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OCTOBER 2017 • Vol. 23 No. 8

New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists

Table of Contents Heat and Hair: Finding the Blance Between Style Needs and Hair Health 1 Letter from the Chair 2 In Memoriam: Davis Gittleman 2 Innovation in Textured Hair Care Agenda 6 Event Location 6 Texture of the Week 7 Innovation in Textured Hair Care Committee 7 Innovation in Textured Hair Care Sponsors 7 Innovation in Textured Hair Care Speakers and Abstracts 8-13 Many Thanks to Our NYSCC Volunteers 14 Employment Opportunities 15

www.nyscc.org

Heat and Hair: Finding the Balance Between Style Needs and Hair Health

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…by Jaesik Hahn, Amy Marconnet, and Tahira Reid

espite widespread use of flat irons among individuals with textured hair, surprisingly little is known about how one should use this device to cater to each person’s unique needs. For example, flat iron manufacturers recommend temperature ranges for different hair types to achieve the best results; however, after compiling their guidelines, one can easily identify the ambiguity of their hair typing (e.g., thin, fine, wavy, curly). More problematic is the inconsistency in the hair typing and corresponding temperature recommendation across manufacturers.1 In fact, the meaning of “the best results” itself is already nebulous enough because everyone’s grooming and styling goals are unique. On the other hand, both users and scientific studies have repeatedly reported the detrimental effects of heat on hair. Studies generally focused on the mechanism of heat damage and contributed to better understanding of how heat degrades hair structures by reducing mechanical strength and structural integrity of the strands.2-6 Unfortunately, while doing so, they have neglected the crucial question of flat iron users: Given my grooming/styling goals, how much heat can I use without severe damage? This is not an easy question to answer because the interactions between various factors involved in flat ironing are not well understood. Thus, even the most experienced hair stylist can only answer broadly that too much heat can be bad because the specific consequence of using heat is uncertain. This causes a problem because uncertainty breeds careless optimism and unreasonable pessimism in extreme cases. The result is either overuse of heat and ensuing frustration of burned hair or an unnecessarily exaggerated fear of heat. Both extremes often lead to the complete avoidance of heat. The recent Natural Hair Movement among significant numbers of people with textured hair has provided both utilitarian and ideological perspectives that support the reduced use of heat and chemicals. However, if one simply avoids heat due to the fear of heat damage while repressing the desire to try new styles that require the use of heat, it greatly limits one’s creative self and freedom of style choice. (Continued on page 3)

I N N O V A T I O N I N T E X T U R E D H A I R C A R E October 12th • Chart House, Weehawken, NJ


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2017 NYSCC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & PROGRAM CHAIRS CHAIR Marie Thadal chairelect@nyscc.org (609) 712-3716

CHAIR-ELECT Cathy Piterski cathypiterski@otponline.net (347) 901-3634

TREASURER Michael Smith Treasurer@nyscc.org 908-625-4331

SECRETARY Giorgino Macalino (862) 324-2749 Secretary@nyscc.org

ADVISOR Rey Ordiales Reyordiales@outlook.com 732-878-7798

HOUSE Mohamed Abdulla (973) 487-6572 house@nyscc.org

MEMBERSHIP John Carola JohnC@protameen.com

PROGRAM Steve Herman program@nyscc.org (973) 479-5702

COMMUNICATIONS Stephen Weinberg (973) 307-4854 webmaster@nyscc.org

SPECIAL EVENTS Amy Marshall amy.marshall@altana.com (908) 806-4664

COSMETISCOPE EDITOR Roger McMullen roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

COSMETISCOPE ASSISTANT EDITOR Joe Albanese (908) 456-2968 joealbanese2@gmail.com

COSMETISCOPE ADVERTISING Bret Clark rbclark@ashland.com

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Letter from the Chair

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…Marie Renee Thadal, Coptis Inc.

o, the NYSCC Educational Program for 2017 will stage its finale on Thursday October 12th! The chapter’s last program event of the year will be held at the beautiful venue, the Chart House in Weehawken, NJ, overlooking the Hudson River with an amazing view of the New York City skyline. I am pleased that our members are eagerly taking advantage of the NYSCC monthly programs. They are planned strategically for our market to discover innovation and stimulate creativity. The October program features Innovation in Textured Hair Care and is designed to equip our members with the tools to capitalize on this growing market segment. Scientists and influencers who will present at the event will share their unique perspective and expertise on the subject. The hair care market, according to an IBIS world report, is the fastest growing segment—hence, a very good reason for holding the October 12th event! Furthermore, new research from Mintel—featured in the breaking news section of Happi.com on September 20, 2017—reveals that shampoo sales among Black consumers are expected to grow 7.3 percent to reach an estimated $473 million in 2017, the largest percent growth seen in the category in the last five years. “Hair care brands need to keep the pulse on the ethnic markets so they stay relevant as this influential segment becomes a larger part of the marketplace,” said Toya Mitchell, Multicultural Analyst at Mintel. As you can see, you cannot afford to miss this event. If you have not registered to attend, be sure to do so today. While finalizing your schedule for the year, please visit the website for more information on the upcoming NYSCC for Education Charity event taking place in conjunction with National’s 71st Annual Meeting and Technology Showcase on Monday, December 11th. Details on sponsoring and attending will soon be available on the NYSCC.org event page. Giorgino Macaliano already has a team in place. You do not want to miss this final celebration, which will take place at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York City, closing a successful 2017 year! As this year’s NYSCC programming ends, do not worry! The volunteers led by the chapter’s Chair-elect Cathy Piterski are carefully planning and crafting an NYSCC 2018 Educational Program promising to be out of this world! In closing, I would like to remind you to take time to vote for the next officers seeking a position on the executive board. The ballots will soon be out. Your vote determines the future of the chapter. I also wish to thank all the Event Chairs and Committee members who worked so hard on the NYSCC 2017 Educational Program, led by Stephen Herman, and the NYSCC Special Events, led by Amy Marshall. It was a great collaboration by all. Well done!

In Memoriam: David Gittleman

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avid Gittleman, Global Sales Director of Micro Powders Inc., passed away on Saturday, August 19, 2017. David was 47 years old and is survived by his wife Alexandra and their two sons Daniel and James. David joined Micro Powders after graduating from Lehigh University with a B.S. degree in Biochemistry and recently celebrated his 25th year with the company. He made vital contributions to Micro Powders’ immense growth over that period. David started his career at MPI as a Quality Assurance Chemist for the Industrial Coatings division. He was promoted to U.S. Sales for the Industrial Division for the East Coast and his territory was expanded to South America and Mexico. He successfully grew this area, building strong customer and supplier relationships and developing successful products for MPI. Following this, David was instrumental in the launching of Micro Powders’ Personal Care division and became Micro Powders’ Global Sales Director for that division. Much to the credit of David’s unrelenting passion to grow this new division, he created many effective products while building valuable relationships with suppliers and customers in the personal care industry. David leaves an enduring imprint on Micro Powders’ success and growth and we all miss him dearly.

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Heat and Hair: Finding the Balance In fact, a recent study on user needs in the online hair care community revealed that there is a persisting need for temporary hair straightening, and the methods based on water setting are sought after—despite their inferior styling efficacy—due to the fear of heat.6 Identification of this need and the lack of solutions led to an effort to better understand how heat behaves in human hair. A brief literature review demonstrated that there is a lack of studies on the thermal properties of hair. Thermal properties such as the thermal diffusivity quantify how well heat moves through or spreads in different materials. So, our efforts began with

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(Continued from page 1)

Figure 1: Thermal map of hair strands on a heater wire observed with an infrared microscope.

Figure 2: Thermal image of flat ironing a hair bundle.

Innovation Comes Naturally

developing a technique to accurately measure thermal properties of hair based on a method originally developed by Anders Jonas Ångstrom in 1860 for long metal rods.7 To adapt it for the small size of the hair samples, we use an infrared microscope that captures movies of the temperature of the hair strands over time while one point along the hair is heated with a metal wire heater. The heat diffuses (spreads) out from the heater along the length of the hair strand as shown in Figure 1. Using the measured thermal properties, we then created a heat transfer model between a flat iron

and a hair bundle. Additionally, we flat ironed a hair bundle with an automated flat ironing mechanism and recorded temperature changes on the bundle with an infrared camera (see Figure 2). At low-temperature settings, the measured change in temperature along the length of a hair bundle over time is predicted well by our simulation (see Figure 3). Next, we measured the change in fatigue strength, curl index, and curl diameter to characterize the tradeoffs between the three according to various flat ironing parameters, which include gliding speed, temperature

Figure 3: Comparison between simulation (red) and experimental results (blue) of the temperature profile over the length of hair bundle when flat ironing at a gliding speed of 1 cm/s at 115 °C. The region enclosed by the black dotted lines indicates where the flat iron moving to the right is located. V O L U M E

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Heat and Hair: Finding the Balance

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(Continued from page 3)

setting, number of passes, and the presence of heat protectant. The results led to the formulation of the guidelines for flat iron usage depending on one’s grooming/styling goals which are defined as a combination of the three components: hair strength, styling efficacy, and curl preservation (Figure 4).

Concluding Remarks This study is a first step toward characterizing the effects of various factors in the styling practices that include heat. The initial motivation was to empower flat iron users by eliminating the fear of heat originating from uncertainty and helping them make informed decisions about their styling practices. However, over the course of research, we realized that our work can also provide hair product developers and professional hair stylists with deeper insights into the trade-offs between different grooming/styling goals. We hope that innovation in new product development, use of existing products, and formulation of grooming/ styling systems will stem from the new insights to better serve the unique needs of textured hair in the increasingly diversified and customized market.

Figure 4: Visual representation of the tradeoffs that exist between styling goals of users: (a) no heat for hair strength and curl preservation; (b) flat ironing at a low temperature (around 100°C) for curl preservation with moderate straightening; (c) flat ironing at a low temperature with a heat protectant for better straightening efficacy at the expense of slightly higher curl loss; and (d) flat ironing at a high temperature (around 200°C) for high straightening efficacy at the expense of great loss in hair strength and curls. Use a high gliding speed (around 5 cm/s) to minimize the loss of hair strength.

References 1.

2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7.

J. Hahn, T. Dandridge, P. Seshadri, A. Marconnet, and T. Reid, Integrating design methodology, thermal sciences, and customer needs to address challenges in the hair care industry, ASME Paper No. DETC2015-46551 (2015). R. McMullen and J. Jachowicz, Thermal degradation of hair. Effect of curling irons, J. Cosmet. Sci., 49, 223-224 (1998). Y. Zhou, R. Rigoletto, D. Koelmel, G. Zhang, T.W. Gillece, L. Foltis, D.J. Moore, X. Qu, and C. Sun, The effect of various cosmetic pretreatments on protecting hair from thermal damage by hot flat ironing, J. Cosmet. Sci., 62, 265-282 (2011). P. Christian, N. Winsey, M. Whatmough, and P.A. Cornwell, The effects of water on heat-styling damage, J. Cosmet. Sci., 62, 15-27 (2011). A. Dussaud, B. Rana, and H.T. Lam, Progressive hair straightening using an automated flat iron: function of silicones, J. Cosmet. Sci., 64, 119-131 (2013). J. Hahn, A. Marconnet, and T. Reid, Using do-it-yourself practitioners as lead users: a case study on the hair care industry, J. Mech. Design, 138(10), 101107 (2016). A.J. Angström, XVII. New method of determining the thermal conductibility of bodies, Lond. Edinb. Dubl. Phil. Mag., 25, 130-142 (1863).

Acknowledgement The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from Procter and Gamble.

Please send news of interest, guest editorials, and comments to

Roger McMullen, Editor • E-mail: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

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About the Authors n Jaesik Hahn

Jaesik received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette in 2013. Co-advised by Dr. Tahira Reid at the REID lab and Dr. Amy Marconnet at the MTEC lab, he is pursuing a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering at the same university. The scope of his research ranges across thermal characterization of human hair, heat transfer modeling of hair bundles, and predictive modeling of styling efficacy and heat damage of hair induced by flat irons. Their early work on hair has been featured in National Geographic magazine, National Public Radio (NPR), Reuters, Washington Post, Smithsonian Magazine, and many other media outlets.

n Amy Marconnet, Ph.D.

n Tahira Reid, Ph.D.

Tahira Reid is an Assistant Professor in the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University and is the director of the Research in Engineering and Interdisciplinary Design (REID) Laboratory. Her research interests include integrating human considerations in engineering systems and the design process. Prior to arriving to Purdue in 2011, she completed a postdoctoral position in the Mechanical Engineering department at Iowa State. In 2010, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor in Design Science, with Mechanical Engineering and Psychology as her focus areas. Dr. Reid received both her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in 2000 and 2004, respectively. As a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Dr. Reid began to explore her curiosities with the challenges of textured hair types and the ways in which mechanical engineering concepts could have an impact. This led to significant review of the literature and eventually a class project in a course called “Design Optimization” where she worked with a team to develop a model for optimizing the hair care of African American women by considering styling, damage, and chemical processes used to straighten hair. After becoming a professor, a new challenge caught her attention: the struggles with heat damage experienced by women with curly hair and their attempts to address them on YouTube. This led to a collaboration with her colleague at Purdue, Dr. Amy Marconnet, Director of the Marconnet Thermal and Energy Conversion (MTEC) Laboratory where these studies began.

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Amy Marconnet is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University. She received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in 2007, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University in 2009 and 2012, respectively. She then worked briefly as a postdoctoral associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, before joining the faculty at Purdue University in 2013. Research in the Marconnet Thermal and Energy Conversion (MTEC) Lab integrates metrology and analysis of underlying transport mechanisms with design and development of nanostructured materials for heat transfer and energy conversion applications.

Upcoming 2017 NYSCC Events Calendar • For updated NYSCC information, visit us on the web at: www.nyscc.org • For National SCC information: www.scconline.org

October 12 Innovation in Textured Hair Care, Chart House, Weehawken, NJ December 11 NYSCC for Education and Charity Event, Hard Rock Cafe, New York, NY December 11-12 SCC 71st Annual Scientific Meeting, The Westin New York at Times Square, New York, NY

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Innovation in Textured Hair Care

October 12, 2017 • 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Chart House, Weehawken, NJ

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e are excited to present a comprehensive program that will focus on one of the most prevalent segments in the personal care industry. Textured hair is hair that is naturally wavy, curly, or coily rather than straight. The degree of hair curvature, or curl, is perhaps one of the most variable hair characteristics with up to eight different classes. Over half of the world’s population has textured hair, and consumers are interested in addressing their hair care needs based on their hair texture, or curl pattern and style goal, as opposed to their ethnicity. Additionally, there has been a shift in preference as women are becoming more accepting of their natural hair texture and less interested in chemical treatments that alter it. Textured hair types have received increasing attention in recent times with more companies and stores delivering product lines, campaigns, and experiences dedicated to wavy, curly, and coily-haired consumers. It is really all about the curls these days! This program features a diverse lineup of scientists, entrepreneurs, media influencers, and a stylist who will educate the audience on the characteristics of textured hair types and the habits and practices of consumers with textured hair, some of the key drivers of the growth of this segment, and recent advancements in the study of textured hair. Attendees will gain insight into this growing category and could win dinner cruise tickets, museum tickets, books by the speakers, and hair products!

Event Chair: Amber O. Evans, Ph.D. • amber.evans@basf.com

Agenda 8:00 – 8:45 a.m. 8:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Registration and Opening Remarks Textured Hair, Its Characteristics and Comparison Against Non-Textured Hair – Dr. Ali Syed (Avlon Industries) and Dr. Maliha Syed (Avlon Industries) The Curl Revolution – How Social Media Transformed an Industry – Michelle Breyer (TextureMedia LLC) The Role of Social Media in Textured Hair Care – Panel Discussion – Mohamed Omer (Revlon), Michelle Breyer (TextureMedia LLC), and Jenell Stewart (KinkyCurlyCoilyMe.com)

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:15 p.m.

Lunch & Recognition of NYSCC Board Why is Textured Hair So Fragile? Insights from Single Fiber Mechanical Tests on African Hair – Dr. Trefor Evans (TRI-Princeton) Heat on Hair: A Mechanical Engineering and User Needs Perspective – Dr. Tahira Reid (Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering) and Jaesik Hahn (Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering) The Natural Hair Movement: Past, Present and Future – Anthony Dickey (Celebrity Stylist and Founder – Hair Rules Salon and Brand)

4:15 – 4:30 p.m.

Closing Remarks

Registration Information: Pre-registration cost/at door cost SCC members: $35/$70 Non-SCC members: $70/$100 Students: $10/$50 Emeritus: $0/$10

Venue information: Chart House Lincoln Harbor, Pier D-T 1700 Harbor Boulevard Weehawken, NJ (201) 348-6628

To register, visit the Events section of the NYSCC website: www.nyscc.org/events. 6

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Texture of the Week

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e are running a social media campaign, Texture of the Week, to compliment this exciting program. The goal of “Texture of the Week” is to engage our network and showcase the beautiful waves, curls, and coils of our membership. One NYSCC member week will be featured on the NYSCC LinkedIn page each week leading up to the event. Interested individuals are invited to submit an entry to nyscc.texturedhair@gmail.com with the following information: • Name, position (optional), and affiliation • Length of SCC membership • Hair texture (wavy, curly, coily/kinky) • Answer to question: What do you love about your hair texture? • Photograph

Innovation in Textured Hair Care Committee

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Chair – Amber Evans

Dr. Amber Evans is a Development Scientist at BASF Corporation. She is primarily responsible for the development of new personal care technologies. Prior to joining BASF, she earned a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences (Cosmetic Science focus) from University of Cincinnati, where she conducted extensive research on the interaction between water hardness metals and hair. Dr. Evans has worked on multiple projects ranging from upstream research for hair colorants to clinical testing for shave care applications at The Procter & Gamble Company. As a member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists and the Advisory Board for the University of Cincinnati Cosmetic Science Program, Dr. Evans is dedicated to influencing the progression of the personal care/cosmetic science field both inside and outside of the lab. n Event

Committee – Mitisha Mehta

Mitisha Mehta is a passionate chemist and an active volunteer of the NYSCC. She joined the NYSCC as a volunteer, and gracefully took the lead with her attention to detail and organization skills. Mitisha earned an M.S. in Cosmetic Science at Fairleigh Dickinson University, and currently works as an Associate Chemist at Revlon in the Eye and Face category. She loves formulating cosmetics and following industry trends. Mitisha persistently trains herself to master the art of formulation and focuses on acquiring skills that help her discern product aesthetics and function. She finds the beauty industry “very exciting” and is looking forward to explore opportunities that tap her potential. _____________________________________________

Sponsors

We express our sincerest gratitude to our sponsors.

I HI P

Additional sponsorship opportunities are available and include one complimentary registration as well as recognition in all event promotions. Please visit www.nyscc.org/events for further details. (Continued on page 8)

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The Soul & Science of Beauty.

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Innovation in Textured Hair Care

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Special Thanks for Your Continued Support and Guidance

www.evonik.com/personal-care

Social Media: Andrea Gafford Camille Martin Sybry Luma Sponsorship Committee: Joe Albanese Yelena Zolotarsky Daphne Benderly Steve Fantano

Scientific Committee: Giorgio Dell’Acqua Mohamed Omer Registration: Basma Elmogy Leila Hamdi Invitations: Jadavia Hunt

Spirit Cruises SILAB creates and manufactures unique, consistently safe, natural active ingredients with proven efficacy.

Do not miss the opportunity to win a Spirit Cruise gift certificate at the Innovation in Textured Hair event on October 12th. The NYSCC will raffle two $250 Spirit Cruise gift cards for a Hudson River dinner cruise at the event.

Recognition Event – NYSCC Board and Committee Members

In recognition of this year’s volunteers of the NYSCC, we will have a special ceremony during the Innovation in Textured Hair event that will consist of a photo-op shooting session where all NYSCC Board and Committee Members can have their own professional headshot. Be sure to come prepared with your hair styled and makeup applied for your very own fashion shoot. Hats off to the NYSCC volunteers! See you on October 12th!

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Speakers and Abstracts Textured Hair, Its Characteristics and Comparison Against Non-Textured Hair Dr. Ali N. Syed (Avlon Industries) and Dr. Maliha Syed (Avlon Industries)

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extured hair is wavy, curly, and coily in its configuration and varies a lot in its properties such as hair diameter, ellipticity, tensile strength, fragility, moisture content, ease of combing, and porosity, as compared to straight hair. Since textured hair varies significantly in its curliness, it is divided into three major types based upon the wavy/curly or coily configuration of the hair. Type 1 is considered as straight/nontextured hair, whereas Type 2, 3, and 4 are considered as textured hair. In this study, hair diameters and ellipticity of Type 1, Type 2, Type 3, and Type 4 were determined and the variability in hair diameter within a single hair fiber and within various types were exposed. The differences in tensile strength and ease of combing of Type 1 and Type 4 hair will be discussed. Different methodologies such as Liquid Retention and Fiber Sink Test were examined to determine fiber porosity. Additionally, porosities of Type 1 and 4 were compared, and differences in porosity of curly/coily hair type were examined.

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N. Syed, Ph.D.

Since 1984, Dr. Ali N. Syed has been President of his own international corporation, Avlon Industries, which manufactures hair care products: Affirm, Keracare, FiberGuard, MoisturColor, and Texture Release. Dr. Syed has also developed several world renowned consumer brands. His most recent consumer brand, As I Am, sold under Salon Commodities, is currently available in mass market retailers. Since 2012, he has also served as an Editor for the scientific journal TenSides, and was a guest speaker at the London College of Hair and Fashion in England and Associação Brasileira de Cosmetologia (Brazilian Association of Cosmetology) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Dr. Ali N. Syed has also conducted numerous lectures on the chemistry of hair for organizations like Chicago Cosmetology Association and has been a Guest Artist at the Midwest Beauty Show. Dr. Syed holds a Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. in Chemistry (with honors) and an M.B.A. in Marketing/Management. n Maliha

Syed, Ph.D.

Dr. Maliha Syed is an emerging research scientist, using her diverse background in chemistry, economics, and polymer science and engineering to formulate breakthrough cosmetic technologies. Committed to the advancement of beauty through scientific innovation, she aspires to develop sustainable haircare and skincare solutions for an international audience. She graduated from the George Washington University (GWU) in 2009 with a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry and Economics. As an undergraduate she investigated natural sunscreens via the alkylation of methyl urocanate and performed research for a national pipe remediation project at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). She completed her Ph.D. in Polymer Science and Engineering at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) in the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials. Her dissertation research specialized in the hydrogen bond-driven structural ordering, volumetric, and thermodynamic properties of dendritic polymers. She has received various fellowship awards including the National Science Foundation (NSF) GK-12 Fellowship and first-place poster at the 2014 Annual Society of Cosmetic Chemists (SCC) Meeting. After completing her Ph.D. in 2015 she joined Avlon Industries as a Principal Scientist. _____________________________________________

The Curl Revolution – How Social Media Transformed an Industry Michelle Breyer (TextureMedia LLC)

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rustrated by the lack of products and information for people with curly and coily hair, people took matters into their own hands to create their own. While once these brands would have been doomed to obscurity, social media provided a platform enabling them to quickly reach consumers. It has led to a new generation of web sites and influencers, changing purchase drivers. It also has blurred the line between the ethnic category and general market as the texture category has exploded.

n Michelle

Breyer

Named one of the 50 Most Influential People in the Multicultural Market by Women’s Wear Daily in 2015, Michelle Breyer is a visionary entrepreneur who took a personal frustration over out-of-control curls and built it into the largest social media platform for hair. TextureMedia reaches 26 million influencers a month, and is considered the top authority for textured hair. What started as a hobby now includes two consumer web sites, an ecommerce site, a market research division, and a partnership with Modern Salon. Michelle has consulted with numerous brands and retailers to help shape their textured hair, whether it be developing the right products or creating communication strategies to most effectively connect with this valuable consumer. She recently wrote The Curl Revolution: Inspiring Stories and Practical Advice from the NaturallyCurly Community, which will be available in September of this year. Additionally, Michelle is a contributor to several books on curly/natural hair, including: Miss Jessie’s: Creating a Successful Business from Scratch by Miko and Titi Branch; Curly Girl: The Handbook, written (Continued on page 10)

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by Devacurl creator Lorraine Massey; and Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America, Ayana Byrd and Lori Thorps. She has also been recognized for WWD – 50 most influential People in the Multicultural Market and awarded the Lifetime CURLchievement Award from CURLbox – 2015 at Cosmoprof. _____________________________________________

Panel: The Role of Social Media in Textured Hair Care Moderator: Mohamed Omer (Revlon) Speakers: Michelle Breyer (TextureMedia LLC) Jenell Stewart (KinkyCurlyCoilyMe.com)

n Mohamed

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Omer

Mohamed Omer received a Master’s degree in Physical Chemistry from Iowa State University and subsequently joined the New York City Police Department (NYPD) Crime Scene Laboratory, where he became an expert on narcotics and managed the intoxicated driver unit before he switched from forensic chemistry to cosmetic chemistry. For the last fifteen years, Omer has focused on innovation and assumed various roles in companies such as Colgate Palmolive, Alberto Culver, Unilever, and L’Oréal, where he helped develop a range of products. He recently stepped down as Associate Vice-president for Strategic Foresight and Innovation at L’Oréal and joined Revlon as Manager of Multicultural Hair. n Jenell

Stewart

Jenell Stewart is the founder and editor in chief of the award-winning website KinkyCurlyCoilyMe.com. She dedicates herself to educating and uplifting women with natural hair by way of her extremely popular website and YouTube channel. Jenell has been featured in Essence and Black Enterprise.com, and starred on the Dr. Oz television show as a Beauty Expert. In 2014, Jenell won the Root Top 100 Peoples Choice Award, and in 2012, was named one of Essence’s top Instagramers. That same year, KinkyCurlyCoilyMe won an award for Favorite Website of the Natural Hair Community. She is a mom of two precious children and is a wife to the most supportive partner ever. _____________________________________________

Why is Textured Hair So Fragile? Insights from Single Fiber Mechanical Tests on African Hair Trefor Evans (TRI-Princeton)

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air breakage is one of the biggest issues for individuals with highly kinky/curly hair, to the end that it can dictate very different habits and practices in the end-user. Conventional single fiber tensile experiments confirm that this hair type is indeed weaker, but not to the extent one might expect, based on the severity of consumer concerns. We have been conducting research into the tendency for fiber failure using an alternate mechanical stimulus, fatigue testing, and observe the anticipated substantially higher breakage. It becomes necessary to contemplate why differing conclusions arise from these seemingly related testing procedures. In doing so, a theory arises that has wider reaching consequences in conceptualizing the reasons for why hair fibers break. As these ideas develop, it becomes ever more apparent that kinky African hair fibers break not just faster, but also by a different mechanism. This acquired knowledge of how and why fibers break provides strategies for mitigation. n Trefor A.

Evans, Ph.D.

Dr. Trefor Evans has worked in the hair care industry for over 25 years. The first 16 of these were spent as a scientist and manager in the product development labs 10

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of large consumer good companies (Helene Curtis and Unilever). He then served for five years as Director of Measurement Services at TRI-Princeton, where he now holds the titles Director of Research and Institute Fellow and is responsible for TRI’s Research Program. Dr. Evans holds a Ph.D. in Physical Analytical Chemistry and has spent his career using measurement science to support the development, launch, and maintenance of many international cosmetic brands and products. These activities include fundamental research, supporting product development efforts, substantiating and validating marketing claims, and a variety of miscellaneous problem-solving tasks. Dr. Evans is very active in the hair care industry through many working relationships with companies of all shape and size. He is a regular presenter at international hair conferences and has been an invited speaker at many technical meetings and symposia. He was chairman of both the 6th and 7th International Conference on Applied Hair Science. Dr. Evans has published numerous articles in trade magazines and the scientific literature and is coauthor and co-editor of the book Practical Modern Hair Science. He writes a regular column on Hair and Hair Testing for Cosmetics & Toiletries magazine, and also sits on this publication’s advisory board. He similarly serves on the Expert Reviewing Panel for both the Journal of Cosmetic Science and the International Journal of Cosmetic Science. He holds seven patents in the area of hair care and his research work has been awarded by the Society of Cosmetic Chemists on three separate occasions. For the past 10 years, Dr. Evans has facilitated and taught TRI’s two annual training classes on Hair Science and Product Claims, which have been held in the U.S. and Europe. He guest lectures on the subject of hair and hair science for a variety of different academic cosmetic programs and has instructed at events organized by the Society of Cosmetic Chemists. _____________________________________________

Premium Ingredients. Custom Solutions.

Deborah Bagnuolo 844 458 7111 lvlomas.com

Heat on Hair: A Mechanical Engineering and User Needs Perspective Tahira Reid and Jaesik Hahn (Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering)

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hile manipulation of textured hair using heat appliances such as a flat iron is a common practice, little is known about how heat spreads through hair. In this talk, we will explore this much neglected topic in two parts. In the first half of our talk, we will discuss how alienated much academic work is from the concerns of people with textured hair, and how those unmet needs are being tackled within offline and online communities. Such communities are effective in sharing available knowledge and some have personally developed regimens for judicious use of heat; however, they lack the scientific rigor necessary to produce results that are generalizable across various hair types and needs of individuals. In the second half of our talk, we will present the ongoing efforts to study the effects of heat on textured hair from the perspective of mechanical engineering. We specifically study thermal properties of hair by measuring thermal diffusivity, which indicates how effectively heat spreads through hair. These studies provide the foundational work for development of a model that describes heat transfer between a hair bundle and flat iron. The study culminates by establishing a model which predicts the amount of heat damage under various usage scenarios of a flat iron. These studies are a first step towards addressing the particular needs of textured hair in the context of heat usage. It aims at establishing robust mathematical correlations between various stakeholders in the interaction between heat and hair. We hope to support the decision making of flat iron users in their grooming practices by demystifying the complexities of the effects of heat on hair and empower them with information as it relates to their much cherished hair. n Tahira

Reid, Ph.D.

Tahira Reid is an Assistant Professor in the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University and is the director of the Research in Engineering and Interdisciplinary Design (REID) Laboratory. Her research interests include integrating human considerations in engineering systems and the design process. Prior to arriving to Purdue in 2012, she completed a postdoctoral position in the Mechanical Engineering department at Iowa State. In 2010, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor in Design Science, with Mechanical Engineering and Psychology as her focus areas. Dr. Reid received both her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in 2000 and V O L U M E

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2004, respectively. As a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Dr. Reid began to explore her curiosities with the challenges of textured hair types and the ways in which mechanical engineering concepts could have an impact. This led to significant review of the literature and eventually a class project in a course called “Design Optimization” where she worked with a team to develop a model for optimizing the hair care of African American women by considering styling, damage, and chemical processes used to straighten hair. After becoming a professor, a new challenge caught her attention: the struggles with heat damage experienced by women with curly hair and their attempts to address them on YouTube. This led to a collaboration with her colleague at Purdue, Dr. Amy Marconnet, Director of the Marconnet Thermal and Energy Conversion (MTEC) Laboratory, where these studies began. n Jaesik

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Jaesik received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette in 2013. Co-advised by Dr. Tahira Reid at the REID lab and Dr. Amy Marconnet at the MTEC lab, he is pursuing a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering at the same university. The scope of his research ranges across thermal characterization of human hair, heat transfer modeling of hair bundles, and predictive modeling of styling efficacy and heat damage of hair induced by flat irons. Their early work on hair has been featured in National Geographic magazine, National Public Radio (NPR), Reuters, Washington Post, Smithsonian Magazine, and many other media outlets. _____________________________________________

The Natural Hair Movement: Past, Present & Future Anthony Dickey (Hair Rules Salon & Brand)

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s a hair stylist for 30 years, I have had the unique opportunity to work in fashion and beauty, the salon industry, and product manufacturing. Through my unique experience and point of view, I will help industry insiders better understand the culture of the consumer, how she came to be, and who we are all because of it. Additionally, I will offer my perspective on the future of textured hair care and styling.

n Anthony

Dickey

Stylist, author, product innovator, and salon owner, Anthony Dickey has spent the better part of his 30-year career dispelling the myth and mockeries surrounding women and their hair. Changing perceptions of beauty and influencing practice, Dickey has pioneered a new standard in beauty that aims to redefine standards in hair care to address the distinctive needs of a multi-textural world. He has been touted as a “Style Svengali” by The New York Times and WWD named Dickey as “one of the most influential people in the multicultural market”. To EBONY, he is a member of their elite Power100. Through his actions and accomplishment, as well as his ability to shape and influence the world in which we live, Dickey has mastered the mystery of textured hair to create iconic hairstyles for designers, advertisers, photographers, and celebrities. Solange, Jill Scott, Rihanna, Estelle, Kelis, Michelle Obama, and Sarah Jessica Parker are but a few notables he has styled for publications including Vogue, Vanity Fair, Essence, and Harper’s Bazaar. His call to action has been the Hair Rules salon. Named “Top 100 Salons in America”, Hair Rules salon is built on the heritage of beauty education and community. With an elite team of stylists in this unique meeting place, Dickey has been proclaimed by Naturally Curly as “one of the best curly hair stylists in the world”. _____________________________________________

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The Curly Chemist: Textured Hair Consumers Know What They Want and Do Not Want in their Haircare Products Michelle Breyer (NaturallyCurly)

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my Dickenson loves coconut oil for her skin and she loves it in her food. But when it comes to her curls, she avoids it at all costs. “Does it ever ruin my curls,” Dickenson says. “It’s way too heavy for my fine hair.” Talk to curly consumers and you may confuse them for a chemist. They know their sulfates and their silicones, and the difference between glycerin and glucose. They often decide what they are going to purchase based on the ingredients they want and those they avoid. For these consumers, ingredients are one of the top two factors influencing the purchase of a new hair product, right behind product reviews, according to Release 2 from TextureTrends 2017, TextureMedia’s comprehensive assessment of the textured hair market. TextureTrends provides the most comprehensive assessment of the textured hair market, surveying more than 3,300 consumers, including consumers with naturally straight hair and those who use chemical relaxers. The report explores many areas of purchasing behavior and product usage, including awareness, spend, retail preferences, and brand loyalty. The textured hair category has been one of the fastest growing and most dynamic in the beauty industry. Two decades ago, few products existed for textured hair, even though more than 60 percent of the population has wavy, curly, or coily hair. Since NaturallyCurly’s inception 19 years ago, the number of products on the market has grown exponentially. Dozens of new brands specifically for curly hair launch each year, and every major hair care brand now offers products for textured hair. The tighter the curl, the more concerned they are about ingredients. Those with textured hair are more likely to avoid certain ingredients than those with straight hair (82% vs. 57%). Those with wavy hair are less likely to be concerned about what is in their products than those with curly or coily hair. The most desired ingredients are coconut oil, argan oil and shea butter. The ingredients they avoid most are sodium lauryl/ 7laureth sulfate, parabens, and isopropyl alcohol, with more people than ever shying away from products with those ingredients in them. Hair blogger Michelle Thames said she likes to know what ingredients are in the products she uses on her skin and hair. She avoids those that dry out her hair. That list includes short chain alcohols (e.g., SD alcohol 40), sulfates (e.g., ammonium lauryl sulfate), and petroleum-based products. Brands are catching on, with some of the top curl brands highlighting desirable ingredients on their label. SheaMoisture, OGX, and Hask are brands that have focused on ingredients in their marketing. But what is on the front of the bottle is not as important as what they see on the back label.

SPECIALTY SILICONES

Other key insights from TextureTrends: • 91% of textured-hair women continue to look for products, even if they have found their “Holy Grail” product. • Dryness, frizz, and styling options are the top three concerns for wavy and curly women, while dryness, hair growth, and detangling are top concerns for coily women. • Curly girls like the option of wearing their hair straight. • 69% of women with textured hair have worn their hair straight in the past 3 months. • Wavy women are the most likely to wear their hair straight. 73% of those with wavy hair have worn their hair straight in the past three months. • 67% of curly girls have straightened their hair in the past three months. • 64% of coily women have worn their hair straight in the past three months. • Protective styles are hot. Protective styles are defined as hairstyles that contain your length and ends to protect them. Twenty-five percent of all textured-hair women have worn a protective style in the past three months.

NYSCC Blog Don’t miss out on the latest advances in cosmetic science. Check out the NYSCC’s blog. nyscc.org/blog

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Many Thanks to Our NYSCC Volunteers COMMITTED TO TECHNOLOGY, FORMULATION AND SUPERIOR NATION-WIDE DISTRIBUTION.

800.296.4942 LINCOLNFINEINGREDIENTS.COM 50 INDUSTRIAL CR., LINCOLN, R.I., 02865

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Employment Opportunities For complete ads please go to the NYSCC website: https://www.nyscc.org/employment-listings.html.

n Senior Color Chemist The Honest Company • Los Angeles, CA

n Sales Manager – Pharma Division Bloomage Freda – Biopharm USA • Parsippany, NJ

n Senior Accounts Manager TRI-K Industries • Various regions

n Documentation Specialist Mana Products • Long Island City, NY

n Manager, Innovation (R&D) Estée Lauder • Melville, NY

n Marketing Associate TRI-K Industries • Denville, NJ

n Technical Service Specialist BASF • Tarrytown, NY

n Senior Formulation Chemist Precious Cosmetics • Lodi, NJ

n E-Sales (Inside Associate) TRI-K Industries • Denville, NJ

n Sales Manager – Northeast Wacker • Northeastern United States

n Color Chemist Temptu • New York, NY

n Senior Chemist Mlyoshi America, Inc. • Valley Cottage, NY

NYSCC for Education and Charity Event December 11, 2017 Hard Rock Cafe, New York, NY

To be held in conjunction with the SCC Scientific Meeting and Technology Showcase.

Call for Papers

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he Cosmetiscope editorial committee invites all interested parties to submit feature technical articles for publication in the NYSCC monthly newsletter. Authors of feature articles are eligible to win the prestigous NYSCC Literature Award ($1,000) for the best front-page article published during the calendar year. Also, authors receive $200 reimbursement to attend a theatrical performance of their choice. Writing an article for your peers is a very rewarding experience, both personally and professionally, and would reserve your place in NYSCC history. You may choose whatever topic you feel would be interesting to fellow colleagues in our industry. We also welcome any other types of commentaries or articles that may be published in the Career Corner, Technical Tidbit section, or as a Letter to the Editor. Please send correspondence to: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu.

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Like, Connect & Tweet

FACEBOOK: NEW YORK SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS

LINKED IN: NEW YORK SCC

TWITTER: @NYSCC

INSTAGRAM: NYSCCMAIN These connections were made possible by the NYSCC Social Media

Monthly Meeting Group Discount The NYSCC is offering a group discount of 15% to companies who send 5 or more employees to a monthly meeting. All five employees would need to be registered at the same time to receive the discount. Once purchased, registrations are non-refundable.

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Cosmetiscope - October 2017  

Cosmetiscope - October 2017  

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