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FEBRUARY 2018 • Vol. 24 No. 2

New York Society of Cosmetic Chemists

www.nyscc.org

IP Strategies in the Cosmetic Industry …by Peter D. Sleman

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sound intellectual property strategy can add value to any business, generate revenue streams, and act as an additional bargaining chip in negotiations. However, it is often difficult for businesses and inventors to figure out how to reduce their IP costs without sacrificing quality. Below are some practical pointers to consider when formulating your IP strategy. These will serve as a primer to help you ask the right questions.

Diversify An effective IP strategy is one that takes a long look at the business, considers all the tools, and chooses the right combination. You may think that all you need is a trademark for a product, when the real value is in your patentable process. Alternatively, a process or product may be old as the Sun, but your brand recognition and goodwill are the real valuable assets to be protected. Also consider trade dress and design patents for cosmetics and toiletries. Excellent communication with your IP counsel will provide the best results, and yield the greatest value ensuring that every dollar you invest gives you a handsome return.

Consider Trade Secrets You can maintain a competitive advantage through trade secrets. Examples of trade secrets can include engineering information; methods, processes, and know-how; tolerances and formulas; business and financial information; computer programs (particularly source code) and related information; pending, unpublished patent applications; business plans; budgets; methods of calculating costs and pricing; customer and supplier lists; internal marketing data; specifics concerning customers and suppliers; products and services in research and/or development; collections of data; and other information relating to a company’s business. Trade secrets require that you and your employees handle the information with care to maintain confidentiality. Additionally, understand that there is a possible tension between trade secret law and the FDA’s ingredient declaration.

Find the Synergy Compositions that provide a synergistic effect over the individual ingredients may be ripe for patenting. When you find such a synergy, test and document the effect and strongly consider filing for patent protection. If a composition, even if it is not available on the market, is merely a mixture of known ingredients and produces no special benefit, evaluate whether patent protection is possible or worthwhile. (Continued on page 2)

P A C K A G I N G A N D Y O U R P R O D U C T S S E M I N A R February 21 • The Venetian, Garfield, NJ


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2018 NYSCC BOARD OF DIRECTORS & PROGRAM CHAIRS CHAIR Cathy Piterski chair@nyscc.org

CHAIR-ELECT Sonia Dawson chair-elect@nyscc.org

TREASURER Michael Smith Treasurer@nyscc.org

SECRETARY Roumelia Alina secretary@nyscc.org

ADVISOR Marie Thadal advisor@nyscc.org

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IP Strategies in the Cosmetic Industry

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(Continued from page 1)

Reduce Patent Prosecution Costs The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has had a backlog of patent applications for years and has attempted to fix this with various methods including raising the costs of Requests for Continued Examination (RCE). By way of background, the USPTO issues rejections of a patent application during examination. If an application continues to be rejected after a Final Office Action, the applicant must file an RCE to keep the application alive. The cost of a first RCE is $1,200, and the cost for every subsequent RCE is $1,700. One way to contain costs is to speak to your attorney about how to eliminate or reduce the number of RCEs, and to utilize the most recent USPTO programs to get your application allowed sooner. For example, interviews with the Patent Examiner are a great way to advance prosecution in a cost-effective manner.

Know Your Market Consider the market before you invest heavily in a product or process. Ask yourself whether your IP is directed to technology that is germane to your business or a passing fad. With apologies for overusing a clichĂŠ, skate to where the puck is going, not where it has been. Your IP strategy should strongly consider your expected sales.

Global Thinking HOUSE Giorgino Macalino giorgino.macalino@croda.com

MEMBERSHIP Mohamed Abdulla mohamed.abdulla@airliquide.com

PROGRAM Steve Herman steveh50@optonline.net

COMMUNICATIONS Theresa Phamduy webmaster@nyscc.org

SPECIAL EVENTS Amy Marshall amy.marshall@altana.com

COSMETISCOPE EDITOR Roger McMullen roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

COSMETISCOPE ADVERTISING Bret Clark rbclark@ashland.com

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It is good for businesses to think globally, but understand that the cost of obtaining IP protection in foreign jurisdictions may be incredibly high. For example, a patent application being prosecuted in China will typically require a U.S. patent attorney, a Chinese patent attorney, and translations of official documents back-and-forth from the office to the applicant. Keep in mind that even if you obtain granted patents in a host of countries, there are additional maintenance fees that must be paid. Additionally, it is incredibly difficult to enforce IP in certain jurisdictions. It is better to take a big-picture look at the IP budget, formulate a strategy with your IP counsel, and discuss the benefits of filing in certain jurisdictions. This article is for general information purposes and is not intended to be and should not be taken as legal advice. This article originally appeared in TheCosmeticChemist.com. Copyright Š 2017; reprinted with permission from The Cosmetic Chemist LLC. _____________________________________________

About the Author:

Peter D. Sleman, J.D.

Peter D. Sleman is a partner at the intellectual property boutique of Wei & Sleman LLP. Peter received his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Rutgers University in 2005, and his J.D. from Seton Hall University School of Law in 2008. Prior to launching his own firm, Peter spent ten years working at worldrenowned intellectual property law firms. He is a registered patent attorney and focuses his practice on IP counseling and procurement. He specializes in patents, trademarks, trade secrets, and copyrights, and supports a variety of industries including cosmetics, medical devices, and packaging. For more information, visit www.patentspace.net. F E B R U A R Y

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Letter from the Chair

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…Cathy Piterski

elcome to the second month of 2018. We are off to a great start! Our Anti-Pollution event in January was a huge success with record numbers of attendance despite the annoying, but pretty snow. Thanks again to our wonderful team! I am truly grateful for all of your hard work. We have some super events coming up in the next few months: • Our NYSCC Ski Trip & Educational Program/Brewery Tour in Killington, VT will be held the weekend of February 9th-11th. • Packaging & Your Products takes place on February 21st at the Venetian in Garfield, NJ. • Fragrance: Science, Regulation, Creation on March 22nd at Legacy Castle in Pompton Plains, NJ. These unique and distinctly different programs are designed to offer top-notch education and information, while providing unmatched networking with your peers and fellow NYSCC Members. Before closing, I should mention all that is going on with Suppliers’ Day 2018. With an almost sold-out exhibit floor, exciting partnerships, and programs offering “something for everyone”, please ensure that you make plans to attend. Anchoring what we now call “Beauty Week in NYC”, Suppliers’ Day at the Jacob K. Javits Center is where you need to be May 15th and 16th. Registration is open, so act now, and take advantage of all that is happening. Anyone who registers before April 15th will automatically be entered to win a trip to the IFSCC Congress, September 18-21, 2018 in Munich, Germany. I look forward to seeing you at these upcoming events. Let’s keep the momentum going!

Upcoming 2018 NYSCC Events Calendar • For updated NYSCC information, visit us on the web at: www.nyscc.org • For National SCC information: www.scconline.org February 9-11 NYSCC & LISCC Joint Ski Trip – Killington, VT February 21 Packaging and Your Products Seminar – The Venetian, Garfield, NJ March 22 Fragrance: Science, Regulation, and Creation Symposium – The Legacy Castle, Pompton Plains, NJ April 25 The Middle East: Cosmetic Trends and Regulations Symposium – Liberty Science Center, Jersey City, NJ May 15-16 NYSCC Suppliers’ Day – Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, New York, NY July 23 NYSCC Golf Outing – Crystal Springs Golf Course, Hamburg, NJ September TBD Sunscreen Symposium: Extending Your Invisible Umbrella – Renaissance Woodbridge Hotel, Iselin, NJ September 20 Culinary Event – Midtown Loft & Terrace, New York, NY October 17 Sustainable Cosmetic Science Seminar – Chart House, Weehawken, NJ November 7 Inflammatory Skin Diseases and Barrier Function Seminar – Valley Regency, Clifton, NJ

Make note of it… Send news of interest, guest editorials, and comments to Roger McMullen, Editor • E-mail: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu

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Packaging and Your Products Seminar February 21, 2018 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. The Venetian, Garfield, NJ

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roduct manufacturing no longer takes place in silos. Sourcing and formulation go hand-in-hand with packaging and delivery systems—and all teams are tasked with systematically working together in crafting a stellar finished product that “hops off the shelf”. On February 21st, be sure to join us as we take a global view of what packaging can be today and tomorrow, and what you need to know to ensure the finished product is packaged to offer the best in stability and functionality. Join us at The Venetian in Garfield, NJ, and hear from experts and award-winning packaging executives who are focused on innovative design and delivery. Registration is now open! To register for this event, please visit the NYSCC website: www.nyscc.org.

Event Chair: John Goffredo

Agenda 4:00 – 4:30 p.m. Registration 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. In Response to the Clean Label Revolution: Are There Crossover Technology Opportunities Between Food and Beauty Care? – Lani Craddock (Scholle IPN) 5:30 – 6:15 p.m. Dinner 6:15 – 7:00 p.m. New Trends in Beauty Packaging – Dustin Wills (MW Luxury Packaging)

Event Location The Venetian, 546 River Drive, Garfield, NJ 07026 • Tel: (973) 546-2250 • www.venetiannj.com

--------------- Speakers and Abstracts ---------------

In Response to the Clean Label Revolution: Are There Crossover Technology Opportunities Between Food and Beauty Care? – Lani Craddock

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he Clean Label movement in food has been growing for decades. Certain groups of consumers have always been interested in what should and shouldn’t be in their food but this ideal has become more and more mainstream. Consumers are armed with new information, and changed attitudes toward health, social issues, and the environment. And now they are demanding transparency into how the product they put in their bodies as well as on their bodies are processed and prepared. This presentation will provide

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insight into established, as well as emerging, technologies regarding food preservation and packaging with potential crossover solutions for beauty care. n Melania

(Lani) Craddock

Melania (Lani) Craddock is the Vice-president of Marketing and Business Development for the performance flexible packaging company, Scholle IPN. Lani utilizes her formal education in food science from Purdue University and Clemson University to help customers in the food industry develop packaging and systems that enhance their offering through extended shelf life, ease of use, and consumer appeal. With 30 years of flexible packaging experience, she has had the opportunity to work in a wide variety of end-use markets, developing solutions to both common everyday problems as well as extraordinary challenges. Early in her career, the move to marketing was a natural extension for the exploration of why consumers want certain things and how a company or supplier can deliver against those needs. Lani’s natural curiosity and interest in solving complex problems has resulted in numerous packaging related patents and industry awards. She is passionate about improving how food products are delivered to consumers. In her current role at Scholle IPN, Lani has also gained knowledge in the area of injection molded components that can be applied to flexible packaging to improve the overall delivery of product from the package. In addition, Lani is a voracious reader but also loves spending time in the out-of-doors. _____________________________________________

New Trends in Beauty Packaging

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– Dustin Wills

n this presentation, we will explore two new trends that have gained traction in the beauty packaging market and that are making a big impact for brands and suppliers. Super Luxury Packaging is a classification for primary and secondary packaging that goes above and beyond traditional packaging in terms of craftsmanship, quality, treatments, and, of course, price. We will examine what differentiates Super Luxury Packaging from other categories of premium and luxury packaging. Influencer Kit packaging is a relatively new phenomenon that has taken on greater importance in the era of hashtags and social media marketing. A sort of arms race, brands are looking to stand out from the crowded market and make an impact while staying true to their brand all while creating truly interesting packaging. n Dustin Wills

Dustin is the Managing Director of the America’s for MW Luxury Packaging where they create award winning packaging and displays for brands such as Johnny Walker, Victoria Beckham, Bobbi Brown, Don Julio, Jack Daniels, Clarins, Beauty Blender, and more. As a 20-year veteran of the packaging and display industry, Dustin has held a number of positions in Los Angeles, Seattle, and London. He has been involved in printing and packaging since his teenage years in his father’s printing business. Dustin has an MBA from the Bristol Business School in England and was educated on a football scholarship at Tiffin University.

Call for Papers

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he Cosmetiscope editorial committee invites all interested parties to submit feature technical articles for publication in the NYSCC monthly newsletter. Authors of feature articles are eligible to win the prestigous NYSCC Literature Award ($1,000) for the best front-page article published during the calendar year. Also, authors receive $200 reimbursement to attend a theatrical performance of their choice. Writing an article for your peers is a very rewarding experience, both personally and professionally, and would reserve your place in NYSCC history. You may choose whatever topic you feel would be interesting to fellow colleagues in our industry. We also welcome any other types of commentaries or articles that may be published in the Career Corner, Technical Tidbit section, or as a Letter to the Editor. Please send correspondence to: roger_mcmullen@fdu.edu.

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NYSCC-American Society of Perfumers Joint Symposium

Fragrance Today Science - Regulation - Creation March 22, 2018

sensiva® – multifunctional additives designed for your innovation

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Legacy Castle • Pompton Plains, NJ

euxyl® – optimum preservation according to your needs

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oin us for a full day of expert presentations on all aspects of the fragrance industry, from the lab, though critical regulatory updates, to marketing, creativity, and the connection of fragrance to art. Regardless of your role in industry, there will be much to learn, and attending this event will provide a unique prospective on the many diverse and exciting aspects of the world of fragrance.

NYSCC Chair Cathy Piterski

NYSCC Event Chair Steve Herman

President, American Society of Perfumers Vincent Kuczinski 6

NYSCC Event Co-chair Jacqueline Mohen

Chair, American Society of Perfumers Christopher C. Diienno F E B R U A R Y

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Agenda 8:40 – 8:45 a.m. Opening Remarks 8:45 – 9:30 a.m. The Science of Fragrance Evaporation and Fixation – Dr. Robert Fuller (Muhlenberg College) 9:30 – 10:15 a.m. From Molecule to Man to Machine: Translating Chemical Perceptual Responses to the Digital Environment – Dr. Andrea Buettner (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg) 10:15 – 10:30 a.m. Break 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Biosynthesis of Fragrance Materials – Leandro Nonino (Ginkgo Bioworks) 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. QRA2 and the 49th Amendment—RIFM Today for Perfumers – Anne Marie Api (RIFM) 12:15 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00 – 1:45 p.m. What the Lab Wants Perfumers and Sales to Know – Davis O’Halloran (Arcade Beauty) 1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Fragrance Marketing in the Digital World – Bart Schmidt (Brands With Purpose) 2:30 – 2:45 p.m. Break 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Entering the Magic Garden: Thoughts on Becoming a Perfumer – Jessica Reichert Weber (Premier Specialties Inc.) and Kaleigh Prokop (MANE) 3:30 – 4:15 p.m. Fragrance in the History of Art – Alexis Palmer Karl (Scent By Alexis)

Event Location The Legacy Castle 141 NJ-23 Pompton Plains, NJ 07444 Tel: (973) 907-7750 Website: https://thelegacycastle.com

Registration Information Pre-registration cost/at door cost: • SCC members: $35/$70 • Non-SCC members: $70/$100 • Students: $10/$50 • Emeritus: $0/$10 To register, please visit the Events section of the NYSCC website: www.nyscc.org.

Hotel Information Hampton Inn & Suites Fairfield 118 US-46 Fairfield, NJ 07004 Tel: (973) 575-5777 (Continued on page 6)

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(Continued from page 5)

--------------- Speakers and Abstracts ---------------

The Science of Fragrance Evaporation and Fixation – Robert Fuller

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nderstanding and controlling fragrance volatility is critical in designing a high performing fragrance. The evaporation process is fairly well understood, but there is little work that applies this work to fragrance ingredients. Perfumery is more accustomed to empirical methods, such as the fragrance pyramid, blotter test, or a simple sniff on a person's arm. These tests will be examined from a physical chemistry perspective. Quantitative results from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments (weight loss) will also be shown for several systems and modeled using equilibrium and kinetic models. A particular emphasis of solvents and fixatives will be discussed and how the formation of a stagnant layer can effectively reduce evaporation rates. n Robert

L. Fuller, Ph.D.

Dr. Robert L. Fuller has worked over 20 years in the fragrance and cosmetics industry. His industrial career began at Colgate-Palmolive where he worked on the Softsoap brand. Subsequently, he worked at Firmenich leading the North American Fragrance Application team, and then at FMI, a contractor manufacturer. In 2012, he joined Muhlenberg College where he currently teaches courses in Fragrance Chemistry, Consumer Products, and General Chemistry. At Muhlenberg, he also has a small team of students who perform research on the physical properties of fragrance ingredients. _____________________________________________

From Molecule to Man to Machine: Translating Chemical Perceptual Responses to the Digital Environment – Andrea Buettner

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espite the wealth of knowledge on chemical composition and olfactory receptors, the prediction of odor quality and intensity of a chemical substance on the basis of its elemental structural—not to mention the general psychophysiological and emotional impact it has on a person—confounds our understanding as we repeatedly encounter the limits of established biological and biochemical methods. This is especially true when it comes to the high interindividual variances that are observed in human odor perception. Digitization—including the concepts and methods that have generally fallen under the buzz term Big Data in recent years—still widely overlooks the chemical and chemo-sensory industry. In particular, the study of analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, physiology, and psychology must interact more intensely with the disciplines of machine learning, sensor technology, and microelectronics to address the manifold of perceptual and translational questions that still remain unanswered today. The initiative of the Campus of the Senses Erlangen aims at combining interdisciplinary basic research with application-oriented R&D on the subject of digital sensory transition with a view to advancing scientific understanding of human chemosensation by recording and processing individual sensory impressions digitally. n Andrea

Buettner, Ph.D.

Dr. Buettner studied Food Chemistry, subsequently completing her Ph.D. in the field of Aroma Research. She was awarded a professorship in the field of Flavor Research and currently holds the position of Professor for Aroma Research at FriedrichAlexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg. She is also Deputy Director of the Fraunhofer Institute of Process Engineering and Packaging IVV and Head of the Department of 8

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Sensory Analytics. In addition, she is co-initiator of the Campus of the Senses Erlangen, together with Professor Albert Heuberger, Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. Dr. Buettner’s work has demonstrated the importance of the combined effects of food and matrix composition—as well as saliva, mucosa, mastication, and swallowing—on flavor release and perception. She has identified new odorous compounds with a special focus on citrus and other food materials and has worked on structure-odor relationships. Recent work also addresses packaged foods and products of daily use in relation to their chemosensorially active constituents. Some of her experimental methods include chemical trace analysis, quantification via stable isotope dilution analysis, monitoring of physiological processes, psychophysical measurements of sensory data, and determination of chemosensorially active and volatile compounds as well as their metabolites in vivo. In current studies at the University of Erlangen and Fraunhofer IVV, Freising, Dr. Buettner has broadened her research interests to include the field of volatiles and chemosensorially active compounds in the physiological context, with monitoring of uptake, distribution, and biotransformation of odorants, as well as neoformation of metabolites from non-volatile food ingredients in vivo and physiological impact of such derivatives in humans. Through her work, she also contributes to research regarding psychological and behavioral aspects in human nutrition. _____________________________________________

Nature’s Power and Man’s Wisdom.™

www.BotanicalsPlus.com

The Biosynthesis of Fragrance Molecules – Leandro Nonino

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iotechnology and fermentation enable the biosynthesis of cultured fragrance ingredients in designer yeasts. Compared to botanical extracts, cultured ingredients can provide better economics, supply stability, and sustainability. This presentation will provide an introduction to the technologies making these ingredients possible at commercial scale and the potential for cultured fragrances in the future.

n Leandro

Nonino

Leandro Nonino is the Head of Business Development for the Flavors and Fragrance Industry at Ginkgo Bioworks, a Boston-based biological engineering company producing cultured ingredients for a wide range of industries. Originally from Brazil, Leandro trained as a Food Engineer before completing an MBA from IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland. Prior to joining Ginkgo Bioworks, Leandro held the position of Vice-president of Sales and Marketing at Evolva SA and previously served as the Global Director of Firmenich’s flavor ingredients business segment and Sales Director for the Americas for Firmenich's ingredients division. While at Firmenich, Leandro’s responsibilities included international sales and marketing, mergers and acquisitions, and long-term strategic product planning. In addition to his flavor and fragrance experience, Nonino has ten years of brand and product management experience in the food industry at Bestfoods, Danone, and Masterfoods. _____________________________________________

QRA2 and the 49th Amendment—RIFM Today for Perfumers – Anne Marie Api

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he 49th Amendment to the International Fragrance Association’s (IFRA) guidelines will bring major changes to the process of establishing fragrance safety as well as altering the use categories and many ingredient use levels. The introduction of the decision tree in the most recent RIFM guidance document, and the development of Quantitative Risk Assessment 2 (QRA2), are prime drivers to the amendment. The new guidance document includes in silico methods and the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TCC), and brings all of RIFM’s diverse testing activities into a unified format. The change in SAF values and incorporation of new cumulative exposure data in QRA2 have a significant effect on the safe usage levels for individual ingredients. (Continued on page 8)

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(Continued from page 7)

Marie Api, Ph.D.

Anne Marie Api is Vice-president, Human Health Sciences of The Research Institute for Fragrance Materials, Inc. (RIFM). Dr. Api started with RIFM in 1984 as a Scientific Assistant and has progressed through Toxicologist and then Manager before her current position. Before joining RIFM, she worked at Unilever Research (Edgewater, NJ) in the safety assurance section. Dr. Api earned a Doctor of Philosophy from Aston University in Birmingham, England. She has been a member of the Society of Toxicology since 1997. Among her other professional affiliations, she is a member of the American Academy of Dermatology, American Chemical Society, American Contact Dermatitis Society, American Society for Photobiology, European Society Contact Dermatitis, Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society of Toxicology, Society of Investigative Dermatology, and Women in Flavor and Fragrance Commerce (Board of Directors, 1997-present; Treasurer, 2008-present). She also is a member of the Dermal Clinical Evaluation Society and served on the DCES Board of Directors from 1991-1997. She has authored over 100 scientific publications and presentations. _____________________________________________

What the Lab Wants Perfumers and Sales to Know – David O’Halloran

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fragrance applications laboratory can be a frenetic place with very diverse customers— from marketers with no scientific background to Ph.D. level scientists with very technical understanding. Customers deliver briefs to the fragrance applications laboratory, which are sometimes very technical and specific. Sales and Perfumery are at the front line with the customer. They pick up and develop against the briefs, and need to always be aware of specific requirements for the customer’s desired effect. Oftentimes, projects that come to the laboratory are misunderstood as information from the customer may be explained loosely, or the sales and internal team may miss a critical detail. More often than not, we fix things as they go wrong. As the technical head of a laboratory, you often have to peel away the layers to resolve problems and maintain a win. Each product form used in a fine fragrance or toiletry laboratory has specific challenges and requirements. Being a well-versed formulator is an important criterion for working in this technical capacity. There is no such thing as a one-fix solution. You have to understand packaging components and manufacturing processes, not only for the fragrance, but the end product as well. This information also needs to be explained to the perfumer, so he/she can create a fragrance which works in its final destination. The customer is also looking for you to make firm and clear suggestions on their base, or how the fragrance can resolve an issue with a base. It is a challenge to squeeze a miracle into such a low percentage that is consistuted by the fragrance in the formula. This paper will address ideas on how you can be successful at doing all this—most of the time—and maintain some sanity.

n David

O’Halloran

David is Vice-president Fragrance and Cosmetic Technologies at Arcade Beauty. Since graduating from Rutgers University in 1978, David has dedicated his career to the cosmetic and fragrance industry. He worked for Pfizer Consumer Products, Mennen, Revlon, P&G, Crabtree and Evelyn, Bristol Myers, Sensient, and Givaudan Fragrances. David created and collaborated on the development of many successful fragrance brand formulations while working on the finished goods side of the business. While at Givaudan, David was responsible for stabilizing and improving fragrance delivery for hundreds of fragrances used today. David has been a guest lecturer at Fairleigh Dickinson University and Rutgers University for students enrolled in Master’s programs. He has also lectured on fragrance applications and skin care at several SCC events. David holds four U.S. patents in skin care, fragrance, and cosmetics. 10

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Fragrance Marketing in the Digital World – Bart Schmidt

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ow do we sell a fragrance product in the digital world? Without brick-and-mortar stores, it is a challenge to connect with consumers on an item we traditionally smell before we buy. Celebrity fragrances, a key marketing tool for many years, have also faded. We will show how to use the new tools of social media to re-image the perfume industry, where a click from a Youtube video can sell fragrance to a new generation.

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Schmidt

Bart Schmidt—originally from Amsterdam, Netherlands—began his fragrance journey in Germany. He spent two years actively studying the industry, received his degree, and then embarked on an intense training/work program in New York. He spent more than twenty years working in the corporate fragrance development world with two of the largest global fragrance houses, Symrise and Firmenich USA. He found Brands With Purpose in January 2013, with the goal to help companies navigate the beauty landscape by creating opportunities for fashion, lifestyle, and celebrity brands to develop and market their own beauty and perfume lines. Bart’s connection with designers, manufacturers, and fulfillment houses has already resulted in several successful launches in fine fragrance (perfumes), air care (i.e. candle), and personal care. Bart’s work philosophy is guided by the three C’s of fragrance development: connect, create, and, most importantly, consider. A portion of his company’s proceeds supports underserved youth development. _____________________________________________

Entering the Magic Garden: Thoughts on Becoming a Perfumer – Jessica Reichert Weber and Kaleigh Prokop

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commonly asked question by those new to, or unfamiliar with, the fragrance industry is: What is a perfumer? Questions that naturally follow are: • What is the training process to become a perfumer? • Where do perfumers draw their inspirations from? • Who the lucky ones that succeed? In this segment, Jessica and Kaleigh will speak about their special stories of becoming perfumers. They will share their experiences of growing and learning within the industry and provide insight into where their passion comes as well as convey their hopes and predictions towards the future of perfumery. n Jessica

Reichert Weber

Jessica was introduced to the fragrance industry by her parents, Tony Reichert (Master Perfumer at Firmenich) and Odila Zocca (Vice-president of Technical and Chief Perfumer at Premier Specialties). Starting with summer internships, she learned early on a great deal about how the industry works and its many intricate details. She continued working during school breaks while attending the University of Hartford, where she received a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History. Jessica originally planned on pursuing a career aligned with her degree. However, while working as a laboratory technician, compounding perfumers’ formulas, she found her calling to follow in her parents’ footsteps. She trained in perfumery under Ted Barba (IFF), who guided her in learning the olfactory characteristics of raw materials and how they are best used in formulation. After just one year of training, Jessica was promoted to Junior Perfumer. Combined with her (Continued on page 10)

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High Performance Ingredients for Skin and Hair Care Smooth, mild, natural and stable

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dedication and passion for learning, and the support of her mentor, parents, and fellow coworkers, Jessica is now a successful Creative Perfumer at Premier Specialties, Inc. While Jessica is exposed to all product categories, she works mostly with personal care and candle (air care) products. n Kaleigh

Prokop

Always drawn to fashion and the creative arts, Kaleigh Prokop moved to New York City to study at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) where she majored in Photography. Upon graduation, Kaleigh pursued a career in Cosmetology and furthered her education by enrolling in FIT’s Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing program. It was during her first class where she discovered her love of perfumery. The ability to channel her creative passions through raw materials was a dream come true. Following an internship at the MANE New York Creative Center and graduating Cum Laude, Kaleigh was offered a position as a Perfumer’s Assistant under Senior Perfumer, Jim Krivda. It was not long before Kaleigh was noticed and given the opportunity to begin her formal perfumery training under Jim Schmitt in the MANE New Jersey laboratory. Today, Kaleigh is an Apprentice Perfumer creating unique and beautiful compositions, and is a key member of the MANE perfumery team. Outside of work, Kaleigh continues to fuel her creative passions and interests through various outlets. Her approach to perfumery is shaped by her many hobbies, which consist of cooking, knitting, traveling, and reading. _____________________________________________

Fragrance in the History of Art

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– Alexis Palmer Karl

n this presentation we will discuss ritual in scent—an olfactory and artistic exploration of ritual spanning from ancient Egyptian and Mayan culture to Shamanism and magical herbalism. Focusing on the oils and incenses extracted from specific resins, woods, spices, and florals, we will learn about the power of these fragrant elements that guided people throughout history in incantations, lifting the veil between spirits, casting spells, and influencing artistic culture. n Alexis

Palmer Karl

Alexis Palmer Karl is a multidisciplinary artist, perfumer, professor, and lecturer. She is the founder and perfumer of the artisanal fragrance company, Scent By Alexis, and co-founder and perfumer of the artisanal House of Cherry Bomb. Her fragrance work has been both exhibited as art, and sold as perfume nationally and internationally. Karl is a regular lecturer on the cultural and historical relevance of fragrance, fashion, and art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Morbid Anatomy Museum, where she held the post of house perfumer and exhibiting artist. Karl teaches lecture and studio courses at Pratt Institute and The School of Visual Arts, where she encourages students to explore fragrance as an artistic medium within installation and performance. Her current research is based on ancient ritualism in fragrance, art, and fashion, and how archaic practices influence contemporary culture. Her research and lectures led her to be a fashion correspondent for Art 511 Magazine, and a contributing writer to various fragrance magazines and blogs. Alexis received her M.F.A. in Figurative Painting at The New York Academy of Art, Graduate School of Figurative Art and B.F.A. in Painting at Cornell University. She has exhibited her paintings, multimedia art, fragrance installations, and fragrance-music performance works in New York City, Italy, and UK. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, Women in The World, Ephemera Magazine, Disinfo Magazine, New York Post, London Times, Art News, ARCO Japan, Elle Magazine, Allure Magazine, Lucky Magazine, Time Out New York, The View, NBC, CNN, Salford City Radio (Manchester, UK), and WMBR Radio (Boston, MA). Karl is a Joan Mitchell Grant recipient, and a finalist in the Art and Olfaction Awards. 12

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ENJOY SUCCESSFUL PARTNERSHIPS Brenntag Specialties, Inc. 1 Cragwood Road, Suite 302 South Plainfield, NJ 07080 Phone: 800 732-0562 Fine Ingredients, Minerals, Colors, Surface Treatments, Proteins, Powders

www.brenntagspecialties.com

Monthly Meeting Group Discount The NYSCC is offering a group discount of 15% to companies who send 5 or more employees to a monthly meeting. All five employees would need to be registered at the same time to receive the discount. Once purchased, registrations are non-refundable.

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With strong roots, we’re green and growing.

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NYSCC Promotes Do Well by Doing Good Highlights of the NYSCC Education Event, December 11, 2017

“Doing Well by Doing Good”… at Whole New Scale and Significance – Barry C. Certner

It’s only Bio.Logical. to contact us: (800) 223-7054 acme-hardesty.com

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ith the pace of “change” today ever so fast, furious, and even frightening, one business leader operating at the very pinnacle of world commerce and technology says that when he speaks to corporate and industry groups, a question he is often asked is: “What is going to be changing in the next 10 years?” In response, he tells them that the more important question they should be asking is: “What is not going to be changing?” Why? Because when you have something you know is true and enduring and will not change over the long term, then you can apply real energy and effort to it. You can put all your resources, all your heart and soul into it knowing that you are working on things that matter and will continue in big ways. When you do this, you wind up having a great deal to show for it, and a great deal that will make a difference for you and others. It turns out that this is just as true when dealing with the human side of enterprise as it is in dealing with issues of price, selection, quality, speed of service, or shipment. When it comes to people, what specifically are the things that do NOT change? They are the things people want deep down and need most of all. They want to know that their lives have meaning, value, and dignity; and that their presence and contributions matter. They want to be a part of things larger than themselves—to serve their fellow man and contribute their time, talents, and efforts to good and useful ends, to products and services that will benefit others. And, in keeping with higher business morals, ethics, and social responsibilities, they want to devote their time and their talents over the course of their careers to things that are fundamentally good and right, and not wrong. Simply put, what they really want, more than any generation before them and at far greater scale of workforce than ever witnessed, is to “Do Well by Doing Good”! Indeed, as money and materialism increasingly consume more and more aspects of the larger culture and everyday transactions in politics, government, business, and most everywhere we look, a tangible and continuing focus on doing good and acts of virtue, service, and responsibility for the common good may be needed more than ever as vital cultural corrective. Thus, to “Do Well by Doing Good” has to do with increased corporate social responsibility and the elevation of business morals and ethics, commitments to planet sustainability, and so forth… but, at its root, it addresses things more basic and heartfelt than these high sounding concepts and corporate buzzwords can capture. Given the choice, more and more conscientious employees would rather be a part of things that are beneficial, helpful, and uplifting. They do not take well to selfish scheming, deceitful advertising, PR misinformation, and opportunistic exploitation of people and/or the planet’s resources. Neither are they inspired by the powers of extractive markets and measures, which exploit others ignorance or prey on weakness, however profitable in the short term those actions may be. Judging by the growing interest in the triple bottom line and its expanded criteria for true business success, not only are more employees seeking to be part of things larger than themselves, but more business owners and shareholders themselves are increasingly committing their companies and industries to things greater than money and short-term profits alone. No doubt, they too are taking this idea of “Doing Well by Doing Good” more seriously than ever before. In all this, there is so much to be hopeful and optimistic. We know, for example, that when this kind of higher meaning and value is present that people are much more satisfied with their lives, much happier and more productive in their jobs, and far more likely to sustain their careers and grow their abilities over time. In contrast, all the evidence points to the fact that when they do not have larger meaning and higher purpose, F E B R U A R Y

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they are considerably more likely to fall prey to debilitating stress, anxiety, depression, exhaustion, insomnia, anomie, alcohol/drug abuse, weight gain, and many serious health and mental health consequences, which of course translate into major productivity losses; to high costs of absenteeism, retention, recruitment, and retraining; and to other substantial business costs and consequences. With so much to be gained—and so many people today genuinely wanting to “Do Well by Doing Good”—it just may be that we are at the threshold of making it happen throughout society at whole new scales and social significance. Even in the face of the now all-too-evident lowliness and negativity, which threatens to bring us down, let us be ever so thankful for the higher, hope-filled things that ever summon us up. For these are the things—ever present in our heart-of-hearts—that, praise be, do not change and will not change!

800.296.4942 LincolnFineIngredients.com 50 Industrial Cr., Lincoln, R.I., 02865

About the Author:

n Dr.

Committed to technology, formulation and superior nation-wide distribution.

Barry C. Certner

Dr. Certner, one of the nation’s leading psychologists and applied behavioral scientists, was the guest speaker at NYSCC Education Event on December 11, 2017 in New York, NY. Dr. Certner has worked extensively with leading corporations and industry executives over the course of his professional career, and has been an integral part of many important projects, which have achieved noteworthy and continuing social value. A great believer in business and industry’s pivotal role and unique capacities to provide important public benefits, Dr. Certner not only shared stories of exciting past projects at the event; but most importantly, offered new social science innovations to help us to rise to today’s challenges. Knowing that we must be prime movers in the vital course corrections needed in society, he showed us that by elevating ourselves to ever higher levels of corporate social responsibility we can play a big part in closing the now huge (and hugely endangering) human progress gap. _____________________________________________

Communities Under the Forest— Can We Separate Humans from Trees? – Giorgio Dell’Acqua

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ur industry often seeks natural ingredients and oils from farming communities in the Southern Hemisphere due to the great biodiversity in its plant life. Some good examples are in Africa, where popular trees such as Argan, Marula, Moringa, and Baobab have been growing for thousands of years. Unfortunately, communities of farmers, from Malawi to South Africa to Rwanda, have been given incentives from food traders to switch their local oil production to monocultures in order to feed a growing population in search of commodity food (and not necessarily a domestic population). In many of these tropical countries, trees of the forest are cut down and the soil is prepared to make way for mass production. As a consequence, the newly introduced monocultures have endangered the local biodiversity and dramatically reduced the supply of local natural ingredients, such as the oils our industry would like to harvest. Trees and humans have coexisted for thousands of years. Modern agriculture should not dismantle this relationship (see for example how trees are used in France to sustain biological agriculture). We cannot sustain a community by changing their natural environment and culture (i.e. traditional knowledge). We cannot reduce a community to a labor force and destroy forests to access soil. Everything is connected: trees, humans, and profit. A true triple bottom line (the metric of sustainable development) is the sum of planet, people, and profit. These elements are connected and indivisible. They should all bring a positive number and grow together. Sustainable sourcing of Marula oil in South Africa or Moringa Oil in Rwanda are good examples where organizations such as The Seed Initiative have worked with local communities and local traders to incentivize the planting of new trees in order to sustain the oils growing demand both in the food and cosmetic industry. Microfinance institutions—supported by local government and/or international missions and nonprofit organizations—collaborate with traders to support farming communities operating through sustainable harvesting. Furthermore, there is an incentive for a community to not cut the tree if the tree products can generate a business. Local communities in Malawi agreed with traders to protect the Baobab trees in order to sustain the fruit business. Sustainable development is indeed making sure that social and environmental responsibilities go hand-in-hand to generate a sustainable profit. (Continued on page 14)

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(Continued from page 13)

About the Author:

n Giorgio

Dell’Acqua, Ph.D.

Dr. Dell’Acqua is a scientist and consultant for the personal care industry. He graduated from The University of Rome, Italy and worked for 15 years as an investigator in applied medical research in Universities such as Mount Sinai Medical School in New York, United States and Harvard Medical School in Boston, United States. Giorgio has spent the last 17 years as an executive and cosmetic scientist in the personal care industry. He is specialized in skin and hair care ingredients, finished product development, and technical marketing. Dr. Dell’Acqua has covered multiple roles as a manager and director in different companies specialized in active ingredients and product development. He has helped bring more than 200 successful active ingredients and finished products to market and has authored more than 60 publications in medicine and cosmetic science. In the last 10 years Giorgio has been writing and lecturing on natural cosmetic ingredients and sustainable supply chain, as well as helping to source, develop, and bring to market many natural ingredients. He is an award winning speaker on natural ingredients, a regular columnist on sustainable cosmetic science, and an adjunct professor in Cosmetic Science at Fairleigh Dickinson University. He is also the chair of the Scientific Affairs Committee for the NYSCC and its scientific blogger. _____________________________________________

The NYSCC and Social Responsibility – Mohamed Omer

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he beauty industry is cleaning up its image by investing in a range of Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability initiatives. Natural cosmetics is becoming a huge global trend. Companies are lowering the environmental impact of their cosmetic products by using greener formulations, reducing packaging, and also cutting greenhouse gas emissions, waste, and energy and water consumption (as you know, green has become the new black). But social responsibility is not just about supply chain, greener ingredients, and free-from claims. Though we strongly support these initiatives, the NYSCC chapter has decided to take a holistic approach to social responsibility by tackling both the chemistry in addition to the chemist. Our new holistic approach to social responsibility includes empowering our community of intelligent and talented students who are the future scientists of our industry. After all, without this community, who would have been able to develop and formulate some of the most innovative and creative products we see on the shelves. We have to nurture this community by providing mentorship and internship to students to motivate, inspire, and encourage them to join our beloved industry. At the NYSCC, we are creating an internship program for top students to expose themselves to real-life business settings, giving them the opportunity to learn about our industry. The internship opportunity will provide prospective cosmetic chemists with an atmosphere that is intended to broaden an entry level candidate’s professional understanding while promoting self-confidence, accomplishment, and career development. More information on this program will be disseminated in the future.

About the Author:

n Mohamed

Omer

Mohamed Omer is currently Hair Category Manager at Revlon. Before Revlon, Mohamed was the Associate Vice-president for Strategic Foresight and Innovation at L’Oréal. Mohamed received a Master’s degree in Physical Chemistry from Iowa State University and subsequently joined the New York City Police Department (NYPD) Crime Scene Laboratory, where he became a narcotics expert and managed the intoxicated driver unit before he switched to cosmetic chemistry. For the last fifteen years, Omer has focused on product development, trends, and innovation. He has assumed various roles in companies, such as Colgate Palmolive, Unilever, Mintel, and L’Oréal, where he helped develop a range of innovative products across multiple categories. Mohamed is an active member of the NYSCC where he serves on the Scientific Committee and chaired the 2017 Open Innovation event. 16

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NYSCC and Long Island SCC Joint Ski Trip February 9-11, 2018 Killington, Vermont

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oin fellow NYSCC and LISCC Chapter members and their invited guests for one to three days of skiing or snow boarding. We have deeply discounted lift tickets for either one, two, or three days: Friday, February 9th; Saturday, February 10th; and Sunday, February 11th. Some people will be traveling to Killington after work on Thursday, February 8th and returning the morning of Sunday, February 11th. We’ve added the third day for those diehards who might want to get in a few more downhill runs before departing on Sunday.

n Brewery Tour and Technical Presentation

As part of the 2018 NYSCC Ski Trip the New York Chapter will sponsor an educational speaker along with a tour of local breweries on Saturday. Come learn a thing or two about K-Beauty from guest speaker Marc Cornell (Vice-president, Product Development at Englewood Laboratories) and taste test some local brewskies in the process. Bus Brewery tour transportation to and from the ski resort will be provided. This option certainly will appeal partially sponsored to non-skiers or those who prefer to ski only one or two of the three days. The brewery by Princeton tour is a full day, starting at 10:00 a.m. and finishing at 6:00 p.m. Please register for the Consumer Research. tour and technical talk for free at www.nyscc.org. Event Chair: NYSCC Committee: LISCC Committee:

Joe Albanese – joealbanese2@gmail.com; (908) 456-2968 Brian Ecclefield – brianecclefield@princetonconsumer.com; (845) 558-2258 Ina Schlenoff – ischleno@estee.com and Glen Muoio – gmuoio@estee.com; (631) 501-5832

Lodging at Killington will not be provided. Try getting together with friends and colleagues to find a hotel or condo to share. Transportation to/from Killington will also not be provided. Car-pooling is recommended. Individuals seeking ride-sharing opportunities may contact: • NYSCC: Joe Albanese – joealbanese@gmail.com; (908) 456-2968 • LISCC: Glen Muoio – gmuoio@estee.com; (631) 501-5832

n Non-members are Welcome!

This is a family event, so children and other invited guests are welcome. Same ski lift and equipment rental rates apply for SCC members and their invited guests. Discounted group lift tickets and rentals are available for purchase through the LISCC. Please make all checks payable to: SCC – Long Island Chapter. If paying by check, mail to Glenn Muoio, Estée Lauder Companies, 125 Pinelawn Road, Melville, NY 11747. To purchase tickets via PayPal, please visit the LISCC website. Go to www.liscc.org/2018_ski.html. If using PayPal, please notify Glen by e-mail at gmuoio@estee.com when registration for lift tickets/rentals is complete. (Continued on page 18)

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n Adult, Ages 19-64

• Adult ticket 1-day (Friday) – $51 • Adult ticket 1-day (Saturday) – $69 • Adult ticket 2-day (Friday and Saturday) – $120 • Adult ticket 2-day (Saturday and Sunday) – $132 • Adult ticket 3-day (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) – $151

n Youth, Ages 7-18 and Senior, Ages 65+

• Youth/senior ticket 1-day (Friday) – $47 • Youth/senior ticket 1-day (Saturday) – $63 • Youth/senior ticket 2-day (Friday and Saturday) – $110 • Youth/senior ticket 2-day (Saturday and Sunday) – $114 • Youth/senior ticket 3-day (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) – $130

n Rentals (includes skis/boots/poles or snowboard/boots):

• Adult (19-64): 1-day, $39; 2-day, $68 ; 3-day, $91 • Youth/Senior (18 & under/65+): 1-day, $29; 2-day, $46; 3-day, $64

n Questions about skiing/snowboarding, please contact:

• Joe Albanese (joealbanese2@gmail.com; (908) 456-2968) • Glen Muolo (gmuolo@estee.com; (631) 501-5832)

n Questions about educational program and touring microbreweries, please contact: • Brian Ecclefield (brianecclefield@princetonconsumer.com; (845) 558-2258)

n Registration closes February 5, 2018.

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NYSCC Ski Trip Educational Program K-Beauty: The Science Behind the Transformational Texture Phenomenon

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osmetics have been around forever. The skincare routine has been refined over the years, but up until recently cosmetics have not been exclusively positioned as “fun”. The K-Beauty trend continues to sweep through the cosmetic world using social media and playful skin care application techniques. Underneath this fun, surprising image-driven cosmetic trend lies a host of applied scientific principles. We will explore K-Beauty not through the lens of social media but more appropriately under the microscope of science (colloid and interface science, skin biology, and physics). Join me for a hands on demonstration while we look behind the curtain on K-Beauty trends from a scientist point of view.

About the Speaker: Marc Cornell Marc Cornell is Vice-president of Innovation at Englewood Lab in Englewood, NJ. During his thirty-year career, he has worked in an R&D role for large (Merck, L’Oréal, Bristol Meyers Squibb, Union Carbide) and medium sized companies (Neostrata, ChemAid Labs, KV Pharmaceutical). For the last twenty years he has worked primarily on the research and formulation development of cosmeceuticals for various brands (Skinceuticals, Neostrata, Biomedic, Strivectin, and La Roche-Posay). In his current role, he has researched K-Beauty skincare trends and developed numerous transformational textures which continue to trend for this surprising sensorial skin care category.

Employment Opportunities For complete ads please go to the NYSCC website: https://www.nyscc.org/employment-listings.html.

n Chemist ChemAid Laboratories, Inc. • Saddle Brook, NJ n Formulation/Analytical Chemist Alchemist Express, LLC

n Director of Fragrance Cosmetic Chemistry Givaudan • New York, NY 18

n Technical Sales Representative Seppic • Fairfield, NJ n R&D Formulation Technician Fareva • Henrico, VA

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Cosmetiscope Feb 2018  
Cosmetiscope Feb 2018