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2005 Annual Report Alberta Poultry Research Centre January 1, 2005 – December 31, 2005


APRC RESEARCH TEAM ........................................................................................................................................4 GRADUATE STUDENTS ..........................................................................................................................................8 APRC BASE FUNDING .............................................................................................................................................9 APRC RESEARCH GRANT FUNDING ................................................................................................................10 APRC RESEARCH GRANT FUNDING: LIST OF PROJECTS ........................................................................10 APRC RESEARCH GRANT FUNDING: LIST OF PROJECTS ........................................................................11 APRC FACILITY USAGE.......................................................................................................................................13 APRC EVIDENCE OF PRODUCTIVITY ............................................................................................................14 A. REFERRED PAPERS IN SCHOLARLY JOURNALS ....................................................................................................14 B. CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS (ABSTRACTS) .....................................................................................................14 C. SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRY PRESENTATION (WITH OR WITHOUT PROCEEDINGS) .................................................16 D. COMMUNITY SERVICES .......................................................................................................................................20 E. GRANTING AGENCY FINAL REPORTS, TECHNICAL BULLETINS AND INDUSTRY REPORTS ...................................21 F. COMPUTER SOFTWARE PATTENTS .......................................................................................................................21 G. APRC STAFF AND STUDENTS AWARDS AND HONORS ........................................................................................22 APRC SIGNIFICANT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES......................................................22

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APRC Research Scientists Frank Robinson

APRC Director Professor and Associate Dean (Academic) AFHE Poultry Production and Physiology

Gaylene Fasenko

Assistant Professor Poultry Embryology and Chick Quality Vice-Chair WISEST

John Feddes

Professor Bio-Resource Engineering

Ellen Goddard

Professor, Co-operative Chair in Agricultural Marketing and Business

Douglas Korver

Associate Professor Poultry Nutrition

Lynn McMullen

Associate Professor Food Microbiology

Robert Renema

Research Associate Reproduction and Metabolism in Poultry

Jeong Sim

Professor Poultry Product Technology

Hoon Sunwoo

Research Associate Egg Science and Product Technology

Martin Zuidhof

Poultry Research Scientist Bioeconomic Modeling

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APRC Research Team Unit/ Researcher

Research Associates PDFs

Graduate Students

Technical Staff

Under Graduate students/summer assistants

0

2

1

2

Feddes

1

1

Goddard

1

Fasenko

Korver

0

3

2

1

McMullen

0

6

1

1

Robinson

2

5

1

4

Sim

1 1.5

1

Zuidhof Sunwoo

2

Renema

0

0

Poultry Unit Total

0

0

4 3

18

11.5

11

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Highlights of 2005 at the Alberta Poultry Research Centre In 2005, the APRC researchers, students, staff and partners had many reasons to get excited about new opportunities in poultry research and learning – five million reasons to be exact. The Alberta Livestock Industry Development Fund (ALIDF) Ltd. and the Alberta Agricultural Research Institute (AARI) awarded the APRC $5 million over 5 years in support of research focused on adding value to poultry products and product development. In 2005, the APRC has focused on filling leadership and research positions to complement the existing, internationally recognized research team. Dr. Iwona Pawlina was hired and assumed the position of APRC Executive Director on January 1, 2006. Dr. Mirko Betti, a new value-added poultry meat scientist from Italy, will join the APRC Team on August 1, 2006. The hiring process continues to engage a poultry product scientist, an egg scientist as well as a commercialization specialist, who will be located at the Alberta Agriculture Iwona Pawlina Food and Rural Development (AAFRD). The $5 million investment also extends to Graduate Student Assistantships to attract the best and most promising students to our program. The APRC provides a terrific opportunity for graduates to learn in a multidisciplinary, collaborative environment that captures the whole R&D continuum from basic and applied research to technology, product development and commercialization. The close relationship which exists between the APRC, Alberta industry and the Alberta Government will bring together future employees and employers. Overall, this $5 million investment in R&D and learning, along with a continuous support from Alberta’s poultry industry, the UofA and AAFRD, will help Alberta’s poultry industry make a giant leap forward in ensuring its long-term market competitiveness. Learning is always at the forefront of the APRC activities. Last June, the APRC and Aviagen NA hosted a very successful three-day broiler breeder workshop for producers and industry representatives. The main focus was on optimal management strategies for breeding stock in consecutive generations. Participants enjoyed a series of presentations delivered by scientists and experts from the APRC, Aviagen NA and the University of Georgia, as well as a hands-on laboratory session which provided a great balance between theory and practice. The APRC has been involved in WISEST (Women in Scholarship, Engineering, Science and Technology) and IAESTE (International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience) as well as summer student training. In July 2005, Dr. Gaylene Fasenko accepted the position of WISEST Vice-Chair. The APRC’s researcher involvement in the WISEST and IAESTE programs enables young women and men to gain experience in scientific research, stimulates interest in the field of poultry science and fosters development of international relations. Researchers involved in WISEST and IAESTE benefit from the high level of quality these students bring to the research and the infusion of fresh ideas, perspectives and questions. There’s a Heifer in Your Tank! In November 2005, Dr. Frank Robinson hosted the third edition of “There’s a Heifer in Your Tank” – Farm Fair Edition - Science Answers to Questions You Didn’t Know You Had About Animal Agriculture” as part of the Edmonton Northlands Farm Fair at Northlands Park. Five hundred people enjoyed this informative and humorous event. The popularity of this event is growing and the only limitation seems to be the size of the venue! Frank and his organizing team Heifer stars received the Canadian Agriculture and Agri-food Award of Excellence for Education and Awareness and the Growing Alberta Leadership Award for Building Youth Leadership.

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The Animal Science 471 class taught by Gaylene held their annual student research symposium in April. The students’ research has been compiled in symposium proceedings. The results of one of the research projects were published in the Journal of Applied Poultry Research and another is being prepared for submission. Two of the student research papers were published in the trade journal “Canada Poultry”. The APRC hosted several scientific events attracting researchers and students nationally and internationally, including the UofA stop on the Alltech North American University Symposium Series and the 2005 Prairie Poultry Meeting at the APRC. The research excellence continues at the APRC. The APRC researchers and students continue to contribute to the research excellence at the Centre. The APRC Team has 8 research papers published or in press in referred scientific journals and has attended over 80 conferences, workshops, and professional meetings where they have delivered presentations, contributed to proceedings or presented research posters. Broiler Breeder Research Program. In June 2005, Drs. Frank Robinson, Rob Renema and Martin Zuidhof completed a comprehensive report on several years of breeder research investigating the interactions of strain, feed allocation and photostimulation age. The study has contributed to the creation of new tools for assessing hen productivity and will benefit hatching egg producers. The APRC/AAFRD officially released the hatching egg module of the Broiler Chicken Supply Chain Model, a valuable economic analysis tool for determining the economic consequences of various management approaches. This computer program supports complex decisions on how to reduce costs, increase profitability and analyze production economics. A new project investigating superior genotypes in a flock of high-yield breeders relative to the growth potential of their broiler offspring has commenced with new MSc graduate students, Abie Naeima and Luis Romero. Nick Wolanski is continuing his on-farm MSc studies with four breeder flocks, monitoring rearing body weight and carcass traits with livability in the laying barn. Melanie Rustad is completing her PhD project investigating early indicators of reproductive dysfunction in female breeders. Adrienne Herron is completing her MSc project dealing with aggressive and sexual behavior of males of varying sizes in naturally mating flocks. Danilo Franco, a Post-Doctoral Fellow from the University of Nebraska, has been contributing to several ongoing projects. In the past year, Rob and Martin have assumed greater responsibility for the broiler breeder research program as Frank has served the Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics as Associate Dean (Academic). We appreciate and acknowledge the assistance provided by Felicity Dennis, Brenda Schneider, the Poultry Unit staff, and the students in Rob and Martin our program. We also acknowledge the financial support of the Hatching Egg Producers from Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. The ongoing support provided by AAFRD, Aviagen NA, the Ag Funding Consortium, the Poultry Industry Council and Lilydale is gratefully appreciated. In 2005, Dr. Gaylene Fasenko has made a direct contribution to the expansion of the APRC family. Connor Wade Turner was born in October 2005. Congratulations Gaylene! The Embryology and Chick Quality Research Program continued during Gaylene’s maternity leave with help from Erin O’Dea, Research technician, and input, when needed, from Gaylene. Jacob Hamidu, MSc student, incorporated a new oxygen analyzer into the embryo metabolism equipment with the technical assistance of Jacob Hamidu Chris Ouellette, J. Feddes Research technician. Jacob conducted several trials examining the effects of genetic strain and parent flock age on embryo metabolism. Ana

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Franco arrived in September from Colombia and began taking courses and conducting research on flock age, egg size and chick quality. Patrick Ward, an undergraduate summer student, collected data to microbiologically assess broiler barn cleaning and sanitizing methods. Katherine Bounds, also an undergraduate summer student, assisted with all ongoing research projects. Support for embryology and chick quality research and student stipends has been generously provided by the ALIDF, AARI, AAFRD, the Alberta Chicken Producers (ACP), the Alberta Poultry Research Centre (APRC), the Canadian Broiler Hatching Egg Marketing Agency (CBHEMA), Jamesway Incubator Company, Lilydale Hatchery, Maple Leaf Hatchery, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Poultry Industry Council (PIC), and the Saskatchewan Chicken Industry Development Fund (SCIDF). The research conducted could not be accomplished without the research technicians at the APRC - the finest staff at the University of Alberta. Prototype-Product Development. Drs. Jeong Sim and Hoon Sunwoo continued their research in IgY technology, developing new and exciting products and product prototypes. These products help address a range of important issues such as the prevention of bacterial growth on the surfaces of food products without inducing resistant bacterial strains as with antibiotics (SpiceGuardTM) as well as the protection of young cattle from scours by using a IgY-based feed additive (AnimalGuardTM). Other exiting products in the “IgY family� include NutraGuardTM, TheraGuardTM, DetectionGuardTM and CosmeGuardTM. In closing, we would like to thank the APRC partners: the Alberta Chicken Producers, Alberta Egg Producers Board, Alberta Hatching Egg Producers, Alberta Turkey Producers, Lilydale Foods, Maple Leaf Poultry, Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development and the University of Alberta for continued support of the Alberta Poultry Research Centre.

APRC Team

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Graduate Students Student Russell Coleman

Degree Supervisor PhD Korver

Name of Project Use Of The Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Technique To Determine Amino Acid Requirements In Broiler Chickens

Jennifer SaundersBlades

PhD

Korver

Effect Of 25-OH Vitamin D3 On Bone Mineral Density And Immune Function Of Chickens

Raven Kirschenman

MSc

Korver

Amino Acid Metabolism in broiler chickens

Melanie Rustad

PhD

Robinson

Identification Of Early Indicators Of Metabolic And Reproductive Dysfunction From OverFeeding Female Broiler Breeders

Nick Wolanski

MSc

Robinson

Reproductive Efficiency in Broiler Breeders

Adrienne Heron

MSc

Robinson

Sexual and Aggressive Behavior of NaturallyMating Broiler Breeder Flocks

Luis Romero

MSc

Robinson

Linkages Between Reproductive Fitness and Growth Potential in Broilers

Abie Naeima

MSc

Robinson

Linkages Between Reproductive Fitness and Growth Potential in Broilers

Tineke Jones

PhD

McMullen

Behaviour of cold adapted, log phase Escherichia coli at temperature near the minimum for growth

Julie Mori

PhD

McMullen

Antiobiotic tesistance Compylobacter spp. – a case control study to determine origin.

Jackson Mah

MSc

McMullen

Heat, acid and salt tolerance of leucocinresistant Listeria monocytogenes

Melissa Haveroen

PHD

McMullen

Detection of Bacteriocins in Meats

Jovana Kovacevic

MSc

McMullen

Presistance of Listeria in Meat Processing facilities

Kevin Webster

MSc

McMullen

Risk Ranking

John Paul Emunu

MSc

Goddard

Consumer Purchases of Specialty Eggs in Canada

Michelle Jendral

PhD

Feddes

Hens Housed In Modified, Commercial And Colony Cages: An Assessment Of Welfare

Ana Franco

MSc

Fasenko

Evaluating factors affecting chick quality.

Jacob Hamidu

MSc

Fasenko

Examining flock age and strain effects on embryonic metabolism.

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APRC BASE FUNDING 2005 APRC Base Funding ALIDF/AARI, 224,250

Industry, $14,000 Alberta Boards, $127,000

UofA, $850,000

AAFRD, $315,000

TOTAL = $1,530,250

2005 APRC Base Industry Funding Maple Leaf, $3,000 Lilydale, $11,100 ATP, $17,400

ACP, $43,500

AEP, $26,400

AHEP, $39,600

TOTAL = $141,000

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APRC RESEARCH GRANT FUNDING 2005 APRC Research Funding

Prov. Bd., 53,200 PIC, $37,772

Ag Consortium,

Industry, $160,800

$368,433

Govt. Natl., $337,601

TOTAL=$957,806

2005 Research Funding Benefiting Commodity Groups $600

$545

$527

$ Thousands

$500

$452

$400 $300

$292 $213 $179

$200 $100 $Breeders

AHEP

ACP

ATP

AEP

Processors TOTAL=$957,806 10


APRC RESEARCH GRANT FUNDING: LIST OF PROJECTS

TITLE OF PROJECT

PRIMARY SCIENTIST

Protein Metabolism in Broiler Chickens

Korver

Refinement of QCT to measure Medullary bone in laying hens

Evaluation of the use of beta-glucan depleted barley oat flour as animal feed

Determining the Linkages Between Optimized Maternal Growth and Egg Production Efficiency with Broiler Offspring Growth and Yield Traits

Korver, R. Heck (University of Guelph), R. Fleming (Roslin Institute) Vasanthan, Temelli, Zijlstra, Korver

Robinson Renema Zuidhof Anthony Putman

Determining the Linkages Between Optimized Maternal Growth and Egg Production Efficiency with Broiler Offspring Growth and Yield Traits Robinson Renema Zuidhof Anthony Putman

The Impact of Timing of Protein Intake on Reproductive Efficiency in Broiler Breeder Females

Robinson Renema Zuidhof

SOURCE NSERC Agriculture Funding Consortium, Alberta Egg Producers, DSM Nutritional Products, University of Alberta Agriculture Funding Consortium, Alberta Barley Commission ALIDF Aviagen Ontario Broiler Hatching Egg and Chick Comm BC Hatching Egg and Chick Comm Lilydale Alberta Chicken Producers U of Arkansas (in kind) Poultry Industry Council ALIDF Aviagen Ontario Broiler Hatching Egg and Chick Commission BC Hatching Egg and Chick Commission Lilydale Alberta Chicken Producers U of Arkansas (in kind) Poultry Industry Council Ag Funding Consortium Aviagen

Funding $29,000 $83,217

$106,250

$62,000 $43,600 $10,000

$10,000 $3,200 $24,000 $7,200 $13,376 $62,000 $43,600 $10,000

$10,000

$3,200 $24,000 $7,200 $13,376 $64,657 $16,000

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BREEDERS, AHEP, 2004-2006 The Impact of Growth Patterns on Reproductive Efficiency and Livability in Male Broiler Breeders Who benefits: BREEDERS, AHEP Bacteriocins for Food Safety Distribution of Listeria in meat plants North America Food Safety Network

Odour control Gestation Stalls Equipment grant for an oxygen analyzer

Equipment grant for a real time PRC

Embryonic viability of domestic poultry Evaluating infrared thermography as a method for early detection of yolk sac infections in broiler chicks. An Sc 471/476 student research projects Breeder parent age affects on fertility, embryonic mortality, and broiler chick quality.

IgY Technology Transfer Program IgY Food Preservative for Food Safety

Inglis Robinson Renema Zuidhof Wilson Inglis McMullen McMullen McMullen

Feddes Church Feddes Fasenko Dixon, Foxcroft, Field, Putman, Kennelly, Fasenko, Okine, Dyck, Christopherson Fasenko Fasenko, Church, Cook, Schaefer Fasenko, Willis Fasenko, Froman, Wilson, Wineland Sim Sunwoo Sim Sunwoo

ALIDF

$46,000

NSERC AFC Uof Guelph collaborative transfer NSERC ALIDF

$34,016 $101, 185 $16,699

23,500 20,000

NSERC

$22,267

NSERC

$65,000

NSERC

$27,633

PIC

$12,772

ALIDF

$7,026

ALIDF PIC AARI Alberta Chicken Producers NSERC

$20,000 $11,624 $10,000 $4,200

CJ Food Industrial Fund from Korea

$100,000 $75,000

TOTAL $957,806

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APRC Facility Usage Facility

Brooder House 1 (48 floor pens) Breeder Hens Cages (288 individual) Breeder Male Cages (60 individual) Vencomatic Colony Housing (2 units) Nutrition House 4 (32 pens) Specht Pullet Cages2 (chick trials) Environmental2 Chambers East House (8 floor pens 4 cage rooms) Test House Floor Pens

Overall Utilization Rate 67%

Broiler Trials

Breeder Trials

Layer Trials

Unit Operations

24%

12%

14%

17% rare breeds

75%

75%

80%

80%

68%

68%

59%

30%

43%

43%

91%

12%

29%

79%

100%

fert.egg program 67% 33%

100% 14%

Test House Conventional Cages Test House Colony Cages Broiler Processing Plant (3-day kills) Hatchery Lilydale Room

Alberta Turkey Producers Computer Lab 1 3

100%

10%

100%

2 kills

86% (rare breed) & fert. Egg program 90% 100% Fertile egg production

2 kills

11 10 exp. 1 hatch rare breeds hatches hatches Alberta Chicken Producers 1 Day Alberta Egg Producers 2 Days Alberta Turkey Producers 1 Day Alberta Hatching egg Producers Processors 8 Days APRC Team 22 Days U of A, safety, animal care, animal handling 35 Days Industry Related Workshops 3 9 Days Heavy use by graduate students, undergraduate students, technicians and researchers. Estimated use 44 man hours per day

Days actually populated/days per year Broiler Breeder workshop, AAFRD air quality, AB parks

2 4

ncludes 2 wk cleanup time Under ventilation renovation May7-Oct 30/05

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APRC Evidence of Productivity A. Referred Papers in Scholarly Journals 1. Griffin, A. M., R. A. Renema, F. E. Robinson, and M. J. Zuidhof, 2005. The Influence of rearing light period and the use of broiler or broiler breeder diets on 42-day body weight, fleshing and flock uniformity in broiler stocks. J. Appl. Poult. Res. 14:204-216. 2. Hagen, K. E., L.L. Guan, G. W. Tannock, D. R. Korver, and G. E. Allison. 2005. Detection, characterization, and in vitro and in vivo expression of genes encoding sproteins in Lactobacillus gallinarum strains isolated from chicken. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 71:6633-6643. 3. Johnson, J.M., A. Rajic, L.M. McMullen. 2005. Antimicrobial resistance of selected Salmonella isolates from Alberta food animals and food. Can. Vet. J. 46:141-46. 4. Liang, Y., J. J. Leonard, J. J. Feddes, W. B. McGill. 2005. A simulation model of ammonia volatilization in composting. Transactions of the ASAE. Vol. 47(5): 1667-1680. 5. Segura, J. C., J. Feddes and M. Zuidhof. 2005. Mid-day and night-time cooling of broiler chickens. Journal of Applied Poultry Science. 6. Renema, R. A., J.J.R. Feddes, K. L. Schmid, M. A. Ford, A. R. Kolk, 2005. Internal Egg Temperature in Response to Pre-incubation Warming in Broiler Breeder and Turkey Eggs. J. of Appl. Poult. Res. 7. Wenger II, C.A. Ouellette, J.J.R. Feddes, S.E. Hrudey SE. 2005. The Design and Use of the Personal Environmental Sampling Backpack (PESB II) for Activity-Specific Exposure Monitoring of Career Pig Barn Workers. Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health. 11:315-324. 8. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Mathematical characterization of broiler carcass yield dynamics. Poultry Science 84:1108–1122.

B. Conference Presentations (Abstracts) 1. Franco, D. J., R. A. Renema, and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Calcium absorption: regulation and importance to maintain eggshell quality in poultry. Proceedings of the Prairie Poultry Meeting, Edmonton, AB. 2. Hamidu, J. A. ., L. K. Secretan, J. A. Pasternak, E. E. O’Dea, and G. M. Fasenko, E. O’Dea. 2005. The effect of turkey egg storage on embryonic metabolism. Prairie Poultry Meeting. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. May 5, 2005. 3. Herron, A. N., F. E. Robinson, N. J. Cook, R. A. Renema, D. G. Martz, J. J. R. Feddes and J. S. Church. 2005. The use of digital video recorders, starlight cameras, and Ethovision software for capturing poultry behaviour remotely. Proceedings of the Prairie Poultry Meeting, Edmonton, AB. 4. Holm, D. E., A. B. Smykot, N. J. Cook, G. M. Fasenko, and J. S. Church. 2005. Assessing feather cover by infrared thermography. Prairie Poultry Meeting. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. May 5, 2005. 5. Holm, E. and A. Smykot. 2005. Using infrared thermography imaging to measure feather cover in laying hens. Canadian Poultry. October 2005. Volume 92, Number 10. Pages 30-31. (An Sc 471 student research project.)

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6. Jendral, M. J., D. R. Korver, J. S. Church and J. J. R. Feddes. 2005. Behavioural Repertoire, and Bone Mineral Density and Strength of Layer Hens Housed in Conventional, Modified and Furnished Colony Cages. From Darwin to Dawkins: The Science and implications of Animal Sentience. London, England. March 17-18, 2005. 7. Johnson, I.R., Korver, D.R., Vasanthan, T., Temelli, F. 2005. Beta-glucan depleted barley and oat flours as animal feed. 8. Korver, D. R. 2005. Overview of the immune dynamics of the digestive system. July 31, 2005. Invited presentation given at the Informal Poultry Nutrition Symposium, held in conjunction with the 2005 Poultry Science Association Annual Meeting in Auburn, AL. 9. Kumpula, B. and G. M. Fasenko. 2005. Comparing hatchability, incubation length, and chick quality from three egg sizes from tow modern broiler strains. Canadian Broiler Hatching Egg Producers Association Meeting. April 2005. Ottawa, Ontario. 10. Korver, D. R. 2005. Determination of the density of medullary bone in laying hens. May 5, 2005. Prairie Poultry Meeting. Alberta Poultry Research Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB. 11. Nadeau, K. L., C. M. Riczu, and D. R Korver. 2005. Factors affecting bone mineral density of brown and white laying hens. Poult. Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1):86. 12. Renema, R. A., 2005. Reproductive strategies of breeder hens. Poultry Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1): 90. (Invited Symposium Paper). 13. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson, and M. J. Zuidhof. 2005. Reproductive Attitude: Does Successful Broiler Breeder Management Come Down to This? Proceedings of the Prairie Poultry Meeting, Edmonton, AB. 14. Riczu, C. M., K. L. Nadeau, and D. R. Korver. 2005. Effect of midnight feeding on egg production and quality of white and brown- egg-laying hens. Poult. Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1):62. 15. Robinson, F., B. Wuetherick, C. Strawson, N. Wolanski, S. Greenwood, 2005. Recruiting Animal and Poultry Science Students on Campus: Providing Experiential Opportunities to Benefit Both Urban and Rural Students. Poultry Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1): 66. 16. Robinson, F., B. Wuetherick, C. Strawson, S. Greenwood, N. Wolanski;. 2005. Experiences in Inquiry-Based Learning in an Introductory Animal Science Class: Science Answers to Questions You Didn't Know You Had about Animal Agriculture. Poultry Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1): 66. 17. Rustad, M. E., F. E. Robinson, R. A. Renema, M. J. Zuidhof, and V. L. Carney, 2005. Effects of over feeding on sexual maturation and egg production in 8 strains of broiler breeder hens. Poultry Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1): 48. 18. Rustad, M. E., F. E. Robinson, R. A. Renema, M. J. Zuidhof, and B. Fancher. 2005. Effects of ad libitum feeding on sexual maturation, ovarian morphology, and carcass traits in 8 strains of broiler breeder hens. Poultry Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1): 24. 19. Rustad, M. E., F. E. Robinson, R. A. Renema, M. J. Zuidhof, B. Fancher. 2005. Effects of Ad Libitum Feeding on Sexual Maturation, Ovarian Morphology, and Carcass Traits in 8 Strains of Broiler Breeder Hens. Proceedings of the Prairie Poultry Meeting, Edmonton, AB. 20. Saunders-Blades, J. L. and D. R. Korver. 2005. Effect of 25-OH vitamin D3 on broiler breeder production, hatchability and chick innate immune function. Poult. Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1):86.

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21. Terletski, S. D., A. L. Shannon, L. E. McKeown, E. E. O’Dea, and G. M. Fasenko. 2005. The effect of spraying broiler hatching eggs with electrolysed oxidating water on egg shell microbial load, hatchability, chick quality, and broiler production parameters. Incubation and Fertility Research Group Meeting. Lincoln, UK. September 6, 2005. 22. Terletski, S., Shannon, A., and L. McKeown. 2005. Hatching egg sanitizer shows promise. Canadian Poultry. August 2005. Volume 92, Number 8. Pages 18-19. (An Sc 471 student research project.) 23. Wolanski, N., F. Robinson, R. Renema, V. Carney and B. Fancher. 2005. Weights of yolk reserve and carcass traits of broiler chicks from selected parent stock and pure lines. Poultry Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1): 36. 24. Wolanski, N., F. Robinson, R. Renema, V. Carney, B. Fancher. 2005. Weights of yolk reserves and carcass traits of broiler chicks from selected parent stock and pure lines. Proceedings of the Prairie Poultry Meeting, Edmonton, AB. 25. Ward, P., M LaForge, S. Gibson, L. McMullen, and G. Fasenko. 2005. Broiler barn surface type and presence of organic material influences the ability of disinfectants to reduce bacterial populations. Poultry Sci. 84 (Suppl. 1):61. August 2, 2005. 26. Ward, P., M. Laforge, S. Gibson, L. McMullen, and G. Fasenko. 2005. Broiler barn surface type and presence of organic material influences the ability of disinfectants to reduce bacterial populations. Prairie Poultry Meeting. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB. May 5, 2005. 27. Ward, P., Fasenko, G., Gibson, S. and L. McMullen. 2006. A microbiological assessment of on-farm food safety cleaning methods in broiler barns. Alberta Chicken Producers Newsletter. October 2006. 2 pages. 28. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Statistical comparison of nonlinear breast yield curves. Proceedings of the Prairie Poultry Meeting, June 4-5 Edmonton, AB. 29. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Statistical comparison of nonlinear breast yield curves. Poultry Science 84(suppl. 1):83. 30. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Tying it all together: Final comments. Optimizing the Reproductive Output of Female Broiler Breeders. Poultry Science 84(suppl. 1):235.

C. Scientific and Industry Presentation (with or without Proceedings) 1. Fasenko, G. M. Fertile egg management barn to hatchery. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia, March 15, 2005. 2. Fasenko, G. M. Egg management at the hatchery. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia, March 15, 2005. 3. Fasenko, G. M. Incubation and embryonic development. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia, March 15, 2005. 4. Fasenko, G. M. Embryonic development. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia, March 15, 2005. 5. Fasenko, G. M. Egg transfer and hatching. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia, March 15, 2005. 6. Fasenko, G. M. Chick transport. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia, March 15, 2005.

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7. Fasenko, G. M. Chick quality. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia, March 15, 2005. 8. Fasenko, G. M. Chick quality. 2005 Atlantic Poultry Conference Proceedings. Wolfville, NS. February 17-18. 3 pages. 9. Fasenko, G. M. Increasing hatch in breeder flocks. 2005 Saskatchewan Poultry Industry Conference. Saskatoon, SK. March 4. 10. Gursky, L.J., D.J. Derksen, M.J. vanBelkum, K. Kaur, J.C. Vederas, M.E. Stiles, and L.M. McMullen. 2005. Bacteriocin expression in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum UAL26 can be induced using synthetic piscicolin 126 induction peptide. 8th Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria: Genetics, Metabolism, and Applications. Aug 18 to Sept 1. Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands. 11. Jendral, M.J., J.J.R. Feddes and J.S.Church. 2005. Enriched Housing Environments for layer hens: Behavior and Production. Proceeding s of the 7th International Livestock Environment Symposium, ASAE, St. Joseph, MI 7pp 12. Jendral, M.J. 2005. Alternative Layer Housing in the Netherlands, Switzerland and Sweden. Alberta Egg Producers Annual General Meeting. March 1, 2005. Invited Presentation. 13. Jendral, M. J. 2005. Alternative Layer Hen Housing Systems in Europe. Prairie Poultry Meeting. Edmonton, Alberta. May 5, 2005. Invited Presentation. 14. Jendral, M. J. 2005. Housing Systems, Osteoporosis and Euthanasia: Welfare Implications for Laying Hens. WCVM Animal Welfare Club, University of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. October 24, 2005. Invited Presentation. 15. Jones, T., M. Johns, C. Gill, A. Murray, and L.M. McMullen. 2005. The proteomic response of Escherichia coli filaments at temperatures near the minimum for growth. 92nd Annual Meeting of the International Association of Food Protection. August 14 to 17, Baltimore, MD. 16. Jones, T., M. Johns, C. Gill, A. Murray, and L.M. McMullen. 2005. The proteomic response of E. coli at temperatures just below the minimum for growth. Canadian Meat Science Association Annual Technical Symposium Poster Presentation. February 2 to 5. Gatineau, Quebec. 17. Johnson, J.M., L.D. Saunders, L.M. McMullen, P. Hasselback and M. Marie. 2005. Foreign travel and Campylobacter infections. Western Canada Campylobacter Symposium, October 2-3, Banff Alberta. 18. Johnson, I, Korver, D, Vasanthan, T and Temelli, F. Beta-glucan depleted barley and oat flours as animal feeds. 2005. Proceedings of the 18th North American Barley Researchers Workshop and 4th Canadian Barley Symposium, July 17-20, Red Deer, Alberta. Pg 19-23. 19. Korver, D. R. 2005. Research, Analytical Techniques and Practical Experiences Using HyD™. Proceedings of the 2005 Arkansas Nutrition Conference. Rogers, AR. 12 pages. 20. Korver, D. R. 2005. Immune Function and the Gut: Challenges and Opportunities Proceedings of the 32nd Carolina Poultry Nutrition Conference. Raleigh-Durham, NC. 18 pages.

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21. Korver, D. R. 2005. Vitamin D Metabolites: Why Are They Important? Novus International/DSM Nutritional Products Technical meeting. Guelph, ON. 47 pages. 22. McMullen, L.M. 2005. Agri-Food Discovery Place. 30 minute presentation. Presented to the Expert Committee on Meat and Poultry Products, Lacombe AB. April 30. 25 attendees. 23. McMullen, L.M. 2005. Food Safety in Perspective. Alberta Home Economics Association Annual Conference, May 7, 2005. 24. McMullen, L.M. 2005. Food safety and quality: Challenges and perspectives. 3 hour presentation. September 21. University of Alberta. Presentation to visiting scientists from Heilongjiang, China. 25. McMullen, L.M. 2005. Agri-Food Discovery Place. June 28th. University of Alberta. Presentation to Heilongjiang Food Processing Mission from China. 26. McMullen, L.M. 2005. Agri-Food Discovery Place. Presented to representatives from the Meat and Livestock Industry, Australia and the AAFC Staff, Lacombe AB. November 27. Renema, R. A. 2005. Fine Tuning Female Management. Alberta Poultry Research Centre / Aviagen Broiler Breeder School. Edmonton, AB. 28. Renema, R. A. 2005. Unsettable Eggs: Recognizing Shell Defects and Understanding How they Occur. Alberta Poultry Research Centre / Aviagen Broiler Breeder School. Edmonton, AB. 29. Renema, R. A. 2005. Optimizing Broiler Breeder Production Traits: Understanding what your Feed Ingredients Can do for you. Maple Leaf Broiler Breeder Producer Meeting, March 14. Edmonton, AB. 30. Renema, R. A. 2005. Factors Affecting Egg Shape and the Impact of Setting Eggs Points Down. Vencomatic Global Dealers Meeting. Dec 1-3, Lommel, Belgium. 31. Renema, R. A., and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Examining the Impact of Nutrition on the Fertility of Layer and Broiler Breeders. Maximizing Poultry Performance in the Face of Low Cost Competition. Oct 18 and 19, Dublin, Ireland (In English and Russian). 32. Renema, R. A., and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Examining the Impact of Nutrition on the Lifeof-Flock Production. Proceedings of the Redefining Trace Mineral Nutrition Meeting, Nicholasville, Kentucky, 6 pp. 33. Renema, R. A., and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Managing Female Breeders For Egg Quality and Size. Proceedings of the XXVI Seminario Avicola Internacional of the Asociacion Colombiana de Medicos Veterinarios y Zootecnistas Especialistas en Avicultura (AMEVEA), Paipa, Colombia. 6 pp. 34. Renema, R. A., and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Optimizing Chick Production in Broiler Breeders. Vencomatic Global Dealers Meeting. Dec 1-3, Lommel, Belgium. 35. Renema, R. A., and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Understanding the Function of Light at Critical Points in the Management of Pullet and Laying Hen Lighting Programs. Proceedings of the III Seminario Internacional of the Asociacion Peru de Medicos Veterinarios y Zootecnistas Especialistas en Avicultura (AMEVEA), Lima, Peru. 9 pp. 36. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson and M. J. Zuidhof. 2005. Capturing Reproductive Potential: Manipulating Pullet Growth Profiles and Characterizing Reproductive Responses. Proceedings of the XXVI Seminario Avicola Internacional of the Asociacion

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Colombiana de Medicos Veterinarios y Zootecnistas Especialistas en Avicultura (AMEVEA), Paipa, Colombia. 6 pp. 37. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson and M. J. Zuidhof. 2005. Do we Really Know what a ‘Normal’ Broiler Breeder Hen Looks Like? Proceedings of the 34th Annual Poultry Health Conference. Kitchener, ON., 5 pp. 38. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson, and M. J. Zuidhof. 2005. Management of Lighting and Feeding Programs in Heavy Breeders to Maximize Chick Production and Quality. Proceedings of the III Seminario Internacional of the Asociacion Peru de Medicos Veterinarios y Zootecnistas Especialistas en Avicultura (AMEVEA), Lima, Peru. 9 pp. 39. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson and M. J. Zuidhof. 2005. Reproductive Attitudes: Who is doing the Most to Improve Profitability? Proceedings of the 34th Annual Poultry Health Conference. Kitchener, ON., 5 pp. 40. Renema, R. A., F. E. Robinson, M. J. Zuidhof and L. F. Romero. 2005. Understanding the Impact of Feed Allocation Decisions in Broiler Breeder Management. Pages 45-57 in the proceedings of the 30th Poultry Service Industry Workshop, Banff, AB. 41. Renema, R. A., Managing female breeders for egg quality and size. Saskatchewan Broiler Breeder Producers Meeting, March 5. Saskatoon, SK. 42. Renema, R. A., Managing ovarian function through control of environmental influences. Canadian Poultry Research Council Environment Meeting, March 12. Edmonton, AB. 43. Segura, J. C. and J. J. R. Feddes. 2005. Relationship Between Odour Intensity and Concentration of n-Butanol Paper No. 05-020, CSBE, Winnipeg, MN, 19pp. 44. Sunwoo, H. 2005. Exhibition of IgY products at Food Hotel China 2005, November 15-17 2005, Shanghai, China. Public trade show. 45. Sunwoo, H. 2005. Exhibition of IgY products at Taipei International Food Show, June 1619 2005, Taipei, Taiwan. Public trade show. 46. Ward, P. M. Laforge, S. Gibson, L. McMullen, G. Fasenko. 2005. Broiler barn surface type and presence of organic material influences the ability of disinfectants to reduce bacterial populations. Poultry Sci Assoc Annual Meeting, July 31 – August 3, Auburn, Alabama. 47. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. A decision framework for the broiler chicken supply chain. Recent Advances in Pig and Poultry Modeling symposium, April 11-20, 2005, Ithala, South Africa. 48. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Broiler and breeder economics: How to use economic models when working with producers. Poultry Service Industry Workshop. October 4-6, 2005. Banff Alberta. 49. Zuidhof, M. J., R. A. Renema, and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Decision Support for Broiler Breeder Managers. Aviagen Broiler Breeder School June 21-24, Edmonton, Alberta. 50. Zuidhof, M. J., and F. E. Robinson. 2005. Egg Production and Egg Product Research at the APRC. Expert Committee for Eggs and Egg Products. June 8, 2005. Calgary, Alberta. 51. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Introduction to mixed models. Poultry SAS User Group, Edmonton, Alberta.

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52. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Introduction to body weight analysis: mixed, nonlinear, and nonlinear mixed models. Poultry SAS User Group, Edmonton, Alberta. 53. Zuidhof, M. J. 2005. Yield Dynamics. Presentation to Lilydale Live Operations Technical Group, Oct. 24, 2005, Edmonton, AB. Books and Book Chapters 1. Fasenko, G. M. CD – Incubacion, Embryodiagnostico, y Caudad de Pollito. 2005. Worlds’ Poultry Science Association (Columbia Branch). Bogotá DC, Columbia. 2. Renema, R. A., and F. E. Robinson, 2005. Examining the impact of nutrition on the fertility of broiler breeders. Pp: 127-146 in: Nutritional Approaches to Arresting the Decline in Fertility of Pigs and Poultry. L. Nodett, ed. Waginenen University Press, The Netherlands (In press). 3. Sim, J. S. and H.H. Sunwoo. 2006 The Amazing Eggs: The Nature’s Perfect Functional

Food for Human Health, edited by J. S. Sim and H. H. Sunwoo. University of Alberta Publishing. ISBN 1-896110-26-6.

D. Community Services •

APRC has been involved in WISEST (Women in Scholarship, Engineering, Science and Technology) and IAESTE (International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience) as well as summer student training.

In July 2005, Dr. Gaylene Fasenko accepted the position of WISEST Vice-Chair. Drs. Fasenko and Feddes contributed their time to mentor WISEST and IAEST students. APRC researcher involvement in WISEST and IAESTE programs enables young women and men to gain experience in scientific research, stimulates interest in the field of poultry science and fosters development of international relations. High school and international exchange students who typically have little prior experience in the scientific process, and most often have no prior experience with poultry, become involved in an ongoing research trial for a two or three month period. Students are mentored by researchers, graduate students and technicians, and gain experience interacting with and handling birds, collecting and interpreting data and presenting their research findings. In this short period of time, students develop an appreciation for the rigors of science and the importance of poultry research, and are simultaneously eager and excited to determine the outcome of their hard work. Researchers also benefit from the high level of quality these students bring to the research, and the infusion of fresh ideas, perspectives and questions. During her first year as WISEST Vice-Chair, Dr. Fasenko (in collaboration with the VP Research Office) was successful in obtaining University base budget funding for WISEST ($149,312). This marks the first time since it’s inception in 1982 that WISEST will be part of the University base budget. •

“There’s a Heifer in Your Tank” event. In November 2005, Dr. Robinson hosted third edition of “There’s a Heifer in Your Tank” – Farm Fair Edition - Science Answers to Questions you Didn’t Know You Had about Animal Agriculture” as part of the Edmonton Northlands Farm Fair, at Northlands Park. Five hundred people enjoyed this informative and humorous event. The popularity of this event is growing and the only limitation seems

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to be the size of the venue. Dr. Robinson and his organizing team received the Canadian Agriculture and Agri-food Award of Excellence for Education and Awareness and the Growing Alberta Leadership Award for Building Youth Leadership. •

Frank Robinson and Rob Renema visited several elementary schools in Edmonton as part of Classroom Agriculture Program (CAP). Lynn McMullan mentored Connie Au during her internship with Lilydale Foods, Edmonton, Alberta.

•

Michelle Jendral, a PhD student, participated in Read In Program at the Hazeldean Elementary School. This program involves reading to children in grades kindergarten to 6, to encourage literacy and raise awareness about University research. Michelle talked and read to the students on issues related to poultry and other animal species.

E. Granting Agency Final Reports, Technical Bulletins and Industry Reports 1. Jendral, M. J. 2005. Alternative Layer Hen Housing Systems in Europe. Prepared for Alberta Egg Producers and Alberta Farm Animal Care Association. May 2005. 125pp. Available: www.afac.ab.ca/reports.htm 2. Kumpula, B. L. and G. M. Fasenko, 2005. Comparing hatchability, incubation length, and chick quality from three egg sizes from tow modern broiler strains. Canadian Broiler Hatching Egg Producers Association. 3. Korver, D. R., G. A. Allison and M. Scheck. May, 2005. Effect of Dietary Non-Starch Polysaccharides on Gut Microflora and Immune Function of Broiler Chickens. AARI Project #2001J422. Final report submitted to the Alberta Agriculture Research Institute and Danisco Animal Nutrition. 81 pages. 4. Korver, D. R., R. A. Coleman, M.A. Leslie, R. O. Ball, S. Moehn. May 2005. Rapid Determination of Broiler Amino Acid Requirements and Amino Acid and Energy Availability of Feedstuffs. AARI Project # 2003A111R. Progress report submitted to the Alberta Agriculture Research Institute. 6 pages. 5. Korver, D. R. and J. L. Saunders-Blades. June 2005. Breeder Flock Age and Vitamin D Effects on Broiler Hatchability, Immune System and Bone Characteristics. AARI Project # 2003A026R. Progress report submitted to the Alberta Agriculture Research Institute and DSM Nutritional Products. 10 pages. 6. Vasanthan, T, F. Temelli, D.R. Korver and R. Zijlstra. Evaluation of the use of betaglucan depleted barley/oat flour as animal feed. 7. Zuidhof, M. J., R. A. Renema and F. E. Robinson, 2005. AARI Final Project Report. Optimizing Reproductive Efficiency and Metabolism of Female Broiler Breeders as Affected by Genotype, Feed Allocation and Photostimulation Age. 243 pp. 8. Zuidhof, M. J., J. J. R. Feddes, R. J. Hudson, T. Joro, D. R. Korver, and F. E. Robinson, 2005. A bioeconomic model of the broiler chicken supply chain. Final Report #2001J504. The Alberta Agricultural Research Institute, 9th Floor North, John E. Brownlee Building, 10365-97 Street, Edmonton, Alberta T5J 3W7. 199 pp.

F. Computer Software and Patents 1. Sunwoo, H. H. and J.S. Sim. Anti-gluten egg yolk antibodies for the treatment of celiac disease. US Prov 60/521,394 and international PCT 2003064, April 19, 2005. 2. Sunwoo, H. H., J.S. Sim, W.I. Cho., and M.S. Song. IgY as a Natural Food Preservative

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for Meat Safety. Korean Patent 10-2006-022834. 2005. 3. Zuidhof, M. J., and D. Bignell. BCSCM (Broiler Chicken Supply Chain Model). Version 2.46-2.47. Copyright © 2003-2005 by Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development.

G. APRC Staff and Students Awards and Honors Staff Receiving Award Doug Korver •

Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics Teaching Wall of Fame

Frank Robinson •

Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics Teaching Wall of Fame

Awarded the Ag Club “Teacher of the Year” award

Awarded the Growing Alberta Award for Leadership in Agriculture in the category of Building Youth Leadership

Awarded (along with the teaching team for There’s a Heifer in Your Tank) the Canadian Agriculture and Agri-food Award of Excellence for Education and Awareness

Lynn McMullen • Awarded Teacher of the Year by the Faculty of Agriculture, Forestry and Home Economics

Students Receiving Awards Michelle Jendral •

Doctorate student of Dr. Feddes. Michelle received NSERC Canada Graduate Scholarship. May 2005 – May 2007.

Patric Ward •

Undergraduate Student Certificate of Excellence for research presentation made at the Annual Poultry Science Association Meeting, Auburn, Alabama, August 2, 2005. (Co-supervised with Dr. Gaylene Fasenko and Dr. Lynn McMullen).

APRC Significant Research and Development Outcomes Although previous work at the APRC has shown that providing 1 hour of light to encourage feeding in the middle of the night to laying hens is beneficial, recent studies have not replicated that effect. It appears that, although midnight feeding may be an effective means to treat caged-layer fatigue (CLF; avian osteoporosis), prolonged use of midnight feeding may not be warranted. Other possible explanations could be related to different susceptibilities to CLF among the various strains used over the last few years (Korver).

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Use of 25-OH vitamin D3 (HyD™) in broiler breeder hen diets resulted in improved in vitro ability of broiler chick immune cells to resist bacterial infection. An increase in immune function at hatch may allow broiler chicks to get off to a better start in the barn and resist disease challenges (Korver). Doug Korver spent 3 months in 2005 working with the Bone Biology Group at the Roslin Institute in Scotland. During that time, three different methods of measuring bone mineral density and distribution were used to assess the same bones from laying hens of various ages. With the information gathered, the existing quantitative computed tomography (QCT) technique in use at the APRC will provide more refined results, reducing the number of samples that need to be taken, as well as increasing the sensitivity of determining the effects of dietary and management factors on resistance to caged-layer fatigue (CLF; avian osteoporosis). A spin-off company from the University of Alberta (Cevena Bioproducts) has developed a technique to extract bulk quantities of beta-glucans from oats and barley. The beta glucans are a dietary fibre that have health-related benefits in humans, however, they also reduce the digestibility of barley for poultry. The beta-glucan-depleted barley byproduct could be an excellent, reasonably-priced energy supplement for poultry diets (Vasanthan, Temelli, Zijlstra and Korver). Non-starch polysaccharides such as beta-glucan in barley and arabinoxylans in wheat are antinutritional factors in poultry. Enzymes are available that can be added to the diet to reduce the impact of these compounds on bird performance. Work at the APRC has shown that the use of an enzyme product designed fopr wheat-based diets increased broiler performance, reduced the number of specific pathogens in the digestive tract, and altered the balance of bacterial species in the small intestine and ceca of broilers. The shifts in bacterial populations are consistent with reductions in potential bacterial pathogens (Korver). A rapid method has been developed to determine the availability of amino acids from feedstuffs fro broiler chickens. Using the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation method, availability of amino acids can be determined using much smaller amounts of the test feedstuff, and in a shorter period of time than traditional methods. The availability if IAAO for this purpose will allow evaluation of varieties of feed crops at an earlier stage of development; the more promising candidates can be identified sooner. Feed processing and feed additives can also be evaluated much more efficiently than has been possible in the past (Korver). In June 2005, Frank Robinson, Rob Renema and Martin Zuidhof completed a comprehensive report on several years of breeder research investigating interactions of strain, feed allocation and photostimulation age. The study has contributed to the creation of new tools for assessing hen productivity. This project will yield eight scientific papers publications and two technical bulletins for hatching egg producers, and is drawing widespread attention to our research initiatives. Discussing these results around the world has provided us new insights into how to apply this work as well as how this research program fits into the global poultry arena. One of the most interesting research paths arising from this work is the concept of ‘Reproductive Attitude’. This involves the characterization of the balance between the drive to grow and the drive to lay eggs within a hen and scores the hen on its overall nutrient utilization efficiency based on residual feed intake (calculation of how much feed it theoretically needs for its metabolism, growth, and egg production compared to what it actually eats). More results demonstrating the impact of growth profile on sexual maturation and long-term effects of fleshing on the maintenance of a reproductive effort, predictability of egg weight in time, and bioeconomic efficiency of the process have also been characterized. (Robinson, Renema, Zuidhof).

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The hatching egg module of the Broiler Chicken Supply Chain Model was officially released in 2005. This economic analysis tool has been valuable in determining the economic consequences of the types of management decisions we recommend based on research. This type of thinking has also made it much easier for us to generate an economic impact result on many of our current research findings. For example, one of the papers mentioned above deals entirely with the economics of strain, feed allocation and photostimulation age decisions. A reliable method for analyzing embryonic metabolism has been developed and the equipment is continuing to be refined. The recent successful equipment grant from NSERC has enabled the purchase of an oxygen analyzer to be added. In the past, only carbon dioxide produced could be measured from the embryos and oxygen consumption had to be calculated based on a “best guess� respiratory quotient�. With the addition of the oxygen analyzer the respiratory quotient of modern strains can be established. (Fasenko, Hamidu) With on-farm food safety (HACCP type) programs being implemented, research was needed to determine the effectiveness of current poultry industry cleaning and disinfection procedures in broiler barns. Results showed that there were more total aerobic bacteria recovered from barn corners, which demonstrates why producers must concentrate their cleaning efforts on particular areas in the barns. In commercial barns, litter removal and litter removal plus washing significant impact on levels of pathogenic bacteria. Data obtained also showed that certain disinfectants have a greater effectiveness on bacteria when diligent cleaning is performed prior to their application. This research clearly showed that barn sanitation is a multi-step process with each step playing a crucial role in bacterial reduction. (Fasenko, McMullen, Ward) Vitamin E can positively affect egg production and egg quality and may provide protection from oxidative damage from dietary sources. Laying hens were provided NRC levels or enriched levels of Vitamin E in their feed and were provided either standard canola oil or used fryer oil (as an oxidative challenge). Results from our study showed that layers fed with a high oxidative diet had lower intestinal calcium uptake and lower total egg production than the group of bird receiving canola oil. The feed intake, egg weight, egg shell thickness and egg shell weight were higher for the canola-low vitamin E and restaurant grease-high vitamin E groups. These results may indicate that higher levels of vitamin E were able to enhance reproduction ability of the birds by increasing relative ovary and reproductive tract weight but not sufficient to protect the birds from the higher load of oxidative reactive substances. (D. Franco, R. Renema, F. Robinson) Males in a commercial broiler breeder operation were monitored from hatch through to the end of the breeder period to assess links between chick quality and subsequent growth traits on potential success / survival in the breeder barn. Hatch weight was a poor measure of growth potential to 4 wk of age, although by 4 wk of age BW correlated strongly with all subsequent weights (to 18 wk of age). While variation in BW was uniform throughout growth, individual growth varied widely. The CV for relative gains ranged from a low of 17.2 % in the 4 to 8 wk period to a high of 41.0 % in the 16 to 18 wk period. Males that died during the study had a 5% lower growth trajectory at 4 wk of age as compared to males which survived past 38 wk. Growth profile during rearing appears to have a role in determining which males will survive in the breeder barn. (Robinson, Renema, Zuidhof, Wolanski) Broiler breeder sensitivity to protein level during various phases of the rearing period was examined. For one of four 6-wk periods (1 to 6, 7 to 12, 13 to 18, or 19 to 24 wk of age), dietary balanced protein (DBP) level was increased (HIGH) or decreased (LOW) by 3%, or held (STANDARD). Carcass and reproductive traits at the onset of egg production were examined. Overall, frame, age at first egg, and large yellow follicle counts were not affected by DBP during

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rearing. Varying DBP at the beginning of rearing period had no clear affect on sexual development and fleshing, whereas varying DBP at the end of rearing had no affect on SM parameters. When fed from 7 to 12 wk, DBP level affected traits associated with reproductive development, and DBP from 13 to 18 wk affected BW and composition at SM. Analysis of the residual impact of feeding treatments on egg production traits is underway. (Renema, Robinson, Zuidhof) The impact of egg size on residual yolk sac size and utilization was examined in Ross 708 hatching eggs divided into 3 g ranges (52-54, 55-57, 58-60, 61-63, and 64-66 g). Chicks were dissected between 0 and 10 d of age to show the effect of egg size on residual yolk utilization and growth. As expected, chick weight was affected by egg size and ranged from a high of 45.8 g from 64-66 g eggs to a low of 36.7 g from 52-54 g eggs. The 27% greater size of the chicks from these larger eggs did not last – stabilizing at an approximately 15% size advantage through to 10 d of age. The residual yolk sac weight correlated well with chick at hatch, although the relationship was much weaker by 2 d of age and gone by 6 d of age. Whereas large chicks had a larger yolk sac, it did not appear to deliver a growth advantage. Chicks from 52-60 g eggs increased BW 5.1-fold by 10 d compared to a 4.6-fold increase by chicks from 61-66 g eggs, compensating for differences in hatch weight. Chick size appears to affect growth rate more than residual yolk sac does. (Renema, Robinson, Wolanski). Work continues on IgY Technology: technology transfer and product development. SpiceGuardTM is a prophylactic food preservative for preventing bacterial growth on the surface of food and meat products before packaging or consumption. The product is a non-chemical, 100% natural, means for extending the shelf life of food and so addresses the consumer’s growing demand for natural preservatives. This product cannot induce resistant strains as with antibiotics. NutraGuardTM is a prophylactic functional food in the form of a capsule, a nutritional bar, a tablet and a liquid gel. It can also be used as a food supplement for fortifying prepared foods such as infant formulas, beverages, food supplement packages and encapsulations providing extra protection from bacteria, viruses or allergens. TheraGuardTM are anti-allergen products designed for therapeutic, nutraceuticals, and biomedical applications. DetectionGuardTM as ELISA diagnostic kits for detecting environmental pollutants, food allergens, disease causing factors, hormone residues and pathogens in foods. It can also use the IgY for separation and purification applications. CosmeGuardTM as skin/hair care and cosmetic products in cream, shampoo and hair-dye products. AnimalGuardTM as a feed additive to prevent young cattles from scours. (Hoon Sunwoo and Jeong Sim)

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PRC Annual Report 2005  

Poultry Research Centre Annual report 2005

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