULSA

A Prohibition-style, craft cocktail bar with a New Orleans feel to it, this restaurant is fabulous, or should we say, ‘fantastik’? Serving up extraordinary Creole food and an atmosphere like no other place in town, this Cherry Street hot spot is special. Try the Voodoo Chicken and Waffles off the brunch menu, and your taste buds will think Mardi Gras has started early. To begin with, the Belgian waffle is already yummy enough by itself. Then it’s topped with some of the juiciest Cajun-fried chicken breast you’ll ever have. Plus, they top the whole thing off with a shrimp and jumbo lump crab concoction doused in spicy Mornay sauce that you can’t help but spoon into your mouth uncontrollably.

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Prospect Local Bar and Kitchen HOTEL INDIGO 121 S. ELGIN AVE. TULSA

This American-themed restaurant inside one of Tulsa’s coolest hotels, Hotel Indigo Downtown Tulsa, goes above and beyond to make the guest experience one worth remembering. The food is consistently good, and the waitstaff is exceptionally friendly. Although a lot of visitors to the hotel will mention the rooftop view as a highlight of their stay, the restaurant is sure to be right up there with it. Ask for their chicken and waffle dish. You’ll be pleasantly surprised to see it presented in sandwich form. You’ll enjoy a generous portion of delicious chicken breast, inside two waffles cut in half, with bacon on the outside, and either fresh fruit or home fries.


Also Check Out

R Bar & Grill 3421 S. PEORIA AVE. TULSA

With a brunch menu that can change from week to week, R Bar keeps things interesting for those Friday and Saturday night carousers looking to find something amazing to eat the next day. However, one of the staples of their weekend menu is chicken and waffles. Starting from top to bottom, sprinkled candied nuts swim in a warm bath of maple-vanilla syrup and blueberry reduction sauce, which perfectly covers sliced bacon and tender, juicy chicken breast, set on top of a fluffy Belgian waffle.

Cafe Virgil 126 MOHAWK BLVD. | TULSA

IHOP 3130 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | TULSA

Shuffles: Board Game Cafe 207 E. ARCHER ST., UNIT E TULSA

Order chicken and waffles anytime from this Tulsa Arts District destination, and you will add deliciousness to an already fantastic date night or hang-out experience. Not too many places will serve you these amazing cheddar and sage waffles. Add to that crispy chicken tenders piled high, served with thick bacon and delicious maple mustard, and you’ll wonder why you’ve never tried it before. Shuffles has been rocking and rolling since it opened last year. Choose karaoke Thursday night, Tuesday trivia night, after a jaunt through First Friday Art Crawl, or any other time you want to play the latest board games. Every night here is game night — with a side of chicken and waffles.

11020 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA 7123 S. LEWIS AVE. | TULSA 8222 E. 103RD ST., STE. 100 | TULSA 1901 E. HILLSIDE DRIVE | BROKEN ARROW 2020 S. CHEROKEE ST. | CATOOSA 12101 S. WACO AVE. | SAPULPA 9005 N. 121ST E. AVE. | OWASSO 101 S. HWY. 97 | SAND SPRINGS 1600 N. 32ND ST. | MUSKOGEE

Napa Flats Wood-Fired Kitchen 9912 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA

Silver Skillet Family Diner 8228 E. 61ST ST., STE. 114 | TULSA

Slim Chickens 1100 E. HILLSIDE DRIVE | BROKEN ARROW 8712 N. GARNETT ROAD | OWASSO

Tally's Good Food Cafe 1102 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA

The Vault 620 S. CINCINNATI AVE. | TULSA

Twin Peaks 7007 S. MEMORIAL DR. | TULSA

Waterfront Grill 120 AQUARIUM DRIVE | JENKS

SMOKE. Woodfire Grill 1542 E. 15TH ST. TULSA

201 S. MAIN ST. OWASSO

After a special late night out on a Friday or Saturday, SMOKE. Woodfire Grill is a great place to reset the morning after. You can always depend on their excellent food, friendly and helpful staff, and a comfortable and stylish atmosphere. Brunch on Cherry Street or in Owasso is a weekend crowd favorite, and it’s hard to imagine brunching at SMOKE. without their mouth-watering chicken and waffles as a top option. You’re likely to enjoy the aroma of your meal just before you receive it, as you’ll experience with most meals at SMOKE. Enjoy their classic Belgian waffles with melt in your mouth chicken, along with a choice of either sweet maple syrup, sausage gravy, or both.

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Cherry Street is one of the most delightful parts of Tulsa, with loads of local flavor and culture. Anchoring the Cherry Street District is SMOKE. Woodfire Grill, with its take on American cuisine, its intimate dining in a building of glass and exposed brick, and hermetically-sealed cigar lounge.

A great restaurant is all about balance. Appetizers and desserts. Steak and potatoes. Fish and veggies. SMOKE. Woodfire Grill nails the “and” by artfully bringing together all the elements for the perfect experience. By Donna Leahey Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

lot of business people, and the hotels recommend us. People come in for a steak, a drink, and a cigar. Here, we see a lot more families. I think we’re finding the sweet spot for the demographic in Owasso.” SMOKE. takes its name from the woodfire grill and the wood smoker used to make their bacon. That woody,

However, what if you take a little piece of Cherry Street and transplant it into Owasso? You get a bit of that midtown flair, finding its place in the culture of the revitalized Main Street area of Owasso. “Just like SMOKE. anchored Cherry Street, SMOKE. is the cornerstone of the Redbud District in Owasso,” says Erik Reynolds, who owns SMOKE. Woodfire Grill, along with his wife, Stephanie, and partners Tommy, Kari, Ken, and Brenda Coulter. “It’s our anniversary in Owasso, and the area is starting to build up.” Owasso’s SMOKE. is part of the SEVEN6MAIN project on Main Street, which also includes MAD Eats, commercial spaces, and upscale apartments as well.

10 Ounce Top Sirloin

“We wanted to recreate SMOKE. when we identified Owasso as a location,” says Reynolds. “We recreated the archways and found reclaimed brick.” It has the same aesthetic, dark wood, and exposed brick and ducts, giving the space an industrial feel. Rather than intimate, however, Owasso’s SMOKE. is airy and spacious. High ceilings and an open floor plan make it feel roomy and comfortable. The flex room in the main dining area can be closed off for private parties. “The flex room is a great room, especially during the party season,” says Reynolds. Natural light pouring through the windows warms the space. An enormous buck mount with an impressive 12-point rack gazes over the area. “The demographic is different here,” says Reynolds. “Cherry Street has a

smoky flavor kisses all the proteins during their time over the flame. But what makes SMOKE. unique? “Me,” says Reynolds. “I keep everything changing. I never stay with one thing. I like to keep our menu rotating and interesting. We have a new menu every six months at both restaurants.”

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Reynolds’ skill with steak is impressive, and you can’t go wrong with any of the selections on his menu. The sirloin is a solid choice, beautifully cooked with grill marks so perfect and pretty they make your mouth water. With a dollop of butter on top and seasonal veggies, it’s a beefy, smoky treat. The 18-ounce rib-eye is seriously hefty, exuding as much flavor and attention-grabbing presence as it’s brought to your table. The pork chop is another can’t-gowrong choice. For a Cajun twist, consider the shrimp and grits: tender, plump shrimp in a flavorful glaze, on a bed of creamy, buttery grits.

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On the weekends, be sure to add brunch at SMOKE. to your plans. It’s an indulgence you won’t regret. Check out the brioche bread pudding French toast for a sweet start to your weekend, or the 8-ounce coulotte steak and eggs for a heartier start. You can grab a burger if you’re not in the mood for breakfast or a sausage scramble with cheddar and served over a biscuit and topped with sausage gravy. You can also enjoy a mimosa or a bloody mary. Stop by for happy hour Monday through Friday from 3-6 p.m. and enjoy $4 martinis, $4 glasses of wine, and halfprice apps.

Monday-Thursday: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 4-10 p.m. Sunday: 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 4-9 p.m.

SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL 1542 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-949-4440

smokewoodfiregrill.com

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With that choice out of the way, you’re faced with an even more difficult decision. The main entrées are simple

201 S. Main | Owasso 918-401-4343

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The list of starters is intriguing, full of choices like crispy quail legs or bacon jam. There’s not a wrong choice but consider the charcuterie board. It’s an artistic arrangement of cheeses, meats, almonds, and fruit. Enjoy a bite of meat and cheese on a bread round, then nibble a bit of fruit, and go back for a different cheese. It’s elegant and beautiful and a fantastic start to your meal. Or consider the fried cauliflower. A bowl full of perfectly tender and crispy fried cauliflower, drizzled with a sweet and tart Korean-inspired sauce.

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The menu is compact but loaded with urban goodness. And Reynolds’ affection for thoughtful recipes is also seen in the appetizers.

Most great restaurants are best represented by their side dishes, and SMOKE. doesn’t disappoint. Brussels sprouts are fried and served with bacon, feta, and a smoked tomato vinaigrette, while the bacon-braised collard greens are a terrific complement to any cut of beef. On the starch side, the fries are a fixture, while Yukon gold mashed potatoes and potato croquettes are mustn’t-miss options.

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Fish lovers have plenty to choose from as well. Picture-perfect highlights include lemon and herb stuffed rainbow trout served with Brussels sprout hash, and salmon with a spring pea puree, wood-grilled broccoli, and chicharrón.

Shrimp and Grits

Bone-In Pork Loin Chop

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The butcher block is more than enough food for two people. It includes an 18-ounce rib-eye, a six-ounce salmon fillet, 12-ounce bone-in pork chop, andouille sausage, horseradish and cheddar croquette, and veggies. It’s served with three sauces: béarnaise, chimichurri, and demi-glace. SMOKE. serves this prodigious meal on a big board in the middle of the table. “It creates conversation and interaction,” says Reynolds.

and straightforward, but with inventive variations that might not be obvious at first glance. Steaks, specialty dishes, soups, salads, and seasonal dishes, each sounds more delicious than the next.

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If you want a decadent meal and a way to feel good about it, try the butcher block. “We donate a portion of each butcher block to local charities, like the Little Lighthouse and the Pride of Owasso marching band,” says Reynolds. “The band goes to the Rose Parade [Pasadena, California] every four years, and we’re donating to help that.”

Monday-Friday: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 4-10 p.m. Sunday: 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 4-9 p.m.


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FRESH SAVANNAH CHOPPED SALAD

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THE MCALISTER’S CLUB

The Germans might have invented the delicatessen, but McAlister’s Deli has made the concept its own with sandwiches and wraps overstuffed with choice cuts, iconic ice tea, next-level spuds, and a brookie. By Donna Leahey Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts Something amazing happened in Oklahoma some 30 years ago. A restaurant opened in Owasso that offered food made fresh to order with less processed ingredients than fast food places but without the price tag of a more formal restaurant. The menu included sandwiches made by hand, salads chock full of fresh ingredients, giant loaded potatoes, and hearty, delicious soups. Since that first McAlister’s Deli opened in Owasso, Green Country has welcomed five additional locations — three in Tulsa, one in Broken Arrow, and one in Bartlesville. At all six locations, you can count on a great meal in a family-friendly atmosphere. McAlister’s Delis are bright and open spaces with homey details and family seating. The design is flooded with natural light from the copious windows.

it’s in the dedication to flavorful, fresh, madeto-order food. “We do fresh prep every day,” says Martinez. It’s a commitment that shows in the fresh taste of everything McAlister’s Deli serves. Of course, McAlister’s is famous for its sweet ice tea. “We have some people who stop by two to four times a day just to refill their tea,” says Martinez. McAlister’s tea is a special blend from Lipton made just for McAlister’s. “We brew it at a secret temperature. Then we mix in the sugar, and it caramelizes.” One of the ways McAlister’s makes it easy for families to enjoy eating out is with their kids’ meals. Choices range from mac and cheese and French bread pizza to a toasted cheese sandwich and garden salad. Just like the adult meals, they’re customizable and made fresh to order. Whichever your child chooses, it’s $0.99 when you dine in, making it not just delicious but affordable to take the whole family out. McAlister’s Deli has a dizzying array of sandwich options helpfully divided into categories: Clubs, Fresh Favorites, Savory and Spicy, Craveable Classics, and Big and Bold.

Bobby Martinez is the general manager of the McAlister’s Deli at 21st Street and Yale Avenue. He’s been with the company for 11 years and worked his way up the ladder and through most of the stores in the Tulsa area. “We’re a family-based restaurant,” he says. “Come here and eat with the family. ‘People first” is one of our mottos.”

Martinez says the McAlister’s Club is one of the top-selling options. It’s beautifully layered with smoked turkey, Black Forest ham, bacon, sharp cheddar and Swiss on wheat. When you bite into it, you’re struck by the crispy bread and savory meat and cheese flavors, but there’s a surprising hint of sweetness that comes from McAlister’s sweet and tangy honey mustard. Or for a unique option, try the orange cranberry club, which replaces the honey mustard with a bright and fresh orange cranberry sauce.

That motto shows in everything McAlister’s Deli does. It’s not just in the friendly customer service;

Another popular sandwich choice can be found under the Savory and Spicy category. The smoky

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Monday-Sunday: 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m.

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MCALISTER’S DELI

MCALISTER’S DELI

8529 N. 129th E. Ave. Owasso 918-376-9000

8102-B S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-392-3354 mcalistersdeli.com

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MCALISTER’S DELI

MCALISTER’S DELI

2330 S. E. Washington Blvd. Bartlesville 918-333-6614

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What if you don’t have to feed a family, but you do have to feed an office? “We do lots of catering,” says Martinez. “It’s a daily thing for us. We have lots of corporate accounts.” You don’t have to have a conference room full of executives to take advantage of McAlister’s catering. You can order sandwich boxes, wrap boxes, dessert trays, and gallon jugs of that famous tea, sweet and tangy lemonade, or breakfast beverages like coffee and orange juice.

720 N. Aspen Broken Arrow 918-258-3354

4951 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-392-3373

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When you’re done with your meal, McAlister’s has freshly baked cookies, brownies, and brookies. The brookie is a rich, chocolatey, fudgy brownie topped with a layer of chocolate chip cookie. The textures and flavors blend into a sweet and chocolaty whole that makes you wonder why you ever ate just a brownie or a cookie when you could have been having both.

MCALISTER’S DELI

MCALISTER’S DELI

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Ranging from a tomato bisque to rich and meaty chili, McAlister’s has the goods when it comes to soups. Their roasted mushroom is a creamy, savory delight, while the broccoli cheddar is cheesy and loaded with chunks of broccoli.

CHICKEN BERRY SALAD

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pepper jack turkey sandwich is a peppery smoked turkey festival of a sandwich served on toasted ciabatta bread. The savory bacon and a swish of that honey mustard round out this party perfectly. McAlister’s spuds aren’t just big; they’re giant. And once they’re split open and loaded with toppings, they’re enough hearty comfort food for anyone. You can get your spud covered in Angus beef and cheddar cheese, or grilled chicken, bacon, and pepper jack with a flavorful chipotle ranch. The Spud Max is loaded with ham, turkey, bacon, cheddar-jack, green onion, black olives, and sour cream.

sweet tea

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Chicken Cordon Bleu and Roasted Mushroom Soup

Monday-Sunday: 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m.


Where the locals have been going since 1975!

Daily ls Lunch Specia am 11 at Open Saturday Monday thru ay Closed Sund

918.622.2668

www.ricardostulsa.com 5629 E. 41st • Tulsa, OK PREVIEW918.COM 91


GK GETTING TO KNOW

RECLAIME

VENITA COOPER

Vinita Cooper has taken her growing love and appreciation of Tulsa’s Greenwood District, along with her energetic love of retro sneakers, and fanned it into a passionate endeavor. Back in 2015, a Vanity Fair article referred to the seven most museum-worthy sneakers in the world. Among them, they described the 1997 Reebok x Chanel Insta Pump Fury as a shoe of mythical proportions, the original 1985 Air Jordan as “the watershed moment of sneaker culture,” and the 2005 Nike SB Pigeon Dunk as “riot inducing” because of the pandemonium that ensued upon its release among sneakerheads, many of whom had camped out three or more days ahead of time to get their hands on the shoe.

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Many Tulsans can probably recall when those shoes, and so many other coveted designs,


GETTING TO KNOW GK

ED RENEGADE “I don’t pretend to be an expert on Black Wall Street and the history of Greenwood,” says Cooper. “Every day, I learn something new from the people whose families have endured the repercussions of what happened. People teach me new things every day, which is one of the things I love about being in this space.”

their passions, even going beyond what she’s done. “A lot of my peers who don’t have entrepreneurship in their background, like myself, hopefully will be impacted by the lessons I’ve learned about trying to create a business,” she says.

Sneakers can be a way for some people to find community, Cooper says. A cool pair of kicks can help someone connect with others and express themselves in a way that they otherwise couldn’t. “I have a love for beautiful things, for unique things,” Cooper says. “I’ve always been into sneakers for as long as I can remember. People respect anyone wearing a really dope pair of sneakers.”

Cooper has taken her growing love and appreciation of the area, along with her energetic love of sneakers, and fanned it into a passion. Through multiple community partnerships like the Tulsa Economic Development Corporation, Black Upstart, and the Tulsa Startup Series, in which she won the grand prize of $15,000, Cooper is taking advantage of the opportunities given her and passing it on. Collaboration and an openness to learning from others are what Cooper sees as one of the keys to her ongoing success. Teaming up over the holidays with Disrupt Tulsa, a north Tulsa youth art alliance project, the boutique worked with young artists to create additional streetwear to go along with the boutique’s already fresh inventory of designed shirts and other apparel designed by local artist, Trey Thaxton.

Located in the historic Archer building, in the heart of the Greenwood District in downtown Tulsa, Cooper designed the rear of the store

Cooper sees her experiences so far as a business owner as an opportunity to give back and inspire others to go on and follow

SILHOUETTE SNEAKERS AND ART 10 N. Greenwood Ave., Ste. C Tulsa 918-732-9166 silhouettetulsa.com

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Starting with an opening night in conjunction with the Tulsa Arts District in November 2019, news of the shop has been steadily growing. Even Tulsa mayor G.T. Bynum snatched up a pair of Air Jordan Retro Royals and was seen on social media, wearing them in various locations around town, including during the usually very formal setting of his annual state of the city address.

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One century after the original Converse All Star sneaker broke onto the scene, Tulsan Venita Cooper is running her resale sneaker shop called Silhouette Sneakers & Art. Cooper proudly displays an inventory of some of the coolest sneaker designs ever made on a sleek shelf system on one side of the shop and local art gallery currently featuring art from the Black Moon Collective on the opposite wall. A passionate belief in herself and her concept, as well as the entrepreneurial spirit of Black Wall Street, is what Cooper says fuels this endeavor.

with brick that symbolizes those used during the height of Black Wall Street before the Tulsa Race Massacre. Seeing it as an honor to be in the building and in an area where so many great businesses run by people of color have gone before her, she is stoked to be a part of the revitalization of the historic area.

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were released. They can talk about where they were on the day those shoes began selling. They even remember precisely how much they paid for them. More importantly, and this is the kicker (pun intended), they know about how much they are worth today on the resale market. Many of those same people have bought and resold so many shoes, it’s staggering. They’re a part of a phenomenon that some are still calling a sneaker subculture. But when a subculture industry reaches nearly $2 billion a year and is projected to become a $6 billion market in another five years, how can it still be considered subculture?

Monday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday: Closed

PREVIEW918.COM 93


SL SHELF LIFE

NONFICTION/MEMOIR

LITERARY / CONTEMPORARY

MYSTERY, THRILLER AND SUSPENSE

ROMANCE/WOMEN’S FICTION

JAN. 7

JAN. 7

JAN. 28 JAN. 21

ANIMALKIND

BY INGRID NEWKIRK AND GENE STONE

Studies show that animals are astounding beings with intelligence, emotions, intricate communications networks, and myriad abilities. In Animalkind, Newkirk and Stone present these findings in a concise and awe-inspiring way, detailing a range of surprising discoveries such as geese fall in love and stay with a partner for life, that fish “sing” underwater, and that elephants use their trunks to send subsonic signals. The authors show readers what they can do in their everyday lives to ensure that the animal world is protected from needless harm.

RUN ME TO EARTH

ALMOST JUST FRIENDS

Three orphans united by devastating loss must do what is necessary to survive the dangerous landscape of 1960s Laos. Then they meet Vang, a doctor dedicated to helping the wounded at all costs. Soon, the teens are serving as motorcycle couriers, navigating their bikes across fields filled with unexploded bombs. When Vang secures their evacuation on the last helicopters leaving the country, it’s a move with irrevocable consequences — and sets them on disparate and treacherous paths across the world.

Piper Manning is fixing up the lake house that her grandparents left her so she can sell it and move on. When a massive storm hits, she runs into a tall, dark, and brooding stranger, Camden Reid. There’s a spark there, one that shocks her. Surprising her further, her siblings arrive, each having secrets. When the secrets come out, it changes everything Piper thinks she knows about her family, herself, and Cam.

BY PAUL YOON

BY JILL SHALVIS

ALSO LOOK FOR:

HUNTER KILLER BY BRAD TAYLOR

While Pike Logan and Jennifer Cahill prepare to join their team on a counterterrorist mission in the triple frontier — the lawless tri-border region where Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay meet — they are targeted in Charleston, South Carolina. A vicious explosion kills a friend, and the perpetrators have set it up to look like an accident. While the authorities believe this was not foul play, Pike knows the attack was meant for him. ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

RECIPE FOR A PERFECT WIFE BY KARMA BROWN

THE MAKING OF A MIRACLE BY MIKE ERUZIONE AND NEAL BOUDETTE

SUCCESSFUL AGING BY DANIEL J. LEVITIN JAN. 7

Sixty-plus years is a unique JAN. 28 developmental stage On the 40th that, like infancy or anniversary of the adolescence, has historic “Miracle its demands and on Ice,” Eruzione distinct advantages. recounts his Levitin reveals amazing career resilience strategies on the ice, the and practical, legendary upset cognitive-enhancing against the Soviets, tricks everyone and winning the should do as gold medal. they age.

94 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

AMERICAN DIRT BY JEANINE CUMMINS JAN. 21

Lydia runs a bookstore in Acapulco, where she lives comfortably with her son and husband. But when Lydia’s husband publishes a tell-all profile of a local drug lord, none of their lives will ever be the same. Forced to flee, Lydia and her son ride trains that make their way north toward the United States.

A LONG PETAL OF THE SEA BY ISABEL ALLENDE JAN. 21

In the late 1930s, Civil War grips Spain. Hundreds of thousands are forced to flee in a treacherous journey over the mountains to the French border. Among them is Roser, a pregnant young widow, who finds her life intertwined with that of Victor Dalmau, an army doctor and the brother of her deceased love.

JAN. 21

A modern-day woman finds inspiration in hidden notes left by her home’s previous owner, a quintessential 1950s housewife. As she discovers remarkable parallels between this woman’s life and her own, it causes her to question the foundation of her relationship with her husband, and what it means to be a wife fighting for her place in a patriarchal society.

ST. FRANCIS SOCIETY FOR WAYWARD PETS BY ANNIE ENGLAND NOBLIN JAN. 14

When Maeve learns her birth mother has left her a house, a vintage V.W. Beetle, and a marauding cat in the small town of Timber Creek, Washington, she packs up to discover the truth about her past. If Maeve is going to make Timber Creek her home, she must figure out where she fits in.

WHEN YOU SEE ME BY LISA GARDNER JAN. 28

F.B.I. special agent Kimberly Quincy and sergeant detective D. D. Warren are following digital bread crumbs left behind by deceased serial kidnapper, Jacob Ness. When a disturbing piece of evidence is discovered, they bring Flora Dane and true-crime savant Keith Edgar to a small town where something seems deeply wrong.

THE WILD ONE BY NICK PETRIE JAN. 14

War veteran Peter Ash has no intention of getting on an airplane until a grieving woman asks him to find her 8-year-old grandson, who’s been kidnapped to Iceland. Finding the boy becomes more complicated when it becomes clear Ash is not welcome in Iceland.


SHELF LIFE SL

SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY AND HORROR

JAN. 7

SELF-HELP AND INSPIRATIONAL

YOUNG ADULT AND MIDDLE GRADE

CHILDREN

JAN. 21 JAN. 14

JAN. 7

TAKING CARE OF MOM BY MERCER MAYER

THE GOD GAME BY DANNY TOBEY

Charlie and his friends enter the G.O.D. Game, a video game run by underground hackers and controlled by a mysterious A.I. that believes it is God. When they accomplish a mission, the game rewards them with expensive tech, revenge on high-school tormentors, and cash flowing from A.T.M.s. As Charlie and his friends try to find a way out of the game, they realize they’ve been manipulated into a more significant web they can’t escape. ALSO LOOK FOR:

THE CALLING: 3 FUNDAMENTAL SHIFTS TO STAY TRUE, GET PAID, AND DO GOOD BY RHA GODDESS

We all have a calling. For most, it’s the thing you have to force yourself not to do. When you try to ignore it, you can’t stop thinking about it. It is the thing that both terrifies you and brings you the most joy. Already living yours? Fundamental shifts such as being aware, accepting responsibility, forgiving yourself and others, and more will help you stay true, get paid, and do good.

THE THIEF KNOT BY KATE MILFORD

Marzana and her best friend are bored. Even though they live in a notorious city where standard rules do not apply, nothing exciting ever happens. That is, until Marzana’s parents are recruited to help solve an odd crime, and she realizes this could be the excitement she’s been waiting for.

Little Critter and his sister decide to help out around the house when mom gets sick. Before long, they learn how hard her job is. Children ages 2 to 5 will enjoy this humorous full-color Little Golden Book.

ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

PEEK-A-BOO LITTLE CHICK BY YU-HSUAN HUANG

ALSO LOOK FOR:

JAN. 28

ONE OF US IS NEXT BY KAREN M. MCMANUS BURN THE DARK BY S. A. HUNT JAN. 14

Robin is a YouTube celebrity gone-viral with her intenselyrealistic witch hunter series. But even her millions of followers don’t know the truth: her series isn’t fiction. Her ultimate goal is to seek revenge against the coven of witches that wronged her mother.

THE BARD’S BLADE BY BRIAN D. ANDERSON JAN. 28

Mariyah enjoys a simple life in Vylari as a renowned winemaker. Her betrothed, Lem, is a musician of rare talent. Whatever life brings, they will face it together. Then a stranger crosses the wards into Vylari for the first time in centuries, bringing a dark prophecy that forces Lem and Mariyah down separate paths.

JAN. 7

YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL BY ROMI NEUSTADT JAN. 14

Mom, wife, daughter, author, speaker, entrepreneur, and coach, Romi Neustadt has figured out the key to having it all: priorities. Her blueprint helps women figure out what to focus on and what not to. The key to achieving your wildest dreams isn’t to downsize them.

NEW RULES OF DIVORCE BY JACQUELINE NEWMAN JAN. 7

Just as the entire landscape of marriage and family has evolved, so too has divorce. Divorce lawyer Newman has seen it all. From a couple fighting over iguana custody to prenuptial agreements featuring cryptocurrency, nothing shocks her.

Truth or dare. Phoebe’s the first target. If you choose not to play, it’s a truth. And hers is dark. Then comes Maeve, and she should know better — always select the dare. But by the time Knox is about to be tagged, things have gotten dangerous. The dares have become deadly.

THIS LIGHT BETWEEN US BY ANDREW FUKUDA JAN. 7

In 1935, 10-yearold Alex Maki from Washington becomes pen pals with Charlie Lévy of France. Their letters continue to fly across the Atlantic, and along with them, the shared hopes of friendship until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the growing Nazi persecution of Jews force them to confront the darkest aspects of human nature.

GET OUT AND PLAY BY JOHN CENA

A little chick is looking for mama. This sweet peek-aboo book with felt flaps throughout will have young readers looking under the soft, easy-to-lift flaps to help the little chick find its mama.

JAN. 7

Elbow Grease loves to race, splash and play with his four monster truck brothers: Tank, Flash, Pinball, and Crash. The brothers enjoy a play day in this Step 1 reader based on John Cena’s Elbow Grease picture book series.

Release dates are subject to change.

PREVIEW918.COM 95


LOCATOR

S SHOWTIME

ADMIRAL TWIN DRIVE-IN 7355 E. Easton St. Tulsa | 918.878.8099 AMC SOUTHROADS 20 4923 E. 41st St. Tulsa | 888.AMC.4FUN B&B CLAREMORE 8 1407 W. Country Club Claremore | 918.342.2422

THE INFORMER JAN. 10

OPENS

JAN. 3

An ex-convict working undercover intentionally gets himself incarcerated again to infiltrate the mob at a maximum-security prison. CAST: JOEL KINNAMAN, ROSAMUND PIKE, CLIVE OWEN RATING: NR

LIKE A BOSS

JAN. 10

Two female friends with very different ideals decide to start a beauty company together. One is more practical, while the other wants to earn her fortune and live a lavish lifestyle. Things take a turn for the worse when their benefactor starts stealing from them.

THE GRUDGE JAN. 3

A single mother and young detective discover that a suburban house is cursed by a vengeful ghost that dooms those who enter it with a violent death. Now, she runs to save herself and her son from demonic spirits from the cursed house in her neighborhood.

JAN. 10

CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. Tulsa | 918.592.3456

CAST: TIFFANY HADDISH, ROSE BYRNE, SALMA HAYEK RATING: NR

THE LAST FULL MEASURE

JAN. 17

Fifty-three years after his death, Airman William H. Pitsenbarger, Jr. (“Pits”) is awarded the nation’s highest military honor for his actions on the battlefield.

CAST: DAVE BAUTISTA, KRISTEN SCHAAL, PARISA FITZ-HENLEY RATING: PG-13

OPENS

JAN. 10

UNDERWATER

BAD BOYS FOR LIFE

A crew of aquatic researchers works to get to safety after an earthquake devastates their subterranean laboratory. But the crew has more than the ocean seabed to fear.

The once inseparable duo of Marcus Burnett and Mike Lowery is coming apart: an aging Burnett has become a police inspector while Lowery, suffering a midlife crisis, is assigned to head up AMMO, a “young guns” group of millennial cops with whom he has nothing in common. Both of them reunite once again when a fierce Romanian mob boss, whose brother they defeated years earlier, exacts retaliation on Mike just as the duo are about to retire officially.

JAN. 10

CAST: KRISTEN STEWART, VINCENT CASSEL, JESSICA HENWICK RATING: PG-13

JAN. 17

CAST: WILL SMITH, MARTIN LAWRENCE, VANESSA HUDGENS RATING: NR

96 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020

CINEMARK SAND SPRINGS 1112 E. Charles Page Blvd. | Sand Springs 918.894.6888

CINEMARK TULSA 10802 E. 71st S. | Tulsa 800.FAN.DANG (#1128)

JAN. 10

A hardened CIA operative finds himself at the mercy of a precocious 9-year-old girl, having been sent undercover to surveil her family.

CINEMARK BROKEN ARROW 1801 E. Hillside Drive Broken Arrow | 918.355.0427

CINERGY 6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918.894.6888

OPENS

CAST: ANDREA RISEBOROUGH, DEMIÁN BICHIR, JOHN CHO RATING: R

MY SPY

B&B CINEMA 8 1245 New Sapulpa Road Sapulpa | 918.227.7469

CAST: SEBASTIAN STAN, WILLIAM HURT, SAMUEL L. JACKSON RATING: R

ETON SQUARE 6 CINEMA 8421 E. 61st St. Tulsa | 918.286.2618 AMC CLASSIC OWASSO 12601 E. 86th St. N. Owasso | 918.376.9191 STARWORLD 20 10301 S Memorial Drive Tulsa | 918.369.7475 WARREN BROKEN ARROW 18 1700 W. Aspen Creek Drive Broken Arrow | 918.893.9798


SHOWTIME S A HIDDEN LIFE

OPENS JAN. 3

Based on real events, this is the story of an unsung hero who refused to fight for the Nazis in World War II.

1917

OPENS JAN. 10

At the height of World War I, two young British soldiers are given a seemingly impossible mission. In a race against time, they must cross enemy territory and deliver a message.

CLEMENCY

OPENS

OPENS JAN. 10

As she prepares to execute another inmate, Bernadine must confront the psychological and emotional demons her job creates, ultimately connecting her to the man she is sanctioned to kill.

JUST MERCY

OPENS JAN. 10

The film shadows world-renowned civil rights defense attorney Bryan Stevenson as he recounts his experiences and details the case of a condemned death row prisoner whom he fought to free.

WEST OF ZANZIBAR (1928)

JAN. 11

Lon Chaney and Lionel Barrymore star in this gripping drama of vengeance.

WEATHERING WITH YOU

JAN. 15

A high-school boy who has run away to Tokyo befriends a girl who appears to be able to manipulate the weather.

ALL MY SONS PRESENTED BY NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE JAN. 16

Despite hard choices and even harder knocks, Joe and Kate Keller are a success story. They have built a home, raised two sons, and established a thriving business. But nothing lasts forever, and their contented lives, already shadowed by the loss of their eldest boy to war, are about to shatter. Academy Award-winner Sally Field (Steel Magnolias, Brothers & Sisters) and Bill Pullman (The Sinner, Independence Day) star in Arthur Miller’s blistering drama.

FLASH GORDON

JAN. 24

DOLITTLE

JAN. 17

After losing his wife seven years earlier, the eccentric Dr. John Dolittle, famed doctor and veterinarian of Victorian England, hermits himself away behind the high walls of Dolittle Manor with only his menagerie of animals for company. But when Queen Victoria falls gravely ill, a reluctant Dolittle is forced to set sail on an epic adventure to a mythical island in search of a cure, regaining his wit and courage as he crosses old adversaries and encounters wondrous creatures. CAST: ROBERT DOWNEY JR., HARRY COLLETT, ANTONIO BANDERAS RATING: NR

THE GENTLEMEN JAN. 24

A very British drug lord tries to sell off his highly profitable empire to a dynasty of Oklahoma billionaires. CAST: MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY, CHARLIE HUNNAM, HENRY GOLDING RATING: R

THE TURNING JAN. 24

A young governess is hired by a man who has become responsible for his young nephew and niece after the deaths of their parents. A modern take on Henry James’ novella The Turn of the Screw. CAST: MACKENZIE DAVIS, FINN WOLFHARD, BROOKLYNN PRINCE RATING: PG-13

JAN. 24-25

Based on the 1930s comic strip, and featuring the music of Queen, this feature film has Flash and Dale Arden racing through space to battle Ming the Merciless, and save the Earth from destruction.

SPECIAL

OPENS

JAN. 24

MONDAY IS

FREE POPCORN DAY *Circle Cinema members only

CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa

SHOWTIMES: 918-592-3456 TICKETS: circlecinema.com

Check the Circle Cinema website for times, costs, additional events, and more details. Release dates, showings, and ratings are subject to change.

RELEASE DATES AND RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

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NR = A RATING WAS NOT AVAILABLE AS OF DEC. 20, 2019

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See our feature on page 68

98 PREVIEW 918 JANUARY 2020


See our feature on page 32


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Fine-dining excellence

The only Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Oklahoma ®

Beautiful river views Luxurious resort hotel

Awesome live music

5 o’Clock Somewhere® Bar, Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville®, Paradise Cove Theater

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January 2020 (Vol. 34, No. 1)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...

January 2020 (Vol. 34, No. 1)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...