Page 1

MENU FOR THE MASSES WHERE TO DINE

W H AT TO D O

WE’VE FOUND 27 OPTIONS WHERE YOU CAN INDULGE WITH GRACE AND GAME IN THE ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT WORLD

WHERE TO FIND IT

WHEN IT’S HAPPENING

NOVEMBER 2019

LICK BEING SICK TRYING TO AVOID THE FLU? YOU MAY BE DOING IT WRONG

THE BEARDED AGE SALUTING FACIAL SPLENDOR FOR NO-SHAVE NOVEMBER

98° AMERICA THREE DOG NIGHT BELLA’S HOUSE ROOF SIXTY SIX LOS MARIACHIS HOWDY BURGER

ALL FOWLED UP 10 TIPS FOR SURVIVING THANKSGIVING WITH A DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILY

SSENSORY ENSORY AADVENTURE DVENTURE

MEGA-PLAYGROUND CINERGY IS PACKED WITH ATTRACTIONS FOR A HIGH-ENERGY GOOD TIME

PREVIEW918.COM J U S T V I S I T I N G ? L I V I N G LO C A L? W E ’ V E G OT YO U C OV E R E D.


M FROM THE MAYOR As mayor of Tulsa, it is my honor to welcome you to our great city. Whether you’re visiting, or have deep roots here, I invite you to take time to explore our beautiful city and discover all the things that set us apart from other cities. I highly recommend Preview 918 as your go-to guide to navigate our incredible city. For more than 30 years, Preview has covered the 918, offering Tulsans and visitors alike the inside scoop to area restaurants and cafés, lodging, local attractions and events, world-class entertainment venues, tourist destinations, and unique shopping venues that are bound to please and delight. Our city is home to the world’s greatest collection of western art at the Gilcrease Museum, as well as Italian Renaissance displays at the Philbrook Museum. It’s a treasure trove for lovers of architecture, from mid-century modern housing, to the downtown Art Deco District, and our iconic BOK Center, designed by the internationally acclaimed architect César Pelli.

Tulsa Roughnecks soccer. Or time a visit to coincide with special events, such as Tulsa Tough bike racing, the Tulsa Run, the Route 66 Marathon, and the NCAA basketball tournament. The Tulsa area offers more than 80 miles of pedestrian and bicycle trails for a great way to see Tulsa. Tulsa is also a city on the move. In 2018, we opened the Gathering Place. The Gathering Place is a world class riverfront park designed to welcome all to a vibrant and inclusive public space that engages, educates and excites.

We connect with over 200,000 readers each month covering dining, fitness, retail, services, entertainment, people, events, lifestyles, and the arts. Preview 918 is freely distributed to over 650 locations in the Tulsa and Green Country area including QuikTrip, Reasor’s, over 100 hotels, Tulsa International Airport, casinos, retail shops, boutiques, restaurants, bars, medical offices, salons, gyms, and service providers. And many of those readers tell us that Preview 918 faithfully helps them identify their interests, wants, and needs.

Local advertising and business inquiries: 918-745-1190. To distribute Preview 918 at your place of business: 918‑745‑1190.

Sports spectators can look to the University of Tulsa or Oral Roberts University athletic programs, Tulsa Oiler hockey games, and

G.T. Bynum

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL, BRAND, AND STRATEGY Chris Greer chrisg@previewgreencountry.com

MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER Marc Rains marc@previewgreencountry.com

MANAGING EDITOR | SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Michele Chiappetta michele@previewgreencountry.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Greer, Michele Chiappetta, Tiffany Duncan, Donna Leahey, Rob Harmon, G.K. Hizer, Gina Conroy, Lindsay Morris, John Tranchina, Jennifer Zehnder, Sarah Herrera, TravelOK.com

CREATIVE TEAM Jared Hood jared@previewgreencountry.com Beth Rose beth@previewgreencountry.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Elizabeth Wollmershauser

4 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

In over 100 area Hotels and Motels

Best regards, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa

For a night on the town, Tulsa serves up family entertainment at the Guthrie Green and Tulsa Drillers baseball at ONEOK Field. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center attracts Broadway musicals, renowned musicians and excellent local theater productions, and is home to the Tulsa Ballet.

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A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has remained the most trusted and widely read lifestyle publication in the Tulsa and Green Country area for more than 30 years. While other magazines have come and gone, Preview 918 has not only remained but has achieved unprecedented prestige within our community. It has been, and will continue to be, the magazine the 918 area lives by.

I’m pleased so many of you have made your home in Tulsa. If you’re visiting our city, please enjoy your stay here. I also want to invite you to come back often to experience opportunities you won’t find anywhere else. In the meantime, you can find out more about Tulsa by visiting cityoftulsa.‌org.

Tulsa’s unique entertainment and shopping districts provide enjoyable experiences for the entire family. From an art crawl in the Tulsa Arts District, to a concert at the historic Cain’s Ballroom, to a trip to the Tulsa Zoo or a leisurely drive along Route 66 — there’s no end to what you can experience here.  

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VOL. 33, NO. 11

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Marc Rains, Sarah Eliza Roberts, Sarah Herrera, Jennifer Zehnder, Valerie Wei‑Haas, Kelli Greer

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Preview 918 is published 12 times a year. Reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited.

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WWW.ISSUU.COM/PREVIEWMAGAZINETULSA While the information has been compiled carefully to ensure accuracy at the time of publication, all content is provided for general guidance only and is subject to change. The publisher can’t guarantee the accuracy of all information or be responsible for omissions or errors. Preview 918 claims no credit for any images published in this issue unless otherwise noted. Images are copyright to their respective owners. Health, small business, and financial advice provided in Preview 918 and preview918.com are for educational and entertainment purposes only. Always consult with a qualified professional for health, small business, and financial advice. Preview 918, 10026-A S. Mingo, Suite 322, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Copyright 2019 by Preview 918. All rights reserved. Preview 918 is an affiliated publication produced by Fore Today Publications LLC.  


T TABLE OF CONTENTS NOVEMBER 2019

FEATURES

76 ON THE COVER

STARTER: 16 CONVERSATION AMERICA

Former Air Force brats Dewey Bunnell and Gerry Beckley continue to guide Grammy-winning America into its fifth decade.

18 CONVERSATION STARTER: 98°

With a revived career, a strong friendship and brotherhood within the band, and an ongoing connection with its audience, 98 Degrees is far from burned out.

22

CONVERSATION STARTER: THREE DOG NIGHT

A band that thrived on tight, high-spirited arrangements of well-selected songs by leading writers, Three Dog Night released 21 consecutive Top 40 hits.

38 THANKSGIVING MADE EASY

Preparation for Thanksgiving can overwhelm even the most seasoned home cook. Beyond turkey, stuffing, gravy, and cranberry sauce, the primary ingredient required is organization. Once you figure it out, the hard part is over.

84

AWAKEN YOUR SENSES

Great Mexican food often comes down to the quality of ingredients. And that’s a selling point at the Los Mariachis Mexican Restaurants. Prepare to load up on underrated gems, including a pineapple stuffed with fajita meat, street tacos, chicken tortilla soup, and a Big Mamma.

26 ALLTHEINFAMILY

The husband and wife group, Tedeschi Trucks Band, boils down a vast array of influences, making them their own while catering to an incredibly dedicated fanbase hanging on each night’s unique setlist.

28

BANISH BOREDOM

Featuring a unique selection of interactive games, bowling, escape rooms, VR, and recline-and-dine cinemas, Cinergy packs experiences and attractions for every level of entertainment seeker.

34 DRUMSTICK DYSFUNCTION

Thanksgiving is supposed to be a joyous occasion where relatives gather for a feast, conversation, sports, and general family togetherness. For those of you nervous about what’s to come, we’ve got tips to surviving the get-together.

WAY OF THE WHISKER 42 THE

This is the season of razors sitting idle on sinks and chins disappearing in silky and wiry, trimmed and untamed, curly and cascading decoration.

46

IN THE HUNT

88 PATTY PALACE

There’s more to hunting than sitting in a stand waiting on “the” shot. It’s not necessarily easy, but with a little preparation (and maybe a guide), even a novice can have a great outing this fall.

Top-quality ingredients and flat-top crisped beef combine to create a delicious throw-back burger that’s well worth every calorie. Add a glass of fresh-squeezed lemonade to your order and revel in the classic Americana combo.

80 BLESSING OF BUFFETS

92 CULTIVATING CONFIDENCE

From time to time, there’s something undeniably satisfying about a meal that doesn’t end until you decide it should. You can find that experience and plenty of tasty options at these 27 spots.

After losing 80 pounds, Julie Brothers is doing things she never dreamed possible thanks to “wantpower.” But her most significant accomplishment is inspiring others to live their dreams.

The season of indoor play is upon us. Are you ready? When your day calls for excitement of a higher order, find action satisfaction at Cinergy. With movie theaters, virtual reality games, escape rooms, bowling, food, full service bar, TV screens, and more, Cinergy is perfect for those times when you want to get out of your routine, especially when you want to go with the whole family or a big group of friends with different tastes. There’s something for everyone. November is also the month for giving thanks, and we’ve got that covered as well. Whether you’re a Thanksgiving newbie or pro, this issue has all the recipes, tips, and techniques to make your holiday season easier, more delicious, and as sanity-saving as possible.

COVER CREDIT Photographer: Sarah Eliza Roberts Model: Rianne Ross Agency: Roz Model Management Venue: Cinergy

DEPARTMENTS 16 Conversation Starter

59 Sports Schedule

70 Restaurant + Bar Finder

78 Failed or Nailed

10 Music + Concerts + Comedy

26 Sound Check

60 Green Country Scene

72 Health + Fitness

92 Get to Know

13 Happenings

49 Downtown Locator

64 Beyond Tulsa

74 Cocktail Confidential

94 Shelf Life

50 Tulsa Locator

66 Style + Shopping

76 Eats + Treats

96 Showtime

52 Sports Central

68 Launch Pad

8 $91.80 in 48 Challenge

15 Street Talk

6 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019


The only catch was that they had to spend it at places, events or shops profiled in the October 2019 issue of Preview 918.

918 $91.80 IN 48 CHALLENGE The mission posed to Richard and Christine Shockey was to spend $91.80 (we used the local area code for the amount) in two days. And if they could find fun and free activities … bonus.

SO, PROVIDING AN ENVELOPE OF CASH AND TELLING PEOPLE TO SPEND IT IN 48 HOURS ISN’T EXACTLY A CHALLENGE, BUT IT MAKES THIS ASSIGNMENT MORE INTERESTING.

STOP #1

COST $11 We started as American as you can get with lunch at Flo’s Burger Diner. They have a new sign, so they are easier to find on 11th Street. Flo’s has a large selection of burgers to choose from, but we went with the classic. Add the Bomb Sauce for $0.50; it’s cream cheese with bacon and jalapeño.  You won’t be sorry.   COST: $11

STOP #4 u Think yo our can blow cash in g interestin ways?

STOP #2

Early in the evening, we went to Villa Ravenna in the Farm Shopping Center. We had to restrain ourselves and only ordered an appetizer. We had the bacon-wrapped dates. A date has never tasted so good.

Afterward, we moved on to Miami Nights Restaurant and Lounge. They have an extensive menu, but we were sticking with our appetizer plan. We ordered mariquitas, and plantain chips with a garlic dipping sauce. Because there were so many different choices, we decided to go all out and also ordered the shrimp scampi that comes in a jasmine wine and garlic lemon sauce. We also tried the empanadas (one beef and one guava cream cheese) as our dessert. There was plenty to share, and in doing so, we had a little Cuban buffet. If we are being totally honest, we weren’t sure what we were getting into, but the people and the live music were great, and the food is a garlic lover’s dream. We will be going back soon.

STOP #3

COST: $24

After American, Italian, and Cuban, we decided to go Asian with the buffet at Yutaka. In addition to a fantastic selection of Asian food, they also have a variety of sushi and a build-your-ownstyle hibachi grill. The fresh and hot hibachi food was our favorite.

STOP #5

COST: $24

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AND DROP A MESSAGE WITH SOME OF YOUR IDEAS. WE MIGHT JUST LACE YOUR POCKETS WITH GREEN AND TURN YOU LOOSE. 8 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

For our last stop, we headed to the Riverwalk in Jenks. Who doesn’t need a walk after eating your way across town? We found ourselves at Maryn’s Taphouse and Raw Bar. Shrimp, lobster, crab rolls, and all things seafood are on the menu. On recommendation from our server, we ordered tamale balls and loaded beer cheese fries. COST: $20


H HAPPENINGS NOVEMBER LIVE MUSIC VENUES 5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa

BLACKBIRD ON PEARL

1336 E. 6th St. | Tulsa

BOK CENTER

200 S. Denver Ave. | Tulsa

BRADY THEATER

105 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

CAIN’S BALLROOM

423 N. Main St. | Tulsa

CROW CREEK TAVERN

3534 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa

GUTHRIE GREEN

111 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

IDL BALLROOM

230 E. 1st St. | Tulsa

INNER CIRCLE VODKA BAR 410 N. Main St. | Tulsa

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT 8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

02 01 TRISHA YEARWOOD

MERCURY LOUNGE

Brady Theater | Tulsa

1747 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

THERESA CAPUTO

OKLAHOMA JAZZ HALL OF FAME 5 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

PARADISE COVE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

PEORIA SHOWPLACE | BUFFALO RUN CASINO & RESORT

1000 Buffalo Run Blvd. | Miami

RABBIT HOLE

BOBBY BONES AND THE RAGING IDIOTS

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

116 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa

REDS

CASTING CROWNS AND HILLSONG WORSHIP

325 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

RIFFS | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

BOK Center | Tulsa

DANNY BAKER

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

Soul City Gastropub and Music House | Tulsa

SKYLINE EVENT CENTER | OSAGE CASINO HOTEL

951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa

SOUL CITY

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa

SOUNDPONY

409 N. Main St. | Tulsa

SWAMPHOUSE

05

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON AND THE STRANGERS

06

RUMOURS OF FLEETWOOD MAC

Brady Theater | Tulsa

Brady Theater | Tulsa

06-09 GREG MORTON

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

07 RASCAL FLATTS

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

PARKER MCCOLLUM

Buffalo Run Casino & Resort | Miami

1529 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE COLONY

2809 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa

THE FUR SHOP

520 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE HUNT CLUB

224 N. Main St. | Tulsa

THE JOINT | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

STONEY LARUE

THE VANGUARD

01-02 SKIP CLARK

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa 222 N. Main St. | Tulsa

TRACK 5 | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

102 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

10 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

03

MARK CHESNUTT AND LORRIE MORGAN

T he Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

85 SOUTH

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

AMERICA

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa


THURSDAY

11.07

SATURDAY

11.09

SATURDAY

11.30

AMERICA

8PM

JO KOY

8PM

HOLIDAY DREAMS

8PM

TURN IT ON, TURN IT UP SCAN TO PURCHASE TICKETS

Schedule subject to change.


H HAPPENINGS NOVEMBER

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

08 09

12 TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND Brady Theater | Tulsa

13 RYAN BINGHAM

CRAYONS IMPROV COMEDY SHOW

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Heritage United Methodist Church | Broken Arrow

98°

13-16 GABRIEL RUTLEDGE

14 The Loony Bin | Tulsa

JO KOY

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

HORTON RECORDS 6TH ANNUAL ROCK ‘N’ FOLK ‘N’ CHILI COOK-OFF Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

ZZ TOP

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

16 Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel | Tulsa

JIM GAFFIGAN

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

INDIGO GIRLS

Brady Theater | Tulsa

I LOVE THE ‘90S

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

TWENTY ONE PILOTS MERCYME

BOK Center | Tulsa

BOK Center | Tulsa

10 TOMMY TUTONE

17 DIRTY HEADS 20-23 ALEX ORTIZ Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

Soul City Gastropub and Music House | Tulsa

BAD BUNNY BOK Center | Tulsa

NAPOLEON DYNAMITE

TRACY GRAMMER

Brady Theater | Tulsa

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

21

ANNIE MOSES BAND

Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center | Broken Arrow

THE VIBRO KINGS

Soul City Gastropub and Music House | Tulsa

12 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

09-10 HARLEM QUARTET

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

THREE DOG NIGHT OLD DOMINION WITH SCOTTY MCCREERY BOK Center | Tulsa

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

RILEY GREEN

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa


HAPPENINGS ALSO IN NOVEMBER H

22

ALSO IN NOVEMBER NOV. 1 FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL Tulsa Arts District | Tulsa

ELLIS PAUL

NOV. 1 DIA DE LOS MUERTOS (DAY OF THE DEAD) ARTS FESTIVAL Living Arts of Tulsa | Tulsa

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

READ SOUTHALL BAND Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

23 VIXEN

IDL Ballroom | Tulsa

24

COLIN MOCHRIE AND BRAD SHERWOOD

NOV. 1-4 WILL ROGERS DAYS

Will Rogers Memorial Museum | Claremore

EVERYWHERE

3 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS

NOV. 1-3 TULSA BALLET: GISELLE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

5 NOV. 1-9 COLOR BREED CONGRESS

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

ELECTION DAY

11

27

DREAMERS

29

14TH ANNUAL LEFTOVER TURKEY

NOV. 1-3 LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

NOV. 1-3 WHAT THE BUTLER SAW VETERANS DAYS

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

28

THANKSGIVING

THE 1975

BOK Center | Tulsa

29-30

30

MIKE HEAD

29

The Loony Bin | Tulsa

NOV. 1-9 PUMPKIN FESTIVAL

Shepherd’s Cross | Claremore

NOV. 2 ILLUMINATE GALA

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

NOV. 1-3 FALL HOME EXPO Expo Square | Tulsa

NOV. 1-3 KING’S MEDIEVAL FAIRE Black Gold Park | Glenpool

NOV. 2-3 TULSA POP CULTURE EXPO Woodland Hills Mall | Tulsa

GRADY NICHOLS

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

BLACK FRIDAY PREVIEW918.COM 13


H HAPPENINGS ALSO IN NOVEMBER NOV. 9 EAGLE OPS WELCOME HOME 5K

NOV. 15-17 VINTAGE TULSA SHOW

NOV. 23-24 OKLAHOMA FAMILY PET EXPO Expo Square | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

NOV. 28-DEC. 31 CASTLE CHRISTMAS

Mohawk Park | Tulsa

NOV. 2-3 BATTLE OF HONEY SPRINGS RE-ENACTMENT

NOV. 9 SAN MIGUEL PRESENTS DANCING WITH THE TULSA STARS

The Castle of Muskogee | Muskogee

NOV. 23-24 ROUTE 66 MARATHON AND HALF MARATHON

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

Downtown Tulsa

Honey Springs Battlefield | Checotah

Pine Lodge Resort | Ketchum

NOV. 29-30 WILL’S COUNTRY CHRISTMAS

Expo Square | Tulsa

Tulsa Technology Center Riverside Campus | Tulsa

NOV. 5 BANDSTAND

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

NOV. 7-17 LOVE, LOSS, AND WHAT I WORE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

NOV. 10-14 OKLAHOMA JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL Circle Cinema | Tulsa

NOV. 15 WOODY’S WEEKEND WORKSHOP

NOV. 21 LEGACY OF LAUGHTER

River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

NOV. 21 LIGHTS ON!

Downtown Jenks

NOV. 21 DINNER OF RECONCILIATION

Honor Heights Park | Muskogee

NOV. 28-JAN. 1 WINTER WONDERLAND CHRISTMAS LIGHT TOUR

NOV. 17 OKLAHOMA BRIDAL AND WEDDING EXPO NOV. 9 WORLD WAR II BIG BAND HANGAR DANCE

NOV. 28-DEC. 31 GARDEN OF LIGHTS

Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch | Oologah

NOV. 23-JAN. 5 WINTERFEST Downtown Tulsa

NOV. 26-DEC. 22 WEST BEND WINTERLAND Claremore Expo Center | Claremore

Greenwood Cultural Center | Tulsa

NOV. 29-DEC. 7 POLAR EXPRESS PAJAMA PARTY Three Rivers Museum | Muskogee

NOV. 29-DEC. 22 WOOLAROC WONDERLAND OF LIGHTS Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve | Bartlesville

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

NOV. 15 ROBERT EDSEL

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

NOV. 27-JAN. 1 RHEMA CHRISTMAS LIGHTS

Rhema Bible Church | Broken Arrow

NOV. 8 DRAGONS LOVE TACOS AND OTHER STORIES

NOV. 15-16 NANYEHI

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

NOV. 8-9 WILD AT ART

NOV. 15-16 KICKOFF CLASSIC

Tulsa Garden Center | Tulsa

NOV. 21-24 HUNTER JUMPER EXHIBITORS OF OKLAHOMA FALL FINALE

NOV. 29-JAN. 5 GARDEN OF LIGHTS

Tulsa Botanic Garden | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

Downtown Claremore

NOV. 22-24 AN AFFAIR OF THE HEART Expo Square | Tulsa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

Philbrook Museum of Art | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

NOV. 15-16 DICKENS ON THE BOULEVARD

NOV. 8-10 JURASSIC QUEST

NOV. 29-DEC. 31 PHILBROOK FESTIVAL

NOV. 15-17 LEGALLY BLONDE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

NOV. 23 BOARE’S HEADE FEASTE The Castle of Muskogee | Muskogee

NOV. 28-DEC. 1 USA BMX GRAND NATIONAL PRO SERIES FINAL Expo Square | Tulsa

NOV. 30 HOLIDAY DREAMS

NOV. 28-DEC. 30 TWIN BRIDGES PARK OF LIGHTS

NOV. 30-DEC. 1 RUTS N’ GUTS

Twin Bridges State Park | Fairland

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Chisolm Trail South Park | Broken Arrow

Dates, events and times are subject to change.

14 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019


Is mac and cheese a Thanksgiving dish?

STREET TALK ST

I’d say no, but I’m honestly willing to eat mac and cheese anywhere.

— BREANN

I didn’t grow up with it being part of Thanksgiving, but I started doing it a few years ago using a gourmet recipe. I make it every year now. It’s amazing with turkey. — BOBBI

I like mac and cheese but not for Thanksgiving. — ROSE

I’ve never considered mac and cheese a Thanksgiving dish. In my opinion, I don’t feel that it’s very traditional. Obviously, times do change, so maybe it’s becoming a trend. — SYLVIE

If your Thanksgiving includes kids, if should include mac and cheese. — JOY

Of course. One of the great things about mac and cheese is all the customization options. Add some bread crumbs, bacon, or any other cheeses. Plus nothing beats leftover turkey mixed with leftover mac and cheese.

— BETH

Oh, yes. The mac and cheese we get for Thanksgiving from Chick-fil-A is so good, it seems like somebody’s grandma is in that kitchen making it.

— CHELSEA

It’s odd for us Brits to see it as a side dish as it’s a main meal here. I think you guys are on to something.

To me, Thanksgiving is all about family and enjoying our favorite comfort foods while enjoying our favorite people. Mac and cheese fits the bill for comfort food and also keeps the younger kiddos (and grown up kids) happy. — LAUREN Mac and cheese isn’t a traditional Thanksgiving dish. You don’t go to Thanksgiving dinner expecting mac and cheese as a side dish.  — HEATHER 

You can’t have a Thanksgiving without a little bit of cheese. — LARISSA

— KIRSTY

Mac and cheese is a dish you can eat any time. I personally prefer more traditional sides, like yams; foods you don’t normally eat on a daily or weekly basis. — SANDRA

Yes, because kids love mac and cheese. — ALAN

I never heard anyone say, come over for Thanksgiving and let’s watch football and have macaroni and cheese. — WAYNE

I like macaroni and cheese all the time.

— JACKSON

Although I love mac and cheese, I don’t count it as a Thanksgivings dish. Never fear, there are plenty of other carbs that belong in Thanksgiving dinner like dressing, stuffing, mashed potatoes, rolls, sweet potatoes and casseroles. — LISA

Never unless you’re under the age of 21.

— GARY

WANT TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION? We’ll post a question on our Facebook each month. Give us an answer and photo, and you might end up in our magazine. PREVIEW918.COM 15


AMERICA

CS CONVERSATION STARTER

FORMER AIR FORCE BRATS DEWEY BUNNELL AND GERRY BECKLEY CONTINUE TO GUIDE GRAMMY-WINNING AMERICA INTO ITS FIFTH DECADE.

BY G.K. HIZER

When most people are asked about the band America, they reference the group’s iconic hit “A Horse with No Name” or possibly lesser-played songs “Ventura Highway” or “Sister Golden Hair.” It’s a touch ironic that a trio of American kids who met in a London, England, high school would become so closely identified with the late’60s acoustic, predominantly Southern California and HaightAshbury sound.

16 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

The band’s ability and willingness to evolve led the group down a variety of paths with a sometimes chameleonlike sound. Although the group’s acoustic roots have always remained intact, an experimental attitude and willingness to change led the band through more psychedelic, ornate and Beatlesque, and polished ‘80s synth-pop iterations. Along the way, the group has recorded a string of

hits that have grown in fans’ subconscious, even when they don’t immediately think of America when recalling the songs themselves. While America remained active on the concert trail, the band generated a new wave of interest when Gerry Beckley got involved with Adam Schlesinger (of indierock group, Fountains of Wayne). As a result, Schlesinger and James Iha (Smashing Pumpkins)

produced 2007’s Here & Now, to positive reviews, renewed interest, and a new wave of younger fans. Founding members Beckley and Dewey Bunnell are touring in support of America’s 50th anniversary and a recent hits compilation that spans their career (50th Anniversary: Golden Hits). In advance of a stop at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa (Nov. 7), we talked to Bunnell.


YOU BEGAN WORKING WITH GEORGE MARTIN IN 1974. HOW MUCH DID HE, AS A PRODUCER, INFLUENCE YOUR SOUND AND DIRECTION?

A.

Teaming up with George at a pivotal time in our career gave us the freedom to explore some different ideas concerning production, most notably George’s abilities with orchestral and vocal arrangements. He took over the day-to-day role of producer on the seven albums after our fourth album beginning with Holiday (1974). Those years were very special for us all.

Dan’s departure was the singlebiggest disturbance on our career path. The three of us had been extremely close since high school and had put together the band as a unified team. We made the decision right away that he could not be formally “replaced,” but we needed to fill his shoes with other musicians in the following years to sing the high harmony parts and play lead guitar which, along with his songwriting talents, were the strongest elements he brought to the band.

Q.

YOUR WORK WITH RUSS BALLARD IN THE EARLY-’80S TRANSITIONED THE GROUP BACK TO THE RADIO WITH A MORE POLISHED AND REFINED SOUND. HOW DID YOU ADJUST WHEN WORKING WITH BALLARD?

A.

At the point that we met Russ, we were in a career slump. The musical landscape was changing, and we were not a band to follow new trends. We were open to recording a few songs that we had not written at that point. “You Can Do Magic” jumped out as a tune that was written with us in mind, and it proved to be a big success on the album View

the albums ourselves. Future albums were conceived and produced by Gerry and I.

Q.

HOW MUCH DID WORKING WITH ADAM SCHLESINGER DIFFER FROM PREVIOUS PARTNERSHIPS?

A.

By the time we began work with Adam and James Iha on Here & Now, we had made two other albums, Hourglass (1994) and Human Nature (1998), which were very satisfying in so far as we wrote and produced them together. We regained the control and confidence we had

Q.

WHAT KEEPS AMERICA GOING?

A.

Having started the group in our teens, it is the only thing we have ever done in our adult lives. We have grown up on the road, touring, and playing live shows; that keeps us inspired and energized.

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Q.

A.

Ultimately, we used several other producers and recorded songs by other outside writers during the time after Russ, which took even more control out of our hands. In the end, it was an experiment that was not as satisfying as creating

missed on the albums before them, so going into another collaboration was easier and we knew what to expect. It was a great experience working with Adam and James and the other artists they brought in.

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A.

The fact that we were young Americans who came of age in London during an amazing time in musical history, 1967-72, gave us a unique perspective. We were able to see British bands perform and at the same time we got the American artists album releases at the Air Force base before they reached the street in London. I think the combination of all that music, and the hunger we had to see and hear it all, influenced the way we wrote and produced our own music.

FOUNDING MEMBER DAN PEEK DEPARTED FROM THE GROUP IN 1977. HOW MUCH DID THAT AFFECT THE CHEMISTRY OF THE GROUP?

from the Ground (1982), resulting in collaboration with Russ on the follow-up album, Your Move (1983). It was a good experience, but a change that took a lot of the process out of our hands.

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WHAT INITIALLY MADE THE BIGGEST INFLUENCES ON THE AMERICA SOUND AND AESTHETIC?

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Nov. 7: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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98DEGREES

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By most measurements, 98 Degrees was the third-biggest boy band of its era, with the Backstreet Boys and the Justin Timberlake-led NSYNC filling

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the top two slots. 98 Degrees was always different amongst the crowd, where instead of focusing on big poppy choruses, the group elected

to highlight their R&B and soul influences. And unlike Backstreet, NSYNC and others, they weren’t created

by a producer, but rather by Jeff Timmons. During his senior year of college in Ohio, Timmons gathered a different lineup of guys together at a


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The new lineup included Justin Jeffre and Nick Lachey, who then talked his younger brother, Drew, who was an EMT in New York to fill out the foursome.

With all four singers’ schedules finally aligning, as well as what Nick calls “the boy band cycle coming back around,” 98 Degrees felt the time was right to reunite. In 2017, 98 Degrees released its second Christmas album, Let It Snow, followed by a seasonal tour, and has continued to remain active.

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party to sing to girls. That inspired him to quit school, move to Los Angeles, and start a serious vocal group styled after the harmonies of Boyz II Men.

In August 2012, 98 Degrees tested the waters for a potential return by appearing at the Mixtape Festival in Hershey, Pennsylvania, as well as The Today Show that same weekend. In an interview with Rolling Stone, Drew Lachey explained that the members felt comfortable committing to the group again and that the timing felt right.

“We were always very careful to make sure everyone knew we’d never really broken up,” Nick Lachey told Rolling Stone. “We always had the intention of doing another record. It just maybe took a little longer than we anticipated.”

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BY G.K. HIZER

On Sept. 10, 2001, 98 Degrees was standing at the precipice of its career, performing to a sold-out crowd at Madison Square Garden in New York, as part of the Michael Jackson: 30th Anniversary Celebration. The star-studded salute to the pop icon’s career provided a platform for what could have pushed the group to the next level. Instead, the 9/11 attacks on New York City occurred the next day, bringing a change in perspective and priorities. In light of all that transpired, the quartet opted to take a break. Aside from a one-off TV performance in 2004, it would be over 10 years before the group would perform again.

In the interim, members of the group each pursued individual projects. Both Nick Lachey and Timmons released underwhelming solo albums; Nick starred in a slew of reality shows — the most high-profile of which, Newlyweds, centered on his much-scrutinized marriage to ex-wife Jessica Simpson; and Drew Lachey won as a contestant on Dancing with the Stars.

That weekend established the groundwork for a more

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WITH A REVIVED CAREER, A STRONG FRIENDSHIP AND BROTHERHOOD WITHIN THE BAND, AND AN ONGOING CONNECTION WITH ITS AUDIENCE, 98 DEGREES IS FAR FROM BURNED OUT.

Although the group made a splash with their debut single, “Invisible Man” in 1997, critics were still suspicious of their success. The group’s credibility was cemented, however, when the lead single from their sophomore album (98 Degrees and Rising), “Because of You” sailed to No. 3 on the Billboard charts. The group also collaborated with soul icon Stevie Wonder on “True to Your Heart” for the soundtrack to Disney’s Mulan in 1998.

significant reunion, as 98 Degrees hit the road in the summer of 2013 as part of “The Package Tour” with New Kids on the Block and Boyz II Men. Paired with the band’s first studio album in 13 years, 2.0, the group launched into the second stage of its career.

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Their vocal abilities caught the attention of music executives, and 98 Degrees ultimately signed a recording deal with Motown and, later, Universal Records.

Nov. 16: 7 p.m. Must be 18 or older to attend

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THREEDOGNIGHT

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Three Dog Night has been rocking for more than five decades. From 1969-74, no other band came close to their number of hits, records sold, or concert attendance. The group was founded in 1967 with an unusual lineup that boasted three lead vocalists: Danny Hutton, Chuck Negron, and Cory Wells. Three Dog Night released its debut single, “Nobody,” in 1968. The next year, the band’s second single, “Try a Little Tenderness,” peaked at No.29 on the Billboard Top 40 chart. Over the years, the group went on to become world-renowned for their pop hits, written by such gifted songwriters as Harry Nilsson, Randy Newman, Paul Williams, Elton John, and John Hiatt. Newman’s “Mama Told Me (Not to Come)” became one of the group’s biggest hits, selling more than a million copies. Newman had recorded the song about a naive man’s introduction to L.A.’s wild ’60s music scene a few years earlier, with less success. Three Dog Night also recorded the first commercially available version of “Your Song.” They chose not to release it as a single as a courtesy to John, whom they had met when he was an opening act for the band. In the 1980s, Negron left the trio, and in 2015 Wells died. Today, Hutton fronts the band, joined by singer David Morgan and accompanied by musicians including the group’s long-time guitarist Michael Allsup.

A BAND THAT THRIVED ON TIGHT, HIGH-SPIRITED ARRANGEMENTS OF WELL-SELECTED SONGS BY LEADING WRITERS, THREE DOG NIGHT RELEASED 21 CONSECUTIVE TOP 40 HITS. BY DONNA LEAHEY

At an age when most people are enjoying a well-earned retirement, Three Dog Night is still maintaining a grueling touring schedule. With songs like “Mama Told Me (Not to Come),” “Joy to the World,” “Black and White,” and “An Old Fashioned Love Song” still popular in commercials and movies, this Grammy-nominated band has maintained its presence in pop culture. Hutton, who still loves touring, doesn’t have a favorite song but gave Preview 918 an idea of what fans should expect when the band performs Nov. 21 at Paradise Cove.


Q.

THREE DOG NIGHT IS KNOWN FOR HAVING EMBRACED THE CUTTING EDGE OF TECHNOLOGY IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY. HOW HAVE YOU MADE THAT CHANGE FROM MAKING MUSIC IN THE LATE 1960S TO NOW?

A.

We are finishing our first album since 1976. I had to walk a tightrope with that. I have a fullon studio in my house that used to belong to Alice Cooper. We wanted to keep the Three Dog Night vibe, but I also wanted to introduce a more modern thing where we wouldn’t lose our identity. They no longer are doing fade-outs on records. We used to have those big chords and

Consecutive top 40 hits. Every single we put out was a hit. That means we can’t put out another single, or it will screw up our streak.

Q.

WITH ALL THAT SUCCESS, HOW DO YOU PICK A PLAYLIST FOR YOUR CONCERTS?

A.

We’ve been together for 51 years. I formed the band, and then brought in a singer and another singer, and then it was the three of us. Like any brothers, we would bump heads, and everybody had different ideas. And one guy used to get bored doing the hits, and he’d stick in too many blues songs, or new songs, or songs he liked. My feeling is that we’re not there to please ourselves. Usually, it’s a different venue every night, so it’s not like being on Broadway where you’re doing the same place and same songs every night. Every time, it’s fresh. I like to start the set showing what we can do, then get a little softer in the middle, then go out like a rocket. Hopefully, we sound as good or better than we did in the’70s.

We haven’t lowered the key in any of the songs.

Q.

YOU HAVE RECORDED HITS BY SOME OF THE BEST SONGWRITERS IN THE BUSINESS.

A.

I helped Elton John when he came to the States. I met him in England. He was going by Reggie Dwight at the time. I invited him and Bernie [Taupin] to a club once. I was sitting downstairs in the bar with him, and he started singing to a record on the speaker. I told him that he had an incredible voice, but he said he wanted to be a writer. One time he came with us to a club, and we couldn’t get him on the guest list, so he acted like a roadie for us.

Q.

YOU GUYS DISBANDED IN 1976. WHAT GOT YOU BACK TOGETHER?

A.

I left, and the other guys carried on for a couple of months, but they started fighting. We got back together in 1980-81. After I left, I got myself straightened out and healthy by running 10 miles a day. Then I became a manager. I got into the punk scene. It was a really interesting period. Then I got a call saying someone was forming a bogus Three Dog Night group. I phoned one of the other singers to inform them, so we got back together to stop the bogus band. That was the start of us coming back.

THREE DOG NIGHT

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That song was No. 1 in the United States and England for us. Then, Tom Jones covered it [in 2000], and he went to No. 1 in England. And all the ad libs and stuff on the end? He copied all our little ad libs vocally. All these young people are going to think, ‘You’re doing that Tom Jones hit.’”

YOU’RE CREDITED WITH 21 TOP 40 HITS.

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A.

The guy who did it originally [Cory Wells] died. Now it’s our drummer.

Q. A.

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“MAMA TOLD ME (NOT TO COME)” IS SUCH A FUN SONG. WHO DOES THE SPEAKING PART?

they’d slowly fade. We kept that stuff in mind when we did the album. I wrote six of the songs.

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Nov. 21: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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Where Tulsa’s Aviation heritage takes Flight!

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SC SOUND CHECK Susan Tedeschi Derek Trucks

ALL IN THE FAMILY Since officially forming in 2010, Tedeschi Trucks Band has garnered a loyal, if not passionate, following. Steeped in a mixture of Southern rock, soul, blues, and gospel, the band crosses genres and defies categorization, most often classified in the catch-all “Americana” label. Led by the husband and wife combo of Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi, the group is known for its eclectic, jamoriented performances, and has become one of the best and most well-respected live bands across genres. If expectations run high with this group, it’s because of its impressive pedigree. Tedeschi set blues fans’ ears ablaze with her 1998

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sophomore release, Just Won’t Burn, and became a strong headliner in her own right after opening for John Mellencamp, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Allman Brothers, Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan. Her voice has been described as a blend of Bonnie Raitt and Janis Joplin, both of whom she claims as influences. Her guitar playing is influenced by Buddy Guy, Johnny Watson, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Freddie King, and Doyle Bramhall II. Trucks picked up the guitar when he was 9 years old, and morphed into a child prodigy, appearing alongside Guy and touring with Thunderhawk by the time he was 13. As the nephew of Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks, Derek guested with the band on regular occasions and became a formal member of the band

The husband and wife group, Tedeschi Trucks Band, boils down a vast array of influences, making them their own while catering to an incredibly dedicated fanbase hanging on each night’s unique setlist. BY G.K. HIZER

in 1999, continuing with the Allman Brothers through the group’s final performance in 2014. Trucks has appeared twice in Rolling Stone’s list of The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. He was listed as 81st in 2003 and 16th in 2011. A 2006 article in The Wall Street Journal described him as “the most awe-inspiring electric slide guitar player performing today.” In 2007, Trucks appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone for an article called the “New Guitar Gods.” Even so, Tedeschi and Trucks experimented with their chemistry, testing the waters by touring their respective bands together and combining members for Soul Stew Revival, before committing to the Tedeschi Trucks Band in 2010.

“You have to remember, we waited for nine, almost 10 years before we were ready to be in a band together,” says Trucks. “We toured together a couple of times before that to make sure it could work. Sure, there are times that there is husband and wife stuff, but we don’t take that onstage. It helps that there’s a considerable amount of shared respect and shared intentions. It’s easier when you’re trying to achieve the same things. “The stage and what happens live is important to both of us; everything else falls away when we’re playing. I can honestly say the band has made us closer, which I wasn’t sure would happen. I guess I got fortunate. You have to find the right person with the right disposition to be able to be around each other that much.”


paradise never sounded So Good.

Beyond its namesakes, TTB is stacked with talent, boasting a 12-member lineup that includes keyboards, horns, and background vocalists, expanding the group’s sound beyond a mere Southern rock or blues outfit. While that influences the writing process, it also casts a wide net for the band’s eclectic and exhilarating live shows. Setlists shift from night to night, leading fans to follow the group around the country and to specific locations in a quest to catch the band’s most magical moments. “We just finished six nights at the Beacon Theatre [New York],” Trucks says. “We played 86 or 87 songs over that stretch and close to 60 of those were originals, with scattered covers, and even then, most of that has some direct lineage for us.

If we play from something by Derek and the Dominos or dig into Mad Dogs & Englishmen, it’s from us playing with Eric Clapton or Leon Russell. And then there are some blues covers that I think are American songbook, if you will, and part of our collective consciousness of what we grew up with. As a band, we’re probably not going to write a straight blues song, but they’re a lot of fun to play.” The band’s latest album, Signs, addresses a variety of emotions, including loss, grief, and hope. The album was written over a rough period when the band lost several people close to it, including Butch Trucks, Gregg Allman, Leon Russell, B.B. King, and Bruce Hampton. Longtime keyboardist/flutist Kofi Burbridge passed away on the album’s release day as well.

Theresa Caputo Nov 2 Rascal Flatts Nov 7 zz top Nov 8 I love the 90’s Nov 14 Jim Gaffigan Nov 16 Three Dog Night Nov 21 Chase Rice Dec 6 LuAnn de Lesseps Dec 20 Cirque Musica Dec 22 Steve Miller Band DEC 27 John Fogerty DEC 29 Ron White DEC 31

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FEATURING A UNIQUE SELECTION OF INTERACTIVE GAMES, BOWLING, ESCAPE ROOMS, VR, AND RECLINE-AND-DINE CINEMAS, CINERGY PACKS EXPERIENCES AND ATTRACTIONS FOR EVERY LEVEL OF

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ENTERTAINMENT SEEKER. By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts


Are you looking to take your entertainment to the next level? Eager to try the latest games in a place that provides just about every form of fun you can imagine — fun for every age group from kids to grandparents — under one roof ? Then you’ll find the perfect place to do it all when you visit the entertainment center known as Cinergy. Conveniently located across from Woodland Hills Mall, Cinergy offers all you could want to give you hours of fun within its four walls. “We’re the only ones who have everything under one roof,” explains Aaron Latus, general manager of Tulsa’s Cinergy. Everything is a good description for it. With movie theaters, virtual reality games, escape rooms, bowling, food, full service bar, TV screens, and more, Cinergy is perfect for those times when you want to get out of your routine, especially when you want to go with the whole family or a big group of friends with different tastes. There’s something for everyone.

“Tulsa is a thriving city,” says Latus, describing what appealed to the company about opening its first Oklahoma location. “We knew we’d fit in the niche in the market. People love us. They tell us, ‘We had no idea what you guys had.’” Cinergy has four Texas locations in Amarillo, Copperas Cove, Midland, and Odessa. Walking into Cinergy is an experience in itself. The glitz, the lights, the music — it’s a little like visiting the state fair, where you know there’s going to be so much to see, do, eat and drink and play. And everything about it is affordable. “No one has a lower ticket value,” says Latus. “We give you the best amenities for the best price. Why wouldn’t you want to pay less for more?” At one end of the sizable, 60,000-square-foot building,

there are eight luxurious movie theaters of different sizes, small to large, showing the latest films. These cinemas have the latest in seating, cushy chairs that not only recline but have

heating elements and individual swivel tables for an extra touch of comfort and convenience. All the theaters are dine-in; at the push of a button you can order food, and it will be delivered to

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you. Cinergy offers a premium chef-inspired dining menu which includes an extensive bar menu pouring draft beer and craft cocktails. If you’re a sports fan, you’ll want to check out the bar with your pals. The area is attractive and comfortable, featuring 20 enormous TV screens and seating up to 160 people. “Nobody in the region has anything quite like it,” says Latus. From draft beers and artisan cocktails to pizzas, burgers, and more, you’ll love hanging out there for Monday night football or happy hour, Monday-Thursday, 3-7 p.m.

“Our hyperbowling doesn’t cost any more than regular bowling,” Latus says. “A lot of people love it because it’s a faster game. It’s just $10 an hour for a lane Monday through Thursday before 5:30 p.m.” Beyond the bowling and game floors, Cinergy features five escape rooms, ranging from a beginner’s level up to expert. Designed by Hollywood set designers, Cinergy’s escape rooms can accommodate up to eight people, and they’re as interactive as possible for a fully immersive experience. You don’t just read and solve clues. “If you move, the lighting will move, and the sound will change,” says Latus. “Our escape rooms have you shooting at things, balancing water, and pointing lights a certain way.” To make the fun as easy as possible, Cinergy uses fun cards,

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Spending at Cinergy gains you points that you can use for items like free popcorn at the theaters and more. Points and games can win you prizes that are fun not just for kids but adults too. “We’ve got PlayStations, Coach bags, Apple watches, and tablets.”

CINERGY

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This state-of-the-art experience blends tech, electronics, lights and sensors to amp up bowling into an experience a lot like a video game. Each roll of the ball is different, with flashing, moving lights to target, glowing pins, and more. Plus, you get to level up to more

a form of electronic payment card you can load with cash and register online. “If it gets lost or stolen, we can transfer points to a new card,” says Latus. “A lot of places don’t offer that.”

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intense play as the game goes on. People love the fast-paced fun of it.

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If you like bowling, check out the boutique bowling lanes. In addition to traditional bowling, Cinergy offers a unique attraction called hyperbowling. “We’re the only ones who have

hyperbowling. No one else in the state has it,” says Latus.

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In the center of Cinergy, you’ll find a host of games to choose from. There are the regular arcade games — around a hundred in all, including both classics and the latest on the market. Then there’s the XD Dark Ride, a stateof-the-art, eight-seat, movie-style immersive game. If you’re into virtual reality, check out the Hologate station. Serving up to four players, the Hologate area is open so spectators can look on while you and your friends play one of the most immersive VR games on the market.

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J JENKS

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Drumstick dysfunction Thanksgiving is supposed to be a joyous occasion where relatives gather for a feast, conversation, sports, and general family togetherness. For those of you nervous about what’s to come, we’ve got tips to surviving the get-together.

Instead of denying these realities, plan for them. (You get extra credit if you can find a way to have a sense of humor about them too.) Then consider using the following tips to begin to avoid at least some of the usual family drama.

Line up some co-conspirators Chances are you’re not the only one who is irked by your family’s dysfunctional routines. Figure out who you can call on to help make things different.

By Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed. D.

For some families, holidays are just another excuse to get together to eat good food and have a good time. They’re not looking for articles like this one because they’ve somehow figured out the formula for successful family togetherness with minimum stress. If you have a challenging family, it’s only human to be a bit incredulous and more than a bit jealous to see other folks living out the holiday fantasy when you’re just trying to live through it. Just because it’s always been that way doesn’t mean you’re doomed to a lifetime of Thanksgivings where you grin and go to your happy place until, thank goodness, it’s over. You can make a difference. You may even be able to start enjoying your dysfunctional crowd. With a little planning and some social engineering, you can take control of the situation and make this Thanksgiving feel better. First, make an honest appraisal of the family. It’s not new information that your mother doesn’t like your sister’s husband, or your grandmother is going to want attention for her latest aches and pains. It’s not news to anyone that so-and-so has to be the center of attention or so-and-so somehow gets her feelings hurt every year.

Then do some pre-event strategizing. Agree to tag-team each other with the folks you all find particularly difficult. Set up a signal you’ll use to call in a replacement. Brainstorm ways to steer a particular individual’s most tiresome and troublesome antics in a different direction.

Give assignments Is someone always critical of the menu? Ask her if she would please bring that complicated dish that is her trademark so she’ll have a place to shine. Is there a teenager who mopes about, bringing everyone down? Maybe offer to pay him to entertain the younger set for a couple of hours after dinner so the adults can talk.

Invite “buffers” Most people’s manners improve when outsiders enter the scene. If you can count on your family to put their best feet forward for the company, invite some. (If not, don’t.) There are always people who would love a place to go on holidays or who would like to experience a real American Thanksgiving. Think about older adults in your church or community whose grown children live far away, or divorced friends whose kids are with the other parent this year, or foreign exchange

students from your local high school or college.

Decide on booze Nowhere is it written that there shall be alcohol whenever a family gets together. If there are problem drinkers in the family, let everyone know ahead of time that you are holding an alcohol-free party. Serve sparkling cider and a delightful nonalcoholic punch. People in your family who can’t stand being at a gathering without an alcoholic haze will probably leave early or decline the invitation. Everyone else will be spared another holiday ruined by someone’s inability to handle their drinking.

Take charge of seating Have some of the younger kids make place cards and assign seats. Folks are less likely to switch places when admiring kids’ handiwork. Put people who rub each other the wrong way at opposite ends of the table. Seat the most troublesome person right next to you or one of your co-conspirators so that you can head off unfortunate conversation topics as soon as they start.

Guide the conversation If your family doesn’t seem to know how to talk without getting into arguments or if you’re not the most socially adept person yourself, give yourself some help by introducing The Conversation Game (see page 36). Announce at the beginning of the meal that you want to use the gathering as a time to get to know each other better. Ask everyone to indulge you by playing the game for at least part of the meal. Hopefully, people will like this change in family dynamics enough to want to keep it going.

Give kids a way to be included Then set them free. Kids are not going to enjoy being trapped at a table with adults (especially dysfunctional adults)

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The

Thanksgiving Conversation GAME for extended periods. They get restless. They get whiny. They slump in their chairs. Yes, they should be expected to behave with at least a minimum of decorum during the meal, but head off complaints and tantrums by planning something for them to do while the adults linger at the table. Have the materials for a simple craft project set up and ready to go.

No willing teens? Set up a child care schedule ahead of time, so the adults spell each other. Auntie oversees a kid project while the rest of the adults finish their meal. Uncle takes the kids out to run around between dinner and dessert. Plan to share the load and nobody feels martyred, and everybody has a better time.

Provide escape routes Togetherness is not for everyone. Make sure there are ways for the shyer or more intimidated to get away from the crowd. If most people will be watching football, set up a movie in another room for those who want out. Ask for help in the kitchen to give the overwhelmed person a graceful way to withdraw from the bore who is boring her. Set up a jigsaw puzzle on a card table in a corner so that people who don’t want to be part of the conversation have a way to occupy themselves and still be part of the party. Arrange with one of your co-conspirators to suggest a beforeor after-dinner walk for people who need a breather.

Reward yourself After everyone leaves, reward yourself. Sink into your favorite chair and give yourself credit (and an extra piece of pie?) for trying to make a difference. It takes a lot of time and a lot of effort to make a significant change in the habits and attitudes of a dysfunctional family. Any small step in the right direction is something to be thankful for. PsychCentral.com contributed to this article.

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This is a game the whole family can play. Make up a stack of cards with discussion starters on them. Brainstorm “starters” that will make people reminisce or laugh. Make sure to include cards that appeal to all ages. Some ideas are listed below. To play the game, ask the person to your right to pick a card and read it. Each person at the table gets to answer. It’s fine for someone to “pass” if they don’t have something to say. After everyone has had a turn to respond, the deck gets passed to the next person to choose a card. And so on.

Sample starters What song brings up the happiest memories for you?

I f you could have one superpower, what would it be?

If you were a car, what kind would you be?

I f you could live somewhere else for a year, where would you go?

If you were given a thousand dollars with the rule that you couldn’t spend it on yourself, what would you do with it? What was the best day of your life so far?

I f you knew you were going to spend a year in a science station in Antarctica, what three things would you most want to take with you to do when you weren’t working?

If you could change places with a celebrity, who would it be and why?

W  hat do you think is the secret to staying young at heart?

If you could go to a fancy restaurant and price were no object, where would you go and what would you order?

What  bargain would you love to find on eBay or at a garage sale?

What is the best way to cheer you up when you’re down?

What  do you hope someone will invent soon?

What is the one thing you’ve done in your life that you are proudest of?

I f someone gave you a gift certificate for a tattoo, what would you get and where would you put it?

If you formed a band, what would you name it? What kind of music would you play?

W  hich would you rather be: A famous athlete, a great singer, or an important politician?


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Thanksgiving Made Easy Preparation for Thanksgiving can overwhelm even the most seasoned home cook. Beyond turkey, stuffing, gravy, and cranberry sauce, the primary ingredient required is organization. Once you figure it out, the hard part is over. — BY GINA CONROY Thanksgiving is one of America’s favorite holidays. History documents that after a devastating and deadly first year in the new world, the Pilgrims collected an abundant crop in the fall of 1621 and celebrated with a feast of thanks to God for his provision. Little did they know that the men’s gunfire from their “fowling” would attract the attention of the Wampanoag Native Americans, who heard the excessive gunshots and thought the Pilgrims were under attack.

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Imagine the Pilgrims’ surprise when Chief Massasoit arrived with 90 of his men ready to aid the settlers in battle. Imagine Massasoit’s surprise when he realized he had shown up uninvited to the Pilgrims’ feast. Imagine the stress the Pilgrims felt when realizing there wasn’t enough food to feed their unexpected guests. Massasoit, probably not wanting to be that guest, sent his men hunting for game. They returned

with deer and presented their gift to their hosts. You could say it was the first potluck in the new world. Though the scenery and table settings have changed over the centuries, and turkey has replaced deer as the main course, family and friends still gather together, giving thanks like the very first Thanksgiving. While it’s highly unlikely 90 unexpected guests would ever show up to your Thanksgiving dinner, here’s a stress-free guide to help you host

and have a thankful Thanksgiving without a cooking breakdown.

PLAN THE MENU

Nothing cuts through the stress of the holiday like planning. With today’s technology, online recipes, and cooking shows, it’s never too early to start. You can meal plan solo or invite family and friends to help. You may want to try a few new recipes before Thanksgiving to make sure you “nail it” before


the big day. Don’t forget to plan for people with food restrictions, and schedule the mealtime around work and football schedules so that no one feels left out of the celebration.

BE THANKFUL FOR TAKEOUT

Though many of us grew up watching our grandmothers and mothers slave away in the kitchen before and after the meal, more of us are choosing to keep it simple to avoid the stress and enjoy the day. While hiring a caterer might be overkill unless you have the money to spend or want to impress your family and friends, consider ordering holiday takeout. Restaurants and groups like Justin Thompson Catering (tulsacatering. com/holiday-dinners) provide the entire dinner from turkey and ham to green beans and mashed potatoes, and the food tastes like grandma made. Don’t forget to order the mouth-watering rolls and rhubarb jelly. There’s even a wide selection of pies. Ordering meals from grocery stores like Whole Foods has become more popular and can cost as low as $10 a person. Just remember you might want to order extra servings. What is Black Friday without leftovers? You can serve the food straight out of the metal tins or take out platters for quick clean up or transfer the items to your serving dishes, and no one will know it didn’t come from your oven.

POTLUCK -

Hosting a potluck is not without precedent. Remember the Wampanoag? It not only eases the pressure on the host, but it allows guests to share their favorite dishes. With today’s online meal planning websites, hosting a potluck is easy and efficient. First, choose a meal-planning site. Create a sign-up sheet and add the

most popular Thanksgiving items, then sign up for the dishes you plan to cook. Allow space for guests to bring a new recipe or a twist on an old favorite. List vegan, gluten-free, and other allergy-free items so you can be mindful of guests with dietary restrictions. Add spaces for a cleanup crew for guests who might not have time or money to contribute. Once completed, invite your guests to sign up. If you’re not internet savvy, call guests asking them what items they plan on bringing. Just remember, as the host you will need to keep track of all this information and send gentle reminders. The online signups may have an automated reminder system, so if that’s important to you, consider that when choosing which one to use. While you can always plan for the best, as the saying goes, you should also prepare for the worst. Have extra ingredients on hand to throw together missing dishes like that green bean casserole or cranberry sauce someone forgot to bring. No matter what shows up on your table, decide to be thankful. Don’t forget to have a backup plan for those unexpected events when Rover eats the turkey while everyone is watching the game. Having a stash of frozen precooked boneless turkey, ham, or even turkey pot pies can ease the disappointment of a ruined meal. Once you’ve planned your menu, it’s time to start your shopping list. With today’s “to do” apps and Alexa, that’s not a problem. You can create lists hands-free and set reminders to shop for the items or use pen and paper. Just remember to bring your list when you go shopping.

SERVING SIZE MATTERS

Remember it’s a tradition to leave Thanksgiving dinner bloated and gorged, so it’s better to have too much food than not enough. But how much is more than enough?

Today’s online Thanksgiving food planning calculators take away most of the guesswork. While some are basic, others factor whether guests are children or adult, and light or heavy eaters. There’s even a setting to calculate if you want leftovers. You can calculate for light, medium, or heavy drinkers, for those who wish to indulge in the fruit of the vine. If you’re not into technology, consider 1.5 to 2 pounds per person is more than enough. Foodnetwork.com also has a list of amounts of each item based on the number of guests.

SHOP, SO YOU DON’T DROP

Buy the bird or ham as soon as they’re available. Don’t wait until the last minute because they may be hard to find. You may want to pick up an extra turkey or ham just in case. If you don’t need it, then you’ll have a head start on your Christmas dinner shopping. Stock up on non-perishable items like stuffing, potatoes, cranberries (whole or can), and other items that have a shelf life. The only caveat is to remember what you bought and where you stashed the supplies. Though fresh is always best, having Thanksgiving staples in your pantry can help cut down on the stress as the holiday draws nearer.

SET IT AND FORGET IT

Whether you’re serving dinner on fine china or decorated paper plates, you can set the table days before the meal. While some may want to use their best china, consider the cleanup time and if you wish to spend another hour in the kitchen. To cut down on the cleanup, use disposable decorative plates with chargers and napkins with napkin rings to add that holiday flair. Plan which serving dishes you’ll use, iron the tablecloth, and set the table ahead of time. If you’re

worried about your setting collecting dust, throw a clean sheet over it to ensure everything stays clean for Thanksgiving.

TAKE INVENTORY

Remember that menu list you planned and those groceries you bought? Double-check to see what you still need to buy. In the past, Walmart was the only one doing online ordering and instant pickup. Now stores like Sam’s and Target offer similar services. Just know that some of these stores require a two-day advance order, and advance ordering times may be different during the holidays. If you’re picky about your produce, you can shop a week in advance or order online for pickup. Although some shoppers claim you pay a little extra, it may be worth it.

TIME IT OUT

Running through the cooking schedule can save a lot of time and stress. Write a timetable of what goes in the oven when. This will not only help you keep the food preparation flowing, but it will help you remember to warm up the rolls and pull the cranberry sauce from the refrigerator. Delegate tasks to different people to cut down on the workload for the host. Clean out your refrigerator so you have space to store all the food you’ll be cooking in the next few days. This also cuts down on the stress of how to prepare and keep everything fresh. And lastly, don’t forget to confirm the potluck dishes and cleanup crew.

THAW THE BIRD

Nothing evokes a state of panic like realizing the night before Thanksgiving that you forgot to thaw the turkey. Most packaging will give you the proper thawing time, but the general rule is to allow for 24 hours of defrosting time for every 4 to 5 pounds of turkey. When you pull the bird or ham out of the freezer, don’t forget to shop

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for any forgotten items. Nothing evokes your inner Grinch more than standing in the long checkout line with the other shoppers scrounging for last-minute items.

CHOP SO YOU DON’T DROP

Chopping and prepping vegetables, cheeses, and hors d’oeuvres a few days ahead not only saves you time but also counter space. Also, you can oversee little helpers without worrying about something boiling over on the stove. Plus, it gives children a sense of responsibility and accomplishment to be part of the preparations.

24 HOURS OUT

Cook and prepare vegetables and stuffing, then put them in oven-safe dishes for warming in the microwave or oven. Lumpy mashed potatoes can be taken care of the night before and warmed in a crockpot Thanksgiving morning. Boil eggs and put together hors d’oeuvres trays if you have enough space in your refrigerator. Bake pies, cornbread, and other items that would take up space in the oven.

PREP THE HOUSE

Start your holiday with a clean kitchen and empty dishwashers and trashcans. Line your bins with more than one bag so that you have a new bag ready to go when one becomes full. Remove precious objects from the living room to save them from hyper

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little ones. If coats and bags are going on your bed, cover your duvet and pillows with a sheet to protect them from the elements. Finally, light a candle in the bathroom — it’s just a nice touch.

IT’S KICKOFF TIME

With all the planning done, Thanksgiving Day should be a piece of cake… or pie. Whether you go traditional with your turkey, deep-fry it, or try the turkey in a bag, it should be the first thing you start on after you wake up. For the best flavor possible, the turkey needs to be out of the oven (or smoker or fryer) at least 30 minutes before you plan to carve it, so it has time to rest before serving. Assemble and serve hors d’oeuvres an hour or two before you plan to sit down and eat. Set timers to remind you of your cooking schedule. Right before you sit down to eat, have Alexa remind you to pull the cranberry sauce from the refrigerator.

REMEMBER WHAT TRULY MATTERS

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to set aside differences, family feuds, and long-held grudges. It’s a time to reflect on what is truly important and what we have to be thankful for in life. The best holidays are the ones where everyone enjoys the day, including the host. And nothing makes the holiday sweeter than a day filled with love and laughter. And of course, pumpkin pie.


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The Way of the

Whisker

Trimmed, bushy, or three-day stubble: No matter how you wear them, beards have been growing more popular over the last decade, and it doesn’t look like men will be cutting back on the trend anytime soon. Beard growing and maintenance has come a long way since your grandfather was sporting his woolly winter whiskers. Today, facial hair is avant-garde. Some may even say beard styles can be a work of art. While old-school barbers and salons are still around, they might not cut it when it comes to sculpting the new trends in beards.

This is the season of razors sitting idle on sinks and chins disappearing in silky and wiry, trimmed and untamed, curly and cascading decoration.

just throw a clipper guard on and do that any longer.” One search on the internet will show you just how many different beard styles there are. Deciding which one to sport is enough to make a guy want to shave it all off. And yet more and more men are choosing to grow facial hair, especially during No-Shave November. So, what’s behind the trend? McDaniel can’t say for sure, but she has a theory.

Crystal McDaniel worked in salons for 20 years before she opened Tonsorial, “part old-school barbershop, part hip destination salon,” at The Boxyard in downtown Tulsa.

“Different people feel a lot more confident with having hair on their face,” says McDaniel. “It’s almost like armor or a shield of protection.” If someone has had acne as a kid or other skin blemishes, a beard can mask the imperfections of their skin.

“At the salons, we would run clippers over beards and call it a beard trim. But now there’s a style to it,” says McDaniel. “There are guys who like [a style] where it comes to a point or where it’s squared off. You can’t

You might think that growing a beard requires little more than, you know, growing it. But that’s not the case. Like the hair on top of your head, beards require maintenance: washing, trimming, conditioning, and yes, even brushing.

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By Gina Conroy

Whether you’ve been growing your beard for a while, or just starting, there are some things you should know to help keep those wiry whiskers working for you all month long and beyond.

CONSIDER FACE STRUCTURE Faces come in all shapes and sizes. And so should beards. When choosing the style of your beard, first consider your facial structure: round, square, oval, or rectangle. Different types of beards complement different faces. “If the face is very round and you let your beard grow at the same rate, the cheeks will emphasize the round shape,” says McDaniel. “Taking the length down on the cheeks and leaving length at the chin creates a more flattering shape.” For a rectangular face, McDaniel says it’s sometimes better to shorten the beard in the chin area to take away that extra length. “To have that chiseled jawline, we fade and taper


“Getting that shape is what takes the beard to the next level,” says McDaniel. “It brings a lot of distinction when you have those angles that you cut in.” While some men might be able to trim and shape their beards on their own, McDaniel says most men are not able to determine how much hair is too much on the cheeks and not enough on the chin. To grow a beard right from the start, she suggests scheduling a beard trim with a barber the next time you get a haircut. Not only will they assess your facial structure for the best beard for you, but they can determine where your jaw hits and where your facial hair doesn’t grow in as thick as in other areas. They can start the trimming and shaping early to compensate for weaker areas of growth. “Some men have hair that grows in really good and everything starts linking up, and then others are just not growing in as you think, and you’re constantly sculpting and contouring and making it special for that individual,” she says. A good beard trim should also include cleaning under the neck. Many men don’t realize there’s a huge difference between neck hair and beard hair. “Trimming the neck hair helps push the beard outward and gives it more fullness in the chin area,” says McDaniel. “It gives it a more chiseled look. How often should you schedule a beard trim? Every four weeks or when you schedule your hair appointment.

PRODUCT MAKES PERFECT If your scratchy whiskers are preventing you from getting the kisses and loving you deserve, chances are you’re not pampering your beard as you should. While most men have grown accustomed to using gel and foams on the hair on their head, they often overlook applying product to their beards. “Making sure your beard has enough moisture is important to growing it to the length that you want,” says McDaniel. “We always recommend using styling products like beard oils, foams, and even mustache wax.” While oils help maintain moisture, foams keep those wiry flyaway hairs in their place. When the mustache is long enough, McDaniel recommends wax to get that part in the middle of the lip directly in between nostrils and for extra shaping. Long gone are the stereotypes once associated with beard wearing men. No longer considered lazy, unkempt, or only the tattooed biker type, any man can grow a beard and look good doing it. “Well-dressed men in suits and ties are sporting beards,” says McDaniel. “I feel like right now it’s a world of opportunity for facial hair.”

TONSORIAL

GROOMED FOR SUCCESS GROWING A BEARD IS ONE THING, BUT HOW YOU CARE FOR IT DETERMINES HOW GREAT IT LOOKS. TO KEEP YOUR BEARD LOOKING (AND SMELLING) GOOD, YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE TO PUT IN SOME WORK.

Wash

You wouldn’t use regular face soap on your hair, so it makes no sense to use it on your beard either. They’re both hair, and hair needs shampoo. There are plenty of great beard-specific shampoos out there that use special botanicals to help soften the hair and keep it from getting dried out. Just make sure that you like the smell of whatever you use, since it’s right by your nose.

Condition

Keeping your beard soft is the key to not wanting to shave it all off. A dry, scratchy beard will be unbearable, and the way to avoid that is to use a beard conditioner. A good conditioner will moisturize your beard and keep it healthy — two important factors in maintaining facial comfort. A conditioner also has the added benefit of working almost like a styling gel, so you can keep that beast tame.

Oil

While a conditioner does soften your beard, good beard oil will soften it even further, plus has the added advantage of warding off the dreaded beard dandruff. No one wants to see a guy with a dusting of skin flakes down the front of his shirt, after all. And perhaps the coup de grace of good beard oil is that it will make your beard smell amazing. And since it never leaves your face, smelling amazing is a pretty sweet perk.

Disinfect

Beards can get pretty gross. So, while washing it is essential, a good added measure is an antibacterial beard balm, something that further helps soften, but also kills all of the little microscopic critters hoping to set up shop in there.

Brush

Keep your beard from getting tangled and unruly by brushing it daily with a beard brush. It’ll also help spread the beard oil you’re using (as well as your natural face oils) to keep your beard as healthy as possible.

Trim

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A PROFESSIONAL TRIM GOES A LONG WAY If you want to start growing strong from the start, it’s never too soon for a professional trim.

“If men can make it past the itching stage, they can grow anything,” says McDaniel, who recommends beard oils to soften the new hairs. Washing your beard and keeping it clean with a beard shampoo, specially designed to help with the flaking of the skin, can also cut down on the itching. Always read the labels for proper use, as washing too often can dry out your skin and damage hair growth.

TO

“We have an eye for it,” says McDaniel, who admits it’s easier to create a style for a client when she can look him straight in the face. Besides facial shape, growth patterns and whether the hair grows well or sparse in certain areas should be considered. As a former hairstylist and salon owner, McDaniel feels barbers have an “edge” to beard styling that not everybody is trained for.

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If you’re unsure of which beard is right for you based on your facial structure, McDaniel suggests consulting a barber trained in the latest beard styling techniques.

KEEP IT GROWING One reason most men give up growing their beard is because of the itch. When the new growth or sharp hair breaks through the skin, it irritates. Also, dead skin cells from the face get trapped in the beard, causing more itching. Although the itch lasts one to three weeks, it can be so severe that men give up and reach for the razor.

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to make differing lengths,” says McDaniel. “This gives an illusion of a jawline if there isn’t one present.”

The final piece of maintenance for your beard is that you need to trim it occasionally. Beard hair doesn’t always grow evenly. Plus, as it grows out, you’re going to want to give it a little bit of shape. This can be done by visiting a place like Tonsorial or investing in a quality beard trimmer — one with a selection of attachments that you can use to keep from accidentally carving out giant bald spots for when your hand slips.

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After being stuck in the house, trying to beat the heat after a longer summer than expected, it feels fantastic to get outdoors and enjoy nature. For a lot of men and women in Oklahoma, spending time outside not only means hiking the trails or picnics in the park, but it also means wild game hunting. Some say Northeast Oklahoma is prime real estate for hunting, where plenty of memories can be made during recreation times like these.

IN THE

HUNT There’s more to hunting than sitting in a stand waiting on “the” shot. It’s not necessarily easy, but with a little preparation (and maybe a guide), even a novice can have a great outing this fall. BY ROB HARMON

However, for those of us who have always dreamed of taking down that enormous whitetail buck or tracking a wild, feral half-ton hog but have never even hunted, figuring out where to start is a huge task itself. Lots of questions need to be answered before heading into the great outdoors. What weapon will you use? Bow, rifle, handgun? What will you hunt? Hog, deer, bear, rabbit, or squirrel? Should you use a professional guide or go on your own? If you hire a guide, what comes with their services? Answer all those questions, and you may have the hunting experience of a lifetime. Fail to ponder all the options, and you could end up spending a boatload of money, have a miserable time, and have very little to show from it. Let’s take a look at some key things to consider, before going on your first hunt. Ben Pogany with Pogany Whitetails, a hunting preserve 30 minutes south of Tulsa, says there’s a lot to think about for a first-timer. This even includes what you wear. “If it’s hot, dress appropriately. If it’s cold, be ready,” says Pogany. “You can’t sit in a tree stand for hours if you’re freezing. It’s not going to be fun for you, and you’re not going to be successful because you’re going to be moving around too much.” Pogany says the important issues are being comfortable shooting and making sure the scope of the bow or rifle you’re using is sighted

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Also, unlike a whitetail deer, if you put a bad shot on a hog, it can come after you. That’s when the hunted becomes the hunter, and you’re what’s on the menu. Not good. That brings us to the issue of what to hunt. Deer, hog, some other smaller animal? Take hogs, for example. Wild hogs are a dangerous animal and a significant menace in Oklahoma. Cattle farmers have to minimize loss by getting rid of them. Hogs root their beds in the ground to stay cool in the summer and warm in the winter. But those holes are just the right size for cows to break their legs in. “If you raise cattle, then having too many hogs on your land is pretty tough to take,” says Pogany. “They also destroy hayfields and cause other trouble for landowners.” A service offered at Pogany Whitetails is tracking hogs on

Deer are more astute to their surroundings, according to Pogany, and are more likely to smell a hunter than a hog would. Scent is everything when you’re hunting whitetail. Staying mindful of the way the wind is blowing is paramount. Hogs are typically just rooting around looking for food and not picking up on scent as much. To that end, use products to help mask scents, such as soap, body wash, shampoo, and laundry detergent. You can also take bottles of scent-blocking spray to use while you’re in the great outdoors. Using a guide on your first hunt is up to you, but a few answered questions about a guide you’re considering might come in handy. How much money do their services cost? What do you get for the money? The success rate is a huge factor. You don’t want to spend a ton of money on a guide and not kill anything. Is the guide going to process the animal for you? Do they take you to the shooting range beforehand? What do they offer? For over a decade, Pogany Whitetails has been answering those questions and so many more. His company also offers a three day, all-inclusive trophy whitetail hunt that includes lodging, meals, drinks (including beer and wine), and a one-onone guide. They also offer several exotic hunts including wildebeest, zebra, white buffalo, and elk.

HERE ARE SOME OF THE COMMON MISTAKES BEGINNING HUNTERS MAKE AND HOW TO AVOID THEM.

PRACTICE Too many new and experienced hunters don’t spend enough time practicing with their weapon of choice. This is particularly true for bowhunters, who typically require much more practice to maintain proper form and consistent shot execution. The best way to ensure you can make a great shot is by practicing year-round in as close to real hunting conditions as possible. For bowhunters, this may mean practicing from an elevated position and taking shots at a variety of distances and angles. For firearm hunters, it may mean practicing freehand shots from various positions. You won’t always have a nice solid rifle rest when that buck-of-a-lifetime presents a broadside shot.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS If it’s warm, wear layers. You are likely to be cold in the morning and evening and hot during the day. For cold weather situations, coveralls and heavy coats are the norm. Keep your head and neck warm with a warmer and cap. Boots are the most critical piece of clothing for cold weather hunting. There are several things you can buy on the cheap and get away with; hunting boots are not one of them. Buy quality waterproof boots. For cold weather hunting, they should have at least 800 grams of Thinsulate. Keep your feet warm, and you can keep hunting.

PLAY THE WIND Regardless of which scent-eliminating products you use, you will never be 100% scent-free. The only surefire way to avoid being busted by a deer’s nose is by staying downwind of the deer. Of course, to do so, you first need to have a good idea of which direction the deer will come from. You will also have to be mindful of the wind direction at all times.

HANG IT RIGHT When selecting a stand tree, always look for potential issues. Is the tree alive and safe to put a stand in? You’ll also want to consider if you will have any cover in the stand to break up your outline. You will need to know which direction, in relation to the tree, the sun will rise and set, so you aren’t left staring straight into the sun on a morning or evening hunt. Also, keep in mind from which direction the deer are most likely to approach. You’ll want your stand to be positioned in a way that allows you to get a shot without a lot of excessive movement.

KNOW THE LAND If at all possible, you should be familiar with the land you are hunting. Sure, you may get an opportunity to hunt on a piece of property or even public hunting land that you don’t have the chance to scout before the hunt. However, if you do have full access to the property you will hunt, you should put in the time to be well versed in the details of that property.

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20182 Indian Road | Kellyville 918-521-5018 poganywhitetails.com

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“Everybody wants a clean kill,” Pogany says. “Everybody wants an ethical situation. A guide is going to help you with that aspect of it. Especially if you’re new to the sport.”

“Scent is the biggest thing. We’re going to adjust where we hunt and how we hunt, based on the wind.”

EVEN WITH A GREAT MENTOR OR GUIDE, YOU WILL LIKELY STILL FIND YOURSELF MAKING SOME TYPICAL ROOKIE MISTAKES. BUT TAKE HEART: EVEN AVID HUNTERS FIND WAYS TO MESS UP HUNTS REGULARLY.

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Most of us who have never been hunting aren’t going to think about making sure the rifle or bow’s scope will help us hit what we’re shooting. Pogany says that’s one reason to have a guide go with you on your first outing. A good guide can sight in a weapon much quicker than the person who goes out and buys the first rifle off the shelf. Nobody wants to put a bad shot on an animal and then watch it suffer.

“It doesn’t matter what you’re hunting,” says Pogany, “staying flexible is a key, because depending on which way the wind is blowing, the hunt changes.

IN FOR THE KILL

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“A good guide,” says Pogany, “will take you to the range and make sure you can shoot. That might also include helping you sight in your gun.”

a farmer’s land and in the wild, taking them to their ranch outside of Kellyville, Oklahoma, and letting people hunt them.

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in. Before your first hunt, go to a shooting range and test your skills, as well as remind yourself of the safety rules. Take the time to make sure you feel at ease with your weapon before going out into the real situation.

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FRA

City Hall

DEC

1S

R

13

10

N

12

20

VER

OOD ELW

244

MAI

DEN

51

D

Brady Theater

244

ONEOK Field

CHE

Woody AR Guthrie Center

5

OOD ENW GRE

37

N ERO CAM Guthrie Green DY BRA

OOD

11

BRA

64

19

ENW

412

Greenwood Cultural Center

34

A

Cain’s Ballroom

GRE

41

E

TULSA LOCATOR TL

DOWNTOWN TULSA

30

TH

3

2 4

CHERRY 5

THE BOXYARD Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 Jason’s Deli | A5-30 Juniper | D3-1 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 Mexicali | D2-11 MixCo | C2-17 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41

PRHYME | D2-12 Sisserou’s | D2-20 SMOKE. | A5-32 The Tavern | E2-37 Tavolo | C3-3 Ti Amo | C2-4 Yokozuna | D3-38

SHOPPING American Hatfield | D3-33 Boomtown Tees | D3-14 Garden Deva | D5-37 Modern Mess | D3-33

32

51

Rosegold | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33

American Hatfield | D3-33 Blank Med Spa | D3-33 Blue Sky Bank | D3-33 Modern Mess | D3-33 Riley’s Wine & Spirits | D3-33 Rosegold | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33 Tonsorial | D3-33

EVERYTHING ELSE The Bond | D4-39 Blank Med Spa | D3-33

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TL TULSA LOCATOR

G

TULSA AND SURROUNDING AREAS

PREV EW

SPERRY

40

7

7

86TH N

OWAS

76TH N

27 56TH N

F

75

38 Tulsa Zoo

36 N TH

17

129TH E.

51

61ST

48

28

2

64

ST

111

TH

72

18

81ST

91ST

7

32 5

46

20

9

BIXBY 47

6

129TH E.

16

71 GARNETT

29

MEMORIAL

4

65

MEMORIAL

121ST

70

44

55

43 101

30

MINGO

23

15

40

14

SHERIDAN

3

36

64

12

42

26 2

Oral Roberts Univ. Mabee Ct. 58

59

Between 111th & 121st 1

66

13

YALE

48

Oklahoma Aquarium

JENKS

50 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

97

21 32

72

61 24

SAPULPA

2

LaFortune 80 Park

St. Francis Hospital

83

41ST

56

41

A

31ST Hicks Park

22 44

169

31

HARVARD

Jones Airport

44

91Whiteside Park

LEWIS

Turkey Mountain Park

93 21ST

45

5

23

PEORIA

B

RIVERSIDE

ARKANSAS RIVER

UNION 75

72

51

MIDTOWN

3

39

6

Expo Square

29

Philbrook Museum of Art7

94

Tulsa State Fairgrounds

GARNETT

Chandler Park

11TH

MINGO

35

PINE

MEMORIAL

27

Woodward Park St. John Med. Ctr.

244

APACHE

48 SHERIDAN

Of 21 1Univ. Tulsa

2

50

169

PINE YALE

DOWNTOWN BOK Ctr. 30

75

HARVARD

OSU Tulsa

11

SAND SPRINGS

11

LEWIS

D

Crawford Park

UTICA

412

36TH N

Tulsa Air & Space Museum

26TH N / APACHE

PEORIA

51

GILCREASE MUSEUM

Gilcrease Museum

GILCREASE EXPY

MARTIN LUTHER KING

KWY ALE P TISD E

46TH N MINGO

19 Tulsa Botanic Garden

C

Mohawk Park Lake Yahola


TULSA LOCATOR TL 96TH N PRESENTED BY:

72

SSO

360 Home | D4-21 Antique Restoration | D4-11 Bella’s House | B5-32, A5-32 Children’s Orchard | A5-18 Edible Arrangements | C4-7, A5-7, G6-7 I-44 Antique Mall | C4-3 Landella | D5-45 Miss McGillicutty’s Antiques | A4-54 Secret Gardens | A6-47 Tulsa Stained Glass | C5-56 Ziegler Art & Frame | D4-17

52

CATOOSA 10

412

66

244

1

53

26

DINING

209TH E.

BROKEN ARROW 40

72 ASPEN

23

63 COUNTY LINE

LYNN LANE

MAIN ELM

est. 20 13

7

Ricardos | C5-31 Rincón Mexican Grill & Cantina | B5-13 SMOKE. | D4-27, G6-27 Steak Stuffers USA | C5-14 Table 20 | D4-35 Ti Amo | B5-80 Waterfront Grill | A4-70 Yokozuna | A5-43 Yutaka Grill Sushi & Buffet | C5-12

ENTERTAINMENT

COUNTY LINE / 193RD E.

177TH E.

161ST E.

1ST

Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

145TH E.

1ST

SHOPPING

8

Albert G’s Bar & Q | C4-91 Amazing Thai Cuisine | B7-63 Brownies Burgers | D4-29, B5-29 Chimi’s | B5-2, C4-2, D4-2 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 El Chico | D6-93 El Guapo’s | B4-15 Elmer’s BBQ | C4-39 Fat Daddy’s Pub and Grille | B5-64 Flo’s Burger Diner | D4-1, D8-1 Fuji | B5-20 George’s Pub | A4-61 Goodcents Deli Fresh Subs | A5-9 In The Raw | C4-23, B5-23, B7-23 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Jason’s Deli | D4-30, B5-30 Kirin | B6-28 Kitch | A4 -42 Los Cabos | G6-40, A4-40, B7-40 Los Mariachis | B5-26, A4-26 Maryn’s Taphouse and Raw Bar | A4-58 McAllister’s | B4-72, B5-72, B6-72, D5-72, G6-72 McNellie’s Pub | B5-16 Miami Nights Restaurant & Lounge | D5-5 Molly’s Landing | E8-52 Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano | C4-94

Cinergy | B5-55 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 Got Wood | A4-24 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Tulsa Air and Space Museum | E5-38

CASINO Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | D7-10 Osage Casino Hotel | E3-19 OTHER OSAGE CASINO LOCATIONS: 222 Allen Road | Bartlesville 301 Blackjack Dr. | Sand Springs 5591 W. Rogers Blvd. | Skiatook 39 Deer Ave. | Hominy 2017 E. 15th St. and Hwy. 99 | Pawhuska

River Spirit Casino Resort | B4-83

EVERYTHING ELSE Blue Cottage | A4-59 Carey Clinic | B5-36 Kuts 4 Kids | B4-48, B6-48 New Life Massage & Bodyworks | C4-22 Shears | A4-41

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IT’S EASY TO GIVE UP ON HOPE AND A PLAN WHEN IT DOESN’T HAPPEN IN A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF TIME. LUCKILY FOR BOOKER T. WASHINGTON’S TREY PHIPPS, HIS PERSISTENCE AND PATIENCE PAID OFF IN THE FORM OF AN OFFER FROM HIS DREAM PROGRAM. by john tranchina

|

photos by marc rains

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Booker T. Washington High School senior Trey Phipps always dreamed of playing Division I basketball at the University of Oklahoma. And it wasn’t just because his father, Conley (also his coach at BTW), played there. “Growing up, I was always an OU fan,” says Trey, a 6-foot-2, 170-pound shooting guard who led the Hornets to the Class 6A state championship last year with a virtuoso performance.

But when a scholarship from the Sooners hadn’t materialized, he committed to the University of Tulsa in May 2018, at the end of his sophomore year. The problem was that he felt like he was settling. So, last July, he made the tough decision to decommit from the Golden Hurricane. As fate would have it, two days later, he received an offer to wear the crimson and cream.


“It was like a dream come true to be able to get the opportunity to go play at Oklahoma,” Trey says. “[The commitment to TU] happened kind of fast. Tulsa is a great school, and it’s a great place to play basketball, but I always wanted to bet on myself to go play at the highest level.” Conley, who starred at Cleveland High School (about 35 miles northwest of Tulsa), went on to play two seasons at Oklahoma from 1984-86 before transferring to Northeastern State University in Tahlequah to get more playing time. “It’s special for me to see him go to OU because that’s where he’s always wanted to go,” says Conley, who served as an assistant coach at Oral Roberts University from 1999-2014. “The fact that I went there and played for a couple of years has nothing to do with it. It’s the fact that he’s worked hard to achieve a dream. Now he’s got to chase that other goal of being an excellent player at OU.” It is a path that Trey has been following since he was young, accompanying his dad to ORU practices and getting a firsthand look at what it takes for Division I college athletes to succeed. “My dad would take me up to the gym to work out with the college guys,” Trey says. “It was helpful; it was just showing me how much I loved the game and how much I loved to be around it. It helped me grow as a person and know what an athlete has to deal with and know what type of work an athlete has to put in to be at the highest level.” And Conley has been there the whole way, directly coaching him the last six years, including for his freshman year at Sapulpa High School in 2016-17 and then at Booker T. Washington after that. The dynamic of coaching his

son has involved a persistent search for balance, Conley says, because trying to separate the roles of ‘dad’ and ‘coach’ has been an ongoing process. “It’s difficult for me staying within the boundaries of being a dad, and being a coach,” Conley says. “The thing I try to do is be his coach for two hours every day when we’re practicing and be his dad for the rest of the time. Sometimes, I cross those boundaries. It’s something that’s been a continuous battle for many years, but we make it through it. We have a great relationship, on and off the floor.” “We’re pretty good about it,” Trey adds. “He leaves it at the gym. It makes it special knowing you get to go out there and get a win for your dad. He’s been coaching me all four years [of high school]. It’s been more of an adjustment for me, knowing that I need to be on point every day because he’s going to hold me accountable.” After a strong sophomore season in which Booker T. Washington reached the Class 5A final before falling to Memorial, Trey took another step forward last season, when he averaged 17.6 points, 5.2 assists, and 4.5 rebounds per game. And even though they moved up to face tougher competition in Class 6A, the Hornets continued to excel, as Trey formed an outstanding duo with teammate Bryce Thompson, who is still deciding between Division I suitors including Oklahoma, North Carolina, Kansas, and others. Perhaps Trey’s best performance of the season came in the 6A state final, a game played at ORU’s Mabee Center — the same court he spent so many hours at as a boy. He scored a career-high 42 points, including eight 3-pointers, in BTW’s 82-70 triumph over Putnam City North.

Trey Phipps

“It was very special,” Trey says of winning the state title. “It was a surreal feeling to get over the hump and get a ring finally.” Trey was named a Tulsa World Player of the Year finalist, then followed up his high school season with an outstanding spring and summer for his AAU club team, the Tulsa-based Playing with Purpose. With Thompson as his teammate again, Trey starred in several AAU showcase tournaments, including one in Atlanta that had many of the top Division I college coaches, including OU’s Lon Kruger, in attendance. “He’s an extremely hard worker, and very dedicated to his craft,” Conley says of Trey. “He’s a very confident player, and that helps him a lot. He’s a very good shooter, whether that’s catch-andshoot or off the dribble. He also has excellent range, he’s

a good ball-handler, and he’s a good passer. “When he started this process, to say I thought he’d be good enough to play at the University of Oklahoma, I certainly couldn’t say that. I will say that nobody’s going to work harder at it than him, and that’s what I’m the proudest of. He’s committed, he’s done the hard stuff, he hasn’t slighted the process, and he’s turned himself into an excellent player.” Now, with his goal met, Trey continues to work hard to improve and plans on helping his high school team defend the state title. “We’re excited,” Trey says of the upcoming season. “I think we know that we’re going to have a target on our backs every night, and our expectations are nothing but another state championship.”

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TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

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TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

Live Music

Check Website for Dates!

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

SISTER ACT ADAIR HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS AND TWIN SISTERS, SOPHIE AND MIA BAGBY, ARE POISED TO GIVE THE WARRIORS A CHANCE AT REPEATING ON THE HARDWOOD AS CLASS 3A STATE CHAMPS. by john tranchina photos by marc rains

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As twins, Sophie and Mia Bagby do almost everything together, including playing on the Adair High School basketball squad. So it was difficult for both of them last year when Sophie missed most of the season with a knee injury. But with a lot of encouragement in her rehab from Mia, Sophie returned just in time for the Class 3A

state tournament and helped spark the Warriors to the state championship.

Now, as seniors, the fraternal twins, who, as you might expect, enjoy a special kind of chemistry on the court, are ready for one last high school basketball season together. After competing during track and field season last spring (but admittedly slower than

usual), Sophie had a bit of a setback with her knee late in the summer, which prompted her to undergo a minor arthroscopic procedure in mid-September to remove loose cartilage. But after more rehab, she should be back and ready to go again by the time the 2019-20 season gets underway in early December.

Dealing with the initial injury last year was difficult for both sisters.


Sophie, a shooting guard, tore the ACL in her knee Aug. 23, 2018, and underwent reconstructive surgery on Sept. 4 (of course, she remembers the exact dates). The usual recovery time for ACL surgery is listed as about six to nine months, so the fact that she was able to get back and play in early March (just about six months after the operation) is impressive. “It was super hard, because basketball is my favorite sport, and it’s hard not being out there and having to sit out and watch everybody play,” Sophie says. “But I also knew that it was part of God’s plan and that he had something bigger waiting at the end. So I had to trust the process.”

Sophie Bagby

Mia, the Warriors’ starting point guard, had a tough time taking the court without her twin in the lineup.

but she assured me that I was. She helped keep me going and helped me to stay strong.”

“It was challenging,” Mia says. “She was a strong figure out on the court, and she had a good presence. Without her, it was crazy and hectic. I hated it.” As the season went on and the games remaining dwindled, the question as to whether Sophie would get back in time, and if she even should attempt it, weighed on everyone’s mind. “It was kind of scary because I didn’t know for sure if I should come back and risk it early,” Sophie says. “But I also had a great surgeon and good physical therapists at Summit Physical Therapy in Claremore. They helped me through the process and got me to where I needed to be.” By all accounts, Mia played a crucial role in Sophie’s rehab process, helping encourage her and keep her motivated to work hard. “She had a huge role in it,” Sophie says. “I was always super discouraged and would feel like I wasn’t doing enough, or I wasn’t working fast enough,

“I tried my best,” Mia says. “We all wanted her back so bad. I needed her back. I thought she handled it the best I’ve ever seen. She did all of her exercises, did everything everyone told her to do, listened to her therapist, her doctor; she was determined to get back, and she made it happen.” Sophie finally retook the floor in the Area playoffs, playing somewhat sparingly in two games before the state tournament started. Even though she wasn’t 100%, Sophie provided a big spark. In the state final, Adair trailed by 12 points in the third quarter, but Sophie’s 3-pointer helped jump-start the comeback. Adair defeated Christian Heritage by 12 for the title. “She did all she could do,” Adair coach Scott Winfield says of Sophie. “She made three 3-pointers in every game of the state tournament. I watched her minutes and played her four minutes here and there because she wasn’t in great shape. Just having her presence out there, her nine points per game while we were in the state tournament, helped us tremendously.”

Mia Bagby “I think [her return] had a lot to do with [us winning],” Mia says. “We had that leadership that we needed, and that calmed us down and helped us remember who we were.” The fact that they were able to win it all after what Sophie endured made the victory sweeter for the twins. “The best feeling in the world,” Sophie says. “It’s been our biggest dream forever and to finally do it together, and after coming back from that injury, it’s like 10 times better.” The twins have been playing together almost their whole lives and have developed practically uncanny chemistry on the court. “We just know each other so well,” Sophie says. “We’ve been playing together since first grade, so she knows how I play, and I know how she plays. It’s easy to read each other and what we’re going to do, and it’s easy to pick her up when she’s mad or when she’s slacking or when I’m slacking. It’s kind of a different connection we have out there.” “I know when she’s going to cut to the bucket and when I can pass it to her,” says Mia. “I know

when she’s going to be open on the 3-point line. We know how we handle things when we’re stressed or when we’re not playing great, so it helps to have someone out there who can talk to me, calm me down, and knows exactly what to say and help in that situation.” Winfield appreciates how well they work together, on and off the court. “They kind of know where each other is at all the time,” Winfield says. “They’re super kids, and great in the classroom. I couldn’t ask for better players.” The twins, who both run cross-country and track, as well as participate in the FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes), are still trying to figure out their plans for 2020. For now, they realize the challenge to repeat as state champions will be difficult, but they are ready for it. “I think it motivates us even more, because we already got a glimpse of that feeling of winning the state championship, and we want it again,” Mia said. “We want to feel that again so badly; it’s motivating all of us to push ourselves to play our best.”

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LET’S GO OILERS SUN NOV 3RD VS. RAPID CITY @4:05PM TUE NOV 5TH VS. ALLEN @7:05PM FRI NOV 15TH VS. RAPID CITY @7:05PM SAT NOV 16TH VS. IDAHO @7:05PM SAT NOV 30TH VS. ALLEN @7:05PM

call (918)-632-7825 to purchase tickets now 58 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019


SS SPORTS SCHEDULE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Lloyd Noble Center (Norman, Okla.) Nov. 5 | vs UTSA | 7p Nov. 9 | vs Minnesota* | 3:30p or 7p Nov. 12 | vs Oregon State** | 10p Nov. 18 | vs William & Mary*** | 6p Nov. 21 | vs Maryland Eastern Shore*** | 7p Nov. 25 | vs Stanford**** | 8:30p Nov. 26 | vs Butler or Missouri**** | TBA –––––––––––––––––– * Sioux Falls, S.D. ** Phil Knight Invitational | Portland, Ore. *** Hall of Fame Classic | Campus Rounds Norman, Okla. **** Hall of Fame Classic | Kansas City, Mo.

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Lloyd Noble Center (Norman, Okla.) Nov. 4 | vs OCU Stars | 7p Nov. 8 | vs Prairie View A&M* | 8p Nov. 20 | vs Stephen F. Austin | 11a Nov. 23 | @ Houston | 2p Nov. 26 | vs Abilene Christian | 7p Nov. 30 | @ Wichita State | 2p –––––––––––––––––– * Preseason WNIT | Norman, Okla.

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Reynolds Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Nov. 5 | vs Houston Baptist | Noon Nov. 9 | @ UT Arlington | 7p Nov. 12 | vs Oral Roberts | 7p Nov. 16 | vs Austin Peay* | 2p Nov. 19 | vs Southeastern Louisiana* | 7p Nov. 27 | vs South Carolina State* | 1p Nov. 30 | @ Vanderbilt** | 7p –––––––––––––––––– * Vanderbilt Invitational | Tulsa, Okla. ** Vanderbilt Invitational | Nashville, Tenn. *** BOK Center Basketball Showdown | Tulsa, Okla.

ORAL ROBERTS MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Mabee Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Nov. 6 | @ Oklahoma State | 7p Nov. 8 | vs Houston Baptist | 7:30p Nov. 12 | @ Tulsa | 7p Nov. 15 | @ Iowa | 7p Nov. 19 | vs Rogers State | 7p Nov. 23 | @ Wichita State | 2p Nov. 25 | vs Southwestern Christian | 7p –––––––––––––––––– * Summit League/WAC Challenge | Chicago, Ill.

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FOOTBALL Home games played at Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium (Norman, Okla.) Nov. 9 | vs Iowa State | TBA Nov. 16 | @ Baylor | TBA Nov. 23 | vs TCU | TBA Nov. 30 | @ Oklahoma State | TBA

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Gallagher-Iba Arena (Stillwater, Okla.) Nov. 1 | vs Rogers State | 7p | Exhibition Nov. 6 | vs Oral Roberts | 7p Nov. 9 | vs Kansas City | 2p Nov. 13 | @ Charleston | 8p Nov. 17 | vs Yale | 1:30p Nov. 22 | vs Western Michigan | 7p Nov. 27 | vs Syracuse* | 6:30p Nov. 29 | vs Penn State or Ole Miss* | TBA –––––––––––––––––– * NIT Season Tip-Off | Brooklyn, N.Y.

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Gallagher-Iba Arena (Stillwater, Okla.) Nov. 5 | vs Idaho | 7p Nov. 8 | vs Lamar | 11a Nov. 13 | @ Tulsa | 7p Nov. 19 | vs Idaho State | 7p Nov. 23 | vs Rice | 2p Nov. 28 | vs Oregon* | 2:15p Nov. 29 | vs Louisville* | Noon Nov. 30 | vs UT Arlington* | Noon –––––––––––––––––– * Paradise Jam | St. Thomas, Virgin Islands

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Reynolds Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Nov. 5 | vs Stephen F. Austin | 7p Nov. 9 | vs Arkansas State | 2p Nov. 13 | vs Oklahoma State | 7p Nov. 21 | vs Oral Roberts | 7p Nov. 25 | vs Loyola Marymount | Noon Nov. 29 | vs Western Kentucky* | 2p Nov. 30 | vs Marquette* | 2p –––––––––––––––––– * St. Mary’s Thanksgiving Classic Moraga, Calif.

ORAL ROBERTS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Mabee Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Nov. 2 | vs Friends University | 2p | Exhibition Nov. 5 | vs Central Christian | 11a Nov. 8 | vs Texas State | 5p Nov. 11 | vs Wichita State | 7p Nov. 14 | @ Arkansas | TBA Nov. 18 | @ Kansas State | 6:30p Nov. 21 | @ Tulsa | 7p Nov. 23 | vs Houston Baptist | 2p Nov. 30 | vs Sam Houston State | 2p

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL Home games played at Boone Pickens Stadium (Stillwater, Okla.) Nov. 2 | vs TCU | TBA Nov. 16 | vs Kansas | TBA Nov. 23 | @ West Virginia | TBA Nov. 30 | vs Oklahoma | TBA

ALL TIMES CENTRAL // GAME DATES/TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

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GC GREEN COUNTRY SCENE

5 Tips to Tackling Your First Quilt PATTERN: Choose a pattern; one with 3-5 fabrics. SIZE: Decide how large you want your quilt to be. Many patterns give instructions for optional sizing. This gives you an idea of how much fabric you need, and you can then select it. REVIEW: Always read the entire pattern before cutting into your fabric; that way, if you have questions, you can ask them before you are fully engaged in the project. There are no stupid questions in quilting. Patterns usually follow a specific formula — fabric requirements, cutting and sewing instructions, and finishing.

0†uilt to Last

From an olden days necessity to a modern-day source of therapy, creative expression, and community, quilting continues to bind together Green Country residents of all ages, backgrounds, and skill levels. By JENNIFER ZEHNDER Growing up, there was always a sewing machine nearby, recalls LeeAnn Burgess of Stilwell, Oklahoma. But

60 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

it wasn’t until her family matriarchs retired from their upholstery business and opened a quilting and fabric

store that Burgess decided to try her hand at the craft. “My mom [Lindy Mahaney] had been a hobby quilter for many years. Opening Front Porch Fabrics [in Stilwell] seemed like a natural transition. She wasn’t ready to retire, nor was my grandmother,” she explains. Though Burgess hadn’t taken an interest in quilting previously, she decided she might need to know what her mother and grandmother were getting into, in case they needed help. “I was hooked after making my first quilt,” she admits. While many of the principles of quilting remain the same — patterning, selecting fabric,

MEASURE AND CUT: Typically, after you’ve selected your fabric and read your pattern, you begin with the cutting instructions. Burgess likes only to cut enough to get started sewing, but most patterns instruct on how to cut out everything you will need for the whole quilt. QUILTING: Once your quilt top is sewn entirely together, it’s time to decide how you want to quilt your project — by hand, by longarm, or if you’re going to attempt to quilt it on your home sewing machine. There are no real “rules” to quilting, Burgess asserts, just some basic guidelines to follow. If you complete your quilt the way that works for you, that’s great! What matters is that it’s finished, and you had fun.

cutting, stitching, quilting, and binding — technology has given today’s quilters a leg up in the resource department. YouTube videos, quilting kits with precut fabrics, computerized and free-motion longarm quilting machines, digitally printed


GREEN COUNTRY SCENE GC fabrics, and a plethora of hand tools, books, and patterns have made quilting more accessible for those wanting to learn and those wanting to streamline the process. “No doubt the computer world has greatly affected our industry, from designing fabrics to quilts,” Burgess shares. “I have a computer program that I use to design my blocks and quilts and even to illustrate the directions in my patterns. “I think if my great-greatgrandmother were alive today, she would marvel at the tools. Over the last 40 years, the rulers, cutting devices, and even pins have changed by leaps and bounds. She would be headover-heels simply for the choice in cutting utensils — scissors are no longer your only choice.” Quilting is uninterrupted creativity and together time for

Must-Have Quilting Tools • Rotary cutter and mat. • A long ruler, typically 5 inches by 24 inches; you can cut out most patterns with this ruler. • A hot iron and a light starch; pressing your pieces well is half the battle of piecing a quilt.

Tulsa, Oklahoma quilters Sandy Horn-Harwell and her daughterin-law, Tricia Horn. Already a gifted seamstress, Horn-Harwell took up the art more than a decade ago. Since then, the founding member of a Maine quilting guild has used her talents for family gift giving and charity work, including quilts for veterans and enlisted military. Horn’s entry into the quilting circle came via pre-cut quilting kits, where the fabric is cut into strips, and multiple patterns are already coordinated. “This was a good way for me to learn how to alternate the light and dark patterns, try to keep

seams straight as I sew, how to measure and cut, and how the machine works,” Horn explains. Like many, the pair use sewing machines to piece their quilt tops. And, for the quilting portion — where the quilt top is sandwiched with batting and backing fabric — rather than hand quilt or use their small machines, they send their pieces to a commercial quilter to speed the process and provide an extra layer of expertise. While it adds to the overall cost of a quilt — anywhere from 0.2 cents per square foot and up — the duo thinks the investment is well worth it. Burgess’ advice for quilting newbies? Learn how to sew a straight line and pace yourself. “Unlike sewing clothing or other sewing projects, 90% of piecing a quilt top requires sewing in a straight line,” she says. “The trick

• A small pair of scissors to keep next to your machine. • A neutral color of thread; cream/ ivory for lighter fabrics or a gray for dark/black fabrics. • A sewing machine you know how to work is the most important tool; you don’t have to have a fancy machine to quilt like a pro. A good straight stitch is all you need.

LeeAnn Burgess and Lindy Mahaney

for a beginner is not jumping into a more difficult pattern before you’re ready, or you’ll end up with what we call UFOs — Unfinished Objects.” Even as an advanced quilter, there’s always something new to learn or a pattern to challenge yourself with, she notes. “Quilting is art you can cuddle with. It requires skill, a few math skills, geometry, and patience,” says Burgess. “But it’s also a community — from giving handmade quilts to comfort those who lost a home to fire or flood, to congratulating a first-time mother and her newborn with a new blanket — there’s no greater joy than being able to unleash your creativity and create a work of art, usable art.”

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GC GREEN COUNTRY SCENE

it’s someone raising club [show] lambs.” The most apparent difference between hair sheep breeds and their wool counterparts is their coat — which contains more hair fibers than the wool fibers, thus eliminating the added expense of shearing. Like wild sheep, hair sheep shed their coats seasonally with some breeds even growing thicker coats in the winter.

Here’s Looking at Ewe Hair sheep are finding their niche in Green Country as farmers look for sustainable, cost-effective ways to raise livestock for meat, profit, and brush control. By Jennifer Zehnder Like many of his commercial livestock ventures, Sean Clark of Westville, Oklahoma, saw sheep as an opportunity to expand his farm portfolio. He began his

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sheep journey in the ‘90s with wool sheep. “I didn’t care for them. The maintenance was just too

much,” Clark shares. “We found hair sheep to be a much better fit for our operation. Now, we hardly ever see wool sheep in my region unless

Clark, who deals in Dorper and Katahdin breeds, appreciates their easy-care coat and ability to thrive in hot, humid climates. Hair sheep also tend to be more disease and parasite resistant than wool sheep. Those attributes, combined with high-reproduction rates and their ability to finish/fatten on pasture only, make them the go-to choice for those wanting to raise hardy, pasture-efficient sheep for meat and sales. Other hair sheep breeds include the American Blackbelly, Barbados Blackbelly, California Red, Romanov, Royal White, Blackhead Persian, St. Augustine, St. Croix, and Wiltshire Horn. According to Clark, hair sheep have given his farm diversity that no other species has offered. “Acre per acre, they offer way better returns than beef, and have a lower startup cost than


GREEN COUNTRY SCENE GC many other types of livestock,” he says. “Additionally, they utilize the forage more efficiently that we have on our farms.”

As the demand for high-quality, naturally raised lamb increases, Clark sees a bright future for hair sheep in the Green Country area.

The advantage is in return on your investment.

“I believe that hair sheep have more potential here in Green Country than just about any other type of livestock,” he says. “From utilizing our marginal timber areas to retrofitting some of the infrastructure left behind by the poultry industry — this gives our region a real advantage over the rest of the country and makes the hair sheep industry prime for expansion in Green Country.”

“Many ewes [ female sheep generally over a year of age] can potentially pay for themselves in their first year, and that’s just something that’s nearly impossible with cattle,” Clark says. “Also, we tend to see returns of approximately twice per acre or more, compared to what cattle can achieve.”

STARTER FLOCK MISTAKES TO AVOID Sean Clark of Clark Farms LLC, is licensed and bonded by USDA Packers and Stockyards as a livestock broker. He has spent a lifetime learning and matching the right stock to the right buyer. That said, he admits he’s made a lot of mistakes and witnessed even more made by others. 1. Buying animals out of dry/arid regions and bringing them into higher rainfall areas. These animals typically haven’t had the parasite exposure that our locally raised animals have, so when confronted with high parasite loads, there tends to be significant death loss. Also, fescue toxicity tends to play a significant role in those animals, and it’s hard to get them to acclimate to one of our major types of forage. I see these issues mostly when folks bring sheep out of central and western Texas, Kansas, and Oklahoma and move them into eastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri. The rule of thumb is that you can move sheep from east to west, but not from west to east.

1

2 3 4 5 2. “Reading it on the internet.” No two operations are identical. Try finding an established, local operation to visit before you jump in. Just because a particular breed or management protocol works in the Pacific Northwest or western Texas areas, doesn’t mean it will be viable in the Ozark region. You have to be able to learn and adapt as you go.

3. Trying to keep non-livestock guardian dog breeds with sheep. Just like a Chihuahua is a poor bird dog, an Australian Cattle Dog or German Shepherd is a lousy LGD. There are always exceptions but stick with the proven breeds — Great Pyrenees, Akbash, Anatolian, etc. 4. Trusting ewes are the age that they are presented — without checking. Whether ignorance or purposeful misrepresentation on the part of the seller, this is something that can doom a new flock from the very beginning. 5. Assuming there’s no learning curve. Be willing to learn as you go so that you can figure out precisely what will and won’t work in your particular operation.

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BT BEYOND TULSA ,

With Bartlesville s significant role in our state history and plenty of money having been invested in its landscape, this former oil capital offers a thriving cultural community and attractions.

the black g ld Burg evident in every 60-degree angle, every fabric shaded turquoise and Cherokee red, and every touch of copper detail and decoration.

By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Rob Harmon One of the larger cities in Oklahoma, Bartlesville has a rich history in two senses of the word.

Hillcrest Country Club

First of all, it’s home to some striking historic spots, places that tie into our state’s history and are worth seeing at least once. Settled by namesake Jacob Bartles in 1873, Bartles Town as it was called, was incorporated in 1897 and became a bustling stop in the Indian Territory.

1901 Price Road Bartlesville

Price Tower 510 Dewey Ave.

Second, Bartlesville has been home to some wealthy oil industrialists who have made a strong impact in Oklahoma. The state’s first commercially productive oil well, the Nellie Johnstone No. 1, was drilled in Bartlesville in 1897. The area became home to oilman Frank Phillips, founder of Phillips Petroleum, whose ranch retreat eventually became home to Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve. With Bartlesville’s significant role in our history and plenty of money having been invested in its landscape, it’s no surprise that when you drive into the city limits, you’ll be seeing well-manicured lawns, clean streets, and attractive parks and buildings that speak of wealth and achievement. The winding roads lined with trees, the beautiful and unique houses… It’s all inviting and appealing to the eyes. Of course, like many parts of Oklahoma, the shifting trends in the energy industry have had an impact on Bartlesville. Two of the city’s largest companies, ConocoPhillips and Phillips 66, have shifted much of their chief operations to Houston. It remains to be seen how the city will weather the changing economic tides. In the meantime, when you’re in the mood for a day trip, Bartlesville is a great location to visit.

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Bartlesville

Frank Phillips Home 1107 Cherokee Ave. Bartlesville

Worth a stop on your tour of Bartlesville, the home of Phillips is an intriguing place to explore. Sign up for a tour of the beautiful neo-classical home and its lovely manicured grounds. Or visit the free museum and gift shop, which features a wonderful collection of the Phillips family’s items, photographs, and other treasures from Oklahoma’s oil boom. The grounds are also available to rent for parties and fundraising events.

This 19-story, 221-foot-high building is architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s only realized skyscraper. Commissioned by CEO Harold Price, who owned an oil pipeline company in Bartlesville, Price Tower has been open to the public since 1956. Once office space, it’s now home to a museum, art gallery, and available for tours. And the tour is well worth your time because seeing Wright’s unique take on architecture is stunning. His artistic vision and dedication to a theme are

Like many parts of Bartlesville, the Hillcrest Country Club was started by Phillips and several other local businesspeople. Famed designer Perry Maxwell designed its golf course. Recently upgraded, the course is a lot of fun to play. But if you want to play golf virtually for training purposes or variety, you can do that too, with over 76 virtual courses to choose from. The club also has FlightScope X2, which helps analyze a golfer’s swing. Not into golf? No problem. Hillcrest also offers tennis, aquatics, weight training, cardio exercise, fine dining, and more.

Johnstone Park 200 N. Cherokee Ave. Bartlesville

The oldest park in Bartlesville, historic Johnstone Park has been in existence since 1903. With nearly 79 acres to explore, you’re unlikely to see it all in one day. But make time to hike the nature trail, do some bird watching, visit the


BEYOND TULSA BT

playground, have a picnic, or bask in the sun somewhere. Be sure to visit the replica of the Nellie Johnstone No. 1, our state’s first commercial oil well. Nearby is the restored Hulah Train Depot, a small historic building relocated to the park. It once served an early steam locomotive that transported oil. At the holidays, the park is decorated for a Festival of Lights.

Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve 1925 Woolaroc

Kiddie Park 205 N. Cherokee Ave. Bartlesville

Inside Johnstone Park is a location worth visiting if you have young children — the Kiddie Park. Established in 1947, this amusement park has tot-sized rides that cater to young ones up to 4 feet tall. Open throughout the summer, and for special occasions like Halloween, the park is fun and reasonably priced. There’s a small carousel, a mini Ferris wheel, a little roller coaster, bumper cars, airplanes, boats, a pirate ship, a train, and more. Hit the concessions stand for hot dogs and ice cream.

Ranch Road Bartlesville

Created as the ranch retreat of Phillips and his family in 1925, Woolaroc is home to a 3,700-acre wildlife preserve just southwest of the center of Bartlesville. Drive through the wildlife park to see both native and exotic animals such as bison, elk, longhorn cattle, llamas, ostriches, and more — over 30 species in all. Then stop by the museum to enjoy its impressive collection of Western and Native American art and artifacts. The lodge is partially open to the public for viewing and special events. There are also hiking trails, playgrounds, concessions, and more to explore.

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SS STYLE + SHOPPING

Chic Choices OWNER DEEDEE LEVINE CONVINCINGLY STAGES THE BELLA’S HOUSE BOUTIQUES AS IF THEY WERE HOME, BALANCING BEAUTIFUL CURIOSITIES, COASTAL CREATIVE ENERGY, AND BOLD ESSENTIALS IN A COZY SPACE FILLED WITH A WIDE-RANGING INVENTORY OF DÉCOR, JEWELRY, HANDBAGS AND MORE. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA & PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS When it’s innovative, elegant, fun fashion, accessories, home décor, and gifts that you’re looking for, then you have to stop in to peruse the merchandise at Bella’s House. Visiting this charming boutique is an experience you won’t soon forget, and it will

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have you coming back again and again. Step into Bella’s House, and you enter a world that is beautiful, clean, modern — with attractive displays that invite you to browse and enjoy the shopping experience.

That’s no surprise when you talk to the shop’s owner, DeeDee Levine, who brings her East Coast sensibilities to the warm environment that Tulsa offers. “I’m from New York City, and I’ve always wanted to have a boutique,”

Levine says. “I love window shopping, and this is something I’ve always wanted to do.” Levine made her dream come true four years ago, opening first a location near Bixby, and recently a second location across from St. Francis Hospital on Yale Avenue. The store is named after her daughter, and she says she initially planned to cater to stayat-home moms with a passion for beautiful things. But she expanded her clientele because people, young and old, love her merchandise so much. “I wanted to bring in items that you couldn’t find in Tulsa,” says Levine of what her stores offer. “I want you to feel like you’re in New York, Miami, or L.A. I want that to be the vibe.” To create that coastal, creative energy, Levine looks for merchandise that is as unique as possible. She goes to market in places like New York and Los Angeles, to ensure she gets to see what’ll be trending and bring it to Tulsa. Most of the clothing, jewelry, and other items change seasonally, and the brands change too, though shoppers can undoubtedly expect


STYLE + SHOPPING SS

to see Kendra Scott and Virgins Saints & Angels products regularly. You might also see Elizabeth Cole, Gorjana, Interlude, Margot Elena, and other recognizable brands. And there’s a range of styles, options, and prices to fit any age and any budget.

thing is sure: Every product she carries is from a brand that gives back to different charities. “Things that give back, things that are made in the USA, things that are sustainable are all in right now,” she says. “People want to feel good about the things they are buying.”

assisting customers in finding the right outfit for proms, weddings, and other special occasions.

“My daughter is 13,” Levine explains. “I want to make sure that if she and her friends want to come in, they can find something. There is something here for everyone.”

What else is in? “Anything leopard is trendy right now — whether it’s shoes, clothes, earrings, or a whole outfit. Ruffles are in as well,” Levine says. Of course, if you’re not seeing something you’re looking for, or if you want help putting together an outfit or a gift, the staff at Bella’s House is happy to accommodate you. They enjoy

The gift options at Bella’s House are luxe and delightful — champagne gummy bears, Scotch truffles, vibrant jewelry, cute socks, handbags, home décor, and more. It’s entertaining to browse and envision what you might want to buy for that friend or family member you want to treat. If you want an extra touch of fun and charm, consider having Bella’s House add balloons to your gift. They have a balloon bar, something that’s popular right now on both coasts, allowing for delightful balloon bouquets customized with names and other cute messages.

customers, including food and drinks for everyone to enjoy. To keep track of events, follow Bella’s House on Instagram and Facebook. All in all, Levine loves being part of the Tulsa local shopping community. “I’m excited to be in Tulsa,” she says. “There’s so much talent and growth here. It’s exciting to be here as a business owner.”

BELLA’S HOUSE

The Vineyard | 7890 E. 106th Place | Tulsa 918-938-8992 bellashousetulsa.com

TO CA Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

BELLA’S HOUSE

Shops at Warren Place | 4830 E. 61st St., Ste. 210 | Tulsa 918-442-2244 bellashousetulsa.com

LO CA TO R

Bella’s House hosts several special events, sales, and live music throughout the year, and Levine plans to host events such as jewelry making and wreath making classes during the holidays. They will also hold a yearly holiday party in early December to thank their

R

And they even bring items to you, if you want them to. “We deliver gifts to someone’s work, home or restaurant, or anywhere else in the Tulsa metro area,” Levine says. Another feature of extra service is coming in the form of monogramming of clothing and fabric items, something Levine intends to launch by the holidays this year.

LO

Regardless of what’s on the shelves in Bella’s House at any given moment, Levine says one

Bella’s House can also place a special order and loves hearing client suggestions for what brands and items to carry.

Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

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LP LAUNCH PAD

Communication DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS ARE AN INEVITABLE PART OF BUSINESS. BUT AS UNCOMFORTABLE AS THEY CAN BE, AVOIDING THEM CAN MAKE THE SITUATION EVEN WORSE. By Michele Chiappetta Difficult conversations. None of us particularly enjoys those words. It’s a rare person who looks forward to having a hard discussion, especially in the confines of work. After all, it’s not like we take a class in school on how to tackle tough subjects, though that kind of thing would be tremendously useful in all our relationships. And though tough issues arise time and time again in our lives, most people tend to avoid talking them through. There are several reasons we do so — from negative past experiences and

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feelings of insecurity to being afraid of what we’ll lose and worries that talking won’t help solve things. But the choice to avoid these conversations only guarantees what we’re facing will continue to be a problem, and possibly grow worse the longer we leave the issue undealt with. It pays off to tackle tough conversations. And if you’re a small-business owner or freelancer, knowing some useful ways to handle a difficult conversation is a boon. You’ll appreciate having some skills in

this area whether you’re firing an employee, letting go of a client, addressing big changes in scopes of work, violations of a contract, or any of the many other issues that can arise when you’re dealing with people. Here are some tips from the experts the next time you’re facing a situation that warrants a difficult conversation.

KNOW YOURSELF One of the keys to handling your work relationships better is to understand what drives

you. If discussing issues with a colleague, boss, or client feels hard, ask yourself why. Are you assuming the conversation will be angry and heated? Do you dislike confrontation? Are you afraid being honest will get you fired? Knowing why you feel as you do can help you assess how realistic (or not) your assumptions are, and may open up possible solutions.

CONSIDER THE BIGGER PICTURE Many times, a difficult conversation is even more difficult because there is missing


information or misinformation that leads to wrong conclusions. So, before you dive into a discussion, first consider how you see the issue. Then challenge your perceptions. Are you telling yourself a story that may not be true? What questions haven’t yet been answered? And when you do talk with the other person, find out how they see the situation. If you ask and listen, you may realize their concerns are entirely different from what you initially assumed.

PLAN AHEAD One of the worst mistakes you can make is to leap into a conversation when you are either unprepared to discuss it, or worse, feeling emotional about it. As much as possible, take some time to calm down before having a tough discussion. And take time to consider what you want from the conversation. That way, you can aim better at your goal.

FOCUS, FOCUS, FOCUS Our natural tendency when having any conversation is to take little rabbit trails. This tendency is more pronounced when having difficult discussions, when we may want to deflect responsibility, get defensive, or feel emotional. So, before you have the hard conversation, choose one or two things tops to focus on. Even if you want to talk about a lot of things, it’s a bad idea to do so. People hear you better, and you’re more likely to arrive at a win-win if you focus relentlessly on one or two issues at a time.

TALK ABOUT THE SITUATION, NOT THE PERSON Making the discussion personal is a sure path to failure. Once you start telling the other person there is something wrong with them or that they’re a “bad person,” you’re heading away from dealing with the issue that needs resolving. If you want the other person to

understand you, try to stay objective and issue-focused.

LISTEN WELL Ah, the art of listening. It’s so underrated. Excellent listening skills pay off in many ways — from helping you come across as empathetic and caring to ensuring you get needed details that can help you arrive at a win-win. Keep in mind, listening isn’t just about being quiet when the other person is talking. It’s active. So, ask questions, repeat ideas back to the other person, and get clarification to make sure you understand them accurately.

KEEP IT SHORT The longer a hard conversation continues, the more likely it is to either get off-track or get emotional — or both. But neither of those possibilities is going to help you arrive at a solution that serves everyone. So, discuss things only as long as necessary to handle the one or two issues you’ve chosen to focus on. Don’t belabor the point. And if someone is getting tired or frustrated, go ahead and end the conversation by setting up a time to come back together later and talk more.

BE OPEN TO FEEDBACK Ultimately, any conversation is a two-way street. And if you’re going to arrive at a win-win, you need to expect that the other person may have some feedback for you that’s not entirely sunshine and rainbows. If you’re planning to say something tough, expect to hear something tough in return. Beyond that, try to see it as a gift. It’s not all the time that you get information that can help you grow in your work and as a person. Take the feedback for what it’s worth. Even if you don’t agree, listen respectfully. And use anything productive to improve your career and your relationships.

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RB RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER

We are tapped into what’s trending and delicious, giving you a first-hand look at where to go, what to eat, where the best cocktails are, and how to map out your culinary adventures in the 918. Whatever your mood, whatever you crave, the 918 has a restaurant or bar sure to satisfy. From local classics to chain favorites, a variety of options catering to every palate and pocketbook are available.

FEATURED LISTINGS ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

2748 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-747-4799 SEE AD | PAGE 58

ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

421 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-728-3650 SEE AD | PAGE 58

AMAZING THAI CUISINE

For those on the move, search our website database with over 200 restaurants and bars in nearly 20 categories.

1232 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-258-8424

PREVIEW918.COM/DINE-DRINK

717 S. Houston Ave., Suite 100 | Tulsa 918-585-3134

CATEGORIES AMERICAN ASIAN BAKERY BARBECUE BARS + PUBS BREAKFAST BRUNCH COFFEE DELI FINE DINING GLOBAL ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN MEXICAN PIZZA SEAFOOD SPECIALTY STEAK SWEETS 70 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

SEE AD | PAGE 87

BAXTER’S INTERURBAN GRILL

SEE AD | PAGE 25

BROWNIES

2130 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-0320 422 Plaza Court, Suite B. | Sand Springs 918-514-0222 SEE AD | PAGE 65

CAZ’S CHOWHOUSE

18 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-588-2469 SEE AD | PAGE 54

CAZ’S PUB

21 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-585-8587 SEE AD | PAGE 54

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

1304 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-587-4411 5320 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-749-7755 6709 E. 81st St. | Tulsa 918-960-2723 SEE AD | PAGE 91

DAVE & BUSTER’S

6812 S. 105th E. Ave. | Tulsa 918-449-3100 SEE AD | PAGE 91

DILLY DINER

402 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-938-6382 SEE AD | PAGE 5

DUST BOWL

211 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-430-3901 SEE AD | PAGE 5

EL CHICO

9825 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-663-7755

GOODCENTS DELI FRESH SUBS

8222 E. 103rd St. | Tulsa 918-364-7827 SEE AD | PAGE 40

HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa 800-760-6700 SEE AD | PAGE 11

BUFFET

SEE AD | PAGE 65

EL GUAPO’S

332 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-RITA 8161 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-728-7482 SEE AD | PAGE 5

FLIP SIDE HWY. 66 DINER

ELGIN PARK

325 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-986-9910 SEE AD | PAGES 5, 59

ELMER’S BBQ

4130 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-6702 SEE AD | PAGE 91

FASSLER HALL

304 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-7898 SEE AD | PAGE 5

FAT DADDY’S PUB AND GRILLE

8056 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa 918-872-6206 SEE AD | PAGE 58

FLO’S BURGER DINER 19322 E. Admiral Place | Catoosa 918-739-4858 2604 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-398-7102 SEE AD | PAGE 87

FUJI

8226 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 918-250-1821 SEE AD | PAGE 25

GEORGE’S PUB

108 N. 1st St. | Jenks 918-296-9711 SEE AD | PAGE 33

MCGILL’S ON 19 REPLAY RIFFS SALSA SLICE THE PERFECT CUP TRACK 5. TOBY KEITH’S I LOVE THIS BAR & GRILL

IN THE RAW

3321 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-1300 6151 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-524-0063 216 S. Main St. | Broken Arrow 918-893-6111 SEE AD | PAGE 45

INCREDIBLE PIZZA

8314 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 539-302-2681 SEE AD | PAGE 3


RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER RB JASON’S DELI

8321 E. 61st St. | Tulsa 918-252-9999

MCNELLIE’S PUB

409 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-7468

1330 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-599-7777

7031 S. Zurich Ave. | Tulsa 918-933-5250

SEE AD | PAGE 25

SEE AD | PAGES 5, 69

JUNIPER

324 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa 918-794-1090 SEE AD | PAGE 7

MEXICALI BORDER CAFÉ 14 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-582-3383 SEE AD | PAGE 55

KIRIN

8041 S. Mingo Road | Tulsa 918-893-8006 SEE AD | PAGE 44

MIAMI NIGHTS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

6510 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-835-4522 SEE AD | PAGE 41

KITCH

377 E Main Street | Jenks 918-528-6766 SEE AD | PAGE 33

LOS CABOS

300 Riverwalk Terrace #100 | Jenks 918-298-2226 151 Bass Pro Drive | Broken Arrow 918-355-8877 9455 N. Owasso Expressway | Owasso 918-609-8671 SEE AD | PAGE 9

LOS MARIACHIS

2534 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-251-0370 11476 S. Union Ave. | Jenks 918-296-5352

MIXCO

3rd and Denver | Tulsa 918-932-8571

RICARDOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

5629 E. 41st St. | Tulsa 918-622-2668 SEE AD | PAGE 41

RINCON MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA

6219 E. 61st. St | Tulsa 918-340-5520 SEE AD | PAGE 41

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa SEE AD | PAGES 27, 100

5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR FIRESIDE GRILL

SEE AD | PAGE 7

MOLLY’S LANDING

3700 N. Old Hwy 66 | Catoosa 918-266-7853

3410 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-561-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 25

OSAGE CASINO HOTEL 951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa 877-246-8777 SEE AD | PAGE 2

400 Riverwalk Terrace, Suite 180 | Jenks 918-946-2796 SEE AD | PAGE 33

MARGARITAVILLE

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St., #13 | Tulsa 918-900-2238 SEE AD | PAGE 20

TABLE 20

1927 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-986-9120 SEE AD | PAGE 45

TAVOLO

427 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa 918-949-4498 SEE AD | PAGE 7

201 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-949-9801

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO

918-995-8080

6024 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-499-1919

R UTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

219 S. Cheyenne Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-5151

918-995-8600

S COREBOARD SPORTS BAR TIKI DINER VISIONS BUFFET

SEE AD | PAGE 44

WATERFRONT GRILL

120 Aquarium Drive | Jenks 918-518-6300

STONECREEK KITCHEN

RONI PEPPO’S

SISSEROU’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT 107 N. Boulder Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-6800 SEE AD | PAGE 55

PRAIRIE BREWPUB

8102-B S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-392-3354

SEE AD | PAGE 41

232 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-936-4395

PRHYME: DOWNTOWN STEAKHOUSE

111 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-794-7700

YOKOZUNA

309 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-508-7676

N INE BAND BREWING CO.

4951 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-392-3373

720 N. Aspen | Broken Arrow 918-258-3354

SWEET BOUTIQUE

SEE AD | PAGE 9

THUNDER BAR & GRILL

MCALISTER’S DELI

8955 S. Memorial Drive | Tulsa 918-392-0770

SEE AD | PAGE 45

SEE AD | PAGE 5

LANDSHARK BAR

SEE AD | PAGE 33

MARYN’S TAPHOUSE AND RAW BAR

7846 E. 51st. St. | Tulsa 918-743-7474

THE TAVERN JOHNNY ROCKETS

SEE AD | PAGE 87

MONDO’S RISTORANTE ITALIAN

STEAK STUFFERS USA

SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL

9146 S. Yale, Ste. 100 | Tulsa 918-508-7676 SEE AD | PAGE 5

YUTAKA GRILL AND SUSHI BUFFET

6560 E. 51st St. | Tulsa 918-921-3400 SEE AD | PAGE 45

1542 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-949-4440 201 S. Main | Owasso 918-401-4343 SEE AD | PAGE 44

SEE AD | PAGE 7

8529 N. 129th E. Ave. | Owasso 918-376-9000 SEE AD | PAGE 79

PREVIEW918.COM 71


Lick Being Sick

HF HEALTH + FITNESS

Are you avoiding your coworker with that hacking cough, cold, or flu in the cubicle next to you? Do you open every doorknob with your elbow? Although complete immunity can’t be guaranteed, we have put together some top tips that might protect you from getting sick this season.

GET A FLU SHOT WASH YOUR HANDS A LOT KEEP YOUR HANDS AWAY FROM YOUR FACE CLEAN HIGH-TOUCH AREAS DAILY DON’T THROW OTHER PEOPLE’S TISSUES AWAY DON’T KISS THE INFECTED

WITH FLU SEASON RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER, IT’S CRUCIAL TO TAKE EARLY ACTION AND BE ARMED WITH INFORMATION AND PREVENTATIVE MEASURES TO PROTECT YOURSELF AND THOSE AROUND YOU. BY LINDSAY MORRIS | PHOTOS BY MARC RAINS Possibly the three worst things about winter are holiday traffic, ice storms and the flu. The flu is something most people will do just about anything to avoid getting. What exactly is the flu, how can you avoid getting it, and if you do get it, how can you treat it? The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by viruses that infect the nose, throat, and sometimes the lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times, it can lead to death. There are three types of influenza or flu. Type A virus is continually changing and is mainly responsible for the vast number of illnesses. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that influenza results in between 9.3-49 million illnesses, between 140,000-960,000 hospitalizations, and between 12,000-79,000 deaths annually in the United States.

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The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly and includes some or all of these symptoms, according to CDC. gov: fever or feeling fever and chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, and fatigue. Some people may also experience vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults. While colds and flu can in many cases look a lot alike, there are some predictable differences. For one thing, colds usually take a few days to build up, while the flu comes on more abruptly. Sometimes a flu patient goes from well to very sick in a few minutes. A cold typically lasts about three to five days, while the flu tends to linger about twice that long. Also, a fever is much more common among flu patients, and the same is true of headaches, body aches, and a dry cough.

The primary infection season for the flu is from the first of November to the beginning of April, says Dr. Terence Carey, with the flu typically peaking in January or February. Carey, the owner of Carey Clinic and a physician board-certified in allergy, asthma, and immunology, has seen more than a few cases of the flu during his medical career. If you haven’t had your flu shot yet, you should. Typically, the best time to get the flu shot is late September or early October. People should usually wait until that time of year because “the antibody levels and immunological protective mechanism start to wane after about six months,” Carey says. “If you get the shot too early, then when you hit peak season, the protections may start to wane.” Everyone older than 6 months should get the flu shot, with just a few exceptions. The flu shot is

DON’T BITE YOUR NAILS KEEP THE WINDOWS CLOSED AVOID SHARING FOOD EAT FRUITS AND VEGETABLES GET PLENTY OF REST KEEP HAND SANITIZER ON HAND GO OUT IN THE SUN BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM QUIT SMOKING not recommended for people with severe, life-threatening allergies to the flu vaccine or any ingredient in the vaccine — which might include gelatin or antibiotics. The vaccine is also not recommended for anyone with an egg allergy. It is also not recommended that anyone with Guillain-Barré Syndrome — a severe, paralyzing illness — receive the flu shot. There are certain types of people who should not skip getting the flu shot, Carey says, such as the very young (but older than


HEALTH + FITNESS HF 6 months), the elderly, and people with chronic pulmonary diseases and chronic heart diseases. “The people at most risk for dying from the flu are the elderly,” he says. Other people who should not compromise on getting a flu shot are people with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, autoimmune diseases, chronic lung disease, asthma, COPD, cardiac disease, immunocompromised people and people on chemotherapy. You probably know someone who refuses to get the flu shot every year because maybe they experienced some sickness as a result of getting it once. Sometimes the flu shot will cause side effects like soreness, redness or swelling at the injection site, or a low-grade fever and aches. Only about 1-2% of people who get a flu shot will have fever as a side effect, according to livescience.‌com. The flu shot isn’t perfect, of course. It won’t prevent everyone from getting the flu. “It’s at best 60-70% effective,” Carey says. “During the epidemic years, there are large numbers of deaths.” However, even with the imperfect nature of the flu shot, the medical community still highly recommends it. Other than the flu shot, you can attempt to avoid the flu by limiting your interaction with crowds and sick people and be sure to practice proper hand-washing.

“If you take it longer than 36 to 48 hours from the onset of symptoms, it won’t change the course of the illness at all,” Carey says.

Dr. Terence Carey Because of these risks, and because the symptoms of colds and flu can be hard to tell apart, people need to take steps to prevent the spread of these viruses. When you are sick with influenza or a cold, your mucus, saliva, and everything coming from your nose, mouth, and throat down to your lungs are teeming with millions of highly infectious virus particles. Sneezing, coughing, or any other activities that transfer your mucus to your environment could make other people sick. If you’re feeling unwell, the best thing you can do is isolate yourself until your symptoms go away. If you go to work or the store, you are likely to spread the illness. If you have to leave the house, avoid touching your mouth or nose, wash your hands frequently, and try to cough or sneeze into the crook of your arm.

CAREY CLINIC

7125 S. Braden Ave. | Tulsa 918-481-8100 careyclinic.com

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Your best bet is to visit a physician and get a prescription for Tamiflu as quickly as possible. Tamiflu is most

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What happens if you manage to contract the flu?

effective within 24 hours of the symptoms.

Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: Closed

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CC COCKTAIL CONFIDENTIAL

drink

in the view One of the best downtown Tulsa happy hours happens above the Blue Dome District at Roof Sixty Six. Be mesmerized by the skyline while enjoying cocktails, beers, and small plates drawing on local inspiration. By Mi che le Chi a p p e tta • Ph oto s by Sa ra h E l i z a Ro b e rts

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The bar’s drink selection is generously stocked with whiskey,

Everything on the menu is designed to be unique. “We’re boutique wines and boutique whiskeys. We try to stick to that,” says Hartman. Because Hartman is a sommelier, the wine selection is well-curated, including Montinore Riesling, Voix de la Vigne Pinot Gris, Maipe Malbec, Boomtown Merlot, and many other options, both by the glass and by the bottle. If you

If you have a special occasion to commemorate, the bar is a great spot for special moments. “We get a lot of people getting engaged up here,” says Hartman. The views make a great backdrop for photos and selfies. It’s also a great place to watch downtown events like Tulsa Tough, the fireworks at ONEOK Field, and more. If you’re interested in reserving a spot in the bar, you can ask about it. But the bar itself is never entirely closed to the public for private events, something Hartman and SJS Hospitality have made a deliberate choice about — they want everyone to have access, not just a select few. “We made a decision not to rent out the entire bar,” Hartman says. “We’ll take a portion of the bar and save it, but still leave the bar open to the public. The public is our bread and butter. They come here every day.”

“We got to know a lot about the Blue Dome area back in the 1920s and ‘30s,” says Hartman of the research that went into the hotel’s overall design and feel. “The Blue Dome was a lot different then. It was a very blue-collar oil worker vibe. There’s some cool history. So we took a lot of that and implemented it.” Another cool feature that the hotel’s roof sports, in addition to a bar, is beehives. Yes, beehives. “I always wanted to do urban bees on the roof,” says Hartman. “We have four beehives, filled with rescued honeybees, which is cool. We just had our first harvest. We got 42 pounds of honey, and we’re going to be doing some honey cocktails, plus using it in our restaurant, and sell little jars of it in our gift shop.”

ROOF SIXTY SIX

Hotel Indigo | 121 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-779-4445 roofsixtysix.com

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Even from inside, the open views are stunning. But if you want to feel even more a part of the landscape you’re overlooking, you can step onto the outside patio area, which is suspended off the building and creates a feeling of floating on air. There’s even an old-style set of tower viewing binoculars to add charm.

Cocktails cleverly draw on local inspiration for their names and flavors. Consider tasting the indulgent Oil Fire Chocolate Martini, made with SelvaRey cacao rum, Oilfire liquor, and Bailey’s Irish cream; the Mother Road Mule, a mint-infused drink of Bedlam vodka, Fever-Tree ginger beer, and lime; or a Blumer Sooner, crafted with Blumer’s Apple Pie Moonshine, apple juice, cinnamon sticks, peppercorns, and orange for a spicy bite of autumn.

The bar menu was recently re-crafted, and now features many tasty options sourced with local ingredients. You’ll enjoy pulled pork with honey barbecue sliders, roasted potato skins with cheddar cheese and pulled pork, pretzel bites served with a selection of mustard dips, and more.

story of the Blue Dome District as possible. You’ll see T-Town’s oil history in the rust reds of the hotel, the oil-inspired fabric patterns, the hanging decorations, the industrial lights, the menu items and more — giving guests a unique experience that is both high-end and boutique.

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It’s easy to see why the spot is so popular. The bar has a fantastic view directly north toward ONEOK Field. There’s also a great view west toward the most iconic buildings in downtown Tulsa — the Philtower, Williams Tower, and other beautiful examples of Tulsa’s architecture. You can also see south toward Hillcrest. The spot is ideal for gazing at sunsets.

Plenty of vodkas, tequilas, bourbons, scotches, rums, cognacs, and even a baijiu (a Chinese grain liquor that can be hard to find) are available too. You’ll find selections from Oklahoma distilleries at the bar. The beers include selections from Oklahoma breweries such as Dead Armadillo, Welltown, Cabin Boys, Prairie, Marshall, Iron Monk, and others.

want a deal on your drinks, stop by for Wine Down Wednesdays, when wines are half-price — both glasses and bottles.

Of course, when you visit Roof Sixty Six, make time to check out Monday-Thursday: 3:30 p.m.-Midnight the rest of Hotel Indigo as well. Friday: 3:30 p.m.-2 a.m. The hotel’s design is intensely Saturday: Noon-2 a.m. detailed, and as authentically Sunday: Noon-Midnight linked to the neighborhood

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Jeff Hartman, the operating partner for SJS Hospitality which runs Hotel Indigo Tulsa Downtown, says Roof Sixty Six is busy throughout all seasons of the year. “It’s very popular,” Hartman says. “Even in the summer, in the heat, people come. It’s amazing.” And with fall and winter chills on the horizon, the bar can keep its patrons warm with a firepit, rooftop heaters, and throw blankets.

because the oil workers who inhabited the Blue Dome district in the 1920s–30s, where Hotel Indigo Tulsa takes its inspiration from, favored whiskey. Locally made Oilfire is available at the bar, along with Jack Daniel’s, Jim Beam, and Maker’s Mark, as well as others you may not have tried yet, like Spitball Cinnamon and Snake River Stampede.

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Whether you’re downtown for a casual drink, date night, catching up with friends, or stopping in after enjoying a show, Roof Sixty Six has something for everyone. On a Friday or Saturday night, you may have to wait in line to get in. But once you step across the threshold and see the stunning landscape in three directions and get a taste of the cocktails, wine, and beer on tap, you’ll be a true believer.

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ET EATS + TREATS

Plates of Plenty by SARAH HERRERA photos by SARAH HERRERA

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SURE, WE ALL LOVE THE TURKEY, AND THE PARADE OF PIES TO FOLLOW, BUT WHAT THANKSGIVING FEAST WOULD BE COMPLETE WITHOUT THE CLUSTER OF SIDES? The season for feasting is finally here, and the opportunities for Thanksgiving dishes are endless. With tailoring to tastes, considering classics, perfecting preferences, and experimenting with new creations, the adventures that accompany holiday meal preparation can be overwhelming. But with a pinch of patience and a quality recipe or two, the season can go from straight stressful to pure bliss — and we’re here to help. We’ve done the research, perused through crowd favorites and must-haves, and taste-tested every outcome from beginning to end, and the product is a perfect trifecta of Thanksgiving sides, both savory and sweet. We’ve got healthy, we’ve got hearty, and we’ve got heavenly. So, heat the oven and call up your friends, because you’ve got a holiday feast to plan.

FESTIVE SALAD SLAW Adapted from thekitchn.com Every feast needs a healthy option or two, and this salad slaw is so fresh and tasty, you won’t even believe it’s good for you.

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DRESSING INGREDIENTS: 1 ⁄3 cup vegetable oil 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar 2 Tbsp. maple syrup

 tsp. Dijon mustard 4 1/2 tsp. kosher salt 1/2 medium red onion, chopped

SALAD INGREDIENTS:  bags of slaw (or cabbage) 2 3⁄4 cup sliced almonds 3 ⁄4 cup fresh parsley leaves, chopped

3⁄4 cup dried cranberries Salt Black pepper

DIRECTIONS:

SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE

1. Whisk together the vinegar, oil, maple syrup, mustard, and salt in a large bowl. Add the red onion and stir to combine. 2. Let the mixture sit at least 10 minutes for the flavors to meld. 3. Add the slaw mix (or shredded cabbage), almonds, cranberries, and parsley to the dressing and toss to combine. 4. Taste and season with salt and pepper.

Adapted from iheartnaptime.net Call it a dish or call it a dessert — either way, you’ll be calling it delicious. This casserole can be either, making it the perfect addition to any table. SWEET POTATO BASE INGREDIENTS:  sweet potatoes (pre-baked) 5 1/2 cup granulated sugar 2 eggs 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 cup butter (slightly melted) 1⁄3 cup evaporated milk (or cream) 1 tsp. vanilla extract

BROWN SUGAR TOPPING INGREDIENTS:  cup brown sugar 1/2 1⁄3 cup flour 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/4 cup butter (softened) 1/2 cup pecans (chopped) 1½ cups marshmallows

CREAMY CHEESY CORN Adapted from healthyfitnessmeals.com Whether you’re a dip person, a corn lover, or a side-savoring fiend, this creamy, cheesy corn is ideal for anyone. Use a chip or use a spoon — just try this dish. INGREDIENTS:  14-ounce bags of frozen kernel 2 corn (thaw and drain) 2 Tbsp. butter 8 ounces cream cheese 1/2 cup milk 1/2 cup shredded cheddar

 Tbsp. garlic powder 1 3 Tbsp. parsley (chopped) 1 tsp. chili flakes Salt Black pepper

DIRECTIONS:

1. Melt butter into a skillet over medium-high heat. Add in corn, garlic, salt, and pepper and sauté for 4-5 minutes. 2. Mix in cream cheese and milk. Stir in shredded cheese and cook until all cheese melts. Remove from heat. 3. Serve and garnish with parsley and chili flakes.

DIRECTIONS:

1. Heat oven to 325 degrees. 2. Scoop cooked potatoes into a bowl and mash. Add white sugar, eggs, salt, butter, milk, and vanilla. Mix. Pour into a 9” by 13” or 11” by 8” baking dish. 3. In a separate bowl, mix the brown sugar, flour, cinnamon, and butter. Stir in the pecans. 4. Sprinkle the topping over the sweet potatoes. 5. Bake sweet potato casserole for 25-30 minutes, or until the topping is lightly browned and caramelized. 6. Sprinkle marshmallows over the top and broil for 2 minutes, or until golden.

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Art

CAKE OF THE A sprinkle-filled, nostalgic explosion of a dessert, the funfetti birthday layer cake is an epitome of homegrown celebration and family. But be prepared for the tasking five-part baking process. By Tiffany Duncan Photos by Chelsi Fisher and Tiffany Duncan Growing up, birthdays were a big deal in my family. It meant a large gathering of family, friends, and of course a towering platter of sprinkly birthday cake as the pièce de résistance. My family loves to celebrate through food, and even when there aren’t birthday parties going on, there is still an abundance of baked goods all the time; cookies, yeast rolls, cakes, cinnamon rolls, pies … you name it, we have it. My grandma is the Oklahoma queen of baked goods. She’s won many Tulsa State Fair blue ribbons, creating cakes with names like Autumn Memories, or infusing them with some surprising secret ingredients, like mashed sweet potatoes. I can still feel the gritty spilled sugar beneath my toes on the stool I stood on as a child as I watched her create silky white meringue for chocolate pie, or ate one too many hearty spoonfuls of chocolate chip cookie dough. My mom also loves to bake and

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have fun in the kitchen. I recall numerous Saturday mornings of making fried doughnuts over the stovetop. For my sixth birthday party, she even made me a cake that looked like a working carousel.

I suspect these memories have something to do with my current obsession with Milk Bar — a Manhattan-based dessert and bakery chain that’s a part of the Momofuku restaurant group. The whimsical brainchild of chef (and my current spirit animal) Christina Tosi, Milk Bar is what confectionary dreams are made of. Everything Milk Bar does mixes the best of childhood nostalgia with innovative baking methods and ingredients, as well as giving absolutely zero craps about calorie content. Their repertoire of decadent treats includes things like ice cream made from fruity cerealsteeped milk; liquid cheesecake that you just go at with a spoon; corn cookies, in which the main ingredient is sweet corn kernels freeze-dried and pulverized into a powder; compost cookies, which include mini pretzels, potato chips, and ground coffee; PB&J panna cotta; and their trademarked “crack pie,” which is apparently so good it was one of the primary inspirations for launching Milk Bar in the first place. But the most iconic crown jewel of the Milk Bar empire has to be their multi-layered, sprinkle-filled, nostalgic explosion of a dessert — the funfetti birthday layer cake. From the moment I watched an episode of Chef ’s Table about Tosi

and Milk Bar this past December, I have been utterly entranced by both this cake, and by Tosi’s unique and very down-to-earth style of desserts. I mean, this girl has studied at the French Culinary Institute and worked at some of the most elite restaurants in New York City. But there she was on Chef ’s Table, walking the cramped aisles of a corner bodega and finding her creative inspiration in very ordinary things, like Cap’n Crunch.

In this episode and also in her cookbooks, Tosi talks a lot about how special her childhood was, and how her family-oriented Virginia roots are deeply entrenched in her food ideology. For her, the funfetti birthday cake is the epitome of homegrown celebration and family — a symbol of uncomplicated joy — so she spent years creating and perfecting a cake that mimicked the taste of this childhood favorite. I, too, have always dearly loved funfetti cake, so when I saw Milk Bar’s rendition, I knew I had to try to make it myself. The problem was that when I grabbed a copy of her cookbook from the library, I realized this is not a dessert for the faint of heart for two reasons. The first is that it’s a five-part baking process that involves the purchasing of unique ingredients and equipment like glucose, citric acid, and sheets of acetate. And the second? This cake could stop an elephant’s heart. Seriously. Some of the ingredients include butter, buttermilk, cream cheese, sugar, brown sugar, vegetable shortening, grapeseed oil, and lots and lots of sprinkles.

But I was committed. I technically worked on this cake for two weeks. I spent a week slowly gathering ingredients and equipment that I didn’t have. The acetate sheets (what you place the cake layers into before freezing to get those nice and clean, welldefined layers) were particularly hard to find. If you find yourself wanting to attempt this cake, or in need of acetate sheets for another baking project, let me save you some time and tell you that you’re going to have to order it from Amazon because it can’t be found in Tulsa. I called all of the craft stores, office suppliers, and every single local bakery I could think of. Luckily Ludger’s Bavarian Cakery (off 91st Street and Sheridan Road) took pity on me and gave me some laminate sheets that were very similar to acetate. Since the cake involves five different parts, I decided to split up the workload throughout the week. On Monday night, I made the birthday cake crumb. These are the little crunchies on top of the cake, as well as layered inside of it for a tasty texture surprise. I burnt the first batch badly, so I had to make another. The second batch was still a bit crunchier than I suspect it was supposed to be, but they were still pretty delicious. On Wednesday night, I made the large funfetti sheet cake, wrapped it, and put it in the fridge overnight. Thursday night, after borrowing a 6-inch cake ring from a friend, I cut out two circles of cake and then cobbled together a third from the leftover pieces. Next came the icing, which Tosi has specifically perfected to look and taste like it came from one of those plastic storebought tubs — thick, sweet, and beautifully smooth.


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Then, after lining the cake ring with acetate and placing it on top of a parchment-lined baking sheet, I pressed the cobbled together layer into the bottom and drizzled on the “birthday soak” with a spoon. (The “birthday soak” is another Milk Bar creation; it’s milk mixed with clear vanilla to soak into the layers for added moisture and flavor.) I slathered on a layer of the decadent white icing and then alternated between adding cake layers and icing layers until there were three of each. To get those perfectly smooth and defined lines, the cake has to freeze for at least 12 hours. Friday morning, I removed the cake from the freezer with much trepidation, nervous that I had somehow done something wrong. But when I removed the cake ring and peeled off the acetate, I nearly

squealed with delight — it was perfect. I was in such a celebratory mood, I went and got my nails painted Milk Bar’s bright, signature electric pink. Later, after taking about a million pictures of the cake, a friend and I dug in and nearly made ourselves sick, it was so good. Even though this cake was rather fussy to make, I will 100% be making it again in the future. If you feel inspired, I encourage you to also try your hand at it, as this is the ultimate in funfetti nostalgia. But even if you’re not into elaborate baking, Milk Bar still has you covered — you can order this cake to be shipped fresh to your house in two days. (Disclaimer: I swear I am in no way affiliated with Milk Bar or getting paid to promote them; I’m just that obsessed.)

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Blessing of Buffets

BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA AND ROB HARMON

From time to time, there's something undeniably satisfying about a meal that doesn't end until you decide it should. You can find that experience and plenty of tasty options at these 27 spots. Ever stop to think about why we love buffet restaurants so much? In part, it’s because we love getting a good deal. The idea of unlimited food for a set price is kind of hard to argue with, especially when we love the restaurant. If you enjoy shrimp and the buffet serves it, it’s time to eat all the shrimp you can. If it’s pizza your heart desires, then eating slice after slice of that delicious pepperoni with cheese is pure heaven. Another reason we’ve fallen for buffets is that they’re quick. Walk into one, and you can have a piping hot plate of your favorite food sitting right in front of you, ready to be devoured, lickety-split. In some restaurants,

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you might be lucky to get an appetizer in 15 minutes, much less the food you came in for. Perhaps the reason most of us like the buffet is because it offers variety. In the early 1900s, Sweeden introduced the smorgasbord. What started as a plethora of cheese and meat and other finger food items in Europe, 100 years later has turned into the all-out buffet in the United States. In Tulsa, we love trying all sorts of food and drink. Walking into a restaurant with the chance to try every last thing on the menu is paradise.

And from time to time, there’s something undeniably satisfying about a meal that doesn’t end until you decide it should. When no matter how much you eat, it costs the same. And where no one’s going to judge you for grabbing yet another plate, since you’re all there on the same mission. This area is filled with such endless experiences, from casino buffets to all-you-can-eat Asian joints, Brazilian steakhouses to bottomless breakfasts. So, strap on a bib, use a napkin, tip your server, and check out our 27 favorite allyou-can-eats.


Cumin Flavor of India 8242 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

This cozy spot serves up tasty Indian food that you won’t soon forget. The buffet is available during lunch hours, Tuesday-Sunday 11 a.m.- 2:30 p.m., making it a great way to taste-test items. You’ll enjoy favorites like tandoori chicken, chicken tikka masala, koftas, punjabi kadhi, aloo cabbage, palak paneer, biryani, tandoori naan, and more. The dishes are authentic and delicious, and you’ll want seconds — perfect for a buffet meal.

Buffet | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 777 W. CHEROKEE ST. | CATOOSA

Beijing Gourmet 8228 E. 61ST ST. | TULSA

Buffet-style dining and Asian food seem to go hand in hand, don’t they? A place like Beijing Gourmet stands out for its spacious room and ample choices, making it a go-to for many families in the Tulsa area. Regulars love the honey chicken, spring rolls, and fried doughnuts. And there’s a Mongolian grill included in the buffet price, so you can have your choice of ingredients freshly made up in exactly the combination you want.

Casinos are typically known for their buffets, among other things. And, as a rule, the better the casino, the better the buffets within. As you should expect, the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino’s buffet is top-notch. Any time of the day, an impressive variety of entrees and side dishes await the hungry patron who doesn’t want to take a gamble on getting food somewhere else. It’s a sure bet that your appetites will be completely satisfied, and taking two or three rounds to do it is part of the fun.

India Palace 6963 S. LEWIS AVE. | TULSA

Tulsa’s oldest Indian restaurant, India Palace, continues to delight foodies around the 918. Their lunch buffet is perfect for getting that Indian fix you’ve been craving. Tulsans love it for their upbeat service and authentic dishes. Favorites include the garlic naan, samosas, and vindaloo. There are plenty of meat and vegan options, so the vegetarians and carnivores in your group can both find something satisfying to chow down on.

Incredible Pizza 8314 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

Variety is the spice of life, so they say. Incredible Pizza seems to live by this motto with not only tasty pizza, but any combination of pizza, as well as so many other menu items like chicken tenders, salad, tacos, soups, and more. With over 150 items available, as well as special-request gluten-free dishes, you’ll be amazed just how incredible this buffet is. Oh, and what other buffet do you know of that also has a world-class arcade attached to it?

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Ollie's Station 4070 SOUTHWEST BLVD. | TULSA

Visiting an all-you-can-eat comfort food restaurant is like enjoying a Thanksgiving or Christmas meal any day of the week. Any time visiting this place is a treat, but it may just be the breakfast buffet that will take you back to the days when grandma cooked up everything under the sun, with no end in sight of good food and great memories. Decorated, top to bottom, with model trains, Ollie’s is a Tulsa tradition worth enjoying soon, even if you were just there.

Nelson's Buffeteria 4401 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | TULSA

Open for breakfast and lunch on weekdays, Nelson’s is a reliable restaurant that throws you back to the past with its cafeteria-style comfort foods. Locals love the chickenfried steak, but you’ll also want to try the beef and noodles with rich brown gravy, the moist meatloaf, homemade mac and cheese, and the bacony green beans. And don’t forget the to-die-for cinnamon rolls and selection of homemade pies. Save the diet for later.

Stonecreek Kitchen | Osage Casino Hotel 951 W. 36TH ST. N. | TULSA

Stonecreek Kitchen serves a daily breakfast buffet from 6 a.m.-11 a.m. with an assortment of sweet breads, muffins, eggs, bacon, biscuits and gravy, and fresh fruit. Their evening buffet (Thursday, Friday, and Saturday) includes all your favorite comfort foods such as fried chicken, fried catfish, mac and cheese, fresh baked rolls, fresh fruit cobbler, and so much more to satisfy your appetite.

Tandoori Guys 2039 W. HOUSTON ST. | BROKEN ARROW

Either the gobi tandoori cauliflower or the chicken tikka masala at Tandoor Guys will make your visit worth it, but every one of their dishes with rich, creamy sauces and tender chunks of chicken and cauliflower will knock your socks off. All the aromatic flavors welcome you the second you walk in, and if you love Indian-style food, you won’t have any trouble finding room for seconds or thirds. Be ready to try something new, because this restaurant makes a habit of introducing its regulars to something never served before.

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Also Check Out Bangkok Thai 3313 E. 32ND PLACE | TULSA

Texas de Brazil 7021 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | TULSA

Love meat? Then this buffet-style restaurant is for you. It’s a Brazilian steakhouse serving as much as you can eat of flame-grilled beef, lamb, pork, chicken, and Brazilian sausage. The salad bar is also all-you-can-eat and filled with a wide selection of seasonal items to satisfy your belly. There will probably be way too much to pick from, so you’ll have to plan to come back. What a problem to have, right?

Buffet Palace 10934 E. 21ST ST. | TULSA

China King 1330 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

China Wok 4971 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Cicis Pizza 2435 W. KENOSHA AVE. | BROKEN ARROW 9540 N. GARNETT ROAD, STE. 107-109 | OWASSO 4949 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA 3126 S. GARNETT ROAD, SUITE B | TULSA 8955-C S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | TULSA

Golden Corral 8144 E. 21ST ST. | TULSA 9711 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

Golden Saddle 6618 E. ADMIRAL PLACE | TULSA

Hibachi Grill Super Buffet 8110 E. 74TH PLACE | TULSA

Himalayas Aroma of India 4844 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | TULSA

JK's Thai Buffet 1421 E. KENOSHA ST. | BROKEN ARROW

Mazzio's

Vision's Buffet | River Spirit 8330 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA

If you have a craving for an endless supply of savory seafood, or an unquenchable desire to feast on tender, juicy beef, chicken or pork, Vision’s is always ready to meet that all-important need. A seemingly infinite variety of melt-in-your-mouth veggies, freshly baked breads, and delicious desserts will be there too. Whatever you’re hoping to chow down on, between slot machines or table games, you can bet your bottom dollar you’ll find it in Oklahoma’s largest casino buffet.

12505 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | BIXBY 1200 E. KENOSHA ST. | BROKEN ARROW 611 N. ASPEN AVE. | BROKEN ARROW 19322A E. ADMIRAL BLVD. | CATOOSA 1504 W. WILL ROGERS BLVD. | CLAREMORE 211 E. MAIN ST. | COLLINSVILLE 13735 S. HWY. 51 | COWETA 519-A E. 141ST ST. | GLENPOOL 510 W. MAIN ST. | JENKS 3030 W. OKMULGEE | MUSKOGEE 2200 E. SHAWNEE BYPASS | MUSKOGEE 8001 OWASSO EXPRESSWAY | OWASSO 408 W. 2ND ST. | SAND SPRINGS 4099 S. HWY. 97 | SAND SPRINGS 100 N. MISSION | SAPULPA 1425 W. ROGERS | SKIATOOK 1712 S. MUSKOGEE | TAHLEQUAH 1115 S. GARNETT ROAD | TULSA 421 E. 11TH ST. | TULSA 5119 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA 1723 W. 51ST ST. | TULSA 10115-G S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA 2425 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

Oriental Pearl

Yutaka Grill & Sushi Buffet 6560 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA

Popular for its blend of American style and Asian style dishes, Yutaka’s buffet will satisfy just about anyone in your group of family and friends. Its no-nonsense atmosphere makes it easy to go with any size group, and everyone from kids to grandparents will find something to enjoy. Try some simple sushi, pepper beef, wontons, noodles, shrimp, fish — or choose your ingredients to be cooked for you at the Mongolian grill section of the buffet.

12140 E. 96TH ST., SUITE 100 | OWASSO

Pita Place 8315 E. 11TH ST. | BIXBY

Shanghai Avenue Super Buffet 803 N. ASPEN AVE. | BROKEN ARROW

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our Y Senses Great Mexican food often comes down to the quality of ingredients. And that’s a selling point at the Los Mariachis Mexican Restaurants. Prepare to load up on underrated gems, including a pineapple stuffed with fajita meat, street tacos, chicken tortilla soup, and a Big Mamma. By Donna Leahey || Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

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From taco trucks to high-end dining, from chains to locallyowned establishments, from Tex-Mex to authentic regional cuisine, Green Country has a plethora of outstanding choices for Mexican dining. You don’t have to look far for a good meal of flavorful Mexican comfort food. If you want something special and unique, you should head to Jenks or Broken Arrow, and try the south-of-the-border delights of Los Mariachis Mexican Restaurant. Los Mariachis has been bringing its take on that cuisine to Tulsa since 2013. They moved to Broken Arrow in 2016 and opened up a second location in Jenks last year. The Broken Arrow location is a bright, open, welcoming space with colorful walls decorated with authentic Mexican touches. “The masks, they’re Mayan and Aztec,” says owner Christian Ramirez. “There’s also a Mayan calendar. We bring them from Guadalajara. I’ve got a friend there; that’s what he does. When he knew I was opening a restaurant, he sent them.”

The masks, calendar, and a trio of friendly lizards decorating the walls serve as a reminder of the culture that created the unique tastes and textures of Mexican cuisine. “We’re family-owned and local,” says general manager Tod Korf. “We have a very diverse staff, ranging from 16-year-olds to college students to career servers. And a mix of ethnicity too. It’s great to get to know different people from different backgrounds. And we have a nice diverse menu that’s a mix of Tex-Mex and authentic Mexican dishes. We cater to all tastes. We have food for all walks of life.”

out with family or friends, or snacks and margaritas. One of the things that make Los Mariachis special is the homemade chorizo. The authentically seasoned chorizo brings a bright, fresh, and deliciously spicy bite to every dish it graces. One of the most popular dishes is the restaurant’s namesake, Los Mariachis. The dish is comprised of grilled steak, chicken, and shrimp along with chorizo

and onions, bell peppers, and tomatoes. It’s served alongside rice and beans, with lettuce, sour cream, guacamole, and pico de gallo. This flavorful combo earns its spot as the signature dish. A unique take on fajitas is La Hawaiiana. They take a half pineapple, cut out the insides, and cook it with your choice of steak, chicken, shrimp, or a combination. The meat is grilled alongside peppers, onions, and tomato and then served in the pineapple and covered with

As enthusiastic as Korf is about the staff and menu, he’s even more proud of the service at Los Mariachis. “I’d put our service against anyone. Our servers are a great bunch, and the kitchen staff is extremely knowledgeable,” he says. It’s that combination of a great staff, a great menu, and great food that makes Los Mariachis such an excellent option for a quick lunch, a night

La Hawaiiana

Margarita

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Meat Trio

Burrito El Bravo

Sitting to the side of these burritos is a unique Mexican side: For a plate full of delicious, Papas a la Mexicana. “I’ve never savory proteins, try the Meat

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Los Mariachis’ cocktail offerings are not-to-beoverlooked either. If you want to sample the tequilas, you can order a flight of shots. Besides a very nice selection of beers, tequila, and mezcal, there are tropical drinks and margaritas. On the rocks or frozen, the margaritas provide a tangy, sweet, or sour accompaniment to your meal. Best of all, they’re a bargain. A 16-ounce margarita is $4.99, the 22-ounce version is $8, and for $14 you can grab the Big Mamma (a 45-ounce goldfish bowl full of that frozen concoction).

R TO Monday-Thursday: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

LOS MARIACHIS MEXICAN RESTAURANT 11476 S. Union Ave. Jenks

918-296-5352 losmariachisusa.com

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If you enjoy authentic street tacos, you need to try Los Mariachis’ offering. You can have your tacos with grilled steak, chicken, pork, pastor (thinly sliced marinated pork), shrimp, or tilapia. They come topped with fresh cilantro and onion and with rice, beans, fiery salsa, and nopal (prickly pear).

918-251-0370 losmariachisusa.com

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The Burrito California is an oversized treat. It’s a giant burrito filled with steak or chicken, rice, refried beans, and pico de gallo. Or for a spicier take on a burrito, try the Burrito el Bravo. Along with beef or chicken, this burrito is stuffed with chorizo and jalapenos, to give it an extra kick.

2534 E. Kenosha St. Broken Arrow

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For seafood lovers, Los Mariachis has you covered. The Tilapia Dorado is a whole fried tilapia with special seasoning. If you like seafood to bite you back, check out the A la Diabla. Your choice of shrimp or tilapia is grilled perfectly and prepared with a spicy sauce.

LOS MARIACHIS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

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A similar flavor profile can be found with the Quesadilla Tropicana. More than just cheese on a tortilla, the dish is topped with smoky bacon, steak, chicken, onion, bell pepper, tomatoes, and chunks of sweet and tangy pineapple, and then smothered with cheese.

Trio. This generous platter offers up a chicken breast as well as tender beef tips covered in creamy queso. A kabob of shrimp, steak, chicken, and bacon, as well as peppers, tomatoes, and onions round out the trio.

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seen these anywhere else,” says Korf. The sides are potatoes that are sliced and fried with special seasoning on top.

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melted cheese. It’s a unique combination, and the pineapple adds a surprising tanginess to the familiar taste of fajitas.

Monday-Thursday: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m.-9 p.m.


Free Wi-Fi Internet Access!

Molly’s Landing Open Since 1984

Steak & Seafood Only 3 1/2 miles from Hard Rock Casino on Highway 66 (Route 66)

918.266.7853

www.mollyslanding.com

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Top-quality ingredients and flat-top crisped beef combine to create a delicious throwback burger that ,s well worth every calorie. Add a glass of fresh-squeezed lemonade to your order and revel in the classicAmericana combo. By Donna Leahey Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

A few decades back, you could hop in your convertible with your friends and cruise the Mother Road, Route 66. The possibilities were as endless as the road unrolling before you and the big blue sky above. And when you got hungry, you’d pull into a roadside hamburger stand for a classic cheeseburger. Add some fries and an ice-cold lemonade to go with it, and life didn’t get much sweeter. Then life sped up. The interstate highway system took the place

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of Route 66, and those great hamburger stands faded away, replaced by fast-food joints that typically did not squeeze their lemonade fresh. Of course, Route 66 is still there; it cuts across Tulsa’s midtown going east to west along 11th Street. The Mother Road is now lined with small businesses, many paying homage to the famous historic highway. Right at Lewis Avenue and 11th Street is one of Tulsa’s most significant and newest monuments to the

old highway: the Mother Road Market. The sprawling space houses over 20 restaurants and shops. There’s plenty of great options to enjoy at Mother Road Market, but their newest shop, Howdy Burger, harkens back to the days of those old roadside stands along Route 66, with burgers you have to try to believe, old-fashioned fries, and sweet-tangy fresh, hand-squeezed lemonade to go along with it. Howdy Burger opened at Mother Road in mid-September.


Rodeo Fries

Single Howdy Burger “I love the area. All the other vendors are cooperative with each other,” says general manager Steve Gleeson. “It’s like a co-op; we share resources and help each other out. “Tulsa needed a remake of the classic burgers on Route 66. We make an old-fashioned burger with a classic burger sauce. We have fresh-squeezed lemonade, and we work with local vendors like Prairie Creek Farms and Fassler Hall for our sausage.”

Not only does Howdy Burger deliver old-fashioned goodness in a burger and fries, but you can also feel good about handing over your money because every month they give back to the community through their Donation Creation Burger. The burger is a new creation each month, featuring an ingredient from a local vendor. In October, it was the BBQ Bison Burger with Oklahoma Joe’s barbecue sauce. For November, look for a holiday-inspired take on the Turkey Burger.

Each month, 25% of the proceeds of that burger go to local charities like Domestic Violence Intervention Services and the Eastern Oklahoma Food Bank. Howdy Burger’s menu is simple and to the point. The eponymous Howdy Burger is the star of the show. “The proof is in the meat,” says Gleeson. And he’s not wrong. One bite will make you a believer. Not one, but two thin, perfectly seared and seasoned beef patties, with not one but two slices

of tangy, creamy cheese. This old-fashioned creation is topped — like every burger should be — with crisp, fresh lettuce, thick slices of tomato, and sharp and spicy onions on top. You can add mustard, pickles, mayo, or fried onions to your burger to make it perfect for you. The whole thing is cradled between halves of a soft, fresh bun. If your appetite is too big for two patties, you can make your burger a hearty triple for just a couple dollars more. Or if you’re

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Sunrise Sandwich

What burger meal is complete without fries? Served alongside the burger in an oldfashioned white paper envelope, these fries will take you back. Fluffy and delicious on the inside, a gentle crunch on the outside, and all-around tasty, they complement the

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HOWDY BURGER

Mother Road Market | 124 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-0845 howdyburger.com

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If you’re looking for something more brunchy, consider the Sunrise Sandwich. It includes locally sourced egg, cheese, rodeo sauce, and your choice of Prairie Creek Farms bacon or Fassler Hall sausage. It’s served atop a challasant. What’s a challasant, you ask? It’s like challah bread made into a croissant. It’s

On the weekends, Howdy Burger offers corn dogs for the kids and grown-up kids. Who doesn’t love a corn dog?

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For kids who prefer a no-frill burger, get the Little Rancher for just $4. It’s a single patty with cheese, and sure to please the pickiest of youngsters.

Be sure to try that fresh-squeezed lemonade. It’s not too sweet, not too sour, and so fresh you can taste it. Cold and crisp and refreshing, it’s a sweet treat like you probably haven’t had for years. Alongside the traditional lemonade, Howdy Burger offers a flavored lemonade that switches out every few weeks. Flavors like blackberry, prickly pear, and passionfruit are on the menu to set off that already beautiful, sweet, and sour cold drink.

a delicious, hearty meal whether you’re starting your day or want breakfast food for lunch or dinner.

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If you prefer a meatless burger, Howdy Burger offers their All Hat Burger. This burger features the tasty and surprisingly savory Impossible Veggie Patty, topped like the original Howdy Burger with lettuce, tomato, onion, and rodeo sauce.

burger perfectly, nestled together on your tray. For an extra treat, try Rodeo Fries. It’s Howdy Burgers’ old-fashioned fries topped with cheese, rodeo sauce, and bacon.

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not as hungry, you can also get your Howdy Burger with a single patty. For an extra treat, spring for some Prairie Creek Farms bacon. It takes an already amazingly great burger and elevates it to savory, smoky, bacon perfection.

Monday: Closed Tuesday-Thursday: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday: 10 a.m.-9 p.m.


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GK GETTING TO KNOW

Cultivatin After losing 80 pounds, Julie Brothers is doing things

she never dreamed possible thanks to “wantpower.” But her most significant accomplishment is inspiring others to live their dreams. by GINA CONROY photos by MARC RAINS Julie Brothers never had a weight issue growing up until she was diagnosed with lupus at age 25. While steroids and medications contributed to her slow weight gain over the years, the foundation for poor health was established decades earlier. Although she and her family led an active lifestyle, food was used as a reward instead of a way to fuel her body.

JULIE BROTHERS

“We had poor eating habits. I grew up eating fried foods and carb-laden side dishes with bread and dessert at every meal,” says Brothers, who admits her mom struggled with her weight her whole life. But her dad wasn’t obese. “He was tall and super thin.” Over the years, Brothers continued to gain weight and become more unhealthy, her weight peaking at 224 pounds. But the motivation to lose weight still wasn’t there. “Fear was my biggest liar and the constant feeling of defeat after years of trying,” says Brothers.   Finally, in January 2018, with her BMI higher than it had ever been and her doctors pushing her to lose the weight, she couldn’t disregard her medical warning signs any longer. “I was prediabetic. My triglycerides and cholesterol were at an all-time high,” says Brothers. “I was a walking time bomb.”

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Both her parents died before seeing their 57th birthday. It was only a matter of time before she joined them if she continued the obesogenic habits. “My dad died of heart disease and my mom of cancer. I didn’t want that for my kid,” says Brothers. “I had a son who was going to be 16. I wanted him to have a mom and dad around as he aged. I want to see my grandkids grow up. My parents didn’t have that luxury.” As an Owasso teacher, she knew she wasn’t being the role model she needed to be to her students, especially after being named Teacher of the Year in 2018. At a size 20, she was embarrassed and frustrated. “I’m standing up in front of my kids teaching them how to be the best version of themselves when I’m not walking the walk,” says Brothers. “It caused me to do a lot of selfreflection.”  But it wasn’t until she and her husband were packing for a cruise in March 2018 that something inside her shifted. “I remember crying and coming into the living room where my husband was,” says Brothers. “He asked me what the matter was. I told him I couldn’t fit into any of my previous summer clothes.”


ing Confidence It was a real awakening moment for Brothers, who had to borrow clothes from a friend to go on the cruise.

“I couldn’t even wear my clothes to go on a trip,” says Brothers, who had to do some serious soul searching and “get it in gear.” What she discovered was in all of her attempts at weight loss, she was the missing ingredient. Although Brothers believed in herself, she failed to participate in her health actively. “I know moms all over can relate,” says Brothers. “I showed up for everyone in my life and was the most trustworthy and accountable person, but when it came to me, I kept sitting in the back row.” Brothers recognized that losing her mom and dad in seven months spiraled her eating habits out of control. “I had to dig deep and look at what were the things that I’m doing to comfort myself whenever I’m having a moment,” says Brothers. “A lot of times, it would be food that my mom used to make me. I had to break away from addictive foods that controlled my life completely.” Armed with renewed purpose, Brothers gave weight loss one more shot, but this attempt, unlike all the others, ended in what would be her biggest life success.  When Brothers got back from her cruise, she connected with a friend in her search for a nutrition plan that would not deprive her of macronutrients but would teach her healthy habits to last a lifetime. “I knew I had to break away from addictive foods that controlled my life completely,” says Brothers. “I

truly believe God placed me in a personal time-out and made me focus on myself.”

Brothers found a low glycemic nutrition plan that worked for her body. “I fueled my body instead of fed my face,” says Brothers. “I didn’t look for that next emotional out. I had freedom and flexibility to make the choices.” After hitting her first goal of losing 20 pounds, she had the confidence that this was a plan for her. Brothers continued working her plan, and bit by bit, success showed up daily. “My outside was beginning to match my inside,” says Brothers. “Everything started aligning, and losing 80 pounds has been a life-changer for me. I’ve gone from a size 20 to a size 4-6, and I’m never going back. I’ve given away all the clothes that don’t fit and will continue using my newfound healthy habits.” As the weight began to shed, the truth as to what was holding her back came into the light: fear of failure and how others saw her. “I had to adopt the mindset, ‘What you think about me is none of my business,’” Brothers says. “Living in that fear mindset was hijacking me.” One way Brothers continues to face fears in her own life is to look at what she’s afraid of, then implement new goals to conquer those fears. Climbing mountains and putting herself in situations she couldn’t finish has always been a fear for Brothers. When an opportunity to go mountain climbing presented itself to Brothers, she took it. “I signed up

to climb Camelback Mountain in November because that fear is a liar,” says Brothers. “I don’t have to listen to those fears anymore.” To get herself ready for that goal, Brothers participates in a fitness boot camp, another fear.  Her fitness trainer, Melinda Young, is whipping her into shape to get ready for that mountain. 

“We allow our fears to take over our minds,” says Brothers. “Then, for some reason, something happens where we get to a point, and we let that fear run our lives. I tell my students, ‘When you see fear coming, tackle it upfront so you don’t end up being an adult with all these fears.’ Once we let fear take root, that fear can overshadow us and seeps into other areas of our lives. The next thing we know, we are afraid to live because we’re succumbing to all these fears.”

nutrition, which is the critical component in your health. “Don’t settle for diets,” says Brothers. “Diets set you up for failure because they are about willpower. Move into the mindset of ‘wantpower,’ and your world will change.”   Next, find a plan. “Don’t look for a plan that fits you because you are what’s doing the damage,” says Brothers. “Change yourself to fit a plan that includes all your macronutrients.” Then, surround yourself with support, believe in yourself, and do the work. “I had to break the chains that were keeping me down,” she says. “Once you cross through that barrier and tell yourself there are no excuses, you can do amazing things.”

To say that conquering your fear or surrendering those things in life holding you back from success is a one-time event is a far cry from reality. You have to do it daily and commit. “Part-timing your health will give you part-time results,” says Brothers. There’s not a day that goes by that Brothers doesn’t pray before her feet hit the ground. “I pull deep from my God every day,” says Brothers. “I let him be the guide, and I live my life accordingly as the best I can. Does it mean it’s perfect? No. But I try every day. I pray for guidance and strength. I pray for God to take over and allow me to have control for that day.” If you’re ready to conquer the fear, Brothers has some simple advice. First, educate yourself on proper

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SL SHELF LIFE

NONFICTION/MEMOIR

LITERARY / CONTEMPORARY

MYSTERY, THRILLER AND SUSPENSE

ROMANCE/WOMEN’S FICTION

NOV. 5

NOV. 5 NOV. 19 NOV. 5

FINDING CHIKA BY MITCH ALBOM

Chika Jeune was born three days before the devastating earthquake that decimated Haiti in 2010. She spent her infancy in a landscape of extreme poverty, and when her mother died giving birth to a baby brother, Chika was brought to The Have Faith Haiti Orphanage that author Mitch Albom operates in Port Au Prince. Chika’s arrival makes a quick impression. Brave and self-assured, even as a 3-year-old, she delights the other kids and teachers. But at age 5, Chika is suddenly diagnosed with something a doctor there says, “No one in Haiti can help you with.”

TWENTY-ONE TRUTHS ABOUT LOVE

THE POPPY WIFE

BY CAROLINE SCOTT

Daniel’s life is at a crossroads. He loves his wife, Jill, who is ready to have a baby. He regrets quitting his job and opening a bookshop, which isn’t doing well. He hasn’t told Jill about their financial trouble. Dan is also an obsessive list maker; his story unfolds entirely in his lists, which are brimming with Dan’s hilarious sense of humor, unique worldview, and deeply personal thoughts. When read in full, his lists paint a picture of a man struggling to be a man.

Edie’s husband, Francis, is presumed killed in action during WW I, but Edie believes he might still be alive. So, she embarks on a journey in the hope of finding some trace of her husband. Meanwhile, Francis’ brother, Harry, returns to the Western Front to photograph gravesites and search for his brother. As Harry and Edie’s paths converge, they get closer to the truth about Francis and, as they do, are faced with the life-changing impact of the answers they discover.

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BY MATTHEW DICK

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ACCOMPLICE

BY JOSEPH KANON

Max Weill has never forgotten the atrocities he saw at Auschwitz — nor the face of Dr. Otto Schramm, a camp doctor who sent Max’s family to the gas chambers. As the war came to a close, Schramm was one of the many high-ranking former-Nazi officers who managed to escape Germany for new lives in South America. With his life nearing its end, Max asks his nephew Aaron Wiley — an American CIA desk analyst — to complete the task Max never could — track down Otto in Argentina, capture him, and bring him back to Germany to stand trial. ALSO LOOK FOR:

STRANGE PLANET BY NATHAN W. PYLE NOV. 19

RIGHT KIND OF CRAZY BY CLINT EMERSON NOV. 12

Clint Emerson, retired Navy SEAL and author of the bestselling 100 Deadly Skills presents an explosive, darkly funny, and often twisted account of being part of an elite clandestine team of covert operatives whose mission was to keep America safe by whatever means necessary. Just be happy he’s on our side.

BROKE BY JODIE ADAMS KIRSHNER NOV. 19

Bankruptcy and the austerity it represents have become a standard “solution” for struggling American cities. What do the spending cuts and limited resources do to the lives of city residents?

94 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

Based on the phenomenally popular Instagram of the same NOV. 5 name, Strange Cassandra Planet covers McMurtrey has the best parents a a full life cycle of the planet’s girl could ask for; they’ve given Cass inhabitants, a life she wouldn’t including trade for the world. milestones such She has everything as The Emergence Day, Being Gains a she needs — but she has questions, Sibling, The Being too. Like, to know Family Attains a who she is. Where Beast, The Formal Education of a she came from. Being and more Questions her including dozens adoptive parents of never-beforecan’t answer, no seen illustrations matter how much in addition to old they love her. favorites. THE HOW & THE WHY BY CYNTHIA HAND

LEAVE ME BREATHLESS BY JODI ELLEN MALPAS

THE CONFESSION CLUB BY ELIZABETH BERG

NOV. 5

When a group of friends starts a monthly supper club, they get more than they bargained for. The plan for congenial evenings abruptly changes course when one of the women reveals something startlingly intimate. The supper club then becomes a confession club.

Ryan Willis has spent years in the protection business. His only chance to relax is at his secluded cabin. So, when Ryan encounters a beautiful stranger there, he’s instantly intrigued. Hannah Bright is a breath of fresh air, and Ryan is soon falling for her. But she is hiding secrets. And the moment he finds out, both their lives are at risk.

NOV. 19

SPY BY DANIELLE STEEL NOV. 26

Alexandra is a stunning beauty who seems destined for a privileged life. But WW II changes things. From her home in idyllic Hampshire, Alex makes her way to London as a volunteer in the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry. But she has skills that draw the attention of another branch of the service.

UNDER OCCUPATION BY ALAN FURST NOV. 26

A man being chased by the Gestapo in Paris hands off a strange-looking document to Paul Ricard. As Ricard finds himself drawn deeper and deeper into anti-Nazi efforts, he travels to Germany to spy on Nazi maneuvers.


SHELF LIFE SL

SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY AND HORROR

SELF-HELP AND INSPIRATIONAL

YOUNG ADULT AND MIDDLE GRADE

CHILDREN

NOV. 5

NOV. 5 NOV. 5 NOV. 25

PADDINGTON STORYBOOK FAVORITES BY MICHAEL BOND

THE STARLESS SEA

THE LIKEABILITY TRAP

ALI CROSS

When graduate student Zachary discovers a mysterious book filled with fantastic tales, he reads something strange: a story from his childhood. Bewildered, Zachary uncovers a series of clues that lead him through a doorway to an ancient library hidden far below the surface of the earth. There, Zachary travels the twisting tunnels, darkened stairwells, crowded ballrooms, and sweetly soaked shores of this magical world, discovering his purpose — in both the mysterious book and in his own life.

Be nice, but not too nice. Be successful, but not too successful. Just be likable. Whatever that means? Women are stuck in an impossible bind. At work, strong women are criticized for being cold, and warm women are seen as pushovers. An award-winning journalist examines this fundamental paradox and empowers readers to let go of old rules and reimagine leadership rather than reinventing themselves.

When Ali’s best friend, Abraham, is reported missing, Ali is desperate to find him. At the same time, a string of burglaries targets his neighborhood — and even his own house. With his father on trial for a crime he didn’t commit, it’s up to Ali to search for clues and find his friend. But being a kid sleuth isn’t easy, and Ali soon learns that clues aren’t always what they seem. Will his detective work lead to a break in Abraham’s case or cause even more trouble for the Cross family?

BY ERIN MORGENSTERN

BY ALICIA MENENDEZ

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NOV. 26

In this twelfth installment of the bestselling series chronicling the epic saga of the making of England, it is a time of political turmoil. The fading King Edward begins to lose control over his successors and their supporters. There are two potential heirs — possibly more. The battle for kingship — and England’s fate — is on.

DON’T KEEP YOUR DAY JOB BY CATHY HELLER NOV. 12

The pursuit of happiness is all about finding our purpose. We want to do our life’s work. But how do we find out what we’re supposed to contribute? What are those key ingredients that push those who succeed to launch their ideas high into the sky, while the rest of us remain stuck on the ground? Don’t Keep Your Day Job will get you fired up to add a little more sparkle to this world.

WHY ARE WE YELLING?: THE ART OF PRODUCTIVE DISAGREEMENT BY BUSTER BENSON NOV. 19

Have you ever walked away from an argument and suddenly thought of all the brilliant things you wish you’d said? Do you avoid certain family members and colleagues because of bitter, festering tension that you can’t figure out how to address? Now, finally, there’s a solution: a new framework that frees you from the trap of unproductive conflict and pointless arguing forever.

EPIC ATHLETES: LIONEL MESSI BY DAN WETZEL

M IS FOR MOVEMENT BY INNOSANTO NAGARA NOV. 5

At first, the protests were in small Lionel Messi has villages and at taken the soccer world by storm. His universities. Then they spread. People drive to succeed drew sustenance has motivated from other social him ever since he movements in other first stepped on countries. And then his local, worn down field as a kid. the unthinkable happened. The Diagnosed with a career-threatening protagonist is medical condition a witness and a participant, at 10, Messi refused to give up and when things change, this on his dream and went on to amass child who is now an adult one of the most exceptional careers is as surprised as anyone. in sports history. NOV. 12

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THE PERFECT SEAT BY MINH LÊ NOV. 12

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FATE OF THE FALLEN SWORD OF KINGS BY KEL KADE BY BERNARD CORNWELL NOV. 5

When Mathias discovers it’s his destiny to save the world, he dives in headfirst. But saving the world isn’t easy or exciting. The going gets rough, and folks start to believe their best chance for survival is to surrender to the forces of evil, which isn’t how the prophecy goes.

BY JAMES PATTERSON

In this collection of six classic stories, Paddington’s nose for adventure leads him into one sticky situation after the next. But with a little curiosity, the best of intentions, and a marmalade sandwich to spare, this beloved bear is a story-time favorite. Join Paddington as he explores a carnival, performs some magic, tries his paw at painting, and more!

This child and parent are almost ready for story time, but first, they must find the perfect seat. This cozy picturebook takes readers through various opposites (“Too rough! Too slippery!”) as the characters search for just the right spot.

I AM PERFECTLY DESIGNED BY KARAMO BROWN AND JASON BROWN NOV. 5

In this empowering ode to modern families, a boy and his father take a joyful walk through the city, discovering how they are perfectly designed for each other.

Release dates are subject to change.

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LOCATOR

S SHOWTIME

ADMIRAL TWIN DRIVE-IN 7355 E. Easton St. Tulsa | 918.878.8099 AMC SOUTHROADS 20 4923 E. 41st St. Tulsa | 888.AMC.4FUN B&B CLAREMORE 8 1407 W. Country Club Claremore | 918.342.2422

OPENS

NOV. 1

B&B CINEMA 8 1245 New Sapulpa Road Sapulpa | 918.227.7469 CINEMARK BROKEN ARROW 1801 E. Hillside Drive Broken Arrow | 918.355.0427

HARRIET

NOV. 1

The extraordinary tale of Harriet Tubman’s escape from slavery and transformation into one of America’s greatest heroes, whose courage, ingenuity, and tenacity freed hundreds of slaves and changed the course of history.

TERMINATOR: DARK FATE NOV. 1

Twenty-seven years after the events of Terminator 2: Judgment Day, a new, modified liquid metal Terminator is sent from the future by Skynet to terminate Dani Ramos, a hybrid cyborg human, and her friends. Sarah Connor comes to their aid, as well as the original Terminator, for a fight for the future. CAST: LINDA HAMILTON, ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, MACKENZIE DAVIS RATING: R

THE IRISHMAN

NOV. 1

Frank Sheeran is a mob hitman and World War II vet who developed his skills during his service in Italy. Now an older man, he reflects on the events that defined his career as a hitman, particularly the role he played in the disappearance of labor leader Jimmy Hoffa, his longtime friend, and his involvement with the Bufalino crime family. CAST: ROBERT DE NIRO, AL PACINO, JOE PESCI RATING: R

96 PREVIEW 918 NOVEMBER 2019

CAST: CYNTHIA ERIVO, LESLIE ODOM JR., JOE ALWYN RATING: NR

MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN

NOV. 1

Set against the backdrop of 1950s New York, Motherless Brooklyn follows Lionel Essrog, a lonely private detective afflicted with Tourette’s Syndrome, as he ventures to solve the murder of his mentor and only friend, Frank Minna.

DOCTOR SLEEP

MIDWAY

Based on the 2013 horror novel of the same name by Stephen King, the film follows an adult Danny Torrance (who was a child in King’s 1977 horror novel The Shining) with psychic powers he calls “the shining” and dealing with alcoholism as his father did. Danny comes across a cult that feeds on the “steam” of children who have the same psychic powers.

The film follows the story of U.S. Navy sailors and aviators who persevered through the Battle of Midway, a turning point in the Pacific Theater of World War II.

NOV. 8

CAST: EWAN MCGREGOR, REBECCA FERGUSON, KYLIEGH CURRAN RATING: R

CAST: JEREMY RENNER, JAMES FRANCO, HEIDI KLUM RATING: PG

LAST CHRISTMAS NOV. 8

A young woman named Kate, who has been continuously unlucky, accepts a job as a department store elf during the holidays. When Kate meets Tom on the job, her life takes an unexpected turn.

FORD V FERRARI

NOV. 15

ARCTIC DOGS

Swifty, the arctic fox, works in the mailroom of the Arctic Blast Delivery Service but dreams of one day becoming a Top Dog (the Arctic’s star husky couriers). To prove himself worthy of the Top Dog role, Swifty secretly commandeers one of the sleds and delivers a mysterious package to a strange location.

CAST: ED SKREIN, PATRICK WILSON, LUKE EVANS RATING: NR

CAST: EMILIA CLARKE, HENRY GOLDING, MICHELLE YEOH RATING: PG-13

CAST: EDWARD NORTON, BRUCE WILLIS, GUGU MBATHA-RAW RATING: R

NOV. 1

NOV. 8

PLAYING WITH FIRE NOV. 8

A crew of rugged firefighters meets their match when attempting to rescue three rambunctious kids. CAST: JOHN CENA, KEEGANMICHAEL KEY, BRIANNA HILDEBRAND RATING: NR OPENS

NOV. 8

American car designer Carroll Shelby and driver Ken Miles battle corporate interference, the laws of physics and their demons to build a revolutionary race car for Ford and challenge Ferrari at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966. CAST: MATT DAMON, CHRISTIAN BALE, CAITRIONA BALFE RATING: PG-13

CINEMARK SAND SPRINGS 1112 E. Charles Page Blvd. | Sand Springs 918.894.6888 CINERGY 6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918.894.6888 CINEMARK TULSA 10802 E. 71st S. | Tulsa 800.FAN.DANG (#1128) CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. Tulsa | 918.592.3456 ETON SQUARE 6 CINEMA 8421 E. 61st St. Tulsa | 918.286.2618 AMC CLASSIC OWASSO 12601 E. 86th St. N. Owasso | 918.376.9191 STARWORLD 20 10301 S Memorial Drive Tulsa | 918.369.7475 WARREN BROKEN ARROW 18 1700 W. Aspen Creek Drive Broken Arrow | 918.893.9798

THE GOOD LIAR

NOV. 15

A seasoned conman finds himself growing to care for the woman he orchestrated his latest scheme against after meeting her online. CAST: IAN MCKELLEN, HELEN MIRREN, RUSSELL TOVEY RATING: R


SHOWTIME S

WHERE’S MY ROY COHN?

OPENS NOV. 1

Roy Cohn personified the dark arts of American politics, turning empty vessels into dangerous demagogues. This thriller-like exposé connects the dots, revealing how a deeply troubled master manipulator shaped our current American nightmare.

FUKRY

OPENS

NOV. 22

NOV. 7

Oklahoma premiere of Blackhorse Lowe’s (in person for Q&A) drama about the ups and downs of friends falling in and out of love or not at all.

JOJO RABBIT

OPENS NOV. 8

A young boy in Hitler’s army finds out his mother is hiding a Jewish girl in their home.

JOE BOB BRIGGS: HOW REDNECKS SAVED HOLLYWOOD NOV. 9 Spend a fast-and-furious two hours with America’s drive-in movie critic as he uses over 200 clips and stills to review the history of rednecks in America.

A ROMANCE OF THE REDWOODS (1917)

NOV. 9

A plucky orphan girl’s gold-rush-era romance is complicated by the fact that the guy she loves is a wanted outlaw.

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF (1971)

NOV. 10

In prerevolutionary Russia, a Jewish peasant contends with marrying off three of his daughters while growing anti-Semitic sentiment threatens his village.

CHARLIE’S ANGELS

21 BRIDGES

Charlie’s Angels have always provided security and investigative skills to private clients, and now the Townsend Agency has expanded internationally, with the smartest, most fearless, most highly trained women all over the globe – multiple teams of Angels guided by multiple Bosleys taking on the toughest jobs across the world. When a young systems engineer blows the whistle on a dangerous technology, these Angels are called into action, putting their lives on the line to protect us all.

An expertly trained NYPD detective named Andre Davis puts the entire New York City on lockdown for him and the other authorities to defeat a gang of bloodthirsty cop killers.

NOV. 15

NOV. 10-14

A five-day festival highlighting the best of Jewish culture through new and classic films from Israel and around the world.

BLADE RUNNER (1982)

NOV. 15-16

A blade runner must pursue and terminate four replicants who stole a ship in space and have returned to Earth to find their creator.

THE REPORT

Idealistic senate staffer Daniel J. Jones, tasked by his boss to lead an investigation into the CIA’s post 9/11 detention and interrogation program, uncovers shocking secrets.

A soon-to-be stepmom is snowed in with her fiancé’s two children at a remote holiday village. Just as relations begin to thaw between the trio, some strange and frightening events take place.

SPECIAL MONDAY IS

FREE POPCORN DAY

FROZEN 2 NOV. 22

Queen Elsa, her sister Anna, Kristoff, Olaf, and Sven embark on a new journey beyond their homeland of Arendelle. CAST: KRISTEN BELL, IDINA MENZEL, JONATHAN GROFF RATING: NR

KNIVES OUT

NOV. 15

CAST: RILEY KEOUGH, JAEDEN MARTELL, LIA MCHUGH RATING: R

OPENS NOV. 22

CAST: CHADWICK BOSEMAN, J.K. SIMMONS, SIENNA MILLER RATING: NR

CAST: KRISTEN STEWART, NAOMI SCOTT, ELLA BALINSKA RATING: PG-13

THE LODGE SIXTH OKLAHOMA JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

NOV. 22

OPENS

NOV. 22

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD NOV. 22

An award-winning cynical journalist, Lloyd Vogel, begrudgingly accepts an assignment to write an Esquire profile piece on the beloved television icon Fred Rogers, with Vogel’s perspective on life transformed after his encounter with Rogers. CAST: TOM HANKS, MATTHEW RHYS, CHRIS COOPER RATING: NR

NOV. 27

A family gathering goes awry when the family’s patriarch dies, and two detectives are sent to investigate the scene. CAST: DANIEL CRAIG, CHRIS EVANS, LAKEITH STANFIELD RATING: PG-13

QUEEN & SLIM

NOV. 27

A couple’s first date takes an unexpected turn when a police officer pulls them over. CAST: DANIEL KALUUYA, JODIE TURNER-SMITH, CHLOE SEVIGNY RATING: R

*Circle Cinema members only

CIRCLE CINEMA

10 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-3456 Tickets: circlecinema.com

Check the Circle Cinema website for times, costs, additional events, and more details. Release dates, showings, and ratings are subject to change.

RELEASE DATES AND RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. NR = A RATING WAS NOT AVAILABLE AS OF OCT. 20, 2019

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November 2019 (Vol. 33, No. 11)  

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