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SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

ADOPTED MAY 10, 2012 PREPARED BY: MSA PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, INC.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

S. Holmen Drive Corridor Plan Town of Onalaska & Village of Holmen Planning Document TOWN BOARD

VILLAGE BOARD

ROLLY BOGERT - CHAIRMAN MARC SCHULTZ - SUPERVISOR SANDY THOMPSON - SUPERVISOR STEVE MICHAELS - SUPERVISOR FRANK FOGEL - SUPERVISOR

NANCY PROCTOR - PRESIDENT NEAL FORDE - TRUSTEE RYAN OLSON - TRUSTEE MIKE DUNHAM - TRUSTEE DAWN KULCINSKI - TRUSTEE TONY HORVATH - TRUSTEE DAN MOSER - TRUSTEE

PLAN COMMISSION

PLAN COMMISSION

ROLLY BOGERT - CHAIR FRANK FOGEL - VICE CHAIR DONNA MURPHY - MEMBER DOUG SHEFELBINE - MEMBER TOM THOMPSON - MEMBER STAN HAUSER - MEMBER AL LOUIS - MEMBER

NANCY PROCTOR - CHAIR KEVIN EVENSON - MEMBER SCOTT HEINIG - MEMBER DAN MOSER - MEMBER TONY SZAK - MEMBER BILL EBNER - MEMBER DEAN OLSON - MEMBER

WITH ASSISTANCE FROM:

WITH ASSISTANCE FROM:

MELISSA ERDMAN - CLERK

SCOTT HEINIG - ADMINISTRATOR/CLERK DEAN OLSON - DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS Holmen/Onalaska residents, property owners, and business owners aƩended meeƟngs, reviewed draŌ materials, and submiƩed comments that have improved this Plan.

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VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


TABLE OF CONTENTS

AD HOC COMMITTEE NANCY PROCTOR - VILLAGE PRESIDENT SCOTT HEINIG - VILLAGE ADMINISTRATOR BEN SPANEL - FORMER VILLAGE DPW DEAN OLSON - VILLAGE DPW RYAN OLSON - VILLAGE TRUSTEE SCOTT RYAN - PUBLIC MEMBER ROLLY BOGERT - TOWN CHAIRMAN SANDY THOMPSON - TOWN SUPERVISOR Special thanks to the ad-hoc planning commiƩee, who devoted their Ɵme and energy to develop this Plan for the future of the South Holmen Drive Corridor.

CHAPTER 1

Introduction......................................................................... 6 1.1 Purpose 1.2 Objectives 1.3 Planning Process 1.4 Planning Area

CHAPTER 2

Existing Conditions ........................................................ 12 2.1 Land Use 2.2 Public Utilities 2.3 Transportation System 2.4 Streetscaping 2.5 Private Development

CHAPTER 3

Recommendations ............................................................ 30 3.1 Future Land Use 3.2 Public Utilities 3.3 Transportation System 3.4 Streetscaping 3.5 Private Development

PREPARED BY: CHAPTER 4

Action Plan ........................................................................ 42 4.1 Action Steps Summary 4.2 Potential Funding Sources

2901 InternaƟonal Lane Suite 300 Madison, WI 53704

APPENDIX A

Retail Market Profile

APPENDIX B

Site & Building Design Handbook

(608) 242-7779 www.msa-ps.com

APPENDIX C

State Planting Guidelines

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

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ACTION LU-1

Amend Comprehensive Plans to include recommendations from this corridor plan. (Plan Commission)

LU-2

Prepare and adopt a memorandum of understanding for a potential boundary agreement. (Joint Local Officials Committee)

UTL-1

Design and build regional stormwater facilities near the US 53 interchange to serve new development. (Public Works Committee)

UTL-2

Extend water and sewer laterials to new development. (Public Works Committee)

TS-1

TS-4 TS-5

Add crosswalks where the bike path crosses any roadway, especially at the CTH OT (south) intersection. (Public Works Committee)

TS-6

Explore merits of a jurisdictional transfer or maintenance agreement of CTH HD to the Village. (Plan Commission, Village Board)

TS-7

Build a landscaped boulevard with curb and gutter between the US 53 interchange and McHugh Road. (Public Works Committee)

TS-7

Build a multi-use path along the eastern side of South Holmen Drive between McHugh Road to CTH OT (northern intersection). (Public Works Committee)

TS-8

Bury overhead wires where feasible. (Public Works Committee)

TS-9

Build a 5-foot sidewalk on the western side of South Holmen Drive between Empire and the US 53 interchange. (Public Works Committee)

TS-3

TS-10

MIDTERM

LONGTERM

2012

2013-2015

2015-2022+

Clearly mark crosswalks at major intersections using either paint or stamped concrete. (Public Works Committee)

ESTIMATED COST $0-$1,000 $10,000-$15,000 $5,000-$8,000 per acre served

--- As Needed ---

Create and adopt an Official Transportation Map. (Public Works Committee) Monitor US 53 on/off ramps and current/future intersections within the corridor, considering traffic controls as needed. (Public Works Committee) Build a multi-use path along the eastern side of STH 35 from CTH OT (southern intersection) to CTH OT (northern intersection). (Public Works Committee) Build a multi-use path along the south/west side of CTH OT (southern intersection) to proposed connection to the Great River State Trail. (Public Works Committee)

TS-2

SHORTTERM

$200-$400 / L.F. Staff Time

--- As Needed ---

Variable $600,000 - $800,00 (Hale Dr.) $15-$30 / L.F. $15-$30 / L.F. $5-$10 / L.F.

--- On Going ---

Unknown Variable $15-$30 / L.F. Variable $15-$30 / L.F.

--- As Needed ---

$5-$10 / L.F.

--- As Needed ---

$8,000-$10,000 (retrofit w/ push buttons) $4,000 (retrofit w/ countdown timers)

STS-7

Provide push buttons to signalized intersections within the corridor, especially at Gaarder. Consider countdown timers, especially at McHugh. (Public Works Committee) Work with La Crosse County to reduce the 45 miles per hour speed limit, especially from Hale Drive to McHugh. An engineering and traffic investigation would be needed to lower the speed limit. (Public Works Committee) Upgrade the wayfinding system along all arterials with access to US 53 (North Holmen Drive, South Holmen Drive, McHugh Road, CTH OT). (Public Works Committee) Add a gateway feature at the McHugh/Holmen intersection with an electronic message sign displaying community events. (Public Works Committee) As the corridor and Village expands, the existing Holmen Sign (across from Cole Court intersection) should move south of its current location to better represent Holmen's village limits. (Public Works Committee) Add Great River Road signage within the boulevard at any point where new interchange traffic could intersect South Holmen Drive. (Public Works Committee) Replace existing light fixtures with dark-sky compliant decorative fixtures with banners. (Public Works Committee) Add additional decorative street lights on South Holmen Drive in sections currently unlit (primarily between Empire Street and the US 53 interchange). (Public Works Committee) Consider adding a few benches and trash receptacles along South Holmen Drive once the proposed multi-use path is built. (Public Works Committee)

STS-8

Provide bike racks at major destinations and near large parking lots. (Public Works Committee)

$500-$1,500 ea

STS-9

Provide screening along STH 35 in front of West Avenue between Sunset Drive and Derek Avenue. (Public Works Committee)

$50,000-$75,000

Provide additional screening along STH 35 in front of the mobile home parks. (Public Works Committee)

$15,000-$30,000

TS-11 TS-12 STS-1 STS-2 STS-3 STS-4 STS-5 STS-6

STS-10 STS-11 STS-12

$4,000-$6,000 $100-$500 per sign $20,000-$40,000 Staff Time $100-$500 per sign $1,000-$2,000 ea $1,000-$2,000 ea $500-$1,500 ea

Add landscaping elements and (potentially) an "iconic" structure in the public right-of-way between South Holmen Drive and S. Main Street (just north of Hale Drive). (Public Works Committee) Add shrubs and minimal trees within the proposed medians from the US 53 interchange to McHugh Road. (Public Works Committee)

D-1

Market private redevelopment in areas currently under-utilized. (Redevelopment Authority)

D-2

Adopt the South Holmen Drive Corridor Design Standards as a new overlay zoning district. (Planning Commission)

$50,000-$100,000 $20,000-$40,000

--- On Going ---

Variable Staff Time


S. Holmen Drive Corridor Plan

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Town of Onalaska & Village of Holmen Planning Document In 2004-05 both the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska identified, through their respective comprehensive land use plans, the need to coordinate a strategy and vision for the (re)development of the area around South Holmen Drive from McHugh Rd. to CTH OT. This stretch of highway is part of the Great River Road, a designated National Scenic Byway which follows the Mississippi River through 10 states. The land use and character along South Holmen Drive are in a period of transition. It’s expected that more land along the corridor will transition to urban uses, particularly in those areas adjacent to the US 53 interchange. There are also opportunities to reinvigorate existing improved parcels and public infrastructure. With these opportunities come certain challenges, in this case managing growth and development along the corridor to meet the expectations of the community and sound planning principles. Adding to this challenge is the fact that land within this corridor meanders between the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska, necessitating coordination of unified land use policies between these communities. In 2010, the Village of Holmen contracted with MSA Professional Services to assist with the development of a master plan for the South Holmen Drive Corridor. This plan outlines a long-range approach for improvements, redevelopment, beautification, and the overall revitalization of the South Holmen Drive Corridor. The recommendations within this plan are intended to achieve the following objectives: 1.

Heighten awareness and “brand” this stretch of roadway as a component of the Great River Road.

2.

Provide a vision for future land uses and supporting transportation and utility infrastructure, compatible with community expectations and sound planning principles.

3.

Enhance the overall aesthetics of the corridor, including private building design, private landscaping and site design, signage, and public streetscaping.

4.

Establish a pedestrian and bicycle network that connects the neighborhoods along the roadway to the Village’s Downtown District and the Great River State Trail.

5.

Foster new private investment of under-utilized land to improve the local economy and tax base.

This plan was developed concurrent with a separate project by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) to reconstruct a portion of STH 35 from Popular St. in the City of Onalaska to just south of the US Highway 53 interchange. The WisDOT is proposing to construct a three-lane roadway, where the center lane will be used as a two-wayleft-turn lane in areas where there are cross streets and a raised median in other areas. It will also include improvements to intersections and revised driveway access where necessary. Construction is planned for 2014 and a portion of this plan’s recommendations are intended to identify additional improvements that could be coordinated with the WisDOT to further enhance this stretch of roadway. The table on the previous page provides a summary of the recommendations described in Chapter 3. Implementation timelines are categorized into short-, medium-, and long-term horizons based on factors such as: •

Whether the recommendation is tied to new development,

Whether the proposed improvement is within public or private property,

The relative urgency for the improvement, or ease within which it could be implemented,

Opportunities for coordination with the WisDOT’s planned reconstruction of STH 35 in 2014, or

Probable cost.

The desired vision for this portion of the Great River Road cannot be created overnight. However, by incrementally implementing the recommendations within this plan the corridor can become the outstanding scenic gateway both communities desire.

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CHAPTER ONE


IntroducƟon

CHAPTER ONE

7 - Study Area / 8 - Background & ObjecƟves / 9 - Planning Process / 10 - Public Input 1.1 STUDY AREA State Highway 35 links the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska to the City of La Crosse, through the City of Onalaska. This stretch of highway is part of the Great River Road, a designated National Scenic Byway which follows the Mississippi River through 10 states. STH 35 connects to US 53, which runs into Interstate 90 five and half miles to the south. The Great River Road Bike Trail also runs through the area, with a trailhead facility in the unincorporated village of Midway. The focus of this study is a 3.3 mile portion of STH 35 from McHugh Rd. (Village of Holmen) in the north to County Highway OT (Town of Onalaska) to the south. In 1992, a jurisdictional transfer occurred between the WisDOT and La Crosse County, with that portion of the roadway from US 53 to McHugh Road becoming Business 35/County Road HD. In addition, from McHugh Rd. to Derek Ave. (0.2 mi.) the roadway is known locally as North Holmen Drive. From Derek Ave. to US 53 (1.4 mi.) the roadway is known locally as South Holmen Drive. However, for the remainder of this plan the entire study area will be referred to as South Holmen Drive, which reflects two trends: •

That the Village will continue to get annexation petition requests along the corridor from Gaarder Road to CTH OT, and

With the additional annexation of 985 acres north of the Village, it is expected that McHugh Rd. will become the perceived deviation of North and South Holmen Drive, even if not officially designated as such.

The “study area” includes parcels abutting South Holmen Drive, as well as parcels in the surrounding growth areas that could potentially affect the functionality of South Holmen Drive in the future. In general, the “corridor boundary” includes parcels between South Holmen Drive and the next public street within the urban areas and within a 1/4-mile in the undeveloped areas. For the purposes of this plan, the entire study area will be included in analysis; however, the recommendations are primarily limited to the corridor boundary. See Figure 1.1 (on the next page) for the boundaries of the corridor and study area.

The Village of Holmen is located in west-central Wisconsin (La Crosse County), and is about 10 miles north of the City of La Crosse, residing along U.S. Highway 53. Due to its close proximity to La Crosse, as well as Interstate 90 (seven miles south), the Village has grown from a small rural farming community of approximately 1,000 residents (19601970s) to a rapidly expanding urban center of 9,005 residents. Continued population growth is expected as the Village has recently annexed an additional 985 acres of developable land to its north. To the south, the Village and the City of Onalaska have a mutual agreement not to expand beyond CTH OT.

The Town of Onalaska (population 5,623) surrounds the majority of Holmen’s east, west and southern borders, and has also seen substantial growth (89%) over the last forty years. In 2010, the Town of Onalaska and the City of Onalaska developed a memorandum of understanding regarding a 10-year boundary agreement.

The Wisconsin portion of the Great River Road follows the Mississippi River for 250 miles from Prescott to the north to Keiler to the south, and passes through 33 rivertown communities along the way, including Holmen. Nearly two-thirds of the designated roadway passes along or through protected natural areas, providing endless birdwatching, picnicking, bicycling, fishing, boating, and paddling opportunities. Historic markers, museums and visitor centers tell the story of the Wisconsin Great River Road and the people who live and work along the Mississippi River.

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CHAPTER ONE Figure 1.1: Corridor Study Area Map

1.2 BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES In 2004-05 both the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska identified, through their respective comprehensive land use plans, the need to coordinate a strategy and vision for the (re)development of the area around South Holmen Drive (STH 35 south of the US 53 interchange and CTH HD north of the interchange) from McHugh Rd. to CTH OT. The South Holmen Drive corridor is the lifeline for the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska with approximately 11,000 to 16,000 vehicles passing through the area every day. The interchange along South Holmen Drive provides the Village connection to the interstate system via US Highway 53 and is the major gateway into the community. As such, the South Holmen Drive Corridor provides the first and last impression for individuals entering and leaving the Village; and because of the proximity to US Highway 53, development of the land along the corridor is key component to the local economy. The land use and character along South Holmen Drive are in a period of transition. It’s expected that more land along the corridor will transition to urban uses, particularly in those areas adjacent to the US 53 interchange. There are also opportunities to reinvigorate existing improved parcels and public infrastructure. With these opportunities come certain challenges, in this case managing growth and development along the corridor to meet the expectations of the community and sound planning principles. Adding to this challenge is the fact that land within this corridor meanders between the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska, necessitating coordination of unified land use policies between these communities. In 2010, the Village of Holmen contracted with MSA Professional Services to assist with the development of a master plan for the South Holmen Drive Corridor. This plan outlines a long-range approach for improvements, redevelopment, beautification, and the overall revitalization of the South Holmen Drive Corridor. This plan was developed concurrent with a separate project by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) to reconstruct a portion of STH 35 from Popular St. in the City of Onalaska to just south of

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VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


INTRODUCTION the US Highway 53 interchange. The WisDOT is proposing to construct a three-lane roadway, where the center lane will be used as a twoway-left-turn lane in areas where there are access issues and a raised median in other areas. It will also include improvements to intersections and revised access where necessary. Construction is planned for 2014 and a portion of this plan’s recommendations are intended to identify additional improvements that could be coordinated with the WisDOT to further enhance this stretch of roadway. This plan is a guide to help Village/Town officials and economic development professionals attract and direct investment along the South Holmen Drive Corridor. This planning document is intended to be a “living” guide for future overall development of the Corridor. It serves to meet the objectives described in the box below.

PLAN OBJECTIVES

1.3 PLANNING PROCESS The planning process began early in 2011 with a series of meetings between officials from the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska. The purpose of these meetings was to engage in initial discussions regarding the willingness of both parties to form a boundary agreement as part of a larger goal to develop a coordinated strategy and vision for the (re)development of the South Holmen Drive corridor; two goals identified in each of the community’s comprehensive land use plans from 2004-05. The following areas of mutual agreement arose from these conversations: •

The jagged municipal boundaries along the corridor present challenges for both communities regarding the efficient delivery of services and the ability to discern a “community edge,” where one community begins and another ends.

The S. Holmen Dr. corridor features a mix of land uses, some of which are incompatible with adjacent uses or are under-utilized given the transportation infrastructure in place. The jagged municipal boundaries presents challenges to unifying land use, site, and building design regulations along the corridor.

Since the corridor still has many undeveloped parcels, and because the WisDOT is planning to reconstruct a portion of S. Holmen Drive in 2014, it is appropriate that both communities engage in conversations regarding land use and transportation planning at this time.

Heighten awareness and “brand” this stretch of roadway as a component of the Great River Road. Provide a vision for future land uses and supporting transportation and utility infrastructure, compatible with community expectations and sound planning principles. Enhance the overall aesthetics of the corridor, including private building design, private landscaping and site design, signage, and public streetscaping. Establish a pedestrian and bicycle network that connects the neighborhoods along the roadway to the Village’s Downtown District and the Great River State Trail.

The two communities agreed to proceed forward with the development of a corridor master plan, including creation of an Ad Hoc Committee to oversee the planning process. Officials also outlined the extent of the planning area and a potential cooperative boundary line (refer to Figure 1.1).

Facilitate private investment of under-utilized land to improve the local economy and tax base.

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CHAPTER ONE This plan was developed over approximately twelve months, beginning in April 2011. The process included several meetings with planners from MSA Professional Services and the Ad Hoc Committee. In addition, a public informational workshop was held during the planning process to gather input from members of the public who live, work, or travel within the study area. The project concluded with a presentation of the plan to the Village Board. Following the completion of this plan, officials from both communities will continue their discussions regarding developing a memorandum of understanding regarding a 10-year, or longer, boundary agreement that includes this planning document. Figure 1.2: Corridor Planning Process

10 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

1.3 PUBLIC INPUT On October 25, 2011, the Village of Holmen, the Town of Onalaska and MSA Professional Services held a public informational meeting (PIM) in order to present the corridor’s draft materials, answer questions, and receive public comment. In all, approximately 45 people attended the PIM including a good mix of residents and business owners from both communities. Comments submitted from the public are displayed on the following page.


INTRODUCTION Table 1.1: Public Comments, October 25, 2011 PIM

# 1

2

3

4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Figure 1.3: Public Comment Location Map

Comment Please insure safe pedestrian travel the entire length of both sides of the corridor & at crossing (walkers & bicyclists) Lower the traffic speeds on Holmen Drive from 45mph to 35mph the entire length of the corridor. Encourage high speed pass thru traffic to US 53 Traffic lights at the intersection of Holmen Drive and McHugh Road needs control adjustments/replacement. Not enough priority is given to traffic crossing Holmen Drive Businesses on Holmen Drive don’t all have a lot of curb appeal. Important for Village/Town’s future to improve curb appeal of existing businesses and improve requirements for future development Keep in mind that boulevards and other improvements will require on-going maintenance & related costs. This all represents a financial burden on already financially strapped municipal governments and taxpayers All three parcels here are four sale Dangerous intersection lots more traffic Street lighting from US 53 and 35 intersection to Gaarder Road is needed When are water & sewer extensions planned? Noise levels from cars and other loud vehicles taking off from stop lights is too high. Can’t sleep with windows open. Need a sound barrier on east side of STH 35 Difficult to see on-coming traffic when turning south off of CTH OT onto STH 35 208 S. Holmen Drive is a commercial business building not a parking lot (ELU Map) Difficult to get out to STH 35, turning left in work week This parcel is in agricultural use, not “vacant or for sale”. Amend Redevelopment Map Try to use local or at the very least Wisconsin contractors and businesses for signage, and other projects when possible Traffic gets backed up on residential street Avoid free flow ramps for improved on road bicycle accommodations Speed limit should be reduced on Holmen Drive

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CHAPTER TWO


ExisƟng CondiƟons

CHAPTER TWO

13 - Land Use / 15 - UƟliƟes / 18 - TransportaƟon / 23 - Streetscaping / 24 - Development Table 2.1: Existing Land Uses, Corridor Boundary # OF % OF PARCELS CORRIDOR TYPE ACRES Agriculture 10 208.6 32.3% Single-Family 158 93.0 14.4% Multi-Family 11 17.5 2.7% Mobile Home 8 111.5 17.3% Mixed Use 3 4.2 0.6% Office 14 18.7 2.9% Retail & Service 25 36.2 5.6% Food Establishment 4 2.9 0.5% Industrial 13 34.0 5.3% Utility 1 1.3 0.2% Open 27 32.5 5.0% Open Space 8 34.6 5.4% Park and Open Space 2 11.7 1.8% Public 4 35.0 5.4% Parking 2 2.7 0.4% Vacant 2 2.0 0.3% TOTALS 292 646.4 100.0%

A crucial early step towards establishing a vision and promoting (re) development in the South Holmen Drive Corridor is analyzing the existing environment identifying issues or opportunities. This chapter will discuss the corridor’s land use, utilities, transportation systems, streetscaping features, and potential for (re)development.

2.1 LAND USE Existing Land Use The South Holmen Drive Corridor has a variety of uses, including mobile home parks, single- and multi-family housing, farming, excavating/ storage uses, and commercial uses. In general, development is near the southern and northern edges of the corridor with more undeveloped land (farming) near the US Highway 53 interchange. The southern edge can be characterized as rural residential (mobile homes, single-family homes, etc.) with a few intensive uses (La Crosse County Highway Department Shop, McHugh Excavating, and Emma’s Diner and Banquet Hall). On the contrary, the northern edge can be characterized as urban with primarily highway commercial and some single- and multi-family buildings. As Table 2.1 illustrates, the corridor primarily consists of residential housing (34%) and farmland (32%). Contrary to most state highways with an interchange, the South Holmen Drive Corridor lacks significant commercial properties, especially abutting the interchange. In total, approximately 62 acres within the corridor is commercial, which makes up only about 9% of the corridor. The corridor’s undeveloped parcels (e.g. farmland, vacant, etc.) may see significant development pressure in the coming future, especially near the US 53 interchange, as the regional population and traffic counts continue to grow. This change will drastically impact the character and function of the South Holmen Drive Corridor.

Figure 2.1 (on the next page) illustrates the varying land uses in the corridor. In general, there are no significant issues with non-compatible land uses. However, there are several areas that present concerns of varying degree: •

The corridor contains a mixture of high and lower quality buildings, signs, and landscaping (refer to Section 2.5). The variations are a reflection of the maturation of the Village from a rural community to a small urban village. Creating and maintaining standards for site and building design will be an important component to ensuring future development meets community expectations reflective of a “Great River Road.”

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CHAPTER TWO Figure 2.1: Existing Land Use Map

The McHugh Excavating business (brown parcels in the southern portion of corridor) surrounds the edge of a single-family residential neighborhood and is adjacent to an environmental corridor.

The single family residences along West Avenue (south of Sunset Drive in the northern portion of the corridor) face South Holmen Drive and sit across from highway commercial uses with significant outdoor merchandise in the front yard setback. Some of these businesses may be better suited for large sites.

The mobile home park could use additional ground screening to mitigate noise from motor vehicles traveling along the corridor.

Future Land Use The preferred land uses for the study area as described in Holmen’s 2004 Comprehensive Land Use Plan are illustrated in Figure 2.2. It shows significant commercial/light industrial development opportunities throughout the S. Holmen Drive corridor with minimal residential or mixed use development in the corridor study area. The current economic climate has hampered new commercial and residential development across the State and it is projected that commercial development will be limited for years to come, especially retail services (refer to Section 2.5). Based on this, it will take significant amount of time before the study area will develop as a primarily commercial corridor. To help plan for infrastructure costs and future traffic flow, the future land use map also suggests potential collector roads within the Village. As shown, the Village anticipates two new road connections to South Holmen Drive. One connection will be at Gaarder Road where the residential neighborhoods west of Halfway Creek can more efficiently connect to South Holmen Drive. The other connection would be near the northern edge of the interchange as an extension of Greeno Road. This connection would provide for better connections for the eastern residential neighborhoods, and it would alleviate increased traffic pressure on Hale Drive and Gaarder Road.

14 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


EXISTING CONDITIONS Figure 2.2: Future Land Use Map (per 2004 Village of Holmen Comp Plan)

The Future Land Use’s proposed roadways would greatly improve accessibility within the Village; however, there are two areas of concern that may have an impact on South Holmen Drive. First, it may not be financially feasible for the Village to build two bridges across Halfway Creek as shown in Figure 2.2. If only one bridge is feasible, traffic would not be split between both the Greeno and the Gaarder proposed intersections, resulting in extra burden to one of these intersections. The second area of concern is in the southeast quadrant of the US 53 interchange where the planned commercial/light industrial area lacks direct access to South Holmen Drive. Generally this type of development would be better served connecting straight to the arterial (South Holmen Drive) than pushing traffic onto existing neighborhood streets prior to connecting to the arterial. Based on this design, the Walden Place intersection with South Holmen Drive would require a more controlled intersection and traffic on the neighborhood streets (Walden Court, Walden Place, Pertzsch Drive, Locust Ave, etc.) would significantly increase.

Gaarder Hale Greeno

The Town of Onalaska’s Future Land Use Map, as depicted in their comprehensive plan, identifies all developable land within the corridor study area as “urban mixed-use.” Policies include encouraging higher densities and intensities of land use including office, commercial, light industrial/manufacturing, residential, and recreational uses. Potential new road networks are not defined.

2.2 PUBLIC UTILITIES Stormwater Utilities The entire corridor is within the Lower Black River watershed with the majority of the water being discharged into the Halfway Creek and Sandlake Creek. As shown in Figure 2.3, water is collected and conveyed through a series of private and public storm sewer pipes, surface swales, and detention (dry) or retention (wet) ponds. The system functions well and meets the needs of the current development pattern. As infill development occurs, it will be necessary to provide additional facilities to meet post-development stormwater management standards established

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

15


CHAPTER TWO Figure 2.3: Stormwater Utilities Map

by the Village of Holmen, La Crosse County, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These standards address two aspects of stormwater management, water quality control (measured as reduction in post-development Total Suspended Solids), and peak discharge rate control. Chapter 56 of the Village’s municipal code describes the relevant standards for stormwater management for new and redevelopment projects. The language in Chapter 56 was originally developed by following State Administrative Code NR151 as they existed at the time the Village’s ordinance was written. Water System Figure 2.4 shows the existing and planned water systems in the Village of Holmen. In an effort to serve future development, the Village plans preliminary water main extensions under existing and proposed roadways within the corridor planning area, including two connections under US 53. These two connections would ensure a resilient system that can sustain the necessary pressures as growth occurs. As shown, the planned extensions under existing roadways include South Holmen Drive (STH 35) from Ulman Street to CTH OT, Cole Court (CTH OT), Filler Court (CTH OT), CTH OT, and Evergreen Way. Existing Town of Onalaska residents could connect to the proposed water mains; however, the majority of the homes may continue using their existing on-site wells for water service. Sanitary Sewer Systems Figure 2.5 shows the existing and planned sanitary sewer systems in the Village of Holmen. In general, the sanitary sewer flows by gravity and lift stations in areas with significant elevation change. The majority of the undeveloped areas already have sanitary sewer lines running through it, but additional pipes and lift stations may be needed dependent on location and intensity of development. Existing Town of Onalaska residents could connect to the existing sanitary system; however, the majority of the homes may continue using their existing on-site septic systems.

16 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


EXISTING CONDITIONS Figure 2.4: Water Systems Map

Figure 2.5: Sanitary Sewer Systems Map

Gaarder

Gaarder

Hale

Hale Greeno

Greeno

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17


CHAPTER TWO Figure 2.6: Transportation Systems Map

2.3 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Road Section Type Within the corridor study area South Holmen Drive can be broken into three sections: 1. An urban four-lane roadway (i.e. curb and gutter) with a shared left-turning lane in the center from McHugh Road to Gaarder Road, 2. A four-lane road transitioning from urban to rural section (i.e. swale system--no curb or gutter) with a shared left turn lane from Gaarder Road to US 53 interchange, and 3. A two-lane rural highway from the US 53 interchange to CTH OT. Road Classification & Vehicle Traffic Figure 2.6 denotes road classifications and traffic counts within the study area. As shown, the South Holmen Drive Corridor is a multi-jurisdictional roadway with the northern section under County jurisdiction (CTH HD) and the southern section under State jurisdiction (STH 35). It carries 3,00012,000 vehicles a day (depending on its location to US 53 interchange) with a 45 miles per hour speed limit. US 53 is a federal highway that bisects South Holmen Drive, carrying approximately 18,000 vehicles a day through the area with a 65 miles per hour speed limit. Additionally there are several County Highways (SN, OT, DH, MH) that intersect STH 35, carrying between 2,000 and 6,000 vehicles a day with a 55 miles per hour speed limit.

18 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


EXISTING CONDITIONS In general, the planning area has seen significant increase in traffic from 2002 to 2008, especially along US 53 and around its interchanges. However, in a couple segments along South Holmen Drive there was a decline in use. The first was between CTH OT and the US 53 interchange (-5%), and the second from Gaarder Road to McHugh Road (-5%). From these statistics, one can assume the following: •

Some traffic is using the CTH OT and CTH MH (McHugh Road) interchanges to reach the residential neighborhoods within the Village of Holmen and the Town of Onalaska instead of the STH 35 interchange, and

•

More traffic is using alternative routes off of South Holmen Drive, such as CTH DH (Main Street) and Hale Drive to reach neighborhoods in west and northwest sections of Holmen.

As more development occurs within the South Holmen Drive corridor it is anticipated that traffic will increase on both itself and on the intersecting collector streets, which may require controlled intersections (e.g. signals, roundabout, etc.) to allow for better flow through the corridor in the future. Street Conditions & Planned Improvements In general, South Holmen Drive is in good to fair condition, except for the shared left turn lane throughout is in fair to poor condition. As traffic is limited on the shared left turn lane, reconstruction would most likely occur when that stretch of roadway needs complete reconstruction. In 2014, WisDOT plans to reconstruct STH 35, including portions from CTH OT to the US 53 interchange as a rural section two-lane boulevard. La Crosse County, in 2007, commissioned a Roadway Plan to assess their highway/road system, including CTH HD (South Holmen Drive from CTH MH (McHugh) to US 53). The plan suggested access management strategies to improve South Holmen Drive, including plantable medians between CTH MH (McHugh) and Hale Drive, as well as, driveway closures around the Hale Drive intersection. These improvements (as shown in the images on the right) were suggested to be completed by 2014.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

19


CHAPTER TWO Intersections & Access Drives There are three signalized intersections along the corridor, one at McHugh/ Main, another at Gaarder Road, and the other at CTH OT. The other intersections along South Holmen Drive allow free flowing movement for vehicles with stop signs for cross street traffic. In addition, there are 36 driveways (28 north of the US 53 interchange and eight south of it) with direct access to the roadway, some of which are too close to one another. The close driveways present a safety concerns as it is unclear which driveway a motorist may be turning into, increasing the probability of rear end crashes. Other access problems stem from a lack of curb and paved driveways, creating turnoffs that are not clearly defined. All existing intersections and access drives allow full movement of vehicles (i.e. straight, left turn, right turn); however, future development within 1,500 feet of the US 53 interchange will be restricted to right in/out driveways due to the existing grass medians, unless median crossings are built. The WisDOT 2014 STH 35 reconstruction project will fix two access issues south of the US 53 interchange. First, Evergreen Way and Walden Place are planned for an “extended” intersection, as they do not match up at a common point; and therefore, increase the potential for car crashes. Second, this project will reroute a couple of driveways near the CTH OT intersection (northern intersection) to alleviate additional potential crash points. As this corridor develops further it is important to align future driveways and intersections with existing access points, creating common points of movement.

Sidewalks and Crosswalk Facilities As shown in Figure 2.6, sidewalks are limited to the urban street sections of South Holmen Drive. From McHugh Road to Empire Street there are sidewalks on both sides of the street, with a sidewalk on the east side of the street from Empire Street to Hale Drive. In general, Holmen’s surrounding residential neighborhoods lack pedestrian access to South Holmen Drive, as the collector streets that feed into the corridor also lack sidewalks. Newer subdivisions in the Village of Holmen have been incorporating sidewalks; however, residents most likely have to travel by car to get to South Holmen Drive. As the corridor continues to develop, South Holmen Drive and the collector streets that connect to the surrounding neighborhoods will need pedestrian access to better serve residents. Crosswalks are also an important element in a safe pedestrian network. Currently there are striped crosswalks across South Holmen Drive at Main/ McHugh, Amy Drive, and Sunset Drive intersections. Commerce Street, Derek Street, Walnut Street, and Empire Street only have marked crosswalks parallel Empire and S. Holmen Dr to South Holmen Drive. The remainder of the intersections lack marked crosswalks. Increased traffic and/or additional sidewalks may warrant additional marked crosswalks in the future. Potentially high risk crossing may warrant more advanced crosswalk facilities, such as painted crosswalks, raised crosswalks, pedestrian crossing signage and lighting, and/or median refuges. In 2009, the Village commissioned a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Plan to assess, amongst other things, the current pedestrian facilities (sidewalks, crosswalks, etc.) around Holmen Middle School and three other schools (Evergreen Elementary, Sand Lake Elementary, and Viking Elementary). The plan discusses South Holmen Drive (CTH HD) as a major impediment to pedestrian travel from the western neighborhoods and Holmen Middle School. Recommendations to improve the corridor

20 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


EXISTING CONDITIONS include: 1) Removing the inactive pedestrian beacons (as shown in the upper right) at Amy Drive; 2) Encourage the School District to coordinate with the Village to initiate an adult crossing guard program; 3) Test the pedestrian interval at the Main/McHugh Street intersection (as it was indicated to be too short to cross the street safely) and consider a countdown timer (as shown on the lower right); 4) Consider installing signals at the Sunset Drive intersection (to encourage students to use this location to cross South Holmen Drive); and 5) Encourage the County to implement recommendations in the 2007 La Crosse County Roadway Plan (see page 19).

The Halfway Creek Trail runs from Midway’s Great River Bike Trailhead to Bluffview Court north of the Village limits. The trail uses on-street bike facilities on CTH OT, crushed stone path along the creek through downtown Holmen, on-street facilities northwest on Main Street, and a crushed stone path along STH 35 to Bluffview Court.

The Great River State Trail runs approximately 250 miles through Wisconsin using primarily the Great River Road (STH 35) between Prescott and Prairie du Chien. A trailhead exists in Midway, just outside the Village of Holmen. The bicycle map can be found on Wisconsin Department of Transportation website.

Bike Facilities As shown in Figure 2.7 (see page 22), the Holmen area has a bicycle network that primarily consists of on-road facilities; however, the Great River State Trail and the Halfway Creek Trail provide for off-street paths for commuters, as well as recreational riders. South Holmen Drive does not have any bicycle facilities, and the speeds and the amount of traffic do not provide for safe bicycle travel. Therefore, Sand Lake Road (CTH SN) and Main Street (CTH DH) are currently considered the regional bike route through the Village of Holmen. However, none of the designated routes shown in Figure 2.7 by the La Crosse Area Regional Planning Committee (LAPC) are signed, and no bike map is distributed to residents/visitors, excluding what is provided on the Great River Road Bike Map by WisDOT.

accommodations from Hale Drive through the remainder of the corridor planning area. The LAPC also suggested designating bike lanes on some of the collectors that intersect South Holmen Drive (e.g. McHugh Road, Main Street, CTH OT) to connect this corridor with the surrounding neighborhoods. In general, the recommended bike facilities are onstreet lanes designed for Type A riders (advanced, commuters) and less for Type B/C (basic bicyclists and children). With the two recreational bike trails within the area (Great River State Trail and Halfway Creek Trail), consideration should be given to facilities for all users (type A/B/C riders).

In 2010, the LAPC provided recommendations for bicycle facilities with the Onalaska and Holmen area, as shown in Figure 2.8 (on page 22). This map suggests wide striped urban shoulders along South Holmen Drive from McHugh Road to Hale Drive, and no change from current

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

21


CHAPTER TWO HD

HOLMEN Gaynor Dr

Kepel Rd

l

cre s

e Rd Kay St

Ln

1st Ave E

Lin

S St

Pioneer Dr

Marlin St

S

Coule

Long

Ryan St

Union St

S

r

D

Ln E

Rolling

Popular Eateries & Grocers

Local Bicycle Route

!

Convenience Stores

!

Coffee Shops

Bike and Walking Trails

Æ ü ! 2

Trailheads

!

Bicycle Shops

0

0.25

F G

Hospitals and Clinics Parks & Recreation Areas Rail Lines

Great River Road 1

1.5 Miles

μ

Mississippi River Trail (MRT) The MRT follows the Great River State Trail (GRST) through this section of Onalaska and Holmen. Great River Road (GRR) The GRR through this area is not at all bicycle friendly, so bicyclists are encouraged to travel either the MRTor East Ave. NOTE: None of the regional routes are signed at this time. The plan is to have them signed by the end of 2012.

East Ave

Riders Club Rd Pine St

Johnson St

l re e kT rai

ay C

!

Ln

s Regional Bicycle Route

Stre b low St

St

s

Gordon

Ln ka Bir

Grove St

lin nk

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s Dr

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VAN RIPER PARK

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i

Ha lfw

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Roberts St E Legion St E Wall St E

William

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Figure 2.7: 2010 Holmen Bike Map (LAPC)

ONALASKA W estwood Dr

L Hau s er Rd

Te

Coffee Shops --Blue Cup Coffee House, 500 Holmen Dr N, Holmen Bike Shops --River Trail Cycles, 500 Holmen Dr N, Holmen Local Eateries --American Legion, 419 1st Ave W, Holmen --Emma's Diner, N5610 CTH OT, Onalaska --The Frosty Mug, 612 Main St N, Holmen --Jacqlon's Country Cafe, 512 Main St S, Holmen --Red Pines, W7305 CTH Z, Onalaska --T Jo's Pizza, 105 State St, Holmen

La Crosse Area Planning Committee, December 2010

22 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


EXISTING CONDITIONS 2.4 STREETSCAPING

Street Furniture

Lighting

The corridor does not include street furniture (i.e. benches, trash receptacles, bike racks, planters, etc.). Generally, these streetscaping features are limited on major thoroughfares, especially those catering mostly to vehicle traffic. If more pedestrian and bicycle accommodations were provided, it may warrant adding street furniture to the corridor.

The corridor is primarily unlit with the exception of the west side of the street from McHugh Road to Empire Road and at intersections between Empire Road and the US 53 interchange. The light fixtures between McHugh and Empire are approximately 30 feet in height and have commercialgrade unpainted metal poles with banner arms attached (with no banners). The other light fixtures (at road intersections) are older, approximately 25-feet in height, and are on utility wood poles with overhead electrical wires for power. In general, a well designed and welcoming corridor includes cohesive lighting fixtures that are at human scale (+/- 20 feet) with decorative elements (i.e. banners, brackets, poles, etc.). The clutter of overhead wires, including those powering street lights, clutters the street view and has a negative effect on a traveler’s experience of the corridor. Public Landscaping The corridor’s rural street section has no public landscaping (i.e. street trees, shrubs, flowers, etc.) along the side of the road, or within the grass medians. The urban sections of the corridor (Gaarder to McHugh) also do not have public landscaping in the sidewalk terrace, intersection medians (concrete only), or along the side of the road. There are opportunities to add public landscaping, especially in the urban sections of the corridor; however, plantings at maturity should stay well below the existing overhead wires, or the wires will need to be buried. Landscaping should also be tolerant of salt from winter road maintenance.

Wayfinding Signage The Village of Holmen does have a wayfinding network with five signs located on South Holmen Drive. Signs are also present on a few of the collector roads intersecting South Holmen Drive, especially near downtown Holmen. The signs are primarily on wood posts and are located in the sidewalk terrace or adjacent to the sidewalk. The sign face has the Holmen logo with one to eight destinations. In general, signs should be designed with no more than five destinations using text that can be read by drivers traveling at, or above, posted speed limits. The current wayfinding signage reads well on roads with low posted speed limits (below 35 MPH); however, South Holmen Drive’s posted 45 MPH speed limit can make it difficult to read, especially with seven destinations listed (as shown in the image above). WisDOT’s 2009 edition of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Controls Devices (MUTCD) is a good resource when designing a wayfinding signage system, in particular Section 2D.50. Any signage on State Highway 35 (South Holmen Drive south of the US 53 interchange) is required to meet the standards within the MUTCD document. The Town of Onalaska does not have any directional signage within the corridor study area.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

23


CHAPTER TWO Gateway/Welcome Signage The Village of Holmen has two welcome signs located on South Holmen Drive. One is located within a half mile of the US 53 interchange near the Cole Court intersection (on the eastern side of the street). It recognizes Miss Wisconsin 2009, who is from Holmen, and welcomes northbound drivers into Holmen. There is minimal landscaping surrounding the sign with a light angled up to provide illumination at night. The second sign is located approximately 500 feet north of the McHugh Road intersection on the western side of the street. The sign only has the Holmen logo, which is visible for southbound travelers. At the base of the sign are a couple of shrubs. The Town of Onalaska does not have a welcome sign within the corridor study area. Road Designation Signage There are a few signs along the corridor denoting its designation as the Great River Road and an American Scenic Byway. There are four sign posts south of the US 53 interchange with the designations shown to the right. Two of the sign posts are near the CTH OT northern intersection and face southbound traffic. One of these posts has the America’s Byways sign, and the other has the Great River Road sign. There is one sign post with both sign faces just north of the southern CTH OT intersection,

24 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

facing northbound traffic. The last post is located just prior to the on-ramp for US 53 East, facing northbound traffic, with the Great River Road sign face. There are additional Great River Road signs on the off-ramps directing travelers southbound towards the Town of Onalaska. No signs suggest South Holmen Drive north of the US 53 interchange as either designation. In addition, given the design speeds along the corridor, the existing signs can be difficult to read, diminishing the recognition of the corridor.

2.5 PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT Building Conditions Individual buildings can have a lasting impression on a person’s perception of an area. Figure 2.7 (on the next page) illustrates building conditions within the corridor boundary (excluding singlefamily and mobile home residential parcels). This is not an evaluation of the structural integrity of the building, but rather a subjective opinion of the condition based on the exterior appearance as viewed from the street or the appropriateness of the building design given the context of the corridor. Based on this subjective evaluation, three major observations can be made: •

A few buildings are in “poor” condition, primarily north of the US 53 interchange. In general, these buildings would probably cost more to update than to tear down and replace.

There are several buildings within the corridor that are in “good” or “excellent” condition (examples shown on the next page); and therefore, leave a positive lasting impression.

There is significant amount of land that is undeveloped, and the development of that land will have a large impact on the overall experience and aesthetic quality of the corridor in future years to come.


EXISTING CONDITIONS Figure 2.7: Building Conditions Map

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

25


CHAPTER TWO Figure 2.8: Property Value Ratio Map

Property Assessment Land and improvement (building) values are assessed annually and provide an objective evaluation of the state of private property in the corridor. Based on the 2010 aggregate assessed values, the total property value in the corridor is $66.2 million ($85,729 per acre). The total land value in the corridor is $15.9 million (an average of $20,629 per acre) with a total improvement value of $50.3 million (an average of $65,100 per acre). Figure 2.8 illustrates the relationship between the value of improvements and the value of the land for each parcel in the corridor. A low number is an indication of an opportunity for (re)development - it means that the parcel is not contributing strongly to the tax base and the cost to remove and replace existing improvements is relatively low. Parcels in red or orange have low value ratios and are the best (re)development opportunities. There are two important trends that are evident: •

Almost all of the under performing parcels (red) are undeveloped parcels and located near the US 53 interchange

•

The majority of the developed parcels are contributing significantly to the tax base

Real Estate Demand In 2010, the Village of Holmen commissioned a study to assess probable demand for future real estate development (office/industrial, commercial, and residential) within its boundaries over the next 20 years. The Development Opportunities Analysis (Place Dynamics) report included an analysis of the competitive environment within the region (refer to Figure 2.9). While most of the data within the study was derived at the County level a number of observations resulted from the study for the Village of Holmen:

26 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


EXISTING CONDITIONS Office/Industrial Space •

Holmen has not typically attracted a significant share of the region’s office/industrial development as it competes with the central City of La Crosse and with the new business parks along Interstate 90, where there are many sites available for development.

Land prices are not likely to be a significant inducement to lure businesses from these locations, as there is a minimal differential between land costs in Onalaska and Holmen.

It is expected that Holmen will attract an average of 40,000 to 80,000 square feet of new office/industrial space for the next ten years. Using a ratio of five square feet of land area for each one square foot of building footprint, this would consume about 10-20 acres through year 2020.

Commercial •

Population growth and increases in consumer demand will result in the need for an additional 592,250 square feet of commercial space in La Crosse County over the next 20 years.

Population growth in Holmen’s trade area is expected to result in a demand for 237,350 square feet of commercial space, of which 40% (94,940 sq.ft.) is expected to be captured in Holmen. This equates to about 11 acres of commercial land.

Residential •

La Crosse County is expected to add only 6,159 new households between 2010 and 2030.

Holmen is currently capturing about 26% of the demand for new housing and can be expected to capture between 20-35% of future housing demand. Roughly 1,232-2,155 housing units.

The expected aging of the population will increase the demand for housing with less maintenance (i.e. multi-family, condos, townhouse, assisted living).

The expected land area required through 2030 for single-family housing in Holmen is 323-565 acres and 53-92 acres of multifamily housing.

Figure 2.9: Community Level Market for the La Crosse metropolitan area

This map illustrates the community-level market for the La Crosse metropolitan area (shown in blue), which is roughly defined by competition in Winona, Eau Claire, Black River Falls, and Sparta. La Crosse will draw into those markets for regional retail and services. Holmen sustains a neighborhood-level market (shown in red) truncated by Onalaska on the south and Winona to the north. Source: Place Dynamics 2010 Development Opportunities Analysis, Holmen WI

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

27


CHAPTER TWO In 2009, the Village annexed 985 acres of land which has become the “Seven Bridges” Tax Increment District. There is little preexisting development in this area, which is planned to become a mixeduse neighborhood with a maximum of 35% of the area devoted to residential uses. The remainder of the area will become a mixture of office, industrial, commercial and civic uses. Because of its level terrain, large sites, and good highway access, the Seven Bridges Neighborhood presents the best opportunity to attract larger office and industrial users and those serving national or international markets. In contrast, the South Holmen Drive area is the preferred location for a combination of residential and “smaller-scaled” commercial development (i.e. those uses geared toward serving the local market). These commercial uses will benefit from proximity to a larger residential population, US 53, and existing commercial developments. Retail Market Analysis Table 2.2 provides a Demographic and Income Profile Report for the Holmen region using a drive-time analysis from the intersection of US 53 and South Holmen Drive (roughly the midpoint of the corridor boundary). The approximate area within each of the drive-times is illustrated in Figure 2.10. Note that the 5-minute drive time includes most of the corporate area of the Village, minus the Seven Bridges TIF District, which is mostly undeveloped at this time. Table 2.2: Demographic and Income Profile 5-Minute Drive Time Summary Population

10-Minute Drive Time

20-Minute Drive Time

2011

2016

2011

2016

2011

2016

9,881

10,498

33,268

34,740

107,858

111,112

Median Age

35.3

35.7

37.5

38.0

34.7

35.3

Households

3,740

4,015

13,195

13,920

43,489

45,196

Average Household Size

2.64

2.61

2.51

2.48

2.37

2.35

Owner Occupied Housing Units

2,887

3,107

9,309

9,882

27,370

28,610

Renter Occupied Housing Units

853

908

3,886

4,037

16,118

16,585

$51,386

$62,598

$51,763

$61,832

$43,443

$52,946

Median Household Income

28 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

Appendix A provides a Retail Market Profile for each of the three drive time areas. The report documents the demand (retail potential) and supply (retail sales) for various industry sectors. Demand is the expected amount spent by consumers at retail establishments and supply estimates sales to consumers by establishments. The Retail Gap represents the difference between retail potential and retail sales. Figure 2.10: Drive Time Analysis, US 53 & S. Holmen Dr. Interchange


EXISTING CONDITIONS The Leakage/Surplus Factor presents a snapshot of retail opportunity, it is a measure of the relationship between supply and demand that ranges from +100 (total leakage) to -100 (total surplus). A positive value indicates there is more demand than supply in the area (i.e. consumers are “leaking� outside of the trade area to acquire goods and services). A negative value indicates there is a surplus of retail sales (i.e. consumers are draw in from outside the trade area and demand within the trade area is being met). The following graphs summarize the leakage and surplus by industry group for each of the three drive time areas.

Figure 2.12: Leakage/Surplus Factor by Industry Group, 10-miles

Figure 2.11: Leakage/Surplus Factor by Industry Group, 5-miles

Figure 2.13: Leakage/Surplus Factor by Industry Group, 20-miles

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

29


M

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n Driv Holme South

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CHAPTER THREE


RecommendaƟons

CHAPTER THREE

31 - Land Use / 33 - UƟliƟes / 33 - TransportaƟon / 37 - Streetscaping / 40 - Development Figure 3.1: Proposed Future Land Use Map (modified)

This chapter presents the vision for the future of the South Holmen Drive corridor, which is to establish the Great River Road as an outstanding scenic gateway to and corridor through the Village and Town with high quality public and private buildings, streetscaping, landscaping, and road design; signage guidelines; and scenic views to the Mississippi River Valley. This chapter includes recommendations for preferred land uses, utility extensions, transportation system improvements, streetscaping enhancements, and building and site design standards. This vision will be realized incrementally, over time, through a series of public and private projects. Completion of each project will require specific action steps and a source of funding (refer to Chapter 4).

3.1 LAND USE 1. Amend the Village Comprehensive Plan and Future Land Use Map to match the recommendations in this Plan. Figure 3.1 illustrates the recommended future land use designations for parcels within the corridor. Some key changes, as compared to the Village’s adopted Comprehensive Plan, are described below: •

Eliminated one of the roads across Halfway Creek, as it would be financial infeasible for the Village to build two bridge crossings for the foreseeable future.

The “Single-Family Residential”, “Transitional Residential” , and “Mobile Home Park” classifications have been replaced with “Low-Density Residential” and “Medium to High Density Residential” as the form of buildings and the type of ownership are best regulated through the Village’s Zoning Code and development review process.

Split the “Commercial / Light Industrial” district into “Neighborhood Commercial” and “Highway Commercial” districts to better regulate the intensity of the development, such that the scale and layout of the commercial development fits into the surrounding residential neighborhood.

“Light Industrial” (from “Commercial / Light Industrial” category) and “Manufacturing” have been combined.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

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CHAPTER THREE The Future Land Use categories can be explained by reviewing the development types allowed in each category, as shown on the right. Note that the Town of Onalaska’s Future Land Use map does not need to be amended as the existing policies for the “Urban MixedUse” category are sufficient. However, it is recommended that the Town adopt as an appendix to its Comprehensive Plan this corridor plan to provide additional detail regarding preferred land uses. 2. Prepare and adopt a memorandum of understanding for a boundary agreement. Both the Village and Town have expressed a desire to adopt a boundary agreement. This planning process began with the development of a “potential cooperative boundary line (refer to Figure 1.1). The Village and Town should begin the process of drafting and adopting a boundary agreement that includes recognition that the Village will not annex land outside of the cooperative boundary line for a 10-year or longer period. In exchange for agreeing not to annex the land outside the boundary, the Town should agree to not allow improvements to occur on undeveloped land within the South Holmen Drive corridor at an intensity above agricultural uses unless annexed into the Village. This corridor land use plan should be incorporated into the agreement, which may also include other details regarding provisions of utility or public services, revenue, or cost sharing. An agreed-upon boundary will allow both parties to more efficiently engage in joint land use planning, reduce land use related disputes, and better plan for infrastructure improvements for sewer, water, and other urban amenities.

32 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

PREFERRED LAND USE TYPES BY FUTURE LAND USE CATEGORY

Government / Institutional

Mixed Use

Civic & Cultural uses

Light Industrial • • •

Light Manufacturing High-Tech Research Storage

• • • •

Highway Commercial • • • • • •

Big Box Retailers and Shopping Centers Service & Hospitality businesses Restaurants and Entertainment uses Civic and Cultural uses Professional & Corporate Offices Medical facilities

Gas Station & Convenience Store

Neighborhood Commercial • • •

• • •

Multi-Family Residential (apartment, condos, townhomes, etc.) Live-Work Residential Workforce Housing Assisted Living, Managed Care facilities Small Retail, Restaurant, & Entertainment uses Service & Hospitality businesses Small Professional Offices Civic & Cultural uses

Medium-High Density Residential • • • • • • •

Multi-Family Residential (apartment, condos, townhomes, etc.) Duplexes Small Lot Single-Family Residential Live-Work Residential Workforce Housing Mobile Home Parks (w/ restrictions) Assisted Living, Managed Care facilities Civic & Cultural Uses

Small Retail uses Service & Hospitality businesses Small Restaurants & Entertainment uses • • Small Professional Offices Low Density Residential • Gas Station & Convenience Store • Civic & Cultural uses • Small & Large Lot Single-Family Residential Park • Duplexes • Pedestrian/Bike Trails • Assisted Living, Managed Care • Greenways/Buffers facilities • Utility Installations • Civic & Cultural Uses • Playgrounds Environmental Corridor • Athletic Fields • Pedestrian/Bike Trails • Greenways/Buffer


RECOMMENDATIONS 3.2 PUBLIC UTILITIES Stormwater Utilities Recommendations As infill development occurs, it will be necessary to provide facilities to meet post development stormwater management standards as established by the Village of Holmen, La Crosse County, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), and the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 1. Consider designing and building regional stormwater facilities in the three large undeveloped areas, as shown in Figure 3.1. The major benefits of a regional system include: •

Allowing development to maximize its potential, while maintaining existing stormwater conditions through a regional approach rather than a site-by-site design.

Increasing the marketability of the sites by eliminating some of the “red tape” associated with new construction and redevelopment.

Reducing the overall cost to construct the required stormwater management facilities by condensing into a single facility.

In general, regional facilities need to be located at the lowest point in the collection area they serve and should be sized at roughly 6-12% of the (planned/potential) impervious area being treated. The regional system design incorporates the following assumptions:

The first regional facility would serve approximately 80 acres between Halfway Creek, US 53, and South Holmen Drive (CTH HD). The second would serve approximately 100 acres between the bluff, US 53, and South Holmen Drive (STH 35). The third would serve approximately 60 acres between South Holmen Drive (STH 35), US 53, and existing residential development.

Water & Sanitary Sewer Systems Recommendation 1. Meet current and future demand for water and sanitary sewer services throughout the Corridor (and the Village), following the planned extensions shown in Figure 2.4 and 2.5. As discussed in Chapter 2, the Village has plans for future extensions to both the water and sanitary sewer systems. In general, they are planned underneath existing and proposed roadways (based on the Future Land Use Map in the Village’s Comprehensive Plan). Sizing of most of the planned pipes are undetermined, and will need further review when extensions are desired/needed based on the intensity of development. See Section 2.2 for more details.

3.3 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM As discussed in Chapter 2, South Holmen Drive is a transitional roadway with both a two lane rural segment and a four lane urban segment. Future transportation improvement projects are designed to manage land use access, reduce the potential for crashes, improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities, while improving the overall aesthetics of the corridor as a major gateway into the Village. The transportation system recommendations are described below and illustrated in Figure 3.2 on page 34.

Peak discharge rate control is provided on a regional basis. That is to say that the cumulative peak flows leaving the development areas are maintained at current levels for the requisite design storms.

Infiltration requirements will be met using on-site facilities.

General Recommendations

Other stormwater management requirements such as oil and grease control will be met using on-site facilities, as appropriate.

1. Adopt an Official Transportation Map. The Village of Holmen should create and adopt an Official Transportation Map which includes the planned transportation facilities recommended in this plan, as well

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CHAPTER THREE as facilities shown in other Village planning documents. An Official Map shows the approximate location and width of future street rightof-way. It is used to inform property owners that identified lands may be required for future streets, and it establishes the Village’s right to acquire that land by dedication or purchase. 2. Monitor US 53 on/off ramps and current/future intersections within the corridor, considering traffic controls as needed. In general, the corridor’s intersections function with little to no issues; however, future growth along the corridor may lead to future congestion. If they become inefficient and/or unsafe in moving pedestrian and vehicle traffic through them, consider more controlled intersections.

South Holmen Drive (STH 35) Recommendations In 2014, WisDOT plans to reconstruct STH 35 between Popular Street (in the City of Onalaska) to CTH OT (in the Town of Onalaska). The design will significantly improve intersection/driveway access with STH 35, introduce auxiliary lanes (which will make it safer for bicycle movement), and add a grass ditch median. However, during this planning process it became apparent there could be a few minor alterations to the WisDOT design that could benefit the entire corridor. These changes will need to be discussed with WisDOT prior to their final designs. 1. Build a multi-use path along the eastern side of STH 35 from CTH OT (southern intersection) to CTH OT (northern intersection). This path will help connect two existing multi-use paths from the Great River State Trail (near the CTH XX and CTH OT intersection) to Hollands Bluff

34 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

Path (near McHugh Rd), as illustrated in Figure 3.1 (on page 31). There are currently minimal driveway conflicts along this stretch, and future development should look to use shared driveways to minimize any future driveway conflicts. The path should be a minimum of 8 feet with 10-12 feet recommended. Asphalt is recommended, as it provides a smoother ride (no expansion joints). 2. Build a multi-use path along the south/west side of CTH OT (southern intersection) to proposed connection to the Great River State Trail. This will allow bikers/pedestrians to enjoy both trails and potentially bring new visitors into the Village.

er Great Riv

il State Tra

3. Add crosswalks where the bike path crosses any roadway, especially at the CTH OT (south) intersection. Consider crosswalk width, material usage, and location when designing safe crosswalks for multiple users. It is recommended that the CTH OT (south) intersection’s crosswalk be stained (rather than striped) to clearly identify pedestrian/biker movement across STH 35.

South Holmen Drive (CTH HD) Recommendations 1. Explore the merits of a jurisdictional transfer or maintenance agreement of CTH HD (South Holmen Drive from McHugh to US 53) to the Village of Holmen. The jurisdictional transfer would allow the Village to have complete control over the improvements recommended in this corridor. As an alternative, the Village and the County could agree to a long term agreement for construction and maintainance of any landscaped medians and multi-use path.


RECOMMENDATIONS 2. Build a landscaped boulevard with curb and gutter between the US 53 interchange to McHugh Road. This recommendation can be completed prior to road reconstruction; however, it may be more cost effective to wait until the road is being redesigned and reconstructed. This will enhance the overall aesthetics of the corridor, as a curbed median allows for additional streetscaping features (discussed in Section 3.4), lighting, and stormwater management. 3. Build a multi-use path along the eastern side of South Holmen Drive between McHugh Road to CTH OT (northern intersection). This path will complete the connection between existing paths from the Great River State Trail to Holland Bluffs Trail (near McHugh Road). The key points to consider when designing the path are: •

The existing 5-foot sidewalk from Hale Drive to McHugh Road could be extended by 3-7 feet to allow for multiple users. It is recommended that any extension matches the current sidewalk material, or asphalt is applied across the entire path, so that it is cohesive (not patchy) and the ride is smoother. The existing grass area between the roadway and the sidewalk should remain to create a buffer between the pedestrian and vehicle movements (following AASHTO standards). There are minimal driveway conflicts along this stretch, and future development should look to use shared driveways to minimize any future driveway conflicts.

The Village will need to work with WisDOT in order to cross underneath the US 53 overpass, especially because it may require changes to the overpass embankment.

A bike path connection should be provided between the South Holmen Drive path and the Halfway Creek Path, as shown on the right.

Halfw a y Cr eek T rail

To promote safety and convenience of the bike route, stop signs for vehicles and caution/yield signs for bicyclists should be provided at crossings that have a great potential for conflict (e.g. commercial driveways).

Place a “Yield to Pedestrians” sign at bridge crossings that do not meet AASHTO standards (eight feet minimum).

Place bike route signage along the path and directional route signage to the path along intersecting streets.

4. Bury overhead wires, where feasible. Overhead wires and utility poles create extra clutter along the roadway. They also affect the type and placement of trees along the corridor, as tree limbs must remain well below the overhead wires. 5. Build a 5-foot sidewalk on the western side of South Holmen Drive between Empire and the interchange. This will promote development, enhance the corridor, and provide safe pedestrian movement; however, the need for this facility is completely dependent on private development. The sidewalk should be installed if a significant portion of South Holmen Drive gets developed or the

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

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CHAPTER THREE proposed road connecting Gaarder and future extension of Greeno gets constructed (see Figure 3.1). It is also recommended a connection be built at the bridge, connecting Halfway Creek Path to South Holmen Drive. 6. Clearly mark crosswalks at major intersections using either stained or stamped concrete. Align crosswalks with sidewalks to clarify movement patterns. As described in Holmen’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Plan, consider moving the pedestrian beacon near Amy Drive to the Sunset Drive intersection, or adding pedestrian signals at Sunset Drive (as shown above). 7. Provide accessible pedestrian actuated signal devices (i.e. push buttons) to signalized intersections within the corridor, especially at Gaarder (McHugh already has push buttons). In addition, countdown timers (see page 21 for an example) should be considered at existing crossings with high-levels of pedestrian movement (i.e. McHugh/Main intersection) and are required on reconstructed or new signalized intersections incorporating push buttons. 8. Work with La Crosse County to reduce the 45 miles per hour speed limit, especially from Hale Drive to McHugh Road. The current speed limit is unsafe and uncomfortable for pedestrian and vehicle movement along and across South Holmen Drive. As the community continues to grow and the corridor gets more developed, the 45 mph speed limit will become more dangerous for all users. Public and local official comments suggest a lower speed is warranted in this stretch of South Holmen Drive. An engineering and traffic investigation must be conducted to determine a reasonable and safe speed limit.

36 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

Figure 3.2: Proposed Streetscaping & Transportation Facilities Map


RECOMMENDATIONS 3.4 STREETSCAPING One of the major objectives of this plan is to heighten the awareness and brand this stretch of roadway as a component of the Great River Road, including aesthetic enhancements that make it more appealing to residents, visitors/shoppers, and potential developers. Figure 3.2 (on page 36) and the recommendations listed below suggest improvements the Village can make to meet this objective. See Appendix C for WisDOT Planting Guidelines.

Holmen Drive (southbound)

Holmen Drive (northbound)

S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

#8

High School

S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

#7

#9

1. Upgrade the wayfinding system along all arterials with access to US 53 (North Holmen Drive, South Holmen Drive, McHugh Road, CTH OT). This will improve the existing sign network to guide travelers from major highway interchanges to key attraction within Holmen. The recommended system incorporates Village “districts” (i.e. South Holmen Business, Seven Bridges, Downtown, etc.) that will be color coded for easy deciphering by travelers. Each district wayfinding signage will direct travelers to nearby destinations/attractions, as well as other districts within the Village. The illustration to the right demonstrates the recommended signage within the South Holmen Drive corridor. It follows the standards required on State Highways, which limits signs to three attractions/destinations (see 2009 edition of Manual on Uniform Traffic Controls Devices). If more destinations are desired (only for signs not located on STH 35), we recommend there be no more than five. Additional signage following this same format would be provided in the other districts created. It is important to include the Holmen Districts sign near all the Village’s US 53 interchanges (Sign #1). Locations of these proposed signs are provided in Figure 3.2.

Halfway Creek

#10

Trailhead

Middle School

#18 S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

#11

Halfway Creek Trailhead Compost Site

High School S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

#5

Compost Site

#12

Compost Site

S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

McHugh Road (eastbound)

Great River Road Trailhead

S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

#20

Middle School

Post Office

Compost Site Halfway Creek Trailhead

#14 #15

#1

#19

Post Office

#13 S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

#2

Gaarder Road (eastbound)

Post Office

Halfway Creek Trailhead

#4 #3

#17

Compost Site

High School

#6

Middile School

Middle School

S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

Wayfinding Signage

CTH OT (westbound)

* This sign is posted twice (before and after US 53 interchage)

#16

#21 McHugh Road (westbound) S. HOLMEN BUSINESS

#22

High School

#23

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

37


CHAPTER THREE Gateway / Welcome Signage 1. Add a gateway feature at the McHugh/Holmen intersection with an electronic message sign displaying community events. The feature should be large enough to be noticed by travelers moving at 35 miles per hour, but it should not interfere with the intersection’s view triangle. Two examples are shown on the right. 2. As the corridor and Village expands, the existing Holmen Sign (across from Cole Court intersection) should move south of its current location to better represent Holmen’s village limits. As the land north of the interchange develops, the sign should be moved to the northeast quadrant of the interchange near the US 53 off-ramp along South Holmen Drive. If the Village were to expand to the CTH OT (southern) intersection, the Village should consider moving it the northeast corner of that intersection. Actual siting of these locations will need WisDOT approval, as they are within the State Highway’s right-of-way.

help beautify the corridor. Possible locations include the intersections of McHugh Road, future extension of Greeno (see Future Land Use Map), and CTH OT (both intersections). The image below provides an example of this designation signage.

Light Fixtures 1. Replace existing light fixtures with dark-sky compliant decorative fixtures with banners, such as the example shown on the right. This will improve the overall aesthetics of the corridor and call attention to the Great River Road and the Village of Holmen. Banners are very welcoming and shows that a community has pride in their Village. Additionally banners can introduce and inform travelers of upcoming events planned in the community. 2. Add additional decorative street lights on South Holmen Drive in sections currently unlit (primarily between Empire and the interchange). Illuminating this stretch of South Holmen Drive will make it safer for vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists traveling through the corridor, especially as the corridor continues to develop and traffic increases. Another benefit of lighting this section is it will call attention to South Holmen Drive from US 53, potentially enticing new development in the corridor. Banners used from Empire Road to McHugh Road should be affixed to these light fixtures as well. Street light electrical wires should be buried underground to eliminate some of the clutter.

Street Furniture Road Designation Signage 1. Add Great River Road signage within the boulevard at any point where new interchange traffic could intersect South Holmen Drive. This will uniquely identify the Great River Road and the Village of Holmen, as well as

38 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

1. Consider adding a few benches and trash receptacles along South Holmen Drive once the proposed multi-use path is built. Benches provide opportunities for bicyclists and pedestrians to rest, and adds to the overall character and activities within the corridor. Trash receptacles will help to keep the corridor clean. Both pieces of furniture should complement each other, as well as the decorative lighting selected for the corridor, in style, design and color in order to enforce a common theme and look in the corridor. Incorporating Great River Road markers is also recommended.


RECOMMENDATIONS

1. Provide screening along STH 35 in front of West Avenue between Sunset Drive and Derek Avenue. It is recommended that a decorative wall be built with flowers/shrubs at the base to soften the edges of the wall. The wall will shield the residences from South Holmen Drive, reducing noise and visual impacts, and will enhance the experience for travelers along South Holmen Drive. 2. Provide additional screening along South Holmen Drive (STH 35) in front of the mobile home parks. This will shield the residences from STH 35, reducing noise and visual impacts, and will enhance the experience for travelers along STH 35. Landscape berms with trees, shrubs, and/or flowers is recommended. Use of evergreens is strongly encouraged, as they provide the most coverage year round.

n Drive Holme

Public Landscaping

3. Add landscaping elements and (potentially) an et “iconic” structure e r in the public rightSt n of-way between ai M South Holmen Drive and Main Street (just north of Hale Drive). This publicly-owned land provides a good opportunity to introduce travelers to Holmen, and potentially to downtown Holmen. As shown in the image on the right, the open grass area could be transformed with street trees, walkways, plaza space (with information kiosk, including Great River Road interpretive marker), and a signature arch with either “Holmen, WI” or “TO DOWNTOWN”. Other iconic features could be a clock tower, water feature (i.e. fountain), or a sculpture piece. At a minimum, adding street trees and a line of shrubs surrounding the exposed utility pipes would help beautify this open grass area between the two streets.

South

2. Provide bike racks at major destinations and near large parking lots. If a multi-use path is built, it is important to provide places for people to lock their bikes up; otherwise, they will use trees, utility poles, etc. or they may not stop at all. Bike racks should be designed to allow the frame to be locked directly to the rack, as shown in the image above.

Example from Oconomowoc, WI

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

39


CHAPTER THREE 4. Add shrubs and minimal trees within the proposed medians from the US 53 interchange to McHugh Road. Additional vegetation in the median will improve the aesthetics of the corridor and adding to the perception of the roadway as a community boulevard rather than a highway boulevard. For WisDOT median planting guidelines, see Appendix C. In all proposed planting areas non-native and drought intolerant vegetation should be avoided.

3.5 PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT Two objectives of this Plan are to enhance the overall aesthetics of the corridor, including private development, and to foster new investment. An important step for the Village is to market land that has high marketability for businesses and services currently in need within the Holmen area. The design of this new (re)development should also meet the highquality design proposed for public investment within this Plan, which the Village and Town both desire.

(Re)development Opportunities 1. Market private redevelopment in areas currently under-utilized. Within the corridor there are many undeveloped parcels, as well a few under-performing developed parcels. As discussed in the Existing Conditions (see Chapter 2), parcels that are strong candidates for (re)development are either for sale, vacant, have low improvement value (relative to land value), and/or have buildings that are in poor condition. Figure 3.3 illustrates the reinvestment opportunities within the corridor. •

Red parcels are the most viable for (re)development, as they are currently for sale (as of April 2011).

•

Pink parcels are also quite viable for (re)development, as they do not have structures on the site.

•

Orange parcels are viable for (re)development, but do have buildings on the site and are not currently for sale; however, the improvements (buildings) have less value than the land (see Figure 2.8).

40 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

Figure 3.3: (Re)Development Opportunities Map


RECOMMENDATIONS •

Yellow parcels are least viable for redevelopment, as the parcels are not for sale and have buildings with value (relative to land values); however, the building exteriors are in poor condition (see Figure 2.7) and would benefit from investment, at least to improve the exterior appearance.

Corridor Design Standards 1. Holmen should adopt the South Holmen Drive Corridor Design Standards and amend their zoning ordinance and map to include a design overlay district. Design Standards establishes regulations that can govern both building and site design. Design Standards present a clear picture of the potential for development and desired design character. They help prospective developers envision what the site, business, or neighborhood will look like in the future, and gives them guidance in crafting plans for their own site and building. It also makes the development approval process more predictable for developers.

RECOMMENDATIONS the Town will have completed the first step which is to create the design guidelines. The second step of implementing the guidelines through creation of a design overlay district will depend on whether a formal boundary agreement is finalized between the Village and Town. If an agreement can be reached, it may not be necessary for either the Town or County to adopt a design overlay district since land within the corridor will be limited to new development without annexation to the Village, which will retain a design overlay district.

The Design Standards are bound as a separate document in a handbook format for use by property owners to design improvements to their parcels and by staff and Plan Commission to evaluate proposals. The standards address a broad range of site and building design issues and include a mix of required items (“standards”) and items that are encouraged, sometimes strongly encouraged, but are not required (“recommendations”). See Appendix B for the Design Standards Handbook. 2. Adoption of the Design Standards by the Town of Onalaska. One of the economic development actions detailed in the Town’s Comprehensive Plan is to “create design guidelines for commercial buildings, sites, signs, landscaping, etc to address the appearance of properties abutting” the Great River Road. The plan described working with La Crosse County to create appropriate mixed-use zoning districts and design standards to implement the goal of creating an attractive Great River Road. By adopting this plan

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

41


CHAPTER FOUR


AcƟon Plan

CHAPTER 4

43 - AcƟon Steps Summary / 43 - PotenƟal Funding Sources This plan is a guide to help Village/Town officials and economic development professionals attract and direct investment along the South Holmen Drive Corridor. The desired vision for this portion of the Great River Road cannot be created overnight. However, by incrementally implementing the recommendations within this plan the corridor can become the outstanding scenic gateway both communities desire. Implementation will take coordination between the Village and Town.

4.1 ACTION STEPS SUMMARY Table 4.1 (on the next page) provides a summary of the recommendations described in Chapter 3, including a designation of those committees with oversight responsibilities and a preferred time frame for completion. Implementation timelines are categorized into short-, medium-, and longterm horizons based on factors such as: •

Whether the recommendation is tied to new development – extensions of water or sewer utilities or the construction of regional stormwater facilities will, for the most part, occur as the market dictates.

Whether the project requires any design or construction services – those that do are unlikely to be completed in 2012.

Whether the proposed improvement is within public or private property – projects that are within the existing public right-of-way, or that require minimal property acquisition, should be quicker to implement.

Opportunities for coordination with the WisDOT’s planned reconstruction of STH 35 in 2014 – road reconstruction projects are usually the best time to make infrastructure or streetscaping improvements.

Probable cost – projects with higher costs are likely to take longer to implement.

Costs identified are preliminary estimates made prior to design considerations, or engineering studies, and typically do not assume any public property acquisition. In nearly every case, more detailed planning, engineering, and budgeting will be necessary before decisions are made to complete individual projects. In addition, particular recommendations may be modified or only partially implemented depending on available funding. The estimates are a starting point which can be used to aid in grant applications or future municipal budgets. In addition, as a means of adding to the local economy, the projects should be completed using materials and contractors within the region.

4.2 POTENTIAL FUNDING SOURCES Funding to complete proposed projects will come from six broad sources: •

General Municipal Funding – It is assumed that some general municipal funds/borrowing will be required to assist with the completion of projects or as a matching source for state or federal grants (e.g. wayfinding, signage, or streetscaping projects).

Special Assessments – Particular projects that benefit individual properties (e.g. water, sewer, or sidewalk installations) could be funded through special assessments whereby the Village recoups initial design and construction costs through increased real estate taxes on those properties for a set period of time.

Holmen’s Stormwater Utility / Utility Providers – Holmen’s existing Stormwater Utility could be used as a source of funding to design and construct proposed regional stormwater facilities. In addition, utility providers could provide economic development incentives through direct financial support, energy assistance, or efficiency incentives.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

43


CHAPTER FOUR Figure 4.1: Action Plan

ACTION LU-1

Amend Comprehensive Plans to include recommendations from this corridor plan. (Plan Commission)

LU-2

Prepare and adopt a memorandum of understanding for a potential boundary agreement. (Joint Local Officials Committee)

UTL-1

Design and build regional stormwater facilities near the US 53 interchange to serve new development. (Public Works Committee)

UTL-2

Extend water and sewer laterials to new development. (Public Works Committee)

TS-1

TS-4 TS-5

Add crosswalks where the bike path crosses any roadway, especially at the CTH OT (south) intersection. (Public Works Committee)

TS-6

Explore merits of a jurisdictional transfer or maintenance agreement of CTH HD to the Village. (Plan Commission, Village Board)

TS-7

Build a landscaped boulevard with curb and gutter between the US 53 interchange and McHugh Road. (Public Works Committee)

TS-7

Build a multi-use path along the eastern side of South Holmen Drive between McHugh Road to CTH OT (northern intersection). (Public Works Committee)

TS-8

Bury overhead wires where feasible. (Public Works Committee)

TS-9

Build a 5-foot sidewalk on the western side of South Holmen Drive between Empire and the US 53 interchange. (Public Works Committee)

TS-3

MIDTERM

LONGTERM

2012

2013-2015

2015-2022+

ESTIMATED COST $0-$1,000 $10,000-$15,000 $5,000-$8,000 per acre served

--- As Needed ---

Create and adopt an Official Transportation Map. (Public Works Committee) Monitor US 53 on/off ramps and current/future intersections within the corridor, considering traffic controls as needed. (Public Works Committee) Build a multi-use path along the eastern side of STH 35 from CTH OT (southern intersection) to CTH OT (northern intersection). (Public Works Committee) Build a multi-use path along the south/west side of CTH OT (southern intersection) to proposed connection to the Great River State Trail. (Public Works Committee)

TS-2

SHORTTERM

$200-$400 / L.F. Staff Time

--- As Needed ---

Variable $600,000 - $800,00 (Hale Dr.) $15-$30 / L.F. $15-$30 / L.F. $5-$10 / L.F.

--- On Going ---

Unknown Variable $15-$30 / L.F. Variable $15-$30 / L.F.

Clearly mark crosswalks at major intersections using either paint or stamped concrete. (Public Works Committee)

--- As Needed ---

$5-$10 / L.F.

--- As Needed ---

$8,000-$10,000 (retrofit w/ push buttons) $4,000 (retrofit w/ countdown timers)

STS-7

Provide push buttons to signalized intersections within the corridor, especially at Gaarder. Consider countdown timers, especially at McHugh. (Public Works Committee) Work with La Crosse County to reduce the 45 miles per hour speed limit, especially from Hale Drive to McHugh. An engineering and traffic investigation would be needed to lower the speed limit. (Public Works Committee) Upgrade the wayfinding system along all arterials with access to US 53 (North Holmen Drive, South Holmen Drive, McHugh Road, CTH OT). (Public Works Committee) Add a gateway feature at the McHugh/Holmen intersection with an electronic message sign displaying community events. (Public Works Committee) As the corridor and Village expands, the existing Holmen Sign (across from Cole Court intersection) should move south of its current location to better represent Holmen's village limits. (Public Works Committee) Add Great River Road signage within the boulevard at any point where new interchange traffic could intersect South Holmen Drive. (Public Works Committee) Replace existing light fixtures with dark-sky compliant decorative fixtures with banners. (Public Works Committee) Add additional decorative street lights on South Holmen Drive in sections currently unlit (primarily between Empire Street and the US 53 interchange). (Public Works Committee) Consider adding a few benches and trash receptacles along South Holmen Drive once the proposed multi-use path is built. (Public Works Committee)

STS-8

Provide bike racks at major destinations and near large parking lots. (Public Works Committee)

$500-$1,500 ea

STS-9

Provide screening along STH 35 in front of West Avenue between Sunset Drive and Derek Avenue. (Public Works Committee)

$50,000-$75,000

Provide additional screening along STH 35 in front of the mobile home parks. (Public Works Committee)

$15,000-$30,000

TS-10 TS-11 TS-12 STS-1 STS-2 STS-3 STS-4 STS-5 STS-6

STS-10 STS-11 STS-12

$4,000-$6,000 $100-$500 per sign $20,000-$40,000 Staff Time $100-$500 per sign $1,000-$2,000 ea $1,000-$2,000 ea $500-$1,500 ea

Add landscaping elements and (potentially) an "iconic" structure in the public right-of-way between South Holmen Drive and S. Main Street (just north of Hale Drive). (Public Works Committee) Add shrubs and minimal trees within the proposed medians from the US 53 interchange to McHugh Road. (Public Works Committee)

D-1

Market private redevelopment in areas currently under-utilized. (Redevelopment Authority)

D-2

Adopt the South Holmen Drive Corridor Design Standards as a new overlay zoning district. (Planning Commission)

44 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

$50,000-$100,000 $20,000-$40,000

--- On Going ---

Variable Staff Time


ACTION PLAN •

Tax Increment Financing (TIF) /Business Improvement District (BID) – The Village could create a TIF District along portions of South Holmen Drive to establish a source of funding to complete streetscaping, infrastructure, or business recruitment projects. The most likely area for a new TIF district would be the undeveloped land around the US 53 interchange. Currently the Village is limited in its ability to create a TIF district within this area as the land is within the Town of Onalaska. However, TIF laws in Wisconsin allow Towns that have cooperative boundary agreements with municipalities the ability to create TIF Districts. This option could be explored further if the need arises.

The Village could also create a Business Improvement District (BID) for the area from McHugh Road to US 53. A BID is a defined area within which businesses pay an additional tax or fee in order to fund improvements within the district’s boundaries. A BID could be used to fund construction of streetscaping enhancements or to fund marketing initiatives.

Private Donations, Developers/Impact Fees – Some of the wayfinding projects (e.g. community/business kiosks or gateway signs) could be partially or fully funded through private donations, public fund raising, or cost sharing with the Holmen Civic and Commerce Association. Funding for other infrastructure projects can also be offset by using funds from impact fees the Village collects as part of the approval of new development in the corridor.

State and Federal Grants – There are many different state or federal grants that may be able to offset the costs of some of the identified projects. Holmen is restricted from applying to some grant programs because the average household incomes in the community are above eligibility criteria. Those that the Village/ Town may have a higher success rate obtaining funding from are listed in the subsequent tables. From that list, the two grant programs that most closely fit with the recommendations of this plan are the WisDOT Transportation Enhancement (TE) Grant and the National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grant program.

Funding Programs By Category Transportation National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants x A project should benefit the byway traveler’s experience, whether it will help manage the intrinsic qualities that support the byway’s designation, shape the byway’s story, interpret the story for visitors or improve visitor facilities along the byway. There are eight categories of eligible project activities: x State and Indian Tribe x Corridor Management Plan Implementation x Safety Improvements x Byway Facilities x Access to Recreation x Resource Protection x Interpretive Information x Marketing Program SAFETEA - Transportation Enhancements (TE) Grant Eligible Projects: x Provision of facilities for pedestrians/bicycles x Provision of safety and educational activities for pedestrians & bicyclists x Preservation of abandoned railway corridors (including the conversion and use thereof for pedestrian or bicycle trails) x Historic Preservation x Rehabilitation/operation of historic transportation buildings (including historic railroad facilities and canals)* x Establishment of transportation museums x Acquisition of scenic easements and scenic or historic sites x Scenic or historic highway programs (including the provision of tourist and welcome center facilities) x Landscaping and other scenic beautification x Control and removal of outdoor advertising x Environmental mitigation of water pollution due to highway run-off or reduce vehicle caused wildlife mortality x Archeological planning and research State Infrastructure Bank Program Grant (SIB) x Provide low interest loans, loan guarantees, interest rate subsidies, lease-buy back options and other financial leveraging instruments that helps communities provide for transportation infrastructure improvements to preserve, promote and encourage economic development or to improve transportation efficiency and mobility. Eligible Projects Include: x Improve an interchange for a new industrial park or commercial development; enhance a road leading up to a contaminated (brownfields) property; provide for better access to facilitate increased auto or truck traffic near commercial or industrial sites; repair or reconstruct a bridge linking downtown businesses with a major state highway(s); provide signal lights, turn lanes and pedestrian walkways a busy highway intersection; construct or widen a road linking an intermodal facility, (i.e. airport, harbor, railroad); widen a highway to improve safety and truck movements for a warehousing/distribution center; and construct parking facilities; bicycle lanes and pedestrian walk-ways to better facilitate customer traffic on or near retail centers and tourist attractions.

Maximum Award

Program funding varies each year; 20% local match funds required.

Application Due Date

No regularly scheduled deadline

Granting Agency

Federal Highway Administration

(January 8, 2012 was the most recent deadline)

Construction projects must be $200,000 and over. All other projects must be $25,000 (federal share) and over. Reimbursement program to project sponsor. 20% local match funds required.

April of even years

WisDOT

Loan Program

60 days loan approval, project agreement in place prior to authorization for construction

WisDOT

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CHAPTER FOUR Funding Programs By Category Local Roads Improvement Program (LRIP) Grant x County Highway Improvement (CHIP); Town Road Improvement (TRIP); and Municipal Street Improvement (MSIP). Three additional discretionary programs (CHIP-D, TRIP-D and MSIP-D) allow municipalities to apply for additional funds for high-cost road projects. x Eligible projects include but are not limited to: x Design or Feasibility Studies x Reconstruction x Resurfacing x Bridge Replacement or Rehabilitation x Asphalt Purchasing Transportation Economic Assistance Program (TEA) Grant x Road, rail, harbor and airport projects that attract employers to Wisconsin or encourage business and industry to remain and expand in the state. Bicycle/Pedestrian Bicycle & Pedestrian Facilities Program (BPFP) x To construct or plan for bicycle or bicycle/pedestrian facility projects. The statutory language specifically excludes pedestrianonly facilities, such as sidewalks, and streetscaping type projects. x Note: Because of the similarities between the BPFP and the Transportation Enhancements (TE) program objectives and eligibility criteria, applications and funding for both programs are undertaken together. Safe Routes to School (SRTS) x Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs encourage children ages K-8 to walk and bike to school by creating safer walking and biking routes. x Eligible projects/activities must focus on children in kindergarten through eighth grades. Projects must be within a two-mile radius of any elementary or middle school.

Parks and Recreation Recreational Trails Program Grant x Eligible projects include: maintenance and restoration of existing trails, development and rehabilitation of trailside and trailhead facilities and trail linkages, construction of new trails, and acquisition of easement or property for trails. x May only be used on trails which have been identified in or which further a specific goal of a local, county or state trail plan included or reference in a statewide comprehensive outdoor recreation plan required by the federal LAWCON. Land and Water Conservation Fund (LAWCON) x This fund is used to implement projects that are identified by both the local and the state Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan. x In general, land acquisition, development, and renovation projects for public outdoor recreation purposes are eligible LWCF projects. LWCF does not include the “nature-based outdoor recreation� restriction that the Stewardship Local Assistance Programs do. /

46 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

/

Maximum Award

Application Due Date

Granting Agency

Distributed by LRIP Committee Reimbursement program requiring 50% local match.

Biennial program; Due November 1 of odd number years.

WisDOT

Awards up to $1,000,000. 50% local match funds required.

Continual

WisDOT

Construction projects must be $200,000 and over. Bicycle and pedestrian planning projects must cost $50,000 or more.

April of even years

WisDOT

Reimbursement program; 100% funded. Infrastructure project must be $25,000 and over; noninfrastructure projects must be $10,000 and over.

March

WisDOT

Up to 50% of the total project costs of a recreational trail project. Payments are reimbursements on costs incurred after project approval.

May 1

WIDNR

50% local match required

May 1

WIDNR


ACTION PLAN Funding Programs By Category Knowles-Nelson Stewardship Program The Stewardship Program was established in 1989 to preserve Wisconsin’s most significant land and water resources for future generations and to provide the land base and recreational facilities needed for quality outdoor experiences. These goals are achieved by acquiring land and easements for conservation and recreation purposes, developing and improving recreational facilities, and restoring wildlife habitat. This is an umbrella program that funds the following grants: Aids for the Acquisition and Development of Local Parks (ADLP) x Helps to buy land or easements and develop or renovate local park and recreation area facilities for nature-based outdoor recreation purposed (e.g., trails, fishing access, and park support facilities). Urban Green Space (UGS) x Helps to buy land or easements in urban or urbanizing area to preserve the scenic and ecological values of natural open spaces for nature-based outdoor recreation, including non-commercial gardening. Urban Rivers (UR) x Helps to buy land on or adjacent to river flowing through urban or urbanizing areas to preserve or restore the scenic and environmental values of riverways for nature-based outdoor recreation. Acquisition of Development Rights Grants (ADR) x Helps to buy development rights (easements) for the protection of natural, agricultural, or forestry values, that would enhance naturebased outdoor recreation. Public Facilities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Public Facilities for Economic Development (CDBG-PFED) x Eligible activities are improvements to public facilities such as water systems, sewerage systems, and roads that are owned by a general or special purpose unit of government, and which will principally benefit businesses, and which as a result will induce businesses to create jobs and invest in the community. General Loan Program State Trust Funds Loan Program x School Districts and municipalities may borrow money from the State Trust Fund Loan Program for a wide variety of purposes including buildings, roads, water and sewer facilities, equipment, recreational facilities, industrial development, or other public purposes.

Maximum Award

Application Due Date

Granting Agency

50% local match required

May 1

WIDNR

$750,000 maximum award

Continuous

WEDC

Municipalities are authorized to borrow up to 5% of the unit's equalized valuation

No application deadline

Wisconsin Department of Justice Board of Commissioners of Public Lands

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

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APPENDIX A: Retail Market Profile B: Site & Building Design Handbook C: State Planting Guidelines

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN MARCH 2012 DRAFT PLAN PREPARED BY: MSA PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, INC.


APPENDIX A

2

VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


MARKET PROFILE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

3


APPENDIX A

4

VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


MARKET PROFILE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

5


APPENDIX A

6

VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


MARKET PROFILE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

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APPENDIX B

S. HOLMEN DRIVE DESIGN STANDARDS VILLAGE OF HOLMEN, WI

ADOPTED MAY 10, 2012

Created with assistance from MSA Professional Services, Inc.


Table of Contents 2-6 3.

Administra on

4.

Design Districts

5.

Terms

ADMINISTRATION

7-14

Street Rela onship

8.

Parking Areas

10.

Landscaping

11.

Exterior Ligh ng

12.

Storage, Service, & Smoking Areas

13.

Stormwater Management

15-21

BUILDING DESIGN

15.

Scale & Ar cula on

16.

Roofline

17.

Street Level & Secondary Facades

18.

Windows & Doors

19.

Projec ons

20.

Signage

21.

Colors & Materials

LAND USE SPECIFIC

23.

Mixed Use / Retail

24.

Big Box Commercial

25.

Light Industrial

26.

Mul -Family Residen al

27-33 Village of Holmen, WI

SITE DESIGN

7.

23-26

2

ADMINISTRATION

CHECKLIST


Administra on Review Process Applicants should review this Handbook at the beginning of the design process and are encouraged to meet with the Village Administrator to discuss the project. The following items must be submi ed for review, unless the Village Administrator determines that they are not needed because the project is limited in scope: Design Standards Checklist (see last pages of Handbook)

Illustra ons, diagrams, samples, and spec sheets

Site Plan showing all of the important features planned for the site, including, as applicable: trash/recycling containers placement, pedestrian pathways, vehicular parking/circula on, landscaping, stormwater management features, and ligh ng

Village staff completes an ini al review and the Village Administrator is authorized to approve those applica ons that both meet the standards and require no addi onal permit approval by the Village. Applica ons determined by staff to NOT meet the standards, that require a site plan, and/ or that require addi onal zoning or building permit approval will be forwarded to the Plan Commission for their review with any applicable staff notes. The applicant will be informed of the outcome of this ini al review within five (5) business days of submi al and may decide at that me to withdraw or revise the submi al or to proceed to Plan Commission review. Submissions must be made thirty (30) days before a Plan Commission mee ng. Applicants that wish to appeal the decision of Plan Commission may do so to the Village Board. Requests for appeal should be made to the Village Administrator.

The Design Standards apply to all parcels (excluding single-family uses) in the South Holmen Drive Corridor Overlay Design Standards District, but they DO NOT compel unplanned modifica ons. Property owners or leaseholders that modify property must ensure that such modifica ons conform to these standards. It is not the intent of these standards to require altera ons beyond the scope of a proposed change, meaning that, for example, window replacements will not automa cally trigger structural changes or awning changes.

STANDARDS VS. RECOMMENDATIONS Required standards are located in the lower por on of each page, and these standards will be enforced, unless a waiver is granted. Recommenda ons are located in the upper por on of the each page. The property owner/leaseholders are encouraged to conform to the recommenda ons, but they will not be enforced as part of the Village’s Zoning Ordinance.

WAIVERS Applicants that do not believe they can or should follow a standard must nego ate with the Plan Commission for a waiver of that requirement.

ADMINISTRATION

APPLICABILITY

Waivers are granted by the Plan Commission on a case-by-case basis and are decided based on the applicant’s ability to demonstrate one or more of the following condi ons: A) the required design feature cannot be met on the site B) the requirement would create undue hardship for the applicant as compared to other proper es in the district C) the intent of the standards can be successfully met with an alterna ve design

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards

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Design Districts Design District Sub-Areas The Design District is organized into two dis nct zones: Neighborhood Area and Freeway Area. The Design Standards will apply to all proper es within the District, unless a standard specifically states “Neighborhood Area Only”, or “Freeway Area Only”.

ADMINISTRATION

These zones and their accompanying regula ons were developed based on the future land use map and the general land use vision established in the Village’s S. Holmen Drive Corridor Plan (adopted May 10, 2012). The map on the right and descrip ons below explain each of these zones: Neighborhood Area This area includes many of the exis ng commercial and residen al areas along South Holmen Drive. The parcels within these areas are generally smaller and less intensive than those found/planned in the Freeway Area.

Freeway Area This area includes por ons of South Holmen Drive near State Highway 53. The majority of this land is undeveloped and is planned for more intensive uses than in the Neighborhood Area (i.e. highway commercial and mixed use) due to the large lots and proximity to freeway.

INTENT The Holmen South Holmen Drive Corridor Design District is intended to encompass industrial, commercial, mixed use, mulƟ-family residenƟal, and civic properƟes in the South Holmen Drive corridor. All building or site improvement ac vi es normally requiring a permit must conform to the standards defined herein. NOTE: Single-family residenƟal is exempt from these standards.

Handbook Organization The design standards handbook is organized into two parts: 1.

“General” criteria applies to the en re corridor, and

2.

“Land Use Specific” criteria applies to the land use planned for the site/development (i.e. Light Industrial, Mixed Use, Retail, Big Box Commercial, Business, and Mul -Family Residen al)

The “Land Use Specific” criteria is a supplement to the “General” criteria and highlight design elements that are specific to the character and design of each land use district within the South Holmen Drive Corridor Overlay Design District.

4

Village of Holmen, WI


Terms Awning sign

a type of projec ng, on-building sign consis ng of prin ng on fabric or fabric-like sheathing material

Billboard sign

a flat surface, as of a panel, wall or fence on which signs are posted adver sing goods, products, facili es, or services not necessarily on the premises where the sign is located

(o-premise adver sing sign)

Clear glass

glass that is not frosted, nted or obscured in any way, allowing a clear view to the interior of the building

CMU, smooth-faced

a concrete masonry unit, commonly referred to as concrete block, having a smooth exterior finish

EIFS (Exterior Insula on Finishing System)

Footcandle Func onal public entrance Free-standing sign Full-cuto light fixture Ground floor facade

Directly Illuminated Sign

a concrete masonry unit with a textured exterior finish a building product that provides exterior walls with a finished surface, insula on and waterproofing in an integrated composite system a unit of illumina on produced on a surface a building entrance that is unlocked during business hours and is designated for public use any sign which is independent of support from any building

ADMINISTRATION

CMU, split-faced

a light fixture that does not allow light to escape above 90 degrees from ver cal the ground floor por on of the building exterior facing a public street (for measurement purposes, the ground floor facade includes the en re width of the building and the first ten (10) feet above grade) any sign designed to give an ar ficial light directly through any transparent or translucent material from a source of light origina ng within or on such sign.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards

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ADMINISTRATION

Terms

6

a type of free-standing sign whose bo om edge is located within one (1) foot of a ground-mounted pedestal

Monument sign

any parking area that has five (5) or more stalls

Parking lot

the area designated for a single vehicle to park

Parking stall

any free-standing sign which is supported by structures or supports in or upon the ground and independent of support from any building

Pole sign

a type of on-building sign, which is a ached to and projects more than eighteen (18) inches from the building, generally perpendicular from the building face.

Projec ng sign

land reserved for public use, including streets and sidewalks

ROW (Right-of-way)

any sign a ached to, erected on or painted on the wall of a building or structure and projec ng not more than eighteen (18) inches from such wall

Wall Sign

any sign mounted inside a building, either on the window glass, or within two (2) feet of the window, so that the sign can be viewed through a window by the persons outside the building.

Window sign

Village of Holmen, WI


Street Relationship INTENT: To encourage streetscape enhancements that blend the public and private realms, enhancing the pedestrian experience.

Recommendations A. Disabled access should be seamlessly incorporated into the building and site design. Facili es should be designed to provide invi ng access to all users. B. Building placed close to the street and to any street corner is strongly encouraged. If the site has mul ple street corners, place the building nearest the most prominent one (i.e. Holmen Dr).

Standards

2. Freeway Area Only, primary structures fron ng S. Holmen Drive shall be built within one hundred and sixty (160) feet of the front property line (within 80 feet is preferred). Primary structures on lots fron ng any other public street shall be within eighty (80) feet of the front property line. 3. Neighborhood Area Only, within thirty (30) feet of the front property line, parking shall not cover more than fi y (50) percent of the Holmen Drive street frontage. The remainder of this street frontage shall be used for buildings, pa os/decks, landscaping, walkways, stormwater management, and/or signage. 4. Freeway Area Only, within thirty (30) feet of the front property line, parking shall not cover more than eighty (80) percent of the Holmen Drive street frontage. The remainder of this street frontage shall be used for buildings, pa os/ decks, landscaping, walkways, stormwater management, and/or signage. 5. A minimum of one (1) func onal building entrance shall be provided along the building facade facing the street. Buildings that face mul ple streets shall provide an entrance facing the more prominent of the two streets.

Standards #1 & #3: illustrated in image and text below: No Parking Size Limita ons

Up to 30 .

Max 40 .

Max 50% of lot

Building #1 has some parking in front of the building so it may be set back up to 75 ., as long as less than 50% of the front facade is parking. Most of the parking is on the side or rear yards, which has no size limita ons. Building #2 has parking in front which can encompass more than 50% of the front facade, as long as their is a landscaped buer at least 30 feet deep from the front property line.

SITE DESIGN

1. Neighborhood Area Only, primary structures shall be built within forty (40) feet of the front property line, unless the front setback allows for a parking area. If the setback includes parking, the primary structure shall be within eighty (80) feet of the front property line.

The ADA ramp is incorporated in the stair entrance and meets the needs of all users.

Building #3 & #4 have all their parking in the back of the building, which does not have any parking size limita ons. However, the building must be set with 40 feet of the front property line since their is no parking in the front yard.

Example of desired landscaping buer between parking and street.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards

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Parking Areas INTENT: To provide parking lots that are safe for drivers and pedestrians, while mi ga ng the visual and environmental impacts.

Recommendations

Right: examples of good bike racks that allow for u-shape lock to secures the frame to the rack.

A. It is suggested that each building have a minimum of four (4) bicycle parking spaces. B. Bike racks should be designed to allow the frame to be locked directly to the rack.

Le : examples of poor bike racks that do not allow for a lock to secure the bike frame to the rack.

C. Wherever feasible, shared parking lots are encouraged to allow direct vehicular circula on between adjacent parcels. This can be accomplished through the use of access easements and driveways connec ng parking lots. D. Whenever possible, parking areas should be separated into smaller sec ons by using landscaped medians and islands.

SITE DESIGN

E. Whenever possible, parking areas should be placed in the side and rear yards.

Standards The above images show a variety of ways to buffer parking areas from the public sidewalk. The image on the right shows a prohibited condi on along a parking and Prohibited sidewalk edge (no buffer).

HOLMEN DR

Landscape buffering

No more than 20 uninterrupted spaces

20- . MIN

This illustra on meets Standard 4 with medians and parking islands breaking up the parking stalls. Standard 3 is also being met by this illustra on, as there is at least a 20-foot throat depth off of South Holmen Drive and the parking stalls are separated from the public sidewalk by a landscaping divider.

8

Village of Holmen, WI

1. All parking areas of five (5) or more vehicles shall be paved and include concrete curbs along all parking and drive areas. Curbs may feature gaps to allow stormwater flow into infiltra on basins. 2. Parking stalls and drive aisles shall be separated from the public right-of-way and adjacent property lines by a planted landscape buffer. The depth of this buffer shall be at least five (5) feet. 3. Parking lot access driveways to South Holmen Drive shall have a throat depth of twenty (20) feet and be separated from parking stalls by a planted landscaping dividers protected by a concrete curb. 4. Parking lots with rows of more than twenty (20) parking spaces shall be interrupted by a landscape island or median. When trees are planted within the islands, a minimum width of eight (8) feet is preferred.


Parking Areas (cont.)

Standards (cont.) Development #1 Development #2

5. Walkways shall be provided to connect the building entrance(s) to the public sidewalk, if applicable. Walkways that cross parking areas or a drive aisle shall be clearly iden fied, either with different paving materials (such as brick/colored concrete) or with painted crosswalk striping. 6. Neighborhood Area Only, off-street parking in front of the building shall be limited to a doubleloaded parking aisle. 7. Freeway Area Only, front yard parking shall be limited to a two (2) double-loaded parking aisles.

Example of a desired layout in the Freeway Area. Development #1 parking includes doubleloaded parking aisle in the front and rear yards. Development #2 parking includes two doubleloaded parking aisles on the side of the building.

SITE DESIGN

Development #1

Development #2

8. Neighborhood Area Only, parking lots adjacent to residen al proper es shall provide a semiopaque buffer, a minimum of four (4) feet in height, in order to screen out vehicle lights. Screening op ons include a berm with plan ngs, a fence, a line of conifer trees, or a mix of these op ons. A solid fence without landscaping is discouraged.

Example of a desired layout in the Neighborhood Area. Development #1 parking is in the rear yard, and Development #2 parking is one double-loaded aisle on the side of the building. A shared service driveway connects the two developments.

Above are a few alterna ves for parking lot screening adjacent to neighboring residen al proper es.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards

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Landscaping INTENT: To highlight and protect pedestrian routes, guide the safe flow of vehicular traffic, improve the appearance of the parking area, and reduce the nega ve ecological impacts created by parking lots.

Recommendations

SITE DESIGN

A 3-foot high buffer along the public sidewalk defines and separates private parking areas from the public street realm. This improves aesthe c appearance and the pedestrian experience.

A. Yard areas not used for off-street parking are encouraged to be a rac vely landscaped and screening parking/service areas from adjacent proper es. B. Indigenous plants with low water and pes cide needs are strongly encouraged. C. Parking areas, especially in the front yard, should have sufficient landscaping within the parking area or within ten (10) feet of the parking edge. Preferred landscaping include canopy trees (min. 2” caliper), evergreen trees (min 4 .), ornamental trees (min. 5 .), shrubs (min 12”), and rain gardens.

Standards The below images show parking areas that are sufficient landscaped. From top down: landscaping within 10 feet of the parking area, within parking islands, and within a parking median.

1. Plan ngs and low fences located between parking areas and the public street shall not obscure vision between three (3) and eight (8) feet above ground. Trees and bushes that would naturally obscure this zone at maturity shall not be used. 2. All parking lot islands shall be planted and maintained with perennials, shrubs, and/or shade trees. Landscaping should be designed to allow for vehicle overhangs, unless wheel stops are used. 3. One (1) canopy tree shall be planted on the property for every fi y (50) feet of linear street frontage (round decimals up). It shall be placed along the street frontage, between parking and the property line, and/or within parking islands 4. All landscaping shall be completed within twelve (12) months of the issuance of an occupancy permit or final inspec on, in accordance with the approved landscaping plan.

10 Village of Holmen, WI


Exterior Lighting INTENT: To promote effec ve and a rac ve exterior ligh ng that does not produce glare or light pollu on.

Recommendations A. Exterior ligh ng should be designed to complement the character of the building. B. Parking lots and pedestrian walkways should be illuminated uniformly and to the minimum level necessary to ensure safety. A greater number of lower-wa lights may be necessary to achieve this guideline. C. Exterior ligh ng should be energy efficient and should render colors as accurately as possible (i.e. white light rather than green or yellow light). D. Preferred light types include: LED, fluorescent, and high-pressure sodium. Examples of full cutoff fixtures that minimize glare and light pollu on.

1. All exterior building and parking light fixtures shall be full cut-off, except ground ligh ng of the building architectural / landscaping elements are acceptable. Lights directed towards the sky are prohibited. An example of a shielded light fixture that cuts down on light trespass.

2. Parcels abu ng or across the street from residen al or park uses shall not cause light trespass in excess of 0.5 footcandles as measured horizontally, five (5) feet above the ground level at the property line of the affected parcel line. 3. Parking and security ligh ng poles shall not be taller than the maximum allowable building height allowed in the underlying zoning district for the property, or forty (40) feet, whichever is less. For proper es in or abu ng a residen al zoning district, the maximum allowable height shall be twenty-five (25) feet. 4. Spec sheets shall be submi ed with the Design Standards Checklist for each exterior light fixture to be used.

SITE DESIGN

Standards

Prohibited An example of a prohibited non-cutoff light fixture.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 11


Storage & Service Areas INTENT: To improve the appearance of the corridor.

Recommendations A. Shared garbage and recycling facili es are encouraged, where prac cal, as a means to meet screening requirements and preserve access needs. B. Rear yard loading dock and staging areas are strongly encouraged.

Standards

SITE DESIGN

Good examples of how to hide service areas: by a wooden fence with landscaping (upper) or by a brick wall with landscaping (lower).

1. Trash containers, recycling containers, streetlevel mechanical equipment (gas meters, air condi oners, etc.) and roo op mechanical equipment shall be located or screened so that they are not visible from a public street, Halfway Creek, or adjacent proper es. Electrical service boxes are excluded from this requirement (see Standard 2). 2. Placement of service boxes shall be located away from pedestrian zones. Preferred loca ons are in the side or rear yard. 3. Loading dock(s) shall not face South Holmen Drive. Any loading dock facing a residen al property, shall be screened with landscaping and/ or wall not less than six (6) feet in height and integrated with the overall site design and/or building elements. 4. Outdoor storage of products, materials, or equipment is prohibited in the front yard. Shortterm display items or items that are available for purchase by customers are exempt from this standard.

Example of a building facade screening roo op mechanical from ground view.

12 Village of Holmen, WI

5. Screening shall be compa ble with the building architecture, including material pale e and design elements, as well as other site features.


Stormwater Management INTENT: To reduce the nega ve ecological impacts created by parking lots (heat gain, stormwater runoff volume and contaminants).

Recommendations A. Where possible, use rain gardens and bioreten on basins to mi gate run-off and filter pollutants. B. Where large paved areas, such as parking lots, are required, it is recommended that permeable surfaces, pervious asphalt, pervious concrete, or special paving blocks are considered. Generally these permeable services are, at a minimum, being used in parking stalls and walkways. C. Green roofs should be considered. Examples of rain gardens and bioreten on areas within or near parking lots.

Standards

Examples of permeable surfaces: porous concrete (le ) and paving blocks (right).

SITE DESIGN

1. On-site storm water management systems shall meet the of Village’s Erosion Control and Stormwater Management Ordinance (Chapter 56), and Wisconsin Administra ve Code NR 151 (1 acre or greater land disturbance).

Example of a green roof.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 13


INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 14 Village of Holmen, WI


Scale & Articulation INTENT: To establish a consistent theme along the South Holmen Drive corridor that provides visual interest and human scale.

Recommendations A. A full two story building is encouraged (wherever feasible), especially in the Neighborhood Area. B. It is recommended that buildings establish a one-and-a-half story presence along the South Holmen Drive corridor. This can be accomplished by increasing the overall height of the building, by raising a cornice above the roofline, or provide a pitched roof. C. Varying the facade height along extensive blank facades is strongly encouraged.

E. New buildings should establish ver cal propor ons for the street facade, and for the elements within that facade (windows, doors, structural expressions, etc).

Standards 1. Any building with a total width equal to or greater than its height shall u lize one or more of the following techniques: • • •

expression of structural bays, varia ons in material, and/or varia on in the building plane.

Examples above illustrate the Village’s desired building scale and ar cula on along South Holmen Drive.

BUILDING DESIGN

D. All new buildings are encouraged to u lize details or changes in materials to create a discernible base, middle and top.

2. An accurately-measured eleva on of each exposed building facade shall be submi ed with the Design Standards Checklist.

The images above illustrate techniques used to vary the facade heights along a long facade.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 15


Roofline INTENT: To establish a consistent theme along the South Holmen corridor that provides visual interest.

Recommendations Desired

A. Parapet walls with cornices are encouraged. Cosme c “fake” parapets and facades, if used, should be designed three-dimensionally to hide their “fake” characteris cs (as they usually lack depth).

BUILDING DESIGN

Standards The example above shows a raised parapet wall and cornice that extends back to give the percep on of three-dimensional facade (desirable).

Discouraged

The example on the right shows a “fake” parapet wall and cornice that is not three-dimensional (as it lacks depth).

Prohibited

A low-slope roof, which does not meet Standard 2. .

16 Village of Holmen, WI

1. A posi ve visual termina on at the top of the building shall be established, using either a pitched roof with gable(s) facing the street or a flat roof with a defined cornice. 2. Pitched roofs shall have a slope no less than 5:12. 3. An accurately-measured eleva on drawing that illustrates the full rooflines of the proposed buildings shall be submi ed with the Design Standards Checklist.


Street-Level & Secondary Facades INTENT: To provide visually pleasing facades that enliven the South Holmen Drive corridor.

Recommendations A. The base of the building should include elements that relate to the human scale. These should include doors, windows, texture, projec ons, awnings, ornamenta on, etc. B. All building faces should use design features (i.e. window propor ons, expression of the structural bays, etc.) similar to the primary front facade.

Desired An example of street-level facade that is scaled to humans and provide visual interest.

Cap Body Base

Standards 1. A discernible “base� shall be established. The base shall be at least two (2) feet in height, but may include the en re first floor. Buildings to be used primarily for industrial uses are excluded from this standard.

An example of a well-defined base, body, and cap.

2. An accurately-measured eleva on of each exposed building facade shall be submi ed with the Design Standards Checklist.

BUILDING DESIGN

C. Secondary facades facing a public street (corner buildings) are encouraged to incorporate the same materials and design elements (propor ons, scale, windows, doors, etc.) from the Holmen Drive facade along the secondary street. If a change of design or material is desired, make the transi on at an architectural feature, such as column, structural bay ar cula on, protruding/receding building plane, etc.

Example of a secondary facade con nuing the design quality, material pale e, and color pale e of the primary facade. Note the change of material at an architectural element (protruding building plane).

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 17


Windows & Doors INTENT: To enliven and ac vate the South Holmen Drive corridor.

Recommendations Discouraged

A. The use of reflec ve or dark- nted glass on the front facade is discouraged, especially at the ground level. B. A minimum of two (2) feet is desired between the glass and any interior dividers to allow for product display.

BUILDING DESIGN

Reflec ve or dark- nted glass on front facade at the ground-level is discouraged.

An exis ng building that meets the 30% clear glass on the ground-level threshold in the Neighborhood Area. Note that even side facades within 80 feet of a public street must also meet this 30% threshold (as shown in the image above).

The above example is not in the Freeway Area; however, it is an example of a building that just meets the 20% clear glass on the ground-level threshold set for buildings in the Freeway Area.

18 Village of Holmen, WI

Standards 1. Neighborhood Area Only, facades within eighty (80) feet of a public street shall be comprised of at least thirty (30) percent clear glass measured from two (2) to ten (10) feet above grade. Buildings to be used primarily for industrial uses may meet this thirty percent threshold using the enĆ&#x;re facade (rather than between two and ten feet). 2. Freeway Area Only, facades within eighty (80) feet of a public street shall be comprised of at least twenty (20) percent clear glass measured from two (2) to ten (10) feet above grade. Buildings to be used primarily for industrial uses may meet this twenty percent threshold using the enĆ&#x;re facade (rather than between two and ten feet). 3. A diagram illustra ng the percentage of transparent glass on each street-facing facade shall be submi ed with the Design Standards Checklist.


Projections INTENT: To reinforce the exis ng building character within the corridor.

Recommendations A. Use of ground floor awnings and canopies are strongly encouraged. B. Awning colors should relate to and complement the primary colors of the building facade. C. Glowing awnings (backlit, light shows through the material) are discouraged. Preferred ligh ng methods include ligh ng fixtures directed down onto the awning or light fixtures beneath the awning directed to towards the sidewalk. D. Awnings using wood or shingle components are discouraged. Cloth, vinyl, and metal are the preferred awning materials.

This image demonstrates Standard 1 requirements for awning placement.

1. Awnings/Canopies shall be at least three (3) feet in depth and the underside of the projec on shall be at least eight (8) feet above the sidewalk.

The example above and below shows light fixtures that illuminate the awning from above directed downward.

BUILDING DESIGN

Standards

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 19


Signage INTENT: To promote effec ve and a rac ve signage that complements the building’s architectural character and reflects the pedestrian scale of the district.

Recommendations A. Preferred sign types include: wall-mounted (facing the street), monument-style freestanding, and awning.

Window Sign

Neon (interior usage) Sign

B. Signage should be integrated with the architectural concept of the development in scale, detailing, use of color and materials, and placement. C. Pole signs are strongly discouraged.

BUILDING DESIGN

D. Signage height should be minimized to create a pedestrian-friendly environment. Preferred sign height is between five (5) feet and ten (10) feet.

Wall Sign

Monument Sign

E. Exterior lights illumina ng a sign should be mounted above the sign and directed downwards, rather than within the sign face or directed towards the sky.

Standards Awning Sign

Projec ng Sign

1. All signs shall conform to the design and maintenance requirements of the Village’s Sign Ordinance (Chapter 195: Ar cle 7) and a sign permit shall be acquired. 2. Neighborhood Area Only, roof-mounted, neon (excludes interior usage), and billboard signs are prohibited.

Discouraged

Prohibited

3. Neighborhood Area Only, free-standing signs shall not exceed twenty (20) feet above grade. 4. Freeway Area Only, roof-mounted and neon (excludes interior usage) are prohibited.

Pole Sign Directly Illuminated Sign

Neon Sign Roof Sign

5. Freeway Area Only, free-standing signs within one thousand (1,000) feet of State Highway 53 right-of-way can follow current zoning requirements. Free-standing signs beyond this point shall not exceed thirty (30) feet above grade. 6. Free-standing signs shall have landscaping elements (i.e. plan ng material, boulders, fencing) surrounding the base/post of the sign.

20 Village of Holmen, WI


Colors & Materials INTENT: To reinforce the exis ng character, and to provide for variety and visual interest.

Recommendations A. Day-glo or fluorescent colors are strongly discouraged. Bright colors should not be used as the primary facade color, but rather as a secondary color to highlight expression lines or details. B. Preferred exterior finish materials include kilnfired brick, stucco, terra co a, wood siding and details, and fiber cement siding. C. Using vinyl siding as primary building material on the front facade is strongly discouraged.

E. Gravel aggregate materials, stone or cultured stone in a random ashlar pa ern, rough-sawn wood siding, polished stone, and panelized products are strongly discouraged as exterior building materials.

Standards 1. Vinyl siding, if used, shall be at least 0.044� in thickness.

These images are examples of preferred building materials (from top le to bo om right): kiln-fired brick, stucco, terra co a, wood siding, and fiber cement siding.

BUILDING DESIGN

D. EIFS (Exterior Insula on and Finish System) is discouraged as a principle facade material, especially at ground level where suscep ble to damage, but is acceptable above the ground floor and as an accent material.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 21


INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 22 Village of Holmen, WI


Mixed Use / Retail INTENT: To support the development of mixed use and retail buildings that are organized as part of an a rac ve and coordinated corridor.

Recommendations A. Avoid large, undieren ated building walls and roof lines. Desired design features include varia on in materials and colors, projec ng and recessed bays, and varia on in building heights. B. Buildings should be located to enhance their view from the street. Prominent placement at the terminus of a street is encouraged, if appropriate. C. Locate gas pumps behind the store and bring the store close to the public street, wherever possible. D. Retail buildings should be as close as possible to the street.

Standards 1. Each principle building shall have clearly defined, highly visible customer entrances featuring architectural elements such as canopies or por cos, overhangs, arcades, raised parapets, arches or roof forms.

LAND USE SPECIFIC

E. Buildings should be easily u lized for a wide variety of businesses, avoiding franchise design that signifies a par cular brand or product.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 23


Big Box Commercial INTENT: To support the development of big box commercial development that is organized as part of an a rac ve and coordinated corridor.

Recommendations A. Integra ng smaller retail stores as part of a larger retail building is encouraged. B. Building setbacks should be consistent within a given block. C. Avoid large, undieren ated building walls and roof lines. Desired design features include varia on in materials and colors, projec ng and recessed bays, and varia on in building heights.

LAND USE SPECIFIC

Standards

24 Village of Holmen, WI

1. Each large retail store shall have clearly defined, highly visible customer entrances featuring architectural elements such as canopies or por cos, overhangs, arcades, raised parapets, arches or roof forms.


Light Industrial INTENT: To support the development of industrial buildings that are organized as part of an a rac ve and coordinated corridor.

Recommendations A. Buildings should be located to enhance their view from the street. Prominent placement at the terminus of a street is encouraged, if appropriate. B. Larger industrial buildings should have a small oďŹƒce component fron ng the public street. C. There is no fixed percentage of open space (areas excluding buildings, roads and parking areas). Generally 20% would be towards the minimum and 40% considered desirable. D. Building setbacks should be consistent within a given block.

LAND USE SPECIFIC

E. OďŹƒce components should be subdivided and propor oned using architectural features such as windows, entrance features, arcades, porches, trellises, or stainless steel cables with vines along the facade.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 25


Multi-Family Residential INTENT: To support the development of a rac ve mul -family, mul -story apartment and condominium buildings organized as part of a unified and coordinated mul -building development.

Recommendations A. Buildings should be organized to present an a rac ve frontage to the street. B. Buildings should be located to enhance their view from the street. Prominent placement at the terminus of a street is encouraged, if appropriate.

LAND USE SPECIFIC

C. There is no fixed percentage of open space (areas excluding buildings, roads and parking areas). Generally 10% would be towards the minimum and 20% considered desirable.

26 Village of Holmen, WI

D. Avoid large, undieren ated building walls and rooflines. Desired architectural details include projec ng bays/porches and upper-level set-backs and osets to the primary facade(s). E. Landscaping, decora ve walls, or fencing should be used to help define the street edge and provide an a rac ve rela onship between the building and the street. F. Garages should be recessed from the front facade(s) to minimize their visual impact on the design. G. Loca ng services areas and refuse containers in the rear of the site is strongly encouraged.


Checklist Instructions In addi on to this checklist, a site plan shall be submi ed, including (as applicable): Trash and recycling containers Pedestrian pathways Parking and circula on Landscaping Stormwater management features Ligh ng

Plan Com.

Staff

Applicant

If a sec on of these standards does not apply to the proposed project (e.g. parking standards for a facade renova on project) the en re sec on can be skipped by checking the “does not apply� box NA . If any part of a sec on does apply, please fill out the en re sec on with checks for completed standards and cross outs for any that do not apply.

Street Rela onship Standards NA Comments (office use only):

1. Neighborhood Area Only, primary structure(s) are built: 40 feet of the front property line (no parking) -OR80 feet of the front property line (with parking)

2. Freeway Area Only, primary structure(s) fron ng South Holmen Drive are built within 160 feet, -AND/ OR- primary structure(s) fron ng any other public street are within 80 feet.

CHECKLIST

SITE DESIGN

3. Neighborhood Area Only, within 30 feet of front property line, parking does not cover more than 50% of the S. Holmen Drive street frontage. Remainder is used for buildings, pa os/decks, landscaping, walkways, stormwater management, and/or signage.

4. Freeway Area Only, within 30 feet of front property line, parking does not cover more than 80% of the S. Holmen Drive street frontage. Remainder is used for buildings, pa os/decks, landscaping, walkways, stormwater management, and/or signage.

5. At least one func onal building entrance faces the most prominent street.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 27


Checklist

3a. Access driveway(s) to S. Holmen Drive have a at least a 20- throat depth.

CHECKLIST

3b. Parking lot access driveway(s) are separated from parking stalls by a planted landscaping divider protected by a concrete curb. 4. Parking rows are divided by landscape medians or islands such that no more than 20 spaces are uninterrupted. 5a. Building entrances are connected tot he public sidewalk by a walkway. 5b. Walkways crossing parking areas or a drive aisle are clearly marked by striping or material change. 6. Neighborhood Area Only, off-street parking in front of the building is only single- or double-loaded aisle. 7. Freeway Area Only, off-street parking in front of the building is no more than 2 double-loaded aisles. 8. Neighborhood Area Only, parking lots adjacent to residen al proper es have a semi-opaque buffer (min. of 4 feet in height).

28 Village of Holmen, WI

Plan Com.

2. Parking stalls & drive aisles are separated from the public ROW & adjacent proper es by a minimum of 5- planted landscape buffer.

Staff

Applicant 1. Parking areas of 5 or more vehicles are paved and include concrete curbs along all parking/drive areas.

Parking Areas Standards NA Comments (office use only):


Landscaping Standards NA Comments (office use only):

Plan Com.

Staff

Applicant

Checklist

1. Plan ngs & low fences between parking areas & public ROW won’t obscure vision between 3-8 feet above the ground at maturity. 2a. All parking lot islands are planned to be planted and maintained with perrenials, shrubs, and/or shade trees. 2b. Landscaping designed to allow for vehicle overhangs, unless wheel stops are used.

4. All landscaping will be planted within 12 months of issuance of an occupancy permit or final inspec on.

Exterior Ligh ng Standards NA Comments (office use only):

1. Exterior building & parking light fixtures are fullcuto -AND- not directed to the sky (ground lights directed at building are acceptable). 2. Light trespass does not exceed 0.5 footcandles at the property line adjacent to park/residen al use.

CHECKLIST

3. A canopy tree will be planted for every 50 feet of linear street frontage (rounding decimals up) -ANDplaced in designated areas.

3. Parking/security poles are no taller than the building height restric ons in the underlying zoning district, or 40 feet, whichever is less. If abu ng residen al, the poles are no taller than 25 feet. 4. Spec sheets for each light fixture are submi ed.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 29


Checklist Plan Com.

Staff

Applicant 1. Trash/recycling containers & street-level/roo op mechanical equipment are not visible from the street, Halfway Creek, or neighboring property.

Storage & Service Standards NA

CHECKLIST

2. Service boxes are located away from the pedestrian zone.

Comments (office use only):

3. Loading/staging areas are not in the front yard -AND- any loading areas visible from the street or facing residen al property are screened with landscaping &/or wall not less than 6 feet in height & integrated with the overall site design &/or building elements. 4. There is no outdoor storage of products, materials, or equipment in the front yard (excluding short-term display items or items available for purchase). 5. Screening is compa ble with the building architecture (material pale e & design elements), as well as other site features. 1. On-site stormwater management systems meet the: Village’s Erosion Control and Stormwater Management, -ANDWisconsin Administra ve Code NR 151 (1 acre or greater land disturbance)

30 Village of Holmen, WI

Stormwater Management Standard NA


Plan Com.

Staff

Applicant

Checklist

BUILDING DESIGN Scale & Ar cula on Standards NA Comments (office use only):

1. Any building with a total width equal to or greater than its height u lizes one or more of the following techniques: expression of structural bay, varia on in material, -AND/ORvaria on in the building plane.

2. An accurately-measured eleva on of each exposed building facade & any neighboring buildings is submi ed.

NA Comments (office use only):

Street-Level Facades Standards

1. The roof has a pitched roof with gable(s) facing the street or a flat roof with a defined cornice. 2. The roof has a slope no less than 5:12. 3. An accurately-measure eleva on drawing illustra ng the roofline of the proposed building & any neighboring building is submi ed.

CHECKLIST

Roofline Standards

1. A discernible “base� is established, comprising at least the first 2 feet of the building, or at most the en re first floor facade (excludes Industrial buildings).

NA Comments (office use only):

2. An accurately-measured eleva ons of each exposed building facade and neighboring buildings are submi ed.

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 31


Checklist Plan Com.

2. Freeway Area Only, facades within 80 feet of a public street have at least 20% clear glass between two and ten feet above grade (Industrial bldgs can meet this requirement using the en re facade).

Staff

Applicant 1. Neighborhood Area Only, facades within 80 feet of a public street have at least 30% clear glass between two and ten feet above grade (Industrial bldgs can meet this requirement using the en re facade).

Windows & Doors Standards NA Comments (office use only):

CHECKLIST

3. Diagram(s) illustra ng the percentage of transparent glass on each street-facing facade is submi ed.

1. Awnings/Canopies are at least 3 feet in depth and at least 8 feet above the sidewalk.

Projec ons Standards NA

1. All signs conform to the design and maintenance requirements of the Village’s Sign Ordinance (CH 195: Ar cle 7). 2. Neighborhood Area Only, there are NO roofmounted, neon (excluding interior usage), or billboard signs on the property. 3. Neighborhood Area Only, NO freestanding sign exceeds 20 feet above grade. 4. Freeway Area Only, there are NO roof-mounted and neon (excluding interior usage) on the property. 5. Freeway Area Only, free-standing signs beyond 1,000 feet of STH 53 right-of-way does NOT exceed 30 feet above grade. 6. Free-standing signs have landscaping elements surrounding the base/post of the sign.

32 Village of Holmen, WI

Signage Standards NA Comments (office use only):


Plan Com.

Staff

Applicant

Checklist

Colors & Materials Standards NA

1. Vinyl siding is at least 0.044 inches in thickness.

LAND USE SPECIFIC Mixed Use / Retail Standards

Big Box Commercial Standards NA

1. Each large retail store has a clear defined, highly visible customer entrance featuring architectural elements (e.g. canopies, por cos, overhangs, arcades, raised parapets, arches, roof forms, etc.).

CHECKLIST

NA

1. Each principle building has a clear defined, highly visible customer entrance featuring architectural elements (e.g. canopies, por cos, overhangs, arcades, raised parapets, arches, roof forms, etc.).

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR design standards 33


APPENDIX C

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

1


VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

APPENDIX C

2


3

WI PLANTING GUIDE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN


VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

APPENDIX C

4


WI PLANTING GUIDE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

5


APPENDIX C

6

VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


WI PLANTING GUIDE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

7


APPENDIX C

8

VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


WI PLANTING GUIDE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

9


APPENDIX C

10 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


WI PLANTING GUIDE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

11


APPENDIX C

12 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA


WI PLANTING GUIDE

SOUTH HOLMEN DRIVE CORRIDOR PLAN

13


APPENDIX C

14 VILLAGE OF HOLMEN & TOWN OF ONALASKA

2012 South Holmen Drive Corridor Plan  

This plan is a guide to help Village/Town officials and economic development professionals attract and direct investment along the South Hol...

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