Page 1

MARCH 2017 • Vol. 23 No. 3

New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists

Table of Contents The Future of Open Innovation Page 1 Letter from the Chair Page 2 Product Innovation— Think “Open Iteration” Page 5 NYSCC Open Innovation Symposium Pages 6-9 Globalization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit Pages 10-13 91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium Pages 14-15 Suppliers’ Day Information Pages 16-18

O

www.nyscc.org

The Future of Open Innovation by Doug Berger

pen Innovation has been an increasingly hot topic since 2003 and the publication of Henry Chesbrough’s book, Open Innovation. Open innovation began with the realization of this disturbing insight: companies relying solely on internal activities to identify, develop, and commercialize new products were losing ground to those companies that tapped the vast external ecosystem of knowledge, skills, and technology. Open innovation ignited a paradigm shift conceptualizing innovation as a field of enterprise activity, distinct yet allied with research and development. The innovation paradigm was cast as a growth engine— a new pathway forward for sustained competitive advantage, bigger commercial success, higher profitability, and increased productivity. Innovation has now evolved into a discipline in its own right complete with skills, processes, and practices that can be taught, transferred, and executed. However, this innovation paradigm challenges organizational traditions and orthodoxies around how ideas are originated, evaluated, developed, commercialized, and scaled. Therefore, implementation requires established business organizations to stretch and operate in the context of a complex external ecosystem; to collaborate with non-traditional players; to tap external expertise no matter where it is located; and to morph the organization to be porous and agile rather than tightly bounded and rigid. Changing mindsets has never been easy and fourteen years into open innovation people continue to underestimate the challenge of implementation.

Looking at Innovation Investments— What are the Pluses and Minuses as Seen from the C-suite? Top-of-mind for executives is the elusive answer to the questions: What does my company have to show for our innovation investment? Where have open innovation and more broadly innovation been a significant value-add? Where am I disappointed with returns? 1. Open innovation has improved time to market, product features, solving technical challenges, and product cost. These are all vital metrics for R&D effectiveness. This enthusiasm, rightly so, comes from continued delivery of incremental gains in the productivity of R&D. 2. True innovation is rare. Executives typically see products that just renew and sustain the brand or product line. Product variety continues to increase in markets that are already crowded. Consumers are confused. Shelf space is harder to earn.

(Continued on page 4)

OPEN INNOVATION—THE BUSINESS OF COSMETICS March 23 • Pleasantdale Chateau, West Orange, NJ


C

2017 NYSCC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & PROGRAM CHAIRS CHAIr Marie Thadal chairelect@nyscc.org (609) 712-3716

CHAIr-ELECT Cathy Piterski cpiterski@essentialingredients.com (201) 675-3799

TrEASurEr Michael Smith Treasurer@nyscc.org 908-625-4331

SECrETArY Giorgino Macalino (862) 324-2749 Secretary@nyscc.org

ADVISOr Rey Ordiales Reyordiales@outlook.com 732-878-7798

HOuSE Mohamed Abdulla (973) 487-6572 house@nyscc.org

MEMBErSHIP John Carola JohnC@protameen.com

O

S

M

E

T

I

Letter from the Chair

O

S

C

O

P

E

…Marie Renee Thadal, Coptis Inc.

n February 15th at the NYSCC Future of Sustainability event, we rolled out the red carpet for our most sustainable companies. Out of many entrants, the companies selected by a panel of independent judges were: Alban Muller, Croda, and Seppic. These industry suppliers were recognized by the New York chapter for their robust sustainable initiatives and practices. More than ever, companies are proving that implementing a “Planet, People, Profit” strategy to their business model can bring much value to their brand. On behalf of the NYSCC executive board, I congratulate our sustainability award winners and thank our distinguished speakers for sharing their knowledge. The winners also received an invitation to participate in the session, Discover Sustainability, which will take place at the 2017 Suppliers’ Day. Elizabeth Kaufman, a student member of the society and a Ph.D. candidate at New York University, should be applauded for taking on this major project while defending her thesis. Elizabeth truly loves the SCC and wants to see the New York chapter grow. So, what is next? Mergers and acquisitions were rampant in 2016. In fact, it has been an upward trend since 2014. Why are so many companies moving away from organic growth approaches to innovation? How can suppliers and manufacturers take advantage of this trend? Where are the opportunities? Mohamed Omer of Revlon and his team are planning a full-day event to address this dynamic environment. The business of cosmetics is not only appropriate for upper management, but also for bench chemists so that they can understand how projects and processes can help boost a company's valuation. In other words, all employees at a firm need to understand the end game, which is value creation. The agenda strives to cover: • Ideation and new product design. • Brand strategy. • IP strategies and university alliances. • Mergers and acquisitions. Yes, many things are happening at the NYSCC! Event chairs and committee members are working diligently to create a sustainable future for the chapter. Registration is open for Open Innovation – The Business of Cosmetics at www.nyscc.org/events. See you bright and early on March 23rd at the beautiful Pleasantdale Château in South Orange, NJ.

PrOGrAM Steve Herman program@nyscc.org (973) 479-5702

COMMuNICATIONS

Upcoming 2017 NYSCC Events Calendar • For updated NYSCC information, visit us on the web at: www.nyscc.org • For National SCC information: www.scconline.org

Stephen Weinberg (973) 307-4854 webmaster@nyscc.org

March 23 Open Innovation, Pleasantdale Château, West Orange, NJ

SPECIAL EVENTS

April 19 Globalization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit, The Bethwood, Totowa, NJ

Amy Marshall amy.marshall@altana.com (908) 806-4664

COSMETISCOPE EDITOr Roger McMullen roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

COSMETISCOPE ASSISTANT EDITOr Joe Albanese (908) 456-2968 joealbanese2@gmail.com

COSMETISCOPE ADVErTISING Bret Clark rbclark@ashland.com

2

May 2-3 NYSCC Suppliers’ Day, Jacob Javits Convention Center, New York, NY July 9-12 91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium, The City College of New York, New York, NY July 26 NYSCC Golf Outing, Hamburg, NJ September 6 Fashion, Beauty and Technology, New York, NY September 6 Culinary Event, Midtown Loft, New York, NY October 12 Innovations in Textured Hair Care, Grand Summit Hotel, Summit, NJ November 8 NYSCC Board Transition Meeting, The Venetian, Garfield, NJ

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

Scientific and Academic Affairs Committee

T

he Chair of Scientific and Academic Affairs of the NYSCC is organizing a Scientific Committee to discuss topics relevant for our NYSCC members. The scientific committee is charged with developing content for communication on cosmetic science, innovation, supply chain, product and ingredient development, and other relevant topics for our industry using communication platforms such as its website (blog), the official newsletter of the NYSCC (Cosmetiscope) and social media channels (such as Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc.). It will also use public newspapers, blogs, and magazines as communication tools in order to reach consumers and the general public, outside our industry, with the goal to divulge scientifically proven information and reduce misinformation on cosmetics and cosmetic science. The Scientific Committee will work very close with the NYSCC webmaster, editorial board of Cosmetiscope, and NYSCC Chairs for Public Relations, Social Media and Events to coordinate the communication effort. It will also reach out to Academia to invite researchers at colleges and universities to speak at NYSCC events and to contribute as advisors on specific topics. Any member of the NYSCC that is interested in proposing his/her candidature for the NYSCC Scientific Committee, or would like to receive more information, can reach the Chair, Giorgio Dell’Acqua, at Giorgio_Dellacqua@hotmail.com or (201) 744-4262.

Eighth Biennial Holistic Cosmetic Symposium & Suppliers’ Showcase SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS – Twin Cities Chapter

Holistic Symposium • March 21 Earle Brown Heritage Center • Brooklyn Center, Minnesota Topics of particular interest include: • Organic Ingredients Green Packaging • Natural Preservatives Green Manufacturing • Formulating Green • Sustainable or Fair Trade Ingredients • Biodiversity and Ethical Sourcing • Marketing and Consumer Trends • Regulatory Updates

Come be a part of the SCC’s original Green Symposium! For suppliers’ interested in participating in the afternoon showcase, a separate packet was sent out in November. V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

3


C

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

The Future of Open Innovation

C

O

P

E

(Continued from page 1)

3. Competitive differentiation and intellectual property, once strong growth drivers, have become increasingly transient. It is a continuous battle to stay competitive and consumer relevant. The competition always catches up. Erosion of revenue streams forces an emphasis on short-term cost improvement activities. 4. Executives see products that are technical successes and commercial failures, resulting in a high percent of ‘false positives’. 5. Over the past 15 years the world has become flat, global, and disruptive. The pace of start-ups in all categories is accelerating and established companies are the laggards. The ability to build new brands and create game-changers has become the dominion of venture capitalists and entrepreneurs. In summary, 60-80% of executives continue to be disappointed with the return on their innovation investment. From their perspective, productivity of new SKUs has improved, yet the only option for significant growth comes down to over-paying for acquisitions. The trickle down of this story makes for unhappy brand managers and R&D.

What Do Executives really Care About? At the end of the day, executives truly care about two results from their investments: new growth and improved profitability. When executives speak of the critical importance of innovation, they really want products, services, and business models which take the business into new territories and generate new revenues and profit streams. Executives want innovation to be a reliable growth driver. They want to be leading the competition. They want new $50 mm benefit platforms organically built; platforms that they can scale to $500 mm. They want to unleash entrepreneurial growth while bounding risk. Executives want to feel the pride that comes from hearing that “Wow!” excitement from their channels and consumers.

March 23 – Outlook for the Future At the NYSCC conference I will share leading-edge perspectives, processes, and practices, which are achieving new arenas of corporate growth. Topics for the session include: • Becoming Agile – How to Adapt Current Processes • Ways the Entrepreneurial Venturing Model is Going Corporate • Opportunity Engineering – How to Identify and Mitigate Risk Versus Avoiding It • Innovation Beyond Products and Services • The Creative Mix – How to Originate ‘Big Potential’ Ideas

The future has already arrived. It’s just not evenly distributed! William Gibson

About the Author… Doug is founder and Managing Director of INNOVATE LLC., experts in aiding companies to shift into the paradigm of bold innovation, corporate entrepreneurship, and breakthrough thinking. The core of INNOVATE’S work is achieving growth trajectories above historic trend lines. Our purpose is to liberate talent, passion, and creativity. INNOVATE is known for directly impacting those sticky challenge areas and pain points at the root cause of disappointing organic growth and making entrepreneurial execution work. Clients include many of the Fortune 500 companies including Johnson & Johnson, Alberto-Culver, DuPont, The Walt Disney Company, AT&T, and Weyerhaeuser. INNOVATE works with companies in the middle market, and advises and mentors start-ups. Doug speaks at conferences and corporate events. He publishes the electronic magazine, The Innovators ezine, and he authored The Breakthrough Mind, based on teaching thousands of people the art and skills of breakthrough thinking. Doug can be reached by e-mail at doug@innovate1st.com. 4

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

Product Innovation—Think “Open Iteration” by Pierre-Edouard Harant

E

ver tried launching a new consumer product into market? It is hard. There are numerous steps to successfully validate and many pitfalls to avoid. And on top of that, in most cases, after suffering delays and cost overruns, a majority of products will fail to become commercially successful even if the business case looked promising on paper. Things are a little easier for new products which are close to a company’s core competencies, but in terms of new product ideas or innovations which are outside of these core competencies, many companies will struggle to launch successful products and/or will spend enormous amounts of time, resources, and money trying. This can be a real issue as a company’s mediumto long-term growth depends on its ability to evolve and reinvent itself through innovation and disruptive new products. Failing to successfully launch these new products/innovations and wanting to stick to legacy or incrementally improved products can be deadly. However, many large corporations incentivise their employees on short-term key performance indicators (KPIs) and control them with tight budgets, making it really hard for them to come up with the new disruptive product ideas needed in the long term to ensure the corporation’s growth and survival. This seems like a bit of an unsolvable equation. How can a corporation launch new disruptive products/ innovations necessary for its long-term growth while bearing in mind the short-term realities of budgets and KPIs’ constraints? The solution, we believe, is “Open Iteration”. By iteration, I mean the process of testing a lot of new products in the market, receive quick feedback from customers, iterate based on the feedbacks, and quickly scale successes. The more different these new products are from the company’s existing portfolio, the higher the chance of finding its next growth relay. Iteration solves one part of the equation, the long-term growth. But how can a corporation iterate on a lot new products, which are largely different from its existing portfolio with in-house resource, while solving the second part of the equation, the short-term resource and cost constraints? They need to be open. By open I mean the willingness to work with external partners able to deliver these disruptive new products together with the corporations. Ideally, the external partners need to be able to go end-to-end, from the idea or concept of these new products, to quick prototyping, iterations following consumers’ feedback, scaling, and, finally, mass manufacture. Being open and working in partnership with such end-to-end organizations will allow corporations to save time, cost, red tape (think procurement process for one partner rather than 30 suppliers), and resources, hence solving the second part of the equation. Running an Open Iteration process within your organisation can be the source of disruptive new innovations leading to long-term success at low risk.

Making Personal Personal Car Caree Beautiful®

Specialty Silicones & Actives Skin Car Caree Hair Car Caree Color Cosmetics ®

www.biosiltech.com

About the Author…

A

n aeronautical engineer, start-up investor, and ex-investment banker, PierreEdouard is Managing Director at RPD International, where he leads business development and corporate relationships, helping his clients innovate faster and execute better. Pierre-Edouard spent seven years at private equity funds—Ancala Partners and Macquarie Capital—where he originated and led a number of transactions.

V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

5


C

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

C

O

P

E

Open Innovation – The Business of Cosmetics March 23 • 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

H

Pleasantdale Château • West Orange, NJ

enry Chesbrough popularized the phrase “open innovation” in his 2003 book Open Innovation: The New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology. He described the concept as, “the use of purposive inflows and outflows of knowledge to accelerate internal innovation and expand markets for external use of innovation, respectively.” Open innovation assumes that firms should use external ideas as well as internal ideas to advance their technology. As boundaries have become more permeable, innovations can easily transfer inward and outward. Companies cannot afford to rely entirely on their own research, but should buy or license processes or inventions from other companies or research universities. In addition, internal inventions not being used should be taken outside the company through licensing, joint ventures, and spin-offs. Join us in March as a group of diverse experts illuminate the ways open innovation can stimulate your company’s future. Learn the benefits, challenges, and potential pitfalls when you explore opportunities with other companies through partnerships and licensing and with universities through their technology transfer systems. Anyone with a concern for the central role innovation plays in commercial success in the 21st century cannot afford to miss this exciting event.

Event Committee: Chair Mohamed Omer – Mohamed.Omer@Revlon.com Sahar Fakhry-Smith – SaharF@snfhc.com • Mitisha Mehta – mitisham@student.fdu.edu John Creek – John.Creek@rb.com For more information, visit www.nyscc.org.

Agenda 8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Registration and Opening Remarks (NYSCC Chair – Marie Thadal) 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Implementing Open Innovation: Lessons from the Leaders – Gene Slowinski Co-creating Innovation – John Bell Open Innovation and Licensing – Jennifer Gottwald 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch (Sponsor Highlights) 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. The Future of Open Innovation – Doug Berger Transformational Open Innovation: A Tango Between Packaging and Formula – Marisol Simard Innovating from the Dirt Up: Innovation in the Potato Industry and Beyond – Gary Laney A Century of Transformation and a Peek into the Future: Open Innovation at Ashland – David Hood

Reinventing Supplier Innovation Relationships Uncover the Power of Collaboration …A Note from Event Chair, Mohamed Omer

T

o compete effectively in today’s business environment, firms are replacing the “not invented here” syndrome with the “invented anywhere approach”. Leading organizations are rapidly moving from buy/sell relationships to close collaborations that allow both customers and suppliers to achieve a level of innovation

6

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

that brings marketplace advantage. To better understand the dynamics of these relationships, the Industrial Research Institute sponsored a two-year study titled, Reinventing Supplier Innovation Relationships. The purpose of the research is to uncover the power and critical components that energize these collaborations. The goal is to uncover a set of guideline principals that lead to more innovative relationships. Is it time to unlock the innovation power of your supplier relationships? Join us at the Open Innovation – The Business of Cosmetics event and you will: • Learn how the “Want, Find, Get, Manage” model helps executives determine high value projects, allocate intellectual property rights, define agreement boundaries, and develop a financial model that shares both risks and rewards. • See how firms use Voice of the Supply Chain to identify higher value projects. • Understand how firms use collaborative relationships to grow outside the core. _____________________________________________

Implementing Open Innovation: Lessons from the Leaders – Gene Slowinski

O

pen Innovation is transforming the nature of commercial development. To compete effectively in today’s business environment, firms are using strategic alliances to link their resources with the complementary resources of other world-class organizations. They are replacing the “not invented here” syndrome with the “invented anywhere approach”. Unfortunately, many alliances fail. Managers must deal with the complexities of allocating rights to jointly developed intellectual assets, protecting proprietary know-how and trade secrets, linking decision-making structures, and utilizing financial models that allow both firms to share the risks as well as rewards of collaboration. Dr. Slowinski’s 25 years of work on over 250 alliances led him to identify key best practices. He will present a set of simple, but powerful management tools and metrics. Many firms use these tools to increase the value of both their individual alliances and their alliance portfolios. n Gene Slowinski, Ph.D. Gene Slowinski is the Director of Strategic Alliance and Open Innovation Research at the Graduate School of Management, Rutgers University and Managing Partner of the Alliance Management Group, a consulting firm devoted to the formation and management of strategic alliances. His clients include Unilever, John Deere, Hershey’s, P&G, GSK, Kraft, Battelle, Energizer, PepsiCo, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sherwin Williams, and many other firms. Prior to forming the Alliance Management Group, he held management positions at AT&T Bell Laboratories and Novartis Corporation. Dr. Slowinski’s articles on managing strategic alliances can be found in Business Horizons, Research-Technology Management, Mergers and Acquisitions, Economic Development Quarterly, Les Nouvelles, and Cooperative Strategies in International Business. His new book, Reinventing Corporate Growth is the leading book on growing the corporation through Open Innovation. _____________________________________________

Co-creating Innovation – John Bell

I

nnovation is key for a company like Johnson & Johnson. Only through innovation, we can improve the lives of people across the globe. In our search for game-changing innovations with novel business models, Johnson & Johnson likes to team up with start-ups, universities, and larger companies to co-create new innovations.

n Dr. John Bell, Ph.D. Dr. John Bell is Vice-president External Innovation and New Business Models for Johnson & Johnson Consumer. In this role, he is responsible for driving the cooperation with entrepreneurs, strategic suppliers, partner companies, and universities to co-create game-changing innovations. His team represents the Johnson & Johnson Consumer Business in the Johnson & Johnson Innovation Centers. Before he joined Johnson & Johnson, John was Vice-president of Strategy and New Business Development at Philips Research. Prior to that, he was responsible for Strategic Alliances in Philips and also worked as Strategy Consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers. John has a strong background in open innovation, new business creation, partnerships, and strategy. He has a track record of creating new emerging businesses, setting up an internal incubator, driving the cultural change towards Open Innovation, and managing alliances. John is also responsible for strategy and business

(Continued on page 8)

V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

7


C

Like, Connect & Tweet

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

C

O

P

Open Innovation – The Business of Cosmetics

E

(Continued from page 7)

development in a promising high-tech hardware start-up. John has a B.S. degree in Business Economics and a Ph.D. on Joint Ventures from Tilburg University. Currently, he is part-time professor at Tilburg University. _____________________________________________

Open Innovation and Licensing – Jennifer Gottwald

FACEBOOK: NEW YORK SOCIETY OF COSMETIC CHEMISTS

LINKED IN: NEW YORK SCC

TWITTER: @NYSCC

r

esearch universities are the origin of many promising inventions in need of commercial partners to further develop them. In this presentation, attendees will learn about the framework within which university technology transfer offices work as well as to understand how to license their ideas and partner with them. Examples of successes and deals that fell apart will be given.

n Jennifer Gottwald, Ph.D. Jennifer Gottwald is a Licensing Manager at the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), where she has worked for fourteen years. WARF manages the patenting and licensing of the University of Wisconsin – Madison (UW), the WiCell Research Institute, and the Morgridge Institute for Research. Ms. Gottwald is responsible for the licensing of a portfolio of life science research tools and biotechnology intellectual properties, including green technologies. She also leads the WARF Clean Technologies Accelerator group. She is a Certified Licensing Professional and Patent Agent. She received a B.S. in Botany and German Literature, and a Ph.D. in Plant Molecular Biology from UW. She lectures in the M.S. in Biotechnology program at UW and is a founder and active in the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Women Inventors Committee. _____________________________________________

The Future of Open Innovation – Doug Berger

INSTAGRAM: NYSCCMAIN These connections were made possible by the NYSCC Social Media

F

or every best practice discipline there comes a point when the discipline must be reinvented to remain relevant. In this presentation, Doug Berger will highlight the practices and underlying premises which shaped the first era of open innovation. Then he will explore new developments that are reshaping the future of open innovation.

n Doug Berger Doug Berger is an international speaker, educator, and advisor on breakaway growth, disruptive thinking, and corporate entrepreneurship. He is the Founder and Managing Director of INNOVATE, a firm which collaborates with executives and companies to successfully commercialize bold opportunities in arenas including women’s health and beauty, chemicals, and medical devices. Doug has developed and facilitated corporate transformation and innovation programs for 20+ years. He is on the faculty of entrepreneurial boot camps and is author of The Breakthrough Mind based on his years of experience leading workshops and empowering thousands of people to achieve aspirational goals. _____________________________________________

Transformational Open Innovation: A Tango Between Packaging and Formula – Marisol Simard

T

his talk reflects upon a few inescapable questions that leaders must ask themselves in order to successfully capitalize on open innovation—or transformational open innovation—in the Beauty category. Who should be involved, and at what stage? Is there a need? Is it worth it? Can we deliver? How? In addressing these questions, and more, Mrs. Simard will share some lessons learned from over 20 years of experience in the field of innovation packaging and will provide insights from her unique perspective.

n Marisol Simard Marisol Simard is an innovation facilitator and strategist, based in the New York City area. Early in her career she interned in Milan, Italy for SowdenDesign, and later designed and delivered Pelican International’s first fishing-boat line. For the last 17 years she has worked in the cosmetic industry with Aptar, Avon, and L’Oréal USA as founder and leader of their respective U.S. Packaging Innovation Centers. Mrs. Simard holds more than 12 U.S. patents in the field of packaging and her designs have sold many 8

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

millions of units worldwide, including the award-winning Avon Mega Effects mascara. She is currently the President of Dandelion Clocks, an innovation consultancy helping businesses ignite the full potential of their creative teams and innovation initiatives. _____________________________________________

Innovating from the Dirt Up – Innovation in the Potato Industry and Beyond – Gary Laney • • • •

Biotechnology driving innovation—a ten year guess on benefits. Yikes! My product benefit doesn’t matter to consumers. Finding and leveraging an emotional connection to your product. Different innovation models that can accelerate product development, launch more quickly, and reduce capital and risk.

n Gary Laney Gary Laney is the founder of Farm to Fork Marketing, Inc. His career has reached into the full spectrum of the food supply chain and consists of developing marketing plans and new brands as well as repositioning existing brands and guiding the development and launch of new products. Gary’s powerful approach puts new products in the hands of consumers much faster and more flexibly than traditional innovation processes. _____________________________________________

A Century of Transformation and a Peek into the Future: Open Innovation at Ashland – David Hood

A

shland has been almost a century in the making. It has evolved from an oil company to a diversified chemicals conglomerate, and further to a global specialty chemicals supplier. This transformation was only possible by adding unique value to customer products. The new Ashland, and its strategy, are well positioned to bring innovative solutions to the personal care industry. Open Innovation has been a critical part of this comprehensive transformation. Ashland employs a variety of Open Innovation methods. We will present our Open Innovation initiatives and share some recent successes while peeking into the future.

• 100% n derived • No eye i • High-fo • EO-free, EO free • Biodegr

Suga®Nate 160NC Sodium Laur yllglucosiddes Hydrox ypropylsulfonate

colonialchem.com

Andrew Minczuk 201-259-7245 andrew.minczuk@colonialchem.com

n David Hood Dr. David K. Hood is currently a Senior Group Leader for Innovation Management: Upstream Technologies, Intellectual Property and Global Open Innovation at Ashland Specialty Ingredients (ASI), a division of Ashland. He has more than 18 years of professional experience in the specialty chemical industry. After completing a Visiting Assistant Professor position in the Department of Chemistry at William & Mary, he joined International Specialty Products (ISP). Throughout his career, he has enjoyed technical team building, leading global teams responsible for technology expansion, new business development programs including structuring complex R&D agreements and relationships as well as due diligence processes for corporate M&A activities. His varied technical interests include functional polymeric materials, printing technologies, technical coatings, and polymer architecture/ design. He holds more than 25 U.S. patents and has co-authored more than 30 technical articles. In 2004, he was awarded the Thomas Alva Edison Award (Consumer Division) by the R&D Council of New Jersey. _____________________________________________

registration Information Pre-registration cost At door cost SCC members $45 $70 Non-SCC members $60 $90 Students/Unemployed Members $10 $50 Emeritus members $0 $40 _____________________________________________

Location Pleasantdale Château, 757 Eagle Rock Avenue, West Orange, NJ • Tel: (973) 731-5600

V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

9


C

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

C

O

P

E

The New York Chapter of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists and the Product Development and Management Association of New York & New Jersey present:

Globalization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit April 19, 2017 The Bethwood • Totowa, NJ

sensiva® – multifunctional additives designed for your innovation euxyl® – optimum preservation according to your needs

An Evening Update on Markets, Business Climates, and Culture in these Dynamic Regions

1-888-267-4220

B

razil, Russia, India, and China are collectively referred to as the BRIC countries, and are among the fastest growing developing markets in the world. These countries are collectively, and Brazil individually, culturally diverse and major consumers of personal care products and fragrances. Brexit has been an earthquake that has set the entire European continent rolling in terms of currency fluctuations, intercountry relationships, and many other facets, too numerous to mention. It will affect how markets interact and develop enormously over the years. As more companies are embracing globalization to reach new customers in new markets, a greater understanding of culture, consumer preferences, important product types, and regulatory issues in these vast and growing markets is essential.

Agenda

Event Chairs: Mike Smith (MSmith@rd.us.loreal.com) and Mavis Dennis (mavis_dennis@colpal.com).

4:00 – 4:30 p.m. Registration and Cocktail Reception 4:30 – 4:45 p.m. Opening Remarks – Chair Mike Smith and Moderator Anastaisia Colon 4:45 – 5:30 p.m. Business Across Boarders: What You Need to Know to Manage Cultural Differences in a World of Brexit, BRICS, and Boundariless Borders – Dean Foster 5:30 – 6:15 p.m. Update on China: Opportunities in the World’s Second Largest Economy – Evelyn Su 6:15 – 7:00 p.m. Dinner 7:00 – 7:45 p.m. Update on Growing and Emerging Markets—Key Influences as a Measure of Success – Sarah Jindal 7:45 – 8:30 p.m. Russia: Unwrapping the Mystery – Alexander Settles 8:30 – 8:45 p.m. Closing Remarks – Marie Thadal, NYSCC Chair

10

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

Speaker Abstracts and Biographies… Business Across Boarders: What You Need to Know to Manage Cultural Differences in a World of Brexit, BRICS, and Boundariless Borders

C

Premium Ingredients. Custom Solutions.

– Dean Foster

ultural competency, or the ability to manage cultural differences in order to advance your organization’s global success, is perhaps the single most critical business skill in the 21st century. This is all the more important in the new environment of Brexit, influential emerging markets, and a world of fluid and shifting borders. This presentation will explore important major world cultural identities, how they reveal themselves in business and work, and the challenges they present to working with them in the newly evolved post-Brexit, BRIC, and borders without boundaries world of today. At the end of this fun, interactive keynote presentation, you will have a deeper understanding of the cultural requirements for working with major world regions today, and take home implementable critical “best practices” for doing so.

Deborah Bagnuolo 844 458 7111 lvlomas.com

n Dean Foster As president of DFA Intercultural Global Solutions, New York, Dean Foster conducts cross-cultural training worldwide and consults on intercultural business issues with most Fortune 1000 companies around the globe. For over twenty years, Dean has played a major role in the development of the intercultural training field: formerly he was founder and Managing Director of Berlitz Cross-Cultural Worldwide, Vice-president at GMAC/Windham Intercultural, and founder of Cross-Cultural Consulting Associates, New York. Dean is a frequent guest on CNN, CNBC, and other TV and radio shows as well as keynotes at major international professional conferences. Dean has been interviewed in major publications, such as Newsweek Magazine, New York Times, and USA Today. He is also a frequent Guest lecturer at Harvard Business School, New York University, Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and other educational organizations. _____________________________________________

Update on China: Opportunities in the World’s Second Largest Economy

C

– Evelyn Su

hina is the second largest economy in the world, and it is the world’s fastest growing consumer market. Despite the size of this market, the average consumer only spends $25/year on personal care products, leaving enormous room for growth. With all this potential there is large competition for attention between domestic and international brands, so international brands must be prepared for a highly competitive environment. Companies doing business in China must understand some key regional and cultural differences in the Chinese consumer and maintain focus on the popular product types, which often differ from those common in Western economies. This presentation will provide an update of the essential landscape of China in terms of regulation, culture, essential product types, opportunities, and trends in the personal care industry.

n Evelyn Su Dr. Evelyn Su is the president, co-founder, and Chief Scientific Officer of Sino Lion, a leading innovative and new technological materials company that serves worldwide markets in the personal care, pharmaceutical, health care, and related industries. Dr. Su obtained her Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1993 from University of Connecticut located in Storrs, Connecticut. After graduation, Dr. Su worked as a Scientist at Pfizer during 1993-1995. In July 1995, Dr. Su co-founded Sino Lion USA, and moved its operation to 1 World Trade Center in New York City until the horrific destruction of the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001. She feels extremely fortunate that she is still alive today. Dr. Su is the author of the book Asian Botanicals (written in English) as well as numerous peer-reviewed academic journal articles. She has given scores of invited talks and conference presentations as either a keynote or invited speaker in the United States and at international conferences. Dr. Su has extensive experience in inventing and managing new materials technologies and commercializing various technologies into marketable products worldwide. She has successfully led Sino Lion in collaborating with (Continued on page 12)

V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

11


C With strong roots, we’re green and growing.

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

C

O

P

Globilization of the Emerging Markets – Bric ‘N Brexit

E

(Continued from page 11)

a number of Fortune 500 companies in bringing technologies into the marketplace either in the form of Open-Innovation, exclusive co-development programs, or non-exclusive technology commercialization. Since 1995, Dr. Su has worked extensively as an innovative entrepreneur in both the United States and China. Under her leadership, Sino Lion has become a globally approved supplier to a growing number of Fortune 500 companies. _____________________________________________

It’s only Bio.Logical. to contact us: (800) 223-7054 acme-hardesty.com

Fully-operational fragrance laboratory and manufacturer, creating aromas for perfumes and colognes, household, personal care, hair care and air care products. Contact us to learn more:

Perry Pellegrino or Jane Pinda

678.361.8717 connect@fragrancewest.com fragrancewest.com

Update on Growing and Emerging Markets— Key Influences as a Measure of Success

T

– Sarah Jindal

his market update on Brazil, China, and India will highlight changes over the past five years that have influenced the beauty and personal care landscape with a focus on categories that are growing with market examples. It will provide consumer insights that are essential for brands and marketers when formulating their strategy for success. Understanding the ‘wants and needs’ of the consumer is critical when developing market-ready products.

n Sarah Jindal As Mintel’s Senior Innovation and Insights Analyst, Sarah regularly interfaces with key beauty clients and lends her expertise based on over 17 years of experience developing ingredient technologies for beauty and personal care. Sarah’s roles in both marketing and product development cover all beauty and personal care categories with a focus on skincare and active ingredients. Having worked for a variety of companies over her career, Sarah has gained an in-depth understanding of the industry and draws upon not only her work experience but also degrees in Biology, Biochemistry, and Evolutionary Biology. _____________________________________________

Russia: Unwrapping the Mystery

r

– Alexander Settles

ussia is unique among the BRIC countries, with its history of investment in basic science and research, higher education, and infrastructure. And Russia has a central role in a multipolar world. The rapid development from 1999 to 2008 radically changed their economy, as a broad middle class of consumers became established. After the financial crisis, lower oils prices delayed a return to growth. Since the recovery in 2009, firms producing consumer products continued to expand into Russia, developing marketing, sales, and distribution functions that targeted the particularities of the Russian market. While Russia has been projected to be the largest consumer market in Europe by 2025 there still exists uncertainty in the market. Prof. Settles will provide an overview of the current political and economic situation in Russia with a focus on the manufacturing of consumer goods in Russia. He will highlight a case study of the Swedish cosmetic firm Oriflame, discussing their manufacturing operations and investments in Russia. Prof. Settles will also provide an overview of the cultural differences of the Russian consumer and the unique considerations of doing business in Russia. I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma; but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest. …Winston Churchill, 1939 n Alexander Settles Dr. Settles is an assistant professor of professional practice in the Department of Management and Global Business at Rutgers Business School and was Fulbright Scholar in Russia during the 2005-2006 academic years. Previously he was an Instructor at Nevada State College, a Professor of Corporate Governance and Strategic Management, and the Deputy Director of the Corporate Governance Center at the National Research University Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Russia. Dr. Settles has served as a consultant to the World Bank Institute, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Center for International Private

12

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

Enterprise. Dr. Settles’ research focuses on emerging market multinationals and management practices in emerging market firms with a specialization in Russian firms.

registration Information Pre-registration cost SCC members $35 Non-SCC members $50 Students/Unemployed Members $10 Emeritus members $0

At door cost $50 $75 $10 $0

To register, visit www.nyscc.org and click on the Events section.

Location The Bethwood, 38 Lackawanna Avenue, Totowa, NJ Tel: (800) 377-8316 • www.thebethwood.com

Hair Measurement Science Symposium June 8, 2017 TrI-Princeton • Princeton, NJ A one-day symposium dedicated to scientists who perform instrumental laboratory measurements on hair. For more information, visit www.triprinceton.org.

NYSCC Annual Golf Outing July 26, 2017 Crystal Springs Golf Club Hamburg, NJ For registration visit: www.nyscc.org. For more information, contact Jim Lynch: jim.lynch@ultrachem.com.

Society of Cosmetic Chemists 71st Annual Scientific Meeting December 11-12, 2017 The Westin New York at Times Square • New York, NY For more information, send inquiries to: info@scconline.org. V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

13


C

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

C

O

P

E

COMMITTED TO TECHNOLOGY, FORMULATION AND SUPERIOR NATION-WIDE DISTRIBUTION.

800.296.4942 LINCOLNFINEINGREDIENTS.COM 50 INDUSTRIAL CR., LINCOLN, R.I., 02865

MIXING SEMINAR Tuesday, May 9, 2017

EKATO Corporation 48 Spruce St, Oakland, NJ 07436 Call 201- 825 - 4684 X205 chelsea.rowen@ekato.com http://www.ekato.com/news/workshops-and-seminars/

91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium July 9-12

S

The City College of New York • New York, NY

teve Herman, Program Chair of the NYSCC, and Kaushal Rege of Arizona State University are chairing a session on Colloids and Surface Science in Medicine & Personal Care Products at the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium being held at The City College of New York next summer. In addition, the NYSCC is sponsoring the keynote speaker, Prof. Mansoor M. Amiji. This is a major annual event for the ACS that moves to a different university every year. The NYSCC is actively engaging other scientific societies for joint meetings and partnerships to increase the educational opportunities for our members, so this is a particularly exciting addition to our calendar. Elizabeth Kaufman, currently a doctoral candidate completing her Ph.D. work in chemistry at NYU, will moderate the session.

Combinatorial-designed Nano-systems for Systemic Delivery of Nucleic Acid Therapeutics

T

– Mansoor M. Amiji

remendous advances in molecular and personalized medicine also present challenges for translation of innovative experimental approaches into clinically relevant strategies. To overcome some of these challenges, nanotechnology offers interesting solutions for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. For many systemic diseases, overcoming biological barriers and target specific delivery are the key challenges. Additionally, a newer generation of molecular therapies, such as gene therapy, oligonucleotides, and RNA interference (RNAi) require robust and highly specific intracellular delivery strategies for effective and clinically meaningful therapeutic outcomes. In this presentation, I will cover our strategic approach to develop and evaluate a novel platformbased combinatorial approach for targeted delivery systems for both small molecule and nucleic acid therapeutics. Using click conjugation chemistry and other synthetic approaches, we have developed a library of formulations of anticancer chemotherapeutics and have evaluated their encapsulation and delivery potential using dextran-based self-assembled nanoparticles. In addition, we have utilized a hyaluronic acid based nanoparticle library of formulations for delivery of nucleic acid constructs, including small interfering RNA.1-4

14

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

In each of the cases discussed above, our fundamental guiding principles have been to develop innovative drug delivery solutions for intractable biomedical challenges using safe materials and scalable manufacturing methods to facilitate translation of these experimental approaches into clinically useful products.

We provide tailored solutions to our customers...

references 1. S.C. Abeylath, S. Ganta, A. Iyer, and M. Amiji, Combinatorial-designed multifunctional polymeric nanosystems for tumor-targeted therapeutic delivery, Acc. Chem. Res., 44, 1009-1017 (2011). 2. S.C. Abeylath and M.M. Amiji, “Click” synthesis of dextran macrostructures for combinatorialdesigned self-assembled nanoparticles encapsulating diverse anticancer therapeutics, Bioorg. Med. Chem., 19, 6167-6173 (2011). 3. S. Ganesh, A. Iyer, D. Morrissey, and M. Amiji, Hyaluronic acid-based self-assembling nanosystems for CD44 target mediated siRNA delivery to solid tumors, Biomat., 34, 3489-3502 (2013). 4. A. Singh, M. Talekar, T.H. Tran, A. Samantha, R. Sundaram, and M.M. Amiji, Combinatorial approach in the design of multifunctional polymeric nano-delivery systems for cancer therapy, J. Mat. Chem. B, 2, 8069-8084 (2014).

elecorporation.com

Distributed by Callahan Distributed Chemical Company

n About the Speaker r. Mansoor Amiji is currently the University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Co-Director of Northeastern University Nanomedicine Education and Research Consortium (NERC) at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. NERC oversees a doctoral training program in Nanomedicine Science and Technology that is co-funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Amiji received his B.S. degree in Pharmacy from Northeastern University in 1988 and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Purdue University in 1992. His research is focused on development of biocompatible materials from natural and synthetic polymers, target-specific drug and gene delivery systems for cancer and infectious diseases, and nanotechnology applications for medical diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. His research has received over $18 million in sustained funding from the NIH, NSF, private foundations, and the pharmaceutical/biotech industries. Dr. Amiji teaches in the professional pharmacy program and in the graduate programs of Pharmaceutical Science, Biotechnology, and Nanomedicine. He has published six books and over 200 book chapters, peerreviewed articles, and conference proceedings. He has received a number of honors and awards including the Nano Science and Technology Institute’s Award for Outstanding Contributions towards the Advancement of Nanotechnology, Microtechnology, and Biotechnology, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Meritorious Manuscript Award, Controlled Release Society’s (CRS) Nagai Award, and the AAPS and CRS Fellowships.

D

For more information about the event visit: www.colloids2017.org. If you have any further questions about the NYSCC’s sponsorship or involvement in this event, please contact Steve Herman at steveh50@optonline.net.

Call for Papers

T

he Cosmetiscope editorial committee invites all interested parties to submit feature technical articles for publication in the NYSCC monthly newsletter. Authors of feature articles are eligible to win the prestigous NYSCC Literature Award ($1,000) for the best front-page article published during the calendar year. Also, authors receive $200 reimbursement to attend a theatrical performance of their choice. Writing an article for your peers is a very rewarding experience, both personally and professionally, and would reserve your place in NYSCC history. You may choose whatever topic you feel would be interesting to fellow colleagues in our industry. We also welcome any other types of commentaries or articles that may be published in the Career Corner, Technical Tidbit section, or as a Letter to the Editor. Please send correspondence to: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu.

V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

15


C

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

C

O

P

E

The Soul & Science of Beauty.

www.evonik.com/personal-care

SILAB creates and manufactures unique, consistently safe, natural active ingredients with proven efficacy.

You need more information about our products? Please contact our subsidiary SILAB Inc.: email: silabinc@silabinc.com phone: 732-335-1030

engineering natural active ingredients

NYSCC Blog Don’t miss out on the latest advances in cosmetic science. Check out the NYSCC’s blog. nyscc.org/blog 16

M A R C H

2 0 1 7


W

W

W

.

N

Y

S

C

C

.

O

R

G

The NYSCC is proud to launch its first “Future Chemists Workshop” at this year’s Suppliers’ Day show, where aspiring cosmetic chemists, students, and young formulators starting in their career get to learn about the basics in formulation as well as discover some tips and tricks by two of our esteemed industry experts.

Employment Opportunities For complete ads please go to the NYSCC website: https://www.nyscc.org/employment-listings.html. n Development Scientist Rockline Industries • Springdale, AR

n Site Director – Clinical Research Princeton Consumer Research Corp Princeton, NJ

n Specialist, Technical Information Development (R&D) Shiseido Americas • East Windsor, NJ

n Technical Manager Alzo International, Inc. • Sayreville, NJ n Senior Chemist Autumn Harp, Inc. • Burlington, VT V O L U M E

2 3

N o . 3

n East Coast Account Manager Silab • Hazlet, NJ

n Sales Manager Applechem, Inc. • Parsippany, NJ n Cosmetic Chemist Sytheon Ltd. • Boonton, NJ

17


C

O

S

M

E

T

I

S

C

O

P

E

Make note of it‌ Send news of interest, guest editorials, and comments to roger McMullen, Editor • E-mail: roger_mcmullen @fdu.edu

Monthly Meeting Group Discount The NYSCC is offering a group discount of 15% to companies who send 5 or more employees to a monthly meeting. All five employees would need to be registered at the same time to receive the discount. Once purchased, registrations are non-refundable.

18

M A R C H

2 0 1 7

Cosmetiscope - March 2017  
Cosmetiscope - March 2017