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PLACES THAT ARE PLAYING CUPID IN OUR MIGHTY MELTS THIRTY-SEVEN INFATUATION WITH THE TIME-HONORED GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH

WHERE TO DINE

W H AT TO D O

WHERE TO FIND IT

WHEN IT’S HAPPENING

FEBRUARY 2020

KINDRED SPIRITS

DISTINCTLY TRIPPY

ODDITIES AND CURIOSITIES EXPO ATTRACTS ADMIRERS OF THE STRANGE AND UNUSUAL

EXPLORE WAYNE COYNE’S ARTY PARTY AT AHHA TULSA

STYX FOREIGNER WILLIAM SHATNER HOWARD JONES DOROTHY AND THE PRINCE OF OZ AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY GOT WOOD EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS FAMOUS STEAKHOUSE HABANEROS MEXICAN GRILL

EXERCISE YOUR MANNERS

WHOle LOTtA LovE

ARE YOU GUILTY OF BAD GYM BEHAVIOR?

building off success in los angeles and new york, ana berry is forging a unique career path with a passion for the tulsa area

PREVIEW918.COM

J U S T V I S I T I N G ? L I V I N G LO C A L? W E ’ V E G OT YO U C OV E R E D.


M FROM THE MAYOR As mayor of Tulsa, it is my honor to welcome you to our great city. Whether you’re visiting, or have deep roots here, I invite you to take time to explore our beautiful city and discover all the things that set us apart from other cities. I highly recommend Preview 918 as your go-to guide to navigate our incredible city. For more than 34 years, Preview has covered the 918, offering Tulsans and visitors alike the inside scoop to area restaurants and cafés, lodging, local attractions and events, world-class entertainment venues, tourist destinations, and unique shopping venues that are bound to please and delight. Our city is home to the world’s greatest collection of western art at the Gilcrease Museum, as well as Italian Renaissance displays at the Philbrook Museum. It’s a treasure trove for lovers of architecture, from mid-century modern housing, to the downtown Art Deco District, and our iconic BOK Center, designed by the internationally acclaimed architect César Pelli.

Tulsa Roughnecks soccer. Or time a visit to coincide with special events, such as Tulsa Tough bike racing, the Tulsa Run, the Route 66 Marathon, and the NCAA basketball tournament. The Tulsa area offers more than 80 miles of pedestrian and bicycle trails for a great way to see Tulsa. Tulsa is also a city on the move. In 2018, we opened the Gathering Place. The Gathering Place is a world class riverfront park designed to welcome all to a vibrant and inclusive public space that engages, educates, and excites.

To distribute Preview 918 at your place of business: 918‑745‑1190.

G.T. Bynum

FOLLOW US! PREVIEW918

MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER Marc Rains marc@previewgreencountry.com

MANAGING EDITOR | SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Michele Chiappetta michele@previewgreencountry.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Greer, Michele Chiappetta, Donna Leahey, Rob Harmon, G.K. Hizer, Gina Conroy, Lindsay Morris, John Tranchina, Jennifer Zehnder, Sarah Herrera, Ashton Greer, TravelOK.com

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Elizabeth Wollmershauser

4 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020

In over 100 area Hotels and Motels

Local advertising and business inquiries: 918-745-1190.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL, BRAND, AND STRATEGY Chris Greer chrisg@previewgreencountry.com

Beth Rose beth@previewgreencountry.com

A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has remained the most trusted and widely read lifestyle publication in the Tulsa and Green Country area for more than 30 years. While other magazines have come and gone, Preview 918 has not only remained but has achieved unprecedented prestige within our community. It has been, and will continue to be, the magazine the 918 area lives by.

We connect with over 200,000 readers each month covering dining, fitness, retail, services, entertainment, people, events, lifestyles, and the arts. Preview 918 is freely distributed to over 650 locations in the Tulsa and Green Country area including Reasor’s, over 100 hotels, Tulsa International Airport, casinos, retail shops, boutiques, restaurants, bars, medical offices, salons, gyms, and service providers. And many of those readers tell us that Preview 918 faithfully helps them identify their interests, wants, and needs.

Sports spectators can look to the University of Tulsa or Oral Roberts University athletic programs, Tulsa Oiler hockey games, and

CREATIVE TEAM Jared Hood jared@previewgreencountry.com

PREVIEW918.COM

Best regards, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa

For a night on the town, Tulsa serves up family entertainment at the Guthrie Green and Tulsa Drillers baseball at ONEOK Field. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center attracts Broadway musicals, renowned musicians and excellent local theater productions, and is home to the Tulsa Ballet.

FACEBOOK.COM/PREVIEW918

VOL. 34, NO. 2

I’m pleased so many of you have made your home in Tulsa. If you’re visiting our city, please enjoy your stay here. I also want to invite you to come back often to experience opportunities you won’t find anywhere else. In the meantime, you can find out more about Tulsa by visiting cityoftulsa.‌org.

Tulsa’s unique entertainment and shopping districts provide enjoyable experiences for the entire family. From an art crawl in the Tulsa Arts District, to a concert at the historic Cain’s Ballroom, to a trip to the Tulsa Zoo or a leisurely drive along Route 66 — there’s no end to what you can experience here.  

LIKE US!

PREV EW

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Marc Rains, Sarah Eliza Roberts, Sarah Herrera, Jennifer Zehnder, Valerie Wei‑Haas, Kelli Greer

FOLLOW US!

@PREVIEWTULSA FIELD OPERATIONS MANAGER Stephen Hurt stephen@previewgreencountry.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ann Murphy ann@previewgreencountry.com ROUTE DISTRIBUTION Rachel Blanchard, Cory Blanchard, Garrett Rinner SENIOR CONSULTANT Randy Dietzel PUBLISHERS Robert and Amy Rinner robert@previewgreencountry.com

Preview 918 is published 12 times a year. Reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited.

READ US!

WWW.ISSUU.COM/PREVIEWMAGAZINETULSA While the information has been compiled carefully to ensure accuracy at the time of publication, all content is provided for general guidance only and is subject to change. The publisher can’t guarantee the accuracy of all information or be responsible for omissions or errors. Preview 918 claims no credit for any images published in this issue unless otherwise noted. Images are copyright to their respective owners. Health, small business, and financial advice provided in Preview 918 and preview918.com are for educational and entertainment purposes only. Always consult with a qualified professional for health, small business, and financial advice. Preview 918, 10026-A S. Mingo, Suite 322, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Copyright 2020 by Preview 918. All rights reserved. Preview 918 is an affiliated publication produced by Fore Today Publications LLC.  


THE TRANSFORMATION IS COMPLETE

COME REDISCOVER THE

CULINARY QUEEN OF THE CORNER T U L SA A R T S D I ST R I C T • 2 01 N. M A I N ST. TAV E R N T U L SA .C O M


T TABLE OF CONTENTS FEBRUARY 2020

FEATURES 16

CONVERSATION STARTER: WILLIAM SHATNER

A cultural icon since the 1960s, William Shatner shares some of his secrets to living long and prospering, as well as behind-the-scenes stories from playing Captain James T. Kirk and Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.

20

CONVERSATION STARTER: FOREIGNER

22

CONVERSATION STARTER: STYX

With 10 multi-platinum albums and 16 top 30 hits, Foreigner is one of the most popular rock acts in the world with a formidable musical arsenal that continues to propel tours and over 80 million album sales.

34

76 ON THE COVER

BURIED SECRETS

Tossing guilt around like a hand grenade, Theatre Tulsa tackles the hard truth that with family, often the deepest wounds come from the people closest to us in Tracy Letts’ August: Osage County.

36 FRIGHT CLUB

With taxidermy, preserved specimens, antiques, quack medical devices, clothing, jewelry, skulls and bones, and funeral collectibles, the Oddities and Curiosities Expo is for like-minded lovers of the strange and unusual.

80 GRILLED TO PERFECTION

Food trends might come and go, but the phenomenon of the grilled cheese sandwich is forever. And we found 37 restaurants that have taken mom’s Kraft-slices-on-Wonder-bread recipe to another level.

84 THE EAT IS ON

With an atmosphere that is lively, colorful, and comfortably casual, Habaneros Mexican Grill lives up to its name with an exhaustive list of dishes, drinks, and house specialties.

With “Mr. Roboto” back in the setlist, Styx continues to draw from over four decades of chart hits, joyous singalongs, and hard-driving deep cuts.

STARTER: 24 CONVERSATION HOWARD JONES

Howard Jones’ acoustic trio tour offers fans a stripped-down trip through his nearly 40-year career, complete with stories behind the inspiration for many of his hits and life on the road.

INTO THE 88 DIPPING MEDITERRANEAN

40 ARTY PARTY

The King’s Mouth exhibit at ahha Tulsa offers an adventure in sight and sound, with the same surreal, psychedelic sensibility you’d expect at a Flaming Lips concert.

28 CREATIVE FORCE

42 LET THE GAMES BEGIN

32 BALLET BONANZA

68 THE ART OF FOOD

After stints in Los Angeles and New York, television host, commercial spokeswoman, singer, and multimedia journalist Ana Berry brings her charm, energy, and personality to the Tulsa-area music and media arts scenes.

Featuring special effects usually reserved for Broadway productions, journey with Dorothy, Glinda, and Scarecrow as they make their heroic return to save the land of Oz in Dorothy and the Prince of Oz.

Cozy vibes, faultless service, family recipes, and terrific food seal the deal at the intimate, yet inviting, Famous Steakhouse inspired by the fragrant spices and smoky grills of Lebanese cooking.

A veritable cornucopia of arcade options and sensory overload await players at Cinergy, including basketball, pinball, skee-ball, shooting games, XD rides, virtual reality Hologate, and more.

When it comes to getting a unique gift for just about any size group and any celebration, then it’s worth your time to visit the friendly, creative, fast team of fruit lovers over at Edible Arrangements.

92 LOOKING SHARP

Got Wood offers an axperience that is not only fun and challenging but is something everyone in the family can do.

With a drive to cut out a niche that embraces her love for the arts, Ana Berry, whose career has taken her nationally and internationally as a TV host, commercial spokeswoman, and multimedia journalist, brings her charm, energy and personality to the music and media arts scene in Green Country.

COVER CREDIT Photographer: Sarah Eliza Roberts Model: Ana Berry

DEPARTMENTS

8 $91.80 in 48 Challenge

10 Music + Concerts + Comedy 13 Happenings 15 Street Talk

6 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020

16 Conversation Starter

54 Sports Central

68 Style + Shopping

76 Eats + Treats

26 Sound Check

61 Sports Schedule

70 Restaurant + Bar Finder

92 Get to Know

49 Downtown Locator

62 Green Country Scene

72 Launch Pad

94 Shelf Life

50 Tulsa Locator

66 Beyond Tulsa

74 Health + Fitness

96 Showtime

52 Homegrown Heroes


The only catch was that she had to spend it at places, events or shops profiled in the January 2020 issue of Preview 918.

918 $91.80 IN 48 CHALLENGE The mission posed to Holly Jeffrey was to spend $91.80 (we used the local area code for the amount) in two days. And if she could find fun and free activities … bonus.

SO, PROVIDING AN ENVELOPE OF CASH AND TELLING PEOPLE TO SPEND IT IN 48 HOURS ISN’T EXACTLY A CHALLENGE, BUT IT MAKES THIS ASSIGNMENT MORE INTERESTING.

2 Staying in The Boxyard, we next visited Riley’s Wine and Spirits. The owner, Chris, was quite engaging, exuding his love of his family’s homeland, Ireland. I purchased a cute candy cane filled with four small bottles of DeKuyper schnapps.

1 My daughter-in-law, Michelle Krieger, and granddaughter, Reilly Harbison, and I began the challenge at The Boxyard in downtown Tulsa. Sweet Boutique is a quaint little candy store that is packed with delicious choices. From the front display of “buy five, get one free,” I picked a box of macarons, and my daughter-inlaw got a box of truffles and fudge.

COST: $5

COST: $31

3 After leaving The Boxyard, we headed to Ziegler Art & Frame. In addition to an enormous amount of artwork, and framing and matting services, one can also find a large variety of gift items. Forever the bargain hunter, I found a neat canvas print in the garage sale room. My granddaughter picked out a leather luggage tag to give as a gift. COST: $18

u Think yo our can blow cash in g interestin ways?

4 We finished our shopping expedition with a trip back downtown to Decopolis. From the welcome sign and the art deco vibe throughout, this is not your usual bookstore. We all agreed this should be a destination for locals as well as visitors. I found a super cool Turkey Mountain T-shirt for my brother, a dog love book, and a stuffed saber-toothed tiger. COST: $40

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AND DROP A MESSAGE WITH SOME OF YOUR IDEAS. WE MIGHT JUST LACE YOUR POCKETS WITH GREEN AND TURN YOU LOOSE. 8 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


PREVIEW918.COM 9


H HAPPENINGS FEBRUARY LIVE MUSIC VENUES 5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa

BLACKBIRD ON PEARL

1336 E. 6th St. | Tulsa

BOK CENTER

200 S. Denver Ave. | Tulsa

CAIN’S BALLROOM

423 N. Main St. | Tulsa

CROW CREEK TAVERN

3534 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa

GUTHRIE GREEN

111 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa

IDL BALLROOM

230 E. 1st St. | Tulsa

INNER CIRCLE VODKA BAR 410 N. Main St. | Tulsa

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT 8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

MERCURY LOUNGE

1747 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

01

5 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

PEORIA SHOWPLACE | BUFFALO RUN CASINO & RESORT

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

05 CELINE DION

06

ELI YOUNG BAND

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

07

RABBIT HOLE REDS

325 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

RIFFS | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

SOUL CITY

GRANGER SMITH WITH EARL DIBBLES JR. Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa

SOUNDPONY

409 N. Main St. | Tulsa

SWAMPHOUSE

1529 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE COLONY

2809 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa

THE FUR SHOP

520 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

THE HUNT CLUB

224 N. Main St. | Tulsa

THE JOINT | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

THE VANGUARD

222 N. Main St. | Tulsa

TRACK 5 | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

TULSA THEATER

105 W. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

102 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa

10 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Duet | Tulsa

116 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa

951 W. 36th St. N. | Tulsa

FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS

ANA BERRY AND BOSSA

1000 Buffalo Run Blvd. | Miami

SKYLINE EVENT CENTER | OSAGE CASINO HOTEL

08

BOK Center | Tulsa

OKLAHOMA JAZZ HALL OF FAME PARADISE COVE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

02

DAEDALUS QUARTET

WINTER JAM

BOK Center | Tulsa

ALL THAT JAZZ Hillcrest Country Club | Bartlesville

VOCTAVE

Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center | Broken Arrow

RIFF RAFF The Vanguard | Tulsa

MIRANDA LAMBERT BOK Center | Tulsa

JON PARDI

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

09 PITBULL

BOK Center | Tulsa


Where Tulsa’s Aviation heritage takes Flight!

THE INTERNATIONAL SENSATION STOMPONLINE.COM

See our feature on page 68

MARCH 6-8 TULSA PAC

918.596.7111

ON SALE NOW!

CELEBRITYATTRACTIONS.COM Groups SAVE! Call 918.796.0220

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Celebrity Attractions & More To You!

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PREVIEW918.COM 11


H HAPPENINGS FEBRUARY

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY

11

NIKKI GLASER

Buffalo Run Casino & Resort | Miami

13

FOREIGNER

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

IRATION

20

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

STYX

Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

JACKIE VENSON

Woody Guthrie Center | Tulsa

YOUNG DOLPH AND KEY GLOCK Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

14 COLD WAR KIDS

15 21 Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

G HERBO

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

STORM LARGE

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

16 SILVERSUN PICKUPS Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

18 ERIC JOHNSON

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

DABABY

BOK Center | Tulsa

BLACK TIGER SEX MACHINE

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

LIL TJAY

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

MATT FRASER

12 GRACE POTTER

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

12 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020

Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel | Tulsa

JOSH TURNER

19

TORI KELLY

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Tulsa Theater | Tulsa


HAPPENINGS ALSO IN FEBRUARY H EVERYWHERE

22

2

GROUNDHOG DAY

27 HOWARD JONES

The Vanguard | Tulsa

IDL Ballroom | Tulsa

BOK Center | Tulsa

#IMOMSOHARD Tulsa Theater | Tulsa

DEAD METAL SOCIETY

FEB. 1 2 FRIENDS AND JUNK CRAFT SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

FEB. 1 TASM RUNWAY RUN

28 AARON LEWIS

29 Tulsa Theater | Tulsa

BRANTLEY GILBERT

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

2

SUPER BOWL BUCKCHERRY

FEB. 1 HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN IN CONCERT

Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium | Tulsa

14 FEB. 1 HIGH SCHOOL HOOPS BOK Center | Tulsa

VALENTINE’S DAY

17

FEB. 1 TULSA BALLET: IDOLS AND ICONS

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

FEB. 1 AMERICAN SPIRIT CHAMPIONSHIP

Buffalo Run Casino & Resort | Miami

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

MARLON WAYANS

Skyline Event Center | Osage Casino Hotel | Tulsa

PRESIDENTS’ DAY

CASEY DONAHEW

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

26

FEB. 1-2 TULSA BOAT, SPORT AND TRAVEL SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

FEB. 1-16 UNDERNEATH THE LINTEL

26

NGHTMRE

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

ASH WEDNESDAY

121 W. 3rd St. | Grove

PUDDLE OF MUDD

Buffalo Run Casino & Resort | Miami

PREVIEW918.COM 13


H HAPPENINGS ALSO IN FEBRUARY

FEB. 22 COOKING UP COMPASSION Cox Business Center | Tulsa

FEB. 15 KELLI O’HARA

Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center | Broken Arrow

FEB. 22-23 COA CHEER AND DANCE HEART OF AMERICA NATIONALS

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

FEB. 25 LIVE UNITED AWARDS AND LUNCHEON FEB. 6-9 I HAVE BEFORE ME A REMARKABLE DOCUMENT GIVEN TO ME BY A YOUNG LADY FROM RWANDA

FEB. 7-9 TULSA FISHING AND HUNTING EXPO Expo Square | Tulsa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

FEB. 13-16 TULSA BALLET: DOROTHY AND THE PRINCE OF OZ

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

FEB. 15 EAST MEETS WEST: ROARING TWENTIES NIGHT

OSU-CHS Tandy Medical Academic Building | Tulsa

FEB. 27-MARCH 1 AKDAR SHRINE CIRCUS Expo Square | Tulsa

FEB. 7 FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL Tulsa Arts District | Tulsa

FEB. 8 MALPASO DANCE COMPANY

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

FEB. 8 HEART BALL

FEB. 14-16 MIDSOUTH TACKLE, HUNTING AND BOAT SHOW Grove Civic Center | Tulsa

FEB. 15-23 AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

FEB. 8-9 TULSA WOMEN’S EXPO

FEB. 21 STREET SCHOOL’S STREET PARTY

Expo Square | Tulsa

Tulsa Botanic Garden | Tulsa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

Expo Square | Tulsa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

FEB. 9 FULL MOON NATURE HIKE

FEB. 28 MEMORY GALA

FEB. 14-15 HOOSIER ARENACROSS NATIONALS

FEB. 28-29 STARPOWER NATIONAL TALENT COMPETITION Cox Business Center | Tulsa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

FEB. 14-16 VINTAGE TULSA SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

FEB. 7 MARLEE MATLIN AND HENRY WINKLER

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

FEB. 12 DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD LIVE! Tulsa Theater | Tulsa

FEB. 7-8 CHRIST IN YOUTH

FEB. 14-16 DARRYL STARBIRD’S NATIONAL ROD AND CUSTOM CAR SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

FEB. 21-22 ILLINOIS RIVER FLY FISHING SCHOOL

Tenkiller State Park | Vian

FEB. 21-23 TULSA REMODEL AND LANDSCAPE SHOW

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

Mabee Center | Tulsa

FEB. 7-9 BMX SOONER NATIONALS Expo Square | Tulsa

FEB. 13 WILLIAM SHATNER Tulsa Theater | Tulsa

FEB. 14-23 GODSPELL

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

FEB. 22 ODDITIES AND CURIOSITIES EXPO Expo Square | Tulsa

FEB. 28-MARCH 1 MADAMA BUTTERFLY

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

FEB. 29 RED RIBBON GALA

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

FEB. 29-MARCH 1 TROLLS LIVE! BOK Center | Tulsa

Dates, events and times are subject to change.

14 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


STREET TALK ST

DO YOU REMEMBER YOUR FIRST

Mine was on a park bench under the stars with my first boyfriend. I was 17.

— SHANNON

My first kiss was on a bench in a park in Florida. We ended up kissing for 10 minutes. It was cool.

— ZACH

Yes, and it was awful. I wish I could forget.

— HALLIE

— ALAN

In 1990, I was a sophomore in high school, and I met a girl, and rather immediately became in love, as only a teenager can. But she was in a relationship with another guy, so I decided we would be best friends. Then there came a night when we were both lying on a hill looking at the stars. After a long silence, she said, “I’ve never been good at making the first move.” “Me neither,” I said, my heart a tympani. She asked what we should do about it, and I said, “We’re two intelligent teenage kids. I’m sure we can think of something if we put our heads together.” We did.

— RICK

It was so weird and awkward. But our lips were locked for about five minutes straight. It’s a day I will never forget.

She tried to give me a tonsillectomy.

— ANDY

— YULIA

It was in first grade. Susan wanted to tell me a secret on the playground. When I leaned in to hear, she turned my face to hers and kissed me several times before I could pull away.

I was 13, and he was 14. He was standing in front of my sister’s car following a Friday night of roller skating. I asked him if he was going to kiss me. He sang at my wedding 10 years later.

I was 10 years old, and we had a missionary family staying with us. We both wondered what it would be like to kiss. We tried it, and it was awkward. We’re friends, and our families are friends to this day.

— PATRICK

Dear Lord, that was 40 years ago.

— TROY

— SARAH BETH

I was 6 years old, sitting on my bed, watching my siblings play videogames, and then I saw her and realized she’d been there all along. It was the wall. We made eye contact, and then it happened: I kissed her. It was magical, and it lasted for longer than it should. Then I heard my name, and I realized I’d been caught. Of course I remember my first kiss; my siblings won’t let me forget it.

Sadie Hawkins dance. Does kindergarten count?

— KRYSTAL

My first kiss? Yes, I do. I wasn’t expecting it.

— KRISTY

— JOSIAH

It was second grade. His name was Francisco. It meant something because he was cute, and I had no idea how it was to like someone or to call them a boyfriend. We were supposed to go to third grade together, but he left for Florida after the grade was over. All I did was shrug my shoulders and walked away from him. So much for that.

— REBECCA

It was a clear summer night with a slight breeze. I just admitted how I felt about her, and she told me she knew. As we kissed, there was stillness, as time stood still. There was no sound, no wind, just the everlasting bliss of that kiss and how I never wanted that moment to end.

— JIMMIE

I was 17, and he eventually ended up marrying one of my employees.

— ANDREA

WANT TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION? We’ll post a question on our Facebook each month. Give us an answer and photo, and you might end up in our magazine. PREVIEW918.COM 15


CS CONVERSATION STARTER BY ROB HARMON

william shatner

PHOTO BY RORY LEWIS

16 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


Q A.

The familiar thing in show business is failure. We’re all accustomed If you’ve never seen an actor to seeing what doesn’t work until struggle for an answer, you have you’re graced by a touch of good your opportunity that night. But, luck and fate, that something seriously, it’s got to be unique, works. Then you think, ‘My gosh, in some way, for many people this is a success. I can’t believe it.’ in Tulsa to come to a theater, And that’s the way we feel about see a movie, and then the actor it in show business. There’s a comes out and talks about the wonderful legend about the show film. Surely that’s got to be a biz manager. There is out there a different experience. guy who is the show biz manager, who visits you at night, usually while you’re fast asleep, and says, ‘You know, you really aren’t any good.’ And you have to fight that thing. So, when you have success, it WHAT DO YOU comes like a bolt of lightning.

Q.

LIKE ABOUT DOING A Q&A TOUR?

A.

I’ve gotten accustomed to touring. I had a one-person show on Broadway, and when it closed, I went on tour. I thought, ‘How romantic, how wonderful, going from city to city.’ By the time I got to the second city, I realized it wasn’t romantic. Just getting to the theater took all your energy. But I toured that one-person show. On this tour of Wrath of Khan, it’s fun to go out and ad-lib, do a spontaneous hour, and walk that rope in front of an audience. It’s a challenge I think is fun. We tried this in a couple of places and found that it worked. After Tulsa, I’m going to tour 10 cities in Europe. It is a bit like reality TV. You go out and see what happens, see what questions the audience asks, and how informative or amusing or entertaining I can make my answers.

Q.

IS THERE ANY ONE AWARD OR HONOR YOU’VE RECEIVED THAT IS MORE SPECIAL TO YOU?

A.

I talked earlier about seeing an actor struggle for an answer. There’s one, right there. Let’s see. I’ve got a Golden Globe and some Emmys. Those are the top awards the industry can give you. I am gratified that they thought enough of my performances to provide me with those. I suppose those are the most special ones.

Q.

WHAT’S SOMETHING YOU DON’T USUALLY GET TO TALK ABOUT?

A.

There’s a wonderful thing you gradually learn. Somebody says, ‘Tell me about your sore tooth.’ Then I say, ‘You know, I’m looking at the blue sky and wondering how come blue.’ You don’t have to answer the question at all. You see, politicians do that all the time, and personalities have to learn how to do that, but it takes a while because people in show biz want to be loved. So, they want to do what you say, and they don’t know until it’s late in their life that you don’t have to. I work with horses a lot, and you can train a young horse. You can make the horse jump or slide or roll on its back, but a lot of horses, after they get older, think, ‘You know, I’m not going to do that,’ and they don’t do it.

Q.

ANY LIFE ADVICE FROM WILLIAM SHATNER? HOW WOULD CAPTAIN KIRK ANSWER THAT SAME QUESTION?

A.

Captain Kirk and William Shatner would say the same thing. My advice to the folks in Tulsa is that Feb. 13, go to the Tulsa Theater, and you will have a life-changing time with me.

WILLIAM SHATNER Tulsa Theater 105 W. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa 918-582-7239 tulsatheater.com

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With a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for television and one on Canada’s Walk of Fame in his country of origin, Shatner has nearly done and seen it all. What’s left for him to do but join us in Tulsa Feb. 13 at the Brady Theater, for a night of nostalgia with a showing of Paramount’s 1982 film, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, including a Q&A with Shatner afterward.

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WHICH OF YOUR CHARACTERS HAVE SURPRISED YOU MOST BY THEIR POPULARITY?

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After doing everything from television to movies, from multiple spoken-word albums to novel writing, there isn’t anything Shatner hasn’t done. For nearly 70 years, Shatner, who turns 89 in March, has embraced a career of ups and downs, failure, and successes, all while becoming a pop culture icon with such roles as television and film’s Captain James Kirk from the Star Trek franchise, TV’s Denny Crane from Boston Legal, as well as the eponymous T.J. Hooker.

IS THERE ANYTHING ATTENDEES WOULD FIND SURPRISING ABOUT THE WRATH OF KHAN Q&A?

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Stepping out onstage in front of a live audience to do a question and answer session, without knowing what will happen, is just as entertaining for William Shatner as it is to his audience. Go figure, that a man used to boldly going where no man has gone before, is in his element on a oneperson transcontinental Q&A tour where anything goes.

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A CULTURAL ICON SINCE THE 1960S, WILLIAM SHATNER SHARES SOME OF HIS SECRETS TO LIVING LONG AND PROSPERING, AS WELL AS BEHINDTHE-SCENES STORIES FROM PLAYING CAPTAIN JAMES T. KIRK AND STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN.

Feb. 13: 7:30 p.m.

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502 EAST 3RD STREET | TULSA, OK, 74120

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BY DONNA LEAHEY

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WITH 10 MULTI-PLATINUM ALBUMS AND 16 TOP 30 HITS, FOREIGNER IS ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR ROCK ACTS IN THE WORLD WITH A FORMIDABLE MUSICAL ARSENAL THAT CONTINUES TO PROPEL TOURS AND OVER 80 MILLION ALBUM SALES.

TOM GIMBEL

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Depending on your age, 1976 might seem like prehistory, or it might seem like it was just a few years ago. To fans of rock ‘n’ roll, 1976 is a milestone. It’s the year that American vocalist Lou Gramm joined forces with Brits Mick Jones and Ian McDonald to form iconic rock band Foreigner. Their selftitled first album became an instant hit powered by singles like “Feels Like the First Time,” “Long, Long Way from Home,” and “Cold as Ice.” The hits continued with influential albums like Double Vision (1978), Head Games (1979), 4 (1981), Agent Provocateur (1984), and Inside Information (1987). There have been some lineup changes, new music, and an orchestral recording, but through it all Foreigner just keeps rocking audiences with their powerful, energetic, classic sound and songs. Guitarist Jones is the sole remaining member of the classic Foreigner lineup. Over the past couple of years, he’s been joined by Gramm and other classic-era members on brief occasions. The current incarnation features lead singer Kelly Hansen, bassist Jeff Pilson, drummer Chris Frazier, and multi-instrumentalist Tom Gimbel. Gimbel (vocals and saxophone) has been with Foreigner since 1995. His sax wails through hits like “Urgent,” while his throaty vocals power through ballads like “I Want to Know What Love Is” or rockers like “Juke Box Hero.” His love for everything rock music was evident when he spoke with Preview 918 ahead of Foreigner’s Feb. 13 return to River Spirit Casino Resort.

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Q HOW DO YOU KEEP THE SONGS FULL OF ENERGY PLAYING THEM AGAIN AND AGAIN?

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I think the energy is written into the song. The fact that I’m in love with rock music, it’s always going to be good. It never gets old hitting those power chords in “Juke Box Hero.” It’s so much fun. Losing my mind on saxophone during “Urgent” is something I could do 10 times a day and be very happy. It never gets close to being old. It’s brand-new every time I do it.

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WHY DON’T MORE BANDS USE A SAXOPHONE? IT’S GREAT FOR ROCK MUSIC.

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Yeah, it’s on a lot of our records. A saxophone is always hanging around, lurking around the corner, and waiting to be set free.

I don’t have a preference for fast or slower songs. I love the songs for what is inside them. You can learn from a song like “That Was Yesterday,” where the message is you have to move on, but don’t forget about the past. That’s a great message. “Waiting for a Girl Like You” is not really a slow song, per se; it’s more of a rhythm and blues song. It’s making my hips move just talking about it. I love both those songs with all my heart, and I love rock songs too. So, it’s equal. It’s a complete tie, to answer your question.

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DOUBLE VISION HAS BEEN OUT OVER 40 YEARS. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN TO FOREIGNER, TO HAVE THOSE DECADES OF MUSIC BEHIND YOU?

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I think years go by like months now. We used to measure time in years, and now we measure in decades. It’s incredible that much time has passed. I think if you’re a rock purist like me, it’ll never get old. I don’t think that’s ever going to happen. I haven’t even seen an inkling of it. These songs resonate not just with me but with people. They were written in a way that withstood the test of time well. So, I think we’re good to go for the next 40 years.

HOW MUCH TIME DO YOU SPEND ON THE ROAD?

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We do about a hundred shows a year, and for each show, you figure two days away from home, so that’s 200 days gone. That gives me 100 days to pick up the pieces, answer all the mail, and then go again. I wouldn’t have it any other way, and we’re delighted that people still want to rock with us.

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FOREIGNER IS INVOLVED IN SOME PRETTY GREAT PHILANTHROPY.

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We work with the Shriners, and they work with children’s hospitals. They’ve been building children’s hospitals since the 1920s, so whatever we can do for the Shriners, we do.

We’re also working with the Grammy Foundation in its efforts to save music in public schools. So many schools are ditching music programs. It’s terrible because the kids didn’t do anything wrong. They just come in one day, and it’s like, “No more band. Turn in your trombone.” I think that’s a shame because it kept me out of trouble. I still got in a lot of trouble, but not as much as if I hadn’t had music in school. I couldn’t wait to go to music class. I think for a lot of kids, music fills a void in their lives. They have a sense of identity and something cool and fun to do in school. We also like to have local choirs come onstage with us. School

choirs submit a demo, and our publicist picks the best one in the area. The choir comes onstage with us for “I Want to Know What Love Is.” It’s cool because we donate to their music program; it’s kind of like giving them their first paying jobs. It’s fun seeing the looks on their faces, and hopefully, they can get the experience of being in front of a crowd.

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WHAT’S NEXT FOR FOREIGNER?

We played with an orchestra in Nashville for a few shows in January. Any time we’re playing with an orchestra, we love playing with all those textures. We just finished doing a 10-show residency in Las Vegas at the Venetian Resort. This will be our year to get into the residency world. Everybody’s doing it, right? We’re also going to Europe in May. We’re doing some big shows in London and all through Europe with Whitesnake and Europe. Do you get that? We’re going to Europe with Europe. We know those guys; they’re fun. Our drummer used to be in Whitesnake, so it’ll be like a family reunion. We’re psyched.

FOREIGNER Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort 8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 888-748-3731 riverspirittulsa.com

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Somewhere between 1,000 and 2,000.

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WITH GREAT BALLADS AND SOLID ROCK HITS, DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE?

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HOW MANY TIMES DO YOU THINK YOU’VE PERFORMED SONGS LIKE “URGENT” AND “JUKE BOX HERO”?

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Feb. 13: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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BY DONNA LEAHEY

styx

WITH “MR. ROBOTO” BACK IN THE SETLIST, STYX CONTINUES TO DRAW FROM OVER FOUR DECADES OF CHART HITS, JOYOUS SINGALONGS, AND HARD-DRIVING DEEP CUTS.

Classic rock band Styx created the soundtrack of the late ‘70s and early ‘80s with epic albums like The Grand Illusion (1977), Pieces of Eight (1978), Cornerstone (1979), and Paradise Theatre (1981).

year and is the first rock band in history to have four consecutive certified multi-million-selling albums beginning with The Grand Illusion. Styx is also one of few musical acts to have top 10 singles in three different decades.

Known for such hits as “Blue Collar Man (Long Nights),” “Lady,” “Come Sail Away,” “Crystal Ball,” “Too Much Time on My Hands,” “Renegade,” and “Fooling Yourself (The Angry Young Man),” Styx plays about 100 shows each

Near the end of the ‘90s, Styx found itself in need of a keyboardist and vocalist following the departure of Dennis DeYoung. DeYoung was replaced by Lawrence Gowan, a classically trained pianist, who had

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achieved platinum success as a solo act on Sony Canada. Twenty years later, Gowan can hardly be called the “new guy” anymore. While the lineup has changed throughout the years, original members James “J.Y.” Young and Chuck Panozzo still hold down the guitar and bass respectively and contribute to vocals. Tommy Shaw, the band member who has found the most solo success, has been with the group on and off for 30 years.

Current album The Mission was released in 2017, and like much of Styx’s most significant work, it’s a concept album. This one is about a mission to Mars, and it’s the band’s highest-charting album since their most famous fellow concept record, Kilroy Was Here (1983). Gowan talked with Preview 918 ahead of the band’s Feb. 20 show at River Spirit Casino Resort.


Q We continue to forge new music and new Styx ideas that will live alongside the historical pieces of the band that everyone knows and loves. So, I suppose that shows some change. Also, because we tour so much, there are tiny little things we tweak along the way. We’re playing “Mr. Roboto” again. A couple of years ago, we would never have imagined ever considering that, but we have.

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DO YOU ENJOY PLAYING “MR. ROBOTO”?

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I do. It’s a fun song to play. I enjoy the story of someone who has something to hide and slowly

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE SONGS TO PERFORM AMONG STYX’S CLASSICS?

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It’s hard not to enjoy “Renegade.” It’s one of the songs I have less responsibility on. I do some harmonies in the opening and the middle. The reason I chose that one is not that I’m lazy. We play it at the end of the night. Wherever we play around the world, I get a chance to observe the audience at that point and see the emotional arc they’ve traversed throughout the night. I also love the songs I have more responsibility on, like “Come Sail Away.”

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WHAT ABOUT THE MORE MODERN SONGS? WHICH ARE YOUR FAVORITES AMONG THOSE?

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We open the show every time with the opening track off The Mission called “Gone Gone Gone.” And I sing lead on that one. So, it’s kind of a bucking-bronco-outof-the-gate type of song. I get to rev things up immediately, and

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HOW MUCH DOES STYX TOUR?

Well, 100 is the mark. So by shooting for 100, we end up doing 110 or 120 shows each year. In 2018, we decided to play 80 shows because J.Y. [James Young] needed a little more time at home, which means we played 91 or 92. Last year I played 20 solo shows in Canada where I take my band out. So, I’m on the road two-thirds of the year, usually.

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THAT SEEMS TIRING.

Not at all. There’s a great vitality derived from having to get ready for a show every night at 8 o’clock. I have way more reserves of

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WHAT’S NEXT FOR STYX?

There are always things on the horizon for us, though we don’t look too far down the road, to be honest. The more you do this, the more you learn to appreciate the now. We have new things we’re very excited about. We’ll spend some time in the studio mashing out those ideas. If they rise to the level of what we accomplished with The Mission, there could be new Styx music on the horizon. We have no real mandate to make new music; we have plenty of material. But if it goes well, we’ll have something new to present. The tour has become such a central part of what we’re about. It’s the one thing you can’t download. You have to be in the venue to experience a live rock show. We stay focused on that.

STYX Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort 8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 888-748-3731 riverspirittulsa.com

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Then there’s our album, The Mission, which continues to do well. We have played special nights where we did the album in its entirety in Las Vegas, Boston, and two nights in New York. The album has fallen in place among Styx’s legacy records of the band.

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The other song that gets me is “Radio Silence” [off The Mission]. That one has been very well received. It’s got a very singable chorus. It’s reminiscent sonically of a number of the classics of the past, particularly “Man in the Wilderness.” And then toward the end of the night, I do the piano solo piece from The Mission called “Khedive.” It’s a challenge, a tough piece to pull off. I’ve got to get my fingers ready for that one.

energy that kick in when I’m on tour than when I’m at home. It’s been the rhythm of my life for 40 years now. I look at playing live as something that gets me jacked up. I also sleep better on a tour bus, when my bed is moving down the highway. I’m well outfitted for this lifestyle.

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I think the last time we were here was about a year ago. Since that time, we’re much more seasoned professionals, as we approach the 50th year of the existence of Styx. We toured internationally. We played in England, a sold-out night at the London Palladium. We did a sold-out night at Oslo, Norway, and played to over 40,000 people in Sweden.

it segues seamlessly into “Blue Collar Man (Long Nights).” I love that we’ve got the new and the tried-and-true back-to-back right at the top of the show; it’s a great way to open.

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WHAT’S CHANGED SINCE THE LAST TIME STYX VISITED TULSA?

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reveals it, as if it’s a private conversation you’re having with thousands of people. In my solo career, I have some songs with that sort of point of view, and I’m able to kind of conjure that angle when I’m singing that song and utilize that sort of way of delivery. It’s part of the encore, and people seem to enjoy it.

Feb. 20: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

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BY G.K. HIZER PHOTO BY SIMON FOWLER

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Most recently, Jones has released expanded remasters of his first two albums, and an album in 2019, Transform, that saw him return to form in the electronic music field to the delight of longtime fans. This winter and spring, Jones returns to the U.S. to revisit his catalog with a new twist — touring as a trio, to give the songs a more personal and intimate reading. Before setting off on tour, which brings him to The Vanguard Feb. 27, he took the time to discuss the tour and reflected on his career.

I like the idea of a trio because it’s an unusual take on my songs. Nick Beggs [Kajagoogoo, Belinda Carlisle, John Paul Jones], Robin Boult [Roger Daltrey, Dave Stewart, Fish], and I have been terrific friends for two or three decades. It’s about stripping back the songs and giving them a new twist. I’ve got roughly 100 songs in my canon, so it’s interesting to provide them with a new twist, and I’m choosing songs that fit the format. Also, it’s so much more fun to tour with your mates, and I feel like I should keep touring because that’s my unique contribution to the fans. And for me, this will be my first time to come to Tulsa.

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WHAT LED YOU TO GO THE INDEPENDENT ROUTE, AND HOW HAS THAT CHANGED HOW YOU APPROACH THE MUSIC INDUSTRY?

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It was organic. I did five albums with Warner Brothers with worldwide distribution and promotion. I appreciated it, but they didn’t want to re-sign me, and I didn’t want to stop making music. Being independent and owning your label means you become more hands-on, and it just suited me very well. I had a fantastic opportunity with the spotlight on me for that decade, but I didn’t feel like I could continue that way, because the spotlight is very intense. The change suits me. I also wanted to maintain the quality of the work and respect the loyalty of my fans.

WHAT CONTINUES TO INSPIRE YOU TO CREATE NEW MUSIC?

I can only speak to Transform, but I knew the fans were keen on me doing another electronic record. I was ready and excited. It felt like the right time, and I had some things I wanted to say. Also, I met BT [American musician, DJ, singer, songwriter, and audio engineer], whose work I’ve always respected. We got along well and collaborated on three songs. Once we got on a roll, it became fascinating. It turned out well, got reasonably good reviews, and a good response from the fans. That said, I’ve no idea what’s next.

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IN 2018, REMASTERED VERSIONS OF YOUR FIRST TWO ALBUMS WERE RELEASED WITH ADDITIONAL TRACKS. HOW DID THAT WORK OUT?

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I had mixed feelings with that because I’m not much for looking backward. When I got down into it, finding different mixes and releasing something a little different, I quite enjoyed the process in the end, but they had to persuade me to agree to it. I think going back and listening made me reconsider what the magic ingredients were when I started.

HOWARD JONES The Vanguard 222 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-561-6885 thevanguardtulsa.com

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After his contract with Warner Music Group ended in 1993, Jones focused his efforts on production and songwriting, having a hand in creating hits for several other dance artists in the early ‘90s. He then started his label, Dtox, initially selling his music at live concerts and through his website before branching into digital distribution, remaining active as a musician and performer for the better part of four decades.

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I like to do different things all the time. I’ve been out with a full band and done the electronic thing, and I’ve toured solo, with just a piano and the songs. It’s really about keeping my interests piqued.

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While his debut album, Human’s Lib (1984), was initially a bigger hit in the U.K., the signature single “What is Love?” and “New Song” both reached the top 40 in the United States. His follow-up album, Dream into Action (1985), established him across America with radio hits “Things Can Only Get Better” and “Life in One Day,” as well as lesser hits “Like to Got to Know You Well” and “Look Mama,” landing the album on the U.S. top 40 charts for over a year. A re-recorded version of “No One Is to Blame,” featuring Phil Collins on drums and backing vocals, was released on his next album, One to One (1986), and reached No. 4 on the singles charts.

WHAT’S THE THOUGHT PROCESS BEHIND DOING THE TRIO TOUR, AND HOW DO YOU APPROACH YOUR SONGS DIFFERENTLY FOR SOMETHING LIKE THIS?

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By most accounts, Howard Jones was a crucial figure in the ‘80s pop scene. Aside from landing firmly on the pop charts (with 15 top 40 singles worldwide between 198392), Jones was essential in establishing the synth-pop movement and incorporating electronic music elements into the pop spectrum.

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HOWARD JONES’ ACOUSTIC TRIO TOUR OFFERS FANS A STRIPPED-DOWN TRIP THROUGH HIS NEARLY 40YEAR CAREER, COMPLETE WITH STORIES BEHIND THE INSPIRATION FOR MANY OF HIS HITS AND LIFE ON THE ROAD.

Feb. 27: 8 p.m.

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Repossessing Life Following years of personal and professional upheaval, multi-

instrumentalist Grace Potter steps into the soulful

Daylight of a fresh start with a perspective that has changed her as an artist, wife, and mother. BY G.K. HIZER PHOTOS BY PAMELA NEAL

Early on, Grace Potter established her powerful voice and an undeniable magnetism that comes through in her writing. Shortly after debuting with her initial, independent solo album, Original Soul, in 2004, her band started to gain traction. Grace Potter and the Nocturnals’ 2005 album, Nothing But the Water, established the group within jam band circles and led the band to being signed by Hollywood Records, which reissued the album in May 2006.

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Throughout four albums, Grace Potter and the Nocturnals evolved into a rollicking tour de force, intertwining its blues and soul-based roots with a big rock swagger and dance-driven beats. While Potter’s 2015 solo album, Midnight, still reflected a few of her roots (most specifically on the guitar-oriented “Empty Heart”), it largely dove even deeper into the experimental and dance-oriented direction that the Nocturnals’ last album, The Lion the Beast the Beat, had pointed to.

In the four years since Midnight’s release, Potter’s world has shifted dramatically. Following her divorce from drummer Matt Burr and the official dissolution of the Nocturnals, rumors swirled that Potter considered walking away from music altogether. As it turns out, those considerations were more than mere rumors, but this past fall, Potter emerged with a solo album, Daylight, that returns to her more soulful roots and a fresh start.

With a reconfigured band, Potter revealed her new compositions and a fresh outlook with select shows and a few festival appearances in the latter half of 2019, before setting out on a 2020 tour that brings her through Tulsa for a return to Cain’s Ballroom (Feb.12). “On Original Soul, there were some songs from my teens. I wanted to go there, with all of the emotions [when writing Daylight],” she says. “When


“That’s my baseline as a songwriter. I don’t think I knew how far I had strayed from that,” she says. “I’ll never forget when Scott [Tournet], my guitarist [with the Nocturnals], got into LCD Soundsystem, and he was listening to them all of the time, or when Michael [Libramento], our bassist, got into Africali and the quirky instrumental stuff. Subconsciously, I guess it all creeps in, and sometimes a reset is what’s needed. “When you mention reset, though, to me, it’s more a debut. It feels like this is maybe more me than before the band. Now I feel like I have some of that teenage swagger back; the fearlessness and openness, being unafraid of putting it out there.” That fearlessness is something that Potter had to grow into, however. After stepping away from music, it was a journey for Potter to find her way back.

“When we took the demos to the label, they thought it was an album. I was hesitant as the songs were far too personal,” she says. “I just wanted to get a sense of direction sound-wise. I was enjoying the more organic, garage sound we were getting. The label loved what we had so far, and it ended up becoming the record.” The result is the most vulnerable, open, and emotionally raw record of Potter’s career. With the opening strains of “Love is Love,” you can tell this is a different woman, opening herself up to all.

So Good.

eli young band feb 1 foreigner feb 13 styx feb 20 Trevor noah Mar 13 candlebox Mar 26 the beach boys apr 30 All performances subject to change.

By the end of the record, Potter channels everything she’s gone through in the past four years: loss, pain, love, and redemption. Whether this is a reset, a debut, or a rebirth, Daylight shines on Potter as she steps into her own with a new authority and freedom radiating from her soul.

Live Music 7 Nights a Week in 5 o’Clock Somewhere Bar Fridays & Saturdays in Margaritaville! Visit margaritavilletulsa.com for a complete schedule.

GRACE POTTER Cain’s Ballroom 423 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-584-2306 cainsballroom.com

For Potter, coming back to music was part of a healing process.

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“People have asked if I thought about quitting,” she says. “The thing is, in my mind, I did. I spent more than 10 years with a record contract and 13 in a band. In the end, all I saw was the people that got hurt, and I decided I don’t want to make music if it hurts the people I care about. I was done and thought I should go back to painting.”

When Potter tracked the songs with her husband, engineer, and producer Eric Valentine, they were intended to be demos and sketches of things to come. Ultimately, things didn’t work out that way.

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Those discoveries helped redirect the return to a soulful and stripped-back sound on Daylight.

“Once I started writing, all of the vulnerability came out in surplus. I had to welcome that,” she says. “If I was going to heal, I had to go all the way and dive in. The thing is, I didn’t expect to put a record out. I was writing for me, sort of therapy, if you will.”

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you’re writing for a band, you have to have some swagger and bravado; as a teenager, I didn’t worry about that. When I was moving, I found a bunch of old songs, books, and journals tucked away and a piano bench that was chock full of notebooks. That made me remember not feeling like I owed anyone anything.”

Feb. 12: 8 p.m.

81st & RIVERSIDE

888-748-3731

RIVERSPIRITTULSA.COM

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ORCE After stints in Los Angeles and New York, television host, commercial spokeswoman, singer, and multimedia journalist Ana Berry brings her charm, energy, and personality to the Tulsa-area music and media arts scenes.

a TV host, commercial spokeswoman, and multimedia journalist. Now, she’s back in Tulsa and bringing her charm, energy, and personality to the music and media arts scene here. As the daughter of actor Milton Berry and former Tulsa TV news anchor Beth Rengel, it’s fair to say Ana Berry was destined to reach for the spotlight. “I was always bigger than life and a force to be reckoned with,” says Berry of her early years. “It turned into my art.” Berry felt drawn to the days of glamorous Hollywood stardom, loving actresses of Hollywood’s golden age, like Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor. But it wasn’t until she left Tulsa as a teenager that she got a better sense of what she might want to do with her life. “When I was 16, I studied in New York City,” says Berry. “I came back to Tulsa a very different person.” Determined to pursue the arts, Berry headed to Chicago to earn a bachelor’s degree in fine arts in acting from The Theatre School at DePaul University.

Over the years, she’s lived in LA and New York City, headed up programs like the travel show America’s Gypsy and the business show New to the Street, and acted in well-known shows and movies like Prison Break, The Following, Blue Bloods, Ugly Betty, 30 Rock, and The Bourne Legacy. So, what brought her back to Tulsa? Simple: her daughter. “I went through a challenging divorce,” says Berry. “I thought I would live the rest of my life in New York City, but having a child [there], it’s not practical,” she says. “New York City is a concrete jungle gym if you’re a parent and are not a millionaire.” Deciding to uproot her life and return to her hometown in 2015 is something she hasn’t regretted. It’s inspired her to forge a unique path. “I am creating a career that doesn’t exist in Tulsa, as a professional spokesperson who is 100% self-employed,” she says. “You don’t have to live in New York City or LA to be creative and get

By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts Live in Tulsa long enough, and you’ll meet many a “boomerang” — people who were born and raised here, then left to explore the world, then returned years later to reconnect with their roots. Sometimes, it takes a little time away from T-Town to both spread one’s wings, and also develop a more profound sense of appreciation for the things our city does well. A self-proclaimed boomeranger who has explored the world and returned to Tulsa with a drive to cut out a niche that embraces her love for the arts is Ana Berry, whose career has taken her nationally and internationally as

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stuff done. You can live in a small town [or city] and do it. Living in a smaller community, you get so much accomplished. You can help those in need. You can get your project launched. You can be unique.” Berry appreciates the quality of life available here too. “Tulsa has changed a lot [over the years], and now my perspective is different,” she says. “I have come to understand the value of living in a smaller community. The support system [here] is different. Though I don’t always feel recognized by the big boys, I know I am making a difference.” Part of that difference is in her work to highlight news that is positive and uplifting, something Berry feels strongly about. “I am not big into the way news is shared today and what it does to our system,” she says. “I want to share good news that supports our community.” Berry does this through work like #Unscripted, a digital talk show which features weekly short segments about great people, places, and things in Green Country. On it, Berry has covered events like Tulsa Botanic Garden’s Viva La Vida, Hues for Hope, Love and Light, and the Big Om at Home Yoga Festival (she is a yoga teacher too). And she’s interviewed people like art studio owner Steve Liggett, fashion designer Zang Toi and others. Through her relationship with Rogers State University, Berry hosts I Want Answers, an academic show she describes as Family Feud meets Jeopardy! with local schools. The show supports schools, giving students scholarships. “I love doing it,” she says. Beyond her other on-camera work — which includes doing shows like Tulsa Today, This Is Tulsa, Home Pros, Good Day Tulsa, and more — Berry also sings with her band Bossa, which plays bossa nova, latin jazz, and world music. “I’ve always sung, but I’ve never been a real singer. I never sang in a band,” she says. “But I put together a band; we started in June 2019 and have been playing all around town. I sing in

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Brazilian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and English, almost cabaret-style. I dance onstage, all types of dance. It’s an experience. Everyone ends up dancing, always.” With Bossa, Berry has achieved some exciting firsts. “We were the first bossa nova band to appear on Good Day Tulsa. We were the first band to sell out a Wednesday ladies’ night at Duet. The music is fun.” Bossa is scheduled to play Duet again, Feb. 6. Berry also loves working with Arts Alliance Tulsa, for which she is producing 40 videos highlighting their 40 organizations; the videos start airing this month. Arts Alliance Tulsa, and organizations like it, are “extremely important for us as a city, bringing in tourism and helping put Tulsa on the map as a thriving community for the arts. It always has been, it has a legacy, but it’s continuing,” she says. “I’m grateful to be in Tulsa, and I want the world to know what Tulsa is. There’s art. There’s culture. The quality of life is much better. You get more bang for your buck. It’s easier on your nervous system. Tulsa has a lot to offer in terms of quality of life. Things are vibrant, moving. We have to keep creating jobs here for our creatives, whether it’s music, on camera, art. We have to keep supporting our creatives. I’m happy here. It’s a good place to live.” 


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BALLET

FEATURING SPECIAL EFFECTS USUALLY RESERVED FOR BROADWAY PRODUCTIONS, JOURNEY WITH DOROTHY, GLINDA, AND SCARECROW AS THEY MAKE THEIR HEROIC RETURN TO SAVE THE LAND OF OZ IN DOROTHY AND THE PRINCE OF OZ. BY GINA CONROY

BONANZA no one rendition brings to life the story of this teenager with a wanderlust for adventure with more beauty and grace than the Tulsa Ballet under the direction of Marcello Angelini.

hose of us who are old enough may remember waiting all year for the annual late-night television showing of MGM’s 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz. It was an enchanting time where the magic of Hollywood transported Dorothy Gale from her dreary black and white farm of Kansas to the dangerous and colorful land of Oz. Even before 1939, audiences were drawn to Dorothy’s adventures in L. Frank Baum’s 1900 book The Wizard of Oz. In the ‘70s and ‘80s, new versions and sequels emerged, including The Wiz (1978), starring Diana Ross and Michael Jackson, that took audiences to a fantasy Oz on the streets of New York City. Over the last couple of decades, many remakes and spin-off stories have been told, including the musical Wicked. Though the story has been told in many art forms over the century,

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Angelini, a trained ballet dancer who has performed principal and leading roles in classical repertoire including various versions of Sleeping Beauty, Romeo and Juliet, and Swan Lake, wanted a broader audience to experience this enchanting art form. To do that, he needed to create a ballet everyone could enjoy. “When we set off on this journey, we looked at about 100 stories, knowing that we wanted to select a recognizable name while not falling into the trap of doing a banal, superficial knock-off of a famous movie or book,” says Angelini, who has been artistic director with Tulsa Ballet since 1995. “The plan was to take the audience on a trip in a familiar place, the land of Oz, but once there explore another area of the magical land.” His vision was simple: create a ballet that worked from a 360-degrees point of view.

“We were looking for a piece that worked well for new audiences, one that would be enjoyed by ballet lovers, one that had a clear plot and with a story well told, with great music, great sets and puppetry, and beautiful costumes,” says Angelini. To bring his vision to life, Angelini needed a team. But not just any team: the best in the creative field. The only thing Angelini knew ahead of time was that the choreography, under the direction of Edwaard Liang, would be phenomenal. The rest of the story would unfold piece by piece during the design process. They didn’t even have a storyline until Oliver Peter Graber, the librettist (a person who writes the text of the ballet), mentioned that Baum wrote a series of books, not just The Wizard of Oz. Angelini’s team decided to use one of the other books for the base of their story. “We revised the plot to include a love story, and then moved forward with sets, costumes, and original score,” says Angelini. With Graber assembling the score from existing music and

composing the additional 30%, plus Basil Twist, the top puppeteer in the United States on the team, they were off to a great start. “We commissioned Mark Zappone, one of the top costume designers in the country,” says Angelini. “We wanted the costumes, as well as the sets, to be glamorous; we wanted them to help take the audience on this imaginative journey.” That’s just what Zappone did. Through collaboration with BalletMet of Columbus, Ohio, Dorothy and the Prince of Oz ended up being a $1 million commissioned full-length ballet. “When we world premiered it in 2016 [in Tulsa,] we sold out every show,” says Angelini, who estimated a third of the audience were first-time ballet attendees. “Everybody left the theater enchanted by the piece and intrigued with our art form.” This month, Tulsa has another opportunity to be enchanted by this ballet. Featuring special effects you usually see on Broadway, Tulsa audiences


will travel back to the land of Oz and experience this adventure with Dorothy and all the beloved characters of the series, including Glinda and Scarecrow. “The tornado effect in the beginning of the ballet with the house flying up in the air is quite spectacular,” says Angelini. “Genius Award winner puppeteer Basil Twist built three puppets that are part of the show and help illustrate the story. They are manipulated by dancers who are visible during the action, and yet they [the puppets] look eerily real.” And speaking of dancers, Tulsa Ballet, which has earned the reputation of being among the top 10 in the country, has some of the best in the industry. Each year they receive between 1,400 and 1,600 resumes. “Requests come from all over the world,” says Angelini. Currently, they have 10 countries represented in their roster. Knowing that these applications are to replace between one and four dancers a year, Angelini is very careful about the dancers they hire. “Of course, we want them to be good, versatile, strong technically and artistically, but then we make sure they fit our organizational culture,” says Angelini. Defining their culture took about a year, starting with interviewing each department in the company. Then with the help of a consultant, they created a small book that summarizes their beliefs, aims, and aspiration.

As artistic director, Angelini strives to make sure the experience of going to the ballet is a fulfilling one for everyone from the moment the audience walks through the front doors of the Tulsa Performing Arts Center to the time they leave the theater. To bring this enhanced experience to the public, he offers a free preperformance discussion. “Knowing the background of the dance, what to look for, the story behind the story and the details of how this work came to life, will give the audience members participating in the pre-performance experience a sense of perspective, and a sharpened focus on what they are about to see,” says Angelini.

See our feature on page 84

Audience members will find all kinds of interesting information at the staff table to satisfy their curiosity and give them the information they need to enhance the experience. The discussion includes hearing the story and the creation of Dorothy and the Prince of Oz before they see the ballet. Whether you’re a seasoned ballet enthusiast or new to this storytelling art form, Angelini encourages you to see it for yourself. “Dorothy and the Prince of Oz was created and built around the idea of engaging people who are not familiar with ballet,” says Angelini. “[But] Oz is meant for everybody.”

DOROTHY AND THE PRINCE OF OZ

“You will find, in that booklet, the word excellence in every single paragraph and sentence,” says Angelini.

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When you watch the dancers leap, glide, and turn onstage, that’s just what you will see: excellence.

Feb. 13: 7:00 p.m. Feb. 14-15: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 16: 2:30 p.m.

Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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Buried Secrets TOSSING GUILT AROUND LIKE A HAND GRENADE, THEATRE TULSA TACKLES THE HARD TRUTH THAT WITH FAMILY, OFTEN THE DEEPEST WOUNDS COME FROM THE PEOPLE CLOSEST TO US IN TRACY LETTS’ AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY. Most people try to hide their sordid family secrets. Not Tulsa playwright Tracy Letts. Not only did he air his family’s dirty laundry for the entire world to see, but he also won a Pulitzer Prize for it. Lisa Stefanic, who’s acted and directed with Theatre Tulsa for 35 years, is thrilled to bring his story to life onstage. “It’s a privilege to have this opportunity to work with one of his pieces,” says Stefanic about Oklahoma-born Letts, whom she calls the “homeboy who has all those accolades.” With such a high profile story that has not only had a run on Broadway but the big screen starring Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts, pulling it off is not without its challenges. “I want to make this our show, not like any other productions [or movie] out there,” says Stefanic. “This is ours. We dissect it. We study it. We create characters with the material given to us. We let that play grow and develop as we nurture and feed it with

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all indigestion and discomfort that comes with that. Then we go into labor [tech week] and give birth to a beautiful, truthful, and insightful show.” Described as a darkly comedic drama, August: Osage County was inspired by real-life events surrounding Letts’ maternal grandfather’s suicide. Letts was 10 years old. If suicide wasn’t enough trauma for a young boy to experience, he watched his grandmother’s addiction to painkillers not only affect her but impact his family through the generations. The play explores the ties that bind us and how strong they are when buried secrets are revealed. It delves into why people make the choices they make and that these choices have consequences, sometimes tragic. Ultimately, it tells the hard truth that most times, the deepest wounds come from the people closest to us: family. It’s a story of a family not haunted by ghosts of the past, but by the

present, says Stefanic. And it shows “that the more self-centered your focus is, the more damaging and destructive the impact will be.” Not intended for young children, the heavy subject matter, which includes drugs, alcohol, and sex as well as dark psychological and disturbing relationships, can make some very uncomfortable. For others, it may hit too close to home, which is why Vivica Walkenbach, who plays Violet, the bitter, pill-popping matriarch grandmother, believes this very powerfully written show should come with a warning label. If you have any real bad psychological problems, she says, this play could be a trigger. “They are not a happy family,” says Walkenbach. “They fight constantly, and there is a lot of accusatory guilt in this play.” Like most dysfunctional families, they toss guilt around like a hand grenade. “You did this. I didn’t do that. All blame and anger.” It’s not hard to see why all three daughters are in destructive

BY GINA CONROY PHOTOS BY JOSH NEW relationships or divorcing, and why the family is falling apart. Despite all the dark themes and family dysfunction, this play keeps drawing audiences to the theaters like onlookers to a train wreck. You may wonder what’s so appealing about watching a family fall apart, but it isn’t without humor; dark humor, that is. “There are a lot of amusing moments, but they are cutting and biting and meant to be destructive at the same time,” says Walkenbach. “These people have to make fun of things, or it becomes a horror show. You can’t sit through three hours of it, or you’re depressed. You have to find something funny about it.” At the helm of this sinking familial ship is grandmother Violet. “She’s a slash and burn type of person and has a tongue she uses as a knife. Everybody is afraid of that tongue,” says Walkenbach. “If somebody says something to her she doesn’t like, she one-ups them. She


VIVICA WALKENBACH AS VIOLET WESTON

says. “She believes nobody’s stronger than her, and she walks on people to prove her point.” Despite the complicated, dark subject matter, abusive family relationships — past and present — this play connects with audiences on so many levels, and that’s a good thing.

cuts them down. She can manipulate and twist and make you think you are wrong all the time, and she’s a genius at it.” Despite her harsh, unrelenting treatment of her family, the audience may muster up some sympathy for Violet. “She’s a tough nut to crack,” Walkenbach says. And throughout the play, you come to understand why. “She was raised in an abusive home by an abusive mother,” Walkenbach says. While some abused children grow up to be the opposite of their abusive parent, Violet became her mother. As the play progresses, it’s easy to see why she is a master manipulator; it’s all about survival. “The abuse [which is revealed in the show] was a horrible thing,” says Walkenbach. “If people see her relive it, people are going to go ‘Oh, God well, OK. If we don’t like her, at least we can understand why she is this way.’”

For those who are fortunate enough not to be able to relate to this dysfunctional Oklahoma family, Stefanic says, “There’s likely something in the storyline that goes beyond your life experiences, and we can learn from that. There is always a connection to someone about something in a show.”

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

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“She’s very unhappy with her life. She’s got cancer and probably not going to live much longer,” Walkenbach

Even though it may hit too close to home and trigger memories for some, it can also be a starting point for muchneeded healing. “It certainly would be a conversation piece for any partner, friend, or spouse; a lot to talk about over coffee, dessert, or wine for sure,” says Stefanic.

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The mantra “I will be here when everybody else is gone. I’m the strongest one” is spoken by Violet in some way, shape, or form throughout the show and points to her inner demons she has not yet overcome.

“Attending this show, or any performance for that matter, can promote a connection and an understanding of the human condition,” says Stefanic. “It also allows the audience to feel emotions they often don’t. Sometimes the actors can open their emotional veins and expose what the audience can’t.”

Feb. 15: 8 p.m. Feb. 16: 2 p.m. Feb. 21: 8 p.m. Feb. 22: 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Feb. 23: 2 p.m.

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With taxidermy, preserved specimens, antiques, quack medical devices, clothing, jewelry, skulls and bones, and funeral collectibles, the Oddities and Curiosities Expo is for like-minded lovers of the strange and unusual. By Gina Conroy Growing up, Michelle Cozzaglio remembers always being intrigued by being different. She enjoyed those creepy ‘90s TV shows like Tales from the Crypt, Goosebumps, Are You Afraid of the Dark? as well as the classics like The Munsters and The Addams Family.

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“I’ve always loved to be scared,” says Cozzaglio. But it wasn’t until she discovered punk music at 12 years old that her curiosity with the strange and unusual took root and started to spread. “It opened my eyes to an amazing and welcoming

community of people just like me, proud to be different from the norm,” says Cozzaglio, who admits when she was younger, she didn’t necessarily feel not “normal,” but hadn’t found what made her happy yet. When she did, she knew she was “in this for life.” Over the years, Cozzaglio collected various weird items, including antiques, knick-knacks, old postcards and books, records, CDs, and the list goes on. Today her collection has evolved to include things like bones, human skulls, taxidermy, plants, and more.

Although her parents weren’t big fans of punk or the lifestyle Cozzaglio was embracing (because they didn’t want her to be made fun of), as time went on, they understood it wasn’t just a phase. “They hated when I would come home with colored hair,” says Cozzaglio. Today they come to every single Tulsa show. “They are our biggest supporters.” You can say Cozzaglio’s leap from a lover of the unusual to the owner and curator of the Oddities and Curiosities Expo began in 2013 when she and her husband started organizing events that focused on punk and


“It can be hard as a kid to find your place, but it will happen,” says Cozzaglio. “Don’t ignore what you’re passionate about just because it isn’t cool. When you’ve found something you feel passionate about, you know it.” Since 2016, when Cozzaglio quit her job and dove headfirst into her passion, the Oddities and Curiosities Expo has been held across the country and has grown to 22 dates in 2020 with plans to expand as time goes on. While Tulsa isn’t their biggest show, it is home. “We always have a great turn out of a few thousand people and love hearing the positive feedback from the community afterward,” says Cozzaglio. “We will always have the event

“You’ll find items such as taxidermy, preserved specimens, original artwork, horror and Halloween-inspired pieces, antiques, handcrafted oddities, quack medical devices, clothing, jewelry, skulls and bones, funeral collectibles and much more,” says Cozzaglio. Cozzaglio wants to stress that all specimens in their show are sustainably sourced. “No animals were killed for the sake of art or collecting for our show,” she says. Other activities at the expo include the four-hour jackalope workshop, which covers the basics of taxidermy. According to the workshop summary, you will learn how to skin, tan, prep the hide, create a custom

While the expo is for all ages, and they provide PG and PG-13 entertainment throughout the day, they do advise parental discretion. “Many families and children of all age ranges come and enjoy our shows across the country, but there may be items that could frighten a child,” says Cozzaglio. “It depends on the child, so we recommend the parent make the ultimate decision.”

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Expo Square 4145 E. 21st St. | Tulsa

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Cozzaglio continued bartending for about a year and a half, never considering the possibility of organizing events for a full-time job. “I loved doing it, but I couldn’t see it sustaining me,” she says. “One day, I decided just to quit. Best decision of my life.”

Cozzaglio wants to encourage others, especially young people, to follow their dreams.

Besides the entertainment and unique vendors, Cozzaglio wants the expo to be a safe place for like-minded lovers of the strange and unusual to discover new artists and find community.

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In 2016, Cozzaglio finally quit. “I just couldn’t take it anymore and left my high-paying job for a fun bartending job to hold me over until I figured out what I wanted to do,” she says.

“My parents raised me to work hard for what I want,” says Cozzaglio. “Because of the amazing work ethic I witnessed them having as a kid, I’ve grown up to know the importance of working hard to get where you want to be.”

If the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the Oddities and Curiosities Expo is a sideshow at a circus, you wouldn’t be wrong. With sword swallowing, walking on glass, the human pin cushion, and more, the expo has all the classic stunts that may make some onlookers hold their breath in astonishment, and others peek through their fingers in cringing curiosity. However, the main attraction is the vendors, dealers, artists, and small businesses from all over the country offering all things weird.

mannequin, learn the basics of clay work, and by the end, will have your first jackalope mount. You will be provided with your own sustainably sourced rabbit along with a pair of cruelty-free resin antlers.

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“I was unhappy with my 8-to-5 job. I made great money for my age, but I was miserable every single day going there,” says Cozzaglio, who managed to stick it out long enough to buy her first house in 2015.

Today curating events, which includes booking the venues, vendors, all the back-end work, and traveling to each show to oversee, is her fulltime job.

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alternative music and culture. At 22 years old, she’d already been working full time at AT&T for two years in the business division handling business accounts. While the pay was great, the work wasn’t satisfying.

in Tulsa because of the tremendous support we’ve gotten since we started.”

Feb. 22: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

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If you’re a fan of The Flaming Lips, you may already know what to expect. King’s Mouth started as an interactive party piece that was on display at The Womb in Oklahoma City, where Coyne and some friends have been showing off creative works privately since 2011. “It was like a party,” says Coyne of The Womb’s early days. “We would throw a party every three or four months.” There would be music and art on display, as well as people gathering for food, drinks, dancing, and hanging out, an experience Coyne likens to The Factory, Andy Warhol’s studio. The King’s Mouth itself was essentially a cylinder at the time, where people could climb in and watch movies and listen to music mashups featuring other artists. Eventually, the partying grew somewhat passé, but the creativity didn’t. Coyne wanted to keep his art experience going. And he credits a friend, John Lewis, a curator at Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum, for giving him the impetus to push the piece at The Womb into a higher artistic stratosphere. “He [Lewis] came to Oklahoma City, saw it, and encouraged us to make it more original,” says Coyne. “Do original music. Everything in it is just original art, which for me upped the ante. Once he said that,

After you climb inside the King’s Mouth sculpture, you’ll don a set of prismatic 3D-style glasses, lay back on the cushions, look above you, and enjoy a vibrant display of music by The Flaming Lips, accompanied by flashing LED lights that are nearly blinding at times. The experience is something that doesn’t quite fit neatly into words and must be lived to be fully appreciated.

The secret, though, is that the exhibit is, in a lot of ways, an example of the kind of experience Coyne himself wants when he visits an art gallery. And it’s something he senses modern-day audiences want too. “I wanted to make an experience for people to climb inside, but I’m one of those people,” he says. “I like the idea of going in there, laying down and seeing this.” Visiting the exhibit is included in the cost of admission to ahha Tulsa.

Every detail has been crafted, experimented with, and shaped for maximum effect, says Coyne, from the choice of glasses to wear (they tried 12-13 types before settling on the ones you’ll get as a souvenir) to the length of the experience (around six minutes; long enough to immerse you, not long enough to create long line delays). The music, visuals, lights, even the cushions inside the sculpture are carefully chosen and add to the overall delight of the experience. Wayne Coyne

“It’s an extension of things that I like,” says Coyne. “I think that’s what all art is, essentially.” Like immersive activities, what King’s Mouth does best is allow you to focus entirely on the experience, sans smartphone, sans distractions, so you can indeed be in the moment. At a certain point, the lights and music surround you, and you feel like you’re floating, almost weightless. “It becomes this flow all around you. It’s magic,” he says.

KING’S MOUTH

ahha Tulsa 101 E. Archer St. | Tulsa 918-584-3333 ahhatulsa.org

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That’s the charm and appeal of the King’s Mouth exhibit, an immersive, hypnotic sculpture and story told in art, music, and lights by The Flaming Lips frontman Wayne Coyne, currently on display at ahha Tulsa through May.

The current traveling King’s Mouth exhibit expands upon that party piece. It offers a distinctly trippy adventure in sight and sound, with the same surreal, psychedelic sensibility you’d expect at a Flaming Lips concert. Standing tall and silver, a stylized face topped with a crown of shimmering mylar balloons and featuring a pink tongue made of foam beckons you to enter, either before or after you have viewed Coyne’s accompanying 14 paintings hanging on a wall nearby.

King’s Mouth has been on display around the country, to long lines of enthusiastic crowds. Beyond the actual time inside the sculpture for the music and LED lights display, the exhibit is accompanied by the paintings display, a book by Coyne, various merchandise such as T-shirts and toys, and the Grammy-winning band’s latest album, King’s Mouth, released in 2019.

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Imagine walking into an art gallery where people are waiting just as eagerly in line to participate in an exhibit as they do when they are seeing a concert or playing virtual reality games at Cinergy or Incredible Pizza. Imagine that the experience is creative, musical, bright, luxurious, and communal — something you can enjoy with friends, family, young and old, even strangers if you so choose.

you get to go in there and do something with your friends. It’s an experience,” says Coyne. “When you’re in there with your friends, and they’re excited, and they’re laughing, that’s pretty priceless. That’s what you want.”

Some people love it so much, say the ahha curators, that they’ll get back in line to do it again. “I think people like the idea that

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By Michele Chiappetta Photos by George Salisbury and ahha Tulsa

he made it sound like maybe this could be something. He encouraged me to do the paintings. He said, ‘Maybe there’s a story that goes with this.’ I just started to make up a story. All these things, it does just sometimes take someone nudging you along, and saying, ‘Come on, it’s great, but go a little further.’”

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The King’s Mouth exhibit at ahha Tulsa offers an adventure in sight and sound, with the same surreal, psychedelic sensibility you’d expect at a Flaming Lips concert.

Wednesday-Saturday: Noon–9 p.m. Sunday: Noon-7 p.m.

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A VERITABLE CORNUCOPIA OF ARCADE OPTIONS AND SENSORY OVERLOAD AWAIT PLAYERS AT CINERGY, INCLUDING BASKETBALL, PINBALL, SKEE-BALL, SHOOTING GAMES, XD RIDES, VIRTUAL REALITY HOLOGATE, AND MORE. By Michele Chiappetta / Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

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“Shall we play a game?” That’s not just a famous line from an ‘80s classic movie that you may remember if you’re old enough. It’s also a perfect question to ask when you’ve got a few hours of free time. To enjoy a communal gaming experience, it’s time to head to Cinergy and tackle their superbly fun arcade gaming floor. You’ll be impressed with the number and style of games available to players of all ages.

in the door. They do so with top-notch service, a pristine gaming environment, and lots of new play action that guarantees nothing gets old. “We stay vibrant,” says Latus. “When we see that a game is no longer viable, it’s too old, or it’s not the great thing out there that people want to play, then we’re quick to replace it.”

“We have about 100 games on the floor, and they are the newest games out there,” says Aaron Latus, general manager and a huge fan, by his admission, of all things gaming. “I’m a big kid. I love this stuff. This is what I live for. When I got this job, this is what I love to do in my downtime. So now I get to do it all the time.”

As a result of this ever-changing gaming landscape, Cinergy attracts loyal repeat players who enjoy knowing they’re going to be exposed to the hottest new games rather than just the stale usuals. The arcade area is as bright and glitzy and full of bells and whistles as you’d expect, but it’s also impressively neat, clean, and inviting. There’s a great variety of options, from basketball, pinball and skee-ball to shooting games and driving and more.

Latus and his fun-loving staff enjoy bringing their passion for games to everyone who walks

Beyond what you’d expect from an arcade, Cinergy provides two additional gaming opportunities

that are extremely popular, immersive, and quite frankly addicting — the XD Dark Ride, and the Hologate. Both are worth playing. XD rides are not exactly new, but they are cool. And Cinergy has the latest model, with features that are unique and entertaining. “We’ve got the XD Dark Ride, which is just incredible,” says Latus. “The XD Dark Ride is the newest one out there, the latest model, which is very different from the older XD machines.” If you’ve tried an XD ride before, you’ll know that the older models are designed to mimic the feel of a roller coaster, with seats that bump and move in front of a screen projecting 4D graphics. The XD Dark Ride that Cinergy has ramps all that up on steroids for maximum fun. The XD Dark Ride has eight seats, cordoned off by a black curtain that closes once the ride begins for maximum effect. And it is one intense ride.

“You’ve got the 4D graphics, and now they’ve got guns, and you’re shooting at everything that comes at you,” says Latus. “You’re not just holding on for your life; you’re also shooting as you’re holding on for dear life.” Right now, Cinergy offers four game options on the XD Dark Ride — a zombie chase, werewolves, killer clowns, and a pirate ship. “You’ll hear it on a Saturday night, people screaming and laughing,” says Latus. “It’s the people playing the game. And they’ll get right back in line.” The other cool game you can’t find elsewhere in Tulsa is the Hologate, a virtual reality (VR) game experience that levels up the entertainment to impressively immersive proportions. “VR is becoming the newest and hottest thing out there,” says Latus. “Everybody is getting to do things that maybe you once had to take a vacation for, and now you can do this in

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If needed, staff members can guide you through the game by speaking into your headset. But honestly, once you get the sense of how to lock and load with the gaming gear, you’ll be so drawn in, you’ll forget everything but the game itself. You’ll have the sensation of creatures running at

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Once you’re done playing, you can hustle all the points you just won over to Cinergy’s generous and impressive redemption area. “The cool thing about our redemption area is that our games pay out. We want people to win. We want people walking around with our stuff,” says Latus. And it’s not just easy to win; it’s exhilarating too because the prizes are fantastic. “We have prizes for adults through teenagers to the young

You can redeem those points as soon as you earn them, or you can hold on to them until you’re ready to spend them, which is a popular option. “People will save at their points and go Christmas shopping here with their points,” says Latus. All in all, Cinergy’s games, movies, and more are bringing

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6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918-894-6888 cinergy.com/locations/tulsa

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“People completely forget they’re playing a game at Cinergy because they’re so engrossed in the world that they’re now seeing,” says Latus.

a fresh infusion of life into the Woodland Hills area. “This area has been a dead corner for a while. Now it’s being rejuvenated,” says Latus. “Even the people within the shopping complex here have said they’ve gotten a lot of business from us drawing in business. People are starting to realize we’re here.”

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Cinergy’s Hologate includes several different playing scenarios, including zombies (of course), rock star playing, solo and team play, and more. In addition to the typical VR headsets you’ll find at other gaming places, the Hologate comes with vests that create the sensation of being struck or shot, increasing the game’s sense of full immersion.

kids,” says Latus. “We have Coach purses, Coach wallets, and Apple tablets. We make sure it’s the latest series. We’ve got Apple watches. We’ve got PlayStation 4s, Xbox Ones, drones, Nerf guns, and all this other cool stuff. And it goes all the way down to the little stuff that you’re going to be picking up after your kid every day. We have prizes for all ages, and that’s what’s cool.”

CA

you, grabbing for you, menacing you from all angles. It’s a definite rush.

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virtual reality worlds. You have the safety of it with everything that’s there at your fingertips.”

Monday-Friday: 11 a.m.-Midnight Saturday-Sunday: 9 a.m.-2 a.m.


Tulsa's #1 Antique Mall Since 1996! I-44 Antique and Collectibles Mall has been Tulsa's #1 Antique Store since 1996. Come and see what our more than 50 vendors have to offer in our 9,000 square feet of dealer space.

Celebrating + Years!

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Getting your child's haircut can be scary, but I have put the fun in it for you and your child! PREVIEW918.COM 45


46 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


Bledsoe pointed out some of the highlights of the show this year, with many mainstays supplemented by a few new features.

“We have a little bit of everything for everybody at this show,” says Brice Bledsoe, co-producer at Starbird Productions. “They’re not just classics. If you like anything on two or four wheels, because we have motorcycles as well, you’ll find something at this show that will pique your interest.” The Starbird show has changed a bit over the years, but the essence of the show remains the same: display cool, exciting cars while entertaining with specific events and other side attractions. In the end, the spectators undoubtedly leave satisfied. Bledsoe acknowledges that the landscape has evolved over the years, but the core attraction is still there. “It’s not just about the old cars; it’s new cars these days, too,” says Bledsoe, the grandson of legendary car customizer Starbird, who retired from producing the shows several years ago. “A lot of people are finding ways to personalize cars. They always said it was the American love affair with the car. It started in Detroit, and guys across the country in the ‘40s, ‘50s, and ‘60s just started out trying different things. Now we have an entire sport that’s centralized around it and have taken it to

“We have some of the more high-dollar, nice flashy stuff upstairs in our regular show, and then downstairs, on the east side, we have our Rockin’ Billy Bash,” Bledsoe says. “It’s kind of a show within the show, and it’s more about the cars in the rat-rod style, where it’s not so much about the glitz and glamor, but more about the guys who are working on cars in the backyard or garage. It’s got sort of its own culture. We also do contests for pin-up girls and beards. There are also pinstripers and tattoo artists. We have pedal car races for children and mini-bike races. “In our action arena, we’re going to have the live hooning going again, which is essentially burnouts, flame throwers, freestyle, doing figure eights, and whatnot. And then we’ve got a demolition derby Friday starting at 9 p.m.” On Saturday in the arena, there will be an old-school-style monster truck show, which Bledsoe points out, originated with the Starbird show in Tulsa in the 1980s and is a bit different from the current incarnation of monster truck shows. Cliff Starbird, Darryl’s son and Bledsoe’s uncle, created one of the first monster trucks and will have it on display. “We were the first ones to do the sideby-side racing over cars, but we’ve got a handful of the old-school monster trucks

Chuck Miller will be there as well. “He’s the guy who originally built the Red Baron, the little T-bucket type car that everyone probably built as a model or picked up a Hot Wheel of,” Bledsoe says of Miller. The cast of another MotorTrend TV show, Wrench’D, will also attend, with Justin Nichols, Maegan Ashline, Ziggy Huizinga, and Nick Roberts signing autographs and selling memorabilia. And as always, there is also a separate kid zone and, really, something to interest just about everyone. “We’ve got a kid zone with inflatables and trampolines and face painting,” Bledsoe says. “We’ll have all kinds of vendors, not just automotive ones. We have all kinds of stuff, including people selling purses, leather bags, toys, collector items, and die-cast cars.” Tickets bought in advance are $20 (16 and up), $10 (13-15), and free for 12 and under. At the door, tickets are $25 (16 and up) and $15 (13-15).

DARRYL STARBIRD’S ROD AND CUSTOM CAR SHOW Expo Square 4145 E. 21st St. | Tulsa

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There will be over 1,000 cars on display from people who live all over the United States, in many different categories, from classic hot rods and customized cars to 4x4s, trucks, low riders, and much more.

“Shows are happening every weekend across America these days. It’s taken off, and I’m glad to see that people are still interested in it and that cars still carry something meaningful to people.”

Inside, there will also be a DJ, bands playing, and celebrity appearances. Ian Roussel, from the MotorTrend TV show Full Custom Garage, will be there along with his famous bubble-top T-Bird signing autographs and taking pictures.

TO

heights I’m not even sure the originals like Darryl Starbird, Gene Winfield, or George Barris would even imagine.

Outside the venue by the Golden Driller statue, check out the Cool Car Corral.

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It may seem like the appeal of old hot rods and customized cars may be on the decline, but nothing could be further from the truth. Yes, the culture of ‘60s and ‘70s muscle cars is a bit different now, but as attendees to the Darryl Starbird National Rod and Custom Show at Expo Square in Tulsa will discover, not only is America’s love for cars still going strong; it’s more intense than ever.

coming back,” Bledsoe says. “Cliff is restoring his Monster ’Vette, which was one of the original monster trucks, and they’re going to have a show-off.”

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THE DARRYL STARBIRD NATIONAL ROD AND CUSTOM SHOW HAS CHANGED OVER THE YEARS. STILL, THE ESSENCE OF THE SHOW REMAINS THE SAME: DISPLAY COOL, EXCITING CARS WHILE ENTERTAINING WITH SPECIFIC EVENTS AND OTHER SIDE ATTRACTIONS. By John Tranchina

Feb. 14: Noon-11 p.m. Feb. 15: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Feb. 16: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

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Whimsical art for over 20 years! 1326 E. 3rd St. Tulsa, OK 74120 Store Hours Monday - Friday 10-5 Saturday 10-3 info@gardendeva.com 918-592-3382 48 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


PREV EW Cain’s Ballroom

16

DY

LANSING

KENOSHA

75

5TH 6TH

ORT

IN

T

CIN

ROI

CIN

7TH

NAT I

33

MAI

8TH TH

PEORIA

N

8

TH

9

TH

7

11TH

1H

TCC

23

10

TH

11

12TH

TH

64

KA

NS

RI V

13TH

75

13TH

AS

14

R

15 2

ENTERTAINMENT

DINING

BOK Center | C2-6 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Tulsa Performing Arts | D3-15 Tulsa Drillers | 3E-15 FC Tulsa | 3E-15

Albert G’s Bar & Q | D3-13 Baxter’s Interurban Grill | B1-23 Caz’s Chowhouse | D2-10 Chimi’s | A5-2 Dilly Diner | D3-18 Dust Bowl | D3-21 El Guapo’s | D3-22

BARS Caz’s Pub | D2-16 Club Majestic | D2-19 Dust Bowl | D3-21 Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41

64

51

TH

E

1

14

4TH

NKF

ELG

35

TON

R

6

LDE

A

TH

Courthouse

39

3RD

12

75 AR

5

Central Library

NE

OSU Medical Center

TH

YEN

B

H

BOU

Cox Business Center

4T

CHE

Civic BOKCenter

RD

3

4

BOS

BOK Center

HRIE GUT N STO HOU

C

2

O

6

2ND

14

15

DET

ND

21

E BLUM18E D38O

Jazz Hall of Fame

Performing Arts Center

DEC

1

36

22

FRA

City Hall

ST

R

13

10

N

20

VER

OOD ELW

244

MAI

DEN

51

D

Brady Theater

244

ONEOK Field

CHE

Woody AR Guthrie Center

5

OOD ENW GRE

37

N ERO CAM Guthrie Green DY BRA

OOD

11

BRA

64

19

Greenwood Cultural Center

34

ENW

412

GRE

41

E

TULSA LOCATOR TL

DOWNTOWN TULSA

SHOPPING Boomtown Tees | D3-14 Garden Deva | D5-37 Sweet Boutique | D3-33

30

TH

3

2 4

32

51

CHERRY 5

THE BOXYARD Elgin Park | E3-34 Fassler Hall | D3-35 Jason’s Deli | A5-30 McNellie’s Pub | D3-36 Mexicali | D2-11 Prairie Brewpub | E2-41 Sisserou’s | D2-20 SMOKE. | A5-32

The Tavern | E2-37 Ti Amo | C2-4 Yokozuna | D3-38

Blue Sky Bank | D3-33 Riley’s Wine & Spirits | D3-33 Sweet Boutique | D3-33 Tonsorial | D3-33

EVERYTHING ELSE The Bond | D4-39

PREVIEW918.COM 49


TL TULSA LOCATOR

G

TULSA AND SURROUNDING AREAS

PREV EW

SPERRY

40

7

86TH N

OWAS

76TH N

27 56TH N

F

75

Mohawk Park

46TH N MINGO

Lake Yahola

38 Tulsa Botanic Garden

Tulsa Zoo

36 N TH

71

44

66

51

61ST

48

71

2

64

10

TH

18

32 MEMORIAL

5

81ST

91ST

7

43 ST

46

20

9

BIXBY 47

6

129TH E.

16

72

GARNETT

MINGO

23

111

44 65

MEMORIAL

4

30

55

SHERIDAN

70

14

13

15

101

64

12

42

121ST

41ST

YALE

3

36

40 Oklahoma Aquarium

26 2

Oral Roberts Univ. Mabee Ct. 58

59

Between 111th & 121st 1

97

HARVARD

SAPULPA

2

LaFortune 80 Park

21 32 48

83

61 24

JENKS

31ST

31

St. Francis Hospital

72

169

Hicks Park

56

41

A

44

91Whiteside Park

LEWIS

Jones Airport

93 21ST

45

5

23

PEORIA

B

Turkey Mountain Park

72

51

MIDTOWN

3

39 75

RIVERSIDE

94

UNION

244

Expo Square

29

Philbrook Museum of Art7 ARKANSAS RIVER

C

Woodward Park St. John Med. Ctr.

6

129TH E.

Tulsa State Fairgrounds

2

50

50 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020

11TH

27

GARNETT

Of 1Univ. Tulsa

48 MINGO

30

Chandler Park

APACHE

PINE

MEMORIAL

SAND SPRINGS

169

PINE

SHERIDAN

DOWNTOWN BOK Ctr.

17 YALE

OSU Tulsa

75

LEWIS

D

Crawford Park

UTICA

412

11

26TH N / APACHE

PEORIA

51

36TH N

Tulsa Air & Space Museum

HARVARD

Gilcrease Museum

GILCREASE MUSEUM

E

GILCREASE EXPY

MARTIN LUTHER KING

KWY ALE P TISD


TULSA LOCATOR TL 96TH N PRESENTED BY:

72

SSO

Bella’s House | B5-32, A5-32 Children’s Orchard | A5-18 Edible Arrangements | C4-7, A5-7 I-44 Antique Mall | C4-3 Landella | D5-45 Miss McGillicutty’s Antiques | A4-54 Secret Gardens | A6-47 Tulsa Stained Glass | C5-56 Ziegler Art & Frame | D4-17

52

CATOOSA 66 412

244

1

53

209TH E.

BROKEN ARROW 26

DINING

COUNTY LINE / 193RD E.

177TH E.

161ST E.

1ST

Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

145TH E.

1ST

SHOPPING

40

72 ASPEN

23

11

63 COUNTY LINE

LYNN LANE

MAIN ELM

est. 20 13

21

7

8

Albert G’s Bar & Q | C4-91 Amazing Thai Cuisine | B7-63 Brownies Burgers | D4-29, Chimi’s | B5-2, C4-2, D4-2 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 El Chico | D6-93 El Guapo’s | B4-15 Elmer’s BBQ | C4-39 Famous Steakhouse | A5-10 Fat Daddy’s Pub and Grille | B5-64 Flo’s Burger Diner | D4-1, D8-1 Fuji | B5-20 George’s Pub | A4-61 Goodcents Deli Fresh Subs | A5-9 Habaneros Mexican Grill| A7-21 In The Raw | C4-23, B5-23, B7-23 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Jason’s Deli | D4-30, B5-30 Kitch | A4 -42 Los Cabos | G6-40, A4-40, B7-40 Los Mariachis | B5-26, A4-26 Maryn’s Taphouse and Raw Bar | A4-58 McAllister’s | B4-72, B5-72, B6-72, D5-72, G6-72 McNellie’s Pub | B5-16 Miami Nights Restaurant & Lounge | D5-5 Molly’s Landing | E8-52 Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano | C4-94

Ricardos | C5-31 Rincón Mexican Grill & Cantina | B5-13 Rocking “R” Ranch House | B7-11 SMOKE. | D4-27, G6-27 Steak Stuffers USA | C5-14 Ti Amo | B5-80 Waterfront Grill | A4-70 Yokozuna | A5-43 Yutaka Grill Sushi & Buffet | C5-12

ENTERTAINMENT Cinergy | B5-55 Dave and Buster’s | B6-44 Gathering Place | C3-71 Got Wood | A4-24 Incredible Pizza | B5-46 Tulsa Air and Space Museum | E5-38

CASINO River Spirit Casino Resort | B4-83

EVERYTHING ELSE Blue Cottage | A4-59 Carey Clinic | B5-36 Kuts 4 Kids | B4-48, B6-48 Shears | A4-41

PREVIEW918.COM 51


HH HOMEGROWN HEROES

Chari -tees

Dallas Harris

FROM UNLOCK HOPE TO COMMON PEOPLE FOR THE COMMON GOOD , DALLAS HARRIS INSPIRES OTHERS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE — ONE PERSON AT A TIME. BY G.K. HIZER PHOTOS BY MARC RAINS

52 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


“It was really interesting to me that all of these crazy things were going on around the world, and I immediately wanted to do something to help others. I started to research how I could get involved, but everything was so expensive, especially as a college student going to school and working in retail. Then I read a quote from Mother Teresa: ‘If you can’t feed 100 people, then feed just one.’ That inspired me, and I started looking for ways to feed people. I found a group that had developed this food that was cheap to produce and was packed with vitamins and nutrients. I got in touch with them and discovered you could pay for a serving for only $.04 cents. I had been involved with bands and had experience with merchandise, so I made a shirt that read, ‘Feed Just One’ and sold it at shows. Each shirt sold paid for a hundred meals.”

Over the past few years, a small organization based out of Broken Arrow has been growing and making waves while helping others. Yes, the local following has grown, but with the help of social media, networking, and word-of-mouth, Unlock Hope has been reaching a national audience while making an impact internationally. Now, the man behind Unlock Hope, Dallas Harris, has his sights set on inspiring others to create change. At first glance, Unlock Hope might seem like another

internet-driven T-shirt company promoting a positive message. Underneath the surface, though, there has always been a reason behind the marketing. Unlock Hope sponsored a full class of girls in Uganda throughout their high school education and, in 2019, transitioned to supporting other causes. “It started in 2006,” says Harris. “I got hold of a DVD that summer called Invisible Children, about child soldiers in Uganda. I found it shocking, and it opened up my eyes to things going on around the world.

From there, Harris got involved with the organization Think Humanity, at first paying for all the meals for a school of female refugees in Uganda that had been separated from their parents. As shirt sales went up, however, he was able to do more: first paying for their school tuition, then paying for the entire hostel, and even all living expenses. In 2019, the focus of Unlock Hope shifted as the group of girls Harris had been sponsoring graduated. “I didn’t want to start over with another group of girls, because that would be another six- to eight-year commitment,” he says. Having done one-time charity specific shirts for other causes in the past, Unlock Hope transitioned to a broader focus, supporting

several charities and organizations in 2019. During the year, Unlock Hope donated over $141,000 to American Civil Liberties Union, Community Solidarity, DonorsChoose, Everytown, Miry’s List, Planting Peace, RAICES Texas, and Think Humanity. In January, he rolled out of a podcast, Common People for the Common Good, which focuses on different topics each month, digging deeper, discussing root causes, and looking to find solutions for broader issues. “I funded the podcast project through Kiva, and the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation matched all of the loans,” Harris says. “I’ll be doing some similar stuff to what we did with Unlock Hope, and I’ll still do shirts for different causes, but the plan is to focus on the podcast to get more in-depth on issues and get several different viewpoints. When looking at homelessness, I plan on talking to someone who runs a homeless shelter, maybe someone in a government office who deals with it, and someone who’s experienced homelessness, to help understand the issue better and find a real solution.” With a plan to focus on a different subject every month, Harris hopes to give others not only a better understanding of the issues but to inspire more people to get involved. “Sure, we can all buy something or give our money and feel better about ourselves for a little bit, but I feel like it does more good to find something you’re passionate about and get more actively involved, then get others more involved,” Harris says.

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

54 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020

BODY AND MIND BALANCE


A LEADER ON THE COLLINSVILLE TRACK TEAM AND IN SCHOOL, ZAC ROBBINS UNDERSTANDS (AND PREACHES TO HIS TEAMMATES) THAT ATHLETIC SUCCESS DEPENDS ON MORE THAN JUST PHYSICAL STRENGTH AND WORKING HARDER. by John Tranchina photos by Marc Rains For Zac Robbins, taking a leadership role doesn’t only apply to the Collinsville track and field team. The senior is also the president of the school’s student council (or “StuCo”), and it’s a responsibility he assumes naturally. It is an integral part of his personality, but it’s also a byproduct of his work ethic, as well as his prior success. As the reigning Class 5A state champion in the discus (with a toss of 155 feet, 10 inches) and the state runner-up in the shot put (54 feet, 2.5 inches), Robbins has the street cred to back up his words and actions. And he is ready for the challenge of repeating and continuing to build on his previous accomplishments this spring. “Last year, I won state in discus, got second in shot put, so obviously one of the goals is to repeat in discus and then get first in shot put, but I have a lot of bigger goals,” says Robbins, who also plays on the Cardinals’ football team that went 8-3 before losing in the first round of the 5A playoffs last fall. “I have colleges that are wanting to look at me, and I have to hit certain marks to get there. Right now, probably more than the goal of winning state is hitting those marks and focusing on myself.

And then if I hit what I want to hit, there’s no doubt that I’ll hit my end goal of winning state.” As a team leader, Robbins relishes the opportunity to help guide his more inexperienced teammates. “On the track team, one of my biggest parts of leadership is being able to mentor the younger teammates,” says Robbins, who is also heavily involved with the FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes), helping revive Collinsville’s chapter last year after it had gone dormant for several years. “I know a lot about form and stuff, and sometimes I’ll see some things the coach doesn’t, and I’ll be able to help them work through that. And also just as an example, because they can see me working hard every day and know what it takes to get to the level I’m at. Those are the two ways I lead. “I enjoy being a leader very much. I’m StuCo president, and actually, I went to the StuCo national convention this summer. Student council and FCA and leadership stuff, it’s a big deal in my life. It’s natural for me to be a leader on the track team because I’m a leader in the school.” Collinsville track and field coach Sean Tesar appreciates the impact that Robbins’ leadership has on the team. “Zac’s personality is to be an alpha, which I think a lot of good leaders are in a way,” Tesar says. “He’s leading by example. And it’s not just in the athletic arena; he’s a leader in the classroom, too. His ACT scores are crazy high, 33, and the GPA is there to match, too. On top of those things, he treats people well, too. I think it’s easy to be in a leadership role and think that means you control people. Zac treats people with respect, and I admire that about him.” Robbins’ leading by example includes the ability to change

when things aren’t going well, an experience he went through last year. After an unexpectedly strong freshman year when he placed 12th in the discus at the state tournament and 15th in the shot put, Robbins struggled a bit as a sophomore, failing to qualify for state in either event. When the problems persisted at the beginning of his junior year, Robbins sought outside help. He ended up altering his throwing technique, and the changes paid off by the end of the season.

Zac Robbins

“I started in seventh grade, and I realized I was pretty good at it,” says Robbins, who initially joined track and field because some of his football friends did. “I should have won the seventhgrade conference in the discus that year, but I didn’t. It still kind of bugs me. But eighth grade was when I became good. I won the conference in shot put and discus, and then in ninth grade, I exceeded my expectations and made it to state in both. And then sophomore year and the beginning of last year, I wasn’t doing very good. I had to go to an outside coach to kind of correct my form.”

the throws events. They do a lot of strength training, power and stuff, but we talk to our athletes about their mental preparation,” Tesar says. “I think that’s very underused by a lot of coaches. We talk about their mental preparation, probably as much as we do their physical. That’s a big part of whether they’re going to be successful or not. And you see some athletes — and Zac’s a good case of that — where they have to be willing to admit faults, accept faults, and understand what you’re going to gain from that acceptance. I think that’s hard for a lot of kids and people in general.”

It was a valuable lesson for Robbins, who realized that sometimes athletic success depends on more than just physical strength and working harder. The mental aspect is important, too, as well as the ability to acknowledge your shortcomings.

And while Robbins is good enough at football to be recruited by several colleges, the excellent student is also smart enough to want to preserve his brain and not subject it to any more potential damage from collisions in football.

“I needed to be more focused,” says Robbins, who is still weighing his options for college. “Especially during my freshman and sophomore years, I would get really bad in my head. I needed to eliminate all the mind games I would play with myself and stay focused on whatever my goal was for that day. You can apply that to a lot of places in life.” Tesar was impressed with how Robbins handled the situation. “Your physical conditioning is a big part of this sport, even in

“I’ve had a couple of schools wanting me for football, but looking forward in life, I don’t want to have any head issues or anything like that,” says Robbins, who plans on participating in track and field in college. “I’ve never really had concussions or anything like that, but it’s something that I don’t want to risk. I’m a pretty smart guy, and I like my brain being at full potential. I love football and everything about it, but I don’t want to be 40 and to look back on it like, ‘Wow, I wish I wouldn’t have played because I can’t think properly right now.’”

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J JENKS See our feature on page 92

56 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


J JENKS

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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

Katelyn Bollenbach

58 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


PLAYING GOLF IN HIGH-PRESSURE SITUATIONS AND BIG-TIME TOURNAMENTS HAS JUNIOR KATELYN BOLLENBACH POISED TO HELP LEAD JENKS PAST ITS RECENT SECONDPLACE STATE FINISHES. by John Tranchina photos by Marc Rains She may only be a junior, but Katelyn Bollenbach has a lot of experience playing golf in high-pressure situations and big-time tournaments, so taking on a leadership role for the Jenks High School team is natural for her. That, as well as the continual improvement she has shown over the past few years, makes her a key player to watch this spring. After finishing 46th individually as a freshman at the Class 6A state tournament in 2018 and then placing seventh last year with a two-round total of 155, Bollenbach is poised to take another step up the ladder. But as a team leader on a young and inexperienced squad, she is also focused on her team. Jenks finished second at state in each of Bollenbach’s two high school seasons (to Edmond North each time),

so she is determined for a better team result this year. That might be a difficult task, as the Lady Trojans lost three of their five starters from last season to graduation. That’s why Bollenbach stepping into the vital leadership role is so important. But despite the inexperience, she believes Jenks will remain a formidable force this season. “It’s about how much work you put in,” says Bollenbach of Jenks’ approach toward the state tournament. “A lot more is on the line, so you have to handle pressure more and be prepared for tough situations. I think getting the younger girls more experienced in that area will be very important. A lot of the teams in the field have lost seniors, so it’s leveled out the playing field a little bit.” One of Bollenbach’s best leadership qualities is her work ethic, as she’s proven to be an excellent example for her younger teammates. “With Katelyn this year and her leadership, she has stepped into that role,” says Lady Trojans coach Vicki Hughes. “We only have two seniors on the team and only one who has played a lot on the varsity level. Katelyn is filling some big shoes left by our previous three [seniors], and she’s done a great job. She’s a motivator, and she sets a good example, and that’s the key. When you’re a leader, those young ones are always watching, so you have

to be on top of your game. You’ve got to be the one putting forth the most effort.” Bollenbach has been playing golf since she was 5 years old, competing in official U.S. youth tournaments since she was 10, and that experience has shown her that the hard work pays off. “I think with golf, you have to put in the work to become good at it,” says Bollenbach, who is also involved in the youth ministry group Young Life outside of school. “Getting second at state two years in a row has been a big factor for me. I want to win finally.” She started out playing as a little kid with her father, Brian Bollenbach, and the game has served as a strong bonding mechanism between the two ever since. “My dad has been a big influence in my golf career,” says Bollenbach, who also used to play soccer but gave it up years ago to concentrate on golf. “He started me when I was young, and I did golf camps and stuff like that. They always told him to keep me in the sport. He’s always pushed me to get out there and work harder. “We used to fight a little bit when he would caddy for me, but it’s been good. He’s always very supportive and wants me to do my best. It’s been good bonding because we go out and play on the weekends and go practice.”

A vital aspect of the game that Bollenbach has focused on, and has made a lot of progress in, has been her mental toughness. Being able to forget about a bad shot or hole quickly has been a big part of her success. “It’s so mental, you just have to stay positive the whole time,” says Bollenbach, who enjoys watching the Masters and other PGA tournaments. “I used to get so mad if I would hit a bad shot, but I’ve learned. Coach [Hughes] always says, ‘You have 10 seconds to be mad, and then you have to forget about it,’ because there’s nothing you can do about it after you hit a bad shot. “I’m still not 100% at it, but that’s a big part of getting better. You have to be able to keep it together and handle your emotions better than anyone else.” The fact that she not only placed seventh at last year’s state tournament but shot a personal-best 74 in the second round, including an impressive 33 over the back nine holes, demonstrates that Bollenbach has been able to overcome those issues and stay focused in pressure situations mostly. Hughes has noticed the progression. “She has grown and matured over the past couple of years,” Hughes says. “Her mental game has gotten a lot stronger. I’m proud of her.”

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LET’S GO OILERS tue feb 11th vs. utah @ 7:05pm sat feb 15th vs. wichita @ 7:05pm sun feb 16th vs. kansas city @ 4:05pm sun feb 23rd vs. allen @ 4:05pm

call (918)-632-7825 to purchase tickets now 60 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


SS SPORTS SCHEDULE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Lloyd Noble Center (Norman, Okla.) Feb. 1 | vs Oklahoma State | 2p Feb. 4 | @ Texas Tech | 8p Feb. 8 | vs West Virginia | 1p Feb. 12 | vs Iowa State | 8p Feb. 15 | @ Kansas | 11a Feb. 18 | vs Baylor | 8p Feb. 22 | @ Oklahoma State | 3p Feb. 25 | vs Texas Tech | 8p Feb. 29 | @ West Virginia | 3p –––––––––––––––––– March 3 | vs Texas | 8p March 7 | @ TCU | 5p

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Lloyd Noble Center (Norman, Okla.)

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Gallagher-Iba Arena (Stillwater, Okla.) Feb. 1 | @ Oklahoma | 2p Feb. 5 | vs TCU | 7p Feb. 8 | @ Baylor | 5p Feb. 11 | @ Kansas State | 8p Feb. 15 | vs Texas Tech | Noon Feb. 18 | @ West Virginia | 6p Feb. 22 | vs Oklahoma | 3p Feb. 24 | @ Kansas | 8p Feb. 29 | vs Iowa State | 3p –––––––––––––––––– March 4 | vs Kansas State | 8p March 7 | @ Texas | 3p

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Gallagher-Iba Arena (Stillwater, Okla.)

Feb. 2 | @ Kansas | Noon Feb. 5 | vs West Virginia | 7p Feb. 8 | @ Iowa State | 2p Feb. 11 | vs Oklahoma State | 7p Feb. 16 | vs Kansas State | 2p Feb. 22 | @ Baylor | 4p Feb. 26 | vs Kansas | 7p Feb. 29 | @ Texas | 7p –––––––––––––––––– March 4 | @ TCU | 6p March 7 | vs Texas Tech | 1p

Feb. 1 | @ Texas Tech | 3p Feb. 5 | @ Iowa State | 6:30p Feb. 8 | vs West Virginia | 2p Feb. 11 | @ Oklahoma | 7p Feb. 15 | vs Baylor | 7p Feb. 23 | @ TCU | 2p Feb. 26 | vs Texas Tech | 7p Feb. 29 | @ Kansas | 5p –––––––––––––––––– March 3 | vs Kansas State | 7p March 8 | @ Texas | 11:30a

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Reynolds Center (Tulsa, Okla.)

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Reynolds Center (Tulsa, Okla.)

Feb. 1 | vs Wichita State | 5p Feb. 6 | vs UConn | 6p Feb. 9 | @ UCF | 1p Feb. 12 | vs ECU | 7p Feb. 15 | @ USF | 11a Feb. 19 | @ Houston | 8p Feb. 22 | vs SMU | 5p Feb. 25 | vs Tulane | 8p Feb. 29 | vs UCF | 5p –––––––––––––––––– March 4 | @ Temple | 6p March 8 | @ Wichita State | 3p

Feb. 1 | @ Memphis | 3p Feb. 5 | vs UCF | 7p Feb. 12 | @ Cincinnati | 6p Feb. 15 | vs SMU | 2p Feb. 19 | @ ECU | 6p Feb. 23 | vs Wichita State | 2p Feb. 29 | @ Temple | 1p –––––––––––––––––– March 2 | vs Houston | 7p

ORAL ROBERTS MEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Mabee Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Feb. 1 | vs Denver | 7p Feb. 6 | @ North Dakota | 7p Feb. 8 | @ North Dakota State | 1p Feb. 12 | vs Omaha | 7p Feb. 15 | vs South Dakota | 7p Feb. 20 | @ Denver | 8p Feb. 27 | vs Western Illinois | 7:30p Feb. 29 | vs Purdue Fort Wayne | 7p

TULSA OILERS Home games are played at BOK Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Feb. 1 | @ Kansas City Mavericks | 7:05p Feb. 7 | @ Indy Fuel | 6:35p Feb. 8 | @ Fort Wayne Komets | 6:35p Feb. 11 | vs Utah Grizzlies | 7:05p Feb. 14 | @ Wichita Thunder | 7:05p Feb. 15 | @ Wichita Thunder | 7:05p Feb. 16 | vs Kansas City Mavericks | 4:05p Feb. 18 | @ Allen Americans | 7:05p Feb. 21 | @ Allen Americans | 7:05p Feb. 23 | vs Allen Americans | 4:05p Feb. 28 | @ Rapid City Rush | 8:05p Feb. 29 | @ Rapid City Rush | 8:05p

ORAL ROBERTS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Home games are played at Mabee Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Feb. 1 | vs South Dakota State | 2p Feb. 7 | @ North Dakota | 7p Feb. 9 | @ North Dakota State | 1p Feb. 13 | vs Omaha | 7p Feb. 15 | vs South Dakota | 2p Feb. 23 | @ Denver | 2p Feb. 27 | vs Western Illinois | 5p Feb. 29 | vs Purdue Fort Wayne | 2p

OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER Home games are played at Chesapeake Energy Arena (Oklahoma City, Okla.) Feb. 5 | vs Cleveland Cavaliers | 7p Feb. 7 | vs Detroit Pistons | 7p Feb. 9 | vs Boston Celtics | 2:30p Feb. 11 | vs San Antonio Spurs | 7p Feb. 13 | @ New Orleans Pelicans | 7p Feb. 21 | vs Denver Nuggets | 7p Feb. 23 | vs San Antonio Spurs | 6p Feb. 25 | @ Chicago Bulls | 7p Feb. 27 | vs Sacramento Kings | 7p Feb. 28 | @ Milwaukee Bucks | 7p

ALL TIMES CENTRAL // GAME DATES/TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

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GC GREEN COUNTRY SCENE

Cow-nting On It SMALL CATTLE BREEDS ARE MAKING A BIG IMPACT IN GREEN COUNTRY AS HOBBY FARMERS AND SEASONED RANCHERS LOOK FOR RIGHT-SIZED SOLUTIONS TO BEEF CATTLE EFFICIENCY AND GOOD OLDFASHIONED SWEAT EQUITY. BY JENNIFER ZEHNDER On the Willow Way Ranch in Muskogee, Oklahoma, American Aberdeen Angus cattle browse winter pastures. An older matriarch watches over a group of napping calves as their dams graze nearby. During their cattle check, owners David and Terry Williams stop to admire their bull, Duke, who surveys his herd and perhaps ponders summer temperatures. Some 90 miles away on Sunshine Acres in Barnsdall, Oklahoma, a herd of Hereford cattle makes their way toward the pasture gate. White-faced and white-socked, the red cattle amble along, single file, in anticipation of feed and to greet owners, Randy and Carolyn Rogers.

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At first glance, both seem like textbook scenes from a rancher’s playbook — with one notable difference, though one might have to get closer to appreciate it. The adult cattle in these Green Country pastures stand between 26 to 48 inches at the hip and average between 750 and 1,450 pounds depending on their respective breed — about 30 to 50% smaller than their standardsized counterparts. American Aberdeens and Miniature Herefords are two of several smallerframed beef cattle breeds being welcomed by small acreage hobby farmers and large-scale ranchers alike.

Docile temperaments, unmatched feed conversion, 30% more prime cuts, suitability for youth 4-H and National FFA Organization projects, and rightsized beef production per acre are just a few factors that are turning folks with small cattle curiosity into official herd owners in northeastern Oklahoma. And while they’re not cattle you should expect to buy or sell at a sale barn at market price per pound, they can be a profitable investment when raised strictly for beef and/or registered and sold to niche clientele such as like-minded homesteaders, ranchers, and grass-fed meat boutique markets.


GREEN COUNTRY SCENE GC The Williams began their full-sized cattle pursuits in 2004 with an investment eye toward their future retirement. However, just five years in, the couple admits they were becoming disenchanted with the full-scale workload and wear and tear on their equipment, facilities, and bank account. Upon the advice of her brother, Terry began researching the benefits of American Aberdeen for their operation — not only as a standalone breed to raise for beef but for crossbreeding on their first-time, standardsized heifers. The American Aberdeen breed originated from the selective breeding of high quality, moderate-framed, registered champion Angus cattle at the Trangie Research Centre in New South Wales, Australia, notes the association website. From the original purchase of herd members in 1929, scientists created a breed that is efficient on grass, moderate in size, black, polled [hornless], and the purest of Angus genetics. The Aberdeen is also free from the dwarfism gene that is sometimes carried in other small cattle breed genetics. “When you add in the Aberdeen’s ease of calving, good nature, and excellent feed conversion, the decision to add them became an easy one,” David says. According to Terry, the couple would sell their commercial calves and use the more efficient Aberdeen for meat since they would finish ( fatten out for butcher) on grass. “It was much more cost-effective since it takes about 70 pounds of grain a week plus grass/ hay to fatten a full-sized commercial steer for a butcher. And we could breed our commercial heifers to our Aberdeen bull, so we didn’t have to worry about pulling large calves or taking longer to breed them back. The half-blood Aberdeen cattle carried that same efficiency, raising more pounds of calf per acre than our full-sized cattle,” she says. In the late 1960s, Point of Rocks Ranch in Fort Davis, Texas, created the Miniature Hereford by selectively breeding certified dwarfismfree, full-sized Herefords to concentrate their best traits into a smaller-framed, more efficient animal. According to the Rogers, these hardy, miniature cattle and smaller homestead goals are a natural fit.

“More and more people are learning the value of rural life, and are moving to rural or suburban areas to enjoy the peacefulness and tranquility available at the edges of the city’s rat race. While these five, 10, or larger acre homesteads are a great investment, taxes and maintenance can easily challenge the tranquility aspect,” Carolyn notes. “That’s where Miniature Herefords come in. At half to a third the size of today’s standard cattle, they thrive on smaller acreages, are far less harmful to the property, and keep the place trimmed and fertilized for you.” Their decision to raise miniature cattle was a twofold dream, the couple says. First, to honor their late PaPa’s desire to raise Miniature Herefords, and second, to realize the practical and economic advantages of embracing the dream as their own. “The more we looked into it, we saw there was a greater area for profit,” Randy shares. “Plus, you could run more cattle per acre than regular cows.”

American Aberdeen and Miniature Herefords By the Numbers • 3 5-50 pounds: the weight of the average newborn calf

• $ 2,500-$3,000: average cost of a registered heifer

• 3 0%: more prime cuts such as rib-eye per 100 pounds than a full-sized beef animal

 ne-third: the feed required than •O standard cattle

• 4 0% or more: retail product per acre • 1 2-25 years: average life span • 1 .5 to 2 acres: required per animal on good grass

Resources: americanaberdeen.com, hereford. org, miniaturehereford.org

This February, the Rogers celebrate 13 years of raising Miniature Hereford cattle on their 43-acre farm. And with each new calf born, they are happily reminded of God’s continued blessings in their lives, including Carolyn’s ongoing triumph over health challenges, which include pancreatic cancer. “We love everything about it [raising Miniature Herefords]. It’s an awesome feeling coming home from work to a relaxed atmosphere on the farm. All the animals know it’s you and greet you at the gates,” Randy says.

David and Terry Williams

And while each might favor different breeds, both couples agree that newcomers to the small cattle world should make sure to do their research, talk to breeders, and start small to see if raising miniature cattle is a fit for them. “The simple fact is that they are beautiful animals, a great meat source, will create an extra source of income, provide tax deduction options, and are very easy to get attached to,” Carolyn says.

Carolyn and Randy Rogers

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TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

64 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


TA TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

Live Music

Check Website for Dates!

PREVIEW918.COM 65


BT BEYOND TULSA

From its well-maintained train depot to the charming farmers market during the summer, Bristow has a spark of vitality that refuses to die out. By Michele Chiappetta Photos by Rob Harmon There’s honestly something special about visiting small-town Oklahoma that gets our imaginations going and makes our sense of adventure and nostalgia come alive. Perhaps it’s the frozen-in-time main streets with their 100-year-old buildings, antique shops, and locally-run and owned breakfast spots. Maybe it’s the one-ofa-kind museums, festivals, and other attractions that ooze with hometown pride and tradition that make a visit to a small town special. Bristow has all these and more — from its well-maintained train depot to the charming farmers market during the summertime. The town got its start in 1898, and like a lot of small towns in that era, it was built to accommodate a train stop between Sapulpa and Oklahoma City on a track run by the St. Louis – San Francisco (“Frisco”) Railway. That depot is still in existence, beautifully maintained, and it’s a powerful draw to visitors, but it’s not the only reason people visit this charming little town. To put it simply, Bristow has a spark of vitality that refuses to die out. Unlike many small towns around the nation that have shrunk practically out of existence, Bristow refuses to become irrelevant. With the old Route 66 running straight through its heart, Bristow is a town full of people who love where they live and don’t mind sharing it with visitors who come interested to learn about its history. And surrounding towns like Stroud and Drumright offer a few spots worth visiting too, making the area well worth a day trip.

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Reinventing Relevance Unique OK

aboard the Frisco caboose and get a feel for what it was like when the train was the only way to travel long distances across the country.

3 14 N. 5TH AVE. | STROUD

Stroud, which is a short drive from Bristow, is a quaint town with friendly people and interesting Main Street architecture. On North Fifth Avenue, you will find a charming house with a fenced-in yard attached to it, that has been converted into a retail property.

Although the shop looks small, Unique OK has a lot to offer in Oklahoma souvenirs, pottery, candles, locally-made gourmet coffee, and so much more. For Mother’s Day, baskets with floral designs inside make a pretty and thoughtful gift. Wind chimes, wood signs, custom cornhole game sets with matching OSU or OU bags, or whatever you request are available for order.

Tidewater Winery 5 4560 W. HWY. 16, E0727 ROAD | DRUMRIGHT

At Tidewater Winery, you can experience some pretty fantastic wines inside a surprisingly historic building, in a place you wouldn’t expect. The winery and event building, located in Drumright, was originally built by John D. Rockefeller (yes, really) as a school for the children of employees of the Tidewater Oil Company (Tydol). Constructed about

100 years ago, it is so well preserved that it is on the National Register of Historic Places. Plan this as one of your stops as you tour Oklahoma wineries, or go to visit one of the country’s oldest, most well-preserved buildings. Either way, Tidewater Winery provides a lesson in history and a greater appreciation of Oklahoma wine. If you’re on the lookout for a unique, romantic location to host a wedding or some other special event, their 8,000-square-foot historic venue right next to the winery’s beautiful vineyard makes the perfect spot to host such a memorable event.

Bristow Train Depot and Museum 1 BURLINGTON NORTHERN RAILROAD | BRISTOW

A visit to the Bristow Train Depot and Museum is like traveling back to the 1890s, when Bristow was formed near a railroad track between the burgeoning cities of Sapulpa and Oklahoma City. Continually being restored, the historic depot and nearby town square give a sense of stepping back in time. Inside the museum, walk on the original 1923 wood floors, see the old ticket counters, and check out the antique desks and equipment used by the depot masters. Outside, climb

Spend time with any of the volunteer docents inside the museum, and you’ll get a history lesson about Bristow you won’t soon forget. You’ll hear about famous people with ties to Bristow, like world-famous Gene Autry,

who, at a young age, served as a telegrapher in this exact building, when it was formerly known as the Frisco Train Depot.

Little Orange Barn 3 6918 W. 231ST ST. S. | BRISTOW

Just across from the Bristow Veterans of Foreign Wars is a beautiful, landscaped property with a sign at the driveway that says, “The Little Orange Barn.” Unless


BEYOND TULSA BT you knew what it was, you might assume it was someone’s weekend retreat home in the country. With a nicely graveled circle drive and an inviting front porch, it’s hard not to welcome yourself to a visit. Enter through one of the gorgeous double doors at the front of the building, and inside you’ll see a shop full of woodwork furniture, collectibles, and knickknacks either made by the owners or curated for your browsing and buying pleasure. Snatch up a vinrella, a cool, fashionable umbrella that is shaped like a bottle of wine until you open it up for use when it rains. It’s an umbrella in a bottle. And it’s adorable. On any given Friday night, live bands perform. At the same time, visitors enjoy a coffee and some of the latest apple pie fudge, cinnamon roll, or special candy the owners have made available for purchase.

Creek Nation Casino 1 21 W. LINCOLN AVE. | BRISTOW

Established in 2008, the Creek Nation Casino in Bristow is a convenient 30-minute drive southwest of Tulsa. Just a mile south of the I-44 Turner Turnpike, through downtown Bristow, is the perfect spot for a wide variety of games for entertainment. The casino is a plush environment for getting your kicks, with exceptional customer service and good food.

Open daily from 8 a.m.-6 a.m., guests 18 and over can enjoy themselves from sun up to sun down and beyond. More than 225 electronic games are yours for the playing. Everything from classic favorite electronic slots to the latest games on the casino scene are available. If you’re ready to win big or unwind with a little weekend gambling, this is a great option. Enjoy a hearty breakfast, lunch, or dinner at the cafe, and you’ll be ready to get back to the casino.

Free Wi-Fi Internet Access!

Molly’s Landing Open Since 1984

Steak & Seafood Only 3 1/2 miles from Hard Rock Casino on Highway 66 (Route 66)

918.266.7853

www.mollyslanding.com

VFW Post 3656 Wake Island Memorial  MERICAN LEGION | A 131 W. 8TH ST. | BRISTOW

The Veterans of Foreign War (VFW) Wake Island Memorial in Bristow is just at the edge of the west side of town and commemorates the 1941 Battle of Wake Island, which occurred on a small island west of Hawaii. This cherished landmark was established by the city of Bristow in the late 1960s to honor those American Veterans who fought for and served our country and the free world. In addition to being informative and educational about our soldiers’ historical contributions, Wake Island Memorial also serves veterans by providing meeting rooms and different ways to honor those who have bravely served. A commemorative tank and cannon, as well as other war memorabilia, serve as a reminder that our people in the armed forces have risked their lives for us and millions around the globe.

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SS STYLE + SHOPPING

the art of food

WHEN IT COMES TO GETTING A UNIQUE GIFT FOR JUST ABOUT ANY SIZE GROUP AND ANY CELEBRATION, THEN IT’S WORTH YOUR TIME TO VISIT THE FRIENDLY, CREATIVE, FAST TEAM OF FRUIT LOVERS OVER AT EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA & PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS Cake? So old-school. Candy bars? All sugar. Roses? Everyone does that. A fern? Come on, you can do better than that. When it comes to getting a unique gift for just about any size group and any celebration, then it’s worth your time to visit the friendly, creative, fast team of fruit lovers over at Edible Arrangements. They’ll craft a beautiful, decorative presentation of fruit for family, friends, clients, and anyone you’re trying to impress with a gift that isn’t the usual old thing. Tulsa’s two Edible Arrangements stores are owned by Tom Stabb, who is dedicated to ensuring top quality and service to everyone who walks in the doors, whether they’re stopping by to place a well-planned order or are looking for a last-minute gift. “Most people are ordering, usually for an occasion,” says Stabb. “But we also have grab-and-go items.”

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It’s easy to picture what Edible Arrangements has been known for since the franchise came on the scene in 1999 — large bouquets of fruits cut to look like flowers. But these days, the stores can do just about anything you can envision. “There are hundreds of different options, sizes, and flavors,” says Stabb, who also notes that customers enjoy the variety available. While you can easily browse the website to find an arrangement that suits you, it’s also just as easy to come in and get some in-person help. “When you come in, our staff can help you. It’s very hands-on, all handcrafted. It’s very labor-intensive, a detailed process.” Arrangements are made to fit what the customer asks for, put together only after an order is made to maximize freshness

and quality. Fruit is used to fit the season, with year-round choices like bananas paired with seasonal fruits such as berries, mangoes, and kiwis in summer, to give you a feast for both the eyes and the stomach. With February being Valentine’s month, Stabb and his team will be working long hours to ensure your special someone receives the perfect gift. There’s always the traditional choice — chocolate covered strawberries. The stores will have some small boxes on hand as much as possible for grab-and-go pickup, but you can place a particular order and get a large box. Edible Arrangements uses Albion strawberries, which are sweeter than most other strawberries, dipped in your choice of semisweet or white chocolate.

There are also numerous fruit bouquet options, featuring a variety of fruits depending on season and arrangement style — fresh honeydew, cantaloupe, grapes, strawberries, pineapple, oranges, apples, and bananas can all make an appearance. The fruits are shaped into flowers, stars, balls, wedges, and more to mimic a floral bouquet’s variety and appeal. Or they can be shaped like doughnuts and footballs if your recipient is so inclined.


Orders can be customized even further by adding plush teddy bears, as well as decorative balloons with birthday, congratulations, get well soon, and other messages. There are also customizable containers, such as rainbows or monkey designs for kids, outdoor mugs, vase styles, and more. “We’ve introduced multiple new items and new containers,” says

favorites among their customers. “We now have platters, so if you’re doing an office party or event, those have been popular,” says Stabb. They also now have cookies, made by the same manufacturer that makes cookies for the DoubleTree hotels. Edible Arrangements bakes the cookies fresh in-house and can create a small box to a large platter of sugar cookies, snickerdoodles, chocolate chip, white chocolate with cranberries, and rocky road.

STYLE + SHOPPING SS They’re also offering Maddy & Maize gourmet popcorn, which is all natural and comes in creative flavors like birthday cake and bourbon barbecue. Edible Arrangements even has everybody’s favorite — minicheesecakes. These airy, creamy, rich creations are available in a traditional plain option

or topped with strawberries or other fresh fruits, whipped cream, or chocolate swizzle. Order them a few at a time or in platters for those special parties you have planned. Gift and party arrangements like these are more affordable than you might think, and Stabb says to come in and let his staff know what you need so they can help you get creative within your price range. They can create individual gifts for parties, platters for catered events, gifts for corporate clients, and even box of fruit fundraisers for schools. It all comes down to making sure their arrangements bring a smile, something Stabb and his team believe in. “We have two people to make happy,” he says, “the customer who buys it and the recipient who receives it. Our mission is to make both people happy.”

EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS

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3311 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-728-3102 ediblearrangements.com

Monday-Friday: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: Closed

Stabb. “We’ve added several new offerings in the arrangements arena, with updated birthday items, and new holidays. It’s not the same old stale ones. If you’ve used us in the past, you can still make the same arrangements, but there’s a lot more to choose from.”

7731 E. 91st St. | Tulsa 918-872-9204 ediblearrangements.com

LO CA TO R

If you’re looking for something in addition to or instead of the fruit arrangements, Edible Arrangements has other choices that have quickly become

EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS

Monday-Friday: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: Closed

PREVIEW918.COM 69


RB RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER

We are tapped into what’s trending and delicious, giving you a first-hand look at where to go, what to eat, where the best cocktails are, and how to map out your culinary adventures in the 918. Whatever your mood, whatever you crave, the 918 has a restaurant or bar sure to satisfy. From local classics to chain favorites, a variety of options catering to every palate and pocketbook are available. For those on the move, search our website database with over 200 restaurants and bars in nearly 20 categories.

PREVIEW918.COM/DINE-DRINK

CATEGORIES AMERICAN

FEATURED LISTINGS ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

2748 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-747-4799 SEE AD | PAGE 60

ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

421 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-728-3650 SEE AD | PAGE 60

BARBECUE

AMAZING THAI CUISINE 1232 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-258-8424 SEE AD | PAGE 91

BAXTER’S INTERURBAN GRILL

717 S. Houston Ave., Suite 100 | Tulsa 918-585-3134

BRUNCH COFFEE DELI FINE DINING GLOBAL ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN MEXICAN PIZZA SEAFOOD SPECIALTY STEAK SWEETS 70 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020

SEE AD | PAGE 73

DILLY DINER

SEE AD | PAGE 60

FLO’S BURGER DINER 19322 E. Admiral Place | Catoosa 918-739-4858 2604 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-398-7102 SEE AD | PAGE 38

402 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-938-6382 SEE AD | PAGE 5

DUST BOWL

211 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-430-3901 SEE AD | PAGE 5

EL CHICO

9825 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-663-7755 SEE AD | PAGE 91

SEE AD | PAGE 91

EL GUAPO’S BROWNIES

2130 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-0320 SEE AD | PAGE 87

BARS + PUBS BREAKFAST

6812 S. 105th E. Ave. | Tulsa 918-449-3100

8056 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa 918-872-6206

FUJI

8226 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 918-250-1821

ASIAN BAKERY

DAVE & BUSTER’S

FAT DADDY’S PUB AND GRILLE

CAZ’S CHOWHOUSE

18 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa 918-588-2469 SEE AD | PAGE 64

CAZ’S PUB

21 E. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa 918-585-8587 SEE AD | PAGE 64

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

1304 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-587-4411 5320 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-749-7755 6709 E. 81st St. | Tulsa 918-960-2723 SEE AD | PAGE 78

332 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-RITA SEE AD | PAGE 5

ELGIN PARK

325 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-986-9910

SEE AD | PAGE 87

GEORGE’S PUB

108 N. 1st St. | Jenks 918-296-9711 SEE AD | PAGE 57

GOODCENTS DELI FRESH SUBS

8222 E. 103rd St. | Tulsa 918-364-7827 SEE AD | PAGE 39

HABANEROS MEXICAN GRILL

4640 S. Elm Place | Broken Arrow 918-940-7272 SEE AD | PAGE 33

SEE AD | PAGES 5, 61

IN THE RAW ELMER’S BBQ

4130 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-6702 SEE AD | PAGE 87

FAMOUS STEAKHOUSE 8922 S. Memorial Drive, Ste. C3 | Tulsa 918-459-7870

3321 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-1300 6151 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-524-0063 216 S. Main St. | Broken Arrow 918-893-6111 SEE AD | PAGE 78

SEE AD | PAGE 78

INCREDIBLE PIZZA FASSLER HALL

304 S. Elgin Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-7898 SEE AD | PAGE 5

8314 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 539-302-2681 SEE AD | PAGE 3

JASON’S DELI

8321 E. 61st St. | Tulsa 918-252-9999 1330 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-599-7777 SEE AD | PAGE 38


RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER RB KITCH

377 E Main Street | Jenks 918-528-6766 SEE AD | PAGE 57

LOS CABOS

300 Riverwalk Terrace #100 | Jenks 918-298-2226 151 Bass Pro Drive | Broken Arrow 918-355-8877 9455 N. Owasso Expressway | Owasso 918-609-8671 SEE AD | PAGE 9

LOS MARIACHIS

2534 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-251-0370 11476 S. Union Ave. | Jenks 918-296-5352

MCNELLIE’S PUB

409 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-382-7468 7031 S. Zurich Ave. | Tulsa 918-933-5250 SEE AD | PAGE 5

400 Riverwalk Terrace, Suite 180 | Jenks 918-946-2796

14 W. Reconciliation Way | Tulsa 918-582-3383

8102-B S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa 918-392-3354 8955 S. Memorial Drive | Tulsa 918-392-0770 720 N. Aspen | Broken Arrow 918-258-3354 8529 N. 129th E. Ave. | Owasso 918-376-9000 2330 SE Washington Blvd. | Bartlesville 918-333-6614 SEE AD | PAGE 33

5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR FIRESIDE GRILL

SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL

1542 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-949-4440 201 S. Main | Owasso 918-401-4343 SEE AD | PAGE 79

STEAK STUFFERS USA 7846 E. 51st. St. | Tulsa 918-743-7474 SEE AD | PAGE 73

MIAMI NIGHTS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

6510 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-835-4522

JOHNNY ROCKETS

SWEET BOUTIQUE LANDSHARK BAR

SEE AD | PAGE 67

MARGARITAVILLE

MOLLY’S LANDING

3700 N. Old Hwy 66 | Catoosa 918-266-7853 SEE AD | PAGE 67

MONDO’S RISTORANTE ITALIAN

3410 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-561-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 79

PRAIRIE BREWPUB 4951 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-392-3373

SEE AD | PAGES 21, 100

SEE AD | PAGE 65

SEE AD | PAGE 57

MCALISTER’S DELI

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa

MEXICALI BORDER CAFÉ

SEE AD | PAGE 57

MARYN’S TAPHOUSE AND RAW BAR

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

THE TAVERN R UTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

918-995-8600

SCOREBOARD SPORTS BAR TIKI DINER VISIONS BUFFET

SEE AD | PAGE 79

5629 E. 41st St. | Tulsa 918-622-2668 SEE AD | PAGE 91

RINCON MEXICAN GRILL & CANTINA

6219 E. 61st. St | Tulsa 918-340-5520 SEE AD | PAGE 87

SEE AD | PAGE 19

918-995-8080

232 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-936-4395

RICARDOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St., #13 | Tulsa 918-900-2238

201 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-949-9801 SEE AD | PAGE 5

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO 6024 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-499-1919 219 S. Cheyenne Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-5151 SEE AD | PAGE 35

WATERFRONT GRILL ROCKING “R” RANCH HOUSE

7501 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-357-2719 SEE AD | PAGE 38

SISSEROU’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT 107 N. Boulder Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-6800

120 Aquarium Drive | Jenks 918-518-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 9

YOKOZUNA

309 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-508-7676 9146 S. Yale, Ste. 100 | Tulsa 918-508-7676 SEE AD | PAGE 5

SEE AD | PAGE 65

YUTAKA GRILL AND SUSHI BUFFET

6560 E. 51st St. | Tulsa 918-921-3400 SEE AD | PAGE 39

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LP LAUNCH PAD

STRESS

TRYING TO DO ALL THE LEGWORK OF SMALL-BUSINESS ACTIVITIES WITHOUT USING THE SHORTCUTS AVAILABLE IS GUARANTEED TO EAT UP YOUR TIME, WEAR OUT YOUR PATIENCE, AND POSSIBLY BURN YOU OUT. — By Michele Chiappetta It’s the month of love. But how well are you loving your small business — and yourself as the boss? Here’s a hint: consider how well (or not so well) you are maintaining all the essential elements of keeping your company running smoothly. If the daily ride feels bumpier than it has to, your business systems may need a little tender loving care. It is all too easy to get lost in the regular grind of getting

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activities done. Between the work you love doing, which earns you income, and the stuff you don’t enjoy so much but that has to get done (like invoicing), smallbusiness owners can often find themselves working crazy hours. Well-known sources like Gallup and the Bureau of Labor Statistics say that small-business owners work, on average, six days a week, at least 50 hours or more per week. The average employee,

by comparison, works about 35 hours a week. The reality is, small-business owners wear a lot of hats, and you have to get the work done at the end of the day. But merely performing task after task all day long can be draining. And trying to do all the legwork of activities like billing and scheduling and writing contracts without using the shortcuts available to you is guaranteed to eat

up your time, wear out your patience, and make you pull your hair out. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Periodically, it’s essential to take a step back and look at how your business is running and what’s needed to help it run more smoothly. This is one of the best ways to love your business and yourself— by streamlining and creating better systems to


keep things moving as easily as possible, with the least amount of stress on you. Here are some handy tips from the trenches to help you do that.

HANDOFF ADMINISTRATIVE TASKS Chances are if you’re a smallbusiness owner, it’s because you like control. You enjoy running your schedule, on your terms, doing the work you love, and taking charge of the salary you make. This is a great trait, but it can also backfire, because you may want to — or feel you have to — get all the work done yourself, including things that don’t earn you money. Any size business can benefit from handing off some tasks to a vendor, like accounting. If you get a lot of phone calls, a concierge service can handle receptionist duties while you focus on projects and clients. Or, go a different route and hire someone to do domestic tasks, like grocery shopping and house cleaning, so you can put that time into your business and then relax. If you are in a position to hire employees, then get serious about doing so. First, consider which tasks are taking up a lot of your time without earning you income (such as balancing the books). Second, think about tasks that are crucial to growth but that you don’t like to do (like marketing). Hire employees for those areas.

STREAMLINE BUSINESS SYSTEMS There are a lot of things on a business owner’s plate — everything from tracking time, calculating mileage, organizing business receipts, and on and on and on. It’s easy to procrastinate doing those things, but if you do, they just stay on your to-do list, mocking you. And they’re important. Of course, you may not have a whole lot of time to do

those things, because after all, you’re running a business. If you don’t have the budget to hire or outsource these tasks, then you need to get the must-dos done yourself. The key is to do it as quickly as possible to maximize the time you spend on client work. This is where streamlining tasks by using the right tools can be handy. Beyond the obvious, like using accounting software (QuickBooks, Freshbooks, and Wave are popular, but there are others), think about what bogs you down or is hard to manage, and then research tech solutions to handle it. Whether you want to keep to-do lists, manage client projects, organize file storage, or schedule employees, there are apps and software to do it. And many have free options so you can test them out and see which ones you like.

MAKE TIME FOR TIME OFF When you’re working those 5060 hour work weeks, it’s easy to feel burned out. It can get to the point where you feel like there’s no time to relax and have a life. But we all know how vital it is to take care of ourselves. That includes getting to the gym, spending time with the kids, visiting the family, taking vacations — all the things that add to your enjoyment of life. The key to this area is making room for time off. Don’t overschedule yourself. Calendar in blocks of time for all the things beyond work that make life worth living. Prioritize work projects that pay more, so you can work less. All of these strategies allow you to enjoy the best part of working for yourself — the freedom to run your life the way you want to.

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HF HEALTH + FITNESS relieve stress. If you must take a call during your workout, go to a private and quiet area to have your conversation. While it’s fine to log your workout, check how many reps and sets you have left, or change a song, texting with your buddies for long bouts of time (especially while someone else is waiting for the equipment) is poor gym etiquette.

Exercise Your Manners

FROM THE CRUDE TO THE CRINGE-WORTHY, THESE BAD GYM BEHAVIORS ARE SERIOUS PET PEEVES. ARE YOU GUILTY OF ANY? BY ASHTON GREER EXCESS CELLPHONE USE Working out is an investment of both time and money. And it’s not always easy to get to the gym or stay motivated. But as you start to see progress and notice how much better you feel, it can begin to become a lifetime routine. This can be very important for some people since they use exercise for several reasons such as losing weight, gaining muscle, or even reducing symptoms of harmful disease. You want to get the most out of your time when you can go, but it doesn’t help when the gym is full of annoyances that detract from your workout and make you less than thrilled to come back. It is already hard enough to fit gym time into your busy schedule that you do not want to encounter any roadblocks while spending a part of your busy day exercising and wearing out your body. From the locker rooms to the equipment, there is an unspoken rule to leave distance if available. For instance, if the gym is practically empty, there’s no need to hop on the treadmill right next to someone who’s already been running. Most can relate to at least some of these gym pet peeves. If you read through this list and realize you are one of these people, now’s the time to start making some changes.

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As cellphones become more advanced, people become more distracted and glued to the screens of their phones. People feel like they need to be connected 24/7, which can be a problem when it comes to working out. Studies show that people who spend time on their phones in between reps show a decrease in the intensity of their workout. This decrease in intensity leads to a reduced heart rate, which means you are burning less energy. Few things are more annoying than someone talking on their cellphone. The machines make the room louder than usual to begin with, so people feel the need to scream while they are having a conversation. Others don’t need to hear your life story or drama while trying to

When in the gym, put your phone down. You’ll not only reap benefits by ramping up intensity and training harder, but others around you may appreciate it as well.

NOT WIPING DOWN EQUIPMENT One of the most important rules is to have proper sweat etiquette. Clean the equipment you use after finishing with it so that the next person does not come in contact with your germs. While it may not seem like a big deal to not clean your equipment, it can be a severe issue. It has been shown that free weights at a gym carry 362 times more bacteria than a public toilet seat. Sweat contains a wide assortment of germs and bacteria, leading to the spread of viruses. Tainted gym surfaces can cause you to catch staphylococcus aureus (staph infections), candida (ringworm), and even E. coli. If you forget to bring a towel, use your sweatshirt or paper towels provided by the club.

NOT RE-RACKING WEIGHTS It’s so frustrating to walk up to a barbell and find weights left on it. Not only do you have to take the time of re-racking someone else’s sweaty weights, but you may even have trouble carrying the weights.

HOGGING EQUIPMENT Whether it be someone accumulating multiple pieces


HEALTH + FITNESS HF of equipment or sitting on a machine when not using it, hoarding equipment can be very frustrating. Most of the time, you are on a time crunch when at the gym, and it does not help when you are waiting for your turn for a piece of equipment. If you see someone waiting to use a piece of equipment you’re on, ask them if they want to work in. If you have multiple sets left, try and finish your reps quickly to give them a chance. This becomes especially true when you’re doing supersets on various pieces of equipment. Unless you hit the gym when it’s dead, don’t spend hours on one machine. This is especially pertinent during peak hours when people might have to wait for machines. A good rule of thumb for cardio equipment is to spend no more than 30 minutes on these machines.

INVADING PERSONAL SPACE Give people their personal space. Do not unnecessarily crowd others. If there are five treadmills, and one is occupied while the other four are available, do not choose the one right next to the occupied machine. If you are waiting for equipment to become available, do not hover directly over the person using the machine. When in the locker room, do not lay all of your belongings out and take up more space than is necessary. It’s also important not to occupy shared space, creating obstacles for your fellow gym-goers. For instance, do not exercise right in front of the racks where all the dumbbells stored.

EXCESSIVE GRUNTING While grunting can be seen as actual exertion during a workout, it can be seen as obnoxious at times. Although some research says that 10% more force is exerted among athletes who grunt during their exercises, there is a distinction between a powerful grunt and an “I am trying to show off ” grunt. It’s one thing to let out a little grunt if it helps you get the weight up, but it’s quite another to be shouting just to get attention. Screaming and distracting people from their sessions isn’t fair. Be respectful of others using the gym space.

OFFERING UNSOLICITED ADVICE Having someone abruptly interrupt your workout to give you advice is distracting and humiliating. It is often already uncomfortable for many people to put themselves out there at the gym. Most gyms offer personal training services to their customers. You may have been studying the proper form for deadlifts and the best protein powders, but offering that advice to your neighboring weight lifter is most likely not welcome. Do what works best for you, but leave the advice to professionals.

TRAINING SICK There might be some truth to sweating out a fever, but when it comes to shared spaces, it’s important to remember that full-blown coughs and sky-rocketing temperatures are not communal. A couple of sniffles are fine, but if you’re blowing your nose between sets, coughing in between reps, or have a fever, stay home and rest. You’re not only delaying your recovery, but you’re also risking getting everyone else in the gym sick as well.

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ET EATS + TREATS

by SARAH HERRERA photos by SARAH HERRERA

loe be s

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EATS + TREATS ET ONE-PAN STEAK DINNER

SO YOU AND YOUR VALENTINE DECIDED TO STAY IN THIS YEAR TO CELEBRATE, AND NOW YOU'RE STRESSING OVER COOKING A FANCY MEAL. FOCUS ON THE CARD AND LEAVE THE RECIPE TO US.

Adapted from LivingLocurto.com If you enjoy a classic meal of steak and potatoes, you’ll love this delicious and straightforward one-pan wonder. It’s the perfect meal for two (or two meals for one). INGREDIENTS: 2 pounds red and gold

potatoes 6 ounces broccoli florets 2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 tsp. dried thyme Salt and ground black pepper,

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, love is in the air, and it’s that time of year to celebrate you and your special someone. Whether you’re high school sweethearts from yesterday or of 50 years, preparing for a blind date, or choosing to spoil a best friend on this traditional day of chocolates and roses, there’s always an excuse to share a meal with someone you adore. However, while some have already reserved their fancy tables and others may have an extravagant (and expensive) evening planned, we know there are those of you who may wish to save some money, stay away from crowded restaurants, and enjoy an intimate moment over a tasty meal for two. This Valentine’s Day article is dedicated to you. Whether you enjoy experimenting in the kitchen, prepping something quick and easy or will do whatever it takes to savor a good steak, this one-pan recipe is delicious, picturesque, and deceptively easy. Top it off with the toogood-to-be-true chocolaty cheesecake that takes mere minutes to whip up (literally), and suddenly you’ve got yourself the perfect dinner and dessert for two people who deserve it.

to taste 2 flank steaks

DIRECTIONS:

ROCKY ROAD NO‑BAKE CHEESECAKE Adapted from MyFoodandFamily.com What’s better than cheese, better than cake, and better than baking? This no-bake cheesecake that takes minutes to prep and seconds to devour.

1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly oil a baking sheet. 2. Cut potatoes in half and place on pan. Cook for 15 minutes. Remove pan. 3. Heat oven to broil. Add broccoli florets and steak to pan (in addition to potatoes). Drizzle with olive oil. Season with garlic, salt, and pepper. 4. Place into oven and broil until the steak is browned and charred at edges ( four to five minutes per side) or until desired.

INGREDIENTS:

3 ounces semisweet chocolate 8 ounces cream cheese 1∕3 cup sugar 1∕4 cup milk

2 cups whipped topping 3∕4 cup mini marshmallows 1∕3 cup chopped peanuts 1 Oreo pie crust

DIRECTIONS:

1. Microwave one ounce of chocolate. Coarsely chop the remaining chocolate. 2. Beat cream cheese, sugar, and milk in a large bowl. Add melted chocolate and mix well. Whisk in cool whip, marshmallows, nuts, and chopped chocolate. 3. Spoon into crust. 4. Refrigerate for four hours or until firm.

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See our feature on page 88

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Food trends might come and go, but the phenomenon of the grilled cheese sandwich is forever. And we found 37 restaurants that have taken mom's Kraft-slices-on-Wonder-bread recipe to another level. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA AND ROB HARMON

perfection

Grilled to

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Oh, grilled cheese sandwich, how do we love you? Let us count the ways. We love the delicious bread, butter, and, of course, cheese that it’s made of. Toasted, popped in the oven, seared on the stove, fried in a pan, grilled inside a panini press —no matter how the sandwich is made, we love its tasty goodness. The grilled cheese sandwich reminds us of our younger years, when, as a summertime meal, a tasty grilled cheese gave us the energy to go back outside and play until the sun went down, and even late into the evening. During the wintertime, our moms served it to warm us up, alongside a hot bowl of soup. Any time of the year, the grilled cheese sandwich reminds us of the comfort we can get from a simple, classic, evergreen dish. Grilled cheese can be made simply with classic white bread and American cheese, or dressed up with bacon, tomato, avocado, sourdough, and just about anything else a creative chef can dream up and execute. Served with a side of simple, crispy fries or a tomato bisque or chips or apple slices — or maybe something genuinely decadent like mac ‘n’ cheese or fresh as a spinach salad, this favorite of favorites is reliable and so wonderful. It’s no surprise, then, that with so many amazing restaurants in Tulsa, grilled cheese is a staple on many local menus, promising us a dish that is precisely as tasty and comforting and indulgent as we expect it to be. Here’s a list of some of our favorite places that are playing cupid in our love affair with the beloved grilled cheese sandwich.

Bread and Butter Kitchen + Bakery 3837 E. 51ST ST. TULSA

Where else can you get a grilled cheese sandwich with four different, delicious kinds of cheese? This is the real Grown-Up Grilled Cheese. Take a bite of American, provolone, Swiss, and cheddar, along with three slices of housemade bread, buttered just right. Add either juicy bacon, avocado, or please your taste buds with perfectly fried green tomatoes. It’s a sandwich you’ll dream of at night and wake up wishing for the next morning.

Brownies 2130 S. HARVARD AVE. TULSA

This place has wowed locals and out-of-towners alike. Greasy-good cheeseburgers, housemade root beer, and the tastiest chocolate pies bring people back, time after time. But from the same amazing grill comes a grilled cheese sandwich that rivals any out there in Green Country. Thick cheese, smashed between two even thicker pieces of buttery bread, tastes fantastic. The atmosphere you get at Brownies also takes an already excellent grilled cheese up a notch or three.

Caz's Chowhouse 18 E. RECONCILIATION WAY TULSA

If you haven’t been to the Tulsa Arts District in a while, then a trip to Caz’s is absolutely in order. The Great Cazbah lives up to the Chowhouse’s reputation of comfort food done right. It’s truly more than a sandwich. With cheddar, American, and Jack cheese, you’ll savor every bite. Add tomato and jalapeno bacon to the mix, and you’ve got a one-of-a-kind sandwich. Throw in one of the house’s fantastic sides, like the glazed carrots or okra. You will not be disappointed.

Cherry Street Kitchen 1441 S. QUAKER AVE. TULSA

The Bombastic is a grilled cheese wonder. Yes, it’s a panini, but you’ll thank us for including it in this issue. This sandwich, with its grilled provolone and cheddar, along with tomato, red onion, and special sauce, is among the tastiest grilled cheeses you’ll ever have. It’s the kind of meal you wish would never end. Enjoy it with the housemade chips, and you’ll wonder where Cherry Street Kitchen has been all your life.

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Dilly Diner 402 E. 2ND ST. TULSA

Chimera Cafe 212 N. MAIN ST. TULSA

We only thought we knew what made a good grilled cheese before we tried the one at Chimera Cafe. The Monsieur Fromage is cheesy goodness and a whole lot more. Take a bite of sharp cheddar jack, perfectly combined with cheese curds from Oklahoma’s Lomah Dairy Farm, along with seasoned veganaise, and your taste buds will light up. If you’re not already salivating, add bacon or adzuki to the whole thing, and you’ll feel the same way we did.

Dilly Diner doesn’t do anything halfway. You get the best they have every time, and you’ll be looking forward to your next visit before you can even say, “check, please.” But this doesn’t come without special touches, a fantastic atmosphere, and spectacular service. Dilly’s grilled cheese is no-nonsense, to be sure, but its yummy brioche bun sets it apart from the rest. The light, sweet yeast bread is so tasty, you’ll almost forget to enjoy the three kinds of cheese and tomato slice in the middle.

Flo's Burger Diner 2604 E. 11TH ST. TULSA 19322 E. ADMIRAL PLACE CATOOSA

Anyone who’s ever visited this burger joint knows that the burgers and chicken sandwiches from Flo’s are a delight. But the Bomb Grilled Cheese at either Flo’s location is also a bomb-dotcom of flavor in the mouth. So much cheese. So much butter. And so much squishy, tasty bread. It’s everything you expect a grilled cheese sandwich to be. There’s simply nothing that comes off that grill that isn’t a complete knockout.

Juniper 324 E. 3RD ST. TULSA

This pimento grilled cheese sandwich with focaccia bread from Juniper is special. Added roasted red bell pepper, sweet corn, and arugula make it such a flavorful sandwich. Enjoy this pleasurable pimento grilled cheese with soup, salad, or vegetables for a complete meal that is superbly memorable. Lunch or dinner at this restaurant, whatever you order, will be a wonderful experience. Juniper’s atmosphere and staff always take any meal up a notch.

George's Pub 108 N. 1ST ST. JENKS

For one of the best visits to England that Green Country has to offer, George’s Pub in Jenks is a good bet. Amazing beer, fantastic food, and a Brit-style atmosphere make this pub a favorite to many. You’ll be tempted to order George’s signature Guinness battered fish and chips, but ask for a grilled cheese. They’ll surprise you with one of the best you’ll ever eat. Enjoy it with a haystack of fries, a nice, cold pint and a good match on the telly. You’ll be in for the time of your life.

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Jason's Deli 1330 E. 15TH ST. TULSA 832 E. 61ST ST. TULSA

We’re pretty sure you can get anything you like at Jason’s Deli. If it has to do with meat and bread, it’s possible and, more importantly, it’s deliciously dependable. From soups to salads, muffalettas, or paninis, it’s all so tasty at Jason’s Deli. And their grilled cheese comes any way you like it. Whether you want extra cheese or a special combination of all their scrumptious flavors, it’s going to be good. Have your grilled cheese with any of their soups or salads, and you’ll have yourself a meal.


Also Check Out

McAlister's Deli

Billy's on the Square

4951 E. 21ST ST. TULSA

424 S. MAIN ST. | TULSA

8102-B S. LEWIS AVE. TULSA

Bin 35 Bistro

3509 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

8955 S. MEMORIAL DR., STE. B TULSA

Boston Deli Grill and Market

720 N. ASPEN BROKEN ARROW

6231 E. 61ST ST. | TULSA

8529 N. 129TH E. AVE. OWASSO

Kitch 377 E. MAIN ST. JENKS

One of Jenks’ not-so-bestkept secrets is the delicious menu at Kitch. This breakfast and lunch spot is run by the same people who serve up tasty sweet creations at Cookiedoodle, so you always know you’re going to enjoy the food. The atmosphere is pretty sweet, too, decorated in a mid-century modern style that brightens your mood as you chow down. Anything you order will satisfy, with creative creations like spicy clubs, gumbo soups, daily frittatas, and more to choose from. You won’t be disappointed by their grilled cheese either. It’s a great way to feed your hunger pangs between shopping or errands in Jenks.

Brookside by Day

2330 SE WASHINGTON BLVD. BARTLESVILLE

If you’re looking to have a grilled cheese like mom used to make, this just may be the one. A taste of this parmesan, Swiss, provolone, and cheddar is like fireworks going off inside your mouth. Yes, it’s that spectacular. All of that yumyum cheese, melted over freshly sliced tomatoes, makes it unfair competition. Put it all between two slices of ciabatta bread, and you’re transported back to the good old days. After trying it with tomato bisque, a chef salad or chips, you’ll want to visit all their locations in Green Country for more.

3313 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

McNellie's Pub 409 E. 1ST ST. TULSA 7031 S. ZURICH AVE. TULSA

People come to McNellie’s for so many important reasons, including good times, great food, and fantastic beer. It’s an atmosphere like few can duplicate. Expect all that and more at any visit to this cherished Tulsa public house. Just as every McNellie’s visit is a time to remember, so is their amazing grilled cheese. It comes with the tastiest Tillamook cheddar and American cheese. And it’s smashed inside warm, flavorful, just-out-of-the-oven brioche bread. Combine it with anything on the menu. You’ll love it.

Freeway Cafe

1547 E. 3RD ST. | TULSA 465 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA 5849 S. 49TH W. AVE. | TULSA

Her Meltdown Too

4377 SOUTHWEST BLVD. | TULSA

Knotty Pig BBQ, Burger & Chili House 6835 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

Levain Kitchen & Bakery 10021 S. YALE AVE. #108 | TULSA

Livi Lee's Daylight Donuts 411 E. BROADWAY ST. | SAND SPRINGS

Main Street Tavern 1325 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

Old School Bagel

3723 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA 6805 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA

Ol'Vine Fresh Grill 3523 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Oliveto

8922 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE | TULSA

Palace Cafe

1301 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

Queenies Plus

1834 UTICA SQUARE | TULSA

Roosevelt's

1551 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

Ron's Hamburgers and Chili

Neighborhood Jam 4830 E. 61ST ST., STE. 300 TULSA

What’s a grilled cheese sandwich like without its sidekick, the bowl of tomato soup? You won’t have to guess if you’re at Neighborhood Jam in Tulsa. It doesn’t come any other way, and why should it? It’s what they call All About the Cheese. Boy, are they right. Three kinds of cheese are blended on fantastic sourdough bread. Is your mouth watering yet? You won’t regret ordering it, and you’ll probably want second helpings.

1913 S. ELM PLACE | BROKEN ARROW 1220 S. LYNN RIGGS BLVD. | CLAREMORE 130 W. 141ST ST. | GLENPOOL 505 W. MAIN ST. | JENKS 9100 N. GARNETT ROAD | OWASSO 233 S. ADAMS ROAD | SAND SPRINGS 804 W. RODGERS | SKIATOOK 1440 S. DENVER AVE. | TULSA 6548 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA 8201 S. HARVARD AVE. | TULSA 1545 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA 7119 S. MINGO ROAD | TULSA

Shiloh's

2604 N. ASPEN AVE. | BROKEN ARROW

Silver Skillet Family Diner

The Tavern 201 N. MAIN ST. TULSA

For those of us who love a good mystery, combined with excellent service and atmosphere, the grilled cheese at the Tavern is a smart choice. Only the chef knows from day to day how the sandwich will be prepared. For those others who need to know there’s at least something consistent in the meal, just rest assured that tomato bisque is a guaranteed element. To be fair, you should always expect it to taste great and match the restaurant’s refined ambiance.

8228 E. 61ST ST. | TULSA

Tally's Good Food Cafe 1102 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA 6100 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA

The Vault

620 S. CINCINNATI AVE. | TULSA

Victoria's Tea Room 7853 E. 71ST ST. | TULSA

Waterfront Grill

120 AQUARIUM DRIVE | JENKS

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Chicken Enchiladas

With an atmosphere that is lively, colorful, and comfortably casual, Habaneros Mexican Grill lives up to its name with an exhaustive list of dishes, drinks, and house specialties. By Donna Leahey & Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

Beef and Chicken Fajitas

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The habanero pepper is a favorite among those who love heat in their food. Green, orange, or red, the habanero has spread across the world from its origin in the Amazon. It became so widespread that people once thought it originated in China, hence the scientific name Capsicum chinense — the pepper of China. The bright habanero is one of the spicier peppers. Colorful, attractive, and hot.

Chicken Fajita Quesadilla

Mucho Bueno Margarita

Which also describes the Broken Arrow restaurant Habaneros Mexican Grill. It’s modern, sleekly attractive, trendy, and popular. Colorful banners decorate the eaves and patio, while greenery and brick welcome you. Inside, Habaneros is a visual party of color and light with unique 3D art, creative lighting, and textures of brick, stone, and dark wood with bright terra cotta and warm honeyed yellow walls. A display of tequila showing off the rich golds of the traditional drink rests near the host stand. TVs line the walls of the bar area, interspersed with colorful sombreros. The patio looks so fun, you know sitting there will be a party, spurred by the bright Mexican music playing from the speakers. “We wanted to play with the colors and all this kind of stuff. The handcrafted booths were designed by us and shipped from Mexico along with the art,” says Habaneros manager Alan Valdez. The 3D artwork is more than just beautiful; it’s environmentally friendly too. Part of Habaneros’ design is the open kitchen. “We’re all about fresh food,” says Valdez. “We have the kitchen open so customers can see how clean and fresh it is. We don’t keep food for the next day. Everything — beans, chicken, salsa — are made fresh each day. Same with drinks. Everything is fresh and authentic.” To meet the commitment to fresh, Habaneros gets its meats from Tulsa Beef, and produce

is delivered daily by GoFresh for the salsa and queso. The flavors of the salsa are distinct, with a hint of cilantro, and a bit of onion. “Every week we make between 60 and 68 gallons of salsa,” says Valdez. It’s easy to see why: it’s irresistible. The queso is equally hard to resist. It’s white queso, creamy and cheesy, and it goes great with the crispy chips or with your meal. While you’re thinking about dips, the guacamole is some of the best in town. The flavor is dominated by perfectly ripened avocado and seasoned to a savory finish that’s amazing on its own and a complement to any dish. One of the most popular menu items is the decadent pollo con queso. Tender, beautifully cooked strips of chicken are covered in creamy queso and served with rice and beans. It won’t take more than a bite to understand why it’s a favorite. The fajitas are another popular option. The dish is served sizzling hot with grilled onions, bell peppers, and tomatoes as well as lettuce, sour cream, that tasty guac, and more. You can choose traditional beef, chicken, pork, fish, or shrimp fajitas. The Texas fajitas are a delicious mix of chicken, beef, and shrimp. If you prefer your fajitas meatless, Habaneros offers fajitas vegetarians. Or go for the deluxe offering with steak, chicken, shrimp, chorizo, and carnitas. Valdez’s favorite is the Triple A Special, which features a bed of flavorful rice topped with chicken, beef, or shrimp and drizzled with queso. You can mix it up with beef, chicken, and shrimp combo if you prefer. The beef is tender and savory and set off beautifully by the queso. The chicken is perfectly seared and seasoned. The shrimp is tender and sweet. It’s a big, comforting, delicious meal you have got to try.

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Pollo Maya

HABANEROS MEXICAN GRILL 4640 S. Elm Place | Broken Arrow 918-940-7272

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Habaneros offers a generous lunch menu that includes many of the same great flavors in a lunch portion and at a lunch price. The el tacazo, for instance, is two tacos, two taquitos, and a guacamole salad for a budgetfriendly $6.50.

Desserts include traditional Mexican options like a custard flan, sweet and steamy hot sopapillas, and a luscious three leches cake. Or try churros just like you could buy on the street in Mexico City.

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The menu offers extensive choices of beef, chicken, pork, and shrimp dishes, and despite the restaurant being named after one of the hottest peppers in the world, only a few of the dishes are spicy. If that’s what you’re looking for, dishes like the camarones a la diablo or the quesadilla de chile rojo will be glad to set your tongue aflame.

Monday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

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Dipping in Medite

KABOBS

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nto the

LAMB CHOPS

erranean

STUFFED GRAPE LEAVES

COZY VIBES, FAULTLESS SERVICE, FAMILY RECIPES, AND TERRIFIC FOOD SEAL THE DEAL AT THE INTIMATE, YET INVITING, FAMOUS STEAKHOUSE INSPIRED BY THE FRAGRANT SPICES AND SMOKY GRILLS OF LEBANESE COOKING. By Gina Conroy Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

The minute you walk through the door of Famous Steakhouse, you’ll understand where it got its name. Photos of famous places and people from old Hollywood to modern blockbusters line the burgundy and mustard-colored walls next to moguls on and off the court. But you don’t have to be famous to be treated like a celebrity. At Famous Steakhouse, everyone experiences fine dining: choice cuisine, superb wines, and outstanding service, all without the hefty price tag. Once home to a wine-bar, located near the corner of 91st Street and Memorial Drive, the first thing that stands out about the Famous Steakhouse is the beautiful brick patio with two flat-screen TVs reminiscent of the Brookside or Utica areas. Inside, soft music from the Rat Pack era plays loudly enough to melt away the stress of the day, but softly enough so you can enjoy the conversation at your white linen draped table, topped with candles and black cloth napkins.

and everywhere else, it’s $40.” Sam, who was in the restaurant business for 20 years before switching to the car industry (Suzuki of Tulsa), knows his steak. Though his motorcycle and car business keep him busy during the day, Sam has always loved the food industry and dreamed of one day having a familyoperated business. When his wife, Rita, said she wanted to do something at night, opening a family-run restaurant seemed like the perfect idea. Both Lebanese, Sam and Rita wanted to bring the flavors of their beloved cuisine back to south Tulsa since not many restaurants offered Mediterranean dishes any more. With Sam’s experience in the ‘90s operating Mayberry Diner and owning King’s Palace Steak House in 2009, they thought a steakhouse that combined their passion for food and love of their Lebanese cuisine seemed like the perfect recipe for success.

Customers leave having had such an enjoyable experience, they want to come back and bring their friends. “We care, and we make sure everyone is happy,” says Sam. “That’s what makes a difference when you have a family that cares about the business, not an employee that’s just waiting for his paycheck.” It’s not just the service that brings back diners, but the food. “The food is amazing,” says West, who was reluctant to try Lebanese food at first but loves the baklava and cabbage rolls. “We get a lot of compliments on our food.” Rita’s love for Mediterranean cooking started as a little girl with her mother and grandmother. At Famous Steakhouse, she uses family recipes and makes the food from scratch daily.

Romantic enough for an intimate Valentine’s date and inviting enough to dine solo at the full bar or with the family close to the big screen TV, Famous Steakhouse welcomes all.

Sky West, who’s worked in the food industry before, joined the Famous Steakhouse “family” two weeks after they opened and says the hands-on, friendly service makes a difference not only for the staff but the customers.

“You grow up with cooking around you, especially on holidays with all the recipes and pastries,” says Rita. “I still cook sometimes with my mom, but my grandmother gave me a lot of recipes. She taught me how to do the grape leaves and cabbage rolls, the Lebanese way with garlic and mint, not tomato sauce.”

“I want everyone to experience it and be able to afford it,” says Sam Mouchantaf. “That’s why steak like the filet is under $30,

“Anytime we’re loaded with people, Sam will come out, make sure you’re doing fine, and if not, he will fix it 100%,” says West.

While Rita is preparing the Mediterranean dishes in the kitchen like hummus, cabbage rolls, and Lebanese tabouli with an

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Using top grade Choice Black Angus beef at the prices offered, the Mouchantafs know they will lose money on some plates. “I prefer to give better quality and less profit,” Sam says. The food quality, atmosphere, and service speaks for itself and will have people coming back. If your mouth isn’t watering yet for this traditional steakhouse cuisine with a Mediterranean flair, here’s a glimpse at what awaits you the next time you dine at Famous Steakhouse. Although dinner starts at 5 p.m., you and your friends can take advantage of the happy hour menu offered Monday-Thursday from 5-7 p.m. With $2.50 domestic beers, select craft cocktails, including the yummy Butterscotch Old Fashioned, and half-priced select appetizers, including the Famous Sampler Platter, there’s something to keep everyone happy. Just because you arrive early doesn’t mean you have to order off the happy hour menu. Full bar service includes craft cocktails and a variety of wines, including a cabernet sauvignon and chardonnay from the Lebanese winery Château Ksara. Sure, Famous Steakhouse offers traditional steakhouse sides like tender calamari lightly breaded and fried, and chilled shrimp cocktail with sauce as well as fried mushrooms, and Buffalo wings with blue cheese dressing. But when you’re at Famous Steakhouse, why not try something they’re more “famous” for? Maybe you’re in the mood for the creamy hummus topped with a drop of olive oil, paprika, and parsley. Or perhaps the carnivore in you will crave kibbeh, the

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Aside from the traditional house and Greek salads, people can choose from several salads with a Mediterranean touch. The fattoush salad is topped with baked pita bread and Famous sauce: a vegan and lemon-based dressing. If you’d like to branch out from the typical lettuce salad, the Famous Salad has arugula, sliced mushrooms, and Parmesan cheese. In contrast, the panache salad tops a bed of lettuce with asparagus, palm hearts, corn, mushrooms, and vegan dressing.

Got kids or just a finicky adult with a plain palate? Famous Steakhouse has burgers and finger foods. What would a Mediterranean menu be without baklava? Yes, you can eat it the traditional way, but Famous Steakhouse takes baklava to the next level with their baklava sundae: chewy baklava crumbles topped with ice cream, chocolate syrup, and nuts. Oh yes, it is as good as it sounds. If your taste is a little more vanilla, try the ice cream. You can’t go wrong with the rich and creamy chocolate mousse or the cheesecake, but you might want to pair it with their premium or specialty coffees or organic tea.

While most of the salads are vegetarianfriendly, if you want to make yours more of a meal, you can add chicken, salmon, or shrimp. Are you craving the traditional steakhouse cuisine with a hand-carved steak? From the charbroiled, tender filet to the New York strip, and the bone-in 20-ounce rib-eye to the sirloin, Famous Steakhouse has you covered.

KIBBEH

Are you cutting back on red meat? You can’t go wrong with two 7-ounce tender and juicy grilled lamb chops. The mellow lamb flavor pairs perfectly with the slightly sweet dipping sauce. Or perhaps you prefer chicken. Whether grilled, topped with cheese and mushrooms, or Hawaiian style, the poultry selection has a flavor for everyone. If pasta or fish is more your style, try the chicken or shrimp Alfredo, or shrimp scampi over noodles. Eating light? They have grilled salmon, or perhaps you’ll want the fish of the day, which may include sea bass and mahi-mahi. What would Famous Steakhouse be without their Mediterranean entrees? Choose from the Famous Kabob, marinated rib-eye or sirloin, with onion, mushroom, and tomato or the kafta kabob, marinated ground beef mixed with onions, parsley, and Mediterranean spices, or the marinated chicken kabob.

SIRLOIN

FAMOUS STEAKHOUSE

8922 S. Memorial Drive, Ste. C3 | Tulsa 918-459-7870 famoussteaktulsa.com

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And just like you’d get at a Lebanese family dinner, the portion sizes are generous, and two sides are always included with each entrée. Customers truly experience fine dining with superior hospitality, all at a price that won’t break the bank.

Can’t decide? We don’t blame you. You may want to try the Famous Sampler Platter, which includes homemade tabouli, hummus, pita bread, veggies, and olives, or order the thick ground beef filled cabbage rolls.

Throw in two sides with every entrée, and you’ve got a meal fit for a king.

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Add Rita’s father, Joseph Habib (the executive chef who used to own restaurants back home in Lebanon) doing a little of everything in the kitchen, and it is a family affair.

“We don’t use the spices we use on the steaks for the kabobs,” Rita says. “People will know the difference.”

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“Sam loves to be back with the chefs cooking up the steaks or whatever he needs to help with,” says West.

Mediterranean style stuffed meatballs with nuts and spices. Want something more vegetarian-friendly? The stuffed grape leaves will leave you stuffed, and the deep-fried cauliflower served with mild garlic and lemon tahini sauce will have you wondering why you never liked cauliflower before.

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abundance of parsley and tomatoes, you can find Sam at the grill.

Monday-Saturday: 5-10 p.m. Sunday: Closed

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Where the locals have been going since 1975!

Daily ls Lunch Specia Open at 11am Saturday Monday thru ay nd Su d se Clo

918.622.2668

www.ricardostulsa.com 5629 E. 41st • Tulsa, OK PREVIEW918.COM 91


GK GETTING TO KNOW

Lo okin Got Wood offers an ax-perience that is not only fun and challenging but is something everyone in the family can do. Tired of the same old, dull family fun night? Looking to spark things up in the entertainment department? Want to live on the edge a little? Then look no further than Got Wood. Located in the heart of downtown Jenks, this urban full-service ax-throwing lounge is on point and offering young and old exciting entertainment that is not only fun and challenging, but it’s something everyone can do. Like the bowling alleys of the ’50s, ax throwing has become a popular sport for all ages, not just the bearded and brawny. And its universal popularity is proving it’s going to be sticking around for a while. When owner Jason Kearney first opened two years ago, he thought it was going to be a testosterone-driven environment. What surprised him was 55% of the people were women. “I think the stereotype is still the 20-30s guy, probably has a beard, maybe some tattoos, but it doesn’t hold true at all,” says Kearney, who knows his full beard and tattoos don’t do much to dispel the stereotype. The sport is very diverse. “If you look at the World Axe Throwing League (WATL) through the rankings, there’re guys and gals of all ages, races, and backgrounds. They don’t fit any stereotype,” says Kearney. Part of the growing popularity could be that people of all ages and backgrounds can enjoy it together, especially families. “The great thing about it is anybody can do it,” says Kearney, who has seen people throw successfully and stick something sharp in the target as young as 4 and as old as 89. “We help modify the throwing implements to fit the age and strength levels.”

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“We have tomahawks which are very light and easy to throw,” says Miguel Tamburini,


ng Sharp

“We go over safety issues first, and I make sure everyone has respect, not only for the instructors but for the blades because they are sharp,” says Tamburini. “Then we teach them how to properly throw axes, machetes, knives, ninja stars, saw blades, and tomahawks.” Once you get the hang of throwing, there are other ways to challenge yourself through friendly competitions with those in your group, taking a step back to increase the distance, or adding another ax rotation challenge to your throw. “There’s a perceived danger to ax throwing, but there’s also excitement to it because there is that element of danger,” says Kearney, who gets a lot of questions as to the safety of the sport, especially for children. “You can’t just cut the kids loose and let them go. You have to keep

Tamburini makes the experience fun and uses humor in his approach with the kids, which gives him instant rapport. As parents listen to him engage with their children, their fears are usually eased. It’s easy to see not only do Kearney and Tamburini know what they’re doing, but their passion for the sport also hits the mark every time.

Kearney knows people have a lot of choices when it comes to spending their entertainment dollars, and he encourages everyone to try ax throwing at least once. “Don’t be scared,” says Kearney, who knows some ax throwing places might not have a passion for the sport like they do at Got Wood. “They see it as a quick buck and more of a business, and you can feel that. And if you tried it somewhere else and didn’t have a great experience, give Got Wood a shot. I guarantee you’ll have fun.”

“It doesn’t feel like work every day,” says Kearney. “Even though I’m doing it for the millionth time, it’s their first time. You can see that excitement in their eyes, especially when they get their first ax to stick.” While it’s true Got Wood is family-friendly with special Sunday family day throwing rates, a big part of their clientele is the after 5 p.m. crowd, which includes friends meeting after work, girls’ night out, or date night. Also, they do various parties throughout the week, including birthdays, gender reveals, bachelor and bachelorette, and divorce parties. But Tamburini’s favorite is the team building events. “Co-workers are used to seeing each other in a work environment behind a desk or computer,” says Tamburini. “Here, I give them an ax and the person you least suspect throws bullseye after bullseye. And everyone is surprised that that person had that skill hidden inside.” These events start by dividing the people who have been in the company the longest versus the people who have been in the company for

JASON KEARNEY

GOT WOOD

103 E. Main St. | Jenks 918-528-3303 gotwoodaxethrowing.com

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At Got Wood, their goal is to make every experience fun and safe. While there is no age restriction on the ax throwing, parental or guardian supervision is required for anyone under 18 years old, and spectators always watch for free. But why would you want to watch when you could throw?

When Tamburini works with young children or hosts a party for 14- to 15-year-olds, for instance, he handles them differently than he would an adult. “I become more of a dictator, and everyone needs to do exactly what I’m telling them because they’re kids, and they’re full of energy. But they are always amazing to work with,” he says.

Got Wood has eight indoor lanes and an outside lane they open on nice days. If your party is bigger than what they can accommodate, they can take the ax throwing to you with their mobile throwing cage.

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He’s seen people go through a wide range of emotions in just 15 minutes. “You go from being afraid to being frustrated to feeling empowered,” says Tamburini. “It’s an empowering experience.”

But the sport is very safe. Kearney says, while he can’t quote the source, since ax throwing has been a legitimate sport in the U.S., “you’re more likely to get an injury bowling than ax throwing.”

the least amount of time. They play games and compete, and the winner gets a gift card at the end.

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People who think they’re strong and will hit a bullseye on the first try may be in for a rude awakening. “Throwing axes is not about strength. It’s more about momentum, accuracy, and finesse,” says Tamburini, who has seen people of all ages start throwing and feel a little frustrated when they miss the mark or fail to get the ax to stick the first time. “But after I give them some tips, they start sticking it in the wall. They start getting a bullseye, and then they’re filled with a lot of adrenaline and feel accomplished.”

them there and engaged. You have to keep them entertained and keep your eyes on them.”

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general manager at Got Wood. “I usually give the tomahawks to people who may have had shoulder injuries or surgery or if they’re advanced in age.” With kids around 6 or 7 years old, they have small, dull hatchets. “They still stick, and they are lighter.”

Monday: By appointment Tuesday-Thursday: 1-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-Midnight Sunday: 1-8 p.m.

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SL SHELF LIFE

NONFICTION/MEMOIR

LITERARY / CONTEMPORARY

MYSTERY, THRILLER AND SUSPENSE

ROMANCE/WOMEN’S FICTION

FEB. 25

FEB. 4

FEB. 4 FEB. 4

SUFFRAGE: WOMEN’S LONG BATTLE FOR THE VOTE BY ELLEN CAROL DUBOIS

The women’s suffrage movement began in the pre-Civil War years with foremothers Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Sojourner Truth. After the Civil War, Congress granted freed African American men the right to vote but not white and African American women, a crushing disappointment. But suffragists brought the fight into the 20th century, building a determined coalition of moderate lobbyists and radical demonstrators to set the stage for securing suffrage for all American women in the Constitution.

THE REGRETS

THE WORST BEST MAN

For weeks, Rachel has been noticing the same golden-haired young man sitting at her Brooklyn bus stop. When she finally musters the courage to introduce herself, the chemistry between them is undeniable. Thomas is a kindred spirit. There’s just one tiny problem: he’s dead. Stuck in a surreal limbo governed by bureaucracy, Thomas is unable to cross over to the afterlife until he completes a 90-day stint on earth, during which time he is forbidden to get involved with a member of the living — lest he incurs “regrets.”

A wedding planner left at the altar? The irony isn’t lost on Lina. But despite that embarrassing moment, Lina is offered an opportunity that could change her life. There’s just one hitch: she has to collaborate with the best man from her own failed nuptials. Marketing expert Max Hartley is determined to make his mark with a coveted hotel client looking to expand its brand. Then he learns he’ll be working with his brother’s whip-smart, stunning — and absolutely off-limits — ex-fiancée. And she loathes him. If they can nail their presentation without killing each other, they’ll both come out ahead.

BY AMY BONNAFFONS

ALSO LOOK FOR:

FEB. 11

In this irreverent essay collection, Ortberg offers hilarious studies of all things pop culture. This is a laugh-out-loud, whip-smart collection for those who don’t take anything — including themselves — too seriously.

DJINN PATROL ON THE PURPLE LINE BY DEEPA ANAPPARA

Nine-year-old Jai drools outside sweet shops, watches too many reality police shows, and considers himself to be smarter than his friends Pari and Faiz. When a classmate goes missing, Jai decides to use the crime-solving skills he has picked up from TV to find him. He asks Pari and Faiz to be his assistants. But what begins as a game turns sinister as other children start disappearing from their neighborhood. ALSO LOOK FOR:

ALSO LOOK FOR:

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SOMETHING THAT MAY SHOCK BY DANIEL MALLORY ORTBERG

BY MIA SOSA

THE SECOND CHANCE CLUB: HARDSHIP AND HOPE AFTER PRISON BY JASON HARDY FEB. 18

A former parole officer shines a bright light on a huge yet hidden part of our justice system through the intertwining stories of seven parolees striving to survive the chaos that awaits them after prison in this book.

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THE GIRL WITH THE LOUDING VOICE BY ABI DARÉ

APARTMENT BY TEDDY WAYNE

FEB. 4

In 1996, the unnamed narrator of Teddy Wayne’s Apartment was attending the MFA writing program at Columbia on his father’s dime. He offers his spare bedroom to Billy, a talented, charismatic classmate from the Midwest, eking out a hand-tomouth existence.

Adunni is a Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. This, her mother has told her, is the only way to get the ability to speak for herself and decide her future. After Adunni’s father sells her to be the third wife of a local man, Adunni runs away to the city.

FEB. 25

MOLLY BIT BY DAN BEVACQUA FEB. 4

Molly Bit knows she’s destined for success. This certainly helps her get through the countless auditions featuring actors who look and dress just like she does. When Molly is offered a lead role in a major film, she knows she must sacrifice everything.

PERFECT LITTLE DEAD TO HER CHILDREN BY SARAH BY SOPHIE HANNAH PINBOROUGH BEEN THERE, MARRIED THAT BY GIGI LEVANGIE FEB. 11

Agnes is the perfect Hollywood wife. Her husband Trevor is a bigshot producer, and from the outside, it looks like they’re living a picture-perfect celebrity life. But the job description of a Hollywood wife doesn’t cover divorce, which is the way Agnes’ life is headed. But Agnes isn’t the type to just lie down and take it.

FEB. 4

Beth hasn’t seen Flora for 12 years. She doesn’t want to see her today — or ever again. But she can’t resist. She parks outside the open gates of Newnham House, watches from across the road as Flora arrives, and calls to her children Thomas and Emily to get out of the car. Flora looks older. But Thomas and Emily look precisely as they did 12 years ago.

FEB. 11

Marcie’s affair with Jason Maddox catapulted her into the world of the elite. Old money, old ties, old secrets. Marcie may have married into this world, but she’ll never be part of it. Then Jason’s boss brings back a new wife from his trip to London. Young, attractive, reckless — nobody can take their eyes off Keisha. Including Marcie’s husband.


SHELF LIFE SL

SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY AND HORROR

FEB. 11

SELF-HELP AND INSPIRATIONAL

YOUNG ADULT AND MIDDLE GRADE

CHILDREN

FEB. 11 FEB. 4

FEB. 4

THE CHILL

BY SCOTT CARSON

In upstate New York’s ancient forests, a drowned village lays beneath the dark, still waters of the Chilewaukee reservoir. The town was destroyed for the greater good: bringing water to the millions living downstate. Now, a century later, it turns out that more than the village was left behind in the waters of the Chill when it was abandoned. The townspeople didn’t evacuate without a fight. A dark prophecy remained, too, and the time has come for it to be fulfilled. ALSO LOOK FOR:

YOU MATTER: LEARNING TO LOVE WHO YOU REALLY ARE BY MATTHEW EMERZIAN

You matter. Not because of what you earn or how you look or what you’ve achieved, but because you are inherently valuable. You Matter is a call to empathy and a joyous celebration of the value of each person. The book is structured into three sections, each of which expands the concept in ever-widening ripples. Each chapter features exercises, journal prompts, and conversation starters to help readers dive deeper. ALSO LOOK FOR:

HERE IN THE REAL WORLD

HAPPY PI DAY TO YOU!

Ware can’t wait to spend his summer dreaming of knights in the Middle Ages and generally being left alone. But then his parents sign him up for dreaded Rec camp, where he meets Jolene, a tough, secretive girl planting a garden in the rubble of an abandoned church next to the camp. As different as Ware and Jolene are, though, they have one thing in common: for them, the lot is a refuge. But when their sanctuary is threatened, Ware looks to the knights’ Code of Chivalry.

The Cat in the Hat makes calculating pi as easy as pie. Using a piece of string and two sticks, the Cat shows beginning readers how to draw a perfect circle. Then, using a can and a piece of ribbon, he shows how to measure a circle’s circumference and diameter, and to use those measurements to calculate pi. Written in simple rhyme, Happy Pi Day is a natural choice for nurturing a child’s interest in math.

BY SARA PENNYPACKER

BY BONNIE WORTH

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ALSO LOOK FOR:

FRIDAY NIGHT WRESTLEFEST BY J.F. FOX THE UNSPOKEN NAME BY A. K. LARKWOOD FEB. 11

What if you knew how and when you would die? Csorwe does. She will climb the mountain, enter the Shrine of the Unspoken, and gain the most honored title: sacrifice. But on the day of her foretold death, a powerful mage offers her a new fate.

DAUGHTER FROM THE DARK BY SERGEY AND MARINA DYACHENKO FEB. 11

After DJ Aspirin saves Alyona from imminent danger, she ends up at his apartment. But who is Alyona? A young con artist? A plant for a nefarious blackmailer? Or perhaps a long-lost daughter Aspirin never knew existed? Aspirin wants her out of his apartment and his life. An unusual protector thwarts every attempt to get rid of her.

GLOW FROM START SIMPLE WITHIN BY LUKAS VOLGER BY JOANNA VARGAS FEB. 18 FEB. 11

Celebrity aesthetician Joanna Vargas is known for her cutting-edge beauty treatments, high-end products, and famous (and seemingly ageless) clients. But her secret to beautiful skin rests on a straightforward principle: developing and maintaining the best routine for your skin type.

Magic can happen with just a few ingredients: sweet potatoes, tortillas, eggs, cabbage, hearty greens, beans, winter squash, mushrooms, tofu, summer squash, and cauliflower. A protein (tofu, beans, eggs) is a foundation. A crunchy garnish (cabbage, greens) is a finishing touch. Once these structural components of a vegetarian meal are established, home chefs can throw in their variations and favorite flavors.

FEB. 18

THE SHADOWS BETWEEN US BY TRICIA LEVENSELLER

THE STARS WE STEAL BY ALEXA DONNE

FEB. 25

Eighteen-yearold Princess Leonie “Leo” Kolburg, heir to a faded European spaceship, has only one thing on her mind: which lucky bachelor can save her family from financial ruin? But when Leo’s childhood friend and first love, Elliot, returns as the captain of a successful whiskey ship, everything changes.

Alessandra is tired of being overlooked, but she has a plan to gain power: woo the Shadow King, marry him, kill him, and take his kingdom for herself. But Alessandra’s not the only one trying to kill the king. As attempts on his life are made, she finds herself trying to keep him alive long enough for him to make her his queen.

FEB. 4

Ladies and gentlemen, it’s Friday night, and these kids are ready to wrestle. Join Dangerous Daddoo as he dishes out some serious moves to get the kids ready for bed. But what happens when Flying Mom Bomb gets home from work? Are the kids toast? This charming and quirky family story will teach you a new Bedtime Blitz that everyone will enjoy.

THE MAGNIFICENT MONSTERS OF CEDAR STREET BY LAUREN OLIVER FEB. 11

Cordelia Clay loves the work she and her father do together: saving and healing the remarkable creatures around Boston at the end of the 19th century. But one morning, Cordelia awakens to discover that her father has disappeared, along with nearly all the monsters in their home.

Release dates are subject to change.

PREVIEW918.COM 95


THE PHOTOGRAPH FEB. 14

S SHOWTIME

A series of intertwining love stories set in the past and the present.

CAST: ISSA RAE, LAKEITH STANFIELD, CHELSEA PERETTI RATING: PG-13

WHAT ABOUT LOVE FEB. 14

Two young lovers change the lives of their parents forever when the parents learn from the joyful experience of their kids, and allow themselves to find their love again. CAST: SHARON STONE, ANDY GARCIA, IAIN GLEN RATING: NR

BIRDS OF PREY

FEB. 7

Since the events of Suicide Squad, Harley Quinn has left the Joker. When Roman Sionis/Black Mask, a narcissistic crime lord, places a hit on a young girl named Cassandra Cain, Gotham City turns upside down looking for her. Harley joins forces with Black Canary, Huntress, and Renee Montoya to protect the girl and to take Sionis down. CAST: MARGOT ROBBIE, MARY ELIZABETH WINSTEAD, EWAN MCGREGOR RATING: R

THE LODGE

FEB. 7

A soon-to-be stepmom is snowed in with her fiancé’s two children at a remote holiday village. Just as relations begin to thaw between the trio, some strange and frightening events take place. CAST: RILEY KEOUGH, JAEDEN MARTELL, LIA MCHUGH RATING: R

ORDINARY LOVE

FEB. 14

An extraordinary look at the lives of a middle-aged couple during the wife’s breast cancer diagnosis.

SONIC THE HEDGEHOG FEB. 14

Sonic is an anthropomorphic blue hedgehog from another world, who comes to Earth to escape villains seeking to harness his power of super-speed. After accidentally causing a massive power outage while hiding out in the town of Green Hills, he is targeted by the government and they hire the malevolent roboticist, Dr. Robotnik, to hunt him down. Meanwhile, ex-SFPD officer-turned-Green Hills sheriff Tom Wachowski must help Sonic evade capture, collect his rings, and prevent Robotnik from using Sonic’s powers to rule the world.

FANTASY ISLAND FEB. 14

The enigmatic Mr. Roarke makes the secret dreams of his lucky guests come true at a luxurious but remote tropical resort. But when the fantasies turn into nightmares, the guests have to solve the island’s mystery in order to escape with their lives. CAST: MICHAEL PENA, MAGGIE Q, LUCY HALE RATING: NR

CAST: LIAM NEESON, LESLEY MANVILLE, DAVID WILMOT RATING: R

DOWNHILL FEB. 14

Barely escaping an avalanche during a family ski vacation in the Alps, a married couple is thrown into disarray as they are forced to reevaluate their lives and how they feel about each other.

LOCATOR ADMIRAL TWIN DRIVE-IN 7355 E. Easton St. Tulsa | 918.878.8099 AMC SOUTHROADS 20 4923 E. 41st St. Tulsa | 888.AMC.4FUN B&B CLAREMORE 8 1407 W. Country Club Claremore | 918.342.2422 B&B CINEMA 8 1245 New Sapulpa Road Sapulpa | 918.227.7469 CINEMARK BROKEN ARROW 1801 E. Hillside Drive Broken Arrow | 918.355.0427 CINERGY 6808 S. Memorial Dr., Ste. 300 | Tulsa 918.894.6888 CINEMARK TULSA 10802 E. 71st S. | Tulsa 800.FAN.DANG (#1128) CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. Tulsa | 918.592.3456 ETON SQUARE 6 CINEMA 8421 E. 61st St. Tulsa | 918.286.2618 AMC CLASSIC OWASSO 12601 E. 86th St. N. Owasso | 918.376.9191 STARWORLD 20 10301 S Memorial Drive Tulsa | 918.369.7475 WARREN BROKEN ARROW 18 1700 W. Aspen Creek Drive Broken Arrow | 918.893.9798

CAST: JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS, WILL FERRELL, MIRANDA OTTO RATING: R

CAST: BEN SCHWARTZ, JIM CARREY, JAMES MARSDEN RATING: NR

THE CALL OF THE WILD FEB. 21

A domesticated St. Bernard/ Scotch Collie dog named Buck is stolen from his Santa Clara, California home, and sold to freight haulers in the Yukon. CAST: HARRISON FORD, DAN STEVENS, OMAR SY RATING: NR

96 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


SHOWTIME S CLEMENCY

OPENS FEB. 7

Years of carrying out death row executions have taken a toll on prison warden Bernadine Williams. As she prepares to execute another inmate, Williams must confront the psychological and emotional demons her job creates.

CITIZEN K

OPENS FEB. 7

The documentary follows the life of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who was once believed to be the wealthiest man in Russia. Khodorkovsky rocketed to prosperity and prominence in the 1990s, served a decade in prison, and became an unlikely martyr for the anti-Putin movement.

DIARY OF A LOST GIRL (1929)

FEB. 8

After falling pregnant to a pharmacist and refusing to marry, a young woman is thrown from her home and sent to a strict girls’ reform school.

FEB. 8

The Spirit Awards are unique among Hollywood awards shows — an all-day celebration of independent film that acts as the primary fundraiser for Film Independent’s year-round calendar of events, international programs, filmmaker education, and artist development programs.

92ND ACADEMY AWARDS

FEB. 9

Celebrate the year of film on the big screen with ballots, refreshments, trivia, and prizes.

TRUE ROMANCE (1993)

FEB. 14-15

FEB. 19

The Battle of Iwo Jima was a major battle in which the United States Marine Corps and Navy landed on, and eventually captured, the island of Iwo Jima from the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II.

GREED

FEB. 28

SPECIAL MONDAY IS

*Circle Cinema members only

10 S. Lewis Ave. | Tulsa

TICKETS: circlecinema.com

FEB. 28

BRAHMS: THE BOY II

WENDY

After a family moves into the Heelshire Mansion, their young son soon makes friends with a lifelike doll called Brahms.

Lost on a mysterious island where aging and time have come unglued, Wendy must fight to save her family, her freedom, and the joyous spirit of youth from the deadly peril of growing up.

FEB. 21

FREE POPCORN DAY

SHOWTIMES: 918-592-3456

Trapped in a violent, controlling relationship with a wealthy and brilliant scientist, Cecilia Kass escapes in the dead of night. She disappears into hiding, aided by her sister, their childhood friend, and his teenage daughter. But when Cecilia’s abusive ex commits suicide and leaves her a generous portion of his vast fortune, Cecilia suspects his death was a hoax. As a series of eerie coincidences turn lethal, threatening the lives of those she loves, Cecilia’s sanity begins to unravel as she desperately tries to prove that she is being hunted by someone nobody can see.

CAST: ANYA TAYLOR-JOY, JOHNNY FLYNN, BILL NIGHY RATING: NR

A satire on wealth centered around a billionaire highstreet fashion mogul’s 60th birthday on the Greek island Mykonos.

CIRCLE CINEMA

THE INVISIBLE MAN

Handsome, clever, and rich, Emma Woodhouse is a restless queen bee without rivals in her sleepy little town. In this glittering satire of social class and the pain of growing up, Emma must adventure through misguided matches and romantic missteps to find the love that has been there all along.

FEB. 21

In Detroit, a lonely pop culture geek marries a call girl, steals cocaine from her pimp, and tries to sell it in Hollywood. Meanwhile, the owners of the cocaine track them down in an attempt to reclaim it.

BATTLE OF IWO JIMA

EMMA

Check the Circle Cinema website for times, costs, additional events, and more details. Release dates, showings, and ratings are subject to change.

CAST: KATIE HOLMES, RALPH INESON, ANJALI JAY RATING: PG-13

FEB. 28

CAST: SHAY WALKER, TOMMIE LYNN MILAZZO, STEPHANIE LYNN WILSON RATING: PG-13

CAST: ELISABETH MOSS, HARRIET DYER, OLIVER JACKSON-COHEN RATING: NR

RELEASE DATES AND RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. NR = A RATING WAS NOT AVAILABLE AS OF JAN. 20, 2020

LO CA TO R

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98 PREVIEW 918 FEBRUARY 2020


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February 2020 (Vol. 34, No. 2)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...

February 2020 (Vol. 34, No. 2)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...