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DECEMBER 2016 • Vol. 22 No. 10

New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists

www.nyscc.org

The Importance of Physicochemical Properties in the Safety Assessment of Skin Care Products

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by Nava Dayan

he first section on the guidelines for testing of chemicals— published in October of 2012 by The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)—outlines a list of relevant physicochemical properties.1 Identification of the composition of interest is the first step in any chemistry-body interaction assessment since it equips the assessor with tools for prediction and drafts a plan for valuation. Properties that do not change the chemical nature of matter are termed “physical” while those that alter the chemical nature of a substance are termed “chemical”. The more detailed the information obtained at the early stage of development, the better one can identify a substance and gain more knowledge of its characteristics. These properties can assist modeling the substance and understanding how it might behave under different conditions. The essence in safety evaluation of compounds we use on a daily basis, such as personal care and cosmetic products, lies in the interaction and impact of the composition on the body. The assessment is based on the postulation that at a given concentration, route of exposure, and intensity, the chemistry (composition applied) introduced to biology (skin) may be recognized by the body as foreign or harmful and, therefore, may generate an unfavorable reaction. The assessor should strive to outline the risks associated with predicted exposure and determine whether the predicted risk is acceptable and the benefit of use justifies the risk. The skin is the largest and most complicated immune organ in the human body. It fulfills multiple roles from acquiring signals from the environment—communicated via sophisticated signaling cascades—to other internal components of the body via circulation and vice versa. Its structure and composition provides a very sensitive responsive flow of stimuli inside and out. To add to this complexity, the skin hosts an abundance of biota—essential contributors to its maintenance—which prevent the proliferation and pathogenicity of opportunistic bacteria and fungi. Certain treatments and practices foster biota imbalance leading to impaired biological barrier, potential disease, and abnormal sensitivity. The first and most important step in safety assessment of skin care ingredients and compositions is the characterization of the compounds applied, including their chemistry, physical properties, stability, and overall nature. The collection of such information at the early stage of (Continued on page 2)

N Y S C C H O L I D A Y P A R T Y • D E C E M B E R 1 s t Maritime Parc, Jersey City, New Jersey (see page 5)


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2016 NYSCC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & PROGRAM CHAIRS Chair Rey Ordiales (732) 878-7798 reyordiales@outlook.com

Chair-ELECT Marie Thadal (609) 712-3716 chairelect@nyscc.org

TrEasurEr Cathy Piterski (201) 675-3799 cpiterski@essentialingredients.com

sECrETary Giorgino Macalino (862) 324-2749 Secretary@nyscc.org

advisor Kim Burch (609) 443-2385 Kim.Burch@elementis.com

housE Mohamed Abdulla (973) 487-6572 house@nyscc.org

MEMbErship John Carola JohnC@protameen.com

prograM John Goffredo (267) 318-6168 john.goffredo@univarusa.com

CoMMuniCaTions Stephen Weinberg (973) 307-4854 webmaster@nyscc.org

spECiaL EvEnTs Gillian Ratto (723) 788-7320 Gillian.Ratto@elementis.com

CosMETisCopE EdiTor Roger McMullen roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

CosMETisCopE assisTanT EdiTor Joe Albanese (908) 456-2968 joealbanese2@gmail.com

CosMETisCopE advErTising Bret Clark rbclark@ashland.com

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The Importance of Physicochemical Properties

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(Continued from page 1)

product development is essential to the project path and its success. The safety assessment of skin care products is determined by their detailed compositions; i.e. the individual raw materials that form the overall product. Raw materials should be characterized for the following: • Chemical structure, molecular weight, and its innate stability under variety of conditions. • Physical properties, such as appearance, color, density, particle size, electrical charge, light absorption, and, when relevant, melting point, boiling point, freezing point, flash point, and minimum ignition temperature. When determining particle size, it should be highlighted that the average particle size is not sufficient to understand the particulate properties, and size distribution should be established so one can assess the size of the particles comprising the majority of the batch. • Level of purity as well as level and nature of impurities. These are key factors since impurities, although usually at lower concentration than the primary ingredient, can impart a toxicological effect that is irrelevant to the core compound and can be minimized or eliminated if the purity is higher. A validated analytical method should be developed and utilized to determine purity and impurity levels to ensure batch-to-batch consistency. According to the EU Commission guidelines published in November of 2013: “When chemically well-defined substances are present, their quantity and molecular formula should be given together with their analytical specifications (degree of purity, identification of major impurities, criteria, and test methods employed).”2 Further, in this document it is outlined that, “Traces can originate from the following sources: impurities in the raw materials/substances; the manufacturing process; potential chemical evolution/interaction; and/or migration of substances in the product that could occur under normal storage conditions and/or through contact with the packaging material.” • In the case of compounds that are extracted with solvents, levels of residual solvents should be determined. • Heavy metals present should be specified. • Solubility should be provided in a variety of relevant solvents. • The pH in water should be determined and recorded. The skin’s normal pH is around 5.5. If the pH generated by the compound is 2 or lower, or 11.5 or higher, the compound is considered as corrosive to the skin and cannot be used in a formulation, or should be neutralized. The interplay between the varieties of physicochemical properties may allow, in part, predicting the interaction of the compound with the skin and hence its toxic potential. This assessment, of course, does not release one from the need to empirically conduct a battery of customized safety assessment studies, but should be part of the overall assessment and justification of theorized risk. Composed of keratin filled corneocytes and surrounded by highly organized lamellar structures, a healthy intact upper skin layer (stratum corneum) is lipophilic and relatively dry (holds around 15% water). Therefore, it is generally assumed that lipophilic compounds will partition easier into the stratum corneum. This means that a lipophilic compound (depending on other relevant properties, such as molecular weight and electric charge) may either remain in the skin’s upper layer, generating a reservoir, or further partition or absorb into deeper layers, such as the viable epidermis, dermis, or vascular network. The lipophilicity of a compound is determined by it octanol/water partition coefficient or Log P value. This value reflects the ratio of concentrations of a compound in a mixture of octanol and water that are immiscible at equilibrium. The coefficient reflects the measure of the difference in solubility in the two

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phases. The higher the solubility in octanol, the higher the lipophilicity, and vice versa. Often, Log P values are used as indicators of a molecule’s ability to penetrate the skin. The general view for the threshold of molecular weight associated with penetration into the skin is 500 Da. This means that compounds that are higher in molecular weight, such as polymers, will remain on the surface of the skin and do not penetrate. This, however, does not imply that they will not impart a biological effect, but that this effect will not be directly associated with the polymer chemistry. For example, hyaluronic acid with molecular weight of 2 x 106 Da, will not penetrate uncompromised skin. It may, however, elevate the stratum corneum water content by capturing water that attempts to leave the body (through the skin to the environment), thereby reducing trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). In the long term, such an effect can change the skin’s biota population and also allow higher solubility and skin partitioning of water soluble compounds in the applied base. If the compound applied to the skin generates a reservoir in the stratum corneum and remains there for a sufficient period of time (not further partitioning into the epidermis), it will most likely be removed with cells that are naturally exfoliated from the skin. If it penetrates beyond the epidermis into the vascularized dermis, it is reasonable to assume that certain amounts will be absorbed into the vascular system to be distributed to the internal organs. Since the skin is positively charged, cationic molecules may exhibit better adherence to the stratum corneum. Here too, depending on other properties, cationic compounds may remain at the upper layer or partition deeper into the skin. The solubility of the compound in the base applied to skin is a crucial aspect to study. Skin absorption is highly dependent on the concentration presented to it. The penetration of molecules into the skin follow Fick’s law of simple diffusion. According to Fick’s law, the flux of molecules will travel from regions of high concentration to regions of low concentration, with a magnitude that is proportional to the concentration gradient. Since the maximum concentration is directly associated to its solubility, the higher the solubility, the higher the penetration, and therefore, the higher the potential exposure and risk. This law does not apply to compounds in their particulate form, such as powders. If a compound absorbs UV or visible light, it may exhibit the potential to be photo-toxic (i.e. photoirritating, photo-sensitizing, or photo-genotoxic). This means that by absorbing radiation, a molecule may interact with the skin resulting in a toxic effect. Since photo-toxicity requires that a molecule absorbs radiation, compounds that do not absorb radiation cannot be photo-toxic. Therefore, such an effect is not of concern and should only be part of the test battery if the interaction is clear or at the borderline. When it comes to the extraction of natural compounds, in which total composition characterization can be difficult and sometimes impossible, the approach should be to focus on the following:

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• The principal compound with the highest concentration in the composition. • Identification of key chemistries that are thought or known to impart the biological activity as well as their properties and concentration. • Residual solvents. • Heavy metals. • Microbiological contamination. • Batch-to-batch consistency of the above. Finally, outlining and documenting the physicochemical properties of the compound or composition of interest should serve for the utilization of in silico approaches to elucidate safety. A good example is structure-activity relationships (SAR). In silico methods are virtual screening techniques and consist of evaluations carried out by computerized methods that use information to compare new or unknown (Continued on page 4)

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The Importance of Physicochemical Properties

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(Continued from page 3)

chemistries to an existing pool of data, and drawing correlation and relevancy. Such tools are used for the prediction of toxic effects using special algorithms. It should be acknowledged that such systems may sometimes provide false information since the algorithm employed may not be relevant, or when a biological or physical effect, such as metabolism or degradation, is not taken into consideration.

Concluding remarks In summary, whether we are dealing with a raw material, blend, natural extract, composition, or formulation, the understanding and collection of physicochemical properties is the first and most essential step in product development for safety assessment. This information should be utilized in the overall evaluation, and be part of the product information package for the product. It should pave a path forward and help make decisions in regard to the sequence of studies that should be conducted.

references 1. OECD; http://www.oecd.org/chemicalsafety/testing/TG%20List%20EN%20Aug%202012.pdf 2. Annex I EU Commission http://eurlex.europa.eu/legalcontent/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32013D0674 &qid=1395764232390&from=FR:PDF Disclaimer: This article is not intended to establish industry or other standards, laws, or regulations. Rather, it merely aims to share knowledge and provide key scientific tools to readers. This article originally appeared in the January 6, 2015 issue of Happi Magazine. Reprinted with permission; Š 2015 Rodman Media.

About the Author

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ava Dayan, Ph.D. has 25 years of experience in the skin care segment, and has yielded more than 150 publication credits in numerous industry-respected journals and four books. She was awarded the InCosmetics Gold Award for innovation and commensurate recognition from the NYSCC and the CRS for excellence. Dr. Dayan is the owner of Dr. Nava Dayan L.L.C, a skin science and research consultancy serving the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and personal care industries. The services of Dr. Nava Dayan L.L.C. include: product feasibility evaluation in skin care; composition of R&D plans covering efficacy and toxicology; planning, execution, and data interpretation into claims, formulations, delivery for improved efficacy, and attenuated toxicity. A sample of expertise includes: drug-skin interactions, bio-markers (genomics and proteomics), skin/age related sensitivities, inflammatory skin disorders, innate immunity, and biota. Dr. Dayan can be contacted by e-mail at: nava.dayan@verizon.net.

Like, Connect & Tweet About Us!

FACEBOOK: NEW YORK LINKED IN: NEW YORK SCC TWITTER: @NYSCC INSTAGRAM: NYSCCMAIN SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS These connections are possible by the NYSCC Social Media Committee

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NYSCC Holiday Party • December 1st

Come join your colleagues of the nysCC for tons of holiday cheer in support of the Chemical Education Foundation’s “you be the Chemist!” • Location: Maritime Parc – 84 Audrey Zapp Drive, Jersey City • Time: 6:00-11:00 p.m. – Happy Hour and Cocktail Reception • Attire: Cocktail Cheer • Tickets: $75 SCC members and non-members Additional questions, please contact Gillian Ratto (gillian.ratto@elementis.com). Live Band!! Big Dance Floor!! Located on the waterfront in Jersey City, gazing at the city lights! For registration and more information please go to www.nyscc.org.

Making Personal Personal Car Caree Beautiful®

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The Future of Sustainability February 15, 2017

seasons Westwood • Washington Township, ny

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ustainability is a wide reaching term that covers many aspects of the cosmetics and personal care industry. This event aims to explore several aspects of sustainability and how they pertain to our responsibilities both as scientists and businesses. Green chemistry can reduce pollutants and lower the energy needed to make products. The repurposing of products originally considered waste not only reduces our footprint but also helps our bottom lines. Finally, understanding the commitments we have to customers to create products that improve both their lives and the world around them allows us to discuss the aspects of sustainability that reach beyond the products we create. Event chair: Elizabeth Kaufman (eak393@nyu.edu) For registration and more information please go to www.nyscc.org.

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Eco-Evolution January 25, 2017 • 4:00 – 8:00 p.m. Chart house • Weehawken, nJ

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Event Chair: bruce h. victor, bhvictor@icloud.com

he January meeting brings two researchers to the New York Chapter who are helping to save our planet in different ways. Jeffrey Brooks is working to create cosmetic ingredients using agricultural products with a low environmental footprint and minimal impact on global warming. Dr. Sylvia Earle is a living legend whose life-long mission is to save our oceans and accomplishments have received world-wide recognition. Inspired by their efforts, our industry is speaking out for its concern for the global environment, investigating new ways to make our products with an eye on the future of mankind.

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American Marine Biologist, Explorer, Author, and Lecturer – Sylvia Earle, Ph.D.

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ational Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Sylvia A. Earle— called "Her Deepness" by the New Yorker and New York Times, "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress, and first "Hero for the Planet" by Time magazine—is an oceanographer, explorer, author, and lecturer. She has experience as a field research scientist, government official, and director for corporate and nonprofit organizations, including the Kerr McGee Corporation, Dresser Industries, Oryx Energy, the Aspen Institute, the Conservation Fund, American Rivers, Mote Marine Laboratory, Duke University Marine Laboratory, Rutgers Institute for Marine Science, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, and Ocean Futures. Formerly chief scientist of NOAA, Earle is the founder of Deep Ocean Exploration and Research, Inc., founder of Mission Blue and SEAlliance, and chair of the Advisory Councils of the Harte Research Institute and the Ocean in Google Earth. She has a B.S. degree from Florida State University, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Duke University, and 22 honorary degrees. She has authored more than 190 scientific, technical, and popular publications; lectured in more than 80 At a habitat’s hemispheric window, countries; and appeared in hundreds of Dr. Earle shows algae to an engineer. radio and television productions. Earle has led more than a hundred expeditions and logged more than 7,000 hours underwater, including: leading the first team of women aquanauts during the Tektite Project in 1970; participating in ten saturation dives, most recently in July 2012; and setting a record for solo diving in 1,000-meter depth. Her research concerns Photograph by Bates Littlehales. marine ecosystems with special reference to exploration, conservation, and the development and use of new technologies for access and effective operations in the deep sea and other remote environments. Her special focus is on developing a global network of areas on the land and in the ocean to safeguard the living systems that provide the underpinnings of global processes, from maintaining biodiversity and yielding basic life support services to providing stability and resiliency in response to accelerating climate change. Earle is the recipient of more than a hundred national and international honors and in 2014 was named a Glamour Woman of the Year. Other honors include the 2011 Royal Geographical Society Gold Medal, 2011 Medal of Honor from the Dominican Republic, 2009 TED Prize, Netherlands Order of the Golden Ark, Australia's International Banksia Award, Italy's Artiglio Award, the International Seakeepers Award, the International Women's Forum, the National Women's Hall of Fame, Academy of Achievement, Los Angeles Times Woman of the Year, and medals from the Explorers Club, the Philadelphia Academy of Sciences, Lindbergh Foundation, National Wildlife Federation, Sigma Xi, Barnard College, and the Society of Women Geographers. D E C E M B E R

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Moisturization Through the Ages – Geoffrey Brooks

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will discuss some of the highlights on the important dynamics of how water works within the skin and hair in relation to water in the environment, and what the cosmetic industry has done to enhance the skin’s appearance by topically applying products. I am very proud and honored to speak on the same platform as Dr. Sylvia Earle who has spent a life-time understanding the dynamics which help to keep our oceans (70% of the planet!) healthy. Up to 60% of the adult body is water, and the skin contains 64% water. As we are terrestrial beings, we live in a very thin atmosphere. Globally, it contains only 0.04% of the world’s fresh water. Not much!!! It is measured by humidity, and your hair and skin are moisturerized when it is saturated (100% RH). Under desert conditions (10% RH), your skin and hair are dried out! External environmental moisture is very important. My previous experience includes working for Beecham (UK) on Brylcreem (about 50 years ago), which was described as the best moisturizing hair cream! I also worked on several skin care products (e.g., Margaret Astor) and understood the importance of moisturizing the skin to relieve dryness and provide a fresher look. Unfortunately the improved appearance of skin and hair was only transitory. Much effort was put into making the effects provided by moisture in your product, and from the body, last longer for greater consumer satisfaction. Moisturization was one claim we were allowed to make for our products, and perhaps the only real claim we are allowed to make now. Temporary relief of dry skin with a moisturizer is not treatment with a drug! Over the years, science has provided a good understanding on how best to moisturize the skin, how the skin uses moisture, and how the skin regulates itself to provide optimal homeostasis. Utilizing a good understanding of the functioning of the skin’s own master regulators (cytokines), it is possible to design analogs which will help optimize this process by up-regulating aquaporins (the cell’s water channeling/optimization mechanism) and other extra-cellular matrix components. We will discuss how these and other approaches can be used to more effectively provide the consumer with greater satisfaction.

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geoffrey brooks Geoffrey Brooks graduated from the University of London with a B.Sc. in Chemistry in 1966. Initially, he went to work for Beecham in Product Development on haircare products (Brylcreem, Silvikrin), then on bath products (Vitabath, Badedas, Midas), and later he helped introduce the Lancaster cosmetic line into the U.S. In 1974 he joined Croda in Technical Sales and Marketing, introducing new proteins, emulsifiers, hair conditioners, and waxes. In 1984 Geoffrey co-founded Brooks Industries, and functioned as CTO – Brooks Industries, introducing many innovative cosmetic ingredients, including yeast extracts, plant proteins, liposomes, and other advanced effective skin delivery systems. Brooks Industries was later sold to Arch Chemicals and provided the basis for their cosmetic specialty chemical business. From 2001 to 2008 he functioned as a roving technical scientific ambassador within Arch in an effort to provide cross business opportunities. In 2008 he joined Solazyme, Inc. in San Francisco as VP & General Manager for Nutrition and Personal Care. Two years later Geoffrey "retired”! However, he still kept very active, helping the University of California market their patented cosmetic peptides. He has also assisted personal care ingredient and nutritionally inspired start-up companies. Most recently, he has served as scientific advisor to Botaneco (located in Calgary, Canada) on their novel seed extraction technologies, which gently release the constituent bio-components in an environmentally friendly manner. The focus has been on utilizing agricultural products which have a very low water footprint, something increasingly important in a warming and changing world.

registration information The meeting will be from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Pre-registration cost SCC members $45 Non-SCC members $75 Students/Unemployed $10/$0 Emeritus members $0

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At door cost $70 $110 $50/$0 $40

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ACME-HARDESTY RENEWABLE, SUSTAINABLE, BIO-BASED PRODUCTS With a 70-year history of solution-based sourcing in bio-based products, Acme-Hardesty has earned the distinction of being RSPO-certified, with many of our products being BioPreferred®. New Product Introduction • Ecomyx Beads – An environmentally friendly alternative to plastic microbeads An Exclusive Representative of Sharon Labs Preservative Solutions • Sharon Biomix – A full line of natural-based preservative solutions • Sharomix Blends – For broad-spectrum, focused protection  • SharoMax Preservative Line – A phenoxyethanol-free preservative solution • Advanced Line – Innovative blends using non-traditional ingredients • Full Line of Parabens and Paraben Blends Palm-Based Oleo Chemicals • Glycerin 99.7% , Fatty Acids, Fatty Alcohols, IPP, IPM and MCT Oil (CCTG) Castor Oil & Derivatives • Pale Pressed & Castor Oil USP, Castor Wax and 12-Hydroxystearic Acid It’s only Bio.Logical. to contact us: (800) 223-7054 acme-hardesty.com

2017 NYSCC Ski Trip February 24, 2017 hunter Mountain, new york

Join the nysCC for a day of skiing or boarding. We will spend the day speeding down the slopes and then gather for a warm lunch at the mountain lodge. Event Chair: Amy Marshall (amy.marshall@altana.com) For registration and more information please go to www.nyscc.org.

Eighth Biennial Holistic Cosmetic Symposium & Suppliers’ Showcase soCiETy oF CosMETiC ChEMisTs – Twin Cities Chapter

– Call for papers – Holistic Symposium • March 21, 2017

Earle brown heritage Center • brooklyn Center, Minnesota Authors are invited to submit titles and abstracts for original papers to be presented in podium format. All topics related to Natural and Green Science will be considered. Topics of particular interest include: • Organic Ingredients • Green Packaging • • Natural Preservatives • Green Manufacturing • Formulating Green • • Sustainable or Fair Trade Ingredients • Biodiversity and Ethical Sourcing • • Marketing and Consumer Trends • Regulatory Updates Tradenames cannot be used in the abstract or presentation.

dEadLinE: december 27, 2016 Abstracts should be submitted via e-mail to Dawn Thiel: dawn.thiel@beraca.com The Holistic Committee will review abstracts and select papers by January 13, 2017.

Come be a part of the SCC’s original Green Symposium! For suppliers’ interested in participating in the afternoon showcase, a separate packet will be sent out in November. 8

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NYSCC Open Innovation Seminar March 23, 2017 pleasantdale Château • West orange, nJ

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enry Chesbrough popularized the phrase “open innovation” in his 2003 book Open Innovation: The New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology. He described the concept as, “the use of purposive inflows and outflows of knowledge to accelerate internal innovation and expand markets for external use of innovation, respectively.” Open innovation assumes that firms should use external ideas as well as internal ideas to advance their technology. As boundaries have become more permeable, innovations can easily transfer inward and outward. Companies cannot afford to rely entirely on their own research, but should buy or license processes or inventions from other companies or research universities. In addition, internal inventions not being used should be taken outside the company through licensing, joint ventures, and spin-offs. Join us in March as a group of diverse experts illuminate the ways open innovation can stimulate your company’s future. Learn the benefits, challenges, and potential pitfalls when you explore opportunities with other companies through partnerships and licensing and with universities through their technology transfer systems. Anyone with a concern for the central role innovation plays in commercial success in the 21st century cannot afford to miss this exciting event. Event Chair: Mohamed Omer (mohamed_omer@hotmail.com) For more information, visit www.nyscc.org.

Globalization of the Emerging Markets Bric 'N Brexit April 19, 2017 The bethwood • Totowa, nJ

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An Evening Update on Markets, Business Climates, and Culture in these Dynamic Regions

razil, Russia, India, and China are collectively referred to as the BRIC countries, and are among the fastest growing developing markets in the world. Collectively, and Brazil individually, are culturally diverse, and major consumers of personal care products and fragrances. Brexit has been an earthquake that has set the entire European continent rolling in terms of currency fluctuations, intercountry relationships, and many other facets, too numerous to mention. It will affect how markets interact and develop enormously over the years. As more companies are embracing globalization to reach new customers in new markets, a greater understanding of culture, consumer preferences, important product types, and regulatory issues in these vast and growing markets is essential. Event chairs: Michael Smith (MSmith@rd.us.loreal.com) and Mavis Dennis (mavis_dennis@colpal.com). For registration and more information please go to www.nyscc.org. V O L U M E

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The Soul & Science of Beauty. www.evonik.com/personal-care

91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium July 9-12, 2017

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The City College of new york • new york, ny

teve Herman, Program Chair of the NYSCC, and Kaushal Rege of Arizona State University are chairing a session on Colloids and Surface Science in Medicine & Personal Care Products at the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium being held at The City College of New York next summer. In addition, the NYSCC is sponsoring the keynote speaker, Ricardo Diez, for this session.

Ricardo Diez, Ph.D. – Keynote Speaker

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r. Diez has been working in the cosmetic industry for more than 35 years holding senior positions in the R&D and Product Development Laboratories in companies that develop and market cosmetic products (Procter & Gamble, Dial Corp, Chanel) as well as in companies that manufacture cosmetic ingredients (Miranol, Stepan, Witco). Over the years, he has synthesized new cosmetic compounds and developed and marketed a good number of cosmetic products protected by patents. He regularly gives lectures in congresses and symposiums, and teaches courses and seminars on cosmetic science for the International Federation of Society of Cosmetic Chemists (IFSCC), the U.S. Society of Cosmetic Chemists, and the Center for Professional Advancement. He was selected recently by the IFSCC to summarize the progress of the cosmetic industry during the past 50 years. For more information about the event visit: www.colloids2017.org. If you have any further questions about the NYSCC’s sponsorship or involvement in this event, please contact Steve Herman at steveh50@optonline.net.

Call for Papers

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he Cosmetiscope editorial committee invites all interested parties to submit feature technical articles for publication in the NYSCC monthly newsletter. Authors of feature articles are eligible to win the prestigous NYSCC Literature Award ($1,000) for the best front-page article published during the calendar year. Also, authors receive $200 reimbursement to attend a theatrical performance of their choice. Writing an article for your peers is a very rewarding experience, both personally and professionally, and would reserve your place in NYSCC history. You may choose whatever topic you feel would be interesting to fellow colleagues in our industry. We also welcome any other types of commentaries or articles that may be published in the Career Corner, Technical Tidbit section, or as a Letter to the Editor. Please send correspondence to: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu.

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Society of Cosmetic Chemists 2016 Continuing Education Program Schedule

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he SCC is dedicated to providing educational opportunities that serve the needs of professionals in our industry. Our instructors are highly qualified industry experts. You will come away from these small, interactive courses having gained the knowledge needed to advance your professional development.

December 8 Clinical and Instrumental Testing of Skin and Skin Care Products • Randall Wickett, Ph.D. December 14 Fragrance in Personal Care • Steve Herman To register or to learn more please visit www.scconline.org. If you have questions please call (212) 668-1500 or email dscelso@scconline.org. All courses will be at the SCC National Office in New York City unless otherwise detailed. *If four or more employees from the same company register, $25 can be deducted off each registration fee. **Customized Onsite Courses can also be arranged. Please call Doreen Scelso at (212) 668-1500 for further information

Monthly Meeting Group Discount The nysCC is offering a group discount of 15% to companies who send 5 or more employees to a monthly meeting. all five employees would need to be registered at the same time to receive the discount. once purchased, registrations are non-refundable.

JournaL oF CosMETiC sCiEnCE The Official Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists CaLL For ManusCripTs

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he Society of Cosmetic Chemists is soliciting scientific manuscripts concerned with cosmetics or the sciences underlying cosmetics, as well as papers of interest to the cosmetic industry for publication in the Journal of Cosmetic Science, The Official Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists. The JOURNAL will consider manuscripts for publication in the following categories, provided they are prepared in proper scientific style and adequately referenced: • Original articles • Review articles • Technical notes • General articles • Preliminary communications • Letters to the Editor SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPTS Manuscripts submitted for publication should be accompanied by a cover letter and sent via e-mail to dscelso@scconline.org. Additional information is available from the SCC National Office: www.scconline.org.

Make note of it… Send news of interest, guest editorials, and comments to roger McMullen, Editor E-mail: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu V O L U M E

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Upcoming 2016-17 NYSCC Events Calendar • For updated nysCC information, visit us on the web at: www.nyscc.org • For national sCC information: www.scconline.org december 1 CEF Charity Event/nysCC officer installation, Maritime parc, Jersey City, nJ January 25 Eco-Evolution, Chart house, Weehawken, nJ February 15 The Future of sustainability, seasons Westwood, Washington Township, nJ February 24 nysCC ski Trip, hunter Mountain, ny March 23 open innovation, pleasantdale Château, West orange, nJ april 19 globalization of the Emerging Markets - bric 'n brexit, The bethwood, Totowa, nJ May 2-3 nysCC suppliers’ day, Jacob Javits Convention Center, new york, ny July 9-12 91st aCs Colloid and surface science symposium, The City College of new york, new york, ny september Tbd Culinary Event, location Tbd september Tbd Fashion, beauty and Technology, new york, ny october 12 innovations in Textured hair Care, grand summit hotel, summit, nJ november 8 nysCC board Transition Meeting, The venetian, garfield, nJ

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NYSCC Historian

he NYSCC Executive Board would like to welcome our new Historian, Sophia Chen. If there are any historical documents, photographs, etc. that you would like to share with other members of the NYSCC, please contact Sophia. She can be reached at historian@nyscc.org.

Employment Opportunities

n Senior Scientist – Sun Care Edgewell Personal Care Products • Allendale, NJ

n Application Laboratory Chemist Gattefossé • Paramus, NJ

n Junior Chemist – Cosmetics Repechage • Secaucus, NJ

n Technical Sales Person LANXESS Corporation Mid Atlantic region (Philadelphia, New Jersey, New York)

n R&D Manager Tropichem Research Labs, LLC • Jupiter, FL n Senior Chemist II Zotos (a subsidiary of Shiseido) • Darien, CT n Product Compliance Manager Inolex, Inc. • Philadelphia, PA n Chemistry Associate II Vizuri Health Sciences • Baltimore, MD 12

n Account Manager SEPPIC Inc. • Fairfield, NJ and/or home office n Customer Service Representative Inolex, Inc. • Philadelphia, PA n R&D Group Leader/Makeup and Skincare Kolmar Labs/K.D.C. • Port Jervis, NY

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Cosmetiscope - December 2016  
Cosmetiscope - December 2016