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Poultry Research Centre

Annual Report The Poultry Research Centre April 1, 2007 – March 31, 2008

The Poultry Research Centre University of Alberta Edmonton, AB, CANADA T6H 2V8 Tel: 780.492.1561 Fax: 780.492.4346 Email: iwona.pawlina@ualberta.ca

www.poultryresearchcentre.ca A leader in poultry learning and research


Excellence in research and learning through partnerships with the entire value chain to advance the development of value-added poultry products and production practices.

To conduct excellent research that leads to the development of innovative and sustainable production systems

To serve as a leading source of scientific knowledge that supports the production of safe, high quality poultry products that meet changing consumer needs

To foster an environment of learning that incorporates input from industry, as well as teaching, technology transfer and knowledge transfer activities

To connect with industry on a continuous manner, both in the receiving of input and the transferring of knowledge


Table of Contents Chair’s Report

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Executive Director’s Report

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This Year’s Highlights

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New Faces at the Poultry Research Centre

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Research Highlights

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Organizational Overview

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Research Funding: Project Listing 2007-08

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Funding

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Facility Usage

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Evidence of Productivity A. Refereed Papers in Scholarly Journals

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B. Conference Presentations (Abstracts)

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C. Scientific and Industry Presentations

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D. Book Chapters

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E. Technical Publications and Industry Reports

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F. Patents

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G. Educational Materials

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H. Awards and Honours

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I. Community Service

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Acronyms Used

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The Poultry Research Centre continues striving for excellence in research and learning in partnership with the poultry industry, Alberta Government, the UofA and funders. The Centre is committed to development of value-added poultry products and technologies and sustainable production practices. The industry support for the Centre has been growing. Three egg processors, IRI Canada Inc., Burnbrae Farms, and Sparks Eggs, joined the long list of the PRC’s industry supporters. The Board of Directors was enriched by another voice from Ontario. Dr. Helen Anne Hudson from Burnbrae Farms joined the PRC Advisory Board of Directors. We are looking forward to working with Helen Anne in building stronger connection with the poultry industry across Canada. In the fall of 2006, the Poultry Research Centre Advisory Board of Directors recommended that the Centre undertake steps to strengthen its biosecurity. The Centre houses very valuable research flocks. Protecting the health of the PRC's flocks means safeguarding industry and public investment in the PRC and its research activities. Last year, the Poultry Research Centre secured funding from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Food Safety Initiative (Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development) and retrofitted its current facilities with improved biosecurity measures. By addressing biosecurity concerns at their own facilities, the Centre joined a growing number of responsible poultry operators contributing to national biosecurity efforts.

The Poultry Research Centre has a strong record in taking research results out to industry for implementation. With the addition of researchers to the ‘value-added’ area over the last two years, the Centre has expanded its capabilities to enable industry to partner further in the discovery of specific knowledge that could lead to technologies or products with potential for commercialization. I would like to express my appreciation to the board, the Poultry Research Centre signatories, funders and the government for their commitment to the Centre and its efforts to strengthen the poultry industry through research, development and technology transfer. I would like to thank Robin Horel and Lloyd Johnston, two board members whose term expired this year, for their dedication and contribution to the success of the Poultry Research Centre. I look forward to working with the Poultry Research Centre team again this year.

Steve Howe, Chair

In November, researchers participated in the Alberta Poultry Industry Research and Development Strategic Priorities Forum in Edmonton. This forum was organized by the poultry commodity Boards: Alberta Chicken Producers, Alberta Egg Producers, Alberta Hatching Egg Producers, and Alberta Turkey producers in association with the Alberta Livestock Industry Development Fund. Dr. Helen Anne Hudson was a key note speaker at the event. The main goal of the event was to establish direction of future research and development investment for the Alberta Poultry Industry. The priorities identified by the industry and funders will help the PRC researchers to continue to focus their research activities on issues that matter to the poultry industry.

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Welcome to the Poultry Research Centre! It is my pleasure to share with you our accomplishments and highlights from activities at the Poultry Research Centre in 2007-2008. The excellence in research and learning at the Centre continues. In 2007, the Centre’s family included 13 researchers from the U of A and Alberta Agriculture, six Post Doctoral Fellows, one Research Associate, 32 graduate students and 11 technicians working on 34 research projects. Together, we are a multidisciplinary team, with strengths that span from Embryology and Chick Quality, Metabolism and Reproduction, Feed and Nutrition, Management and Physiology, and Bioeconomic Modeling to Egg and poultry meat - new product and process development. The new value-added group, Drs. Betti, Wu and Renema, developed their research programs, secured research funding and partnered with the industry. Their graduate students, Postdoctoral Fellows and technicians, commenced research projects aiming at developing technologies that will add value to poultry products. In the past year, our researchers and students have delivered presentations at 33 conferences, 81 scientific and industry meetings and published 17 research papers in peer reviewed journals. They traveled to the US, China, Australia, Japan, Central America, and across Canada and Alberta to share and learn about innovations in poultry science and to bring this knowledge back to the Centre. They have also met with industry across Alberta and Canada to listen to industry issues and concerns. I would like to thank my colleagues for their contributions to the success of the Poultry Research Centre this year. I would also like to thank the Poultry Research Centre Advisory Board of Directors for guiding the Centre in the new direction of value-added research.

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The Centre would not have achieved its current success without valuable partners and supporters: • The University of Alberta • Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development • Alberta Livestock Industry Development Fund • Alberta Agricultural Research Institute • Alberta Chicken Producers • Alberta Egg Producers • Alberta Hatching Egg Producers • Alberta Turkey Producers • Lilydale Inc. • Maple Leaf Foods • Canadian Egg Marketing Agency • Sparks Farms • Burnbrae Farms • IRI Separation Inc.

Iwona Pawlina, Executive Director


This Year’s Highlights The Poultry Research Centre Visits the Alamo

International College of Nutrition Recognizes One of Our Own

Fourteen researchers and graduate students from the Poultry Research Centre delivered 17 oral and poster presentations at the 97th annual meeting of the Poultry Science Association (PSA) held in San Antonio, Texas, in July 2007. This was an opportunity for our researchers, staff and students to share their research results with their peers. We are especially proud of our graduate students who all gave excellent presentations.

Dr. Robert Renema was elected as a Fellow of the International College of Nutrition (ICN) in recognition of significant contributions for the advancement of Nutritional Sciences. In addition to a lifetime membership, he is now entitled to use the designation FICN. This organization extends its membership to nutrition researchers who have made an impact on human health through clinical applications of functional Dr. Rob Renema foods, natural health products, and the development of products such as designer eggs.

Two of our graduate students, Ana Franco and Michelle Jendral, received PSA Student Research Paper Certificates of Excellence. Ana and Michelle were the only graduate students from a Canadian University to receive this honour.

Ana Franco

Ana Franco’s award-winning oral presentation was entitled “Broiler breeder strain and egg size affect egg characteristics, hatchability and broiler performance in old flocks.”

Michelle Jendral was recognized for her poster entitled “Bone quality, behavioral repertoire, and physical condition of laying hens housed in conventional, modified or furnished colony battery cages”. In addition, she was also awarded the Maurice Stein Fellowship Award for this research. This award is given to Michelle Jendral an outstanding graduate student whose training and research in applied poultry sciences may lead to improvements in the efficiency and profitability of the poultry industry. Luis Romero was recognized for his poster entitled “Evaluation of an empirical nonlinear model to estimate feed intake in broiler breeders”. He received Best Poster Award. We are very proud of our students!

“Growing quality… today and in the future” The delivery of a quality product to the consumer requires the dedication of everyone in the value chain. Poultry Research Centre scientists participated in the Alberta Chicken Producers Research Symposium entitled “Growing quality… today and in the future.” The scientists presented information on topics ranging from chick quality and broiler nutrition, to meat and bone quality, and value-added product development.

The PRC’s Biosecurity is for the Birds In 2007, the Poultry Research Centre initiated an ambitious project focused on biosecurity, which was supported in part by the Avian Biosecurity Technology Development Fund (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) and the Alberta Food Safety Initiative (Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development). The project sought and continues to improve biosecurity both at Centre’s research facilities and on commercial poultry operations in Alberta (and beyond). The first phase of the project focused on characterizing and addressing potential threats to the Poultry Research Centre’s research unit located on the University of Alberta’s south campus farm. This process was led by a

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committee which included staff and researchers at the Centre, as well as Dr. Tom Inglis of Poultry Health Services Ltd. (Airdrie, AB). This phase of the project saw numerous enhancements to the Centre’s internal biosecurity. The most visible enhancement was the installation of a perimeter fence with a single access point, designed to control access of vehicles and people to the barns. Other notable improvements include, dedicated transitional areas (or anterooms) for each barn, keypad locks for all external doors and a screening policy for all A view of the perimeter visitors to PRC along with a fence installed as part of visitor questionnaire. While PRC’s biosecurity retrofit improvements are still ongoing, those already made have addressed many of the biosecurity challenges the PRC faces as part of day-to-day operations. The second phase of the project involved developing educational materials and learning opportunities for commercial poultry producers with the aim of improving biosecurity in the commercial industry. There One of two biosecurity were several notable workshops for producers achievements in this phase, including: • An educational DVD that outlined critical components of an on-farm biosecurity strategy. • A producer manual designed to assist producers in identifying and addressing gaps in biosecurity on their operations • Two biosecurity workshops that attracted nearly 40 producers interested in learning more about what they can do to protect their operations from disease outbreaks. For more information about PRC’s biosecurity project, please contact the project coordinator. Matt Oryschak by email biosecurity.prc@ualberta.ca or 780.492.7694.

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Raising the Henhouse Roof – A Special 50th Birthday Party Who says we can’t mix research and fun? Not Dr. Frank Robinson and a group of researchers from the Centre who on November 20th,2007, organized a most unusual 50th birthday party for … chickens. By celebrating a genetic strain developed in 1957, the event brought publicity to the living collection of poultry history maintained for over 15 years at the University of Alberta. The program recognized the contributions of six invited Canadian poultry geneticists involved in the development and maintenance of the historic strains: Dr. Don Shaver (former CEO of Shaver Poultry Breeding Farms), Dr. R. Crawford (Professor emeritus, U of Saskatchewan), Dr. Robb Gowe (formerly of AAFC), Dr. Ed Merritt (formerly of AAFC), Dr. Allan Grunder (formerly of AAFC) and Dr. Jim Chambers (AAFC).

Drs. Grunder, Crawford, Merritt, Shaver, Gowe and Chambers (left to right) at the 50th birthday celebration Poultry Research Centre researchers reported on past and recent uses of some of the 10 valuable strains in research programs that have contributed to the progress of the poultry industry, including the improved production efficiency of today’s chickens. “Eggcited” About Summer This past summer, Dr. Fasenko’s research group participated in the WISEST (Women in Scholarship, Engineering, Science, and Technology) Summer Research Program, which saw two high school students join the group for the duration of the 6 week program. Here is how Aleksa Leszczynski, one of the WISEST students, described her experience:


"Life at the poultry unit actually is thrilling! So many times I have been asked why someone would want to research chickens? I respond with the question 'what did you eat for dinner yesterday?' I now have conclusive evidence that often the answer to this question will be well... chicken'. Many of the projects conducted at the poultry research centre are working to study and improve the animal that we just love to eat!”

There’s a Heifer in the Headlines November 6th, 2007 – Northlands FarmFair The Heifer In Your Tank (HIYT) event, organized by Dr. Frank Robinson and Dana Penrice, has become a tradition in Alberta, attracting new generations of students from the U of A and from Junior high schools who twice a year invite the public along for an evening of learning and laughter. The main objective of the event is to increase awareness of issues in agriculture and food production in youth, university students and the public through engaging them in learning experiences that are entertaining and humorous. The event provides science answers to questions you didn’t know you had about animal agriculture. The Fall 2007, UofA students from ANSC 200 class entertained an audiences of 600 in Edmonton. The Avalon School jazz band of 40 students added musical flavour to the event and the Hillcrest Jr. High Grade 7 class gave their own HIYT presentations.

There’s more of the Heifer…… Heifer in Your Tank - School at the U, where Grade 7 class from Hillcrest Junior High spent a week at the U of A Farm to learn about the agriculture industry and some of the issues it faces. Throughout the week, the class came up with questions they could answer about animal agriculture and presented their HIYT to the peers. There’s a Heifer in your Classroom, according to students from Lendrum School in Edmonton. Current and former Animal Science 200 students helped Grade 6 classes to develop their own questions about animal agriculture and presented their answers at an evening performance for their fellow students at Lendrum School. To learn more about “There’s a Heifer in Your Tank”, visit the HIYT website at: www.hiyt.afhe.ualberta.ca.

Another successful year for ‘Heifer In Your Tank’

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New Faces at the Poultry Research Centre Dr. Tanveer Ahmad (Korver) completed a 1-year postdoctoral appointment in January, 2008 and returned to Pakistan to take up a faculty position at the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, PMAS Arid Agriculture University. Tanveer’s research project was entitled “Dietary Methionine Requirement and Availability for Broiler Chickens through the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Technique”. Dr. AO Dileep (Wu) is a Postdoctoral fellow who is working on egg white protein project. Dileep obtained his doctoral degree from the Department of Fish Processing Technology of Karnataka Veterinary Animal and Fisheries Sciences University, Karnataka, India in February 2006. He joined Dr. Wu’s lab in October 2007. Dr. Derek Haley joined the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science at the University of Alberta as an Assistant Professor in Applied Ethology in July 2007. The Poultry Research Centre is looking forward to working with Dr. Haley on collaborative projects that will address issues related to both poultry behaviour and welfare. Melissa Johnson (Korver) joined Doug Korver’s Poultry Nutrition research group in September of 2007. Melissa’s MSc project will involve investigating the role of a vitamin D metabolite (25-OH vitamin D3) on immune function in broiler chickens. Kaustav Majumder (Wu), a Masters student, is investigating antihypertensive peptides from eggs. He is supported by a PRC scholarship. Vida Moayedi (Betti) is a new MSc student who joined the PRC the last January 2008. Vida will work on a project that aims to find new strategies for increasing the profitability of mechanically separated poultry meat and poultry dark meat. Vida has been granted a PRC scholarship.

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Sandeep Nain (Renema) joined us from India. He has a Veterinary background, and arrived with experience in enriched poultry products and gut histology. He came with glowing recommendations and had ranked in the top 3 to 5% of his poultry classes. Matt Oryschak is the Biosecurity Coordinator with the Poultry Research Centre at the University of Alberta. Prior to joining the PRC, Matt worked for four years with Alberta Agriculture and Food’s Technical Services Division. Prior to that, he was the Livestock Production Instructor for two years in the Agri-Science Program at the Fairview College in Fairview, Alberta. Tulia Perez (Betti, Renema) hails from Colombia. Her degree in Agro-Industrial Production Engineering fits her research in the stability and safety of enriched poultry products. Tulia is working on an MSc project that aims to assess storage and cooking-related effects on omega-3 enriched poultry meat. Yuan Ren (Renema, Wu) joined us from China by way of Guelph. Her Undergraduate degree from China provides her strength in Food Chemistry and, combined with her interests in enrichment of poultry products, provides her with a strong background for her MSc program here. Dr. Sun-Jong, You (Wu) obtained his doctoral degree from the Department of Animal Science and Technology, Graduate School, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea in February of 2007. He is the recipient of the Canadian Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship award.


Research Highlights A. Embryology and Chick Quality Does the age of parents affect quality of offspring? FASENKO – Data from a collaborative study examining the effects of breeder parent age on fertility, embryonic mortality, and broiler chick quality is currently being analyzed. This project examined factors attributed to the rooster and the hen and how they affect chick quality and performance. The outcome will provide information on whether fertility and chick quality problems can be attributed to the male breeder, female breeder, or both parents. Team: M. MacKenzie, J. Wilson (University of Georgia), M. Wineland (N. Carolina State University), and D. Froman (Oregon State University)

Parental age affects poult metabolism FASENKO -- Research was completed to examine embryonic metabolism in two modern turkey genetic strains (Nicholas and Hybrid) at 4 parent flock ages. This research determined that embryonic metabolism per unit of embryo weight decreased as parent flock age increased. This means that to gain 1 g of body weight, embryos from younger breeder flocks need to metabolize at a higher rate than embryos from older breeder flock, putting embryos from young flocks at risk of overheating. Team: G. M. Fasenko, J. A. Hamidu (PhD Student), and J. J. R. Feddes

Eggs with Holes…Can they hatch? FASENKO – A study was recently completed that examined the effects of the hole made by an in-ovo injection machine on hatchability of turkey eggs. The results of this preliminary study found that simply making a hole in the egg with the in-ovo machine did not affect hatchability or poult quality.

composition of eggs and yolk sacs in two common commercial broiler breeder strains. Results showed differences between fat contained in the egg and fat contained in the yolk sacs of chicks hatching from young broiler breeder flocks compared to eggs and yolk sacs from mature and old flocks. Chicks hatching from young parent flocks may have a disadvantage in fat reserves when compared to chicks hatching from older flocks, and this difference may influence chick growth and performance. Team: A. Franco, D. Korver and G. Cherian

New techniques: A novel method to assess intestinal villi FASENKO -- A novel technique for measuring intestinal villi development in broiler chicken embryos (last 3 days of incubation) and broiler chicks (first 3 days of grow out) was investigated. This project provided researchers with information regarding normal intestinal villi growth. This technique for measuring intestinal villi can be applied in further research projects on chick quality. Team: A. Franco and A. Leszczynski

Belly button condition affects intestinal development FASENKO -- Research is underway to analyze the effects of small navel buttons in broiler chicks on intestinal development during the first days posthatch. Early result show that the intestine of chicks hatching with small navel buttons developed slower than the intestine of chicks hatching with healed navels. Because intestinal development is important for nutrient absorption, even small navel buttons affect chick quality and potentially, chick growth and performance. Team: A. Franco and L. Kawalilak

Parent age affects chick quality by affecting fat in yolks FASENKO -- Research was conducted to study the effects of broiler breeder flock age and egg size on the fatty acid

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A. Embryology and Chick Quality (cont.) Evaluation of techniques to assess chick quality RENEMA – Several studies have recently been completed as part of an ongoing exploration of the relationship between chick quality and growth. One of the best predictors of inferior quality is the presence of red hocks (red patches on back of hock joint of the leg) and/or redness on the beak near the nares (nostrils). Both of these conditions indicate the chick struggled getting out of the shell and is now less likely to survive or thrive. What test was the least useful? The reflex test, which measures how fast a chick can right itself when placed upside-down, was never found to correlate with any production traits. Team: R. Robinson, L. Romero and A. Naeima

B. Metabolism and Reproduction Maternal feeding strategies to improve uniformity ROBINSON – A project is currently underway to test the effects of broiler breeder feed and management strategies during the growth phase on flock uniformity. Treatments include everyday and skip-a-day feeding, scatter feeding (broadcast feed on litter), feed dilution, and bird sorting. By creating a more uniform group of birds at the point of transfer to the breeder house, we feel that we will be able to create the foundation for more uniform chick quality and early production traits. Early results show very positive effects of bird sorting on overall flock uniformity Team: D. Holm, F. Robinson, R. Renema, M. Zuidhof, and A. Pishnamazi

Manipulation of protein during growth affects breeder development RENEMA -- In a trial now in the final stages of analysis, dietary balanced protein was raised or lowered by 3% during key broiler breeder developmental rearing periods. With lower protein, both the fat stores and relative ovary weight increased early at the end of the test period starting from the 13-18 wk period, and the difference grew even larger after this. Skeletal development and body composition was most affected by high dietary protein during the 1 to 7 wk and 19 to 25

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wk periods. Interestingly, these were also the periods that did not have a long-term effect on reproductive development, indicating that factors affecting support of ovary development are more important. The exception would be overfleshing, which in the long run diverts nutrients from reproduction to support this energetically-demanding tissue. Team: R. Robinson, L. Romero, A. Pishnamazi, and M. Zuidhof

Understanding breeder male condition and performance ROBINSON -- The final report for a project evaluating male:male aggression, growth, and survival in a commercial setting has been submitted. Males demonstrated a tight relationship between body weight and relative breast muscle, fatness, and testis weight up to peak production. Considering how variable we found the growth profile of individual birds can be within the population, the strength of this relationship between body weight and testes weight (which is closely linked to sperm production traits in younger birds) was somewhat surprising. A body weight of 3 kg was the threshold at which spontaneous testicular development began. Team: R. Renema, and N. Wolanski


B. Metabolism and Reproduction (cont.) Does rooster age affect sperm quality and fertility?

Goundbreaking work in understanding broiler breeder energetics

FASENKO – A summer student research project was conducted to determine the effect of rooster age on sperm movement, concentration and fertility. From this preliminary research it was concluded that rooster age affected sperm quality (mobility was higher in younger roosters but older roosters produced more sperm cells) but did not impact fertility.

ROMERO -- We have recently had success applying statistical nonlinear mixed models to calculated residual feed intake (RFI) in broiler breeders. These models can cope with changes due to age, weight, rate of lay and many other factors. This has allowed us to differentiate between birds naturally more or less efficient than predicted. However, Romero has now perfected the model even further by allowing it to remove potential bias due to feed intake (birds consuming less appeared more efficient) by calculating the residual maintenance requirement (RMR). This is groundbreaking work in broiler breeder energetics. It shows a lot of promise in its potential application to exploration of relationships between maternal efficiency and broiler offspring production traits.

Team: D. Weuster and M. MacKenzie

Does semen quality and composition change with rooster age and storage time? FASENKO – A study is currently underway to investigate the effect of male age and semen storage length on sperm motility, semen protein composition, and fertility in broiler and turkey breeders. The expected outcome of this project is that we will be able to identify proteins in the semen that can be attributed to quality (good or bad) so producers may have another tool to distinguish between low and high quality males. This research is scheduled to be completed in 2009.

Team: M. Zuidhof, R. Renema, F. Robinson and A. Naeima.

Team: M. MacKenzie, N. Kav, M. Dyck, M. Bakst (Germplasm & Gamete Physiology Lab, ARSUSDA), and D. Froman (Oregon State University)

Efficiency in broilers linked to efficiency in breeders ROBINSON – A study to investigate linkages in broiler breeder efficiency with efficiency and meat quality traits of broilers was recently completed. The highly productive graduate students will publish 10-12 papers between them for this work. In addition to new statistical models to assess hen efficiency, they have also identified a period 7-10 days before a hen lays an egg in which she predictably becomes extremely efficient. Once the first egg arrives, efficiency returns to normal. These birds appear to have a natural tendency to utilize carcass stores during final ovary formation – a process that corresponds to very high estrogen levels, which may override some of the inhibitory effects of some of the other metabolic and growth hormones at this time. Team: L. Romero, A. Naeima, R.Renema and M. Zuidhof

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C. Management and Physiology Immunity in chickens has changed over the last 50 years

Welfare considerations: Group sizes for laying hens in furnished cages

KORVER – Investigation into the differences in immune function, and protein metabolic response to inflammation in modern and 1957 random-bred chickens is underway. Korver’s group have found that modern birds regulate the immune system differently than the random-bred birds. An increased understanding of the chicken immune system is important to be able to react quickly to any potential changes in the way growthpromoting antibiotics are used in Canada.

HALEY -- This collaborative project began in 2006 and final reporting has now been completed. The study confirms the strong preferences of hens for using nest boxes and perches. One trade-off that needs to be considered is that providing these amenities resulted in birds having less feather cover at the end of the laying cycle. Team: N. Cook (Principal Investigator, Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development), J. Feddes, D. Korver, J. Church

Understanding laying hen medullary bone metabolism KORVER – Progress is being made to investigate management factors prior to first egg that may increase skeletal quality over the laying cycle in laying hens. Caged-layer fatigue (osteoporosis) is not necessarily due to an overall loss in bone tissue, but rather a redistribution of structural bone over time.

D. Feed and Nutrition Maternal and dietary 25-OH D3 on broiler innate and cellular immune response

Availability of methionine sources for broilers

KORVER – Korver and Saunders-Blades (Ph.D student) are investing the use of 25-OH vitamin D3 on broiler breeder productivity and health, as well as chick quality and immune function. They have found that prior to 10 days of age, broiler chicks may have an impaired ability to convert dietary vitamin D to the active form used in the body.

KORVER – Research is underway to compare two commercially-available methionine sources for biological activity in chickens.

E. Education and Learning Innovations in the Poultry Industry ROBINSON – Robinson and Penrice led an initiative to produce a series of DVDs highlighting innovations in the poultry industry. This well-received DVD and booklet combo is now available and provides valuable information to the public, educational groups, and will help producers explain what goes on every day in primary production of poultry products.

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F. Meat and Egg Products Optimization of Omega-3 chicken meat enrichment ZUIDHOF --An optimal scenario for enriching breast meat from 35 day old broilers to level where a claim ‘source of omega-3 fatty acids’ can be applied to the product is to provide broilers with 17% dietary ground flaxseed meal for 15 days prior to processing. A second optimization scenario was discovered. Broiler dark meat has a lower monetary value than breast meat in current markets. It can also be enriched with Omega -3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) much more easily than breast meat. Thirty-five day old broilers fed either 10% flaxseed meal for 8 days, or 17% flaxseed meal for 4 days prior to slaughter had thighs with levels of n-3 that exceed the threshold required to label the meat ‘source of omega-3 fatty acids’. Using this strategy, there is little (no statistically significant) negative economic impact on production (7% increase) and no negative effect on yield. Team: M. Betti, T. Perez, D. Korver, V. Carney, B. Schneider, W. Wismer, F. Robinson and R. Renema

Omega – 3 enrichment of chicken: Understanding the process. ZUIDHOF – Further investigating into optimization of omega-3 enrichment of broiler meat continued. We learned that it takes longer to enrich breast meat than thigh meat to the 300 mg /100g threshold needed to use a product label indicating the meat as a source of omega3 poly-unsaturated fatty acid. Perez and Betti found that while the flax-based medium chain omega-3 fatty acid accumulated in the fat cells, the longer chain omega-3 fatty acids (like DHA) accumulated in the cell membranes Team: M. Betti, R. Renema, T. Perez, D. Korver and V. Carney

Understanding Omega-3 enrichment of chicken: Fatty acid profiles and stability BETTI – The PRC value-added team conducted research to establish the fatty acid profile and level of omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) enrichment in fresh and cooked chicken meat. Antioxidant stability was provided through combinations of Vitamin E and Organic Selenium. The highest level of n-3 PUFA enrichment was

in raw thigh meat with a dietary treatment of Vitamin E and Selenium (1,429 mg LNA / 100g meat). While treatment did not affect overall fat content or level of long chain n-3 PUFAs, n-6:n-3 ratio changed between the raw and cooked state. This is important, as the health benefits of n-3 PUFAs can be dependent on the body’s ability to absorb them (n-3 PUFAs compete with the n-6 fatty acids for absorption). Team: T. Perez, R. Renema, M. Zuidhof, Y. Ren, and J. Wu

Stability of Omega-3 fatty acids in eggs ZUIDHOF – In a related study exploring the storage and cooking stability of omega-3 PUFAs in enriched eggs fortified with antioxidants. The higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids in omega-3 PUFA enriched eggs is more susceptible to oxidative damage during storage and cooking, as well as potentially triggering breakdown of cholesterol into cholesterol oxidative products (COP). The C18:3 (LNA) and C18:2 (LA) concentrations were increased in eggs from the Selenium compared to the Control treatment, with no difference found for the Vitamin E or the Vitamin E + Selenium treatments. All of the antioxidant-fortified treatments raised the concentrations of the long-chain PUFA’s, C22:5 (EPA) and C22:6 (DHA) compared to eggs from the Control diet Team: Y. Ren, R. Renema, M. Betti, J. Wu and T. Perez

Extracting valuable health compounds from eggs WU -- Ovomucin, a viscous protein that was first isolated in 1898, contributes to the nature of egg white. In addition to its excellent gelling and emulsifying properties, ovomucin was reported to have antivirus, antitumor and cholesterol-lowering properties. A novel technology to extract high purity ovomucin (greater than 90%, compared with the purity of less than 70% using previous methods) has been developed at our laboratory. It is expected that ovomucin will have wide applications as functional food/nutraceutical ingredient and biomaterial. A Report of Invention based on this new technology was filed in March to initiate the protection of the intellectual property. Team: A. Dileep, N. Kav and V. Mazurak

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F. Meat and Egg Products (cont.) QSAR-aided study of antihypertensive peptides from eggs

Handling stress and temperature stress affect meat quality

WU -- Bioactive peptides, small fragments from egg proteins, may have implications for a wide range of chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes). Using in silico digestion, we have generated over 20,000 kinds of peptides from egg proteins. The most potent antihypertensive peptides have been predicted and the study is currently underway to release specifically these peptides from egg proteins. In addition, our preliminary research indicated that intake egg products (boiled egg and fried egg products) could release antihypertensive peptides through the action of gastrointestinal enzymes. Hypertension, a disease affecting over 20% of population in North American, is one of the well-identified major risk factors for the development of heart disease.

RENEMA -- In a project nearing completion, this group examined the relationship of an acute handling stress or a longer-term temperature stress on meat quality in broilers between 28 and 56 wk of age. Drip loss was lowest in birds held in the cold treatment (2.0%) vs the heat and neutral treatments (2.3 % and 2.2%, respectively). One of the more important measures of meat quality is 15 min pH, which was strongly affected by the shackling stress treatment (10 seconds or 120 seconds handling on shackles). We are working on developing a ‘flap-test’ as a potential measure of stress response in broilers. Team: B. Schneider, M. Betti, M. Zuidhof and V. Carney

Team: M. Kaustav and S. Davidge

G. Bioeconomic Modeling Optimal broiler feeding programs If we feed too little protein, birds get fat. People eat this fat, with consequences on their health. If we feed higher protein diets to broilers, we can increase lean yield or the levels of healthier types of fat, and have a better impact on human health. We are continuing to evaluate the data set to find optimal industry solutions. Team: F. Hernandez, B. Schneider, R. Renema, D. Korver, M. Betti, V. Carney, and F. Robinson

The metabolic heat of the food you eat… a study of broiler heat stress ZUIDHOF – A pilot study was conducted to determine the suitability of wireless remote temperature sensors for early detection of disease. The following results are a bonus. The effect of nutrition and heat stress on core body temperature was investigated. Body temperatures were higher in birds fed a low compared to high energy diet (39.6C vs. 39.3C). Body temperature was significantly

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different in all protein treatments, with higher and lower than recommended protein levels resulting in lower body temperature (39.4C vs. 39.4C vs. 39.7C, respectively). Heat stress conditions increased body temperature by 0.42C. The body temperature response to heat stress was affected differently depending on energy and protein in diet. Body temperatures of low energy birds increased 0.37C more than in birds fed higher energy. Body temperatures increased 0.60C in birds fed 100% of recommended protein, 0.37C in birds fed 115%, and 0.29C in birds fed 85% of recommended protein. These results demonstrate that nutrition affects body temperatures of broilers, and that nutrient levels in feed can modulate their response to heat stress. Team: R. Renema, D. Peters, J. Berezowski, F. Hernandez, and C. Annett


G. Bioeconomic Modeling (cont.) Environmental temperature affects hen body temperature and egg characteristics RENEMA -- Laying hens received surgically-implanted remote temperature sensors as part of a project determining their value in the early detection of disease. Frequent measurement of feed intake, body weight, and egg weight allowed us to determine hen efficiency down to the level of actual maintenance requirements adjusted for feed intake. After 2 wk at the same temperature, birds were moved to a warmer or cooler environment. Birds in the 28 C room had a 0.5 C higher core body temperature than the birds at 18C. Despite eating a similar amount of food, the warm room birds diverted fewer nutrients to keeping warm and ended up gaining 3 g more per day in BW than those in the cool room (who actually lost some weight). The shell quality of the warm

room birds was also slightly reduced. This suggests early signs of heat stress. The increased yolk size in warm room eggs demonstrates the availability of extra nutrients in this environment due to lower maintenance requirements. This study led to new insights on the relationship between feed intake and classification of a hen as efficient or not. Additionally, we were able to determine the direct impact of bird microclimate (through comparison of internal to cage-based temperature sensors) on hen temperature and efficiency. Team: C. Oort, A. Abiaka, M. Zuidhof, and A Pishnamazi

13


Organizational Overview Governance Steve Howe, Chair

Jake Kotowich

Starline Poultry

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

Don Copeland, Vice Chair

Lloyd Johnston

Donco Poultry Ltd., Ontario

Alberta Chicken Producers

Darcy Fitzgerald

Robin Horel

Alberta Livestock Industry Development Fund Ltd.

Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council

Deborah Whale

Iwona Pawlina, Ex Officio

Ontario Livestock and Poultry Council (founding member)

The Poultry Research Centre - University of Alberta

Doug Korver

Frank Robinson, Ex Officio

Department of AFNS, University of Alberta

Department of AFNS - University of Alberta

Duane Olson

Martin Zuidhof, Ex Officio

Alberta Turkey Producers

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

Helen Anne Hudson Burnbrae Farms

Operations Iwona Pawlina

Shannon Park

Executive Director Poultry Research Centre

Technology Adoption and Commercialization Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

Doug Korver

Lyle Bouvier

Academic Leader University of Alberta

Poultry Research Centre Unit Manager University of Alberta

Valerie Carney Technology Transfer Specialist Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

Technical and Administrative Support

14

Erin Christopher

Felicity Dennis

Research Technician

Animal Care Technician

Nigel Davidson

Laurie Heidebrecht

Animal Care Technician

Administrative Support


Technical and Administrative Support (cont.) Kerry Nadeau

Yan Xu

Research Technician

Research Technician

Matt Oryschak

Giles Hinse

Biosecurity Coordinator

Animal Care Technician

Chris Ouellette

Jordana Manalang

Instrumentation Technician

Research Technician

Nick Wolanski Biosecurity Technician

Researchers Mirko Betti

Robert Renema

Assistant Professor - Value Added Poultry Meat

Assistant Professor - Value Added Poultry Science

Graduate Students: 2.5 Technicians: 1 Summer Assistants/Undergraduate Students: 2

Graduate Students: 2 Post Doctoral Fellows/Research Associates: 1 Summer Assistants/Undergraduate Students: 1

Gaylene Fasenko

Frank Robinson

Assistant Professor - Poultry Embryology and Chick Quality

Professor - Poultry Production and Physiology; and Associate Dean (Academic), Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences

Graduate Students: 3 Technicians: 1 Summer Assistants/Undergraduate Students: 3

Graduate Students: 6 Technicians: 1

John Feddes

Wendy Wismer

Professor - Bio-Resource Engineering

Assistant Professor - Sensory and Consumer Scientist

Graduate Students: 1

Ellen Goddard

Graduate Students: 1 Post Doctoral Fellows/Research Associates: 1 Summer/Undergraduate Students: 1

Professor - Co-operative Chair in Agricultural Marketing and Business

Jianping Wu

Derek Haley

Assistant Professor - High Value Egg Utilization (Egg protein chemistry)

Assistant Professor - Applied Animal Behaviour

Douglas Korver Associate Professor - Poultry Nutrition Graduate Students: 7 Post Doctoral Fellows/Research Associates: 1 Technicians: 2 Summer Assistants/Undergraduate Students: 5

Lynn McMullen

Graduate Students: 1.5 Post Doctoral Fellows/Research Associates: 2 Technicians: 1

Martin Zuidhof Poultry Research Scientist - Bioeconomic Modeling Post Doctoral Fellows/Research Associates: 1 Technicians: 1 Summer Assistants/Undergraduate Students: 11

Professor - Food Microbiology Graduate Students: 7

Totals

Tomas Nilsson

Graduate Students

32

Assistant Professor - Agribusiness, Industrial Organization and Member of the AVRI Council

Post Doctoral Fellows/Research Associates

6

Graduate Students: 1

Technicians

12*

Summer Assistants/Undergraduate Students

23

*includes 7 technicians employed by researchers and 5 employed by the Poultry Unit

15


Graduate Students Umesh Chand

Jovana Kovacevic

MSc program (Dr. Nilsson) Project: Consumer welfare, firm behaviour and supply management policies in the chicken industry

MSc program (Dr. McMullen) Project: Persistence of Listeria in Meat Processing facilities

Russell Coleman

Margaret MacKenzie

PhD program (Dr. Korver) Project: Use of the indicator amino acid oxidation technique to determine amino acid requirements in broiler chickens

PhD program (Dr. Fasenko) Project: Breeder parent age effects on fertility, embryonic mortality, and broiler chick quality

Ana Franco

PhD program (Dr. Korver) Project: 25-OH vitamin D3 in poultry

PhD program (Dr. Fasenko) Project: Yolk sac infections in broiler chicks: anatomy, microbiology, and immunology challenges

Jacob Hamidu PhD program (Dr. Fasenko) Project: Factors affecting turkey embryonic metabolism, cell viability and hatchability

Melissa Haveroen PhD program (Dr. McMullen) Project: Detection of bacteriocins in meats

Adrienne Heron

16

Sandy Mael

Kaustav Majumder MSc program (Dr. Wu) Project: QSAR-aided study of antihypertensive peptides from eggs

Lorelei Martinez Miguel MSc program (Dr. Wismer) Project: Consumer product maps for poultry products: Established perceptions and new product opportunities

Vida Moajedi

MSc program (Dr. Robinson) Project: Sexual and aggressive behavior of naturallymating broiler breeder flocks

MSc program (Dr. Betti) Project: New approach for increasing the profitability of mechanically separated poultry meat (MSPM) and dark meat in further processed products

Linda Ho

Emefa Monu

MSc program (Dr. McMullen) Project: Spoilage of meat by psychrotrophic Clostridium spp.

PhD program (Dr. McMullen) Project: Multiple bacteriocins to improve safety of meat products

Erica Holm

Julie Mori

MSc program (Dr. Robinson) Project: Optimizing broiler chicken carcass uniformity through maternal management and nutrition

PhD program (Dr. McMullen) Project: Antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter spp.: A case control study to determine origin

Michelle Jendral

Sandeep Nain

PhD program (Dr. Feddes) Project: Hens housed in modified, commercial and colony cages: An assessment of welfare

MSc program (Dr. Renema) Project: Optimization of Laying Hens for Value-Added Egg Production

Melissa Johnson

Abie Naeima

MSc program (Dr. Korver) Project: The role of a vitamin D metabolite (25-OH vitamin D3) on immune function in broiler chickens

MSc program (Dr. Robinson) Project: Linkages between reproductive fitness and growth potential in broilers

Raven Kirschenman

Tulia Ines Perez de la Ossa

MSc program (Dr. Korver) Project: Amino acid metabolism in broiler chickens

MSc program (Drs. Betti and Renema) Project: Stability of omega-3 enriched poultry products


Graduate Students (cont.) Yuan Ren

Kevin Webster

MSc program (Drs. Wu and Renema) Project: Stability of omega-3 enriched eggs

MSc program (Dr. McMullen) Project: Risk ranking for food safety

Luis Romero

Nick Wolanski

PhD program (Dr. Robinson) Project: Linkages between reproductive fitness and growth potential in broilers

MSc program (Dr. Robinson) Project: Reproductive efficiency in broiler breeders

Melanie Rustad

PhD program (Dr. Korver) Project: Evaluation of variability in feedstuff quality for poultry

PhD program (Dr. Robinson) Project: Identification of early indicators of metabolic and reproductive dysfunction from over-feeding female broiler breeders

Mojtaba Yegani

Jennifer Saunders-Blades PhD program (Dr. Korver) Project: Effect Of 25-OH vitamin D3 on bone mineral density and immune function of chickens

Brenda Schneider MSc program (Dr. Betti) Project: Supply chain approach to meat quality

Hayat Shah MAg (course-based Master’s) program (Dr. Korver)

Boon Fei Tan MSc program (Dr. McMullen) Project: Microbial community associated with Campylobacter spp. isolate from meat processing environment

17


18 Primary Scientist and Collaborators

$1,320 in kind

AviTech

Lilydale Lilydale

Lilydale

ALIDF

Jamesway Incubator Company

Fasenko, G.

Fasenko, G.

Fasenko, G.

Fasenko, G.

Fasenko, G. and C. Ouellette

Examining the effect of the hole made by an in-ovo injection machine on the hatchability of turkey eggs

Omphalitis and intestinal development in broiler embryos and chicks

Embryonic metabolism in domestic avian species: Influence of genetic strain and parent flock age

Poultry embryonic metabolism, cell viability, and gene expression: The influence of egg storage

Upgrades to incubator controls and software

$5,157.00 in kind

$84,341

$1,600.00

$211 (in kind)

$15,000 in kind (donation of in-ovo injection machines)

AFAC

$16,090

Amount ($)

Fasenko, G.

Contributor

Understanding the biology behind the fertility decline in broiler breeders: Are current management practices aimed at improving fertility worth the risk to biosecurity?

Embryology and Chick Quality

Project Title

Research Funding: Project Listing 2007-08

Hatching egg producers, hatcheries

Hatching egg, chicken producers, turkey producers

Breeders, Hatcheries, Hatching egg producers, Chicken and Turkey producers

Broiler producers

Hatching egg producers, turkey producers, hatcheries

Hatching egg producers (both chicken and turkey)

Who Benefits


19

Bedecarrats, G. and R. Renema Renema, R., M. Zuidhof, M. Betti and V. Carney Renema, R., D. Franco, F. Robinson and M. Zuidhof Robinson, F., R. Renema, M. Zuidhof, N. Anthony and C. Putman

Use of thyroxin as an alternate molting procedure in turkey breeder hens.

Ante-mortem stressors affect broiler meat value

Alternate day feeding program to enrich eggs with lutein and omega fatty acids in commercial laying hens

Determining the linkages between optimized maternal growth and egg production efficiency with broiler offspring growth and yield traits

Robinson, F., R. Renema, M. Zuidhof and V. Carney

Renema, R., M. Zuidhof, D. Korver and V. Carney

Management and Physiology

Optimizing broiler chicken carcass uniformity through maternal management and nutrition

Improving the effectiveness of laying hens for use in value-added egg production

Metabolism and Reproduction

Project Title

Primary Scientist and Collaborators

$25,000 $24,873 $12,000

Aviagen NSERC-CRD ACP

$20,000

California State Polytechnic University – Pomona

$52,000

$10,000

AFAC

ALIDF

$10,000

PIC

$1,440 (in kind)

Hybrid Turkeys Inc.

$10,000

ACP

$11,000

$5,000

BCHEC

CPRC

$28,563

Aviagen

$16,000

PIC $48,146

$5,000

AEP

Ag-Funding Consortium

$74,321

Amount ($)

ALIDF

Contributor

Hatching egg producers, Chicken producers, Processors, Breeders

Egg producers

Chicken and turkey producers

Turkey, Turkey breeders

Hatching egg producers, Chicken producers, Processors, Breeders

Egg producers

Who Benefits


20 Primary Scientist and Collaborators

Korver, D. Korver, D

Korver, D

Korver, D

Laying hen medullary bone metabolism

Maternal and dietary 25-OH D3 on broiler innate and cellular immune response

Availability of methionine sources for broilers

Helm, J., R. Zijlstra, E. Beltranena, D. Korver, T. McAllister and M. Oba

Zuidhof, M.

Protein metabolism in chickens

Feed grain quality

Feed and Nutrition

Temperature and protein: energy ratio linkages between breeder and broiler energetics, performance, and carcass quality

Management and Physiology (cont.)

Project Title

$28,200

$31,500

DSM Nutritional Products Degussa GMBH

$62,949

provided funding in ‘06/’07 ACP

PIC

$15,526

Novus International DSM Nutritional Products

$500

$10,600

$29,000

$45,258

$25,000

Amount ($)

AEP

NSERC

ACIDF

PIC

Contributor

All sectors

Broiler producers, Hatching egg producers

Egg Producers

Chicken, Turkey Producers

All sectors

Broiler producers, Hatching egg producers, Processors

Who Benefits


21

Betti, M., R. Renema, M. Zuidhof, D. Korver, V. Carney and W. Wismer Betti, M.

Effect of broiler plane of nutrition on meat quality

New approach for increasing the profitability of mechanically separated poultry meat (MSPM) and dark meat in further processed food products

Meat and Egg Products

Zuidhof, M. and D. Korver

Integration of HACCP into the research and learning missions of the Poultry Research Centre

$ 83,500 $13,500

ACP

$13,000

$70,000

ALIDF

PIC

Food Safety Initiative, AAFC

$8,280

Industry (PRC extension) PIC

$10,000

U of A

Robinson, F.

$15,000

CFIA

Pawlina, I., N. Wolanski, D. Korver, F. Robinson, C. Wilkinson, T. Inglis, V. Carney and L. Bouvier

Biosecurity project at the PRC

Innovation in the poultry industry: A digital video production for web based learning (User’s handbook)

$82,000

Food Safety Initiative, AAFC $79,043

Amount ($)

Carney, V., M. Oryschak, T. Inglis, I. Pawlina, L. Bouvier, D. Korver, C. Wilkinson and F. Robinson

Contributor

Biosecurity learning hub at the PRC

Education and Learning

Project Title

Primary Scientist and Collaborators

Processors and producers

Chicken producers, Processors

Processors, Chicken producers, Turkey producers

Producers

Producers

Producers

Who Benefits


22 Primary Scientist and Collaborators

Stability of enriched poultry products

Optimization of Omega 3 broiler enrichment

HPP to improve safety of processed meats

Bacteriocins for food safety

Multi-bacteriocin producing lactics

Survival of Campylobacter spp.

Zuidhof, M., R. Renema, M. Betti and J. Wu

Zuidhof, M.

McMullen, L. and M. G채nzle

$188,547

$3,000

ACP Food Safety Initiative, AAFC

$57,000

$101,775

$34,000

$164,000

$30,000

ALIDF

ALIDF

NSERC

NSERC

Vederas, J. and L. McMullen McMullen, L.

ALIDF

Nattress, F., L. McMullen, C.O. Gill and B. Sampathkura

$2,000

IRI Separations (in kind)

$25,180

$7,666

AEP

NSERC

$79,893

$1,500 (in-kind)

New Food Classics

ALIDF

$ 75,000

Amount ($)

ALIDF

Contributor

Wu, J.

Wu, J., N. Kav and V. Mazurek

Co-extraction of valuable egg white proteins through fractionation

Antioxidant peptides from egg proteins

Betti, M.

High pressure processing of chicken meat proteins: Effect on protein gel formation for improved conventional and novel applications of chicken meat.

Meat and Egg Products (cont.)

Project Title

Chicken producers, Processors, Egg producers

Broiler producers, processors

Processors

Processors

Processors

Processors

Egg producers

Egg producers

Processors and producers

Who Benefits


23

Value-based marketing decision support through characterization of growth, fatness, and yield

Bioeconomic Modeling

Project Title

Zuidhof, M.

Primary Scientist and Collaborators

$17,000 $17,000 $7,000 $20,000

ALIDF ACP Cobb-Vantress

Amount ($)

AFC

Contributor

Broiler producers, Processors

Who Benefits


Funding A. PRC Base Funding, 2007-08 University of Alberta ($943,000)

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development ($370,000)

Industry ($37,500)

Alberta Industry Boards ($155,250)

Total: $1,505,750

B. PRC Industry Base Funding, 2007-08 Alberta Egg Producers ($26,450)

Alberta Chicken Producers ($66,700)

Alberta Turkey Producers ($20,700) Lilydale ($10,700)

Maple Leaf ($10,700) Alberta Hatching Egg Producers ($41,400) IRI Separations ($3,220)

Total: $192,750 24

Burnbrae Farms ($6,440) Sparks Farms ($6,440)


C. PRC Research Funding, 2007-08 Other Universities ($35,000)

Poultry Industry Council ($72,280)

National Poultry Industry Boards ($11,000)

Provincial Industry Boards ($124,715)

Canadian Poultry Research Council ($11,000) Poultry Industry ($242,607)

Federal Government ($359,553)

Provincial Government ($1,131,761)

Total: $1,987,916

D. 2007-08 Research Funding Benefiting Commodity Groups Processors Eggs

Turkey Chicken Hatching Eggs

Breeders $0

$200

$400

$600

$800

$1,000

$1,200

$1,400

Research Funding (in 000‘s of dollars)

Total: $4,459,368 Total investment in research: $1,987,916 Total distribution of benefits: $4,459,368 ($2.24 for every $1 invested)

25


Facility Usage A. Research Facilities % Utilization by:

Facility/Unit Brooder House (48 floor pens)

Broiler/Turkey Trials

Breeder Trials

10.6

3.8

Layer Trials

Unit Operations

Overall % Utilization

33.5

48

Breeder Hen Cages (288 units)

43

43

Breeder Male Cages (60 units)

43

43

Vencomatic Colony Housing (2 units)

0

Nutrition House (32 pens)

33

Specht Pullet Cages (Pullet Trials)

52

Environmental Chambers

23

48

81 52

49

72

Test House - Floor Pens Test House - Conventional Cages

51

Test House - Colony Cages Broiler Processing Plant (3-day kills) Hatchery

92

92

37

88

88

88

20

20

17 hatches

1 hatch

18 hatches

B. Non-Research Facilities Facility Lilydale Classroom

26

User Group

Utilization

Alberta Chicken Producers

0 days

Alberta Egg Producers

2 days

Alberta Turkey Producers

0 days

Alberta Hatching Egg Producers

2 days

Processors

3 days

Poultry Research Centre meetings/functions

66 days

University of Alberta and other

5 days

Industry-related workshops

11 days

Alberta Turkey Producers Students (undergraduate and graduate), technicians and Computer Lab researchers

40 man hours/d


Evidence of Productivity A. Refereed Papers in Scholarly Journals 1.

Bohaychuk, V.M., M. van Belkum, M.E. Stiles and L.M. McMullen. 2008. Effect of Low Temperature on Stability of Theta-Type Plasmids in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. FEMS Microbiol. Letters 280:14-20.

2.

Fasenko, G. M. 2007. Egg Storage and the Embryo. Poul. Sci. 86:1020-1024.

3.

Fasenko, G. M. and E. E. O’Dea. 2007. Evaluating Broiler Growth and Mortality in Chicks with Minor Navel Conditions at Hatching. Poult. Sci. 2008 87: 594-597.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Hamidu, J. A., G. M. Fasenko, J. J. R. Feddes, E. E. O’Dea, C. A. Ouellette, M. J. Wineland and V. L. Christensen. 2007. The Effect of Broiler Breeder Genetic Strain and Parent Flock Age on Eggshell Conductance and Embryonic Metabolism. Poultry Sci. 86:2420-2432. Johnson, J.Y.M., L. M. McMullen, P. Hasselback, M. Louie, G. Jhangri and L. D. Saunders. 2007. Risk factors for Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Campylobacter Infections in Southern Alberta. Epidemiology and Infection (in press) Loponen, J., K. Konig, J. Wu and M.G. Ganzle. 2008. Influence of Thiol Metabolism of Lactobacilli on Egg White Proteins in Wheat Sourdoughs. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (In press). Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson and M. J. Zuidhof. 2007. Reproductive Efficiency and Metabolism of Female Broiler Breeders as Affected by Genotype, Feed Allocation, and Age at Photostimulation. 2. Sexual Maturation. Poult. Sci. 86:2267-2277. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson, M. E. Rustad, 2007. Implications of Changes to Commercial Broiler and Broiler Breeder Body Weight Targets Over the Past 30 years. World’s Poult. Sci. J. 63:457-472. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson, R. M. Beliveau. H. C. Davis and E. A. Lindquist. 2007. End-of-Season Reproductive and Carcass Morphology of Commercial Broiler Breeder Females. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. 16:27-38.

10. Renema, R. A., M. E. Rustad, and F. E. Robinson. 2007. Implications of Changes to Commercial Broiler and Broiler Breeder Body Weight Targets Over the Past 30 Years. World’s Poult. Sci. J. 63:457-472. 11. Robinson, F. E., B. Wuetherick, N. Wolanski and S. Greenwood. 2007. Building Core Animal Science Knowledge Through Project-Based Study: Name That Tool. NACTA Journal 51:33-36. 12. Robinson, F. E., M. J. Zuidhof and R. A. Renema. 2007. Reproductive Efficiency and Metabolism of Female Broiler Breeders as Affected by Genotype, Feed Allocation and Age at Photostimulation: 1. Pullet Growth and Development. Poult. Sci. 86: 2256-2266. 13. Wolanski, N. J., F. E. Robinson, R. A. Renema, V. L. Carney and B. L. Fancher. 2007. Relationships Among Egg Characteristics, Chick Measurements And Early Growth Traits In Ten Broiler Breeder Strains. Poult. Sci. 86:1784-1792. 14. Wu, J. and A.D. Muir. 2008. Comparative Structural, Emulsifying and Biological Properties of Two Major Canola Proteins, Cruciferin and Napin. Journal of Food Science (In press). 15. Wu, J. and R.E. Aluko. 2007. Structural Requirements of Bitter Peptides and their Correlations with Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity. Journal of Peptide Science 13: 63-69. 16. Yuan, L., J. Wu and R.E. Aluko. 2007. Size of the Aliphatic Chain of Sodium houttuyfonate Analogs Determines their Affinity for Rennin and Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules 41: 274–280. 17. Zuidhof, M. J., R. A. Renema and F. E. Robinson. 2007. Reproductive Efficiency and Metabolism of Female Broiler Breeders as Affected by Genotype, Feed Allocation and Age at Photostimulation: 3. Reproductive Efficiency. Poult. Sci. 86: 2278-2286.

27


B. Conference Presentations (Abstracts) 1.

Betti, M., M. J. Zuidhof, B. L. Schneider, R. A. Renema, V. L. Carney, F. E. Robinson and D. R. Korver, 2007. Dietary Faxseed Supplementation Affects Processing Yields and Meat Technological Properties. Poult. Sci. 86: (Suppl. 1): 792.

9.

2.

Carlson, D.R., L. Wang, M.E. Stiles and L.M. McMullen. 2007. Occurrence of Carnobacterium spp. on Retail Samples of Ready-to-Eat Meats. International Association of Food Protection Annual Conference, July 8 to 11, Orlando, FL. Poster Presentation.

3.

Carlson, D.R., M.E. Stiles, D.C. Smith and L.M. McMullen. 2007. Fate of Listeria monocytogenes in a Processed Meat with Sodium Lactate and Diacetate and a Biopreservative. International Association of Food Protection Annual Conference, July 8 to 11, Orlando, FL. Poster Presentation.

10. Jendral, M. J., D. R. Korver, J. S. Church and J. R. Feddes. 2007. Bone Quality, Behavioural Repertoire and Physical Condition of Laying Hens Housed in Conventional, Modified and Furnished Colony Battery Cages. American Dairy Science Association/ Poultry Science Association/Asociacion Mexicana De Produccion Animal/American Society of Animal Science Joint Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX. Poster presentation.

4.

Carney, V. L., M. J. Zuidhof, M. Betti, B. L. Schneider, R. A. Renema, F. E. Robinson, and D. R. Korver, 2007. Dietary Flaxseed Supplementation Affects Broiler Live Performance. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl. 1):520.

5.

Franco A. M., G. M. Fasenko and E. O’Dea. 2007. Broiler Breeder Strain and Egg Size Affect Egg Characteristics, Hatchability and Broiler Performance in Old Flocks. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl.1): 166. Peerreviewed abstract. Poultry Science Association International Meeting. San Antonio, Texas.

6.

Franco-Jimenez, D., R. Renema, M. Zuidhof, F. Robinson, 2007. Effect of Alternate Lutein and Flaxseed Enriched Diet Combinations on Production Parameters in Laying Hens. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl. 1):521.

7.

8.

28

Hamidu, J. A., G. M. Fasenko, E. E. O’Dea, J. J. R. Feddes, C. A. Ouellette, V. L. Christensen and M. J. Wineland. 2007. Does Broiler Breeder Flock Age Influence Embryonic Metabolism in Different Genetic Strains? Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl.1): 165. Peer-reviewed abstract. Poultry Science Association International Meeting. San Antonio, Texas. Hernandez, F.I.L., D. R. Korver, R. A. Renema, and M. J. Zuidhof, 2008. Dietary Protein and Energy Effects on Broiler Live Performance to 42 days. Poultry Sci. 87(Suppl. 1)(Proceedings of the SPSS Annual Meeting).

Holm, D. E., R. A. Renema, F. E. Robinson and M. J. Zuidhof, 2007. The Relationship Between Female Feather Cover, Mating Frequency and Male–to– Female Aggression in Broiler Breeders. Poult. Sci. 86: (Suppl. 1): 168.

11. Kirschenman, R. D. and D. R. Korver. 2007. Effect of Strain and Immune Status on Dietary Lysine Requirements in Broilers as Determined by Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation. American Dairy Science Association/Poultry Science Association/Asociacion Mexicana De Produccion Animal/American Society of Animal Science Joint Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX. Oral Presentation. 12. Kovacevic, J., V. Bohaychuk, P.R. Barrios, G. Gensler, D. Rolheiser and L.M. McMullen. 2007. Evaluation of Detection Methods for the Identification of Listeria spp. Recovered from Meat Processing Facilities. International Association of Food Protection Annual Conference, July 8 to 11, Orlando, FL. Poster Presentation. 13. Naeima, A., L. F. Romero, M. J. Zuidhof, R. A. Renema and F. E. Robinson, 2007. Effect of Female Broiler Breeder BW Profile and Rate of Lay on Broiler Chick Traits, Growth Performance and Meat Quality. Poult. Sci. 86: (Suppl. 1): 167. 14. Naeima, A., L. F. Romero, M. J. Zuidhof, R. A. Renema, F. E. Robinson, 2007. Effect of Female Broiler Breeder BW Profile and Rate of Lay on Broiler Chick Traits, Growth Performance and Meat Quality. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl. 1):167-168. 15. Penrice, D. and F. E. Robinson. 2007. Name That Tool for Schools: Bringing Agriculture into Elementary School Classrooms. NACTA Journal 51: (2) 112.


B. Conference Presentations (cont.) 16. Perez, T. I., M. Betti, M. J. Zuidhof, B. L. Schneider, R. A. Renema, V. L. Carney, and D. R. Korver, 2008. Omega-3 Enrichment of Chicken Meat Using Ground Flaxseed: Effect of Level and Duration on Fatty acids Composition of Trycyglycerols and Phospholipids. Poultry Sci. 87(Suppl. 1)(Proceedings of the SPSS Annual Meeting). 17. Renema, R.A., L.F. Romero, A. Naeima, F.E. Robinson, and M.J. Zuidhof, 2007. Effect of Reducing Body Weight Variability on the Sexual Maturation of Broiler Breeder Females. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl. 1):226. 18. Renema, R.A., M.J. Zuidhof, and F.E. Robinson, 2007. Practical Breeder Nutrition. Proceedings of the World’s Poultry Science Association, 29th Poultry Science Symposium: Biology of Breeding Poultry. (Invited Presentation) 19. Robinson, F. E., N. J. Wolanski, B. Wuetherick and S. Varnhagen, 2007. Integrating Research and Teaching in an Introductory Course Setting: There’s a Heifer in Your Tank. Poult. Sci. 86: (Suppl. 1): 238. 20. Robinson, F. E., N. J. Wolanski, S. Varnhagen and B. Wuetherick. 2007. Assessing Student Perceptions of a Group Project-Based Learning Experience: Before, During and After. STLHE Conference Abstract. Page 65. 21. Robinson, F. E., S. Koeckhoven, D. Penrice and A. Lamont. 2007. Undergraduate Students as Innovators in Agricultural Awareness. National Ag Awareness Conference. (published electronically). 22. Romero, L. F., M. J. Zuidhof, F. E. Robinson, A. Naeima, R. A. Renema, 2008. Evaluation of an Empirical Nonlinear Model to Estimate Feed Intake in Broiler Breeders. Poultry Sci. 87(Suppl. 1) (Proceedings of the SPSS Annual Meeting) 23. Romero, L.F., M.J. Zuidhof, A. Naeima, F.E. Robinson and R.A. Renema, 2007. Partial Coefficients of Nutrient Partitioning of Broiler Breeders Using Different Feeding Strategies During the Production Phase. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl. 1):166. 24. Romero, L.F., M.J. Zuidhof, F.E. Robinson, A. Naeima, and R.A. Renema, 2007. Effects of Feeding Strategies on Productivity of Broiler Breeders. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl. 1):226.

25. Webster, K., C. Jardine, L.M. McMullen and S. Cash. 2007. Risk Ranking: Investigating Expert and Public Differences in Evaluating Food Safety Risks. Agricultural Institute of Canada Annual Conference, Edmonton, Nov 5 to 6, 2007. Poster Presentation. 26. Wolanski, N. H. Gross and F. Robinson. 2007. Seeding our Student Crops of Tomorrow: Taking the Heifer in Your Tank Program to School-Aged Children. NACTA Journal 51: (2) 112. 27. Wolanski, N. J. and F. E. Robinson. 2007. Teaching Opportunities for Graduate Students: Who benefits? Poult. Sci. 86: (Suppl. 1): 238. 28. Wu, J. and R.E. Aluko. 2007. Positional Arrangement of Hydrophobic and Bulky Amino Acids Determines Bitterness Intensity of Di- and Tri-peptides. Poster presented at the 3rd annual conference of the Advanced Foods and Materials Network, Quebec City, PQ, June 3-5. 29. Wu, J., A. Mahfuz, L. Johnson and S. Jung. 2007. Methods for De-emulsification of Cream Obtained from Enzyme-Assisted Aqueous Extraction of Oil from Soybean Flakes. Oral presented at the 98th AOCS Annual Meeting, Quebec City, Quebec, May 13-16. 30. Wu, J., R.E. Aluko and S. Nakai. 2007. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides. Oral presented at the 7th International Conference on Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, P. R. China, November 12-15. 31. Wuetherick, B., F. Robinson, S. Varnhagen and M. Wilson. 2007. Understanding Students’ Perceptions of Learning in an Inquiry Mode. 30th Annual Conference of Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia. Adelaide Australia, July 8-11. Pp 29 Abstracts. 32. Yuan, L., J. Wu and R.E. Aluko. 2007. Kinetics of the Inhibition of Rennin and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Sodium Houttuyfonate Analogs. Poster presented at the 3rd annual conference of the Advanced Foods and Materials Network, Quebec City, PQ, June 3-5. 33. Zuidhof, M. J., R. A. Renema, F. E. Robinson, and L. F. Romero, 2007. The Energetics of Female Broiler Breeders are Affected by Genotype and Environment. Poultry Sci. 86 (Suppl. 1):227.

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C. Scientific and Industry Presentations (with or without Proceedings) 1.

Betti M., Zuidhof MJ., Schneider BL., Renema RA., Carney VL., Robinson FE., Korver DR. 2007. Dietary Flaxseed Supplementation Affects Processing Yields and Meat Technological Properties. Feedinfo News Service Scientific Reviews.

10. Cook, N. J., A.B. Smykot, D. E. Holm, G. M. Fasenko and J. S. Church. Assessing Feather Cover of Laying Hens by Infrared Thermography. Alberta Egg Producers Board Meeting. Calgary, AB. July 31st, 2007.

2.

Betti M. Poultry Meat Quality. Alberta Turkey Producers Annual General Meeting. Red Deer, AB. February 26th, 2008.

3.

Carney, V., M. Zuidhof, B. Schneider and F. Robinson. “50 years of Genetic Progress…What does it Look Like?” Alberta Chicken Producers Regional Meetings (Edmonton, Olds and Lethbridge). November 2007

11. Fasenko, G. M. Poultry Embryo Viability and Metabolism: The Key to Hatchling Health. Inner Mongolia Agricultural University. Hohhot, China. May 9th, 2007.

4.

5.

Carney, V. L., M. J. Zuidhof, B. L. Schneider and F. E. Robinson. 2007. 50 years of Genetic Progress: What Does it Look Like? Symposium to mark the 50th birthday of the Poultry Research Centre’s randombred strains. November 20th, 2007. Edmonton, AB.

6.

Chand, U. Consumer Welfare, Firm Behaviour and Supply Management Policies in the Chicken Industry. IFASA Value Added Meat Conference - Meat Solutions for Tomorrow, St Albert, AB. February 16th, 2007 (Graduate student poster).

7.

30

Carney, V. “Selecting the Broiler of Tomorrow… Managing the Broiler Breeder of Today” Alberta Hatching Egg Producers Annual General Meeting, Red Deer, AB. February 2008.

Chand, U., E. Goddard and T. Nilsson. Product Line Pricing in Oligopoly Markets: An Analysis of the Frozen Poultry Market in Canada. Making Choices: Consumers and Their Impact on Canada’s Agriculture and Food. Agriculture Institute Canada Annual Conference. Edmonton, AB. November 5-6th, 2007 (Graduate student poster).

8.

Chand, U., E. Goddard and T. Nilsson. Supply Management and Competitive Conduct in the Canadian Poultry Industry. Poultry Research Centre Annual General Meeting. Edmonton, AB. June 5th, 2007 (Graduate student presentation).

9.

Christopher, E. E. and G. M. Fasenko. Overview of Hatching Egg and Hatchling Research and Facilities. Agri-Food Discovery Place. Edmonton, AB. October 3rd, 2007.

12. Fasenko, G. M. Poultry Embryo Viability and Metabolism: The Key to Hatchling Health. Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University. Yangling, China. May 14th, 2007. 13. Fasenko, G. M. Early Embryonic Development and Mortality. The Poultry Federation. Springdale, Arkansas. April 25th, 2007. 14. Fasenko, G. M., A. M. Franco, B. Hudson, C. Varnhagen, E. Okine, and E. E. O’Dea. Development of an Introductory Course at a Canadian University to Examine the Changing Role of Companion Animals in Society. IAHAIO International Conference on Human-Animal Interactions Abstract Book (Pg. 90). Oral Presentation #51. Tokyo, Japan. October 7th, 2007. 15. Fasenko, G. M., E. E. O’Dea, J. E. Montgomery, J. A. Hamidu and K. Martin. Egg Turning: Testing Alternative Egg Turning Protocols. Jamesway Incubator Company 2nd Latin American Seminar Program. Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. April 18th, 2007. 16. Fasenko, G. M., E. E. O’Dea, J. Hamidu, A. Franco and M. MacKenzie. Overview of Research Facilities and Hatching Egg Research of G. M. Fasenko. AviTech. Salisbury, Maryland. October 19th, 2007. 17. Fasenko, G. M., P. Ward, M. LaForge, S. Gibson and L. McMullen. Broiler Barn Surface Type and Litter Material Influence the Ability of Disinfectants to Kill Bacteria. Saskatchewan Chicken Industry Development Fund Seminar. Saskatoon, SK. (via video conferencing). April 26th, 2007.


C. Scientific and Industry Presentations (cont.) 18. Franco A. M., G. M. Fasenko, E. E. O’Dea, D. R. Korver, J. Church, N. Cook. Good Chicks – Bad Chicks. The Alberta Hatching Egg Producers 25th Annual General Meeting. Red Deer, AB. February 27th, 2007. 19. Franco, A. M., G. M. Fasenko, E. E. Christopher, D. R. Korver and G. Cherian. Broiler Breeder Strain and Flock Age: Effects on Hatching Eggs, Hatchability, Saleable Chicks, and Broiler Performance. Poultry Industry Service Workshop. Banff, AB. October 2nd, 2007. 20. Hamidu, J. A, G. M. Fasenko, E. E. O’Dea, J. J. R. Feddes, C. A. Ouellette, V. L. Christensen and M. J. Wineland. Embryonic Heat Production: Are There Differences Between Flock Ages and Genetic Strains? Chick Master Open House. Medina, Ohio. October 17th and 18th, 2007. 21. Hamidu, J. A and G. M. Fasenko. Factors Affecting Turkey Embryonic Metabolism, Avian Cell Viability and Hatchability. Agri-Food Discovery Place. Edmonton, AB. October 3rd, 2007. 22. Hamidu, J. A., G. M. Fasenko. Is it Hot in Here – Or is It Just Me? The Alberta Hatching Egg Producers 25th Annual General Meeting. Red Deer, AB. February 27th, 2007. 23. Hernandez, F. I. L., and M. J. Zuidhof. Effect of Different Protein and Energy Levels on Broiler Growth, Fatness and Yield. Poultry Research Centre Annual Meeting. Edmonton, AB. June 4th, 2007. 24. Korver, D. R. and J. Saunders-Blades. 2007. HyD and Poultry: Bones and Beyond. DSM Nutritional Products Symposium. International Poultry Exposition. Atlanta, Georgia. January 24th, 2007. 25. Korver, D. R. The Rise and Fall of Bone Minerals in Laying Hens. Novus International Technical Symposium, Multi-state Poultry Feeding and Nutrition Conference. Indianapolis, Indiana. May 23rd, 2007. 26. Korver, D. R. 16-24 Week Nutrition. Atlantic Poultry Conference. Wolfville, NS. February 15th, 2007.. 27. Korver, D. R. Effect of Energy & Protein on Egg Quality and Laying Hen Performance. Atlantic Poultry Conference, Wolfville, NS. February 15th, 2007.

28. Korver, D. R. and J. Saunders-Blade. What are the Benefits of Dietary 25-OH D3 (HyD®) for Commercial Broiler Production ?” Alberta Chicken Producers Regional Meetings (Edmonton – Presented by J. Saunders-Blade, Olds and Lethbridge – Presented by V. Carney) November 2007. Seminars by D. R. Korver in China (Beijing and Qingdao) and Indonesia (Jakarta and Surabaya). August 2007: 29. Korver, D. R. and M. J. Zuidhof. 2007. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Enrichment of Chicken Meat: Immune Function and Performance. 30. Korver, D. R. and M. J. Zuidhof. 2007. ValueAdded Egg Products: Approaches and Considerations 31. Korver, D. R.. 2007. Bone Mineral Density and Laying Hen Management. 32. Korver, D. R.. 2007. Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation in Poultry: Amino Acid Requirements and Metabolic Availability Seminars by D. R. Korver in Dalian, China. August 27, 2007: 33. Korver, D. R. and M. J. Zuidhof. 2007. ValueAdded Egg Products: Approaches and Considerations 34. Korver, D. R.. 2007. Bone Mineral Density and Laying Hen Management. 35. Leszczynski, A., L. Kawalilak, A. Franco and G. M. Fasenko. 2007. Using Histology to Study Intestinal Development in Chicken Embryos and Chicks. WISEST Celebration of Research. ETLC Solarium, University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. August 15th, 2007. 36. MacKenzie, M. and G. M. Fasenko. Semen Quality in Poultry. Agri-Food Discovery Place. Edmonton, AB. October 3rd, 2007. 37. MacKenzie, M., G. Fasenko,. M. Dyck, N. Kav, D. Froman and M. Bakst. Which Seminal Proteins Equate to Good Semen Quality in Roosters and Toms? Alberta Poultry Industry Research & Development Strategic Priorities Forum. November 22nd, 2007. (presented by M. Zuidhof)

31


C. Scientific and Industry Presentations (cont.) 38. MacKenzie, M., G. M. Fasenko, D. Froman, J. L. Wilson and M. J. Wineland . Are Seminal Proteins Affected By Male Age and Storage Time? Poultry Research Centre Annual General Meeting. Edmonton, AB. June 5th, 2007. 39. MacKenzie, M., G. M. Fasenko, D. Froman, J. L. Wilson and M. J. Wineland . Are Seminal Proteins Affected By Male Age and Storage Time? Alberta Turkey Producers, Meeting. Red Deer, AB. August 7th, 2007.

50. Renema, R. A. Strategies to Improve Stability of Omega-3 Enriched Products. AB Chicken Producers Research Symposium: Growing Quality. Today and in the Future. Red Deer, March 25th, 2008. 51. Renema, R. A. and D. R. Korver. 2007. Impact of Fat Source and Vitamin E on Egg Production and Egg Quality. 68th Minnesota Nutrition Conference. Minneapolis, MN. September 19th, 2007. 8 pp.

40. MacKenzie, M., G. M. Fasenko, E. E. O’Dea, D. Froman, J. L.Wilson and M. J. Wineland. Fewer Chicks: Who’s to Blame? The Alberta Hatching Egg Producers 25th Annual General Meeting. Red Deer, AB. February 27th, 2007.

52. Renema, R. A. and F. E. Robinson. 2007. Managing Broiler Breeders for Life-of-Flock Production and Fertility. 2nd International In-Ovo Technology Conference on. Lima, Peru. 6 pp.

41. McMullen, L.M. Application of Lactic Acid Bacteria: from Benchtop to Commercialization. AlbertaHeilongjiang Biotechnology Workshop. Harbin, China. May 17th, 2007.

53. Renema, R. A. Does Newer Mean Better? Impact of Genetic Selection on Reproductive Efficiency. 50th Anniversary Celebration of Canadian Random-bred Control Lines and Rare Breed Stocks for Use in Research. Edmonton, AB. November 20th, 2007.

42. McMullen, L.M. Food Safety Research at the University of Alberta. Department of Food Science August First University. Daqing, China. May 14th, 2007. 43. McMullen, L.M. Why Does Food Safety Continue to be Such a Challenge: Change, Change, Change! Agricultural Institute of Canada Annual Conference. Edmonton, AB. November 5th to 6th, 2007. 44. McMullen, L.M. Marketing Food Safely. Step it Up Conference. Leduc, AB. February 4th, 2008. 45. McMullen, L.M. Biopreservation of Meat Products: From Benchtop to Commercialization. Dalhousie University. June 14th, 2007. 46. McMullen, L.M. Biopreservation of Meat Products: From Benchtop to Commercialization. Department of Food and Bioresouce Sciences, University of Saskatchewan. Saskatoon, SK. November 30th, 2007. 47. McMullen, L.M. Food Science Teaching at the University of Alberta. August First University. Daqing, China. May 15th, 2007. 48. Renema, R. A. Value-added Eggs and Egg Products. Invited presentation for the Alberta Egg Producers Co operative AGM. Calgary, AB. March 12th, 2007. 49. Renema, R. A. and F. E. Robinson. 2007. Managing Broiler Breeders for Life-of-Flock Production and

32

Fertility. 2nd International In-Ovo Technology Conference. Lima, Peru. 6 pp.

54. Renema, R. A. Role of Genetics in the Relationship between Egg and Chick Quality and Early Growth Potential. Invited oral presentation to San Fernando and Aveagro. Lima, Peru. November 7th, 2007. 55. Renema, R. A. The Bird of the Future: How will Current Trends in Broiler Genetics and Product Development affect Broiler Breeder Management and Broiler Yield Traits? Invited oral presentation to San Fernando and Aveagro. Lima, Peru. November 7th, 2007. 56. Renema, R.A. and D. R. Korver. Impact of Fat Source and Vitamin E on Egg Production and Egg Quality. Minnesota Nutrition Conference. Minneapolis, MN. September 19th, 2007. 8 pp. 57. Robinson, F. E., R. A. Renema and M. J. Zuidhof. 2007. Optimizing Reproductive Efficiency in Modern Broiler Breeder Hens: The Role of Feed Allocation and Photostimulation. Proceedings of the Second National Symposium on Poultry Nutrition and Feed Science. Beijing. (Translated into Chinese) Pg. 389394. 62. Robinson, F. E., R. A. Renema and M. J. Zuidhof. 2007. Recent Developments in Feeding Broiler Breeders. Proceedings of the 2007 Western Nutrition Conference. Pg. 293-303.


C. Scientific and Industry Presentations (cont.) 63. Robinson, F. E., R. A. Renema and M. J. Zuidhof. 2007. The pullet to hen transition: Why this is the Most Critical Time in Female Broiler Breeder Management. Proceedings of the 2007 Poultry Health Conference. 6 pp. 64. Robinson, F.E. Assessing reproductive potential: Optimization of genetic potential. Oral presentation to the annual meeting of the Alberta Hatching Egg Producers. Red Deer, AB. February 27th, 2007. 65. Robinson, F. E., N. Wolanski, and D. Penrice. 2007. Connecting communities: There’s a heifer in your tank - Rural edition. Connecting communities: Rural and Rural. (published electronically). 66. Robinson, F.E. The University of Alberta Poultry Video Project. Oral Presentation to the 2007 Poultry Health Conference. Kitchener, ON. November 13th, 2007. 67. Robinson, F.E. Undergraduate Students as Innovators in Agricultural Awareness. Oral presentation to the National Ag Awareness Conference. London, ON. May 23, 2007. 68. Robinson, F.E. Extreme Course Makeover in an Introductory Animal Science Class: The Transition to Inquiry-Based Learning. Invited Department Seminar: Department of Animal Science, University of Connecticut. December 6th, 2007. 69. Robinson, F.E. Engaging Undergraduate Students through Inquiry: There’s a Heifer in Your Tank. Invited Plenary Oral Presentation to National Science Center Conference. Telus World of Science. Edmonton, AB. June 8th, 2007 70. Robinson, F.E. Recent Developments in Feeding Broiler Breeders. Oral Presentation to 2007 Western Nutrition Conference. Saskatoon, SK. September 27th, 2007. 71. Robinson, F.E. The Pullet to Hen Transition: Why this is the Most Critical Time in Female Broiler Breeder Management. Oral Presentation to the 2007 Poultry Health Conference. Kitchener, ON. November 13th, 2007. 72. Schneider, B. L., M. J. Zuidhof, V.L. Carney and F. E. Robinson. 2007. 50 Years of Genetic Progress: What’s Happened to the Meat You Eat? Symposium to mark the 50th birthday of the Poultry Research

Centre’s randombred strains. Edmonton, AB. November 20th, 2007. 73. Wu, J. Searching the Most Potent Antihypertensive Peptides from Egg Proteins through a Bioinformatics Approach. 2008 MPF Convention, St. Paul, Minnesota. March 18th-20th, 2008. 74. Wu, J. What’s Left After Antibody Extraction? Alberta Egg Producers Co-op annual meeting. Calgary, AB. March 12th, 2008. 75. Wu, J., R.E. Aluko and S. Nakai. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides. Invited speaker at the Nanjing Agriculture University. Nanjing, China. November 14th, 2007. 76. Wuester, D., M. MacKenzie and G. Fasenko. Rooster Age Effect on Semen Quality and Fertility. WISEST Celebration of Research. ETLC Solarium. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. August 15th, 2007. 77. Zuidhof, M. J. Optimizing Broiler Meat Production. Poultry Research Centre Annual Meeting. Edmonton, AB. June 4th, 2007. 78. Zuidhof, M. J. Optimizing Omega-3 Enrichment of Broiler Meat. Agriculture Research Division (AARD) Conference. June 8th-9th, 2007. 79. Zuidhof, M. J. The Alberta Poultry Industry – An Overview. Seminar (3 hr) for Chinese Tech Transfer Delegation. October 22nd, 2007. 80. Zuidhof, M. J. and V. L. Carney. The Poultry Research Centre at the University of Alberta. Alberta Poultry Industry Research and Development Strategic Priorities Forum. Edmonton, AB. November 22nd, 2007. 81. Zuidhof, M. J., F. E. Robinson, B. L. Schneider, R. A. Renema and F. I. L. Hernandez. Topics in Broiler Supply Chain Research. Presentation (4 hr) to CobbVantress Hatchery Round Table. Edmonton, AB. November 12th-13th, 2007. 82. Zuidhof, M. J., V..L. Carney, B. L. Schneider, F. E. Robinson and R. A. Renema. Comparison of Modern Broilers with Randombred Broiler Strains: What has Happened to Yield Dynamics over 50 Years? Symposium to mark the 50th birthday of the Poultry Research Centre’s randombred strains. Edmonton, AB. November 20th, 2007.

33


D. Books and Book Chapters 1.

Wu, J. and R.A. Renema. Let’s use chicken eggs (Chapter 01) in Handbook of poultry science and technology: Volume 1: Primary processing (Invited book chapter).

E. Technical Publications and Industry Reports Industry Reports: 1.

Fasenko, G. M. and E. E. O’Dea. Evaluating Infrared Thermography as a Method for Early Detection of Yolk Sac Infections in Broiler Chicks. Poultry Industry Council (Project 199). May 7. Research Team Members: J. Church, N. Cook, A. Schaefer. 18 pp.

2.

Fasenko, G. M., E. E. Christopher and A. M. Franco. An examination of the effects of genetic strain, flock age, and egg size on embryo nutrient utilization, saleable chick production, and broiler growth. Canadian Hatching Egg Producers. December 6. Research Team Members: D. R. Korver. 17 pp.

3.

4.

5.

6.

34

Fasenko, G. M., E. E. Christopher and A. M. Franco. An examination of the effects of genetic strain, flock age, and egg size on embryo nutrient utilization, saleable chick production, and broiler growth. Agriculture Funding Consortium. October 5. Research Team Members: D. R. Korver. 53 pp. Fasenko, G. M., J. A. Hamidu and E. E. Christopher. Embryonic Metabolism in Domestic Avian Species: Influence of Genetic Strain and Parent Flock Age. Agriculture Funding Consortium (Project 2004A021R). November 30. Research Team Members: J. J. R. Feddes, F. E. Robinson, V. L. Christensen, M. J. Wineland. 81 pp. Fasenko, G. M., J. A. Hamidu and E. E. O’Dea. Embryonic Metabolism in Domestic Avian Species: Influence of Genetic Strain and Parent Flock Age. Aviagen, Inc. April 13. Research Team Members: J. J. R. Feddes, F. E. Robinson, V. L. Christensen, M. J. Wineland, K. Martin. 32 pp. Fasenko, G. M., J. A. Hamidu and E. E. O’Dea. Embryonic Metabolism in Domestic Avian Species: Influence of Genetic Strain and Parent Flock Age. Jamesway Incubator Company, Inc. April 13. Research Team Members: J. J. R. Feddes, F. E. Robinson, V. L. Christensen, M. J. Wineland, K. Martin. 32 pp.

8.

Fasenko, G. M., J. A. Hamidu and E. E. O’Dea. Embryonic Metabolism in Domestic Avian Species: Influence of Genetic Strain and Parent Flock Age. Poultry Industry Council (Project 174). April 13. Research Team Members: J. J. R. Feddes, F. E. Robinson, V. L. Christensen, M. J. Wineland, K. Martin. 32 pp (plus a 5-page executive summary report).

9.

Holm, D., R. Renema and F. Robinson. Canadian Broiler Hatching Egg Producers Association (CBHEPA) Project Report. Relationship of Female Feather Coverage and Reproductive Condition with Male Mating Aggression and Social Behavior in Broiler Breeders. 2007. 24 pp.

10. Renema, R. A. , F. E. Robinson, N. J. Wolanski, D. E. Holm and A. N. Herron. ALIDF – Project #2004A045R. The Impact of Growth Pattern on Reproductive Efficiency in Male Broiler Breeders. 2007. 129 pp. 11. Renema, R. A. , F. E. Robinson, N. J. Wolanski, D. E. Holm and A. N. Herron. Aviagen North America Inc. Projects #AV-04UA91 and AV-06UA91. The Impact of Growth Pattern on Reproductive Efficiency in Male Broiler Breeders. 2007. 129 pp. 12. Robinson, F. E. , M. J. Zuidhof, R. A. Renema and M. Copeland. ALIDF – Project #2003A098R. Identification of Early Indicators of Metabolic and Reproductive Dysfunction from Over-Feeding Female Broiler Breeders. 2007. 117 pp. 13. Robinson, F. E., M. J. Zuidhof, R. A. Renema and M. Copeland. Aviagen North America Inc. Project #AV03UA91. Identification of Early Indicators of Metabolic and Reproductive Dysfunction from OverFeeding Female Broiler Breeders. 2007. 117 pp. 14. Zuidhof, M.J., M. Betti, T. I. Perex, D. R. Korver, V. L. Carney, B. L. Schneider, W. Wismer, F. E. Robinson and R. A. Renema. Agriculture Funding Consortium


E. Technical Publications and Industry Reports (cont.) Industry Trade Articles: 1.

Betti M., M.J. Zuidhof, B.L. Schneider, R.A. Renema, V.L. Carney, F.E. Robinson and D.R. Korver. 2007. Dietary Flaxseed Supplementation Affects Processing Yields and Meat Technological Properties. Feedinfo News Service Scientific Reviews. April 2007. Available from: www.feedinfo.com

2.

Yegani M. and D. Korver. 2007. Are egg yolk antibodies an alternative to antibiotics? World’s Poultry volume 23, No. 5, pages 22-27.

6.

Salubrité des Aliments À La Ferme: En Essaient des Méthodes de Nettoyage et Désinfection. Poultry Research Centre Rapport #2. Octobre 30, 2006. (This factsheet, that was published in English in October 2006, was translated into French in November 2007.)

Factsheets: Developed by Dr. G.M. Fasenko’s research group. English: 1.

Understanding Embryo Metabolism: A Key to Better Hatchability & Chick Quality. Poultry Research Centre Factsheet #3. April 12, 2007.

2.

Measuring Chick Quality: Does an Unhealed Navel Always Mean a Bad Broiler? Poultry Research Centre Factsheet #4. April 20, 2007.

3.

Is it Flock Age or Simply Egg Size that Affects Chick Quality in Modern Genetic Strains? Poultry Research Centre Factsheet #5. November 9, 2007.

4.

Testing a New Hatching Egg Sanitizer. Poultry Research Centre Factsheet #6. November 21, 2007.

Spanish (en espaňol): 7.

Seguridad Alimenticia en la Granja: Probando Métodos de Limpieza y Desinfección. Poultry Research Centre Reporte #2. Octubre 30, 2006. (This factsheet, that was published in English in October 2006).

8.

Entender el metabolism embrionario: la clave para mejorar nacimientos y calidad de pollito. Poultry Research Centre Reporte #3. Abril 12, 2007.

French (en français): 5.

En Recherchant des Protocoles Alternatifs de Retournement. Poultry Research Centre Rapport #1. Octobre 23, 2006. (This factsheet that was published in English in October 2006 was translated into French in November 2007).

NOTE: All of the above publications are available in electronic format from the Poultry Research Centre’s website: www.poultryresearchcentre.ca

New Innovations in Poultry Research (project summaries): 1.

2.

Adding a Nestbox and Perch to Conventional Layer Hen Battery Cages or Housing Hens in Furnished Large Group Cages Improves Hen Welfare and Benefits Production Characterization of Relationships Among Broiler Breeder Female Growth, Variability and Reproductive Performance for Two Flocks through to Flock Dispersal

3.

Demand for Frozen Processed Poultry Products

4.

Effects of Broiler Genetic Strain and Flock Age on Embryo Metabolism

5.

Egg Yolk Antibody Farming Technology

6.

Genetic Strain, Egg Size, and Flock Age Influences Hatching Eggs Characteristics, Fertility, Hatchability, Chick Quality and Broiler Performance

7.

Consumer Purchases of Specialty Eggs in Canada

NOTE: All of the above publications are available in electronic format from the Poultry Research Centre’s website: www.poultryresearchcentre.ca

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E. Technical Publications and Industry Reports (cont.) Articles in Industry Newsletters and Annual Reports: 1.

Haley, D. Animal welfare is not just about the way we value animals. Animal Care Specialist column for the Alberta Egg Producer’s EggNotes Newsletter. March, 2008. Pg 5.

5.

Haley, D. Some Canadian Universities Choose FreeRun Eggs. Animal Care Specialist column for the Alberta Egg Producer’s EggNotes Newsletter, May, 2007. Pg. 7-8.

2.

Haley, D. The value of animals and animal welfare. Animal Care Specialist column for the Alberta Egg Producer’s EggNotes Newsletter. February, 2008. Pg 7.

6.

Pawlina, I. Submissions to Annual Reports of Alberta Egg Producers, Alberta Hatching Egg Producers, Alberta Turkey Producers as well as the Western Poultry Science Association Newsletter.

3.

Haley, D. The science and the ethics of animal welfare. Animal Care Specialist column for the Alberta Egg Producer’s EggNotes Newsletter. August, 2007. Pg 5.

7.

Robinson, F., R. Renema and M. Zuidhof. The Pullet to Hen Transition: Why This is the Most Critical Time in Female Broiler Breeder Management. Canada Poultry. February 2008.

4.

Haley, D. Farm management and animal welfare. Animal Care Specialist column for the Alberta Egg Producer’s EggNotes Newsletter. November, 2007. Pg 7-8.

F. Patents 1.

Lamsal, B., Johnson, L., Wu, J., Jung, S., Zhang, C., Gerstner, J., Birschbach, P., Penet, C. (2007). Enzyme-assisted soy aqueous process with deemulsification. Patent filed on December 4, 2007 (Ref#. 30949-PCT).

G. Educational Materials

36

1.

Principles of Biosecurity (DVD). Outlines the critical elements of biosecurity programs for commercial poultry operations.

2.

Innovations in the Poultry Industry (DVD). Describes incubation, hatching egg production, broiler production, turkey production, table egg production, and egg grading.

NOTE: Ordering information and low-resolution previews for both videos are available from the Poultry Research Centre’s website: www.poultryresearchcentre.ca


H. Awards and Honours Erin Christopher was the recipient of a Department of Agriculture Food and Nutritional Science Outstanding Achievement Award for Outstanding Support for Research Activities (off-campus).

Frank Robinson was awarded a 3M National Teaching Fellowship, named to the AFHE Teaching Wall of Fame and was the recipient of a NACTA (International) Teaching Fellowship.

Gaylene Fasenko was awarded tenure, and promoted to the position of Associate Professor. This promotion will take effect on July 1, 2008.

Luis Romero was the recipient of the best poster presentation award at the SPSS Annual meeting in Atlanta Georgia Jan, 2008. His presentation was titled “Evaluation of an empirical nonlinear model to estimate feed intake in broiler breeders”. His collaborators on this presentation were: Martin Zuidhof, Frank Robinson, Robert Renema, Abie Naiema.

Ana Franco received a Poultry Science Association Graduate Student Certificate of Excellence for Oral Presentations. Jacob Hamidu, Kaustav Majumder , Martinez Miguel and Sandeep Nain were all recipients of Poultry Research Centre Graduate Student Assistantships.

Sun-Jong You received a Canadian Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship.

Lucas Kawalilak received an NSERC Summer Undergraduate Research Award as well as the Alberta Poultry Industry Council Experiential Learning Award for Undergraduate Students. Robert Renema was elected as a Fellow of the International College of Nutrition (ICN) in recognition of significant contributions to the advancement of the nutritional sciences.

I. Community Service Frank Robinson:

6. Feed allocation to the broiler breeder hen.

1. There’s a Heifer in Your Tank: Heifers in the Headlines Edition. Northlands FarmFair. Edmonton, AB. November 6th, 2007.

7. Strain differences in response to feed allocation and photoperiod.

2. Heifer in Your Tank Student Article Booklets – December 2007. 3. Heifer in Your Tank - School at the U. October 29th to November 2nd, 2007 4. Heifer in Your Tank in the Classroom. February 7th to March 6th, 2008 Presentations to Arbor Acres Breeder School. Huntsville, Alabama. June 11th, 2007: 5. Photostimulation of the broiler breeder hen.

Other presentations: 8. Connecting Communities: Rural and Urban Conference. Vermilion, Alberta. October 12th, 2007. 9. Advancing Inquiry-Based Learning in an Introductory Class Inside and Outside the Classroom. Oral presentation to the Quality Networks Universities, Conference Board of Canada. November 30th, 2007. 10. There’s a Heifer in Your Tank – Opportunities for Youth. Three invited oral presentations to the Alberta Senior 4-H Conference. Pigeon Lake, AB. January 27th, 2007 .

37


Acronyms Used AVRI

Alberta Veterinary Research Institute

AARD

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

AAFC

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

AARI

Alberta Agricultural Research Institute

ACP

Alberta Chicken Producers

AEP

Alberta Egg Producers

AHEP

Alberta Hatching Egg Producers

ALIDF

Alberta Livestock Industry Development Fund

ATP

Alberta Turkey Producers

AFHE

Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics

AHEP

Alberta Hatching Egg Producers

CALAS

Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Sciences

CBHEMA

Canadian Broiler and Hatching Egg Marketing Agency

CCAC

Canadian Council on Animal Care

CFIA

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

CPRC

Canadian Poultry Research Council

IAUTP

Institutional Animal User Training Program

IFASA

Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences, Alberta

NACTA

North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture

NSERC

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

PIC

Poultry Industry Council

PRC

Poultry Research Centre

SCIDF

Saskatchewan Chicken Industry Development Fund

U of A

University of Alberta

USDA-ARS

United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service

39

PRC Annual Report 2007  

Poultry Research Centre Annual Report 2007

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