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APRIL 2017 • Vol. 23 No. 4

New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists

New Frontiers in Snail Mucus Studies for Cosmetic and Pharmaceutical Preparations

Table of Contents Letter from the Chair Page 2 Globalization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit Page 7 NYSCC Suppliers’ Day Page 11 SCC Continuing Education Program Page 12 Opening Day Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Page 12 Digital Age of Beauty Page 13 Discover Sustainability @ Suppliers’ Day 2017 Page 13 Future Chemists Workshop Page 14 Awards Night Party Page 15 91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium Page 16

www.nyscc.org

by Andrea Alogna

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oday, elicicoltura (land snail farming) is a very important activity in many countries. Interestingly, snail mucus is considered a traditional remedy for many ailments. In fact, snail mucus is an amazing substance, useful against acne, wrinkles, stretch marks, heartburn, etc. It owes its properties to the high content of glycolic acid, allantoin, proteins, vitamins, elastin, and collagen as well as other compounds, so far unknown. The world hosts thousands of species of land snails, which live in various types of habitats under different biological and environmental conditions.1 As a result, the composition of snail mucus will depend on the species and environmental conditions of the snail’s habitat.

Introduction Snail mucus is largely used for cosmetic products, but is also found in para-pharmaceutics and dietary supplements. Usually, the concentration of raw material in the final product is highly variable, ranging between 10 to 90%. Thus, the active substances responsible for the beneficial effect of snail mucus will be present in varying proportions. Snail mucus is a very complex matrix, highly influenced by biological and environmental factors. It is fundamental to understand how these factors influence the quality of the raw material in order to ensure effective, standardized products. It should also be noted that our group at Ferrara University had been working in this area for many years, which eventually led to a spin-off into HelixPharma Srl.

Chemical Features In the last several years, we have attempted to define qualitative standards for a good and efficient snail mucus secretion. We started by establishing criteria for defining High Quality Snail Mucus. When we talk about High Quality Snail Mucus, we refer to something that is truly effective in terms of regenerative or antibacterial activity, and has adequate levels of active substances (e.g., allantoin, glycolic acid, proteins, glycosaminoglycans, and polyphenols). Generally, it is presumed that every sample is the same, but this is not true. The analysis of gastropod mucus with infrared spectroscopy is an original application of this technique (see Figure 1).2 For the examination of pure substances, this method is very efficient and enables us to verify the chemical composition by examining the oscillatory behavior of chemical bonds that are excited by a light source. However, in the case of snail slime analysis it is more complicated. Therefore, (Continued on page 4) we generally focus our attention on certain characteristic areas of the infrared spectrum.

GLOBALIZATION OF EMERGING MARKETS – BRIC ‘N BREXIT A p r i l 1 9 • T h e B e t h w o o d , To t o w a , N J


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2017 NYSCC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & PROGRAM CHAIRS CHAIR Marie Thadal chairelect@nyscc.org (609) 712-3716

CHAIR-ELECT Cathy Piterski cathypiterski@otponline.net (201) 675-3799

TREASURER Michael Smith Treasurer@nyscc.org 908-625-4331

SECRETARY Giorgino Macalino (862) 324-2749 Secretary@nyscc.org

ADVISOR Rey Ordiales Reyordiales@outlook.com 732-878-7798

HOUSE Mohamed Abdulla (973) 487-6572 house@nyscc.org

MEMBERSHIP John Carola JohnC@protameen.com

PROGRAM Steve Herman program@nyscc.org (973) 479-5702

COMMUNICATIONS Stephen Weinberg (973) 307-4854 webmaster@nyscc.org

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Letter from the Chair

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…Marie Renee Thadal, Coptis Inc.

egardless of where you are, R&D, innovation, creativity, and regulation in every part of the world impact the global supply chain. In case you have not heard me say this before, the 2017 NYSCC Program aims at identifying key drivers of evolution in the cosmetic industry. The goal is to explore disruptive trends with a focus on learning what global leaders do better than others to maintain their leadership position. The March NYSCC Open Innovation event was well executed, even beyond the vision I had set forth. Great job by the event chairs, co-chairs, and the entire team. We also truly appreciate all the attendees who took time to fill out the post-event survey. Your responses will help bring events and speakers that you, the NYSCC members, wish to see in the future. We encourage everyone to stay engaged and have a say in the evolution of the chapter. As you know, competitive advantages and industry growth have relied on markets that are borderless. But in today’s geopolitical and economic landscape, we cannot help but to be reminded of Heraclitus, the Greek philosopher who quoted: “Change is the only constant in life.” On April 19, 2017 at the Bethwood in Totowa, NJ, the Bric ‘N Brexit event will open a discussion that emphasizes why business models must evolve or risk the chance of becoming obsolete. It was not too long ago many companies were chasing emerging markets. Where do we stand now on globalization or EU regulations? The chairs of the NYSCC’s April event invited four outstanding speakers to share their knowledge and bring updates on this subject. Beyond the chapter’s educational monthly events, the NYSCC volunteers have organized a Suppliers’ Day event unlike any other. First, there is the excitement of moving the show to the Big Apple. Next, visitors will be captivated by an exhibition of global industry suppliers showcasing their latest technologies in one contiguous space. Yet, the volunteers did not stop there. Let us explore other attractions NYSCC Suppliers' Day 2017 has to offer that will add to the experience: • Ribbon Cutting ceremony • Innovation Alley • SCC Continuing Education Program Courses • Future Chemists Workshop • Digital Age of Beauty • Discover Sustainability @ Suppliers’ Day 2017 • Sustainability Awards Night Celebration • Collaboration with the Broadway Musical War Paint celebrating Helena Rubinstein and Elizabeth Arden rise to success • French Pavillion For more information, please visit the website to get all the details and register to be part of the world’s premier cosmetic trade show. You can select which education program you wish to attend at https://nyscc.org/suppliersday/. Keep in mind, no other trade show in the world provides you with what Suppliers’ Day offers: A well-attended show with a global reach powered by our local expertise.

SPECIAL EVENTS Amy Marshall amy.marshall@altana.com (908) 806-4664

COSMETISCOPE EDITOR Roger McMullen roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

COSMETISCOPE ASSISTANT EDITOR Joe Albanese (908) 456-2968 joealbanese2@gmail.com

COSMETISCOPE ADVERTISING Bret Clark rbclark@ashland.com

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Call for Papers

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he Cosmetiscope editorial committee invites all interested parties to submit feature technical articles for publication in the NYSCC monthly newsletter. Authors of feature articles are eligible to win the prestigous NYSCC Literature Award ($1,000) for the best front-page article published during the calendar year. Also, authors receive $200 reimbursement to attend a theatrical performance of their choice. Writing an article for your peers is a very rewarding experience, both personally and professionally, and would reserve your place in NYSCC history. You may choose whatever topic you feel would be interesting to fellow colleagues in our industry. We also welcome any other types of commentaries or articles that may be published in the Career Corner, Technical Tidbit section, or as a Letter to the Editor. Please send correspondence to: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu.

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Scientific and Academic Affairs Committee

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he Chair of Scientific and Academic Affairs of the NYSCC is organizing a Scientific Committee to discuss topics relevant for our NYSCC members. The scientific committee is charged with developing content for communication on cosmetic science, innovation, supply chain, product and ingredient development, and other relevant topics for our industry using communication platforms such as its website (blog), the official newsletter of the NYSCC (Cosmetiscope) and social media channels (such as Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc.). It will also use public newspapers, blogs, and magazines as communication tools in order to reach consumers and the general public, outside our industry, with the goal to divulge scientifically proven information and reduce misinformation on cosmetics and cosmetic science. The Scientific Committee will work very close with the NYSCC webmaster, editorial board of Cosmetiscope, and NYSCC Chairs for Public Relations, Social Media and Events to coordinate the communication effort. It will also reach out to Academia to invite researchers at colleges and universities to speak at NYSCC events and to contribute as advisors on specific topics. Any member of the NYSCC that is interested in proposing his/her candidature for the NYSCC Scientific Committee, or would like to receive more information, can reach the Chair, Giorgio Dell’Acqua, at Giorgio_Dellacqua@hotmail.com or (201) 744-4262.

Upcoming 2017 NYSCC Events Calendar • For updated NYSCC information, visit us on the web at: www.nyscc.org • For National SCC information: www.scconline.org April 19 Globalization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit, The Bethwood, Totowa, NJ May 2-3 NYSCC Suppliers’ Day, Jacob Javits Convention Center, New York, NY More info: https://nyscc.org/suppliersday/ July 9-12 91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium, The City College of New York, New York, NY July 26 NYSCC Golf Outing, Hamburg, NJ September 6 #BeautyAugmented2017, New York, NY September 6 Culinary Event, Midtown Loft, New York, NY October 12 Innovations in Textured Hair Care, Grand Summit Hotel, Summit, NJ November 8 NYSCC Board Transition Meeting, The Venetian, Garfield, NJ December 11-12 SCC 71st Annual Scientific Meeting, The Westin New York at Times Square, NY, NY

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New Frontiers in Snail Mucus Studies

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For example, the absorbance peak to 3250 cm is typical of hydroxylic groups of hydrophilic amino acids (or the residual water in the lyophilized sample). On the other hand, the zone between 3000 and 3200 cm-1 contains information about aromatic amino acids while peaks between 1600 and 1500 cm-1 are the most important ones as they are typical of amide functional groups and serve as key indicators of the presence of proteins, rich in peptide bonds.

Figure 1: FT-IR spectrum of high quality snail mucus.

Therefore, thanks to this type of analysis we can define minimum quality standards that help us to decide in which cases it is worthwhile to progress with additional and more accurate studies. Based on previous studies, infrared spectroscopy is the method of choice to discriminate between mucus produced by different species.2,3 In our opinion, the intraspecific variability of snail mucus is very high due to environmental and biological factors, thereby making this kind of analysis fruitless (Dr. Skingsley states that infrared spectroscopy should allow one to discriminate between different species; however, in our opinion this is extremely difficult when in the same species there is such high variability that it becomes difficult to determine if you are analyzing Helix aspersa or Achatina fulica mucus.) The high degree of variability of snail mucus is strictly related to the place where the snails live, grow, and breed. Different evolutionary forces over millions of years have determined the development of unique features. This make every single species, and every single population, a potential source of macromolecules with different benefits, because the composition of the mucus will differ accordingly to environments. Snail mucus also contains glycosaminoglycans, which are complex polysaccharides made of a homopolymer of diglycosidic units, often conjugated with proteins (mucoproteins) or with uronic and sulfuric acid. They are very important molecules that participate in the regulation of physiological processes through interactions with a wide variety of proteins. These molecules are also an important constituent of land snail mucus in which their hygroscopic activity helps prevent dehydration of the snails. Recently, a novel glycosaminoglycan—acharan sulfate—was isolated and found to be structurally related to heparin and heparan sulfate. It has antitumor activity, which may be related to the inhibition of angiogenesis.4,5 Its mechanism of action is believed to stem from its ability to reduce the size of tumors by halting the action of angiogenic proteins. This is just one example of the great potential that snail mucus secretion could have.

Importance of Glycolic Acid and Allantoin Glycolic acid—also known as hydroacetic acid or hydroxyacetic acid—is the smallest alpha-hydroxy acid (see Figure 2), which is found in some sugar crops. This colorless, odorless, and hygroscopic crystalline solid is very soluble in water and is used in various skin care products. A glycolate is a salt or ester of glycolic acid. Sodium glycolate, for example, may also be used in cosmetics or personal care products. Overall, glycolic acid can reduce the appearance of fine lines, irregular pigmentation, and age spots as well as decrease 4

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the size of enlarged pores. It is used in exfoliating products as an alpha-hydroxy acid peel, or in creams and lotions at a lower concentration for a gentler acid-based peel. On the other hand, allantoin (see Figure 2)—also referred to as 5-ureidohydantoin or glyoxyldiureide—is a diureide of glyoxylic acid. It is one of the most versatile chemical compounds in nature, found in both plants and animals, but also synthesized in the laboratory. Normally, its physical form is an odorless white powder that is soluble in water at 0.5% Figure 2: Molecular structure of (a) glycolic acid and (b) allantoin. (w/w). It is effective in would healing, possibly by inhibiting the chemotaxis of inflammatory cells in the site of the wound and inducing fibroblast proliferation and synthesis of elastin and collagen—structural components of the extracellular matrix that are important for the mechanical properties of the skin.6,7 After considering the properties of these molecules, it is crucial to understand their concentration in snail mucus secretions. The best way to do this is with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both compounds are highly polar and interact loosely with a standard reversed phase C18 column material, but in the case of the modified Synergi-Hydro RP, they interact with the column polar endcapping (mainly via Hbonding). In these conditions, allantoin (4.24 ± 0.02 min) elutes earlier than glycolic acid (4.58 ± 0.02 min) (see Figure 3).8 The presence of glycolic acid and allantoin in the snail mucus do not fully explain all the biological properties of the mucus as there are a plethora of different proteins that are still unknown. In any event, since it is possible to determine the concentration of allantoin and glycolic acid present in snail mucus by HPLC analysis, these could be used as markers for snail mucus quality.

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Figure 3: HPLC chromatogram of snail mucus. Peak 1 corresponds to allantoin and Peak 2 to glycolic acid.

Microbiological Effects Most antibiotics are the products of microorganisms, such as fungi and bacteria. Therefore, it is interesting to find such antibiotic activity in the normal secretions of a mollusk.9 The antibacterial activity of land snail mucus was tested in bacterial culture of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas auruginosa (Gram-negative) at different time points (0, 30, and 60 min). In this experiment, different species reveal a preferential response to one bacterium or the other. For example, Helix aspersa (the common garden snail) is more effective against Pseudomonas auruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, underlying its bacteriostatic activity.10 Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, in fact, differ in their cell wall composition, in which Gram-positive bacteria have a thick peptidoglycan layer in the cell wall, whereas Gram-negative bacteria have a thin layer surrounded by an outer membrane rich in polysaccharides. Therefore, molecules in the snail mucus might react better with some elements rather than others in the cell wall of the bacteria. The antistaphylococcal effect of snail mucus could be due to the presence of an antimicrobial glycoprotein. For example, achacin is an antibacterial glycoprotein found in the mucus of the giant African snail, Achatina fulica. As already noted, the activity of the Helix aspersa mucus is greater against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, perhaps due to the presence of an achacin-like molecule that uniquely interacts with this type of bacterium. The findings of work completed by Otsuka-Fuchin and coworkers suggest that achacin could disrupt cell wall synthesis.11 Other studies have confirmed this hypothesis.9,12 Recently, we also identified an antimicrobial peptide (41 kDa). After electrophoretic separation of snail mucus proteins, bands at 50 kDa and between 30-40 kDa were analyzed by ESI-Q-TOF-HPLC-MS (Figure 4). In the band between 30-40 kDa, a single protein of 41 kDa was identified which could be the basis of the anti-Pseudomanas effect previously observed.13 (Continued on page 6) V O L U M E

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Figure 4: See text for description.

Concluding Remarks In conclusion, further studies are necessary to more deeply understand the composition of snail mucus, which will hopefully lead to other innovative applications in addition to cosmetics and para-pharmaceutics.

References 1. A. Alogna and C. Trapella, Valutazione della variabilità biochimica della secrezione mucosa in diverse specie di Gasteropodi Polmonati, AMS Laurea Unibo, 34-60 (2015). 2. D.R. Skingsley, A.J. White, and A. Weston, Analysis of pulmonate mucus by infrared spectroscopy, J. Moll. Stud., 66, 363-371 (2000). 3. D.R. Skingsley, Investigation of mucus using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Spectroscopy Europe, 22(1), 10-13 (2010). 4. Y.S. Kim, Y.Y. Jo, I.M. Chang, T. Toida, Y. Park, and R.J. Linhardt, Carbohydrates, lipids, and other natural products: A new glycosaminoglycan from the giant African snail Achatina fulica, J. Biol. Chem., 271, 11750-11755 (1996). 5. Y.S. Lee, H.O. Yang, K.H. Shin, H.S. Choi, S.H. Jung, Y.M. Kim, D.K. Oh, R.J. Linhardt, and Y.S. Kim, Suppression of tumor growth by a new glycosaminoglycan isolated from the African giant snail Achatina fulica, Eur. J. Pharmacol., 465, 191-198 (2003). 6. A.M. Posner, Allantoin—its properties and uses, J. Soc. Cosmet. Chem., 9, 58-60 (1958). 7. L.U. Araújo, A. Grabe-Guimarães, V.C. Mosqueira, C.M. Carneiro, and N.M. Silva-Barcellos, Profile of wound healing process induced by allantoin, Acta Cir. Bras., 25, 460-466 (2010). 8. M.A. El Mubarak, F.N. Lamari, and C. Kontoyannis, Simultaneous determination of allantoin and glycolic acid in snail mucus and cosmetic creams with high performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection, J. Chromatogr. A, 1322, 49-53 (2013). 9. S.J. Pitt, M.A. Graham, C.G. Dedi, P.M. Taylor-Harris, and A. Gunn, Antimicrobial properties of mucus from the brown garden snail Helix aspersa, Br. J. Biomed. Sci., 72, 174-181 (2015). 10. S.M. Iguchi, T. Aikawa, and J.J. Matsumoto, Antibacterial activity of snail mucus mucin, Comp. Biochem. Physiol. A Comp. Physiol., 72, 571-574 (1982). 11. H. Otsuka-Fuchino, Y. Watanabe, C. Hirakawa, T. Tamiya, J.J. Matsumoto, and T. Tsuchiya, Bactericidal action of a glycoprotein from the body surface mucus of giant African snail, Comp. Biochem. Physiol. C, 101, 607-613 (1992). 12. W. Alcântara Santana, C. Moura de Melo, J. Cordeiro Cardoso, R.N. Pereira-Filho, A. Silva Rabelo, F. Prado Reis, R.L. Cavalcanti de Albuquerque-Júnior, Assessment of antimicrobial activity and healing potential of mucous secretion of Achatina fulica, Int. J. Morphol., 30, 365-373 (2012). 13. D. Bortolotti, C. Trapella, T. Bernardi, and R. Rizzo. Letter to the Editor: Antimicrobial properties of mucus from the brown garden snail Helix aspersa, Br. J. Biomed. Sci., 73, 49-50 (2016).

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About the Author… Andrea Alogna is currently a Researcher at HelixPharma S.r.l.—a spin-off of Ferrara University—which specializes in certified and sanitized raw materials from snail mucus. He has spent a great deal of time characterizing and investigating the properties of snail mucus as well as exploring business opportunities for these substances. Andrea graduated with a Master’s degree in Biodiversity and Evolution from the University of Bologna. He may be contacted at: lgnndr1@unife.it. 6

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The New York Chapter of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists and the Product Development and Management Association of New York & New Jersey present:

Globalization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit April 19, 2017 The Bethwood • Totowa, NJ

An Evening Update on Markets, Business Climates, and Culture in these Dynamic Regions

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razil, Russia, India, and China are collectively referred to as the BRIC countries, and are among the fastest growing developing markets in the world. These countries are collectively, and Brazil individually, culturally diverse and major consumers of personal care products and fragrances. Brexit has been an earthquake that has set the entire European continent rolling in terms of currency fluctuations, intercountry relationships, and many other facets, too numerous to mention. It will affect how markets interact and develop enormously over the years. As more companies are embracing globalization to reach new customers in new markets, a greater understanding of culture, consumer preferences, important product types, and regulatory issues in these vast and growing markets is essential.

Agenda

Event Chairs: Mike Smith (MSmith@rd.us.loreal.com) and Mavis Dennis (mavis_dennis@colpal.com).

4:00 – 4:30 p.m. Registration and Cocktail Reception 4:30 – 4:45 p.m. Opening Remarks – Chair Mike Smith and Moderator Anastaisia Colon 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. Business Across Boarders: What You Need to Know to Manage Cultural Differences in a World of Brexit, BRICS, and Boundariless Borders – Dean Foster 5:30 – 6:15 p.m. Update on China: Opportunities in the World’s Second Largest Economy – Evelyn Su 6:15 – 7:00 p.m. Dinner 7:00 – 7:45 p.m. Update on Growing and Emerging Markets—Key Influences as a Measure of Success – Sarah Jindal 7:45 – 8:30 p.m. Russia: Unwrapping the Mystery – Alexander Settles 8:30 – 8:45 p.m. Closing Remarks – Marie Thadal, NYSCC Chair (Continued on page 8)

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The Soul & Science of Beauty.

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Globilization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit Speaker Abstracts and Biographies…

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(Continued from page 7)

Business Across Boarders: What You Need to Know to Manage Cultural Differences in a World of Brexit, BRICS, and Boundariless Borders www.evonik.com/personal-care

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– Dean Foster

ultural competency, or the ability to manage cultural differences in order to advance your organization’s global success, is perhaps the single most critical business skill in the 21st century. This is all the more important in the new environment of Brexit, influential emerging markets, and a world of fluid and shifting borders. This presentation will explore important major world cultural identities, how they reveal themselves in business and work, and the challenges they present to working with them in the newly evolved post-Brexit, BRIC, and borders without boundaries world of today. At the end of this fun, interactive keynote presentation, you will have a deeper understanding of the cultural requirements for working with major world regions today, and take home implementable critical “best practices” for doing so. n Dean Foster As president of DFA Intercultural Global Solutions, New York, Dean Foster conducts cross-cultural training worldwide and consults on intercultural business issues with most Fortune 1000 companies around the globe. For over twenty years, Dean has played a major role in the development of the intercultural training field: formerly he was founder and Managing Director of Berlitz Cross-Cultural Worldwide, Vice-president at GMAC/Windham Intercultural, and founder of Cross-Cultural Consulting Associates, New York. Dean is a frequent guest on CNN, CNBC, and other TV and radio shows as well as keynotes at major international professional conferences. Dean has been interviewed in major publications, such as Newsweek Magazine, New York Times, and USA Today. He is also a frequent Guest lecturer at Harvard Business School, New York University, Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and other educational organizations. _____________________________________________

Update on China: Opportunities in the World’s Second Largest Economy

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– Evelyn Su

hina is the second largest economy in the world, and it is the world’s fastest growing consumer market. Despite the size of this market, the average consumer only spends $25/year on personal care products, leaving enormous room for growth. With all this potential there is large competition for attention between domestic and international brands, so international brands must be prepared for a highly competitive environment. Companies doing business in China must understand some key regional and cultural differences in the Chinese consumer and maintain focus on the popular product types, which often differ from those common in Western economies. This presentation will provide an update of the essential landscape of China in terms of regulation, culture, essential product types, opportunities, and trends in the personal care industry.

n Evelyn Su Dr. Evelyn Su is the president, co-founder, and Chief Scientific Officer of Sino Lion, a leading innovative and new technological materials company that serves worldwide markets in the personal care, pharmaceutical, health care, and related industries. Dr. Su obtained her Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1993 from University of Connecticut located in Storrs, Connecticut. After graduation, Dr. Su worked as a Scientist at Pfizer during 1993-1995. In July 1995, Dr. Su co-founded Sino Lion USA, and moved its operation to 1 World Trade Center in New York City until the horrific destruction of the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001. She feels extremely fortunate that she is still alive today. Dr. Su is the author of the book Asian Botanicals (written in English) as well as numerous peer-reviewed academic journal articles. She has given scores of invited talks and conference presentations as either a keynote or invited speaker in the United States and at international conferences. Dr. Su has extensive experience in inventing and managing new materials technologies and commercializing various technologies 8

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into marketable products worldwide. She has successfully led Sino Lion in collaborating with a number of Fortune 500 companies in bringing technologies into the marketplace either in the form of Open-Innovation, exclusive co-development programs, or non-exclusive technology commercialization. Since 1995, Dr. Su has worked extensively as an innovative entrepreneur in both the United States and China. Under her leadership, Sino Lion has become a globally approved supplier to a growing number of Fortune 500 companies. _____________________________________________

Update on Growing and Emerging Markets— Key Influences as a Measure of Success

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– Sarah Jindal

his market update on Brazil, China, and India will highlight changes over the past five years that have influenced the beauty and personal care landscape with a focus on categories that are growing with market examples. It will provide consumer insights that are essential for brands and marketers when formulating their strategy for success. Understanding the ‘wants and needs’ of the consumer is critical when developing market-ready products. n Sarah Jindal As Mintel’s Senior Innovation and Insights Analyst, Sarah regularly interfaces with key beauty clients and lends her expertise based on over 17 years of experience developing ingredient technologies for beauty and personal care. Sarah’s roles in both marketing and product development cover all beauty and personal care categories with a focus on skincare and active ingredients. Having worked for a variety of companies over her career, Sarah has gained an in-depth understanding of the industry and draws upon not only her work experience but also degrees in Biology, Biochemistry, and Evolutionary Biology. _____________________________________________

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Russia: Unwrapping the Mystery

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– Alexander Settles

ussia is unique among the BRIC countries, with its history of investment in basic science and research, higher education, and infrastructure. And Russia has a central role in a multipolar world. The rapid development from 1999 to 2008 radically changed their economy, as a broad middle class of consumers became established. After the financial crisis, lower oils prices delayed a return to growth. Since the recovery in 2009, firms producing consumer products continued to expand into Russia, developing marketing, sales, and distribution functions that targeted the particularities of the Russian market. While Russia has been projected to be the largest consumer market in Europe by 2025 there still exists uncertainty in the market. Prof. Settles will provide an overview of the current political and economic situation in Russia with a focus on the manufacturing of consumer goods in Russia. He will highlight a case study of the Swedish cosmetic firm Oriflame, discussing their manufacturing operations and investments in Russia. Prof. Settles will also provide an overview of the cultural differences of the Russian consumer and the unique considerations of doing business in Russia. I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma; but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest. …Winston Churchill, 1939 n Alexander Settles Dr. Settles is an assistant professor of professional practice in the Department of Management and Global Business at Rutgers Business School and was Fulbright Scholar in Russia during the 2005-2006 academic years. Previously he was an Instructor at Nevada State College, a Professor of Corporate Governance and Strategic Management, and the Deputy Director of the Corporate Governance Center at the National Research University Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Russia. Dr. Settles has served as a consultant to the World Bank Institute, the Organization (Continued on page 10)

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Globilization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit

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for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Center for International Private Enterprise. Dr. Settles’ research focuses on emerging market multinationals and management practices in emerging market firms with a specialization in Russian firms.

Registration Information SCC members Non-SCC members Students/Unemployed Emeritus members

Pre-registration cost $55 $75 $10 $0

At door cost $95 $115 $50 $40

To register, visit www.nyscc.org and click on the Events section.

Location The Bethwood, 38 Lackawanna Avenue, Totowa, NJ

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Hair Measurement Science Symposium June 8, 2017 TRI-Princeton • Princeton, NJ A one-day symposium dedicated to scientists who perform instrumental laboratory measurements on hair. For more information, visit www.triprinceton.org.

NYSCC Annual Golf Outing July 26, 2017 Crystal Springs Golf Club, Hamburg, NJ For registration visit: www.nyscc.org. For more information, contact Jim Lynch: jim.lynch@ultrachem.com.

Society of Cosmetic Chemists 71st Annual Scientific Meeting December 11-12, 2017 The Westin New York at Times Square • New York, NY For more information, send inquiries to: info@scconline.org. 10

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Premium Ingredients. Custom Solutions.

Deborah Bagnuolo 844 458 7111 lvlomas.com

Monthly Meeting Group Discount The NYSCC is offering a group discount of 15% to companies who send 5 or more employees to a monthly meeting. All five employees would need to be registered at the same time to receive the discount. Once purchased, registrations are non-refundable.

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2017 NYSCC Suppliers’ Day Program NYSCC Suppliers’ Day SCC Continuing Education Program Opening Day Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Digital Age of Beauty Discover Sustainability @ Suppliers’ Day 2017 Future Chemists Workshop Awards Night Party

It’s only Bio.Logical. to contact us: (800) 223-7054 acme-hardesty.com

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SCC Continuing Education Program

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he National SCC will showcase two courses leading into the 2017 New York Suppliers’ Day—one covering basics of cosmetic chemistry and a more advanced course that takes a deep dive into formulations. These courses will take place on Monday, May 1st. Your registration will allow you admittance to SUPPLIERS’ DAY EXPO on May 2nd and 3rd.

Fully-operational fragrance laboratory and manufacturer, creating aromas for perfumes and colognes, household, personal care, hair care and air care products. Contact us to learn more:

Perry Pellegrino or Jane Pinda

678.361.8717 connect@fragrancewest.com fragrancewest.com

Beginning Cosmetic Chemistry Monday, May 1, 2017 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Instructed by Perry Romanowski – Vice-president, Brains Publishing This course is designed specifically with beginning cosmetic chemists in mind, but information presented will also be useful for QA chemists and seasoned veteran scientists who want to learn about other areas of formulations. By attending this course, attendees will receive an introduction to the industry, basic physiology of skin and hair, obtain formulation techniques, learn a few tools of the trade, and be able to conduct claims substantiation testing, among many other education tools.

Cosmetics Formulations Monday, May 1, 2017 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Instructed by Mark Chandler – President, ACT Solutions Corp This course is perfect for anyone interested in the mechanics of designing a cosmetic formulation. From this course, attendees will obtain a better understanding of emulsion theory as well as the formulation basics for suncreens, preservation, makeup, hair care, cleansers, and more! _____________________________________________

38th Annual NYSCC Suppliers’ Day Opening Day Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

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he NYSCC will hold a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City at this year’s Suppliers’ Day event on Tuesday, May 2nd at 9:00 a.m. The Javits location in New York City—the hub of fashion, beauty, and related trends—is a conducive environment for R&D product development teams and all those involved in sourcing ingredients for cosmetics, personal care, and wellness products. The Suppliers’ Day exhibit floor will also feature International Pavilions from France and Brazil along with an Innovation Alley and Formulations Solution Station & Theater. We are enthusiastic about the new location, and are very receptive to a venue that will provide contiguous exhibit space offering optimal business exchange and learning for all attendees. But most importantly, we want to share this exciting day with our past chairs who dedicated their time and knowledge to the society by passing down their legacy to future chemists. Therefore, we invite all of our past NYSCC chairs to attend this groundbreaking event. Please R.S.V.P by no later than Friday, April 14th to Sophia Chen at historian@nyscc.org or (908) 327-7237. We hope you can accept this invitation and look forward to hearing from you.

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Digital Age of Beauty

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n today’s dynamic marketplace, the use of digital technology in the product development cycle is becoming standard operating procedure for certain elements—and with the advent of virtual reality, it is expected to grow exponentially. Come learn about the technologies driving this development and assisting manufacturers who are feeling the pressure to introduce new products and reduce time-to-market. Presentations from leaders in the field will focus on supply chain innovations—from data intelligence tools, predictive analytics, 3D printing technology, photo booths/digital enhancements, and filters to virtual teams and collaboration…and so much more. For registration and more information go to: www.nyscc.org.

Tuesday, May 2 • 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. • Achieving Speed to Market in the Digital Age

Speed Up Development with CAD Computer Aided Design – Joy Wolfe, Technology & AP Computer Science Teacher, FIRST Robotics 2590 Advisor

Digital and Technology Consumer Engagement Trends for the Beauty Industry – Sinead Norenius-Raniere, The Pienza Collective Partner, BABA Board Member, iFabbo Founder + Advisor _____________________________________________

Tuesday, May 2 • 2:00 – 3:45 p.m. • Regulatory Compliance in the Digital Age

Formulating for Efficacy™ – Mark Chandler, ACT Solutions Corp

An Efficient Way to Generate a Cosmetic Product Dossier & Product Information File (PIF) – Melanie Cummings, Regulatory Specialist, Repertoire Consulting LLC

How a Raw Material Compliance Library Can Streamline Your New Product Introduction Process for Faster market entry

ALT

– Ken Bubeck, Founder, Ithos Global _____________________________________________

Wednesday, May 3 • 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. • The World of Virtual Reality

Givaudan Active Beauty invites you to an Immersive Beauty Experience – Mathias Fleury, Global Marketing Support Manager, Givaudan Active Beauty

Using Virtual Reality to Open Up Infinite Possibilities – Timothy J. Roach, Global Strategic Marketing Director, Lubrizol Corporation

A View on Customized Cosmetics from the Non-Production Side: Chances, Possibilities, and Limitations – Georg Khazaka, General Manager, Dipl. Oek _____________________________________________

Discover Sustainability @ Suppliers’ Day 2017

Wednesday, May 3, 2017 • 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, Presentation Theater – 1152

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he Suppliers’ Day Presentation Theater will feature short, educational sessions highlighting sustainability on a global scale. Natural, Sustainable, and Green cosmetics are much more than a trend for the cosmetics industry. They are increasingly present and in demand by consumers. Addressing this demand will be experts offering a perspective from around the globe, as well as award-winning exhibitors who are breaking ground in sustainability initiatives. Program will include: • Moderator: Tom Branna, Publisher – HAPPI Magazine • Jadir Nunes, Consultant – Scientific Learning & Innovation Consulting • Technical experts from supplier recipients of the 2017 NYSCC AWARDS PROGRAM will be presenting; the theme of this year’s program was “Focus on Sustainability.” Companies presenting include: Alban Muller, Croda/Sederma, and SEPPIC Inc. V O L U M E

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Make note of it… Send news of interest, guest editorials, and comments to Roger McMullen, Editor • E-mail: roger_mcmullen @fdu.edu

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Future Chemists Workshop Sponsorship

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he NYSCC is proud to launch its first Future Chemists Workshop at this year’s Suppliers’ Day show, where aspiring cosmetic chemists, students, and young formulators starting in their career get to learn about the basics in formulation as well as discover some tips and tricks taught by some of our experienced and seasoned formulators in the industry. We are seeking vendors who would like to support us by lending us equipment that will be needed and used at this formulation event. This could be a great opportunity for increased visibility of your company to attendees and student formulators during one of the biggest tradeshows in our industry, as well as demonstrate your continued support to the NYSCC Chapter. Your generosity will be recognized via a banner ad that will be hanging throughout the show floor or wall advertisement at the workshop. We are asking your support by providing any of the following equipment: hot plates, homogenizers, mixers + stand, thermometers, weighing scale, lab coats, and safety goggles. Please note that we can coordinate the shipment of your equipment to and from Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. If you have any questions or would like to participate in this sponsorship opportunity, please contact John Carola at johnc@protameen.com.

The NYSCC is proud to launch its first “Future Chemists Workshop” at this year’s Suppliers’ Day show, where aspiring cosmetic chemists, students, and young formulators starting in their career get to learn about the basics in formulation as well as discover some tips and tricks by two of our esteemed industry experts.

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Like, Connect & Tweet About Us!

FACEBOOK: NEW YORK LINKED IN: NEW YORK SCC TWITTER: @NYSCC INSTAGRAM: NYSCCMAIN SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS These connections are possible by the NYSCC Social Media Committee

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COMMITTED TO TECHNOLOGY, FORMULATION AND SUPERIOR NATION-WIDE DISTRIBUTION.

800.296.4942 LINCOLNFINEINGREDIENTS.COM 50 INDUSTRIAL CR., LINCOLN, R.I., 02865

MIXING SEMINAR Tuesday, May 9, 2017

EKATO Corporation 48 Spruce St, Oakland, NJ 07436 Call 201- 825 - 4684 X205 chelsea.rowen@ekato.com http://www.ekato.com/news/workshops-and-seminars/

91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium July 9-12

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The City College of New York • New York, NY

teve Herman, Program Chair of the NYSCC, and Kaushal Rege of Arizona State University are chairing a session on Colloids and Surface Science in Medicine & Personal Care Products at the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium being held at The City College of New York next summer. In addition, the NYSCC is sponsoring the keynote speaker, Prof. Mansoor M. Amiji. This is a major annual event for the ACS that moves to a different university every year. The NYSCC is actively engaging other scientific societies for joint meetings and partnerships to increase the educational opportunities for our members, so this is a particularly exciting addition to our calendar. Elizabeth Kaufman, currently a doctoral candidate completing her Ph.D. work in chemistry at NYU, will moderate the session.

Combinatorial-designed Nano-systems for Systemic Delivery of Nucleic Acid Therapeutics

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– Mansoor M. Amiji

remendous advances in molecular and personalized medicine also present challenges for translation of innovative experimental approaches into clinically relevant strategies. To overcome some of these challenges, nanotechnology offers interesting solutions for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. For many systemic diseases, overcoming biological barriers and target specific delivery are the key challenges. Additionally, a newer generation of molecular therapies, such as gene therapy, oligonucleotides, and RNA interference (RNAi) require robust and highly specific intracellular delivery strategies for effective and clinically meaningful therapeutic outcomes. In this presentation, I will cover our strategic approach to develop and evaluate a novel platformbased combinatorial approach for targeted delivery systems for both small molecule and nucleic acid therapeutics. Using click conjugation chemistry and other synthetic approaches, we have developed a library of formulations of anticancer chemotherapeutics and have evaluated their encapsulation and delivery potential using dextran-based self-assembled nanoparticles. In addition, we have utilized a hyaluronic acid based nanoparticle library of formulations for delivery of nucleic acid constructs, including small interfering RNA.1-4

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In each of the cases discussed above, our fundamental guiding principles have been to develop innovative drug delivery solutions for intractable biomedical challenges using safe materials and scalable manufacturing methods to facilitate translation of these experimental approaches into clinically useful products.

We provide tailored solutions to our customers...

References 1. S.C. Abeylath, S. Ganta, A. Iyer, and M. Amiji, Combinatorial-designed multifunctional polymeric nanosystems for tumor-targeted therapeutic delivery, Acc. Chem. Res., 44, 1009-1017 (2011). 2. S.C. Abeylath and M.M. Amiji, “Click” synthesis of dextran macrostructures for combinatorialdesigned self-assembled nanoparticles encapsulating diverse anticancer therapeutics, Bioorg. Med. Chem., 19, 6167-6173 (2011). 3. S. Ganesh, A. Iyer, D. Morrissey, and M. Amiji, Hyaluronic acid-based self-assembling nanosystems for CD44 target mediated siRNA delivery to solid tumors, Biomat., 34, 3489-3502 (2013). 4. A. Singh, M. Talekar, T.H. Tran, A. Samantha, R. Sundaram, and M.M. Amiji, Combinatorial approach in the design of multifunctional polymeric nano-delivery systems for cancer therapy, J. Mat. Chem. B, 2, 8069-8084 (2014). n About the Speaker Dr. Mansoor Amiji is currently the University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Co-Director of Northeastern University Nanomedicine Education and Research Consortium (NERC) at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. NERC oversees a doctoral training program in Nanomedicine Science and Technology that is co-funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Amiji received his B.S. degree in Pharmacy from Northeastern University in 1988 and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Purdue University in 1992. His research is focused on development of biocompatible materials from natural and synthetic polymers, target-specific drug and gene delivery systems for cancer and infectious diseases, and nanotechnology applications for medical diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. His research has received over $18 million in sustained funding from the NIH, NSF, private foundations, and the pharmaceutical/biotech industries. Dr. Amiji teaches in the professional pharmacy program and in the graduate programs of Pharmaceutical Science, Biotechnology, and Nanomedicine. He has published six books and over 200 book chapters, peerreviewed articles, and conference proceedings. He has received a number of honors and awards including the Nano Science and Technology Institute’s Award for Outstanding Contributions towards the Advancement of Nanotechnology, Microtechnology, and Biotechnology, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Meritorious Manuscript Award, Controlled Release Society’s (CRS) Nagai Award, and the AAPS and CRS Fellowships. _____________________________________________

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Liquid Crystal and α-Gel-based Emulsion and Soft Gel Formulations for Skin Care

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– Toshiyuki Suzuki

nique formulations—based on soft gels, microgel dispersions, and multilamellar emulsions—were produced using stable α-gels obtained from the L-arginine salt of long-chain monoalkyl phosphate. The stabilization of α-gel was achieved by the contribution of L-arginine as the counterion of monoalkyl phosphate—the dissociation of three functional groups induces the electrostatic interaction between the neighboring molecules, resulting in the bulkiness that suppresses the precipitation of β- or γcrystals. Lamellar liquid crystals of β-branch-type L-arginine long-chain monoalkyl phosphate was applied to the preparation of gel-like oil-in-liquid crystal (O/LC) emulsions of high internal phase ratios and fine O/W emulsions. This liquid crystal emulsification is available for a wide variety of oils of various polarities, and even for silicone oils and perfluoropolyethers. From the phase behavior during emulsification, and analysis of the dynamic behavior of the liquid crystal membrane, it is concluded that the unique property of liquid crystal emulsification is attributed to the independence of the liquid crystal membrane as a phase against oil and water. These formulations are suitable for skin care products. (Continued on page 18)

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91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium

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(Continued from page 17)

n About the Speaker Toshiyuki Suzuki is currently an executive officer of Cosmos Technical Center Co., Ltd. of Nikkol Group. He is also a visiting professor at Tokyo University of Science. He received a Ph.D. from Nihon University in 1987. He spent a significant amount of his career in R&D at Kao Corporation from 1976 to 2009 as a Research Scientist of cosmetics (for 26 years) and the Director of the Personal Healthcare Lab (for 7 years). He also served as Director at SS Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., in charge of R&D and new product development from 2009 to 2011. His main research interests are emulsion and gel technologies involving molecular assemblies. He has been awarded several prizes for his research and technology development from the following societies: The Chemical Society of Japan, The International Federation of Societies of Cosmetic Chemists (IFSCC), The Society of Cosmetic Chemists of Japan, The Society of Cosmetic Chemists (United States), and Japan Chemical Industry Association. _____________________________________________

Don’t Miss This Event The ACS Colloid & Surface Chemistry Symposium is a wonderful opportunity for NYSCC members to join the ACS in a session jointly created to benefit our members. The conference web site is your portal to this exciting new event for NYSCC members. Please visit: www.colloids2017.org. For event registration, NYSCC members pay ACS member prices. Early registration ends May 15th, so make your plans to attend soon. Please register at: http://colloids2017.org/register.html. NYSCC members are also encouraged to submit abstracts to this extraordinary conference: the abstract deadline is April 15th. For more information about the event visit: www.colloids2017.org. If you have any further questions about the NYSCC’s sponsorship or involvement in this event, please contact Steve Herman at steveh50@optonline.net.

Employment Opportunities For complete ads please go to the NYSCC website: https://www.nyscc.org/employment-listings.html.

n Cosmetic Chemist – Formulation R&D Spartan Brands New York, NY

n Personal Care Marketing Intern Momentive Tarrytown, NY

n Inside Sales Botaneco Inc. Lambertville, NJ

n Assistant Business Development Manager Miyoshi America, Inc. Valley Cottage, NY

n Senior Formulation Chemist Botaneco Inc. Lambertville, NJ

n Product Development Process Engineer Living Proof Cambridge, MA

n R&D Technologist Mast Global New York, NY

n Research Toxicologist The Honest Co. Playa Vista, CA

NYSCC Blog Don’t miss out on the latest advances in cosmetic science. Check out the NYSCC’s blog. nyscc.org/blog 18

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Cosmetiscope - April 2017  
Cosmetiscope - April 2017