Page 1

GRAND LODGE Ancient, Free and Accepted

Masons 0/ tlte State 0/ Missouri • Official Proceedings One Hundred Thirty-Second Annual Communication

• SAINT LOUIS Sept. 29 and 30, A. D. 1953, A. L. 5953


BIOGRAPHICAL

RICHARD O. RUMER Grand Master 1952-1953

Richard Otto Rumer was born on a small farm two and one half miles north of Mascoutah, St. Clair County, Illinois, on September 20, 1896, the son of Otto L. Rumer and Lydia Haase Rumer. He was the middle child of five children, two sisters being older and two brothers younger than he. Although the parents were of limited means and opportunities they always evinced a determination that their children should succeed; and in this they were not disappointed. Brother B,umer attended for seven years a one room country school, and then for three years the Mascoutah High School, fo]J.owed by a year -in the Belleville Commercial College. He moved to St. Louis in 1913 and in 1915, while employed in St. Louis, he entered the Benton College of Law, a night course law school, from which he was graduated with the degree of LL.B. in 1919. He had been admitted to the practice of law after two years only of the law course, and entered the practice in March 1918. Shortly thereafter Brother Rumer entered the army and served for a few months at Camp McArthur, being discharged about December 1, 1918. Upon his return to civilian life he resumed the practice of law with an established firm, specializing in Commercial, Bankruptcy, Probate and Corporate matters, and remained with this firm until 1924 at which time he established his own law office. In December 1929 he became one of counsel for the International Shoe Company with which organization he has remained to this date. In 1950 he was elected a Director and General Counsel. Brother Rumer was united in marriage to Miss Margaret A. Hauer of St. Louis on June 19, .1920, and to this happy union three children were born; Elizabeth (known to her family and friends as Betty) now a secretary for Mary Institute; Robert, a chemical engineer, at this time Production Supervisor of the Monsanto Chemical Company Phospate Plant at Columbia, Tennessee; Margaret Jean (known to her family and friends as Peggy) now Mrs. W. Allan Barrow of St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. Rumer are the proud grandparents of four darling granddaughters. Mr. and Mrs. Rumer are members of the Oak Hill Presbyterian


ii

BIOGRAPHICAL

Church, St. Louis; and one of the subjects emphasized by Brother Rumer in his year as Grand Master was the closer relationship that should exist between the Fraternity and the Church, as exemplified by the Masonic Church Sunday and the breakfast \ in connection therewith attended by over 500 Freemasons. Brother Rumer isa member and Past Master of Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 (initiated January 24, 1918, passed February 14, 1918, raised March 21, 1918); Oriental Chapter No. 78, R.A.M.; St. Aldemar Commandery No. 18, R.T.; St. Louis Conclave No. 42, Red Cross of Constantine (Past Sovereign); Moolah Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S.; Tower Grove Chapter No. 445, O.E.S.; the Square Club. The wide contacts and varied interests of our Junior Past Grand Master are suggested by his membership in the following organizations: Fred W. Stockham Post No. 245, American Legion Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan St. Louis Associated Industries of Missouri (Vice President) American Bar Association Bar Association of St. Louis Cdinmercial Law League of America Missouri Athletic Club . St. Louis Skeet & Trap Club Missouri Duck Hunters Association. Brother Rumer's early and continued activity in the Grand Lodge is indicated by the following: District Lecturer, 33rd District, 19271928; District Deputy Grand Master, 1928-1929; Member Committee' on Appeals and Grievances, 1929-1933; Member Jurisprudence Committee, 1934-43; appointed Grand Marshal, 1943. The contribution which Brother Rumer made to the Craft as a member of the Masonic Home Board can not be estimated. He. was Senior Grand Warden at the time the managemcnt of the Home was completely changed by vote of the Grand Lodge. By the action of the Grand Lodge making the four Senior Grand Lodge officers members of the Board, Brother Rumer was thrust right into the midst of the very important problems incideI,lt to the change of administration. Grand Master Bond appointed him Chairman of the Legal Committee and a trustee of the Endowment Fund. He continued in these positions by appointment of Grand Master Ferguson and the following year responsibility for the guidance of the Home culminated in his office as Grand路 Master. That he has efficiently and wisely performed his duties as President of the Home Board is manifested by the excellent report in the pages of these Procecdings. Relative to his year as Grand Master, it is not enough to say that he was outstanding. Certain salient features should be noted.


iii

BIOGRAPHICAL

In the first place he had an adequate conception of the meaning of Freemasonry. In the thinking of too many the Fratenlity is just another organization of men for mutual help and fellowship. But Brother Rumer recognized the deeper meaning of Freemasonrythat it is a way of life posited upon belief in God as Father and men as Brothers. He stressed this in his addresses all over this State. Moreover, Brother Rumer was not afraid to face issues as they developed and make decisions relative thereto, but fearlessly and conscientiously coped with critical situations as his record in these Proceedings will disclose. Grand Master Rumer has been tireless in his efforts for the Craft. He has manifested unusual ability and wide vision. He has made a lasting impression upon our Fraternity.

H. R.


GRAND LODGE Ancient, Free and Accepted

Masons of the State of Missouri

• Official Proceedings Qne Hundred Thirty-Second Annual Communication

• Sept. 29 and 30, A. D. 1953, A. L. 5953


OFFICERS

Grand Lodge of Missouri 1953-1954

JAMES McBRAYER SELLERS M. W. Grand Master Lexington ORESTES MITCHELL, JR. R.. W. Deputy Grand Master 717 Corby Bldg., St. Joseph WILLIAM J. CRAIG R. W. Senior Grand Wa;rden 1035 S. Pickwick, Springfield HAROLD M. JAyNE R. W. Junior Grand Wa;rden Memphis EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. Grand_Trea~rer Care Union National Bank, Kansas City HAROLD L. READER R. W. Grand Secretary 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8 FREELON K. HADLEY R. W. Grand Lemurer 2005 Penn St., St. Joseph EMMETT L. ROBISON W. Grand ChaplOlin 2416 Doniphan Ave., St. Joseph SAMUEL THURMAN W. Grand Chaplain 225 So. Skinker Ave., St. Louis 5 JAMES W. CLARKE W. Grand Chaplain 44 Kingsbury Place, St. Louis 12 HAMPTON ADAMS W. Grand Chaplain 2 Windermere Place, St. Louis 12 PLINEY H. ELLIOTT W. Grand Chaplain Nevada FRANK P. BRIGGS Grand Senior Deacon Macon ROBERT L. ARONSON Grand Junior Deacon Civil Courts Bldg., St. Louis 1 HAROLD O. GRAUEL Grand Senior Steward Cheney Hall, Cape Girardeau BRUCE H. HUNT Grand Junior Steward Box 721, Kirksville ROBERT H. MANN Grand Marshal 101 W. 11th St., Kansas City JOHN A. WITTHAUS Grand Marshal . Court House, Clayton 5 J. RENICK JONES Grand Sword Bearer 724 N. Main St., Independence ,R. JASPER SMITH ; Grand Pur~ivant 1005 Woodruff Bldg., Springfield FREDERICK J. MARSTON Grand Orator . Boonville JOHN F. BABER Grand Tiler Richmond . The 133rd Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will be held fu. St. Louis, beginning Tuesday, September 28, 1954.


ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL C'OMMUNICATION

The One Hundred Thirty-Second Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri convened at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, at 10 a. m., on Tuesday, September 29, 1953. PRESENT Richard O. Rumer, M. W. Grand Master James McBrayer Sellers, R. W. Deputy Grand Master Orestes Mitchell, Jr., R. W. Senior Grand Warden William J. Craig, R. W. Junior Grand Warden Edmund E. Morris, R. W. Grand Treasurer Harold L. Reader, R. W. Grand Secretary Freelon K. Hadley, R. W. Grand Lecturer Samuel Thurman, W. Grand Chaplain Harold M. Jayne, Grand Senior Deacon Frank P. Briggs, Grand Junior Deacon Robert L. Aronson, Grand Senior Steward Harold O. Grauel, Grand Junior Steward Bruce H. Hunt, Grand Marshal Robert H. Mann, Grand Marshal John A. Witthaus, Grand Sword Bearer Robert L. Hoy, Grand Pursuivant R. Jasper Smith, Grand Orator Arthur M. Jacobs, Grand Tiler

At 10:00 a. m. Most Worshipful Grand Master Richard O. Rumer opened the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri in Ample Form, assisted by the Grand Officers and supported by a large attendance of representatives. The brethren united in singing one verse of "America," after which Grand Chaplain Thurman offered the invocation. CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE-INTERIM REPORT

To th.e Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Credentials begs to report a constitutional number of subordinate lodges are represented. FRED H. KNIGHT, Chairman.


4

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

:MESSAGES

Messages of greeting were received from Past Grand Masters Chiles, Bray, Grand Master Lamb of Indiana, Grand Treasurer Cortini of the Grand Orient of Italy, 'Vorthy Grand Patron Reppert of the Grand Chapter O. E. S., Grand Chaplains Robison and Duncan, Grand Master Gordon of the Grand Encampment, Knights Templar. APPROVAL OF 1952 PROOEEDINGS

On motion, duly made, seconded and carried, the published 1952 Proceedings were approved. INTRODUOTIONS....:......DEPUTIES AND LEOTURERS

R. W. Brother Robert Mann introduced the District Deputy Grand Masters and the District Lecturers present. INTRODUCTIONS-PAST GRAND MASTERS

R. ""V. George F. Morrison introduced the Past Grand Masters present. DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

R. W. Brother Bruce Hunt introduced the following distinguished guests: William B. Massey, S.G.LG. Scottish Rite, Missouri Elvin K. Luff, Grand High Priest, Grand Chapter R. A. Masons of Missouri R. E. Armstrong, Grand Master, GTand Council, R. and S. M. of Missouri Walter J. Eddlemon, Deputy Grand Commander, Grand Commandery, Knights Templar of Missouri Carl R. Greissen, Grand Secretary of Nebraska Fay Smith, Grand Master of Nebraska Bruce Newton, Grand Master of Kansas Elmer Strain, P. G. M., Grand Secretary of Kansas Charles B. Hays, Grand Master of Iowa Earl Delzell, Grand Secretary of Iowa GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS

To the Most Worshipful Grand Loclge} A. F. & A. M., of Missouri: BRETHREN: From the time of his creation, man has stood under a mandate to "replenish the earth, and subdue it" (Genesis 1-28) ; i.e., to apply the intelligence and abilities with ,vhich he was endowed by his Creator at his creation toward the improvement of the world and all people and things that arc upon it. Throughout the ages men who recognized the responsibilities thus placed upon them in return for the dignity of the status into which they were placed have applied their efforts toward the fulfillment of their obligation.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

5

To accomplish their purposes they formed bands and societies through which they unified their efforts and propagated their principals. They met obstacles and overcame them. They did, in fact, improve the world and all that is upon it. One band or society formed for such purposes is the institution of Freemasonry, an organization of men who put their faith in God, and, with confidence that their cause is just, proceed to promote the general good of society. Its principles and procedure appeal to good men. For many years it has contributed materially to the uplift of the moral standards of the world. As I submit to you, as our By-Laws say I must, my account of my acts during the past year, and of my observations, I have a consciousness of the great impact which Freemasonry has had upon our affairs in the past, and a confidence that it still stands second to none in importance in the advancement. of the cultural, social, educational, and spiritual phases of human existence. Freemasonry is good. It is good for the world. It is scarcely proper that I should say I welcome you to this one hundred thirty-second annual communication of our Grand Lodge. You appear not by invitation, but as a matter of right,-as delegates. So, instead of saying I welcome you, I say I greet you. I greet you with joy and satisfaction that come from your demonstration by your presence of your loyalty to the cause we represent. Many here present have attended Grand Lodge Communications before. Many, however, are attending a Grand Lodge Communication for the first time. What I say now is addressed particularly to them because those who attended before know the manner in which the business of a Communication is conducted and the procedure by which Grand Lodge determinations are made. We function as a truly representative organization, and the final determination of every issue which requires a determination is by the vote' of the delegates who are present at the time the issue is presented for action. Virtually every matter upon which you will be required to act will come in the form of a committee report. The several committees will have studied those things whieh are submitted to them and will make their recommendations to you. In this manner you will have the benefit of the considered opinions of competent representatives before you when you are called upon to vote. But the final responsibility for any action of this Grand Lodge is not upon any committee. A required number of those entitled to vote who express themselves by their votes make all final determinations. . I earnestly suggest that it will be beneficial if you will be constant in your attendance and attentive to all matters which are presented. In this manner we can expedite our proceedings and obtain the best results.

•


6

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

GRAND TREASURER'S AND GRAND SECRETARY'S BONDS Our By-Laws require that our Grand Treasurer and our Grand Secretary shall be under bond and that the bonds shall be committed to the custody of the Grand Master. At my installation these bonds were delivered to me; they are in force; they will be duly transmitted to my successor. The practice of requiring bonds of those charged with the custody, management and disposition of assets is but sound, conservative business and prudent management. All lodges should follow the practice. no matter by what other process they seek to safeguard their properties and money. QUIT CLAIM DEED TO PART OF LOT 4 IN BLOCK 1 CIVIL BEND At its last Communication this Grand Lodge approved a recommendation of the Jurisprudence Committee (pro. 1952, p. 118) that the Grand Master execute a quit claim deed in behalf of the Grand Lodge releasing any claim which it might have in the property above described to 'Villiam C. Perry and Cuma Perry. This was done and the deed was delivered. MASONIC PUBLICATIONS Last year, upon the recommendation of the Committee on Masonic Publications, the Grand Secretary was directed to notify the publishers of The Masonic &7 Eastern Star N ewsJ St. Louis, Missouri; The Blue Lodge Mason, Kansas City, Missouri; and The Masonic ReviewJ Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, "that the Grand Lodge does disapprove of the use of the word 'Masonic' and the Masonic Emblem now being used by the three publications specified in this report (those named above), and disapprove of the use of any word, sign or symbol of Freemasonry." The Grand Secretary acted accordingly, with the result that correspondence developed between the Grand Master, upon the Grand Secretary's reference, and these publications, concerning which the chairman of the Committee on Masonic Publications was consulted. The publisher of The Masonic -&7 Eastern Star News agreed to and did discontinue that publication. The name of The Blue Lodge Mason was changed to "The Club of the Month News" and it changed its publication to contain news of various fraternal organizations. The publisher of The Masonic Review protested against the discontinuance in Missouri of the practices of which complaint was made, and while he did not agree to discontinue, it appears that publication is no longer active in Missouri.

•


1953

7

GRAND LODGE' OF MISSOURI

This is merely to report the action of the Grand Master pursuant to directions given. The Committee on Masonic Publications is still charged with giving attention to the路 general subject and will no . doubt give its conclusions and recommendations. THE RESOLUTJON REGARDING A HOME FOR NON-INDIGENT MASONS At our last Communication the Grand Lodge adopted a resolution whereby the Grand Master was directed to appoint a committee of three or more brethren to investigate the need for and the feasibility and initial cost of providing a home for aged Masons who were financially independent and for the wives or widows of such. Pursuant to this direction I appointed the following: Russell E. Murray, St. Louis, Missouri, Chairman Harry C. Ploetze, St. Louis, Missouri R. E. Dewhirst, St. Louis, Missouri Henry Fox, Kansas City, Missouri William H. Utz, St. Joseph, Missouri Oliver Luft, St. Louis, Missouri Harry Thies, St. Louis, Missouri,

I

notified these brethren of their appointments and gave them my ideas of the matters which should be included in their investigation. The Committee has been requested to submit a report. CONSOLIDATION OF LODGES During the year lodges were consolidated in two' instances as per the record in the Grand Secretary's Report. DISPENSATIONS During the year I ordered dispensations issued as per the record in the Grand Secretary's Report. DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS AND THE DISTRICT 'DEPUTIES' CONFERENCE I

For administrative purposes the state of Missouri is divided into 59 districts. For each there is a District Deputy, except in the 33rd District for which there are two. The District Deputies are the personal representatives of the Grand Master in the districts for which they are appointed. Without them the Grand Master could not function. ' A list of those originally appointed appears at pages 143-145 of the Proceedings of 1952. Since that list was published certairi of those who had been appointed found it impossible to continue in their positions with the result that for the 7th District Clyde Roberts of Maryville, Missouri, was appointed in place of Martin Suess;


8

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE' I

for the 29th District John M. Kuhne, Troy, Missouri, was appointed in place of Andy J. Blair; for the 20th District Earl Deardorff of Hale, Missouri, was appointed in place of George 1. Downing; for the 53rd District Dr. J. Fred Park of West Plains, Missouri, was appointed in place of alter J. Eddlemon; for the 57th District John W. Alverson of Kirkwood, Missouri, was appointed in place of Gustave Sexauer. The Gran'd Master had many occasions to call upon the District Deputies for extraordinary service and at no time did he call on any except the one called on responded diligently. In addition, wherever the Grand Master visited during the past year the District Deputies from the district in which the visit was made and from surrounding districts courteously and graciously complimented the Grand Master by their presence. I shall always appreciate the loyalty which the~e great Freemasons exhibited and the great courtesies they extended to me. In order that there might be some uniformity in the manner in which District Deputies proceeded a conference of District Deputies was held at Jefferson City on November 10, 1952 at which there was a very representative attendance. The Grand. Secretary, Deputy Grand Master, Senior Grand Warderi, and Junior Grand Warden were also in attendance and the Grand Lecturer, who had assembled his District Lecturers to meet on the following day, was on hand. A rather extensive agenda of subjects which should be discussed was prepared and there was a discussion of each subject which was presented, in which the District Deputies participated freely. The manner in which the District Deputies participated in the conference was wholesome. Many of the District Deputies have served Freemasonry in various capacities for many years and have served as District Deputy in their district for a number of years. These men brought into the conference the benefit of the experience which they had had in the active management of lodge and district affairs. They brought to the new District Deputies information as to how to proceed. Each deputy was charged with the duty of officially visiting all of the lodges in his district and with the duty of calling an administrative conference of all of the lodge officers in his district. The matter of administrative conferences was placed under the supervision of the committee called "Program for District Meetings" of which Rt. W. Bro. 'Villiam J. Craig was designated as chairman. Those who have had experience with district conferences consider them of great value. They should be co"ntinued. This report, of necessity being dictated well in advance of this Grand Lodge Communication, forecasts a pleasant meeting with the District Deputies who are being invited to attend a dinner in their honor Qn the evening before this Grand Lodge Communication convenes.

'V


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

9

CONFERENCE OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS On three occasions during the year-December 13, 1952, March 14, 1953, and July 11, 1953-the elected and appointed officers of the Grand Lodge met in conference in St. Louis. Such conferences serve' the purpose of keeping the officers informed of Masonic problems and conditions and enable the Grand Master to get the considered opinion of the officers on matters of policy and procedure on which he may desire their advice. The Grand Lodge is not a one man show. The officers should work as a team and they have done so. All, from the newest appointee in line on up, actively participated in these conferences and while the conferences did not attempt formal action or the issuance of orders or directions they did produce ideas which were very helpful to the cause of Freemasonry. I believe that if Grand Masters continue to take their officers into their confidence in conference they will benefit greatly by the assistance they receive. HOLLAND RELIEF On Feb. 5, 1953 the Grand Secretary received a wire from Carl H. Claudy, Executive Secretary of the Masonic Service Association of the United States, advising that devastating floods in Holland had brought a need for funds for relief. The extent of the suffering in Holland occasioned by the floods had been well publicized.. After consulting with the Deputy Grand Master and the Senior Grand Warden and receiving their approval I caused a contribution of $500 to be made to the fund arranged through the Masonic Service Association. VISITATIONS TO OTHER GRAND JURISDICTIONS

•

Accompanied by M. 'VOl'. Bro. Harold L. Reader I attended the Communication of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas at Little Rock, Arkansas, on November 18, 1952. M. Wor. Bro. Reader and I also attended the Communication of the Grand Lodge of Indiana at Indianapolis, Indiana on May 18 and 19, 1953. • These were'the only visits to other Grand Jurisdictions I found it possible to make. . Our Grand Lodge was represented at the Communication of the Grand Lodge of Illinois on October 14 and 15, 1952 by M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, at that of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky on October 21 and 22, 1952 by M. Wor. Bro. James W. Skelly, at that of the Grand Lodge of Kansas on February 11 and 12, 1953 by Rt. Wor. Bro. Orestes Mitchell, Jr., and at the Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario on July 15 and 16, 1953 by M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader.


10

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Visits to Grand Lodges of other Jurisdictions are very desirable. They are pleasant visits at all times and much information concerning practices and procedure is obtained which does not appear in written reports. I am sorry I could not attend more. I am grateful to M. Wor. Bros. Reader and Skelly and to Rt. Wor. Bro. Mitchell for their willingness to represent the 'Grand Master on the occasions referred to. VISITATIONS Several invitations were extended to me on the eve of and in anticipation of my election as GrandMaster which it was a great pleasure to accept. They were: . September 28, 1952-Pyramid Lodge No. 180 sponsored a service in the Chapel at the Masonic Home and I was asked to extend a word of greeting to those assembled who included a number of Grand Lodge officers and visitors to St. Louis for the Grand Lodge Communication. September 29, 1952-With Grand Master Ferguson, the Grand Secretary, the Grand Lecturer, and most of the other Grand Lodge officers I attended the dinner for District Deputy Grand Masters and District Lecturers at the Masonic Home, after which all assembled in the Chapel for a meeting. September 29, 1952-The four Knight Templar Commanderies of St. Louis and the one of DeSoto, Missouri, which compose the Sixth District of the Grand Commandery of Missouri, met in the New Masonic Temple. At the invitation of Rt. Em. Sir Adolph Roeper I was privileged to share the platform with the Grand Commander Knights Templar of Missouri, Rt. Em. Sir Fred Marston. September 30, 1952-St. Louis Conclave No. 20 of the Order of Red Cross of Constantine, of which I was Viceroy at the time, entertained all Missouri members of the order at a breakfast at the Sheraton Hotel to honor the Grand Sovereign, Most Illustrious Knight Companion George C. Marquis, and me. The Grand Sovereign could not be present and so all attention was dirceted. to me. This was a most pleasant occasion and I record it here as an expression of appreciation to the members of my Conclave. After my election and installation there were the following ,appearances: October 2, 1952-At the invitation of Bro. Edwin A. Smith, Venerable Master, I attended the Traditional Feast of Tishri of the Lodge of Perfection of the Scottish Rite Bodies in St. Louis. October 3, 1952-At the openng meeting of the Lodge of Instruction for the 33rd District of Missouri I presented commissions as District Deputy Grand Masters to Bros. Norman R. D. Jones and Dewey C. Hiltibidal. October 16, 1952-Founders' Day dinner of Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City, Missouri. M. Wor. Bro. W. F. Woodruff, a. Past Master of that Lodge who appointed me to a position in the Grand Lodge line, was present as were also his other two appointees, Rt. Wor. Bro. James McBrayer Sellers and Rt. Wor. Bro. Orestes Mitchell, Jr. In addition to making my address I presented a 50-year button to Bro. Roswell Algernon Clark. October 29, 1952-Grand Chapter O. E. S. at路 Keil Auditorium in St. Louis where I was graciously received and permitted to make an address. October 29, 1952-The Goats Club (St. Louis Secretaries) at the Kingsway Hotel in St. Louis.

0


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

11

October 30, 1952-A speeial meeting in honor of my Lodge, Tower Grove Lodge No. 631, at the Scottish Rite Cathedral in St. Louis. Rt. Wor. Bro. John V. Horn was Master of Ceremonies. Wor. Bro. Wesley Kreh presided at the reception of . guests ; over a thousand were in attendance including Past Grand Masters, Grand Lodge officers, representatives of other Grand Bodies, members of St. Louis, St. Louis County, and other Missouri and Illinois lodges. Among the other pleasant occurrences of the evening there was a presentation to me by my good friend, Rt. Wor. Bro. Arthur M. Jacobs, a Past Master of my Lodge, of a fine gold watch from the Past Masters. Also at this meeting it was my privilege to install the Rev. Dr. James W. Clarke, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis, as a Grand Chaplain. October 31, 1952-Installation of officers of Maplewood Lodge No. 566. Wor. Bro. Arthur M. Headrick was installed. November 5, 1952-Lodge of Instruction for the 57th Masonic District. Rt. Wor. Bro. John V. Alverson assumed his duties on that occasion. November 8, 1952-George Washmgton's Masonic Birthday celebration at the Scottish Rite Cathedral. This was arranged by the District Deputies for the 33rd and 57th Districts. The Rev. Dr. James W. Clarke, a Grand Chaplain, delivered the address to a crowd of well over 1,000. ,November 10, 1952-District Deputies' Conference at Jefferson City, Missouri. November 10, 1952-Meeting of the Board of Directors of the new Masonic Temple Board at St. Louis. November 11, 1952-Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 at a meeting to honor Rt. W or. Bro. John Alverson, District Deputy Grand Master for the 57th District. November 13, 1952-Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 and Trinity Lodge No. 641 of which Wor. Bro. Seibert Etter, 1952 president of the Masters Club, was Master at the time. November 14, 1952-Union, Missouri to pay respects to the mother of Wor. Bro. Russell Murray, a member of the Masonic Home Board. November 15, 1952-Masonic Home Board meeting. November 16, 1952-Services in the Chapel at the Masonic Home which were under auspices of Occidental Chapter O.E.S. of which Mrs. Ida Mae Meyers was matron. November 17, 1952-Cornerstone Lodge No. 323. November 18, 1952-Grand Lodge of Arkansas at Little Rock in company with M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary. November 22, 1952-Tuscan Chapter O.E.S. upon the retirement as Patron of M. Wor. Bro. Solon Cameron. November 24, 1952-Arrilstrong Lodge No. 70, Armstrong, Missouri with M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, to lay cornerstone of the Armstrong School C-4 Gymnasium and auditorium. . November 25, 1952-Scottish Rite Women's Club, St. Louis, Missouri. November 26, 1952-District meeting of the 49th District at Marble Hill, Missouri. December 10, 1952-Annual dinner Pride of the West Lodge No. 179. December 11, 1952-Tower Grove Lodge No. 631, annual election. December 12, 1952-Masonic Home Board meeting. December 12, 1952-Annual Homecoming Solomon Lodge No. 271, Springfield, Missouri. December 13, 1952-.conference of Grand Lodge officers, St. Louis, Missouri. ' December 13, 1952-Red Cross of Constantine St. Louis Conclave No. 20, St. Louis, Missouri. . December 18, 1952-Samaritan Lodge No. 424, Bonne Terre,' Missouri


12

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

with M. Wor. Bros. Harold L. Reader and James W. Skelly. 50-year button was presented to Rt. Wor. Bro. William Massey. December 19, 1952-Masonic Home Christmas Party of St Louis Masters and Wardens Club. December 20, 1952-East Gate Lodge No. 630, Kansas City, Missouri. Dinner and meeting. Presented 50-year button to Bro. Lawson M. Branham. December 24, 1952-Masonic Home Christmas Party of the St. Louis Christmas Committee. December 25, 1952-Masonic Home Christmas Breakfast. December 27, 1952-Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall, Missouri. Installed officers at Lodge meeting after St. John's Day dinner. M. Wor. Bro. F. C. Barnhill and Mrs. Barnhill and Rt. Wor. Bro. Robert Hoy and Mrs. Hoy graciously entertained Mrs. Rumer and me on this occasion. January 2, 1953-Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. Installed officers. January 6, 1953-St. Aldemar Commandery No. 18 K.T. at installation of officers. January 9, 1953-Masonic Home Board Meeting. January 12, 1953-Masonic Home, special conference. January 15, 1953-Joplin, Missouri. Visited with M. Wor. Bro. Ray Bond. Dinner at Scottish Rite Temple. Joint meeting of Joplin Lodge No. 335 and Fellowship Lodge No. 345. Installed omcers of both Lodges. January 19, 1953-Dinner in my honor arranged by The Square Club, a club of St. Louis Past Masters. January 19, 1953-Cornerstone Lodge No. 323. Informal visit. January 19, 1953-Itaska Lodge No. 420. Informal visit on occasion of official visit by Rt. Wor. Bro. Dewey C. Hiltibidal, D.D.G.M. January 27, 1953-America Lodge No 347. Informal visit on occasion of official visit by Rt. Wor. Bro. Norman R D. Jones, D.D.G.M. January 29, 1953-Masonic Service Association annual dinner, York Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri. January 29, 1953-Masters and Wardens Club of St. Louis annual meeting and election of officers at Scottish Rite Cathedral, St. Louis, . Missouri. February 4, 1953-Scottish Rite Club, York Hotel, St Louis, Missouri. February 5, 1953-St. James, Missouri, 39th District meeting arranged by Rt. Wor. Bro. W. W. Jackson, D.D.G.M. February 12, 1953-Conference at Masonic Temple, Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. February 14, 1953-Masonic Home Board meeting. February 16, 1953-Downtown High Twelve Club. February 18, 1953-Keystone Lodge No. 243 which had as its guests Triangle Lodge No. 638, Trinity Lodge No. 641, and Columbia Lodge No. 534 (Pacinc, Missouri). February 19, 1953-Tower Grove Chapter O.E.S., Brothers night. February 19, 1953-0riental Chapter No. 78 RA.M. at which M. E. Compo Virgil Saville was making an official visit. February 21, 1953-Conference with officers of Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661 at Masonic Temple. February 21, 1953-Mokane Lodge No. 612, Mokane, Missouri, by courtesy of Rt. Wor. Bro. John A. Witthaus, who had been invited to deliver George Washington Birthday address after an oyster supper. February 24, 25, 26, 1953-Washington, D. C. to animal Washington conferences. March 2, 1953-Missouri Athletic Club dinner to explore Grand Master 's Breakfast plans.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

13

March 4, 1953-Kansas City, Missouri in the matter of David Louis Blair. March 7, 1953-Masters and Wardens installation of officers at Pomegranate Temple. March 7, 1953-Ascalon Commandery No. 16 K. T. at knighting by Rt. Em. Sir Louis Heger of his son. March 8, 1953-Third Baptist Sunday School at which birthday of M. Wor. Bro. W. W. Martin was recognized. March 13, 1953-Masonic Home Board meeting. March 13, 1953-Fenton Lodge No. 281, Fenton, Missouri. March 14, 1953-Conference of Grand Lodge officers at Masonic Home. March 18, 1953-Speeial meeting of Moolah Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. in honor of Imperial Potentate Harvey A. Beffa. March 20, 1953-Sullivan Lodge No. 69, Sullivan, Missouri with M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary. Presented 50-year buttons to Bros. Julius Edwin Banta and Michael P. Biehl. March 24, 1953-Masonic Temple, St. Louis, Missouri. Co~ference with Committee on Home for Non-Indigents. March 25, 1953-Hannibal, Missouri. Dinner arranged by Rt. Wor. Bro. W. R. Usher, D.D.G.M. 15th District, attendance over 300. March 26, 1953-Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. Presented Rt. Wor. Bro. Norman R. D. Jones on occasion of his official visit. . March 27, 1953-Bolivar, Missouri. Cornerstone laying by M. Wor. Bro. Morris E. Ewing at Consolidated Grade School. Dinner and meeting of Bolivar Lodge No. 195 with visitors from _throughout the 41st District and neighboring districts present. Presented 50-year button to Rt. Wor. Bro. L. B. Parrish. Also visited Bro. Pike, formerly dean of the college at Bolivar, a 50-year member who was confined to his room. March 28, 1953-Square Club dinner dance, Moolah Temple, St. Louis, Missouri. March 30, 1953-Kansas City, Missouri. Dinner of the Masters and Wardens Club in dining hall of Temple Lodge No. 299, 9th and Harrison Streets. April 6, 1953-Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 which had as ,its guests, Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40. April 8, 1953-Lodge of Instruction of the 57th District, Wellston Temple. Closing meeting. April 9, 1953-Masonic Home, St. Louis, Missouri to honor Bro. Henry J. Falkenhainer to whom a chair was presented and whose portrait was presented recognizing his appearance at the Home with his orchestra on many occasions including 50 consecutive times on Christmas morning. April 10, 1953-Masonic Home Bo~rd meeting. April 18, 1953-Bardley, Missouri. Pine Lodge No. 314 is in a ' sparsely populated section of Ripley County. Meeting attended by many visitors. Was accompanied by M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader and Rt. W or. Bro. Harry dePriest. April 19, 1953-Sheraton Hotel-Breakfast honoring Grand Guardian of the Order of Jobs Daughters. April 20, 1953-Transportation Trowel Club, a group of Masons engaged in transportation. Dinner at YMCA, St. Louis, Missouri. April 21, 1953-Valley Park Lodge No. 629. April 23, 1953-Meridian Lodge No.2. April 26, 1953-Grand Masters Breakfast, Hotel Chase, St. Louis, Missouri. April 27, 28, 1953-Sedalia, Missouri. After dinner meeting of Grand


14

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Council R. & S. M. Breakfas~ meeting of Lodge of Research, Grand Chapter R.A.M. April 30, 1953-St. Joseph, Missouri. Luncheon at Robidoux Hotel arranged by Rt. Wor. Bro. Orestes Mitchell for Masonic lawyers of St. Joseph; then Savannah, Missouri, District meeting of 11th District held in Circuit Court Room, Court House, Savannah, Missouri, because attendance was too large for Lodge hall. May 2, 3, 1953-Boonville, Missouri, Grand Commandery K. T. May 7, 1953-South Side Hi-Twelve Club of St. Louis at Edmonds Restaurant. ; ,May 8, 1953-Masonie Home to present a recital by the Home children. May 9, 1953-Masonic Home Board meeting. May 13, 1953-Pride of the West Lodge No. 179. Presented 50-year .button to Wor. Bro. William Koken. May 14, 1953-Farmington, Missouri. District meeting of 40th District at hall of Farmington Lodge after a dinner. M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader also attended. May 16, 1953-Jefferson City, Missouri. Annual meeting of the Imperial Council of the Order of Red Cross of Constantine over which Rt. Wor. Bro. George C. Marquis presided. May 18, 19, 1953-Indianapolis, Indiana. Dinner preceding opening of Grand Lodge of Indiana and opening of Annual Communication of Grand Lodge of Indiana. M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, and Mrs. Reader and Mrs. Rumer accompanied me. May 20, 1953-Lodge of Instruction 33rd District, Masonic Temple. Closing session. May 28, 1953-DeSoto, Missouri-40th District meeting. May 29, 1953-Goats Club (Secretaries) meeting, Alhambra Grotto, St. Louis, Missouri. June 1, 1953-With officers of Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 called on Bro. Walton J. Wright, a member of Webster Groves Lodge, to present a 50-year Veteran's Button to him. June 5, 1953-Kirksville, Missouri. Dinner meeting' arranged by Rt. Wor. Bro. E. Lee Baker, D.D.G.M., 2nd District. June 6, 1953-Marceline, Missouri. Dinner meeting of Marceline Masonic Temple· Association over which Bro. Calvin Keller, Grand Commander Knights Templer of Missouri presided. June 8, 1953-Kirkwood, Missouri. Kirkwood Lodge No. 484. June 10, 1953-Hillsboro, Missouri. Conference with Master and Secretary of Joachim Lodge No. 164. June 11, 1953-Trenton, Missouri. Trenton Lodge No. 111 where I installed officers after a dinner with M. Wor. Bro. Ray V. Denslow and several of his friends. June 12, 1953-Princeton, Missouri. Centennial celebration of Mercer Lodge No. 35. June 14, 1953-Masonic Home Chapel. Services under auspices of Matrons and Patrons Clubs O.E.S. of St. Louis and St. Louis County. June 17, 1953-Center, Missouri. Centennial celebration of Ralls Lodge No. 33. .•Tune 18, 1053-0riental Chapter No. 78 R.A.M. in response to an invitation of Ex. Compo Walter Schubert. June 20, 1953-Clayton Lodge No. 601, Clayton, Missouri to participate in the initiation of a business associate. June 23, 1953-Kansas City, Missouri. Orient Chapter RA.M. honored our Grand Treasurer, Rt. Wor. Bro. E. E. Morris. He had served this Chapter as High Priest 50 years ago.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

15

June 27, 1953-Eolia, Missouri, District Conference of Lodges of the Sixteenth District. M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader accompanied me. June 30, 1953-Rose Hill Lodge No. 550, special meeting arranged by Wor. Bro. Herbert H. English _to which all St. Louis lodges which regularly meet on Tuesday evening were invited. July 2, 1953-Northeast Lodge No. 643. Before the meeting I presented a 50-year button to Bro. Henry B. Platche at his home in the presence of his daughter and her family. July 10, 1953-Masonic Home Board meeting. July 11, 1953-Grand Lodge Officers' Conference at New Masonic Temple, St. Louis, Missouri. August 8, 1953-Van Buren Lodge No. 509, the lodge to which M. W or. Bro. Tolman Cotton belongs. August 14, 1953-Masonic Home Board meeting. August 15, 1953-Moberly, Missouri. Dinner meeting of Milton Lodge No. 151. August 24, 1953-Liberty Lodge No. 31, Liberty, Missouri. A special meeting arranged by Rt. W or. Bro. Percy M. Best. September 15, 1953-Mizpah Lodge No. 639. • September 19, 1953-Mount Moriah Lodge No. 40. It would take a whole volume to describe adequately each meeting at which I attended. All were delightful. The brethren were lavish in their courtesies and attention. My regret is that I could not extend my visits to the many other places to which I was invited.

WASHINGTON CONFERENCES . The Annual Meeting of the George "Vashington Masonic National Memorial Association was held in Alexandria, Virginia on February 23, 1953, the Annual Conference of Grand Masters of North America at 'Washington, D. C., on February 24 and 25, 1953, and the Annual Meeting of the Masonic Service Association of the United States at Washington, D. C., on February 26, 1953. Missouri was represented at these conferences by our Grand Secretary, M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, M. Wor. Bro. Bert S. Lee, who continues as a member of the Board of Directors and officer of the George Washington Masonic -National Memorial Association, M. Wor. Bro. Ray V. Denslow, Rt. Wor. Bro. Bruce H. Hunt, and "V. Bro. Ed,vin Knudsen. My business required me to be in St. Louis on Tuesday morning, February 24, but the service of Eastern Airlines made it possible to reach \Vashingtonin time for the Grand Masters' banquet on the evening of that day. M. 'Vor. Bro. Harold L. Reader represented this Grand Lodge at the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association meeting and delivered Missouri's check in the sum of $5,500. At the Grand Masters Conference there were present representatives of forty-eight Grand Lodges of the United States (every state except Nevada plus the District of Columbia), and of seven Grand Lodges of Canada. In addition there were present, at the invitation of the Conference, representatives of the following Grand. Lodges


16

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

which are recognized by Grand Lodges of the United States and Canada and which are referred to as "jurisdictions abroad": Argentina, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico, Germany, and the Philippine Islands. Inspirational, educational and informational addresses were made at the various sessions of the Conference. All are contained in the Report of the Conference, a copy of which is available in the Grand Lodge office and copies of which were procured by the Lodge of Research for distribution to its members. The eagerness with which those who were from the Jurisdictions abroad, some of whom came from countries where freedom as we know it has been under severe restrictions, sought information concerning Masonic practices in the United States and Canada was quite interesting. They gave convincing evidence of a strong desire to promote Masonic principles in their countries according to the manner in which we have promoted them for many years. The banquet on the evening of February 24 was attended by Conference representatives, their ladies, and a large number of guests, many of whom were of the legislative, administrative and judicial branches of our Federal Government. It was a splendid affair. The address of the evening was by Bro. Harold E. Stassen, a Past Master of Shekinah Lodge No. 171 (Minnesota), and his subject was "Unity of Purpose with a Moral Foundation." The Masonic Service Association meeting was devoted to reports of its educational and relief activities and of its Hospital Visitation program. Thirty-five Grand Lodges support the educational and relief activities. Their support is on a per capita basis. Thirty Grand Lodges support the Hospital Visitation program. That support is on a basis of voluntary contributions and Missouri's contribution for each of the past two years has been $5,000. Full and complete reports of all financial transactions of the Masonic Service Association were submitted and are on file. The Grand Secretaries had their own separate conference on February 25, 1953, in accordance with their usual custom. Their annual banquet was held in the evening and it was my pleasure to accept the invitation of our Grand Secretary, M. Wor. Bro. Harold L. Reader, to attend that very pleasant affair. COMMISSION ON INFORMATION FOR RECOGNITION At our last CommunicationM. Wor. Bro. Homer L. Ferguson reported on the appointment, at the 1952 Grand Masters Conference, of a Commission on Information for Recognition whose duty it should be to assemble information concerning Grand Lodges who would apply to members of the Conference for recognition (Pro. 1952, p. 25). M. 'VOl'. Bro. Ferguson recommended that our Grand Lodge contribute $200 toward the fund to support the work of the


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

17

Commission, but the vVays and Means Committee made no appropriation for this purpose. The Commission made a report at the 1953 Grand Masters Conference. Its activities were continued and a request for our participation in its expenses was made again this year. From the standpoint of determining which Grand Lodges should or should not be recogni7.ed by our Grand Lodge I am doubtful if the information assembled by the Commission would have any real practical value. We have in M. 'Vor. Bro. Ray V. Denslow an expert on the subject of recognition who is constantly gathering information concerning Grand Lodges outside of the United States and Canada, and of whom recommendations concerning recognition are constantly sought by other Grand Jurisdictions. However, it seems to me that more nearly uniform practice in recognition among the Grand Lodges of the United States and Canada¡ and those Grand Jurisdictions which they already recognize is highly desirable; that this can be accomplished, to some degree at least, by the Commission on Information above mentioned. It is for that reason I am recommending that this year the Ways and Means Committee include in its report $200 for this purpose. FINANCES-(GRAND LODGE) The probability that there should be an increase in the amount which Lodges in this Jurisdiction are required to contribute to the Grand Lodge for the maintenance of the Masonic Home and for the purposes of the Grand Lodge was reported by M. Wor. Bro. Ray Bond in 1951 and by M. Wor. Bro. Homer L. Ferguson last year. The proposition for an increase will be before this Grand Lodge Communication upon a proposal to amend Section 74 of our ByLaws pertaining to this subject which was offered at our last Communication. • I will give you my views on this proposal, as I believe I should do. At present, and as my report as President of the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home will show, the amount now allocated to the Masonic Home out of the per capita assessment when added to other amounts available to the Home for the purpose of providing for the support and care of Home residents is sufficient and no increase for such purposes is immediately required. For Grand Lodge purposes the situation is otherwise. At our last Communication, by resolution immediately effective, mileage and per diem allowances to accredited representatives in attendance was increased, and a resolution to amend our By-Laws to provide for a continuance of the increase was proposed for consideration this year. Fairness and justice would seem to me to require that it be approved. Certain salaries have been increased and others should be in-


18

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

creased, because the salaried offices and positions of our Grand Lodge should be on a basis in keeping with their importanc~ and in comparison with those in other employment. Costs of printing, postage, and stationery have increased materially and are still on the increase, and this experience has been had with every other expense item. As a result, the budget for the ensuing year which our Ways and Means Committee reported last year was in the total sum of $96,591.52. Of this amount $5,00Q for the Masonic Service Association hospitalization purposes was provided out of voluntary contributions, leaving $91,591.52 to be provided out of regular Grand Lodge funds. With a membership of about 120,000 the per capita of 60 cents per member would produce $72,000, or $19,591.12 less than the budgeted amount. We have ~n hand at present as the result of careful management over a period of many years U.路 S. Government bonds having a par value of $193,000, an amount which could sustain the Grand Lodge for about two years, but we should have a substantial stabilizing fund and should not permit this to decrease. In my meetings with District Deputies and with Lodge officers I have insisted that Lodges should maintain financial integrity, financial stability, and financial dignity; that Lodges should arrange so that their necessary costs and expenses could be provided out of income. The Grand Lodge should operate in the same manner, that is, within income. I.believe the record will show that we will have operated within the budget mentioned above during the past year. Also, a calculation will show that the proposed increase will provide an amount a little in excess of that actually required. I want to remind you, however, that no increase for .the Home is asked immediately, but the need for an increase may come if by chance some sources of income are diminished or increases in costs continue, and that, under the amendment as proposed, this Grand Lodge, at any Communication can order a greater amount paid to the Home than the present $1.90. The resolution saJ7 s, "One dollar and ninety cents shall be used for the support of the Masonic Home unless otherwise ordered by the Grand Lodge." Thus, if necessity required it, an amount for the Home could be provided without waiting for the process of another amendment. I have discussed this proposal to increase the per capita with the Grand Lodge officers at our conferences. I have given it a great deal of consideration. There is a need. The amount suggested is reasonable. I make the earnest recommendation that you give it favorable consideration when it is presented for action.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

19

(CHARTERED LODGES)

Many of our Lodges have alre~dy recognized that economic levels of 1953 do not make it possible to operate on dues that were set to meet a 1939-1941 economic level and have adjusted their dues to provide adequately for increased costs. Others have not and' should do so. There is no monetary value which can be assigned to Masonic membership. It is worth that which it costs to maintain it in the respectable manner in which Freemasons as respectable and dignified citizens of their communities should live in t4eir Lodges. Dues should be adjusted so that without extravagance and waste Lodges can fulfill their obligations to the Grand Lodge, maintain their premises properly, preserve their properties, pay costs of printing, postage, stationery and other expenses, provide for some entertainment; pay salaries of salaried positions according to the standards of their communities, and adequately provide for their obligations to do such charity as needy members, their widows and orphans require. Dues calculated to cover these costs of maintaining Lodges should certainly be within the ability and desire of every member who wants to look with pride upon the great Fraternity of which he is a part and should be provided accordingly. The moneys of a Lodge are to be received by the Secretary whose duty requires him to pay them to the Treasurer. Payments by the Treasurer are to be by order of the Master with the consent of 'the Lodge. These financial transactions require that accurate records of them be kept. Such records should be audited annually, either by a committee appointed for that purpose, or by an accountant employed for that purpose, and the result should be reported to the Lodge. Any person who is entrusted with funds is entitled to have ~ report made to those whose funds are handled showing that he has been faithful to his trust and that he has fully and carefully performed his duties. MILEAGE AND PER DIEM ALLOWANCES FOR COMMITTEE MEMBERS My attention has been called to the fact that our By-Laws limit mileage and per diem allowances in such a manner as that members of certain committees whose attendance at Grand Lodge Communications is essential are excluded. The particular committee to which reference was made is the Committee on Mileage and Per Diem, whose attendance is essential and whose 'duties require long hours of work especially when we have a two-day session., There will be before this Communication a proposal to amend our Mileage and Per Diem By-Law so as to increase the amount of the allowance to those entitled thereto. I have already indicated that I think it should pass.


20

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

I am suggesting to the Jurisprudence Committee whose report will bring the proposal before you for action that it consider the desirability of including in the amendment a provision for mileage and per diem allowances to such committee members as are required to attend Grand Lodge Communications in order to perform their duties. At this moment I know of none in that class who do not get mileage and per diem other than the Mileage and Per Diem Committee. MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION HOSPITAL VISITATION PROGRAM In 1951 this Grand Lodge appropriated $5,000 toward the Masonic Service Association Hospital Visitation Program and directed that there be a solicitation of individual members toward this effort. Out of the funds thus solicited the $5,000 first mentioned was to go back into regular Grand Lodge funds. Last year it was reported that a sufficient amount was received in voluntary contributions to leave on hand $4,751.38 in excess of the original $5,000 contribution. The Grand Master recommended that this Grand Lodge make an annual contribution of $5,000 toward the Visitation Program. The Ways and Means Committee made an appropriation last year and the contribution was made. The Grand Lodge directed that the solicitation for voluntary contributions be continued during the past year. This was done and there is on hand at the date this report is written a balance of $10,250.86 in this account. The Masonic Service Association Hospital Visitation Program is a desirable undertaking. It seeks to bring comfort and aid to those who suffered disabilities in the Armed Service. They do not want for medical attention. They do, however, need comfort and encouragement and attention. They need the sustaining influence of brotherhood. Disabilities do not end with a cessation of hostilities but go on for a long time. The need will be with us for years. Thirty Grand Lodges contribute to the Hospital Visitation activities. Some are more generous than we are; others less. My consideration of the problem causes me to conclude that we should continue to participate and that $5,000 per year is our fair share of the cost of maintaining these services. My recommendation is that out of the funds now on hand, which were contributed in response to our Hospital Visitation program solicitation, we again this year contribute $5,000 to the Masonic Service Association for Hospital Visitation. This leaves on hand in this fund the sum of $5,250.86-more than enough for a like contribution next year. I see no occasion for


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

21

the continuance of the solicitation when there is no immediate plan to use the fund. Therefore, I recommend that no further solicitation for the Hospital Visitation purpose be made during the coming year. Thereafter, and I make this suggestion without attempting to project myself beyond the period for which I should make recommendations now, the situation can be examined. If a continuance of contributions is considered desirable, arrangements can be made to provide for a new solicitation. If as a result of the increase in the Grand Lodge per capita assessment available money is on hand, a contribution can be made out of Grand Lodge funds. The Grand Lodge can decide the course. I favor the voluntary contribution method of raising the fund. A distinguished Past Grand Master disagrees and we had some correspondence in which we exchanged views, but the issue is not before us now, for which reason argument on the question should be reserved until the question comes up for action. I know, however, that by some process the Grand Lodge of Missouri will do its fair share for men who suffer as a consequence of their service to our country. DECISIONS Most inquiries made of me on questions of law were readily answered by reference to clear provisions of our By-Laws and decisions which had been approved by this Grand Lodge. I do not report such here.. To do so would only encumber the record. I report only those few which I think should be finally determined by official action here. DECISION 1 I was asked for a ruling as to whether or not one person might hold two offices in a lodge. My disposition of this question was as follows: The officers of a lodge within the contemplation of this ruling are the following:

Worshipful Master Senior 'Varden Junior Warden Treasurer Secretary

Marshal Senior Deacon Junior Deacon Senior Steward Junior Steward. Tiler

Chaplai~

It is my opinion and I rule that no one person may hold more than one of such offices at one and the same time. DECISION

2

Marlborough Lodge No. 569 now lies within the corporate limits of Kansas City, Missouri. I was asked to determine the question of


22

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

jurisdiction by the Grandview Lodge No. 618 and Marlborough Lodge No. 569 and the determination which was made is as follows: 1. Grandview Lodge No. 618 and Marlborough Lodge No. 569 have jurisdiction respectively in the territory lying equidistant between the corporate limits of each of the to'W'"IlS in which said Lodges are -located. However, if the town of Grandview is not incorporated the jurisdiction is figured from the Lodge Hall in Grandview, but in such case, neither Lodge has jurisdiction within the corporate limits of another city or town where there is a Lodge. (Sec. 188, By-Laws 1947). 2. The jurisdiction of the Lodges in Kansas City, Independence Lodge No. 76 and McDonald Lodge No. 324 extend in all the territory lying equidistant between the corporate limits of Kansas City and the corporate limits of Independence, Missouri, as these Lodges are located in incorporated towns, but neither Lodge has jurisdiction within the corporate limits of another city or town where there is a Lodge. (Sec. 188, By-Laws 1947.) The jurisdiction between the Lodges in Kansas City and Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 extends over the territory lying equidistant between the co'rporate limits of Kansas City and the Lodge Hall of Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 by reason of the fact that the town of Mt. Washington is not incorporated. (Sec. 188, ByLaws 1947; Proc. 1907, p. 14; Proc. 1925, pp. 34, 167.) 3. Independence Lodge No. 76, McDonald Lodge No. 324 and Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614, having concurrent jurisdiction, as approved by M. W. Bro. James M. Bradford (Proc. 1950, p. 29) and approved by the Grand Lodge at 'the 1950 Communication (p. 142), therefore these three Lodges each have jurisdiction in each of the towns in which they; respectively, are located, regardless of whether such town is incorporated or not and the jurisdiction over each of these three Lodges extends over the territory in all directions lying equidistant between the corporate limits of Independence, Missouri and the nearest Lodge or Lodges in the various directions therefrom and in the territory lying equidistant bebveen the Lodge Hall of Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 and the nearest Lodge or Lodges in the various directions therefrom, but have no jurisdiction within the corporate limits of another city or town where there is a Lodge. 4. Jurisdiction of territory is determined by airline. (Sec. 184, By-Laws 1947.) 5. Attention is also called to Sec. 121, By-Laws 1947, relating to residence of petitioner. DECISION

3

A lodge. asked a question to the following effect: If after January 1 of any year and prior to his suspension for non-payment of dues


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

23

a brother asks for a dimit prior to the payment of, his dues for the year in question, what portion of a year's dues must be paid in order to put him in good standing ~o that a dimit may issue ~ My answer was that a full year's dues became due and payable on January 1 of each year and the full amount had to be paid before a dimit could properly issue. DECISION

4

East Gate Lodge No. 630 propounded the question whether UNANIMOUS consent is required' for the Lodge to issue a Certificate of Dimission or whether the Lodge shall issue the Certificate of Dimission upon the favorable MAJORITY VOTE of the Lodge. The determination which was made is as follows: 1. An Entered Apprentice is ENTITLED to a Certificate of Good Standing (Certificate of Dimission) from his Lodge granting a \vaiver of .iurisdiction for the purpose of joining a Lodge in the jurisdiction in which he RESIDES} if he has REMOVED from the jurisdiction of the Lodge to which he belongs, subject to paragraph 3 of this summary. 2. A Lodge, by majority vote, MAY grant a Certificate of Good Standing (Certificate of Dimission), granting a waiver of jurisdiction, to an Entered Apprentice residing in its jurisdiction for the purpose of joining another Lodge, whether he intends to join another Lodge in the same jurisdiction or in another jurisdiction, subject to paragraph 3 of this summary. 3. Where objection is made to the issuance to an Entered Apprentice of a Certificate of Good Standing (Certificate of Dimission), such objection shall be a bar to the issuance of the Certificate for the reasonable period of 60 days, unless sooner withdrawn by the objector. . 4. Masonic usage, custom and the policy of our Grand Lodge forbids the evasion of the duty to prefer charges, by the issuance of Dimits, Certificates of Good Standing or other actions, when circumstances justify tne filing of charges, and, we should always bear in mind that Freemasonry requires that its reputation be maintained and that it will not permit conduct that will bring scandal or disgrace upon the Fraternity. DECISION

5

In re Nebraska Lodge No.1 A. F. & A. M. (Nebraska) and Bro. Paul Blotcky of Heroine Lodge No. 104 (Missouri) This matter had its origin in 1947. Bro. Paul Blotcky, a member of Heroine Lodge No. 104 (Missouri) and at the time a resident of Omaha, Nebraska, was charged with un-Masonic conduct by Nebraska Lodge No.1, Omaha, Nebraska. He had been and was engaged in the wliolesale liquor busi-


24

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

ness in Omaha, Nebraska, and, in Nebraska, a Freemason who engaged in that business in any manner whatsoever was at the time subject to the disciplinary provisions of the laws of the Grand Lodge A. F. & A. M. of Nebraska. Upon being advised that the charges were brought, M. W. Bro. Solon Cameron, then Grand Master of Missouri, requested of the then Grand Master of Nebraska that the case be transferred for trial to Heroine Lodge No. 104 of Missouri. The Grand Master of Nebraska courteously acknowledged the propriety of the request and made the transfer. Thereafter, trial was had before a Commission which resulted in a finding by the Commission that the accused who admittedly had engaged in the whole\ sale liquor business in Omaha, Nebraska, was not guilty of any offense under the laws of the Grand Lodge of Missouri and therefore could not be convicted in the case which this Commission was trying. Accordingly, it returned a verdict of acquittal. According to the published record the Commission made no finding as to whether or not the conduct of the accused was such that he had violated the Masonic Law of Nebraska. Appeal was taken to the Grand Lodge of Missouri and at its 1948 Communication the Grand Lodge of Missouri disposed of the appeal by adopting a report of its Appeals and Grievances Committee which concluded as follows: ,( Since the Accused was charged with a violation of the by-laws of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska and the punishment, if any, for violation thereof should be assessed according to such by-laws, the Committee respectfully recommends that all of the proceedings in Heroine Lodge No. 104 A. F. & A. M. at Kansas City, Missouri, be vacated, set aside and for naught held, and that the entire matter be re-referred to Nebraska Lodge No. -1 of the Grand Jurisdiction of Nebraska for such further action as it may see fit to take (underscoring supplied)."

Nebraska thereupon caused the case t~ be tried in Nebraska Lodge No.1, the路 accused was found guilty of un-Masonic conduct and the penalty was fixed as expulsion. Heroine ~odge No. 104 was notified of this result and requested that M. Wor. Bro. James M. Bradford, then Grand Master of Missouri, issue a decision defining Bro. Blotcky's status. M. Wor. Bro. Bradford did not issue a decision on the question. Instead, he made a full report of the situation in his Address (See Proceedings 1950, pages 35-38) with a view toward a consideration of it and a decision disposing of it by this Grand Lodge. Such consideration was not had. The 1950 Communication of this Grand Lodge was concluded without making a disposition of the question. The matter escaped notice at the 1951 and at the 1952 Communications and came to. me informally, this year, not in the form of a request to have it determined, but only in the form of an inquiry as to its status.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI '

25

I considered the questions involved in this case as important and determined there should be a decision on them. Heroine Lodge No. 104 should be advised definitely what Bro. Blotcky's status is; Bro. Blotcky is entitled to know his status; courtesy to the Grand Lodge of Nebraska demands that we tell it what treatment will be accorded its final disposition of a charge under its law against a Missouri member, made pursuant to a reference to it after it had accorded us the opportunity to make our own .final disposition, and which rereference was "for such further action as it (the Grand Lodge of Nebraska) may see fit to take." Insofar as Nebraska is concerned the matter involves our relations with a sister Jurisdiction. No matters of this character should be allo'wed to remain in an unconcluded state. Therefore, I made and now report the following decision: Bro. Paul Blotcky, having been found guilty of un-Masonic conduct upon charges filed against him in Nebraska Lodge No.1, Omaha, Nebraska, and a penalty of expulsion having been imposed upon him in such proceedings, Heroine Lodge No. 104 and the Grand Lodge of Missouri having been duly notified, the status thus imposed upon him, must, under the circumstances in this case, be recognized by the Grand Lodge of Missouri as his status in Missouri, i.e. he stands in Missouri expelled from all the rights and privileges of a Freemason. This decision is based upon the following: 1. The prevailing rule with reference to the effect in Missouri of disciplinary proceedings by other State Jurisdictions against Missouri Freemasons who reside within such other State Jurisdictions is that they and their effect, unless irregularity in the proceedings appears or is claimed and such is not only not the case here but the contrary appears, must be recognized as valid by this Grand Lodge. (See Report of Committee on Trial by Other State Jurisdictions, Proceedings 1938, pages 128-132.) (See footnote.) 2. Missouri claims for its Lodges, subject only to the obligation to transfer upon the request of the Lodge of which an accused is a member, the right to invoke its disciplinary proceedings against any Freemason affiliated or unaffiliated, Missouri or otherwise, for any offense committed within a Missouri Lodge's jurisdiction. So claiming, it is but reasonable that it must recognize similar rights claimed by a sister Jurisdiction, and must recognize the result of the exercise of such a right by a sister Jurisdiction. (See Grand Lodge By-Laws, Section 230.) 3. In this case, Nebraska recognized Missouri's right to try charges made in a Nebraska Lodge against a Missouri member, which charges were upon conduct in Nebraska. It transferred the case to the Missouri Lodge of which the accused was a member. This Grand Lodge refused to adjudicate the cause. It "vacated, set aside, and for naught held" all of the Missouri proceedings, which


26

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

proceedings included a finding of "not guilty" by a Trial Commission, and ordered the case "re-referred to Nebraska Lodge No. 1 of the Grand Jurisdiction of Nebraska 'for such further action as it might see fit to take.'" This re-reference was without condition or limitation or any notice that Nebraska's action, if it took such, would receive no recognition in Missouri. Nebraska Lodge No. 1 saw fit to take further action, and, having done so at Missouri's suggestion that it might do so, and therefore at Missouri's invitation, this Grand Lodge cannot now refuse to recognize as valid and binding upon it, the result which was obtained. 4. Our Grand Lodge would have had the power to affirm the finding of not guilty, even though there are as I see it, good reasons why that should not have been done, which reasons will hereafter appear, or it could have advised Nebraska that if Nebraska took the "such further action as it may see fit to take," Missouri would feel under no obligation to recognize it. In either event, if thereafter Nebraska proceeded, our Grand Lodge could in good grace have refused to be bound by the Nebraska result, but it cannot take such a position when it refused to make any adjudication and invited Nebraska to proceed. 5. With due deference to M. Wor. Bro. Bradford, whose friend.ship I prize, whose wisdom and judgment in all things I respect and whose earnestness and sincerity are never in doubt, I must disagree with his statement that for Bro. Blotcky to engage in the wholesale liquor business in Nebraska does not serve as a basis for charges of un-Masonic conduct against him under Missouri law and with his statement that Bro. Blotcky was charged and tried for conduct which is not a violation of the laws of this Jurisdiction where he held his membership. W. Bro. Bradford's conclusions are not necessarily so. Neither do I agree with the Missouri Trial Commission (their finding was set aside but it appears in the record) that Bro. Blotcky was not guilty of any offense under Missouri Grand Lodge Law. Our Grand Lodge Law provides that it is a Masonic offense for a Freemason to engage in the wholesale liquor business if he does so under certain conditions, circumstances and surroundings which are specified in our law. Article XXII Sec. 229 of our By-Laws is, insofar as here applicable, as follows: "Masonic Offenses." Masonic offenses which subject the individual offender to trial and punishment, are as follows: (a)

.

(b) Any direct or indirect connection with such manufacture, sale (whether retail or wholesale) or handling of intoxicating liquor as tends, or which occurs in a manner or under a surrounding which tends to impair the good name of the Masonic institution or its usefulness, or to cause scandal, or to degrade it in public estimation," etc.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

27

Thus, it will be seen that under Missouri Masonic law, the tests in detennining whether he, by reason of his business or vocation, is subject to Masonic discipline are, does his conduct tend to impair the good name of the Masonic institution, does it impair the usefulness of the Masonic institution, does it cause scandal, does it degrade Freemasonry in public estimation, does it occur in a manner or under surroundings which have the effect ~ The question of whether conduct is scandalous or disgraceful depends materially on public conceptions of proprieties at the time, at the place and under the surroundings where the conduct takes place. Concepts change, concepts vary according to time and place. I can still remember a time when determining characteristics of a woman who was alleged to be of bad moral character were such as that lipstick was considered indicative, silk stockings provocative and smoking cigarettes conclusive. Bikini bathing suits are considered proper on the Riviera-scandalous on some Michigan and Florida beaches. The Masonic Law of Nebraska provides that no person engaged in liquor traffic in any manner shall enter Freemasonry; that any person in Freemasonry who' enters into the liquor traffic, 'although such entry be legal according to the statutes of the State of Nebraska, shall be subject to Masonic discipline. Having by its law defined its attitude toward liquor traffic, set its public policy and fixed its concepts of propriety in connection therewith, for a Freemason of another Jurisdiction 'to come into Nebraska, privileged to wear Masonic insignia, be known as a Mason to the public and engage in liquor traffic could cause 'Scandal, could bring ridicule upon the Fraternity, 'could disgrace and degrade it in public estimation, and if it did so there would be a Masonic offense under Missouri la'w because such conduct would have occurred in a manner and under a surrounding which would cause those effects. Missouri's Masonic law should and does require that when its members enter a sister jurisdiction such members' conduct must conform to the rules of propriety as established in that sister jurisdiction and this is so not only with reference to liquor traffic, where specific covering provision is found, but with reference to all other conduct. 6. M. W. Bro. Bradford was concerned that if Bro. Blotcky's expulsion by Nebraska was allowed to stand, Missouri under its present law, could never restore him to membership. The situation in this regard is no d,ifferent than an expulsion by any other state for any other offense. Suppose a Missouri Freemason were guilty of such scandalous conduct in California short of conviction of a crime (somehow I wish we could get the notion out of the heads of some that conviction of a crime is' an essential element to a Masonic


28

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

offense) that a California Lodge saw fit to bring charges, such charges being of an offense against Masonry in any jurisdiction, and Missouri decided to permit California to proceed and an expulsion resulted. There would not be any way for Missouri on its own to restore him. We simply do not have the remedy, but this should never retard doing that which we should do with the situation before us. The reputation of the Fraternity is more important than one man's membership or status. Our remedy is to -provide a By-Law specifying the manner in which one expelled by action other than his Lodge or the Grand Lodge can apply for restoration in Missouri without resort to action in the Lodge or Grand Lodge of a sister Jurisdiction which imposed the status upon him. Mackey's Jurisprudence, 9th Edition, pages 553-557, includes the following: (p. 553) "The penal jurisdiction of a subordinate lodge is both geographical and personal. The geographical jurisdiction of a lodge is that penal jurisdiction which it exercises over the territory within which it is situated, and extends to all Masons, affiliated and unaffiliated, who live within that territory." (p. 554) "The personal jurisdiction of a Lodge is that penal jurisdiction which it exercises over its own members, wherever they may be situated. No matter how far a Mason may remove from the lodge of which he is a member, his allegiance to that lodge is indefeasible, so long as he continues a member, it may exercise penal jurisdiction over him. "A lodge exercises penal jurisdiction over all affiliated Masons, although not its members, who live within its territorial limits. A, for instance, a member of a lodge !n New York, but living in the vicinity of a lodge in Florida, is amenable to the jurisdiction of both bodies; to the former by personal jurisdiction, to the latter by geographical. And this is a wise provision of the law; for A, living at a great distance from his own lodge might conduct himself in so disorderly a manner, violating the proprieties of life, and transgressing habitually the moral law, as to bring great reproach upon the institution of whi~h he is a member. Now, his distance from his own lodge, would, in all probability, prevent that body from acquiring any knowledge of the evil course he is pursuing, or if cognizant of it by report, it might :find great difficulty in proving any charge based upon such report." (p. 556) "The Order, therefore, under the great law of self preservation, commits to the lodge in Florida, in whose vicinity he is living and whose good fame is most affected by his conduct, the prerogative of trying and punishing him, so that the world shall not say that a bad Mason can lead a disorderly life, violate the law, under the very eyes of his congregated brethren, and yet receive no reproof for his criminality. And if expulsion is the result of such- -trial, that expulsion, by the lodge in Florida, carries with it expulsion from his own lodge in New York; if the premises are not denied that the"lodge in Florida can rightfully exercise penal jurisdiction, then the conclusion follows, that that expulsion must be legal. ... (p. 557) "The appeal in such a case will be, not to the Grand Lodge of New York, but to that of Florida, for that body alone can investigate matters or redress grievances arising within its own territory, and in one of its own subordinates."


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

.

29

IRREGULAR OR ILLEGAL INITIATIONS, ETC.

.

1. BEATTY B. BRYAN-Pilgrim Lodge No. 652 M. W. Bro. Ferguson found that Brother Beatty B. Bryan had had the Master Mason degree conferred upon him illegally; that it was necessary he should petition for advancement and, if he was elected to advance, M. W. Brother Ferguson said a healing order would be made (Pro. 1952, p. 17). The petition for advancement was not acted upon before M. W. Brother Ferguson's term of office had ended, but was acted upon favorably thereafter. When I was so notified by Pilgrim Lodge No. 652 I issued a healing order. I felt I should carry into effect the promise made by M. W. Brother Ferguson, which he could not do by reason of the termination of his term of office. 2. WILLIAM A. BRANDENBURG-Fulton Lodge No. 48 M. W. Brother Ferguson found that B:rother William A. Brandenburg had been irregularly passed and raised in Nodaway Lodge No. 470 for Fulton Lodge No. 48, the irregularity being in that more than one year had elapsed after he had been initiated and before he was passed without any extension of time having been granted. M. W. Brother Ferguson stated to Fulton Lodge No. 48 that if it would elect Brother Brandenburg to advance he would heal the irregularity. The petition to advance was favorably acted upon on October 3, 1952, the District Deputy Grand Master notified me to that effect, and to keep the promise made by M. W. Brother Ferguson I issued a healing order. . 3. TOM B. TURPIN-Phoenix Lodge ~o. 136 Tom B. Turpin was duly elected to receive the degrees in Phoenix Lodge No. 136 A. F. & A. M., Bowling Green, Missouri. Because he was in the service of the forces of the United States at a point in the State of Washington, Oriental Lodge No. 74 of the jurisdiction of the State of Washington was requested to confer the Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft and Master Mason degrees. In making the request Phoenix Lodge No. 136 (Missouri) advises that it told Oriental Lodge No. 74 (Washington) of the requirement of our , By-Laws that no candidate may be raised or passed less than twentyeight (28) days after the preceding degree was conferred. Oriental Lodge No. 74 (Washington) did not heed its instructions, but, after conferring the Entered Apprentice degree on March 17, 1952 it conferred the Fellow Craft degree on March 31, 1952, or within fourteen (14) days. The irregularity was due to no fault of the petitioner or of Phoenix Lodge No. 136, but was the inadvertent act of a lodge in another jurisdiction which was proceeding as a courtesy to Missouri. I ordered the irregularity healed. 4. ROY AARON BREWER-Joplin Lodge No. 335 Roy Aaron Brewer was duly elected to receive the degrees in Joplin Lodge No. 335. Before he did so he was required to go to Iowa for an extended period of time. Joplin Lodge No. 335, through regular channels, requested that the degrees be conferred by Landmark Lodge No. 103, " Sioux City, Iowa. That Lodge was notified of our "28 days between degrees" requirement. It gave no heed to that requirement and conferred the degrees as follows:


30

PHOCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Entered Apprenti~e-February16, 1953, Fellow Craft........Fehruary 23, 1953 Master Mason-March 2, 1953 Neither Joplin Lodge No. 335. nor Brother Roy Aaron Brewer was at fault. I ordered the irregularity healed. 5. WILLIAM EUGENE REA and JOSEPH ANTHONY SESTITO -Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661 William Eugene Rea was elected to receive the degrees in Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661 shortly before November 10, 1952. At almost the same time that Lodge was requested to confer the degrees upon Joseph Anthony Sestito for Federal Lodge No.1, District of Columbia. Both candidates were initiated on November 10, 1952, passed on December 22, 1952, and raised on January 12, 1953, which was less than four weeks from the time the preceding degree was conferred. Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661 became aware of its error and appealed to me for relief. I called a conference of the officers of the Lodge who met with me on Saturday, February 21, 1953. The District Deputy, R. W. Bro. Norman R. D. Jones, was present. The candidates were wholly without fault. We reached the conclusion that the Lodge's error was due to negligence. New officers had just come into their offices and had not carefully observed prior dates or consulted records. They assured the Grand Master that more diligence would be exercised in the future. I warned the officers of the conse'quences of a recurrence of such conduct, issued a healing order as to William Eugene Rea, and also issued an order stating that to the extent the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia considered it within the province of the Grand Master of Missouri to so order the irregularity as to Joseph Anthony Sestito should stand healed. The Grand Master of the District of Columbia orally advised me that my action was agreeable. , 6. RICHARD ADAMS-Craft Lodge No. 287 Craft Lodge No. 287 elected Richard Adams to receive the degrees and thereafter conferred them as follows: Entered Apprentice-August 6, 1951 Fellow Craft-August 20, 1951 Master Mason-September 3, 1951 The irregularity was disclosed upon the Grand Secretary's audit of the Lodge's return as of June 30, 1952. The Lodge did not report it voluntarily. Inquiry of Craft Lodge No. 287 disclosed that its failure to observe the" four weeks between degrees" provision of our By-Laws (Sec. 118, By-Laws 1947) was willful and deliberate. I refused to issue a healing order. I issued an order declaring the conferring of the Fellow Craft and Master Mason degrees void and of no effect and directing that all moneys received by Craft Lodge No. 287 from Richard Adams on account of dues and/or initiation fees, if fees for the Fellow Craft and Master Mason degrees were separately collected, should be refunded to him. A copy of my finding and order and the reasoning which I applied is lodged in the office of the Grand Secretary. TEMPLE LODGE NO. 299 A. F. & A. M. and DAVID LOUIS BLAIR David Louis Blair received Masonic degree in Temple Lodge No. 299


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

31

after his election upon a petition he filed November 20, 1951. On about September 8, 1952 information was submitted to the then Grand Master to the effect that Blair's petition showed on its face the Lodge was without jUTisdiction to receive it, that Blair had not in fact resided in this jurisdiction for the twelve months .next preceding the date of presenting his petition, and that the Lodge had not processed this and other petitions properly. . This matter was referred to me when I came into office. Nothing had been done theretofore. I caused an investigation of the situation to be made, notified the Lodge and Blair of the complaint and of the result of the investigation, and thereafter, at the request of Blair and with the consent of all parties. I held a hearing on the matter in Kansas City, Missouri at which hearing all interested parties were present and represented. A full record was made of all facts pertaining to this matter which were submitted, and with my disposition of it I filed a full statement of facts found, of the reasoning applied thereto, and of my conclusions and the orders thereon in the office of the Grand Secretary where it is available for examination. Here I will record only a summary of the conclusions and orders: The record showed and officers of Temple Lodge agreed that at about the time Blair ~s petition was received, petitions for the degrees were not processed properly. The Grand Master was assured that the deficient practice had been corrected and that proper methods were being followed. No complaint or claim was made by any Lodge or any member, except that one with reference to David Louis Blair, that any right had been prejudiced by the deficient conduct. I closed this phase of the complaint with an admonition to the Lodge that hereafter all rules with reference to petitions for the degrees must be rigidly observed. From undisputed facts, I found and concluded David Louis Blair had not resided in Missouri for twelve months next before the date he filed his petition for the degrees in Temple Lodge No. 299, that, therefore, Temple Lodge was without jurisdiction to receive and act upon the petition, that all proceedings thereon were a nullity, and that all moneys which Temple Lodge No. 299 had received from David Louis Blair by reason of the filing of his petition, the degrees conferred thereunder, and for dues should be refunded to him. My order was accordingly. A development in the matter of Temple Lodge No. 299, A. F. & A. M. and David Louis Blair which occurred after my order of May 12, 1953 was made and issued was that David Louis Blair re-petitioned Temple Lodge No. 299 on August 4, 1953 and was elected on September 1, 1953. This action was reported to me on September 2, 1953. My inquiry showed that all proceedings incident to this petition were regular and that the Lodge had jurisdiction to receive and act upon the petition. Because Rlqir had, in good faith, participated in the ceremonies of initiation in the proceedings which were held void, I held that if when he presented himself for initiation no objection appeared that then the ceremonies iil which he had participated as the result of his petition to Temple Lodge No. 299 dated November 20, 1951 and the action of the Lodge thereon should apply to his petition of August 4, 1953 upon which he was elected on September 1, 1953; that the Lodge should not be required to go through the process, which process would have been a formality only, of again having David Louis Blair participate in such ceremonies as a candidate; that his status thereupon should be that of a Master Mason, a member of Temple Lodge No. 299, subject, however, to the qualification that he should be under the same requirement of standing an examination in open Lodge in the proficiency lecture of the

o


32

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

first section of the Degree of Master Mason as if he had been raised to that degree on September 1, 1953.

THE USE OF THE WORD "MASONIC" AND OF MASONIC SIGNS AND SYMBOLS FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES BY WHITE CHAPEL MEMORIAL GARDENS, INC. Last December my attention was called to the fact that 'Vhite Chapel Memorial Gardens, Inc., a corporation with headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, in association with Memorial Gardens Association, Inc., a corporation with headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri, in the development of a cemetery at Springfield, Missouri, and for the purposes of promoting the sale of lots in said cemetery had set apart a certain section in said cemetery which they designated as "Masonic Garden" and advertised as such by circulars and other descriptive material. Within the area thus set apart, an area approximately 420 x 500 feet, there had been set up a representation in stone of the chairs and altar of a Masonic Lodge hall. These installations were large and conspicuous; the distance from the chair purporting to represent the Master's chair to the one purporting to represent the Senior Warden's chair was approximately 360 feet with the representation of the altar midway between and that of tpe J unior Warden's chair about 120 feet from the representation of the altar. A square was carved on the repres~ntation of the Master's chair, a level on that of the Senior Warden's chair, a plumb on that of the J"unior Warden's chair, and on the altar in stone was a representation of an open Bible with the Square and Compasses resting thereon. I made a personal inspection of the premises when I visited Springfield, Missouri, on December 12, 1952, and on the same day talked to the Springfield representative of the cemetery association by whom I was told that the arrangement was made by and at the instigation and suggestion of officers of Memorial Gardens Association in Kansas City who controlled the sales policies and plans for the cemetery. Since it appeared that the activity was an obvious use of the word "Masonic" and of Masonic emblems for commercial purposes and further appeared as a representation to the public that the project was one of Masonic connections and sanction I wrote a letter to the promoters on December 29, 1952 addressing it to t'he attention of John C. Gordon, vice president and general manager, and called on them to forthwith cease and desist from the use of Masonic representations in this project and also to forthwith remove the installations patterned after Masonic furniture, furnishings and jewels. By January 9, 1953 I had received no answer and so wrote again. On January 14, 1953 Mr. Gordon wrote me making the contention that the activities of his company gave us no right to complain but asked for a conference.

o


1953

GRAND路 LODGE OF MISSOURI

33

I answered his letter on January 20 and agreed to a conference. On the claim of required absences made by the cemetery company the conference was delayed until February 17, 1953 when Mr. Gordon and Albert E. Stoll, general counsel for the company, appeared at my office. Brother C. Lew Gallant, legal advisor to the Grand Master, was present at this conference. , The net result of the conference was that the representatives of the cemetery company asked until March 15 to consider their position and see if they could reach a determination satisfactory to us. I did not hear from these gentlemen by March 15, but on March 13 or 14 Mr. C. A. Paynter, a Territorial Representative of Memorial Gardens Association, called on Brother R. Jasper Smith at Springfield and from his conversation it appeared to Brother Smith that Mr. Paynter wanted to ascertain if his company could retain Brother Smith to represent his company in this controversy. Brother Smith told Mr. Paynter that he was not available, because, as was the fact, I had previously told Brother Smith that if litigation' was required I would like 'to have him represent the Grand Lodge, and he had agreed to accept such a retainer. Mr. Paynter suggested to Brother Smith that his company might be willing to remove the jewels from the installations if I would stipulate that such removal would finally settle the controversy. Brother Smith communicated this information to me at a time when we were in a Grand Lodge officers conference. After discussing the matter with the officers at the conference I wrote Mr. Gordon on March 17, 1953 informing him that I would not enter into a stipulation according to Mr. Paynter's suggestion. Later I received a letter from Mr. Gordon dated April 2, 1953 in which he said: "We will discontinue the use of the word 'Masonic' in reference to the Garden; and while we feel that we have made no representations in the past which would imply a Masonic connection with the Garden or with the cemetery itself, we will so conduct ourselves in the future that no such representations will be made. , , We will remove from the decorative art pieces now installed in the Garden all symbols and emblems of the Masonic Order, these to be removed by competent workmanship which will remove the same without unnecessary damage to the art pieces themselves."

I answered on April 6 advising that the suggested action would not, in my opinion, cure the cemetery association's violation, that I would not agree that it would do so, and that it appeared 'legal action would have to be taken to determine our rights. Further correspondence followed, the cemetery company urging that I close the matter with an agreement that removing the jewels from the instalhitions would satisfy and I insisting that I would make no such agreement. Rt. vVor. Brother Smith was kept advised of this correspondence by copies of. the letters which were exchanged.


34

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

After waiting until June 2, 1953 and hearing nothing further I suggested to Rt. W. Bro. Smith that he should proceed with suit to compel the cemetery company to cease and desist from the practices in which it h~d engaged; and later, in a telephone conversation, he agreed that before actually instituting the action he would notify the Springfield representative of the cemetery association of our intentions and also make another inspection of the premises. The result was that the cemetery company caused the representation of the square and compasses to be chiseled off of the representation of the Bible on the altar and by some process filled in the representations of the square, level and plumb on the three chairs路 Brother Smith was assured that all advertising and other representations of the cemetery section as a "Masonic" section had been discontinued and also that a more definite concealment of the impressions of the forms of jewels on the three chairs would shortly be made. Now the three chairs on platforms reached by one, two and three steps and the altar with a representatiori of an open Bible thereon remained, but no strictly Masonic identification appears. ",Vhile originally I felt that nothing short of a full removal of all of the mentioned installations should be required, I reached the conclusion that our demand had been recognized, that the impropriety of the conduct of the路 cemetery association had been acknowledged, and that this having been done, no legal action to compel full removal should be instituted. My action was according to the requirements of the resolution adopted in 1929 (Pro. 1929, p. 181) concerning the use of the word "Masonic" or any symbols, emblems, words or phrases of the Masonic Order, as I understood them; my employment of Rt. Wor. Brother R. Jasper Smith was under authority of that resolution and for his services at my request I insisted that he should have a fee commensurate with the value of the services I asked him to perform. He rendered a very modest bill. OUR RITUAL AND THE CONFERRING OF DEGREES Our initiatory ritual路 is designed to communicate the principals of our Fraternity to those who apply for admission in a manner and form which will make an impression on the initiate that will capture his interest and convince him that an affiliation with Freemasonry is more desirable than he expected it to be when he first made his application. The long existing policy of this Grand Lodge is that a ritual should be established, and once established, it should be applied uniformly throughout the State. Our rules provide that certain portions of our ritual must never be reduced to writing in whole or in part. Cipher codes which are


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

35

offered as a guide to these secret portions are absolutely prohibited in our Jurisdiction. Notwithstanding the fact that the prohibition against them has been called to the attention of the Craft many time heretofore, I am told that some of the brethren still resort to their use. One such code which is offered by. an out-of-Missouri publisher is known as "King S.olomon." The mere directions to Dis~rict Deputy Grand Masters and District Lecturers to take up and destroy any such codes which might be found in use do not seem to have accomplished their discontinuance, and, while disciplinary measures are always regrettable, it seems that it may be necessary to resort to them against code users if the practice is not totally discontinued. In order to accomplish uniformity in the use of our ritual a Committee on Ritual was provided to conserve and preserve the work and lectures and to act as final arbiters in the decision of all disputes arising in this Jurisdiction concerning the rituals. Subject to approval by this Grand Lodge, that committee decides on what shall be Missouri's way of conferring the degrees. The duty of supervising the teaching of the correct use of the ritual is upon the Grand Lecturer. He and his District Lecturers and others of their appointment labor long and diligently so that those who actively participate in degree work may do so according to the form prescribed. One thing that plagues the Grand Lecturer and his deputies and interferes with their efforts to establish uniformity is the inclination of some well meaning and enthusiastic brethren to dilute our ritual by the introduction into it of parts of rituals used in other states or sometimes by variations to suit their own convenience. This should not be done. I have never objected to the conferring of a degree in one of our Lodges by well qualified brethren of another state according to the form of their state provided it was understood that it was their form. In fact, I have encouraged visitations from groups in other states for the purposes of such a demonstration and never once when I was asked did I fail to give my approval to such an activity. My objection is to a disturbance of our own form. We have selected it. It is a good way, and instead of hodge podging it by an intermingling with forms of other jurisdictions we should take pride in our way. . This same reasoning causes me to take exception to an attempt to glamorize the second section of our third degree by the use of robes. Robes are used in Chapters, Councils and the Scottish Rite, but the uniform ritual of our State does not provide for their use in Ancient Craft Masonry. Additional objections to their. use are, first, the revelation to a candidate of some unanticipated exhibition at the time he returns at the conclusion of the first section and second, the


36

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

inclination to provoke hilarity and mirth at what is a most serious part of an initiatory service. Those who participate must remember that the entire performance is for the benefit of the candidate-not for spectators-not for participants. Grand Masters of other jurisdictions have issued orders on these matters. I would not do so. Rather,.I appeal to the sense of propriety of each person interested in and who participates in our degree work. Let each one have a loyalty to our Missouri form and a pride in it, which can justly be had if the work is well done. Let each one consider, not how am I doing but what am I doing-what am I doing to the candidate. He is the one of importance upon whom an impression must be made. If work is well done and the . candidate is duly impressed, all else requiring approval by anyone else will take care of itself. Degree teams are and have been a concern. In some jurisdictions Grand Masters have put a ban on them. I do not agree with such action. However, I do want to bring to your attention that whenever a group of brethren, whether from one Lodge or from several Lodges, band together as a "Degree Team" they bring about themselves an atmosphere of authenticity which places upon them the obligation of seeing to it that everyone on the team is proficient and conducts himself strictly according to the requirements of Freemasonry and of the ritual as prescribed. If those in charge of a Degree Team fulfill their obligations as thus stated they can provide much pleasure for themselves, much interest in and help to Lodges and can instill candidates with a true appreciation of Freemasonry. However, no Degree Team should ever engage in any conduct that would justify the contention that its purpose was other than to confer degrees and confer them properly. THE BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD The Building Supervisory Board is one of the most important committees of the Grand Lodge. Although provision for this Board was made over twenty years ago, such a board has been in existence and has functioned ever since, and Grand Masters have brought it to the attention of lodges numerous times, occasions still arise when lodges proceed without considering its existence. Please permit me to bring this before you with emphasis. NO LODGE SHALL BE PERMITTED TO ERECT OR BECOME INTERESTED IN, USE OR OCCUpy A BUILDING OR TEMPLE UNTIL THE PLANS FOR THE PURCHASE, CONSTRUCTION AND FINANCING THEREOF SHALL FIRST HAVE BEEN SUBMITTED TO THE BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD AND ITS PERMISSION OBTAINED. (1947 By-Laws, Sec. 198, p. 53.)


• 1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

37

The Building Supervisory Board is an advisory service committee. Its duties require that it be active constantly. Its purpose is to guard against unwise financial ventures by Lodges and their members and to protect the reputation of Masonry for financial integrity. Its primary concern is that when for Lodge purposes (Temple Associations or similar associations organized by Lodge members come within this scope) a debt is incurred there should be an adequate plan for the retirement of the debt at its maturity or maturities and a reasonable probability of¡ meeting the plan. Permission to proceed is, of course, no guarantee. Permission of the Board is merely the considered judgment of men of experience who have examined the circumstances that the venture is sound. In order to pass upon the desirability of any venture the Board needs information concerning every phase of the project; i.e., location, plans, total costs, available funds, income, fitness for Masonic purposes, proposed occupancies, etc. The Board cannot make personal inspections or concern itself with details. For these it must rely on local representatives of the Fraternity and on District Deputies in the district where the venture is undertaken. It is a part of the District Deputy's duty to assist in the submission of information to the Board. The Chairman of the Building Supervisory Board has kept the Grand Master informed of the matters which were before the Board directly and by means of copies of his correspondence with applicants for his Board's permission. On one item we had a slight difference of opinion regarding procedure. That was soon resolved and the applicant did not suffer. It is my observation that the Board handles matters referred to it in an excellent manner. I repeat the admonition "given earlier with reference to "the necessity of obtaining permission of the Board in matters with which it is concerned and in addition I suggest that the privilege of applying for permission is an opportunity to get advice of such value that Lodges should welcome the requirement that they do so. GEORGE WASHINGTON'S MASONIC BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION Plans for the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Masonic birthday of W. Bro. George Washington were begun during the administration of M. W. Bro. Homer L. Ferguson (See Pro. 1952, p.10). The special committee which he appointed undertook to encourage special attention to this occasion. They suggested programs and plans and distributed much information to interested Masonic ~oups to a~d in making celebrations an adequate observance. I heard of many fine meetings at various places throughout the


• 38

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

state. One in which I participated was that arranged under the leadership of Rt. Wor. Bros. John VV'. Calhoun, Harry C. Ploetze, and Hugh Barden, District Deputy Grand Masters under appointment of M. ·Wor. Bro. Ferguson for the 33rd and· 57th Districts of Missouri, at the Scottish Rite Cathedral in St. Louis on N 0vember 8, 1952. It was an outstanding meeting of more than 1,200 Masons, their ladies and friends. The program consisted of musical selections by the Scottish Rite Choir under the direction of Bro. Charles M. Galloway, a tableau appropriate to the occasion by Scottish Rite Players, a le~rned address by the Rev. Bro. Dr. James W. Clarke, Grand Chaplain, and vocal music by the choral club of Harris Teachers College under the direction of Miss Helen Louise Graves. Freemasonry teaches by precept and example. There is no better Masonic lesson than the life of Bro. George "\Vashington and continued attention should be given to the fact that one of his characteristics was the promotion of the Masonic art.. THE RELIGIOUS SERVICES AND THE MASTER'S BREAKFAST ON APRIL 26, 1953

GR~ND

For a long time it has been my opinion that a closer association between religious institutions-churches of all denominations-and Freemasonry, and a better understanding of their objects and purposes would be mutually beneficial. All in their own way strive for social, spiritual and moral advancement. A method of demonstrating an area of unity was advanced by Rt. Wor. Bro. Robert L. Aronson. It was patterned after a plan which had found favor in New York, that of arranging a period of wor~hip on a Sunday morning, followed by a breakfast for which an appropriate program would be arranged. We discussed the matter at an officers conference and also at a dinner to which St. Louis leaders in Freemasonry, resident Past Grand Masters, resident Grand Chaplains, resident Grand Lodge officers, Presidents of the Masters and Wardens Clubs of the 33rd and 57th Districts, officers of the Square Club of St. Louis and St. Louis County and others were invited. Our resident Grand Chaplains, the Rev. Dr. James VV. Clarke, the Rev. Dr. Hampton Adams, and the Rev. Rabbi Samuel Thurman readily supported the plan by an offer of their houses of worship for the religious services. Under the chairmanship of Rt. Wor. Bro. Aronson and vice-chairmanship of Rt. Wor. Bro. Harry C. Ploetze a committee was fonned to promote interest. April 26, 1953 was fixed as the date. Dr. Wilbur H. Cramblet, now president of the Board of Christian Publications in St. Louis and whose experience in education, religion and Freema..<:;onry qualifi~d him exceptionally for the purpose, agreed to deliver the message at the breakfast. The Hotel Chase agreed to serve.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

39

The hour of worship was set at 8 :30 a.m. No count was made of those who attended at the three .churches-The .Second Presbyterian Church, the Union Avenue Christian Church, and United Hebrew Temple-but there was a fair proportionate attendance at each and at each a very pleasant service, including the observation of the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper at the Christian churches, had been arranged, after which at 9 :30 a.m. all assembled at the Hotel Chase. Here there was a count. The attendance was inspiring. Five hundred forty-nine Freemasons sat down together. The invocation was by Dr. Clarke, who, because of his radio and television appearance, had assigned his assistant, Dr. C. C. Carnahan, to do the service at the church. There was vocal music by Moolah Chanters. Dr. Cramblet's address was on the subject "Masons Believe in God" and the benediction was by Rabbi Samuel Thurman. The many expressions of satisfaction and delight over the kind of a demonstration which was presented cause me to recommend an annual recurrence of such an occasion in St. Louis and cause me to recommend similar affairs throughout the State in all communities. My personal appreciation goes to all who so heartily endorsed and supported this effort at a closer association. between religious institutions and our fraternity. EDUCATION MISSOURI LODGE OF RESEARCH MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION GRAND LODGE LIBRARY 路The desirability of a more extensive opportunity for Masonic education bas been the subject of many discussions and recommendations. Programs patterned after other Grand Jurisdictions have been suggested, and last year W. M. Bro. Ferguson suggested a substantial appropriation for this purpose. However, the limitations upon our finances were such that no appropriation was made. Although the kind of a program M. Wor. Bro. Ferguson suggested was not put into effect, this does not mean that Missouri Freemasons are without an opportunity for broadening their Masonic knowledge. Absent that which some might think we ought to have, we should make better use of that which we have. I will refer to three educational facilities which have the sanction and support of our Grand Lodge. They are: 1. The Missouri Lodge of Research 2. The Masonic Service Association of the United States 3. The Grand Lodge Library 1. The Missouri Lodge of Research exists under a special By-Law of our Grand Lodge. Membership in it is available to any Master Mason in good standing who is a member of a Lodge in our J urisdiction. Among its members are the best informed and most active


40

PROCEEDINGS OF THE I

1953

Freemasons of our State. It regularly publishes and distributes Masonic literature to its members. Its distribution includes such material as the annual Report of the Grand Masters Conference, the Masonic W orId, which is the annual review of Masonic transactions throughout the world, by M. W. Bro. Ray V. Denslow, and the Grand Master's annual address. These publications give much information regarding activiti~s of a relatively current nature over a wide area and are very interesting. In addition at intervals articles are distributed devoted to Masonic history, philosophy, and other matters dealing with Masonic principals. At least twice each year the Missouri Lodge of Research meets, usually at a breakfast meeting, and at such meetings, as well as at its annual meeting for election of officers, full reports of activities are made. 2. Our Grand Lodge supports the Masonic Service Association of the United States by an annual contribution on a per capita basis. The Masonic Service Association is a source of much educational material of classes which cover a wide scope. It furnishes statistical information, inspirational material, such things as suggested speeches, plays, etc. Most is available on application; some is available for:,; purchase on a nominal basis. If anyone is' interested in a specific . subject a lead to material can usually be obtained through this: . association. 3. Few of our members know that our Grand Lodge has a library 'j of Masonic material. It is not of great extent, but it is substantial ! nevertheless. The books of well known Masonic authors are on hand, encyclopaedias are on hand, and, in general, there is in this library enough to occupy one who is interested in Masonic reading.' Our Grand Secretary has done much to arrange that which is on hand and can make it available on request. I repeat, we have opportunities for Masonic education. We have material. We have sources of more material. Instead of complaining of our plight, we should be grateful for what we have and use it to the best advantage. DISTINCTION COMES TO ANGERONA LODGE NO. 193 Angerona Lodge No. 193 is located in Missouri City, a city with a population of about 500, located on the north bank of the Missouri River in Clay County, Missouri. It was chartered in 1859 and according to its 1952 returns to the Grand Lodge it had a membership of 28. Early this year five brothers-Ralph A. Tate, Jefferson D. Tate, Frank 'V. Tate, Edgar Tate, and Claude Tate-decided that they would like to come into Freemasonry, but only if they could do so at the same time, and they selected Angerona Lodge as their choice. While' each lived at a relatively short distance from Angerona Lodge, none lived within the territory over which Angerona Lodge


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

41

had Masonic jurisdiction. Applications for waivers were made to those lodges within whose jurisdiction these men resided and understanding brethren readily granted the waivers in order that their purpose might be accomplished. The petitions were received by Angerona Lodge, favorable action was had on each, and initiations followed. Procedure was such that a special communication was arranged to be held on June 27, 1953 for the purpose of conferring the Master Mason degrees upon them. Rt. 'Vor. Bro. Percy M. Best, DDGM, and Bro. Joe L. Moore, D.L., aided the officers of the Lodge in preparation for this event. Many distinguished brethren gave their attention to this unusual event, and with the assistance of its visitors, the Master Mason degrees were conferred by the Lodge. The selection by five men of Angerona Lodge as their Masonic' choice is a compliment to that Lodge. It is an evidence that its Masonic influence is much greater.than its number of members would indicate. I felt that such an unusual occurrence required mention in this report. THE LEGAL ADVISOR TO THE GRAND MASTER I have concerned myself with Masonic law for more than thirty years. I have had experience on the Appeals' and Grievances Committees and on the Jurisprudence Committee, and have participated in Masonic trials in various capacities on many occasions. I think I know something about Masonic law. My experience in Masonic law convinces me that no man can properly answer questions involving an interpretation of our laws without a study of the immediate problem which is presented. An "off-the-cuff" or "horse-back?' opinion is of little value. A proper answer requires research, and no matter how well a copy of our By-Laws may have been kept current, it is often necessary to go back into early reports for satisfactory answers. The Craft is entitled to complete answers. All of this involves time and with all of his other duties a Grand Master's time is quite well occupied. In order that the Craft should at all times receive satisfactory and complete answers to the questions they propounded, I appointed a Legal Advisor to the Grand Master, Rt. Wor. Bro. C. Lew Gallant, and he has rendered valuable service to the Craft and to the Grand Master during the past year. Grand Masters of previous years have gone to the Jurisprudence Committee for aid in legal problems. The members of the J urisprudence Committee have willingly applied themselves whenever their aid was required, but it is' not the function of the Jurisprudence


42

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Committee to advise the Grand Master; it is their function to advise' the Grand Lodge and to sit as a Committee to review that which the Grand Master does or has done and report their conclusions to the Grand Lodge. They should tell the Grand Lodge if the Grand Master is tight or wrong in what he does and in so deciding should be free of preconceived notions. The Grand' Master should stand charged with his own decisions in the first instance, which position he is in if he takes advice from independent counsel. I recommend to all future Grand Masters that they avail themselves of a system of having an independent Legal Advisor. I recommend that provision be made to compensate him for the services he rendered. JURISDICTION One of the troublesome problems confronting lodges, particularly those outside of the metropolitan areas, for which special provisions have been made, is the matter .of territorial jurisdiction. Section 190 of our By-Laws provides "A Lodge shall not receive a petition from an applicant for the Mysteries of Freemasonry who lives nearer another Lodge, without the unanimous consent of the latter Lodge, except in places where there is more than one Lodge and concurrent jurisdiction." Section 184 provides that distances must' be determined by airline, and also provides penalties for a failure to strictly observe the airline limitation. Thus, if a Lodge has tendered to it a petition from someone in a rural section the officers must apply rule, line, and compasses to whatever map might be available to determine whether or not it has the right to receive and act upon the petition. An error in calculation of a foot might make a difference. The question of whether measurement must be to front gate, front door, or other point could lead to a disturbing dispute. I know of no other determination of territorial limitations which are on such a difficult basis. Then too, consideration should be given to the fact that petitioners are induced to apply for membership by a desire to ,be in fraternal association with their friends who are members, and more often than not the desire is to petition a lodge to which their friends belong and no other. Present modes of travel have extended the area of neighborhoods. Present mO,des of employment at what were formerly considered great distances from home have enlarged the area from which men associate in employment. J f a man: is of Masonic material he should be given the opportunity of selecting a lodge, rather than be put under the compulsion of having a lodge imposed on him. Special legislation providing for concurrent jurisdiction has been ,enacted for Lodges in certain cities, towns and areas. No good' reason


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

43

exists for giving them preferential treatment. Accordingly, I have suggested and there will be proposed an amendment to Section 190 of our By-Laws giving Lodges Masonic jurisdiction in the counties in which they are located and in addition, in the counties adjoining the counties in which they are located, such jurisdiction to be concurrent with that of all other lodges within that territory. If such an amendment is adopted, then to avoid confusion Section 142 of ARTICLE XI should also be amended and a proposal to do so is also to be presented. SUNDAY PICNICS In 1936 the Grand Lodge approved a decision made by Grand Master Skelly that a Masonic Lodge may not give a picnic or outing under the name of the Lodge on Sunday, the Lord's Day, either in the name of the Lodge or through any auxiliary' organization acting for the Lodge. With the revision of our By-Laws in 1947 this decision was written into our By-Laws. It became a part of Section 209. In recent years concepts of propriety in conduct formerly held by those who were looked upon as setting standards have undergone substantial changes. Churches and church leaders have found it desirable to expand their Sabbath activities beyond the confines of their Sanctuaries and Sunday School rooms, and on Sundays to' engage in the promotion of fellowship by supplementary gatherings which were formerly frowned upon as sternly as once 'was smoking of cigarettes by women. On a Sunday morning last summer I attended a service in one of St. Louis' most prominent churches, one affiliated with the Metropolitan Church Federation of St. Louis, an~ was handed a bulletin which announced that on the afternoon of that day a certain group of the church would have a picnic at Pere Marquette Park in IJli- , nois f.or which purpose they 'would meet at the church at 11 a. m., the exact hour for the commencemnt of services of worship, and also that on the following'Sunday the Couples Club would have its picnic in St. Louis County. In like manner many churches of many denominations of St. Louis and its vicinity regularly hold picnics and other social affairs on Sunday. The practice may not be prevalent everywhere in our state; it may not be the practice of all churches. It seems that the practice, insofar路 as churches are concerned, is left to a determination by the particular unit which is involved and is not prohibited by controlling organizations. With the trend of time toward such liberalization of Sunday activities by church groups it seems to me that the strict prohibition


44

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

upon Sunday picnics by Masonic groups is undesirable and that the question of the propriety of such an activity should be left to the determination of individual lodges who should at all times take into consideration the prevailing practices in' their communities and who should mantain such control as will keep the activity within due bounds. So believing, I am causing a proposal to amend Section 209 of our By-Laws to be filed, which calls for the elimination from Section 209 of the following: "A Lodge shall not hold a picnic on Sunday either in the name of the Lodge or through any other organization acting for the Lodge." The proposal will be for action at our next annual communication. THE FORM OF pgTITION FOR DgGREES (Form II Grand Lodge By-Laws 1947, P. 60) At the 1950 Communication of our Grand Lodge an amendment was adopted requiring that a petition for degrees should be accompanied by or should embody a statement on the part of the petitioner "declaring upon his honor that he does not believe in, and is not a member of and does not support any organization that believes in or teaches, or has as its objective, the overthrow of the United States Government by force or by any illegal or unconstitutional methods." The form of petition was thereupon amended by adding a question numbered 12 to the eleven questions already appearing reading "12. Do you upon your honor declare that you do not believe in, and are not a member of or do not support any organization that believes in or teaches, or has as its objective, the overthrow of the United States Government, by force or by any illegal or unconstitutional methods f "

District Deputies an~ Lodge officers throughout the State have complained of confusion caused by the wording of this question. It is long and involved. If carefully read it becomes clear, and of course its objective is to find out if a petitioner is and will admit he is a Communist. The question has in it the fault I find in many of our By-Laws which is an over-verbosity when simpler language could convey the whole meaning. Then, too, the ending would make it appear that the objectional attitude is toward "force or by any illegal or unconstitutional methods." I know of legal and constitutional methods by which the Government of the United States can be changed or its powers can be altered or amended, but I know of no legal or constitutional method by which the United States Government can be overthrown. There is none. Why then indicate by implication that there might be' The motives of those who proposed the amendment resulting in the


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

45

requirement of this declaration were good, but does it actually serve a useful purpose~ If a Communist would seek admission into Freemasonry, which he would do lor ulterior purposes because of it? intolerance of the philosophy of Communism, he would do so surreptitiously and would have no hesitancy in telling a lie about his beliefs. He might also do as Communists have been reported as. doing; i.e., claim belief in one direction one day and change the next, claim an affiliation with the Communist party one day and a change the next. A person who is asked to sponsor a petitioner should be well acquainted with him and should never bring in the petition of a Communist; the duties of the investigating committee should require an inquiry into a petitioner's philosophy, and if these two groups are not sufficient protection nothing will be added by the petitioner's declaration. Because I can see no benefit by requiring the declaration in and because having it in causes confusion I am suggesting its elimination. This requires an amendment. While considering the "declaration" feature of our petition I went over the petition as a whole. Its form could be improved materially. It is by no means a good example of draftsmanship, and it suffers from a "patchwork" process. I realize that at the 1951 Communication (Pro. 1951, p. 122) the Jurisprudence Committee expressed itself as disliking to be continuously changing the form of the petition, still I think that 路if we can simplify our forms and still keep them adequate we should do so. An amendment to accomplish this purpose is being suggested. PHYSICAL DISQUALIFICATIONS Our Grand Lodge rules with reference to physical disqualifications appear to me to discriminate unfairly against otherwise qualified persons who through no fault of their own have suffered the loss of the use of members of their bodies which are necessary for a full compliance with initiatory ceremonies. Strong efforts are being made through various channels to enable the physically handicapped to take as nearly a normal place in life as can be arranged. Freemasonry should make its contribution by finding a way to offer the fellowship of our Fraternity to such unfortunates. Good character is our basic qualification for admission. Good character is not limited to those of perfect physique. This matter should be studied carefully, and it should be acted upon without undue delay. Because any change requires a By-Law amendment whIch must lie over before it can be acted upon, I am suggesting a proposal to amend Section 113 at this Communication, which, after study which I think should be made by the ritual Committee and others who are interested, can be acted on next year.


46

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

NECROLOGY The Grand Lodge official family has suffered the loss of two of its members this year in the passing of Rt. Wor. Bro. C. A. Tolin on December 23, 1952 and Rt. Wor.Bro. Robert L. Fowlkes on June 25, 1953. Rt. 'VOl'. Bro. Tolin was Past D.D.G.M. of the 57th Masonic District and at the time of his death was chairman of the very important Ways and Means Committee. Rt. Wor. Bro. Fowlkes was Past D.D.G.M. of the 50th Masonic District and at the time of his death was District Lecturer of that District. These brethren had served the Craft faithfully and well. The Masonic Home Board lost one of its most valuable members in the passing of Rt. Wor. Bro. Cornelius D. Struble on January 6, 1953. Rt. Wor. Bro. Struble was Past D.D.G.M. of the 22nd Masonic District and at the time of his death was a faithful member of the Home Board. He was a zealous worker in the Craft. Two thousand, one hundred and seventy-three brethren have passed this year to the Grand Lodge above. The Committee on Necrology will pay fitting tribute to the memory of all these brethren. MASONIC HOME Our Masonic Home, which provides for the care, comfort and maintenance of those to whom we have an obligation who, because of infirmities, age, or extreme youth, are unable to provide for themselves and have no one else to provide for them, should have the constant attention of all Freemasons in the state of Missouri. It is the true exhibition of the charitable inclination of our Fraternity. Its maintenance involves the handling of large sums of money and the management of large properties. The Grand Master, whose duties require that he shall also serve as president of the Board of Directors of the Home, has prepared the annual report for the Home which has been printed and will be filed at this Communication. Copies will be ready for distribution before adjournment today. That which is contained in that report will to some extent be a reiteration of what is said here, but the importance is such as to make reiteration desirable. In this address I will comment briefly on some of the more general matters incident to the maintenance and operation of the Home. At our last Communication provision was made for an increase in the number of directors who are required to manage the affairs of the Home from nine to twelve-the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, the Junior Grand Warden, and eight members chosen by ballot by this Grand Lodge. This addition of three was a material aid. The election of the four directors who were elected at the last


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

47

Communication, one to fill an expired term, three to fill the new terms which were provided, provided the board with the services of Rt. V\Tor. Bro. R. Jasper Smith, Rt. Wor. Bro. Henry Fox, Rt. Wor. Bro. Francis Howard, and M. Wor. Brother James M. Bradford, each of whom proved to be of great value to those whose terms carried over. On January 6, 1953 the board suffered the loss by death of Rt. Wor. Bro. Cornelius Struble and at the February meeting of the board Bro. Lester M. Heckman of Kansas City was elected by the board to fill the vacancy thus caused until this Communication of the' Grand Lodge. He has rendered valuable service ever since. The Home family is at a level of about 270 with an average age of the old folks of slightly over 80 years and experience shows that to that group comforts are provided for an average period of 7 years. As indicated under the subject of "Finances," at present our Home is able to operate within the amounts available from Grand Lodge per capita, earnings of the Endowment Fund, and such incidental income which goes into the operating fund from time to time as is available, and this notwithstanding the many costs which have increased during the past several years. Shortly after the last Grand Lodge Communication a new matr:on for the children, Mrs. Dorothy Hanington, was employed' in place of Mrs. Wilmoth Waller, who resigned anda new matron of the old folks, Mrs. Ruth Ely, was employed to replace Mrs. Emma Lee Bettis. Bro. Lewis C. Robertson, who continues to manage the Home and the facilities outside of the hospital services with efficiency and skill, is able to maintain an operating staff in spite of a tight employment situation in St. Louis and the l~mited budget under which he must operate: He does an excellent job. The hospital under the direction of our medical director, Dr. Solon Cameron, continues to give efficient and sympathetic attention to those who require medical care and hospitalization. Dr. 路Cameron not only faithfully and constantly makes available that great professional skill and knowledge of which he has such a vast store, but in addition he makes a great contribution to our Home family by interesting in our problems a staff of the most highly skilled in the medical and surgical fields in the city of St. Louis who regularly render services to our residents without charge to our Home. The names of these great charitably inclined medical and surgical experts appear in the Home report. Dr. Cameron is also able to bring to our Home the assistance of Dr. Walter E. Hennerich, Hospital Commissioner of the City Hospital of the city of St. Louis, who makes facilities available for laboratory and clinical tests and also provides a means by which Home residents whose mental faculties


48

1953

PHOCEEDINGS OF THE

become disturbed to such a point that we cannot provide for them can receive adequate attention. Our committees process applications for admission with diligence. I have yet to find one that I could say was unduly delayed. In reaching their decisions the first concern is whether a need is present which cannot otherwise be supplied. 'Vhenever it is determined that there is a need which cannot be fulfilled otherwise the inclination of our Admissions Committee is to路 find a way to fulfill the need. The. management of the properties of the Home is something which needs constant attention. We have done a great deal in the rehabilitation of Home proprty during the past several years. It seems, however, that no sooner than one rehabilitation has been arranged another shows up. Our superintendent and our Administration Committee give the care of our properties prompt attention. Our representatives, Rt. Wor. Bro. Orestes Mitchell, Jr., Rt. Wor. Bro. Elmer Wagner, and Bro. Lewis C. Robertson, the latter being our superintendent, represented the Masonic Home of Missouri at the annual meeting of Masonic Home Executives Association of the United States at Plattsmouth, Nebraska, in June of this year. Attendance at the meetings of this Association is an education in Home management, and those who attend bring back helpful information. Missouri was again recognized by having its Home superintendent elected to the position of secretary and treasurer of the Association. In my separate report on the Masonic Home I will comment on the necessity and desirability of constantly building our Endowment Fund. Here I will comment on the management of that fund. The arrangement authorized by this Grand Lodge under which the St. Louis Union Trust Company acts as our advisor and agent has, in my opinion, proven to be very satisfactory. Before this Grand Lodge approved an investment policy which permitted investments in equity securities in 1951 our portfolio stood as follows: Heal Estate Loans United States Bonds Other Bonds Corporation Stocks Cash Due from Income Fund

$1,275,982.49 223,070.88 14,382.22 154,019.81 1,943.66 7.49

Approx. 76.4% Approx. 13.36% Approx.9%

$1,669,406.55

According to the St. Louis Union Trust Company report of July 30, 1953 our portfolio stood as follows: Bonds Preferred Stocks Common Stocks Notes (Secured) Cash

$ 307,728.41

. . . .

10,243.75 809,361.93 802,020.96 25,786.84 $1,955,141.89

15.7% .6% 41.4% 41.0% 1.3%


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

49

and the present annual estimated income is reported by the St. Louis Union Trust Company as $88,168.26 or about 4.56 per cent of the July 30, 1953 value of the fund. The conversion from real estate securities to equities was accomplished in an orderly manner out of payments which fell due and were made according to the terms of the notes. As I leave the Home Board I make this observation-Freemasonry should be forever grateful to the men who serve as members of the Board of Directors for the great amount of time 'and attention which they give to Home affairs without hope of any reward except the satisfaction that they are doing something for the poor and unfortunate. This Grand Lodge is extremely fortunate in its choice of those who are continuing to serve and I 路am quite sure that those who are continuing to serve will inspire those whom you will elect at this Communication to give service of the same character with the same enthusiasm. THE STATE AND CONDITION OF FREEMASONRY IN THIS JURISDICTION During the year I made visits to about twenty-five of the Districts into which our Jurisdiction is divided; on these visits I came into contact with representatives of small community lodges, with those of lodges in large metropolitan areas, and with those of lodges of all types and sizes of areas in between. On the whole the representatives of lodges with whom I came into contact were, in my opinion, fairly representative of those throughout this Jurisdiction. In addition, I was in communication with District Deputies, Grand Lodge officers, and other area representatives throughout the year, each of whom brought information concerning the Masonic activities in his particular community or area. The Grand Lecturer traveled more extensively than I did and brought to me the benefit of his experiences. From the information thus obtained, I can report to you (1) that there is an intense interest in Freemasonry throughout our Jurisdiction. (2) that the chartered Lodges are conscientiously promoting the, interest of the Craft; (3) that officers of Lodges in general are endeavoring to improve Masonic practices and to conform strictly to the requirements of this Grand Lodge; and (4) that Freemasonry is held in high regard throughout the state. The most convincing evidence that Freemasonry's desirability continues at a high level lies in that again this year ,"ye report a gain in membership. The following figures should be of interest to our members: In 1929 our membership stood at 113,791. Then came a severe economic recession and we suffered a continuing decline in members until 1942, at which time a membership of 85,422 was reported.


50

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Thereafter the turn was to increases, increases each year until this year when our membership stands at 120,196, an increase of 34,774 within an eleven year period. Of course in a group of almost 600 lodges composed of over 120,000 members there are and will always be those who fall into error in procedure and in conduct. Human tendencies will always produce that result. But intentional error and intentional misconduct are rare. I report to you with confidence and satisfaction that the general condition of Freemasonry in the Jurisdiction is good. A most cordial relationship exists between this Grand Lodge and the ruling bodies of the organizations in Missouri we regularly recognize as of Masonic affiliation. The presiding heads of these organizations have extended niany courtesies to your Grand Master and constantly' indicated a desire to cooperate in supporting our chartered Lodges. The status of our relationship with the Order of Eastern Star is best indicated by the manner in which it, through its representatives, has participated in the affairs of our Masonic Home. More details concerning this participation appear in my report concerning our Home, but here I want to call attention to a fact which indicates the spirit in which the Order of Eastern Star cooperates. The only fixed obligation of the Eastern Star to our Home is that it shall contribute twenty-five cents per member for Home maintenance. It, however, does not limit itself to the fulfillment of its fixed obligation. It exhibits that commendable characteristic, which is so desirable in all people who practice it, of doing more than it is actually required to do, and this year it has undertaken projects which will involve costs of about two and one half times its fixed obligation, which costs will be in addition to its per capita contribution. It is a great pleasure to report these supporting attitudes of our associates in the causes and objectives of our Grand Lodge. Brethren, such is my account to you. My term of office is drawing to a close. As it does I should like to repeat that which I have tried ,to say to the brethren on occasions heretofore. Freemasonry is not a form or a ceremony. It is a force-a force which comes from within the breast-a force which requires men to do that which was enjoined upon them by their Creator and which drives them into an association in the form of our Lodge organizations. Being thus, the most important officers in our Fraternity are those who manage arid control the Lodges into which men come. They should receive all of the help and encouragement it is possible to give them from every available source, and we should be forever grateful to that great group of men, the officers of our chartered Lodges, whose constancy of attention insures the stability of our Institution.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

51

It is impossible to single out for mention anyone particular occurrence in this year which might be designate~ as having brought the most pleasure or satisfaction. There were so many pleasant occasions. Also, and except for two, I will not undertake to express gratitude to individuals. The uniform courtesy and graciousness of all would scarcely make this proper, and so I will express my thanks collectively to the Officers of the Grand Lodge, to the Past Grand Masters, to the members of the Masonic Home Board, to all District Deputies,' to all District Lecturers, to all Committee members, to everyone who was called upon in any capacity whatsoever. For particular mention I choose first M. Wor. Bro. W. F. Woodruff, my friend of many years, who first appointed me into the \ position from which by th~ usual progression route I reached my present position and who installed me as Grand Master. He gave me the opportunity. I have tried to merit his confidence. And then I choose to refer specifically to M. Wor. Bro. Reader, our Grand Secretary. Dr. Reader is the Grand Secretary of our Grand Lodge, but he , has been something much more important to me, as no doubt he has been and will continue to be to those who serve as Grand Masters, so long as he remains in office. We have been together on many oc~asions under many circumstances. Somehow, in a fashion that is mysterious, he has a power which sets up a line of communication with the subconscious mind whereby he transmits of his great knowledge, his wisdom, his understanding of people, his power of personality and the workings of a great soul to those with whom he comes in contact. I have felt the impact of his great power. I shall be everlastingly grateful for what he has done for me. And then, to all of you who do not come within the classes to which my expressions were particularly applied, to all with whom I have come into Masonic fellowship, to all Freemasons in our Jurisdiction, I express my heartful thanks for the privilege of occupying this great office and for the pleasures which your kindness and helpfulness have brought to me. Fraternally submitted, RICHARD O. RUMER, Grand Master. REPORT OF GRAND SECRETARY .

M. W. Brother Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, presented


52

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

his report for the period September 11, 1952 to September 10, 1953, which was received and ordered printed in the Proceedings. The report is as follows: SUMMARY OF THE WORK

Total Membership September 10, 1953 Net Gain Initiated Passed Raised LILBOURN LODGE NO.

. 120,196 . 2,196 . 5,099 . 4,824 . 4,762

666

Charter was granted to Lilbourn Lodge No. 666 on September 30,1952. DUPLICATE CHARTER

To Rutledge Lodge No. 572, on November 22, 1952, the original having been damaged by leak in the roof. MARLBOROUGH LODGE NO.

569

Marlborough Lodge No. 569 was transferred from the 59th District to the 22nd District December 27, 1952. COURTESIES

Two hundred and ninety-three requests have been made to Sister Grand Jurisdictions to confer degrees for Missouri Lodges; and one hundred and three requests have been made to Missouri 路Lodljes by Sister Grand Jurisdictions. LODGES CONSOLIDATED

Mokane Lodge No. 612 consolidated with Portland Lodge No. 242 under name and number of Mokane Lodge No. 612, on March 27, 1953; Wellsville Lodge No. 194 consolidated with Social Lodge No. 266, under name and number of Wellsville Lodge No. 194, on April 14, 1953. GRAND REPRESENTATIVES

The Grand Master appointed the tives: Bertram H. Blum Ernest C. Morris . William C. Wharton Kenneth G. Fernald Emesto F. 'J. Plant Thomas C. Jackson C. Weston Ringer Tomas Villamar Contreras

f~llowing

Grand Representa-

Delaware Oklahoma West Virginia District of Columbia Argentina Manitoba Massachusetts Guatemala


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

E. A. Peisley Henry Marshall Rowley Olafur Gislason Primo 1. Guzman

53

New South Wales New Mexico Iceland Philippines

NOMINATIONS FOR GRAND REPRESENTATIVES

The Grand Master nominated brethren as Grand Representatives near the Grand Lodge of Missouri as follows: John Horn Robert L. Hoy Robert Brinkman A. B. Vanlandingham

Argentina Delaware Louisiana New Mexico

FIFTY-YEAR

BUTTO~S

The following brethren whose names have been certified by their respective lodges and confirmed by the records of the Grand Lodge as eligible, have received buttons in recognition of their long years of Masonic standing: No. 113 113 566 476 626 626 443 76 9 1 287 284 3 273 345 345 345 345 282 282 559 339 443 443 550 302 273 416 446 446 446 446 35

and Name of Lodge Plattsburg Plattsburg Maplewood Mt. Hope Magnolia M~gnolia

Anchor Independence George Washington Missouri Craft Canopy Beacon St. Clair Fellowship Fellowship Fellowship Fellowship Cosmos Cosmos ClarksdaJe Fidelity Anchor Anchor Rose Hill Lick Creek St. Clair Cache Ivanhoe Ivanhoe Ivanhoe Ivanhoe Mercer

Name of Brother H. C. Walker Madison H. White Wm. H. Jenner " Geo. T. Bell Horace G. Beedle Fred A. Meyer Arnold Zerweck T. Radford Hardin , . Embra H. English Milton P. Kline r. Andy Zenge, Sr. . Virgil Walter Anderson Louis S. Shaffner E. L. Nance Thomas P. Lewis John L. Perry Robert L. Neff Julius A. Becker Charles Frederick Scholl Geo. W. Burley John C. Whitsell J. B. Jewett Geo. T. Meyer Ernest G. Daish Frederick E. Briner John L. Day :1". M. Burch Fred H. Beck Henry C. Weinle Roswell A. Clark Frank Blake Clarence L. Ellis R. Wyn Ballew

No. of YeOlfs 52 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 57 50 57 , .50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 51


54 354 5 354 636 345 332 87 126 323 2 360 360 198 121 121 401 40 40 84 520 319 149 362 631 445 420 345 284 207 3 460 205 630 424 539 312 567 73 392 282 282 289 614 149 422 89 376 376 36 187 89 109 147 272 299 170 109

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Hebron United Hebron Freedom Fellowship Excello Washington Seaman Cornerstone Meridian Tuscan Tuscan Allensville Erwin Erwin Carterville Mount Moriah Mount Moriah Webster Groves Clifton Heights Paulville Lexington Hiram Tower Grove West Gate Itaska Fellowship Canopy Clay Beacon Lambskin Trilumina East Gate Samaritan Dawn Cuba Miller Eureka Christian Cosmos Cosmos '" Graham Mt. Washington Lexington Gate of the Temple Friendship King Hill King Hill Cooper Hermon Friendship Stanberry Cass Granite Temple Benevolence Stanberry

1953

Paul E. Coil 50 Ernest M. Edie 50 J. Frank Harrison 50 Henry A. Sevedge 50 Samuel F. Jones 50 50 Wm. N. Franks '" Carl N. Guenther 51 Frank O. Custer 50 John E. Schmid 50 Frank J. Harmacek 50 Harry T. T. Smith 50 Louis Barklage 50 James H. Hunt '" .. 50 Geo. W. Tontz 50 Henry Schaales 50 Clement E. Ault 50 John M. Heubach 50 John A. Mathewson 50 Warren W. Sutton 50 Hugo Niehaus 50 John T. Bruner 50 A. W. Allen 50 C. J. Townsend 50 Fred Herman Schlinkert 51 John A. Guttmann " .50 CaT! A. Tholl 50 Wilbert L. 'Coleman 50 Robert J. Mitchell 52 Wm. F. Hirrlinger 50 Henry H. Luebbert 50 Charles E. Schumacker 50 Jesse M. Barrett 54 '. . Lawson M. Branham 50 Wm. B. Massey 50 Arch E. Hatchitt 50 John G. Fox 50 Robert L. Richeson 51 Otto K. Benecke 50 Wm. E. Church 50 Moe H. Furth : 50 Leonhard Haeger 52 Frank E. McNeal 50 Frank J. Ellen 50 Jesse G. Crenshaw '" .50 T. Frank Ellison 52 Robert Lee Taylor 50 Slade Ross Taylor 50 Jesse Moore " , 50 Roy D. Williams 50 Carl B. Hesford 50 Wm. J. Wiley 51 Alfred D. McGinnis 50 John F. Grimes 50 August M. Kraemer 50 Wm. B. Dickinson 50 R. L. Dome 50 Owen Collier 59


1953 344 9 414 272 38 30 207 625 198 185 19 2 460

Moberly Joe M. Berger George Washington John Kiburz Greensburg Virgil C. Kaser Granite George M. Trubner Callao Herman J.J. Baker Huntsville B. H. Shiflett Clay Fred K. Harris Sheffield Eric A. Anderson Allensville ~ W. Riley Thompson Chamois John K. Fletcher Paris Union James Boyd Meridian Henry Schaumburg Lambskin ..............•J. A. Carmichael 1~4 Wellsville .T ames E. Mapes George E. Cable ~ 147 Cass Edsel A. Ruddiman 84 Webster Groves John C. Schofield 18 Palmyra 7 0 'Sullivan Edgar E. Page 1 Missouri Samuel A. Humphrey 544 Algabil Justus W. Schaumburg 9 George Washington Roland E. C. Lee John Suttles 391 Raytown Arthur young 391 Raytown J. Q. Peterson 101 Bogard 422 Gate of the Temple Louis J. Leysaht Walter Funk, Sr 40 Mount Moriah John B. Reynolds 345 Fellowship James H. Ewing 57 Richmond 57 Richmond Harry Bates Smith George Allen Trigg 57 Richmond J ulius E. Banta 69 Sullivan Sullivan Michael P. Biehl 69 136 Phoenix O. A. Wilson Claude S. Kennerly· 360 Tuscan 282 Cosmos Chas. M. Barnard 282 Cosmos Geo. Kaiser Walter A. Higbee 259 Lodge of Love Fred .J. Fick 121 Erwin Albert F. Linde 121 Erwin ' J. O. Redfearn 100 Ash Grove 116 Barnes 1\1. E. Pettigrew Henry A. Steiner 20 St. Louis Geo. W. Moore 512 Webb City Davis Rich ; 578 Forest Park Andrew C. Pirtle 578 Forest Park 626 .Magnolia Geo. A. Bromley 482 Clintonville Wm. R. Lewis Wm. C. Rese 578 Forest Park J. Finley Clayton 299 Temple T. J. Pace 425 Green Ridge Peter C. Bushell 40 Mount Moriah L. B. Parrish 195 Bolivar 344 Moberly Wm. E. Bonnell John Leininger 121 Erwin Julius C. Heidenreich 121 Erwin W. T. Koken 179 Pride of the West 179 Pride ?f the West Arthur T. Gaertner

I

,

55

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

51 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 57 50 50 50 50 51 51 50 50 50 50 57 57 50 50 50 50 51 50 50 50 50 53 50 :.50 50 50 50 50 69 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 51 51 53 50' 50 53 50 50 50


56 99 40 239 161 323 420 447 447 187 12 303 36 105 28 101 322 322 40 147 401 174 5 5 576 190 504 83 83 126 84 353 323 43 360 28 639 639 369 481 83 205 298 298 298 443 119 1 1 20 537 404 161 445 77 77 92 197

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Mt. Vernon ............• Frank Leathers Mount Moriah ........•• Herman Adler Hopewell ............•.• F. H. Sumpter Clifton Hill ..........••• E. E. Hunt Cornerston~ Eugene B. Bartley Itaska ................•• J obn Thomas Stephan Jacoby J. W. Walker Jaeoby Andrew J. Lemley Hermon S. P. Linn Tyro ..................• Harry Rathbun Osage .................• Wm. L. Earp Arthur M. Hitch Cooper Kirksville Charles Tallman St. John's W. P. Birney Bogard D. W. Minnis Hardin Robert Eslinger Hardin J. W. Shackleford Mount Moriah James H. Scott Cass John F. Atkinson Carterville : L. E. Boyd Sturgeon James L. Palmer United Ernest M. Box United Fred D. Thayer Olive Branch Henry J. Falkenhainer Putnam Ed. Clay Petty Platte City F. J. Maple Laclede W. Elmer McComb Laclede Everett L. Vernon Seaman N. A. Mewmaw Webster Groves Walton J. Wright Barnesville Wesley B. Dickson Cornerstone Bernard Greensfelder Jefferson : A. E. Longenecker Tuscan Frederick E. Woodruff St. John's Wm. A. Spegal Mizpah Harry C. Evers Mizpah Theo. J. Evers Composite David A. Hilton Marceline Jacob H. Wallovich Laclede J. Wiley Atkins Trilumina F. C.. Barnhill Sampson W. T. Herd Sampson Sam Martin Sampson Russell Nichols Anchor Stephen P. Fenwick DeSoto Ernest Horstmeyer Missouri Edward L. Harberg Missouri James Macnish St. Louis W. Hampton Nash Bethel Albert H. Marquette Rosendale George W. Davis Clifton Hill A. J. Bradsher West Gate Wm. F. Landwehr Lebanon Wm. P. Darst Lebanon Rudolph G. Jonas Perseverance John Freeman Culver Carthage Fagen J. Clinkenbeard

·

50 56 54 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 54 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 54 50 50 50 50 50 55 • 53 50 50 50 50 50 50 51 : .' .51 52 50 50 50 50 50 50 '.' 53 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 52 51 50 50


1953 403 77 563 422 93 93 104 198 198 246 565 9

57

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Lowry City Frank V. Wright Lebanon Samuel C. Veach york ' Enoch Harrison Gate of the Temple Waldo P; Renshaw St. Mark's Charles Schreiner St. Mark's Charles Kaess Heroine Otho E. Seager Allensville A. A. Hunt Allensville .............â&#x20AC;˘ James Miller MontgomeTy ...........â&#x20AC;˘ Wm. Hughes Tebbetts W. C. Link Emil F. Kriegel George Washington

,.,

50 50 51 50 50 50 50 50 50 52 50 50

DISPEN8.ATIONS

By order of Grand Master Rumer dispensations were issued as follows: October 2, 1952. To M. Wor. Bro. James W. Skelly to lay cornerstone of High School at Rolla, Mo., on October 3, 1952. October 10, 1952. To .Wor. Master John O. Cahill of Meridian Lodge No. 2 to hold Stated Communication of October 23 at Alhambra Grotto. October 15, 1952. To Wor. Master Wesley C. Kreh to hold Special Communication of Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 at Scottish Rite Cathedral on October 30, 1952. October 15, 1952. To Rt. Wor. Harold O. Grauel to set Lilbourn Lodge U.D. to work under Charter, October 16, 1952. October 15, 1952. To Wor. Master R. Ottendorf, Republic Lodge No. 570, to meet in Hall of Billings Lodge No. 379 during time that Hall of Republic Lodge was being remodeled. October 22, 1952. To Wor. Master Earl F. Hilleman, of Overland Lodge No. 623, to hold Special Communication of lodge on Saturday, October 25, 1952, at Wellston Masonic Temple, for installation of officers. October 27, 1952. To Wor. Bro. Harry F. Sunderland to dedicate new Temple of Cold Water Lodge No. 485 on November 10, 1952. October 29, 1952. To Wor: Master Harry Cohen, to hold a night meeting of Olive Branch Lodge in the New Masonic Temple, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, on November 7, 1952. November 28, 1952. To Wor. Master Anthony De Basio, of Freedom Lodge No. 636 to hold installation of Officers at Gardenville Masonic Temple on December 27, 1952. November 28, 1952. To Wor. Bro. Beryl Calkins, of Xenia Lodge No. 50, to use the lodge room of Pickering Lodge No. 472, Pickering, Mo., until damage caused by tornado of November 16, 1952, is repaired. December 8, 1952. To Wor. Master John O. Cahill, of Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis, Mo., to hold installation of officers on December 27, 1952, at Alhambra Grotto Building. December 11, 1952. To Wor. Master Ernest F. Pyle, of Stockton Lodge No. 283, to hold joint installation of officers with Eastern Star on December 30, 1952. December 18, 1952. To Wor. Bro. B. M. Crates, of Hogle's Creek Lodge No. 279, to hold installation of officers in the Wheatland High School Building on December 20, 1952. December 22, 1952. To Wor. Master Clarence E. Hartley, of Jefferson Lodge No. 43, to hold election of secretary on January 5, 1953. December 24, 1952. To Rt. Wor. Henry A. Tanner, D.D.G.M., 52nd


58

/

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

District, to dedicate new Temple of Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209 on December 30, 1952. December 24, 1952. To Wor. Master, L. W. Schlueter of Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia, to hold joint installation of officers with Acacia Lodge No. 602, at the Acacia Hall, on Tuesday, December 30, 1952. December 29, 1952. To Wor. Master Harry Cohen of Olive Branch Lodge No. 576, to hold public installation of officers in the Commandery Hall, New Masonic Temple, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, on December 30, 1952. February 16, 1953. To WOT. Master James W. Taylor, of Beacon Lodge No.3, to hold public installation of officers in the Scottish Rite Cathedral on Saturday, April 4, 1953. February 27, 1953. To Wor. Master J. Sterling Marshall of Sikeston Lodge No. 310 to hold special meeting in the Hall of Morehouse Lodge No. 603, Morehouse, Mo., February 28, 1953, for work in all three degrees. MaTch 4, 1953. To Rt. Wor. Claud T. Wood, D.D.G.M., 38th District to dedicate new temple of Mack's Creek Lodge No. 433 on March 7, 1953. March 17, 1953. To W or. Master of Portland Lodge No. 242 to hold . meeting of lodge on Friday night, March 27, 1953. March 23, 1953. To M. Wor. Bro. Morris E. Ewing, to lay cornerstone of Grade School Building at Bolivar, Mo., on afternoon of March 27, 1953. March 23, 1953. To M. Wor. Bro. Morris E. Ewing to lay cornerstone of Grade School Building at Polk, Mo., on morning of March 27, 1953. March 24, 1953. To Wor. Master of Social Lodge No. 266, Martinsburg, Mo., to hold meetings of Social Lodge No. 266, Martinsburg, Mo. March 25, 1953. To Wor. Master Howard M. Wilson, Pattonsburg Lodge No. 65, to hold special meeting in the Pattonsburg High School Auditorium on Friday, April 17, 1953, for the purpose of receiving a visit from the brethren of the East Gate Travelers Club of East Gate Temple', Kansas City, Mo. March 31, 1953. To Landon B. Atkins, Wor. Master Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis, to hold Special Communication at the Scottish Rite Cathedral, St. Louis, on May 16, 1953. May 1, 1953. To Rt. Wor. J. Fred Park, D.D.G.M., 53rd District, to dedicate new Temple of Rockbridge Lodge No. 435, at Almartha, Mo., on May 1, 1953. June 5, 1953. To Rt. Wor. P. L. Marsh, D.D.G.M., 16th District, to dedicate Eolia High School for Masonic purposes. June 12, 1953. To Wor. Master of Eolia Lodge No. 14, Eolia, Mo., to hold meeting in Eolia High School Building on June 27, 1953. June 18, 1953. To Wor. Master of Hazelwood Lodge No. 459, Seymour, Mo., to reballot on petition of Ray Allen, Paul Triplett and Howard Benson at first regular communication of lodge following June 22, 1953. July 8, 1953. To Rt. Wor. D. Lear Tanner, D.D.G.M., 22nd District, to dedicate the DeMolay Building, 4236 Prospect Ave., Kansas City, Mo., for Masonic purposes. August 28, 1953.' To WOT. Master of St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, St. Joseph, Mo., to reballot on petition for the degrees of Everett Elbert Owens. STATISTICAIr-YEAR 1952-1953 Number of Chartered Lodges, September 10, 1952 Lodges U.D.

595 2


1953

59

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Number of Chartered Lodges, September 10, 1953 . Lodges U.D . September 10, 1953,· Total Membership ..........•••......• September 10, 1952, Total Membership in 597 Lodges .. 118,008 Adjustment by audit of individual· Lodges 8

594 1

120,196

118,000 Total Number: Raised Affiliated Reinstated

4,762 793 1,454

:

7,009 Less: Total Number: Dimitted Dellths Suspended N.P.D. Suspended U.M.C. Expelled

817 2,173 1,816

. .

. 7

4,813 I

NET GAIN, September 10, 1953

2,196 120,196

1953

PER CAPITA TAX

1953 Per Capita Tax due on 595 reporting Lodges $298,924.30 Total Amount paid to September 10, 1953 $299,230.70 Less over-payments of 414.45 - - - - $298,816.25 Balance Due on 595 reporting Lodges, September 10, 1953 .. $ September 10, 1953, no Lodges unreported.

108.05

MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI

Welfare Committee: Paid to Masonic Home, Checks 3, 132, 156, 217, 275 and 311 $ Per Capita Tax: Paid to Masonic Home: Check No. 49 $ 5,061.64 Check No. 293 92,000.00 Check No. 308 90,000.00 Check No. 310 38,000.00 Check No. 334 6,500.00

3,500.00

$231,561.64 Balance Due Masonic Home, September 10, 1953: On 1953 Per Capita Tax $ On 1952 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1951 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1950 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1949 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1948 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1947 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1946 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1945 Back Per Capita Tax . On 1944 Back Per Capita Tax .

915.33 1,416..75 49.40 22.80 22.19 17.10 10.50 16.50 3.00 4.50


60. On On On On On On On On On On

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 1938 1937 1936 1935 1934

Back Back Back Back Back Back Back Back Back Back

Per Per Per Per Per Per Per Per Per Per

Capita Capita Capita Capita Capita Capita Capita Capita Capita Capita.

Tax ............ Tax ............ Tax ............ Tax ............ Tax ............ Tax ............ Tax路 ............ Tax ............ Tax ............ Tax ............

4.50 4.50 3.00 4.50 6.00 3.00 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 $

2,509.57

SPECIAL INITIATION FUND

Paid to Masonic Home ale this Fund, September 11, 1952 to September 10, 1953 Balance due Masonic Home, September 10, 1953

$ 52,2'00.00 1,950.00

GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Paid to Frederick Schondau, Secretary, (Check No. 43) Balanc~ due September 10, 1953

$

5,500.00 4,161.50

September 10, 1953-($481.56 Bond and $646.13 in Bank) $

1,127.69

DR. WM. P. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

JOSEPH S. MCINTYRE LIBRARY FUND

September 10, 1953-Bank Balance

$

923.16


1953

61

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

GRAND LODGE F~ANCES SYNOPSIS OF F~ANCIAL STATEMENT SEPTEMBER 10, 1953 GRAND LODGE PORTION RECEIPTS: From Per Capita Interest on Securities Refund on Per Diem Account Sale of Manuals Sale of 50 Year Veterans' Buttons Sale of 1947 By-Laws Dues Receipt Cards Refund D.D.G.M. Account Miscellaneous

. . : . . . . . .

$72,323.77 4,842.50 2,283:92 2,509.50 530.40 167.00 1,861.55 103.65 243.77

Total . EXPENDITURES: Payroll . $27,000.00 Budget (less Hosp.) . 54,063.39 234.96 Social Security . 1,720.02 Dues Receipt Cards . 960.00 . 50 Year Veterans' Buttons 2,816.42 Manuals . 6.00 Special Library Fund . 500.00 Holland Relief ......................â&#x20AC;˘...

$84,866.06

$87,300.79 Less credit for allowance on St. Louis Earnings Tax (Excess Expense over Receipts

2.84 $87,297.95 $ 2,431.89)

MASONlC HOME PORTION

RECEIPTS: Per Capita 1952-1953 EXPENDITURES: Paid to Home (This includes $5,061.64 due in 1952) Hospital Visitation Fund~Collected this year (Paid this year $5,000.00) TOTAL RECEIPTS TOTAL EXPENDITURES Excess of Receipts over Expenditures Balance from last year

$229,009.58 $231,561.64 13,249.48 $327,125.12 $323,859.59 $ 3,265.53 $111,147.81

$114,413.34 Less: Balance due Masonic Home on Per Capita .. $ 2,509.57 Special Library Fund 123.48 Hospital Visitation Fund 13,000.86 - - - - $ 15,633.91 Working Balance Available

$ 98,779.43


62

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

GRAND LODGE FINANCES Cash in Grand Lodge Depositories, September 10, 1952.... $111,147.81 Cash Balance, September 10, 1952, ' Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Mo. $ 2,500.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1952, Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. 10,000.00 Cash Balance, September 10, 1952, Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo. 98,647.81 $111,147.81 RECEIPTS: Per Capita Tax, 1953 Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax, Back Per Capita Tax,

1952 1951 1950 1949 1948 1947 1946 1945 1944 1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 1938 1937 1936 1935 1934

$299,230.70 $1,864.15 65.00 30.00 29.20 22.50 14.70 23.10 4.20 6.30 6.30 6.30 4.20 6.30 8.40 4.20 2.10 2.10 2.10 1.50 - - - - $ 2,102.65

Received from Defunct Lodges and members thereof . Sale of 1921 Constitutions and By-Laws . Sale of 1947 By-Laws . Sale路 of Dues Receipts . Sale of Masonic Veterans' Buttons . Sale of Masonic Manuals . Sale of Trial Code Booklets . Sale of Pocket Encyclopedia . Refunds and Miscellaneous: Leslie Koeneker-Refund on Mileage and Per Diem check $ 1.12 Charter Fee: Rutledge Lodge No. 572 5.00 Refund on Mileage and Per Diem Account Refund on Dist. Lect. & D.D.G.M. Special Account Interest on Permanent Fund Securities Hospital Visitation Service Fund Total Income

. . . .

$301,333.35 95.75 23.00 167.00 1,861.55 530.40 2,509.50 38.15 80.75

6.12 2,283.92 103.65 4,842.50 13,249.48 $327,125.12


1953

63

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Transfer of Bank Funds to Union National Bank: From Bank of Kirksville $ 2,500.00 From Wood & Huston Bank..... 10,000.00 - - - - $ 12,500.00 September 10, 1952, Cash in Grand Lodge Depositories TOTAL RECEIPTS, September 10, 1953

$339,625.12 $111,147.81 $450,772.93

ANALYSIS OF DISBURSEMENTS

Total Expenses to September 10, 1953 TRANSFER OF BANK FUNDS TO UNION NATIONAL BANK: From Bank of Kirksville From Wood & Huston Bank

$323,859.59 $ 2,500.00 10,000.00 12,500.00

Total Disbursements to September 10, 1953

$336,359.59

Payroll . Printed Proceedings $ 2,979.30 Salaries and Allowances: Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Lecturer, Grand Lecturer Emeritus, Grand 26,401.95 Treasurer and Grand Lodge Office Help Federal Withholding Tax: ' Paid $2,433.60 Withheld 2,433.60

~

Social Security-F. 1. C. A. Paid ............ Withheld St. Louis Earnings Tax: Withheld Paid.....

27,000.00

469.92 234.96

234.96

94.25 91.41

2.84

Grand Correspondent . Maintenance--Grand Lodge Office . . Expense, G. L. Offieers (O.G.M.) Ritual C~mmittee Expense . Printing, Postage and Stationery . Dist. Lecturers and D.D.G.M. Conferences . . Masonic Relief Ass 'no U. S. & Canada Masonic Service Association : . Telephone & Telegrams-G. L. Office Bonds-Gr. Sec 'yo & Gr. Treas., and Insurance Reporter: Grand Lodge Session . Expenses: Grand Lodge Session . Contingent: Grand Lodge Expense Fund . Audit Company ~ . Washington Meetings . Grand Lodge Officers' Conferences . Relief and Charity .

750.00 1,800.00 515.88 157.84 4,473.82 2,000.00 420.02 2,180.08 300.35 403.30 75.00 2,282.11 554.26 234.25 400.00 588.18 3,500.00


64

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Expenses: D.D.G~M.s . . Care of Portraits of Past Grand Masters Jewel for Grand Master . Filing Equipment . . M. S. A.-Hospitalization Office Equipment, and Repair to G. M. Jewel .. Rugs for Grand Secretary'8 Office . Lodge of Research-Publication of information obtained in the Library of Congress . Allowance to carry out recommendation of Grand Master and other contingencies .

6.00 274.50 452.88 5,000.00 336.64 884.90 1,000.00 1,092.13 $59,063.39

Total Budget Appropriation for 1952-1953 (Exclusive of Payroll) (This includes a $700.00 item for additional expense of Grand Lecturer appropriated by Ways and Means Committee as an addition to the budget adopted by Grand Lodge September 1951, and reflected in the financial report fo.r year endrng September 10, 1952.) Actual Disbursements

$71,463.00

$59,063.39

Amount unexpended $12,399.61 Total paid Masonic Home ale Back Per Capita Tax collected to September 10" 1953 5,061.64 Total paid Masonic Home ale 1953 Per Capita Tax : $226,500.00 Dues Receipt Cards Purchases of Veterans' Buttons Manuals路-Special Account Special Library Fund Holland Masonic Relief

'

. . . . .

$231,561.64 1,720.02 960.00 2,816.42 6.00 500.00

Total Disbursements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $323,859.59 Transfer of Bank Funds to Union National Bank: From Bank of Kirksville $ 2,500.00 From Wood & Huston Bank.. . . .. . . . .. 10,000.00 12,500.00 Total Disbursements to September 10, 1953

$336,359.59

REOAPlTULATION

Total Receipts to September 10, 1953 Total Disbursements to September 10, 1953

$450,772.93 $336,359.59

Cash Balance, September 10, 1953, in General Fund

$114,413.34

Cash Balance, September 10, 1953, in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo. $114,413.34 Less: Balance due Masonic Home ale Per Capita Tax to September 10, 1953 2,509.57


1953

65

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Less: General Library l!"und Less: Due to M.S.A.-Hospitalization

. .

123.48 13,000.86 $ 15,633.91

September 10, 1953TOTAL AMOUNT AVAILABLE IN GENERAL FUND $ 98,779.43

Fraternally submitted, HAROLD L. READER, Grand Secretary. REPORT OF GRAND TREASURER

R. W. Brother Edmund E. Morris, Grand Treasurer, presented his report covering- the period from路 September 10, 1952 to September 10, 1953 which was received as follows, and ordered printed . in the proceedings: 1952 Sept. 10 Balance in Wood & Huston Bank, Marshall, Mo. $ 10,000.00 Sept. 10 Balance in Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Mo... 2,500.00 Sept. 10 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo~ 98,942.01 $111,442.01 1953 Sept. 10 Received from Grand Secretary $327,477.07 Sept. 10 By Trllnsfer drafts on Marshall and Kirksville 12,500.00 $451,419.08 Sept. 10 Disbursed during the year by Warrants No.1 to No. 336, not consecutive . Transfer drafts issued on Marshall & Kirksville . Sept. 10 Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Mo.

324,358.64 12,500.00 114,560.44 $451,419.08

As Grand Treasurer, I charge myself with the custody of the following securities contained in Safe Deposit Box No. 6111路 in the Union Safe Deposit Company of Kansas City, which said box is subject to the joint control of myself and the Grand Master, or his delegated representative: U. S. Savings Bonds-Series "G"-2%% Due 10/1/53-Cost Due 6/1/55-Cost Due 9/1/58-Cost Due 12/1/59-Cost Due 4/1/60-Cost Due 4/1/61c-Cost Due 9/1/62-Cost

. . . . . . .

5,000.00 10,000.00 18,700.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 10,000.00

U. S.. Treasury Bonds-2%%- 6/15/1964/69-Par Value U. S. Treasury Bonds-2%%-12/15/1964/69-Par Value

12,000.00 17,000.00


66 U. U. U. U.

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE S. S. S. S.

Treasury Treasuty TTeasury Treasury

Bonds-2%%- 3/15/1965/70-Par Bonds-2%%- 3/15/1966/71-Par Bonds-2%%- 6/15/1967/72-Par Bonds-2%%-12/15/1967/72-Par

10,000.00 6,000.00 40,000.00 25,000.00

Value Value Value Value

$193,700.00 I also hold for William F. Kuhn Library.Association U. S. Treas. Bonds, 2%%, Series 1967/72, Par Value

$

500.00

Fraternally submitted, EDMUND ~. MORRIS,

Grand Treasurer. REPORT OF AUDITOR

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge A. P. and A. M. of Missouri: Gentlemert : Pursuant to engagement, we have examined and checked the books and records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer of the Grand Lodge, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Missourifor the period from September 11, 1952 to September 10, 1953, also the Masonic. Rome Initiation Fund, the George Washington Memorial Fund, the W m. F. Kuhn Library Fund and the Joseph S. McIntyre Library Fund for the same period and respectfully present the following report: J

GENERAL FUND PER GRAND SECRETARY'S BOOKS

Balance, September 11, 1952 $111,147.81 Receipts Forwarded to Grand Treasurer Per Capital Tax 1953 $299,230.70 Back Per Capita Tax 1952 $ 1,864.15 Back PeT Capita Tax 1951 ..... 65.00 Back Per Capita Tax 1950 .. 30.00 Back Per Capita Tax 1949 . . . . . . . . 29.20 Back Per Capita Tax 1948 22.50 Back Per Capita Tax 1947 14.70 Back Per Capita Tax 1946 23.10 Back Per Capita Tax 1945 4.20 Back Per Capita Tax 1944 6.30 Back Per Capita Tax 1943 6.30 Back Per Capita Tax 1942 6.30 Back Per Capita Tax 1941 ..... 4.20 Back Per Capita Tax 1940 6.30 Back Per Capita Tax 1939. . . . . . . . 8.40 Back Per Capita Tax 1938 . . . . . . . . 4 . 2 0 Back Per Capita Tax 1937 . . . . . . . . 2.10 Back Per Capita Tax 1936 2.10 Back Per Capita Tax 1935 2.10 Back P~r Capita Tax 1934 .... 1.50 2,102.65 Sale of Masonic Manuals $ 2,509.50 Sale of Constitution and By-Laws: 1921 23.00


1953

67

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

1947 ........•......••••...... Sale of 50 Year Veteran Buttons .. Sale of Dues Receipt Cards ~ Sale of Trial Code . Sale of Pocket Encyclopedia . Duplicate Charter Fee Interest on Permanent Fund Securities Back Dues-Members of Defunct Lodges Hospital Visitation Fund Refunds: Mileage and Per Diem Account D.D.G.M. and D.L. Expense Account

167.00 530.40 1,861.55 38.15 80.75

5,210.35

.

5.00

.

4,842.50

. .

95.75 13,249.48

.$ 2,285.04 .

103.65

2,388.69

Total Receipts . $327,125.12 Transfers to Union National Bank: From Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri $10,000.00 From Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Missouri 2,500.00 \12,500.00 . 339,625.12 $450,772.93 Disbursements Per Checks Issued for Expenses . . .. $323,859.59 Transfers to Union National Bank: From Wood and Huston Bank, Marshall, Missouri $10,000.00 From Bank of Kirksville, Kirksville, Missouri 2,500.00 12,500.00

336,359.59

Balance, September 10, 1953 (Per Grand Secretary's Books) $114,413.34 Balance, September 10, 1953 (Per Grand Treasurer's Books) $114,560.44 RECONCILIATION

Balance, September 10, 1953 Per Grand Treasurer's ;Sooks $114,560.44 Less Outstanding Check, No. 320-August 25, 1953 147.10 Balance, September 10, 1953 Per Grand

Secr~tary's

Consisting of Balance in Union National Bank, Kansas City, Missouri

Books $114,413.34 $114,413.34

BONDS

On September 17, 1953 in company with Mr. E. E. Morris, Grand Treasurer and a representative of the Grand Master, we examined the securities listed on the following page, which are kept for safekeeping in the Grand Lodge Safe deposit box at the Union National Bank of Kansas City, Missouri:


68

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE PERMANENT FUND

Bond Number 211585E 211586F 23572B 2371A 4615E 21845E 21846F

Kind U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

Maturity 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964/69 1964(69

Interest Interest Par Value Total Dates Rate 6/15 & 12/15 2%% $ 1,000.00 1,000.00 6/15 & 12/15 2%% 10,000.00 6/15 & 12/15 2%% 5,000.00 6/15 & 12/15 2%% 10,000.00 6/15 & 12/15 2%% 1,000.00 6/15 & 12/15 2%% 1,000.00 $ 29,000.00 6/15 & 12/15 2%%

8564D 77195E

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

1965/70 1965/70

3/15 & 3/15 &

9/15 9/15

2%% 2%%

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00

10,000.00

56530 5932B

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury

1966/71 1966/71

3/15 & 3/15 &

9/15 9/15

2%% 2lh%

$ 1,000.00 5,000.00

6,000.00

8964D 49654D 41669K 41670L 41671A 28103C 26122B 315324D

U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S. Treasury U. S: Treasury U. S. Treasury

1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72 1967/72

6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15 6/15

12/15 12/15 12/15 12/15 12/15 12/15 12/15 12/15

2lh% 2%% 2%% 2%% 2%% 2%% 2%% 2%%

$ 5,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00

& & & & & & & &

65,000.00 $110,000.00

Redemption Value Cost 9/10/53 $ 4,960.00 $ 5,000.00 $ $ 9,790.00

V29384G Series G

Oct.,

1953

Maturity Value $ 5,000.00

X253352G Series G

June,

1955

$10,000.00

Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept., Sept.,

$

~ept.,

1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958

$18,700.00

$17,970.70

$18,700.00

18,700.00

Dec.,

1959

$10,000.00

$ 9,520.00

$10,000.00

10,000.00 10,000.00

C437033G C437034G D2320085G M4864090G M4864091G M4864092G V702346G X582056G

Series Series Series Series Series Series Series Series

G G G G G G G G

X806975G Series G

100.00 100.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

$

96.10 96.10 480.50 961.00 961.00 961.00 4,805.00 9,610.00

$10,000.00 $

5,000.00 10,000.00

100.00 100.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00

X807739G Series G

April,

1960

$10,000.00

$ 9,490.00

$10,000.00

X909237G Series G X909238G Series G

April, April,

1961 1961

$10,000.00 10,000.00

$ 9,470.00 9,470.00

$10,000.00 10,000.00

$20,000.00

$18,940.00

$20,000.00

20,000.00

X1146710G Series G

Sept.,

1962

$10,000.00

$ 9,510.00

$10,000.00

10,000.00

$83,700.00

$80,180.70

$83,700.00 $ 83,700.00 $193,700.00


1953

69

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI WM. F. KUHN LmRARY FUND

Bond Interest Interest Par Number Kind M;aturity Dates Rate Value Cost 1556430 U. S. Treasury 1967/72 6/15 & 12/15 2%% $500.00 $481.56 .There was no change in the investments in the Permanent Fund during the year under review. A $500.00 bond, Series 1952/54, in the Wm. Kuhn Library Fund was called and part of the proceeds was reinvested in a 2% %. u. S. Treasury $500.00 par value bond, Series 1967/72, costing $481.56 plus accrued interest, $4.13. All interest income was accounted for. MASONIC HOME INITIATION FUND

Balance in Bank, September 11, 1952 Received from Masonic Lodges during the Period September 11, 1952 to September 10, 1953

.

$ 1,700.00

.

52,450.00 $54,150.00

Transferred to Masonic Home during the Period September 11, 1952 to September 10, 1953

.

52,200.00

Balance in First National Bank in Saint Louis, September 10, 1953

.

$ 1,950.00

.

$ 4,417.56

.

5,247.00

GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL FUND

Balance in Bank, September 11, 1952 Received from Masonic Lodges during the Period September 11, 1952 to September 10, 1953

$ 9,664.56 Transferred to George Washington Memorial Association, February 9, 1953 Bank Charges

$5,500.00 3.06

5,503.06

.

$ 4,161.50

.

$ 1,113.10

12.50 6.22

18.72

Balance in First National Bank in Saint Louis . September 10, 1953 WM. F. KUHN LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 11, 1952 Receipts: Interest on Bond Interest on Savings Account

$

$ 1,131.82

Disbursements: Accru~d Interest on Bond Purchased Balance, September 10, 1953

4.13 .

$ 1,127.69

Consisting of Cash in Savings Account, First National Bank in Saint Louis $ 646.13 U. S. Treasury Bond No. 1556430-2%% 1967/72-Par Value $500.00-Cost 481.56 $ 1,127.69 As commented upon in a prior caption, a $500.00 Treasury Bond was


70

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

called and the proceeds invested路in a U. S. Treasury Bond, 2%% Series 1967/72, costing $481.56 plus $4.13 accrued interest. JOSEPH S. MCINTYRE LIBRARY FUND

Balance, September 11, 1952 _. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. No Transactions 'during Year under Review . Balance in Mercantile Trust Company, Saint Louis,. September 10, 1953

$

923.16

$

923.16

MILEAGE AND PER DIEM COMMITTEE

Deposit from General Fund Disbursements Mileage and Per Diem Checks Issued and Paid $24,716.08 Less Overpayment 1.12

$27,000.00

$24,714.96

Transferred to General Fund:. From This Account $ 2,283.92 Refunded Directly By Recipient of Overpayment. . . . 1.12

2,2~5.04

Balance, September 10, 1953

$27,000.00

.

D.D-G.M. AND D.L. CONFERENCE EXPENSE

Deposit from General Fund .:.......................... Disbursements Mileage and Expense Checks Issued and Paid " $1,896.35 Transferred to General Fund 103.65 Balance, September 10, 1953 .. :

$2,000.00 2,000.00

.

The various items in the foregoing report have been taken from the books and records of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Treasurer and reflect the recorded cash transactions of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M. of Missouri from September 11, 1952 to September 10,1953. The Lodgoe returns were checked to the Grand Secretary's records. The recorded cash receipts of the Masonic Home Initiation Fund and the George Washington Memorial Fund were compared with the stubs of receipts to the Lodges therefor. Cancelled checks were inspected in support of the disbursements and the bank balances shown in the report were confirmed directly to us by the depositaries. . Respectfully submitted, C. K. BENSON & CO., Certified Pu,blic Accountants. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE

M. VV'. Brother RayV.Denslow presented the report of the Com-


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

71

mittee on Foreign Correspondence which was received and ordered printed in the proceedings. . (See "The Masonic 路World.") REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GRAND LODGES

M. W. Brother Ray V. Denslow presented the report of the Committee on Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges which was adopted and路is as follows: To the Most WOTshpiful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri:

BRETHREN: We your Committee on Foreign Recognition beg leave to make the following report: We recommend the extension of recognition to the Grand Lodge of Venezuela,which we believe to be a legitimate sovereign Grand Lodge. We regret to learn of an attempt to create a schism in the United Grand Lodge of Berlin, which is not to be confused with the United Grand Lodge of Germany of which our friend Dr. Theo Vogel is Grand Master. Brethren who live in such strategic places should strive to secure unity rather than personal advancement. Fraternally submitted, RAY V. DENSLOW, Cha<irmatn, H. C. JOHNSTON, HAROLD L. REAEDR. OALLED FROM LABOR

The Grand Lodge was called from labor at noon, the Grand Chaplain offering prayer.


TUESDAY AFTERNOON 1:30 p. m.

The Grand Lodge was called to labor at 1 :30 p. m., the Grand Chaplain offering prayer. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON NECROLOGY

M. VV. Brother James VV. Skelly, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Necrology which was adopted and is as follows: To the MOld Worsllipf1tl Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of. Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee, charged with the solemn duty of. acquainting this Grand Lodge with its losses of faithful members during the year, reports that 2173 have passed to their reward. Some of these were seemingly in the prime of life, while others were like the old Pilgrim who remained here lingering long after those who loved him dearly and venerated every hair of his head, would have been glad for his own sake to see him go home. Those times are not alike in any two instances, and no man can tell when the night shall come. Among the many who have given outstanding service to }'reemasonry, we note the following: M. Wor. Bro. Karl Max Vetsburg. On a quiet Sunday, September 20, 1953, the community and Freemasons in particular, were shocked to hear that our genial and well-beloved Brother had passed away at one 0 'clock that morning. He had seemed to be in his usual health, and on the preceding day had participated in the solemn Yom Kippur service in Temple Israel. During the service he became ill, a condition at first not thought to be serious, but from which there was no recovery, and he quietly passed to the land where sorrow is unknown. M. Wor. Brother Vetsburg was born in Jefferson City, June 22, 1879, and in 1885 removed with his parents to St. Louis, where he received his public school and high school training, and undergraduate study in Washington University. He graduated forom the Law School of Columbia University in June, 1903, and immediately took up the practice of law in St. Louis, wh{;lre he made a reputation as a highly respected member of the Bar, not only for his ability, but for his unswerving adherence to the highest ethical standards. He was not married,-his heart was with his Mother, his rremple and Freemasonry. He was raised in Cornerstone Lodge No. 323, in 1907, and served as Worshipful Master in 1913. He was a member of the Scottish Rite, thirty-second Degree. In ]914 he was District Lecturer, and in ]9]5, District Deputy Grand Master in the 33rd Masonic District, which then embraced St. Louis and St. Louis County. He was appointed Grand Pursuivant in 1929 and advanced regularly to 1939, when he was elected -Grand Master. His administration was marked by scrupulous attention to his duties, with many perplexing decisions, all of which were approved. His standing and usefulness are further marked by his continued service


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

73

KaTZ M. Vetsburg to the Grand Lodge on important committees, from the day of his retirement 1IIltil his death. . He was Past President of Missouri Lodge No. 22, St. Louis, Missouri, of the Order of B 'nai Brith, and was Past President of District No. 2, of B 'nai Brith, embracing several Sta.tes. He was President of the Masonic Temple Associa.tion in St. Louis

.

,


74

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

for 27 years, and was noted ,for regular attendance at all meetings of the Association and its committees. Masonic funeral services were conducted in the Temple by M. Wor.-Brother Rumer, Grand Master, September 22, followed next day by religious services in Temple .Israel, of Which he was Secretary for many years. It might have been said on these occasions, as was said of Sir Cliristopher Wren, in Saint Paul's Cathedral, "'If you would see his monument, look about you." After 1;JJ.e services all that was mortal of our beloved Brother was laid to rest in Mount Sinai Cemetery. ' , R. Wor. Brother RobertL. Fowlkes died June 25, 1953. He was Past District Lecturer and Past District Deputy Grand Master. Wor. Brl>ther William E. Harris, Piedmont, Mi!lsouri, died September 4, 1953. He was District Lecturer of the 52nd District. R. Wor. Brother Cornelius D. Struble died January 6, 1953. He was Past District Deputy Grand Master, Past Grand Master of the Grand Council, Royal and Select Masters, and a member of the Masonic Home Board. R. Wor. Brother Cecil A. Tolin was struck and instantly killed by an automobile, Dllcember 23, '1952. He was Past District Deputy Grand Master, and had been chairman of important committees of the Grand Looge. , , Gone unto that Land upon whose peaceful shore There rests no shadow, falls no stain Where those who meet shall part no more, And those long parted meet again. , JAMES W. SKELLY, Chairma.1t, EMMETT L. RoBISON, SAMUEL THURMAN.

Arkansas: M. Wor. Bro. James Benjamin Bunn, Past Grand Master, died February 17, 1953; Brazil (Do Sul): R. Wor. Bro. J. M. Dll Souza, Magalhaes~ GraIid Secretary of Foreign Relations, died Ap1"il 23, 1953. Colora(},(}: M. Wor. Bro. William L. Bush, Past Grand Master, died October 1, 1952. . Costa Rica: M. Wor. Bro. Eric C. Murray, Past Grand Master, died September 21, 1952. . Delaware: M. Wor. Bro. Walter W. Hynson, Past Grand Master, died July 4, 1953; M. Wl>r. Bro. Weldon C. Waples, Past Grand Master, 'died October 14, 1952. . Di8trict of Columbia: M. Wor. Bro. Roy D. Borden, Grand Master, died June 19, 1953. IdaM: M. Wor. Bro. FTank Knox, Past Grand Master, died'September 1, 1953. . Indiana.: M. Wor. Bro. Charles C. La Follette, Past Grand Master, died October 24, 1952; M. Wor. Brl>. Richard H. Schweitzer, Past Grand Master and Grand Treasurer, died November 21, 1952. Italy-Grand Orient: M. Wor. Bro. Ugo Lenzi, Grand Master, died April 21, 1953. Loui8iana.: M. Wor. Bro. Quintin Theodore Hardtner, Past Grand Master, died August 21, 1953. Ma.ine: M. War. Bro. Harold Hale Murchie, Past Grand Master, died March 7, 1953; Rt. Wor. Bro. Frank J. Cole, Past Senior Grand Warden, died October 31, 1952. Manitoba: M. Wor~ Bra. Justice William J. Major, Past Grand Master, died August 13, 1953.

,

\.

!


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

75

Michigan: M. Wor. Bro. iohn H.Hawks, Past Grand Master died November 12, 1952. Minnesota: M. W,or. Bro. Edmund Alexander Montgomery, Past Grand Master, Chairman Committee on Foreign Correspondence 1923-August, 1952, died August 11, 1952; M. Wor. Bro. Vernon Gates, Past Grand Master, died Nov~mber 20, 1952. Mississippi: M., Wor. Bro. Morris Goldstein, Past Grand Master, Grand Tiler,路died December 8, 1952. Montana: M. Wor. Bro. Dr. WilliamJ. Marshall, Past Grand Master, died September 23, 1952. Nevada: M. W or. Bro. Frank H. Norcross, Past Grand Master, died November 4, 1952. New Hampshire: M. Wor. Bro. Orville Edwin Cain, Past Grand Master, died October 10, 1952; M. Wor. Bro. Allan Melbourne WilBon, Past Grand Master, died May 31, 1953. North Carolina: M. Wor. Bro. Julius C. Hobbs, Past Grand Master, died June 8, 1953. North Dakota: M. Wor. Bro. Theodore Bird Elton, Past Grand Master, died January 16, 1953. Oregon: M. Wor. Bro. Walter Milton Ransom, Past Grand Master, died September 17, 1952; M. Wor. Bro. Jared William Summerhays, Past Grand Master, died June 9, 1953; M. Wor. Brother Arthur Douglas Hoy, Past Grand Master, died December 19, 1952. Smtth Caro-Una: M. Wor. Bro. Samuel Tucker Lanham, Past Grand Master, died July 31, 1953; M. Wor, Bro. Robert Archer Cooper, Past Grand Master, died August 7, 1953; M. Wor. Bro. CharIton Durant, 'Past Grand Master, died May 11, 1953. South Dakota: M. Wor. Bro. Sanford Grant Donaldson, Past Grand Master, died March 28, 1953. Texas: M. Wor. Bro. Frank C. Jones, Past Grand Master, died November 15, 1952; M. Wor. Bro. James Joseph Gallaher, Past Grand Master, died October 22, 1952. Vermont: M. Wor. Bro. Cady Lewis Earle, Past Grand Master, died November 1, 1952. Virginia: R. Wor. Bro. William Simpson Pettit, Grand Treasurer 1926-1953, died June 2, 1953. Washington: M. Wor. Bro". Leslie Ward Lee, Past Grand Master, died October 5, 1952. West Virginia: M. Wor. Bro. Frank Fremont Flaig, Past Grand Master, Grand Secretary, died Septemb~r 9, 1952. Wisconsin: M. Wor. Bro. Albert W. Elmgreen, Past Grand Master, died May 14, 1953; Rt. Wor. Bro. Cyrus D. Stockwell, Senior Grand Warden, died January 15, 1953; M. Wor. Bro. D. H. Mooney, Past Grand Master, died January 31, 1953. Wyoming: M. Wor. Bro. Dr. George O. Hanna, Past Grand Master, died May 16, 1953. AMENDMENT PROPOSED RE JURISDICTION o~

The following proposed amendment was presented and by order the Grand Master reading of same was waived:

Proposed Amendment to Section 190, Article XVI, By-Laws 1947 To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. Of Missouri: The following resolution to amend our By-Laws is herewith presented: RESOLVED, That Section 190 of Article XVI of the By-Laws of this Grand Lodge, which now reads


76

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

"SEC. 190. Jurisdktion. A Lodge shall not receive a petition from an applicant for the Mysteries of Freemasonry who lives nearer another Lodge, without the unanimous consent of the latter Lodge, except in places where there is more than one Lodge and concurrent jurisdiction." be amended so as to read as follows: "SEC. 190. Jurisdiat{on. Each Lodge shall have jurisdiction within an area consisting of the county in which it is located and the counties adjoining the county in which it is located. A Lodge shall not entertain a petition from an applicant who lives outside its jurisdiction unless and until the consent of the District Deputy Grand Master of the District in which such applicant lives is :first obtained." RICHARD O. RUMER, Tower Grove Lodge No. 63t.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT 'RE AFFILIATION OF MASTER MASON

The following proposed amendment was presented and by order of the Grand Master reading of same was waived: Proposed Amendment to Section 142, Article XI, By-Laws 1947 To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: The following. rE.!solut~on to ,amend our By-Laws is herewith presented: RESOLVED, That Section 142 of Article XI of the By-Laws of this Gran~ Lodge, which now reads "SEC. 142. Affiliation of Master Ma.son. A nonaffiliated Master Mason may apply for affiliation to any Lodge in this jurisdiction, and is not confined to the jurisdiction of the Lodge nearest his place of residence. A non-resident may not affiliate with any Lodge in this State, except as provided in Section 192. A Master Mason in good standing in a Lodge in this jurisdiction, whose Lodge consents, or who has removed from the jurisdiction of the Lodge to which he belongs, may apply for affiliation, in the manner provided in Sections 126 and 168, to any Lodge in this jurisdiction, and is not confined to the jurisdiction of the Lodge nearest his place of residence. See Forms V and

Vr."

be amended so as to read as follows: "SEC. 142. Affiliation of Master Mason. A nonaffiliated Master Mason who is a resident of this State may apply for affiliation to any Lodge in this jurisdiction. A non-resident of this State may affiliate only in the manner provided in Section 192. A member in good standing of a Lodg~ in this State, if his Lodge consents, or, without his Lodge's consent if he has moved from the jurisdiction of his Lodge, may apply for affiliation to any Lodge in this jurisdiction. ' , RICHA.RD O. RUMER, Tower Grove Lodge No. 631.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT RE SUNDAY PICNICS

The following proposed amendment was presented and by order of the Grand Master reading of same was waived:


1953

77

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Proposed Amendment to Section 209, Article XX, By-Laws 1947 To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: The following resolution to amend our By-Laws is herewith presented: RESOLVED, That Section 209 of Article XX of the By-Laws of this Grand Lodge, which now reads "SEC. 209. Sunday. A Lodge meeting shall not be held on the first day of the week, commonly called Sunday, except to perform funeral services. A Lodge shall not hold a picnic on Sunday either in the name of the Lodge or through any other organization acting for the Lodge. ' , flo be amended so as to read as follows: "SEC. 209. Su.nday. A Lodge meeting shall not be held on the first day of the week, commonly called Sunday, except to perform funeral services." RICHARD O. RUMER, Tower Grove Lodge No. 631. PROPOSED AMENDMENT RE FORM OF PETITION

The proposed amendment was presented and by order of the Grand Master reading of same was Waived: Proposal to Amend Petition for Degrees (General Forms II)

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: The following proposal to amend the form PETITION FOR DEGREES, General Forms II, is herewith presented: RESOLVED, That General'Forms II now provided by the By-Laws of this Grand Lodge be revised and amended so as to be in form and substance as follows: To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of .............. Lodge No A. F. & A. M.: The undersigned, of his own free will and accord, hereby petitions your Lodge for the' Mysteries of Freemasonry and respectfully represents that 1. His full name is . 2. He was born at . 3. The date of his birth is . . 4. He now lives at 5. During the past ten years he has lived at . (If at more than on~ place, give time at each place) 6. For the past ten years his occupation has been

...............

'(Gi~~'b~~i~'~~ 'ddd;e's~)'

.

.

7. He is a firm believer in the One Living and True God. 8. He previously petitioned any Masonic Lodge for (has or has not) membership. (If statement is "has previously petitioned," give place, date, name of Lodge and disposition of petition.) 9. He been convicted or charged with the commis(has never or has) sion of a crime. (If statement is "has been," state time,

â&#x20AC;˘


7'8

PROCEEDINGS OF THE place and nature)

.

10. He declaTes upon his honor that all representations herein made are true. 11. He promises that if his petition is granted he will cheerfully comply with the rules and regulations of the Fraternity. Dated at this day of , 19 We, the undersigned members in good standing of the Lodge to which the foregoing petition is addressed, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with , the petitioner therein路 named, and that in our opinion he is well qualified to become a Freemason. Dated at

this

I

day of , 19 . O. RUMER, Tower Grove Lodge No. 631.

RICHARD

PROPOSED AMENDMENT RE DISQUALIFICATIONS

The following proposed amendment was presented and by order of the Grand Master reading of same was waived: Proposed Amendment to Section 113, Article IX, By-Laws 1941 To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, ..4.. F. and ..4.. M. of Missouri: The following resolution to amend our By-Laws is herewith presented: RESOLVED, That Section 113 of Article IX of the By-Laws of this Grand Lodge, which'now reads , 'SEC. 113. Disqualifications, PhySical and Otherwise. No Lodge shall confer a degree of Ancient Craft Masonry on any person whose physical defects are such as to prevent路 his receiving and imparting the ceremonies of the several degrees; provided, that nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to render anyone ineligible to the privileges of Freemasonry who can by the aid of artificial appliances, possessed and used by him, confoTm to the necessary ceremonies. If from any cause, the Lodge finds the candidate totally disqualified, the fee shall be r~turned a.nd no further action shall be taken." be amended so as to read as follows: , 'SEC. 113. D'isqualifications, Physical and Otherwise. Any person whose physical defects are such as to prevent his receiving and imparting the ceremonies of the several degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry and for whom artificial appliances which would enable him to conform to the several ceTemonies cannot be provided may have the degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry conferred upon him in a manner and according to rules which shall be. established by the Ritual Committee of the Grand Lodge. " RICHARD O. RUMER., Tower Grove Lodge No. 631.

REPORT OF THE MASONIC HOME

The report of the Masonic Home was presented and ordered received and printed in the Proceedings. The report is as follows:


REPORT OF THE 'MASONIC HOME 1953

To the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri: BRETHREN': The amendment of Sec. 199 of the Grand Lodge By-Laws, which was adopted at our 1952 Communication, provided that the number to be elected to serve as Directors on the Board of Directors of the Masonic Home Board along with the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Senior and Junior Grand Wardens should be eight instead of five as theretofore, and that the regular term of a Director elected as such should be four years instead of five years as theretofore. . Thus a Board of Directors of a total of twelve was arranged. The amendment also provided that the Board should have power and authority to provide by By-Laws or otherwise for and to elect such officers (except President) as it might determine upon. This increase in the number whose duty it is to manage and control the affairs of ou.r Masonic Home .proved to be a very material improvement. It made it possible to make a distribution of committee functions among a greater number, thus relieving an overburden which had been upon the smaller number. The amendment providing for the additional Board members could not become effective until the Agreement of Incorporation of the Masonic Home of Missouri was amended by appropriate action filed in the Circuit Court of the City of St. Louis; hence, the four members who were elected at our last Communication did not immediately come upon the Board with full voting authority. Nevertheless, these newly elected members were invited to attend the 9rganization meeting of the Board which was held immediately after the conclusion of the Grand Lodge Communication, they were tentatively given committee appointments, they were invited to attend the subsequent meeting, contributed materially to the transaction of the business on hand, and at the d.ate of the December meeting the above-mentioned amendment had been made effective and they came into their full authority as Directors. The officers and committees elected or appointed in the manner provided by the By-Laws, all of which became fully effective at the date of the December meeting of the Board, were:

Treasurer-Elmer W. Wagner.


80

PROCEEDINGS OJ!' THE

1953

Seerctary...--Lewis C. Robertson. . . Legal Committee-Orestes Mitchell, .Tr., Chairman; Henry W. Fox, R. .Tasper Smith. Finance Committee-Elmer W. Wagner, Chairman; Morris E. Ewing, Cornelius D. Struble, William .T. Craig. Hospital Committee-.T. M. Sellers, Chairman; Russell E. Murray, Morris }<j. Ewing, William .T. Craig, James M. Bradford. Administration Committee-Morris K }<iwing, Chairman; Russell E. Murray, .T. M. Sellers, William J. Craig, James M. Bradford. Admissions and Discipline Committee-Russell E. Murray, Chairman; Cornelius D. Struble, Morris E. Ewing, .T. M. Sellers, Henry W. Fox, Francis Howard, James M. Bradford. Fraternal Relations Committee-.T. M. Sellers, Chairman; Elmer W. Wagner, William .T. Craig, Francis Howard. Trustees of the Endowment Fund-Richard O. Rumer, Morris E. Ewing, .T. M. Sellers.

At this point I report that an amendment to the By-Laws of the Home was adopted providing that instead of requiring the Deputy Grand Master to be Vice President of the Board, the Vice President shall be elected by the Board. No change in the office of Vice President was made as the result of this change. On January 6, 1953 the Board suffered the loss by death of Brother Cornelius D. Struble, whose term of office was until 1955. At the February meeting of the Board, an adjourned quarterly meeting, Brother Lester M. Heckman of Kansas City, Missouri was elected to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Brother Struble until the next Communication of the Grand Lodge. No group of men could have worked in greater harmony than did this Board of Directors of the Masonic Home during the past year. Each proceeded with a consciousness of the great responsibility \vhich the management of a large institution and a large amount of money for the purpose of dispensing charity to those placed in charge of the Home involves. Each, at sacrifices of time and convenience, contributed of his. experience, skill, knowledge and effort with only one purpose-that of doing a service for his Fraternity and for humanity. My appreciation goes to them for their considerate attention at all times and to the Grand Lodge for the privilege and pleasure of working with such a fine group of Freemasons. THE HOME PERSONNEL

In October, 1952, Mrs. Ruth F. Ely \vas employed as Matron of Old People to replace Mrs. Emma Lee Bettis. Shortly after she assumed her duties she became seriously ill and required some difficult surgery. Our Medical Director saw to it that she received the best of attention available and she made a remarkable recovery since which time she has diligently performed her duties. In November, 1952, Mrs. 'Vilmoth "ValIer, who had been our Matron of Children for more than thirty-two years, decided to rc-


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

81

tire and move to Huntsville, Missouri. At the November meeting of the Board we said our farewells and presented to Mrs. 'ValIer a clock as a parting gift. Later we had a large portrait of Mrs. 'ValIer prepared to be hung in an appropriate place in the Administration Building. To replace }\{rs. vValler we employed Mrs. Dorothy Harrington who continues careful attention to our children and all problems associated with their care. There were no other changes in the principal positions. There is a constant turnover in general help and this problem is made difficult by a tight labor market in St. Louis. The nurse situation is also one which requires constant attention and is affected by shortages in the available supply of such personnel. MAINTENANCE PROBLEMS

The maintenance problem is one that is constant. Hardly is one project about to be completed when another presents itself. M. W. Bro. Ray Bond, in 1951, reported on the project of rehabilitating the heating plant. As in connection with every other project delays in procurement of materials, and others caused by strikes, shortages of help and other conditions beyond 'control were encountered, but before the commencement of the heating season in 1952 that job was completed and we went into the fall season of 1952 with two good boilers,. each equipped to use gas as fuel with oil stand,by equipment and a plant in good condition. Although the 19521953 winter was mild, experience indicates that our gas and oil fuel arrangement will effect a material savings in fuel cost, in addition to which there will be savings in labor costs, disposal of ashes, etc. as well as the elimination of the dirt and inconvenience incident to_ the use of coal. vVe have no further complaints that we cause a smoke nuisance. M. Wor. Bro. Ferguson reported on the cleaning and painting projects, the replacement of toilet alld bath facilities, and on the replacement of the communication system. Then there came the problem of cornices and they were bad, cracks in the women's building, decoration of the dining room in the women's building, and replacement of concrete finishes. The need for each repair or replacement job is, in each instance, carefully examined by members of the Administration Committee, advice of an architect is obtained on major items, and all major work is let on the basis of competitive bids. I can say with assurance that the Home's money is carefully spent. Since the early part of 1951, we have spent for rehabilitation and replacement $186,680.41. This work falls roughly into three classifications. . For new installations and improved installations we have spent a total of $108,388.92. This includes such items as a sprinkler system


82

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

in 'the hospital, new boiler and rehabilitation of the heating system, an inter-communication system, new floor in the hospital operating room, insulation of steam pipes in the Women's Building, bath lifts in the hospital, and items of such nature. Under the head of improvements and replacements are included cleaning and tuckpointing, painting, repairs to windows in the chapel, plaster repairs, resurfacing driveway, remodeling of buildings, etc., total expenditure of $45,809.11. Under the head of miscellaneous work done is included new cornices on Men's Building and Employees' quarters, driveways, new loading dock, refurbishing of bath and toilet rooms in the hospital, major repairs and replacements on food elevators and architect's fees, a total expenditure of $32,482.38. All of this work has been let on competitive bids approved by the Board of Directors. TWO MAJOR :PROJECTS

Separate and apart from the general maintenance problems just mentioned there are two which should be reported separately: (1) the employees' quarters, and (2) the superintendent's apartment. The need to do something about employees' quarters was recognized well over a year ago. They had had no .attention for years. The furniture was old. The quarters lacked an attractiveness of comfort. The bath and toilet facilities were bad. There were no showers. Help was hard to hold with such living facilities as were offered. The question of what to do was discussed over a period of several months, and we had decided to do something about this when the representatives of the Grand Chapter O.E.S. came to us with an offer to do something for the Home. When these representatives saw our employee quarters problem they came forward with an' offer to do something about it. They studied the architect's plans and estimates of costs and decided they would undertake the whole project. The original estimate of the cost was between $30,000 and $35,000. That job is practically done. Instead of costing $35,000 the cost will be more nearly $45,000 and the Order of Eastern Star refused to be bound by what we understood was its limit and are paying the bill in full. This undertaking is an excellent demonstration of the cooperative attitude of the Order of Eastern Star and of that organization's fine relationship with the Masonic Home. The question of a home for our Superintendent had also been the subject of discussion for months. His home is what I have termed a monstrosity, a large drafty old home on the Blossom tract on Enright near Union Boulevard. The cost of keeping it in repair was terrific, and while the house looked fine when viewed at a distance, a close examination showed its many defects. Then, too, we were confident that the Blossom tract should be sold. All


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

83

in all, somehow and somewhere a home for our superintendent had to be provided. Consultation with our architect and his recommendation and long and careful consideration led us to the conclusion that an adequate apartment could be arranged on the first floor of the building immediately north of the Administration Building. Some years ago this building had been used to house older boys but with a reduced boy population had not been in use for several years. The apartment is now under construction. The cost is estimated at between $23,000 and $25,000 and it should provide an apartment good for many years. In addition, and to serve our night nurses, ,ve had an apartment in the men's building rearranged so that now the night nurses can rest in the daytime with much more comfort than they enjoyed heretofore. I report the physical properties of our Home in good condition but I report also that maintenance is a constant problem and must receive constant attention. HENRY J. FALKENHAINER

For fifty - consecutive years Bro. Henry J. Falkenhainer appeared at the Masonic Home on Christmas morning with an orchestra which under his direction brought cheer to all. His performances were first in the dining hall at breakfast time-7 a. m.-and then he would take his talented group into the hospital so that those confined there might receive a musical greeting. In addition and on numerous other occasions throughout these fifty years Bro. Falkenhainer appeared at the Home with orchestras, principally with that of Moolah Temple. The Board of Directors of the Home determined that such faithfulness should be recognized and immortalized and so, after consultation with Bro. Falkenhainer's family, it procured a chair for him and a portrait of him for the Home. These .were presented on the evening of April 9 at the Home by the Grand Master. There were present on this occasion, in addition to Bro. Falkenhainer and the Grand Master, Mrs. Falkenhainer, Mr. and' Mrs. Norman Falkenhainer, Victor Falkenhainer, the Superintendent of the Home, the Medical Director, the members of the Admissions and Disciplin~e Committee of the Board which included Mrs. Alta Tate, who represents the Order of Eastern. Star, and Mrs. Rumer. I regret the duty of recording as I report on this pleasant event that Mrs. Falkenhainer, who throughout the years had given such attention to Home affairs that at times it appeared she was on its regular staff, passed to her eternal Home on June 7, 1953. FINANCES

A full statement of the financial transactions of the Home and of


84

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

its financial condition appears in the reports which are a part of this report. It is self-explanatory. I will make but a few comments with reference to Home finances.. The regular and ordinary costs of operating Our Home (including ordinary maintenance and repairs) are provided out of and should be within Home income. This income is from Grand Lodge per capita, Grand Chapter O. E. S. per capita, miscellaneous items and interest and income from investments of the general fund, income fund and endowment fund. The reports show that our Home has been operated within this income, and I believe it can be operated within its available income for the next year. There is therefore, as I see it, no occasion for an increase in the per capita requirement for operating purposes at this time. It is always desirable to build up the Endowment Fund. The Endowment Fund is a stabilizing support of every institution and contributions to that fund should be encouraged. Many people think that an endowment fund contribution must be one in major amounts, or should come by way of a bequest. This is not so. Small contributions during lifetime are a great demonstration of true charity because they involve sacrifices which bequests do not involve. Then too, a contribution during lifetime gives to the donor the joy and satisfaction of seeing the results of his contribution. At every occasion contributions to our endowment fund should be encouraged. ENTERTAINMENT, HOLIDAY AND OTHER OBSERVANCES

Entertainment and observances of holidays, birthdays, etc., are provided in an adequate manner. The Home management arranges for certain entertainment and observances and the cost comes out of the fund provided by the Lodges throughout the State in response to a request made by the Grand Master for contributions for this purpose. A full list of the contributions and of the expenditures charged to this fund appears in this report. The representatives of St. Louis and St. Louis County lodges who call themselves the Masonic Home Christmas Committee of St. Louis and St. Louis County function on a round-the-year basis. The Masters and Wardens Clubs of the 33rd and 57th Districts continue their activities. In addition, other organizations come forward from time to time to give attention to the Home family. Music by such groups as Moolah Temple Band, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Letter Carriers Band is provided on the lawn during the summer season. (Under a special heading I will mention Bro. Henry J. Falkenhainer and his contribution toward happiness at our Home).


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

85

To everyone who contributes to the happiness of our Home Family, whether they are specifically mentioned or not, we, who have the immediate problems of the Home at hand, are and Freemasons throughout the State should be forever grateful. RELIGIOUS SERVICES IN THE CHAPEL

The Christmas Committee of St. Louis and St. Louis County under the chairmanship of Wor. Bro. Henry J. Diller arranged that on one Sunday of each month, September to June inclusive, there was an hour of worship i'n the Home Chapel. Each service was sponsored by a different Masonic or Eastern Star group and on occasions two or more groups joined in such sponsoring. Our thanks go to Wor. Bro. Diller's committee, to the ministers who brought messages, to the choirs, to the sponsors, and to all who otherwise participated in these services. THE ORDER OF EASTERN STAR

In the section of the Grand Master's address entitled "The State and Condition of Freemasonry in Missouri" and that portion thereof regarding our relations with other Missouri organizations of Masonic affiliation I reported on the manner in which the Order of Eastern Star went far beyond its fixed obligation in supporting our Home. In the section of this report entitled "Major Projects" I reported that project which the. Order of Eastern Star provided for and the approximate cost. I now report additional contributions of useful articles which that great organization made during the past year: For the Hospital: 10 Platform Rockers 3 Wheel Chairs 3 Vibra-Bath units 2 Gas Stoves for diet kitchens Steel Furniture for the Doctor's office For the Administration Office: New Steel Furniture for the office For the Children's Department: 1 Gas Range Total cost

$3,594.16

The following gifts were sent direct to the Home from Chapters, clubs and individual members during the ycar: . Cash, for special gifts and purposes Hand-made quilts 6 Blankets and comforts 12 Sheets 2 Pillow Cases 65 Bath towels.................................. 244 Dresser scarfs '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 86

$2,016.39


86

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

. 944 Canned fruit, vegetables and jelly Oranges and apples . 13 crates Eggs . 4 cases Cookies . 266 pounds Candy . 201 pounds Candy bars . 44 dozen Many individual gifts and miscellaneous items.

The Advisory Board of the Order of Eastern Star, along with the Grand Matron, the Deputy Grand Matron, and the Grand Secretary, again gave their attention to Home affairs by their attendance at the Board's regular meetings. The Board has kept these representatives advised of its actions throughout the year by furnishing to them copies of the minutes of all Board meetings; that is, of regular meetings and of the monthly executive committee meetings. In addition to this support and assistance, one of the Advisory Board, Mrs. Alta Tate, has regularly attended meetings of the Admissions Committee and has given much assistance to that committee. Weare very grateful to the Educational Fund Board, Order of Eastern Star, for the interest they have shown in one of the children in the Home who gives every indication of having a fine musical talent. They are generously providing the funds for this fourteen year old girl, Donna Petersen, to have the training necessary for de,velopment of her talent. SURPLUS REAL ESTATE

The Board of Directors has reached the conclusion that the Huthmaker property-78 acres of vacant property located in St. . Louis County which came as a gift some twenty years ago:-and the Blossom property-a parcel 500 feet by 500 feet on the northwest corner of Enright and Union Avenues in St. Louis, were not essential to the maintenance of our Home facilities and that these properties should be sold. Neither parcel is one for which there is a "fast" market. In order to be advised as to the value of the Huthmaker tract, Roy Wenzlick and Associates, real estate analysts and appraisers, were employed to make an appraisal. That organization concluded the tract had a fair value of $70,000.00. The difficulty with a sale of the Blossom tract is that it is under rigid building restrictions and certain neighboring property holders have indicated opposition to a change in these restrictions. The migration of the St. Louis population has reduced the desirability of this property for the purpose permitted by the restrictions. Offers for both tracts have been and are being solicited. One offer for the Huthmaker tract, which was considered inadequate,


1953

87

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

was received. An interest was shown in the Blossom tract by a logical purchaser. There are some burdens in the ownership of these properties but they are not so great that a sacrifice price should be accepted for them. In determining upon a sale price the Board will, of necessity, have to use , its best judgment. STATISTICAL INFORMATION

I invite your attention路 particularly to the statistical information which is appended to this report. In part, at least, it indicates the extent of ,our activities, the magnitude of our problems, and the interest and support which our Home receives from its friends. It is a big organization, it is doing a fi~1e service, and it is well operated. CONCLUSION

Charity lies at the foundation of Freemasonry. It is a duty, but it should not be considered as路 such. It should be a desire, as something Freemasons want to do rather than as something they are compelled to do by any process other than that which springs from within. Our Masonic Home of Missouri is a true exemplification of a worthy charity, and it should have our constant attention. Fraternally submitted, RICHARD O. RUMER, ,Grand Master. APPLICATIONS ...........................

Carried 'over from previous year Received during the year

4 78

82 Admitted to the Home during the year Rejected because of ineligibility Referred to Relief and Charity Committee of Grand Lodge Withdrawn by Lodge Continued for further investigation

64 10 3 1 4

82 MEMBER STATISTICS Members in the Home July 1, 1952 Arrivals during the year Discharged during the year Died during the year Members in the Home July 1, 1953 Total members in the Home July 1, 1953

Men 49 23

Women 167 35

Boys 15 2

Girls 13 5

17 1

18

13 262

72 1 9

202 29

o

62

171

16

2

5

o


88

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

MASONIC HOME HOSPITAL 71 Total number of patients in the hospital July 1, 1952 . 265 Total number of patients admitted during the year 220 Total number of patients discharged during the year . 39* Total number of deaths during the year . Total number of patients in the hospital July 1, 1953 . 77 Average number of patients 77 in the hospital per day during the year ~. Total patients' days in the hospital . 28,533 Total number of patients treated during the year . 22,222 Total number of out-patients treated during the year . 19,107 19 Total number of operations perfo'rmed . * Includes 1 employee. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE CHRISTMAS AND ENTERTAIMENT. FUND-1952-1953 5.00 Howard Lodge No.4, New Franklin $ 25.00 United Lodge No.5, Springfield . O'Sullivan Lodge No.7, Walnut Grove . 5.00 5.00 Agency Lodge No. 10, Agency . . . Pauldingville Lodge No. 11, Wright City 5.00 Tyro Lodge No. 12, Caledonia . 10.00 Rising Sun Lodge No. 13, Barry . 10.00 Western Star Lodge No. 15, Winston . 10.00 . Memphis Lodge No. 16, Memphis 10.00 10.00 Clarksville Lodge No. 17, Clarksville . Palmyra Lodge No. 18, Palmyra . 10.00 5.00 Paris Union Lodge No. 19, Paris . 5.00 Havana Lodge No. 21, McFall . 5.00 Wellington Lodge No. 22, DeKalb . 5.00 Wyaconda Lodge No. 24, LaGrange , . 10.00 St. Johns Lodge No. 28, Hannibal . 10.00 . WindsOT Lodge No. 29, Windsor Liberty Lodge No. 31, Liberty . 10.00 10.00 Humphreys Lodge No. 32, Humphreys . 5.00 Ralls Lodge No. 33, Center . 10.00 Troy Lodge No. 34, Troy . 10.00 : . Mercer Lodge No. 35, Princeton 9.00 Hemple Lodge No. 377, Hemple . 10.00 . Callao Lodge No. 38, Callao 5.00 DeWitt Lodge No. 39, DeWitt . 10.00 Bismarck Lodge No. 41, Bismarck . 50.00 Jefferson Lodge No. 43, Jefferson City . 10.00 Fayette Lodge No. 47, Fayette . 25.00 Fulton Lodge No. 48, Fulton . 5.00 Xenia Lodge No. 50, Hopkins . 5.00 Livingston Lodge No. 51, Glasgow . 50.00 Wakanda Lodge No. 52, Carrollton . Weston IJodge No. 53, Weston . 10.00 Index Lodge No. 54, Garden City . 5.00 Tipton Lodge No. 56, Tipton . 25.00 Richmond Lodge No. 57, Richmond . 25.00 . Monticello Lodge No. 58, Monticello 5.00 Centralia Lodge No. 59, Centralia . 10.00 Waverly Lodge No. 61, Waverly . 10.00 . Vinci! Lodge No. 62, Cameron 10.00


1953

Cambridge Lodge No. 63, Slater Monroe Lodge No. 64, Monroe City Pattonsburg Lodge No. 65, Pattonsburg Grant City Lodge No. 66, Grant City Kennett Lodge No. 68, Kennett Sullivan Lodge No. 69, Sullivan Armstrong Lodge No. 70, Armstrong Savannah Lodge No. 71, Savannah Gorin Lodge No. 72, Gorin Eureka Lodge No. 73, Brunswick Silex Lodge No. 75,· Silex Independence Lodge No. 76, Independence Lebanon Lodge No. 77, Steelville St. Joseph Lodge No. 78, St. Joseph Jackson Lodge No. 82, Linneus Laclede Lodge No. 83, Lebanon Brookfield Lodge No. 86, Brookfield Defiance Lodge No. 88, Sheridan Friendship Lodge No. 89, Chillicothe Russelville Lodge No. 90, Russelville Madison Lodge No. 91, Madison Perseverance Lodge No. 92, Louisiana St. Mark's Lodge No. 93, Cape Girardeau Bethany Lodge No. 97, Bethany Webster Lodge No. 98, Marshfield Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 99, Mt. Vernon Bloomington Lodge No. 102, Bevier West View Lodge No. 103, Millersville Gallatin Lodge No. 106, Gallatin Greenville Lodge No. 107, Greenville Stanberry Lodge No. 109, Stanberry Marcus Lodge No. 110, Fredericktown Trenton Lodge No. 111, Trenton Maitland Lodge No. 112, Maitland Plattsburg Lodge No. 113, Plattsburg Twilight Lodge No. 114, Columbia Laddonia Lodge No. 115, Laddonia Barnes Lodge No. 116, Cabool DeSoto Lodge No. 119, DeSoto Compass Lodge No. 120, Parkville Triplett Lodge No. 122, Triplett Hermann Lodge No. 123, Hermann Union Star Lodge No. 124, Union Star Gentryville Lodge No. 125, Gentryville Seaman Lodge No. 126, Milan Athens Lodge No. 127, Albany Monett Lodge No. 129, Monett Hume Lodge No. 130, Hume Potosi Lodge No. 131, Potosi Farmington Lodge No. 132, Farmington Star of the West Lodge No. 133, Ironton Olean Lodge No. 134, Olean Delphian Lodge No. 137, Birch Tree Lincoln Lodge No. 138, Fillmore Oregon Lodge No. 139, Oregon Amsterdam Lodge No. 141, Amsterdam Pleasant Grove Lodge No. 142, Otterville

89

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

10.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 20.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 35.00 15.00 10.00 20.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 2.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 50.00 • 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 ••• 50.00 . 5.00 . 10.00 . 10.00 . 5.00 . 10.00 . 10.00 . 5.00 . 10.00 . 10.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 15.00 . 5.00 . 10.00 . 10.00 . 10.00 . 5.00 . 10.00 . 5.00 . 5.00 . 10.00 . 10.00 .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '" •...... . . . . . f • • • • • • • • • • • • '.'


90

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Modern Lodge No. 144, Humansville . Latimer Lodge No. 145, Licking . Cass Lodge No. 147, Harrisonville . Lexington Lodge No. 149, Lexington . Birming Lodge No. 150, Fawcett . Linn Creek Lodge No. 152, Camdenton . . Bloomfield Lodge No. 153, Bloomfield Ionic Lodge No. 154, Desloge . Ashland Lodge No. 156, Ashland . North Star Lodge No. 157, Rockport . Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158, Mountain Grove ,' . Green City Lodge No. 159, Green City . Pleasant Lodge No. 160; Morrisville . Clifton Hill Lodge No. 161, Clifton Hill . . Whitesville Lodge No. 162, Whitesville Portageville Lodge No. 166, Portageville . . Camden Point Lodge No. 169, Camden Point . Benevolence Lodge No. 170, Utica Gray Summit Lodge No. 173, Gray Summit . Point Pleasant Lodge No. 176, Conran . Texas Lodge No. 177, Houston . . Griswold Lo~ge No. 178, Bellflower California Lodge No. 183, California . Morley Lodge No. 184, Morley : . , . Chamois Lodge No. 185, Chamois Hermon Lodge No. 187, Liberal . Hannibal Lodge No. 188, Hannibal . Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, St. Joseph . Putnam Lodge No. 190, Newtown . Frankford Lodge No. 192, Frankford . Angerona Lodge No. 193, Missouri City . Wellsville Lodge No. 194, Wellsville ............â&#x20AC;˘......... Bolivar Lodge. No. 195, Bolivar . . Allensville Lodge No. 198, Allendale New Hope Lodge No. 199, ElsbeTry . .' .. Ravenwood Lodge No. 201, Ravenwood Brumley Lodge No. 203, Brumley . Trilumina Lodge No. 205, Marshall . Somerset Lodge No. 206, Powersville . . Clay Lodge No. 207, Excelsior Springs Salisbury Lodge No. 208, Salisbury . Poplar Bluff Lodge No. 209, Poplar Bluff . Four Mile Lodge No. 212, Campbell . ' . Rolla Lodge No. 213, Rolla Forest City Lodge No. 214, Forest City . Hornersville Lodge No. 215, Hornersville . Hale City Lodge No. 216, Hale . Barbee Lodge No. 217, Sweet Springs ' . Albert Pike Lodge No. 219, Kansas City . Kan!3as City Lodg~ No. 220, Kansas City . Mystic Tie Lodge No. 221, Oak Ridge . LaBelle Lodge No. 222, LaBelle . Ray Lodge No. 223, Camden . Hamilton Lodge No. 224, Hamilton . . Salem Lodge No. 225, Salem Saline Lodge No. 226, St. Mary's . . Cypress Lodge No. 227, Laclede

1953 10.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 15.50 10.00 10.00 20.00 10.00 7.50 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 10.00 2.50 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 15.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 3.00 2.50 15.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00


1953

91

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Shelbina Lodge No. 228, Shelbina St. James Lodge No. 230, St. James Cardwell Lodge No. 231, Cardwell Polo Lodge No. 232, Polo Bucklin Lodge No. 233, Bucklin St. Francois Lodge No. 234, Libertyville Sedalia Lodge No. 236, Sedalia LaPlata Lodge No. 237, LaPlata .. . Rushville Lodge No. 238, Rushville Hopewell Lodge No. 239, Lesterville Palestine Lodge No. 241, St. Charles Knobnoster Lodge No. 245, Knobnoster Montgomery Lodge No. 246, Montgomery City Neosho Lodge No. 247, Neosho Carroll Lodge No. 249, Norborne ;Hope Lodge No. 251, Washington Laredo Lodge No. 253, Laredo Butler Lodge No. 254, Butler Alton Lodge ,No. 255, AIton Shekinah Lodge No. 256, Festus Mechanicsville Lodge No. 260, Defiance Holden Lodge No. 262, Holden Summit Lodge No. 263, Lee's Summit Corinthian Lodge No. 265, Warrensburg Brotherhood Lodge No. 269, St. Joseph New Salem Lodge No. 270, Winfield Solomon Lodge No. 271, Springfield Granite Lodge No. 272, Sedalia St. Clair Lodge No. 273, Osceola Grand River Lodge No. 276, Freeman William D. Muir Lodge No. 277, Pilot Grove Essex Lodge No. 278, Essex Hogle's Creek Lodge No. 279, Wheatland Stockton Lodge No. 283, Stockton Canopy Lodge No. 284, Aurora Earl Lodge No. 285, Coffey Craft Lodge No. 287, Canton Graham Lodge No. 289, Graham Fairmont Lodge No. 290, Wyaconda Edina Lodge No. 291, Edina Lamar Lodge No. 292, Lamar Moniteau Lodge No. 295, Jamestown Sampson Lodge No. 298, Lutie Temple Lodge No. 299, Kansas City Osage Lodge No. 303, Nevada Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305, Kansas City Ashlar Lodge No. 806, Commerce ~ , Parrott Lodge No. 308, Maysville Sikeston Lodge No. 310, Sikeston Cuba Lodge No. 312, Cuba Rural Lodge No. 316, Kansas City Osborn Lodge No. 317, Osborn Paulville Lodge No. 319, Hurdland Versailles Lodge No. 320, Versailles Hardin Lodge No. 322, Hardin McDonald Lodge No. 324, Independence Dockery Lodge No. 325, Meadville

. . . . ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '" .. . . . . . . . . . . . . " '" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10.00 22.25 10.00

5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 100.00 5.00 35.00 25.00 25.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 15.00 5.00 7.50 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 2.50 25.00 5.00 5.00 15.00 25.00 5.00 25.00 50.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 15.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 10.00


92

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Linn Lodge No. 326, Linn . Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327, West Plains . Cainsville Lodge No. 328, Cainsville ' .. Charity Lodge No. 331, St. Joseph . Joplin Lodge No. 335, Joplin . Hallsville Lodge No. 336, Hallsville . Herculaneum Lodge No. 338, Herculaneum . Fidelity Lodge No. 339, Farley , . Rockville Lodge No. 341, Rockville . Circle Lodge No. 342, Roscoe , . Fellowship Lodge No. 345, Joplin .,., , . Pollock Lodge No. 349, Pollock . Mosaic Lodge No. 351, Belleview , . Friend Lodge No. 352, Ozark . Barnesville Lodge No. 353, Ellington . Hebron Lodge No. 354, Mexico., . Ancient Landmark Lodge No, 356, Harrisburg . Northwest Lodge No. 358, Tarkio . Garrett Lodge No. 359, Arcola , .. , : . Hiram Lodge No. 362, Kahoka . Fraternal Lodge No. 363, Robertsville . Adair Lodge No. 366, Kirksville . Crescent Hill Lodge No. 368, Adrian . Composite Lodge No. 369, Doniphan . Williamstown Lodge No. 370, Williamstown . Sheldon Lodge No. 371, Sheldon . Belle Lodge No. 373, Belle ,.: , . Waynesville Lodge No. 375, Waynesville , . King Hill Lodge No. 376, St. Joseph . Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377, King City . Berlin Lodge No. 378, Fairport . Billings Lodge No. 379, Billings , . Queen City Lodge No. 380, Queen City . Ionia Lodge No. 381, Eldon , . Pythagoras Lodge No. 383, Cassville, . East Prairie Lodge No. 384, East Prairie . Richland Lodge No. 385, Richland . Arcana Lodge No. 389, Harris . Raytown Lodge No. 391, Raytown . Christian Lodge No. 392, Oak Grove , . Beehive Lodge No. 393, Lawson . Jasper Lodge No. 398, Jasper . Pike Lodge No. 399, Curryville : . Decatur Lodge No. 400, Pierce City . Malta Lodge No. 402, Malta Bend , . Lowry City Lodge No. 403, Lowry City . Rosendale Lodge No. 404, Rosendale , . Malden Lodge No. 406, Malden '. Charleston Lodge No. 407, Charleston , , .. Montrose Lodge No. 408, Montrose : . Louisville Lodge No. 409, Louisville ', . Iberia Lodge No. 410, Iberia . Joppa Lodge No. 411, Hartville :., . Appleton City Lodge No. 412, Appleton City . Valley Lodge No. 413, Bolckow . Hunnewell Lodge No. 415, Hunnewell . Whitewater Lodge No. 417, Whitewater .

1953 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 50.00 10.00路 5.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 *20.00 10.00 20.00 10.00 78.74 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00


1953

93

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Star Lodge No. 419, Taberville Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield Samaritan Lodge No. 424, Bonne Terre Green Ridge Lodge No. 425, Green Ridge Glenwood Lodge No. 427, Glenwood Winona Lodge No. 430, Winona Wheeling Lodge No. 434, Wheeling Rockbridge Lodge No. 435, Rockbridge Temperance Lodge No. 438, Smithville Mt. Olive Lodge No. 439, Rogersville Excelsior Lodge No. 441, Jackson Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446, Kansas City Jacoby Lodge No. 447, Darlington Schell City Lodge No. 448, Schell City Continental Lodge No. 454, Stewartsville Jonesburg Lodge No. 457, Jonesburg Caruthersville Lodge No. 461, Caruthersville Clifton Lodge No. 463, Thayer Concordia Lodge No. 464, Concordia Southwest Lodge No. 466, Southwest City Nodawa.y Lodge No. 470, Maryville Mineral Lodge No. 471, Oronogo Pickering Lodge No. 472, Pickering Golden Lodge No. 475, Golden City Mt. Hope Lodge No. 476, Odessa Henderson Lodge No. 477, Rogersville Rich Hill Lodge No. 479, Rich Hill Marceline Lodge No. 481, Marceline Cairo Lodge No. 486, Cairo Lakeville Lodge No. 489, Bell City Vandalia Lodge No. 491, Vandalia Daggett Lodge No. 492, McKittrick Lewistown Lodge No. 494, Lewistown Unity Lodge No. 495, Richards Equality Lodge No. 497, Newburg Jameson Lodge No. 500, Jameson Buckner Lodge No. 501, Buckner Philadelphia Lodge No. 502, Philadelphia Prairie Home Lodge No. 503, Prairie Horne Lathrop Lodge No. 506, Lathrop Clearmont Lodge No. 507, Clearmont Saxton Lodge No. 508, Saxton Van Buren Lodge No. 509, Van Buren New Hampton Lodge No. 510, New Hampton Skidmore Lodge No. 511, Skidmore Webb City Lodge No. 512, Webb City Senath Lodge No. 513, Senath Granby Lodge No. 514, Granby Galena Lodge No. 515, Galena Gate City Lodge No. 522, Kansas City Cunningham Lodge No. 525, Sumner Wayne Lodge No. 526, Piedmont Higbee Lodge No. 527, Higbee Dexter Lodge No. 532, Dexter Comfort Lodge No. 533, Wheaton Columbia Lodge No. 534, Pacific Blackwell Lodge No. 535, Blackwell

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . .

10.00 25.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 6.00 5.00 10.00 20.00 10.00 5.00 400.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 25.00 50.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 15.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 15.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 15.00 5.00 10.00 5.00


94

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Ingomar Lodge No. 536, Willow Springs Bethel Lodge No. 537, Bethel Dawn Lodge No. 539, Ludlow Winigan Lodge No. 540, Winigan Jacksonville Lodge No. 541, Jacksonville Mansfield Lodge No. 543, Mansfield Zalma Lodge No. 545, Zalma Orient Lodge No. 546, Kansas City South Gate Lodge ~o. 547, Kansas City : Clinton Lodge No. 548, Clinton Carl Junction Lodge No. 549, Carl Junction Pendleton Lodge No. 551, Doe Run Foster Lodge No. 554, Foster Moscow Lodge No. 558, Moscow Mills Clarksdale Lodge No. 559, Clarksdale Nelson Lodge No. 560, Nelson York Lodge No. 563, Kansas City Jamesport Lodge No. 564, Jamesport Miller Lodge No. 567, Miller Marlborough Lodge No. 569, Kansas City Republic Lodge No. 570, Republic Hayti Lodge No. 571, Hayti Hutledge Lodge No. 572, Rutledge' LaMonte Lodge No. 574, LaMonte Easter Lodge No. 575, St. Clair Grandin Lodge No. 579, Grandin Illmo Lodge No. 581, !lImo Novinger Lodge No. 583, Novinger Branson Lodge No. 587, Branson, St. Francisville Lodge No. 588, Wayland Advance Lodge No. 590, Advance Union Lodge No. 593, Union ' Puxico Lodge No. 596, Puxico Bosworth Lodge No. 597, Bosworth Leadwood Lodge No. 598, Leadwood Elvins Lodge No. 599, Flat River Cosby Lodge No. 600, Cosby Acacia Lodge No. 602, Columbia Morehouse Lodge No. 603, Morehouse Eminence Lodge No. 607, Eminence Strafford Lodge No. 608, Strafford Warrenton Lodge No. 609, Warrenton Mokane Lodge No. 612, Mokane Mount Washington liodge No. 614, Mount Washington Chaffee Lodge No. 615, Chaffee Swope Park Lodge No. 617, Kansas City Grandview Lodge No. 6]8, Grandview Anderson Lodge No. 621, Anderson Norwood Lodge No. 622, Norwood Owensville Lodge No. 624, Owensville Sheffield Lodge No. 625, Kansas City East Gate Lodge No. 630, Kansas City Archie Lodge No. 633, Archie Mountai'n View Lodge No. 637, Mountain View Northeast Lodge No. 643, Kansas City Grain Valley Lodge No. 644, Grain Valley Noel Lodge No. 647, Noel

:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 41.00 5.00 5.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 15.00 10.00 15.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 13.00 15.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 50.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 12.50 10.00 25.00 10.00 10.00 34.00 25.00 50.00 10.00 5.00 65.65 25.00 5.00


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Elmer Lodge No. 648, Elmer Cleveland Lodge No. 651, Cleveland Country Club Lodge No. 656, Kansas City Alpha Lodge No. 659, Kansas City Clarence Lodge No. 662, Clarence Rockhill Lodge No. 663, Kansas City Wardell Lodge No. 665, Wardell Lilbourn-Lodge No. 666, Lilbourn

:............... '"

* Includes $10.00 for 1951-52

95 5.00 5.00 25.60 35.00 7.50 10.00 10.00 17.70 $5,141.34

OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS

St. Graal Commandery No. 12, K. T., Columbia $ 10.00 25.00 St. John's Commandery No 20, K. T., Springfield . 25.00 Prince of Peace Commandery No. 29, K. T., Jefferson City . 5.00 St. Elmo Commandery No. 43, K. 'r., Bolivar . 10.00 West Plains Commandery No. 48, K. T., West Plains . 10.00 Albany Commandery No. 60, K. 'r., Albany ' . 25.00 East Gate Commandery No. 70, K. T.; Kansas City . 5.00 Bolivar Chapter No.5, R. A. M., Bolivar . 10.00 Independence Chapter No. 12, R. A. M., Independence . 10.00 . Columbia Chapter No. 17, R. A M., Columbia 10.00 Owens Chapter No. 96, R. A. M., Maryville . 10.00 West Plains Chapter No. 108, R. A. M., West Plains : 25.00 East Gate Chapter No. 136, R. A. M., Kansas City . 15.00 . Ransom A. Breuer Masonic Association, Gray Summit 10.00 Bendix Square and Compass Club, Grandview . 50.00 McDonnell Square Club, St. Louis . 10.00 Nevada Chapter No. 53, O. E. S., Nevada . 25.00 Venus Chapter No. 153, O. E. S., St. Louis . 15.00 St. Marks Chapter No. 167, O. E. S., Cape Girardeau .. ' . Hesperia Chapter No. 172, O. E. S., Kansas City . 100.00 10.00 Webster Chapter No. 439, O. E. S., Marshfield : . 10.00 Concordia Chapter No. 504, O. E. S., Concordia . 2.00 Elim Chapter No. 541, O. E. S., Bethel . 5.00 1945 Past Matrons Club of 34th District, Grandview . 5.00 Past Matrons Club, Bonne Terre' . 20.00 Electa Club, St. Louis . Rcema Club, Webster Groves Chapter No. 64, O. E. S., Webster Groves : . , 25.00 Mizpah Shrine No. 17, Jefferson City . 5.00 5.00 Bethel No.6, Job's Daughters, Webster Groves . 20.00 Virgil L. Abbett and James R. Stewart, St. Joseph . Anonymous Gift . 1.00 5.00 Earl Banning and R. D. Polsgrove, Oregon . 5.00 F. C. Barnhill, Marshall . 20.00 William Birkenmeyer, St. Louis . 5.00 MT. and Mrs. W. D. Burlingame, Sedalia . 5.00 J. F. Faulkenberry, Lesterville . 10.00 Henry W. Fox, Kansas City . 10.00 Garnet L. Gunther, St. Louis . 1.00 H. H. Haukenberry, Independence . 5.00 John M. Herndon, Columbia . 5.00 Dr. M. Herrmann, St. Louis, in memory of Samuel Wagner . 10.00 Charles A. Jobson, Joplin .


96

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

William S. .Juergens, Sullivan Robert. H. Mann, Kansas City Fred Mollenauer, Joplin Charles Rose, Rifle, Colorado Bert F. St. Clair, Noel Floyd F. Sargert, San Diego, California Roy D. Scott, Lesterville Dr. B. R. Tharp, Alton 36 Members of East Gate Commandery No 70, K. '1'., Kansas City R. W. Underwood, Myrtle

5.00 lO.OO 5.00 5.00 5.00 2.50 5.00 1.00

:

36.00 1.00 $5,810.84

EXPENDITURES :FROM THE CHRISTMAS AND ENTERTAINMENT :FUND-1952-1953 Cash gifts for July 4th Watermelon feasts on the lawn Candy, doughnuts, napkins, and prizes for Hallowe 'en Cash gifts for Thanksgiving Turkeys for Thanksgiving dinner Cash gifts for Washington's Birthday Candy for ]<~aster Birthday gifts to the old folks Bh路thday cards Motion pictures at the Home, operator only Outside shows for children and carfare Police Circus tickets for children Bus to Police Circus for old folks Carfare to Scout Exposition 'rreats for 'parties Chair rental for outdoor affairs Picnic tables Subscription to National Geographic Magazine Repairs to television sets Repairs to motion picture projector Christmas: Cash gifts to the old folks Gifts for the children Trees and decorations Candy, nuts, fruit and pastry Turkeys for Christmas dinner

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 699.00 26.65 56.72 512.00 282.31 498.00 271. 70 221.00 13.20 120.00 14.58 41.30 18.80 2.10 40.60 10.00 115.51 5.25 185.35 2.55

. . . . .

696.00 127.97 130.55 858.62 276.38

$5,226.14

CONTRmUTIONS TO MASONIC HOME CHRISTMAS COMMITTEE O:F ST. LOUIS AND ST. LOUIS COUNTY August 29, 1952 to July 31, 1953 Lodges Missouri Lodge No.1 $ 30.00 Meridian Lodge No.2 . 50.00 Beacon Lodge No.3 . 60.00 . George Washington Lodge No.9 60.00 St. Louis Lodge No. 20 . 25.00 Naphtali Lodge No. 25 . 25.00 Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 . 50.00


1953

97

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Bonhomme Lodge No. 45 Polar Star Lodge No. 79 ; Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 Pomegranate Lodge No. 95 Erwin Lodge No. 121 Occidental Lodge No. 163 Pride of the West Lodge No. 179 Pyramid Lodge No. 180 Good Hope Lodge No. 218 Keystone Lodge No. 243 Aurora Lodge No. 267 Fenton Lodge No. 281 Cosmos Lodge No. 282 Meramec Lodge No. 313 Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 Paul Revere Lodge No. 330 America Lodge No. 347 Tuscan Lodge No. 360 Cache Lodge No. 416 Itaska Lodge No. 420 Anchor Lodge No. 443 West Gate Lodge No. 445 Lambskin Lodge No. 460 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Harmony Lodge No. 499 Euclid Lodge No. 505 Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 ApolIo Lodge No. 529 :B'erguson Lodge No. 542 Algabil Lodge No. 544 Rose Hill Lodge No. 550 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 Forest Park Lodge No. 578 Clayton Lodge No. 601 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Overland Lodge No. 623 Magnolia Lodge No. 626 Valley Park Lodge No. 629 Tower Grove Lodge No. 631 Freedom Lodge No. 636 'rriangle Lodge No. 638 ' l\.fizpah Lodge No. 639 .r ennings Lodge No. 640 Trinity Lodge No. 641 Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 University Lodge No. 649 Pilgrim Lodge No. 652 Commonwealth Lodge No. 654 Gardenville Lodge No. 655 Progress Lodge No. 657 Purity Lodge No. 658 Theodore Roosevelt Lodge No. 661 Berkley, U.D

,

:-

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . r •••••••.••

. . . . . . . . .

10.00 25.00 100.00 50.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 50.00 100.00 25.00 35.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 50.00 10.00 25.00 50.00 100.00 10.00 50.00 '25.00 50.00 25.00 50.00 25.00 50.00 25.00 25.00 10.00 20.00 25.00 50.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 20.00 25.00 10.00 50.00 50.00 20.00 10.00 10.00 15.00 15.00 25.00 20.00 20.00 30.00 10.00 10.00 5.00


98

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Other Masonic Bodies Missouri Chapter No.1, R. A. M. . St. Louis Chapter No.8, R. A. M. . Bellefontaine Chapter No. 25, R. A. M. . Killwinning Chapter No. 50, R. A. M. . Oriental Chapter No. 78, R. A. M Rabonni Chapter No. 131, R. A. M Schechinah Chapter No. 132, R. A. M. . Wellston Chapter No. 138, R. A. M. . Cabany Chapter No. 140, R. A. M Hiram Council No.1, R. & S. M York Council No. 40, R. & S. M Jeremiah Council No. 48, R. & S. M. . St. Louis Commandery No.1, K. T Ivanhoe Commandery No.8, K. T Ascalon Commandery No. 16, K. T St. Aldemar Commandery No. 18, K. T Alhambra Grotto, St. Louis Moolah Temple, St. Louis Scottish Rite, St. Louis Square Club, St. Louis

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 5.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 100.00 500.00 150.00 25.00

. . . . . . . . .

25.00 65.00 5.00 5.00 25.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 100.00

Friends White Squirrel Members of Benjamin Franklin Lodge No. 642 Members of Triangle Lodge No. 638 : Members of Erwin Lodge No. 121 Down Town High Twelve Club American Legion Public Service Post Members of Bridgeton Lodge No. 80 Members of Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 Pittsburg Visitation Club Total

$3,215.00

EXPENDITURES FROM THE FUNDS OF THE MASONIC HOME CHRISTMAS COMMITTEE OF ST. LOUIS AND ST. LOUIS COUNTY August 29, 1952 to July 31, 1953

For For For For

Cash and other gifts Entertainments and refreshments Outings printing and postage

$1,598.82 363.69 449.13 116.88 $2,528.52


1953

99

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

ADDITIONS TO THE ENDOWMENT Fl,TND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1952-1953 Angela Campbell Estate '. $65,642.93 Adele H. Doellner Estate 200.00 Mary Huthmaker Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. 6,155.33 George T. Mannion Estate 9,160.44 Helen Primavesi Estate 29,152.50 GertTude French Rouse Estate 250.00 Reinhold Schenkmeyer Estate 500.00 Thomas Stayton Estate............................. 2,683.54 Otto August Vogelsang Estate 24,545.74, Gift in memory of Mrs. C. L. Alexander 2.00 Gifts in memory of Mrs. Ella K. Falkenhaincr 6.00 Gifts in memory of Harry Grimspan 10.00 Gifts in memory of Mrs. Katherina Hammermeister. . . . 7.50 Gifts in memory of Mrs. Olaf Murray 15.00 Gifts in memory of Truman Rose 15.00 Gifts in memory of Carl Schlapp, Sr. 15.00 Gifts in memory of Cecil A. Tolin 50.00 Gift of Robert A. Winkelmaier, in memory of Mrs. Bertha Winkelmaier . 50.00 Gifts in honor of Julian Simon . 74.00 Gifts of Members of Erwin Lodge No. 121 . 5.00 Gifts of Members of Occidental Lodge No. 163 . 25.00 Gifts of Members of Pyramid Lodge No. 180 . 56.00 Gifts of Members of Albert Pike Lodge No. 219 . 13.00 Gifts of Members of Euclid Lodge No. 505 . 86.00 Gifts of Members of Ferguson Lodge No. 542 . 7.00 Gifts of Members of Mansfield Lodge No. 543 . 5.00 Gifts of Members of Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 . 10.00 Gifts of Members of Elvins Lodge No. 599 . 5.00 Gifts of Members of Acacia Lodge No. 602 . 3.00 Gifts of Members of Swope Park Lodge No. 617 . 10.00 Gifts of Members of Jennings Lodge No. 640 . 5.00 Gifts of Members of Gardenville Lodge No. 655 . 3.00 Gift of }'rank B. Adam . 50.00 Gift of Clarence W. Crites . 10.00 Gift of Dr. Solon Cameron . 100.00 â&#x20AC;˘ Gift of Will Docter . 100.00 Gift of M. L. Gross . 10.00 Gift of Albert E. Hamlin . 50.00 Gift of Robert Jacobi . 10.00 Gift of Ray McClanhan . 10.00 Gift of George Mavrematis . 20.00 Gift of Fred Mollenauer . 30.00 Gift of E. H. Penton . 10.00 Gift of Oscar Schmclig . 20.00 Gift of A. H. Windmoeller . 5.00 Gift of John A. Witthaus . 20.00 Gift of Blue Silver Lancers, Moolah Temple ' 250.00 Gift of W. B. Distributors, Inc . 300.00 Gift of Wm. B. Ittner, Inc . 200.00 $139,962.98


100

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1952

Knights Templar Fund James L. Kirkendall W. S. Smith Fund T. W. Higgins Fund James W. Harris Fund Masonic Home Certificate Fund Ferdinand Herold Fund John B. Croshaw Fund J'acob F. Gunlich Fund Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons Fund Grand Chapter Royal and Select Masters Fund T. W. Cotton Fund Orville A. and Maria Haynes Fund A. M. Hough Fund Jacob Lampert Fund Mrs. E. Wurz Adolph Gluck Fund ParraIle Massengale Fund Mrs. Lillie F. Fletcher Fund Frederick A. Logan Fund Robert Elliott Black Fund Nathan Schloss Fund A. P. Christianson Fund Agnes Rice Estate Hugh Hartshorn Fund William Pamprin Fund Morgena Peterson Fund Otto E. and Mrs. Grant Howard Fund General Fund Julius C. Garrell Fund War Relief Loyal Service Fund James W. Boyd Fund Ararat Temple, Kansas City Fund Mrs. Willie A. Woods Fund Grotto and Shrine Fund Morris and Ella IJeftwich Fund Mrs. Mary Lynch Fund A. P. Fletcher Fund Frank Beecher Fund A. 11:. Dockery Fund Edward H. Meier Fund William H. Potter Estate Fund J. C. Jacquith Estate Fund Initiation Fund Nicholas R. Wall Fund Abraham Palan Fund Bonds from a friend of the Home sold for Maggie Nicholson Fund Louisa Yott Fund

. $35,114.00 . 13,150.00 . 11,730.00 5,000.00 . 1,665.74 . 1,117.60 . 500.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,000.00 . 3,000.00 . 2,500.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,000.00 . 5,000.00 . . 30,000.00 500.00 . 500.00 . 806.60 . . 1,000.00 500.00 . 1,000.00 . 932.83 . . 2,067.91 . 51,096.35 2,327.75 . 1,000.00 . 500.00 . 1,000.00 . . 128,740.03 1,000.00 . 7,107.50 . 500.00 . 500.00 . . 3,000.00. . 17,056.95 . 1,800.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,000.00 . 1,442.48 . 1,000.00 500.00 . . 13,305.50 . 19,122.61 . 246,700.00 . 500.00 . 584.70 . 52,218.75 . 550.36 . 500.00


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

101

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1952 Gustav Bischoff Fund . 500.00 550.00 W. L. Tamme Fund . Erdhaus Estate secured and unsecured . 7,665.32 Henry T. Kilpatrick Fund . 2,000.00 William A. Hall Fund . 500.00 1,000.00 Henry Siegfried . Edward l\1:eyer . 500.00 Charles V. B. Slade . 9,548.75 Robert F. Stevenson . 14,992.13 1,105.14 . Glen Marquis Frank L. Schofield ..............................• 1,000.00 D. M. Wilson . 528.00 Mary C. Clapp . 3,405.09 Samuel Rife Estate . 7,548.50 Charlea Reilly . 100.00 E. C. Robinson . 2,500.00 B. S. Schwartz . 692.83 Brockett A. Dickson . 1,000.00 George F. Bergfeld . 500.00 Sarah B. Coffman . 465.89 Samuel A. Gluck . 200.00 100.00 Wellston Lodge No. 613 ~ . Richard Sinclair . 200.00 Karl Backrow . 100.00 Robert Lungstraas . 286.00 June Lee Cotton . 250.00 St. Joseph Chapter No. 198, O. E. S. . . 450.00 Marcus A. Loevy . 70.00 Sam Plan . 100.00 W. J. Scherek . 46.00 Myrtle Lodge No. 338 . 310.95 Ludwig Kotany . 200.00 Charles E. Koken ......•......................... 300.00 Philip Stremmel, Jr . 137.40 Boor Fletcher . 400.00 Alphonzo Whipple . 100.00 A. Bolin Fund . 400.00 . M. A. Covey Fund 25.00 William F. Kier Fund . 10,000.00 John T. Short Fund . 200.00 Paul Keiser Fund . 2,000.00 John Oliver Fund '," ; . 371.36 J. M. Darrow Fund . 5,000.00 T. W. Pritchett Fund . 1,000.00 Annie Martin Fund . 259.98 Comstock Estate .............•................... 115,760.97 Comstock Estate (doubtful value) . 2,500.00 Julia C. Norton Fund . 1,000.00 J. M. Darrow Estate .............................• 5,000.00


102

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIO HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1952

William Latham, Jr. Estate ...............•........ John M. Woodson Estate . . Sol E. Waggoner Estate Jacob C. C. Waldeck Estate . Adam Herold Estate . James Vinyard Estate . . George B. Mills Estate, Stock and Bonds John Rehrs Estate' . ' . William Russell Estate, Cash William Russell Estate, Bonds and Other Securities .. Joseph Kronacher Estate , . . William A. Raming Estate Fred Herket Estate . Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, Cash .....•.............. Oscar H. Elbrecht Estate, Stock and Bonds . Edward F. W. Kaiser . Henry W. Hunning Estate . . Dr. Louis F. Bode Estate Fred Segelke Estate . Charles Geitner Estate ..•...•..................... William B. Archer Estate . James Ward Nixon Memorial . Henry C. Grenner Estate, Stocks, Bonds and Cash . Berthold Linder Estate ..........••.•.............. Charles H. Schureman Estate . . Charles A. Brown Estate Ernest Bi-uneman .............................•... A. S. Hudson Estate . Myrtle Kipp Estate ......•....................... John Cunningham Estate . . Mrs. Pearl Kaiser Annuity Estate of William Modra .........•...•............ George W. Lecak Gift . . Louis J. Brohammer Gift Fred D. Gardner Estate . . George H. W oltjen Estate Mrs. Virginia Allen Church Estate (in memory of Ethelbert Forrester Allen) . Irvin Levosier Page Estate . Gift in memory of William T. Coombs . Barbara Seaman Bequest . Isador Mendle IJegacy . Estate of Joseph S. McIntyre . Estate of James R. Anderson ......•........•...... R. F. Stevenson Estate , . . George William James Estate Gerard B. Lambert ..........................•.... Mary Huthmaker Estate, Bond and Cash . Estate of William Rothmeyer .

1,000.00 5,467.91 1,000.00 500.00 211.08 933.24 11,600.00 250.00 1,901.39 4,392.00 431.05 1,000.00 2,000.00 405.86 2,780.00 25,000.00 100.00 300.00 214.47 1,000.00 5,085.00 1,000.00 261,502.94 200.00 365.67 1,000.00 100.00 942.84 707.16 16,875.25 5,500.00 6,362.19 500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 25.00 50.00 100.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 2,103.03 10.00 1,000.00 7.40 30,550.12 50.00


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

103

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1952

Louis Schmidt Estate . William W. Alexander ...........................• Mrs. Kate Fellers Estate . Fred Mueller Estate . Frank Gottlieb Estate . Clara Siegel Estate . Emma Winkler Estate . Clara Ethel Downs Memorial Fund . William F. Kuhn Memorial Fund . Arthur Emil Koethe Estate . . Thos. H. Reynolds Gift . Edward Kuhn Estate . Alva Moog Estate . . Nicola Zimmer Memorial Fund Emma H. Doellner Estate . Abraham Romansky Gift . Abraham Romansky Estate . Albert Rabenncck· Estate . . Agnes McAdoo Estate, Bond and Cash F. W. Struchen Estate . Harry P. Brown Estate . Mrs. Anna Kern Estate . Mrs. Elizabeth Clark Estate . Gift in Memory of Alexander Friedberg. : . Emma Schumacher Estate . Gift in Memory of Charles Hermann . Charles Spraul Estate . . Theodore Mueller Estate Frank Ferguson Estate •...................... " . Kathryn Lehman Estate . E. H. Lehnbetter Estate . Logan Busby Estate . Etta Mueller Estate . Franklin V. Kemp Estate, Stocks, Bonds and Cash . Louis Duestrow Estate . Rosa Ruhland Estate . Fannie A. McCarty Estate . Sol Samuel Estate . Fritz William Selleck Estate . Eugene D. Ashbrook Estate . Hugh S. Jamison Estate, Stocks and Cash . Estate of Louis A. Geserich . William J. Whiprecht Estate . Hattie Fuller Estate . Elzie Fulton Estate . William Downs Gift ..•........................... Estate of G. I. Langenberg .•...................... Estate of Virgil L. Muskopf . Mrs. EarI C. Tuggle Gift .

500.00 1,000.00 625.00 100.00 100.00 17,971.36 538.05 1,0.00.00 1,000.00 2,000.00 5,000.00 1,000.00 100.00 50.00 500.00 250.00 500.00 500.00 1,578.00 400.00 10,834.90 6,311.77 5,000.00 50.00 17.75 50.00 300.00 5,000.00 1,815.87 2,697.96 1,000.00 6,928.80 6,266.89 46,929.10 20,000.00 25,000.00 2,807.58 100.00 1,040.05 1,000.00 33,420.08 200.00 5.00 917.87 16,189.95 500.00 250.00 400.00 25.00


104

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1952

A. M. Freund Estate............................. $ 500.00 2,000.00 George C. Paulus Gift . 500.00 Bernard J. Kappel Estate . 250.00 Mary E. Knecht Estate . Mrs. Anna Nipper Estate . 84,726.34 100.00 Fort Leonard Wood National Sojourners Gift. ; 250.00 Minnie K. Geller Estate . 5,743.10 MarY' B. Chandler Estate . '200.00 Iva T. Burns and Lola B. Dickey, Memorial Fund . Albert G. Keller Estate, Bonds and Cash . 3,239.97 100.00 . William Kairns Estate H. O. Hirsch Estate . 5,248.76 . Mrs. Julia Weber Lewis Estate 5,000.00 F. W. Weinheimer Estate, Bonds, Stock and Cash . 57,618.75 Gift of 1949 Wardens and Master Club of St. Louis and St. Louis County . 100.00 Gift of William R. Denslow and Wife " . 100.00 Mrs. Rose M. Sizemore Estate, Bond and Cash . 2,295.62 Gift of G. A. Buder . 393.99 Virginia Stroud Estate . " 1,000.00 Herman Mensendiek Estate, Stocks . 165.00 1,000.00 John R. Goodall Trust . William M. Pinger Estate . 555.20 10.00 Gift in memory of Frederick Quellmalz . August Anthony Nolte Estate . 25.00 Gift of Mrs. Katherine Thomas, Queen City Chapter, 100.00 No. 226, O. E. S. in honor of Ray Bond, G. M . 10.00 Gift of Robert Lewis Macy . 20.00 Gifts in memory of Dillman F. E. Wagner . 100.00 Gift in memory of T. T. Turley and H. 1. Turley . 6,600.00 Edna Ceora Rogers Estate . 4,858.52 â&#x20AC;˘Tohn T. Mathis Estate . 1,000.00 Frank Joseph Arth Estate . 3,726.55 Aubrey B. Henton Estate . . 53,586.08 Rudolph Buhman Estate 500.00 Ernest J. Bunt Estate . 1,000.00 John P. Briebel Estate . 500.00 Mrs. Rose W. Lenore Estate . . 12,333.26 Mrs. Barsha A. Langston Estate . Mrs. Henrietta Pearse Estate 9,783.05 1,000.00 . Morris L. Binowitz Estate 601.60 Edgar P. Schaefer Estate . 108.21 Angela Campbell Estate ; . . 10,604.86 Mrs. Lulu Cammann Zamzow Estate 1,299.12 Mrs. Luella M. Willette Estate . Wm. Frederick Kuhn Memorial Association, in memory of Dr. William Frederick Kuhn . 787.71 Anna L. Gentry Memorial Fund . 2,099.13 Gift in memory of Val O. Decker and Frances Decker. 2,000.00


1953

GRAKD r...ODG E OF MISSOURI

105

ENDOWMENT FUND MASONIC HOME OF MISSOURI 1886-1952

Gift of Robert C. Winkelmaier, in memory of Bertha WinkelInaier . Gift of Leola P. Robertson, in memory of George W. Peters . Gifts in memory of Mrs. Sallie Simon . Gift in memory of John Weiss, Jr . Gift in memory of Emma Krieger . Gift of Calvary Commandery No. 28, K. T., ]<'ulton .. Gift of St. Graal Commandery No. 12, K. T., Columbia Gift of Crane Lodge No. 517, A. F. & A. M., Crane .. Gift of Ferguson Lodge No. 542, A. F. & A. :M., Ferguson . Gift of Senath Lodge No. 513, A. F. & A. M., Senath .. Gift of Frank B. Adam . Gift of H. H. Blackledge . Gift of J. H. Brimmer . Gift of R. n. Cessna . Gift of E. G. Corwine . Gift of Will Docter . Gift of C. R. Hinerman . Gift of Rudolph Egger . Gift of Edward F. Henri . Gift of Louis F. Heidorn . Gift of Robert J aeobi . Gift of George Mavrematis . Gift of Robert L. Maey . Gift of James P. Moore . Gift of Louis J. Ohler . Gift of L. M. Shrum . Gift of George E. Stowell . Gift of W. A. Walker . Gift of J. E. Weissenborn . Gift of Arthur Windmoeller .

100.00 25.00 120.00 26.00 5.50 11.50 10.00 25.00 15.00 10.00 50.00 150.00 10.00 2.00 1.00 100.00 50.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 10.00 20.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 ]0.00 5.00 50.00 25.00 5.00


106

PROCEEDIXGS OF THE

1953

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY .July 1, 1952 to .June 30, 1953 GENERAL FUND

Income Grand Lodge Per Capita Tax $223,561.64 Grand Chapter, O.E.S. Per Capita tax 21,305.25 $244,866.89 1,293.63 17.55

Interest on General Fund Securities Miscellaneous Income

$246,178.07

Expenses Wag 7s. and Salaries . 108,518.97 ProvIsIons . 101,040.03 4,400.84 Dry Goods and Clothing . 744.65 Dry Cleaning and Shoe Repair . Laundry . 22,989.06 Fuel . 15,358.37 Hepairs and Maintenance . 23,098.02 Supplies . 19,836.88 378.61 Icc . 6,027.42 Light . 2,115.38 Water . Insurance . ~149.13 Barber . 1,126.70 600.00 Outside Aid . :Federal Social Security-Employer's rfax . 2,293.70 47.47 Education . Directors, Grand Lodge Officers and Advisory Board Attending Board Meetings . 1,928.50 Children's Allowances . 113.25 Carfare . 313.62 Telephone . 943.13 Auditing . 465.65 Printing, Stationery and Postage . 838.50 Steward's Car Allowance . 720.00 Inspection Fees and Taxes . 163.80 Hauling Ashes, etc. . . 1,278.50 \Vant Ads . 960.94 Petty Cash Expense . 1,282.93 Ne\vspapers . 904.27 Dues and Subscriptions . 46.55 Safe Deposit Boxes . 30.00 Piano Tuning . 107.00 ~fiscel1aneous . 714.65 Masonic Homes Executives Ass 'no convention expense . 364.98 Public Relations . 305.99 Grand Lodge Entertainment . 222.93 Superintendent's Traveling Expense . 122.06 324,552.48 Excess of Expense over Income

.

$ 78,374.41


1953

107

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Transfer from Income Fund

.

65,000.00

Net Decrease in General Fund Balance on Hand July 1, 1952

. .

13,374.41 54,499.81 $ 41,125.40

Balance on Hand June 30, 1953 INCOME FUND

Receipts Interest on Endowment Fund Bonds and Stocks $ 57,8]2.87 Interest on Endowment Fund Real Estate Loans 37,482.54 17,021.66 Received from Members of Home Family . Pensions . 17,796.45 100.00 Sale of Cemetery Lots . . 3,985.25 Income on Income Fund Securities 2,084.10 Miscellaneous Income . - - - - $136,282.87

Disbursements Taxes and Expenses on Estates Agent's Collection Expense--Commission Building Improvements

$

. .

1,421.83 2,743.09 49,138.27 53,303.19

Excess of Receipts over Disbursements Deduct Transfers to General Fund

$ 82,979.68 65,000.00

Net Increase in Income Fund Add Balance on Hand July 1, 1952

$ 17,979.68 195,569.00

Balance on Hand June 30, 1953

$213,548.68

INITIATION FUND

Receipts Initiation Fees Interest on Initiation Fund Securities

$ 51,700.00 8,536.86 ,..--...--- $ 60,236.86

Disbursements Repairs and Improvements Boiler House

$

.

1,265.58 13,844.64 15,110.22

Excess of Rel:eipts over Disbursements Add Balance on Hand July 1, 1952

. .

Balance on Hand June 30, 1953

45,126.64 405,152.86 $450,279.50

BUILDING FUND

Receipts Contributions Interest on Building Fund Securities

$ 1,490.00 . 2,662.50 ---- $

4,152.50


108

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Add Balance on Hand July 1, 1952

119,961.28

Balance on Hand June 30, 1953

$124,113.78

CHRISTMAS AND ENTERTAINMENT FUND

Receipts Contributions

$

5,810.84

Disbursements Entertainments and Gifts

.

Excess of Receipts over Disbursements Balance on Hand July 1, 1952

.

Balance on Hand June 30, 1953

5,201.86 $

608.98 4,494.24

$

5,103.22

REPORT OF THE AUDITOR

To the Board of Directors, Masonic Home of Missouri, Saint Louis, Missouri. GENTLEMEN: Pursuant to engagement, we have prepared this report preliminary to our formal report of the Masonic Home of Missouri to be submitted to the Board of Directors at a later date. We examined the books and records of the secretary for the period July 1, 1952 to June 30, 1953. Our examination covered the General Fund, Income Fund, Initiation Fund, Building Fund, Christmas and Entertainment Fund and Endowment Fund. We have prepared the following summaries of assets and liabilities of the various funds as at June 30, 1953: GENERAL FUND

Assets Cash in United Bank and Trust Co $ 17,765.59 Cash in Mercantile-Commerce National Bank-Payroll Acct. 6,000.00 200.00 Cash in Petty Cash Fund . Inventories-Provisions and supplies . 23,831.82 Unexpired Insurance . 7,967.51 $ 55,764.92

Liabilities Accounts Payable Accrued Social Security Taxes Accrued Withholding Tax

. $ 13,203.60 . 382.64 . 1,053.28 $ 14,639.52 $ 41,125.40

Balance-General Fund INCOME FUND

Assets Cash in Mercantile Trust Company

$ 10,623.82


1953

109

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Securities-At Cost St. Louis Union Trust Company-Agent Endowment Fund Total Income Fund

,

. .

187,782.64 15,142.22

. $213,548.68

INITIATION FUND Cash in Mercantile Trust Company Securities-At Cost Accrued Interest on Securities at Time of Purchase

$ 18,172.83 432,099.96 6.71

Total Initiation Fund

$450,279.50 BUILDING FUND

Cash in Boatmen's National Bank Securities-At Cost

$

4,611.35 119,502.43

Total Building Fund

$124,113.78

CHRISTMAS AND ENTERTAINMENT Cash in Boatmen 's National Bank Total Christmas and Entertainment Fund

$ $

5,103.22 5,103.22

ENDOWMENT FUND Real Estate Loans United States Bonds Other Bonds Corporation Stocks Due from St. Louis Union Trust Company-Agent

. $802,020.96 . 145,920.88 . 167,387.83 . 785,459.83 . 25,786.84

Total Endowment Fund

$1,926,576.34

The bank balances appearing in these funds were confirmed by reconciling certificates, received directly from the depositaries, with the stated book balances. The investments as shown in these funds were verified by examination of the securities, with the exception of the securities of the Endowment Fund which are held by the St. Louis Union Trust Company as agent. The inventories are stated as shown on the inventory sheets prepared by the management. We have shown the securities listed in the Income Fund, Initiation Fund and Building Fund at recorded cost. The stocks in the Endowment Fund are stated at an adjusted carrying value which was 15 per cent below market value on the stocks held at March 1, 1949, and market value on the date received on stocks acquired since that date. The bonds acquired prior to January 1, 1951 are stated at the value placed thereon by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund at the date of acquisition of the securities by the Home. Those acquired since January 1, 1951 are carried at cost. The real estate loans are being carried at cost.


110

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

If you desire any additional information relative to this report, we shall be pleased to have you call upon us. Respectfully submitted, C. K. BENSON & COMPANY, Certified Public Accountants. MEDICAL STArF

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Solon Cameron, Medical Director St. Louis, Mo. William R. Bohne, Orthopedics St. Louis, Mo. James Barrett Brown, Surgery St. Louis, Mo. C. E. Burford, Urology St. Louis, Mo. Stanley S. Burns, Otolaryngology St. Louis, Mo. A. H. Conrad, Dermatology St. Louis, Mo. Ralph Cook, Pediatrics ........•............... St. Louis, Mo. Carl T. Eber, Ophthalmology · St. Louis, Mo. Edwin C. Ernst, Radiology St. Louis, Mo. James Forsen, Surgery St. Louis, Mo. Joseph Glenn, Urology St. Louis, Mo. D.' L. Harris, Bacteriology St. Louis, Mo. Roland M. Klemme, Neuro-Surgery St. Louis, Mo. Charles L. Klenk, Bacteriology St. Louis, Mo. Otto VV. Koch, Otolaryngology St. Louis, Mo. Philip S. Luedde, Ophthalmology St. Louis, Mo. Mary Elizabeth Morris, Gynecology St. Louis, Mo. 'Villiam Nelson, Neurology St. Louis, Mo. Bert O. Owens, Proctology St. Louis, Mo. R. J. Payne, Otolaryngology St. Louis, Mo. Robert E. Schlueter, Emeritus, Surgery St. Louis, Mo. J. Wm. Thompson, Surgery St. Louis, Mo. Henry P. Thym, Surgery St. Louis, Mo. R. S.Weiss, Dermatology St. Louis, Mo.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAND MASTER'S ADDRESS

M. W. Brother Homer L. Ferguson presented the report of the Committee on the Grand Master's Address which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on the Address of the Grand Master submits the following report: We commend the Grand Master on the fidelity with which he has discharged the onerous duties of his office and are keenly aware of the splendid service he has rendered to the Fraternity and to the Craft. His complete and comprehensive address r!3flects his high conception of the office and his unswerving devotion to the principles of Freemasonry. His record of visitations is outstanding and through such visitations he has carried the message of Freemasonry throughout the state, includ-


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

111

ing Lodges which have not previously been honored by the presence of the Grand Master. Many subjects heretofore unmentioned or referred to only briefly are outlined in detail and merit the thoughtful consideration of the Craft. To comment on each of these subjects is superfluous as the Grand Master has set forth in clear and unmistakable language his opinions and rec路 ommendations. We do feel, however, that special emphasis should be given to several subjects and recommendations. As a result of. the prompt and energetic action of the Grand Master the unauthorized use of the name "Masonic" and the use of Masonic Symbols has been definitely settled. The Grand Master recognizes and gives full and deserved credit to the District Deputy Grand Masters for the fine service they have consistently rendered and without whose cooperation the Grand Master would be unable to maintain contact with the various Lodges and the Craft. The constant increase in the cost of operation is a problem which confronts every organization and institution and the Grand Lodge is no exception. The Grand Master reminds the Craft of changing conditions which necessarily must result in increased Lodge assessment to meet the needs of the Grand Lodge. He voices his approval of the increase as proposed by amendment to Section 74 of the By-laws. Notice is taken of the failure of some lodges to anticipate increasing financial demands because of changing economic levels and such lodges arc urged to increase dues in an amount ad~quate for present day purposes. The cogent and timely suggestions of the Grand Master regarding the ritual, conferring of degrees and degree teams should be heeded by Lodge officers and the Brethren. Masonic education. is a subject which has been repeatedly discussed and regarding which numerous suggestions and recommendations have been made with little or no results. Membership in the Lodge of Research, as th~Grand Master points out, furnishes a splendid opportunity to increase knowledge of Masonry and Masonic history. The Grand Master also reminds the Craft of the privileges which they may enjoy through use of the Ma..~onic Library. Increased cost of travel and hotel accommodations make totally inadequate the present per diem of $5.00, and an increase in that amount to all entitled thereto is recommended by the Grand Master. To guard against unwise financial ventures by the Lodges the Grand Lodge some 20 years ago constituted the Building Supervisory Board. The Grand Master, as has his predecessors, admonishes the Lodges, officers and members against assuming any financial liability without the permission of the Board. The appointment of a Ll:)gal Advisor is a distinct innovation but such practice, in our opinion, should be continued. Constantly the Grand Master is called on for decisions aI!d interpretations of Masonic Law. As the Grand Master is now required to serve as President of the Masonic Home in addition to his duties as Grand Master, he should be relieved of the tedium incident to the many demands for legal opinions. The Grand Master proposes, and we approve his recommendation, that the present and future Legal Advisors receive a just compensation for services rendered. The question of physical. disqualification prbsents a real question. Only too well de we know that because of physical inability to comply with certain requirements many good men are denied Masonic membership. Some jurisdictions deal very leniently with such persons while


112

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

others refuse to lower existing standards. The problem is one which merits the thoughtful and kindly consideration of this Grand Lodge. We heartily commend the Grand Master for having brought about a closer association between religious institutions and the Fraternity through the medium of a definite plan for religious services路 and followed by a Grand Masters' breakfast. We urge future,Grand Masters to sponsor an annual r~currence of such an occasion and similar affairs throughout the state. As President of the Masonic Home the Grand Master has rendered further and outstanding service, giving unstintingly of himself and his time in the handling of Home affairs. As a result of his stewardship the Home affairs are functioning in splendid manner, the investment of Home funds have been wisely made and the financial condition is sound. We recommend that the decisions of the Grand Master and the dispensations issued by him be referred to the Jurisprudence Committee. We further recommend that all matters and recommendations pertaining to finances be referred to the Ways and Means Committee. HOMER L. FERGUSON, Chairman, T. W. COTTON, W. F. WOODRUFF, BERT S. LEE, W. R. GENTRY, RAY V. DENSLOW, HARRY SUNDERLAND, M. E. EWING, H. C. JOHNSTON, FORREST C. DONNELL, J. M. BRADFORD, HAROLD L. READER, J. M. SKELLY, FRANK C. BARNIDLL, W. W. MARTIN.

JURISPRUDENCE COMMITTEE-PRELIMINARY REPORT RE MILEAGE AND PER DIEM

M. W. Brother Byrne E. Bigger presented the preliminary report of the Jurisprudence Committee which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Jurisprudence submits the following as a partial report: There has been referred to us the amendment of the Grand Lodge By-Laws found on page 49 of the Proceedings of 1952 relative to mileage and per diem. The Most Worshipful Grand Master has also made some recommendations relative to this subject. We have made some additions to the printed amendment and recommend the following: 76. Mileage and Per Diem. The Past Grand Masters, Grand Officers, District Deputy Grand Masters, District Lecturers and one Representative from each chartered lodge and each lodge U. D., the members of the Committe~ on Appeals and Grievances, the Committee on Credentials, the Committee on Jurisprudence, the Committee on Ways and Means, the Committee on Mileage and Per Diem, the SEC


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

113

Building Supervisory Board and the Cllairman of all other Standing Committees who do not draw mileage and per diem in any other capacity, shall be paid the sum of ten dollars for each day they may be in actual attendance upon the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, and six cents per mile for each mile necessarily traveled in going to and returning therefrom; provided, that no representative shall receive mileage and per diem in a double capacity. We recommend the adoption of the above by-law and that the same shall be effective immediately upon its adoption and the terms thereof be applicable to the 1953 Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge. Respectfully submitted, BYRNE E. BIGGER, HARRY GERSHENSON, MARTIN B. DICKIN SON, SAM WILCOX.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE GEORGE WASHINGTON MASONIC NATIONAL MEMORIAL

M. ""V. Brother Bert S. Lee, Chairman, presented the report of the committee on the George vVashington Masonic National Memorial which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grana Loage, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRE'l'RR.EN: Your Committee on the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association beg leave to make the following report: The Forty-third Annual Convention of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association was held in the Auditorium of the Memorial Association in Alexandria, Virginia on l<'ebruary twentythird, Nineteen Hundred and Fifty-three, b9ginning at 10 0 'clock a. m. All of the Grand Lodges of the United States of America were represented by their Grand Masters and other Grand Officers, seven of the Grand Lodges of Canada; the Grand Lodge of Germany; the Grand Lodge of China; the Grand Lodge of Argentina; the Grand Lodge of Costa Rica; the Grand Lodge of the Philippine Republic; Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas and the York Grand Lodge of Mexico. The Grand Encampment, Knights Templar; the Grand Council, R. & S. M., the General Grand Chapter, R. A. M. Supreme Council 33 A.A.S.H. Southern Jurisdiction; Supreme Council 33 A.A.S.R. Northern Jurisdiction; Grand J mperial Council, Red Cross of Constantine; Imperial Council A.A.O.N.M.S. Nobles of the .Mystic Shrine; Supreme Couneil Mystic Order of Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm; Masonic Relief Association of the United States and Canada; Grand Council, Order of De Molay; Masonic Service Association and National League of Masonic Clubs. 1\1issouri was represented by our Grand Master, M. W. Brother Richard O. Rumer, Grand Secretary, Dr. Harold L. Reader, P.G.M., Grand Marshal Bruce Hunt; Grand Master of the Grand Council Edwin Knudsen; Past Grand Masters RayV. Denslow and Bert S. IJee. During the past year there has been paid out for BuUding Construction and Maintenance $115,917.73. There is un-appropriated in the Building Pund $393,121.25, in the Endowment Fund $503,502.39. There was paid in by Grand Masters at this meeting for the Building Fund $110,473.16 and for the Endowment Fund $64,551.74. Fraternally submitted, BERT S. LEE, Chairman, HARRY S. TRUMAN, ANTHONYF. ITTNER.


114

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

NOMINATIONS FOR MASONIC HOME BOARD For two year period ending 1955 (to fill vacancy) : Lester M. Heckman For four year period ending in 1957: Claud T. Wood Charles A. Jobson Eugene L. McG~e Harry B. DePriest

REPORT OF GRAND LECTURER

R. 'V. Brother Freelon K. Hadley, Grand Lecturer, presented his report which was adopted and is as follows : .

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: My second year as your Grand Lecturer has been a most pleasant one. The brethren throughout the state made every effort to make my visits successful and I received nothing but the finest courtesy and consideration. I greatly appreciate this and hope I have made the same impression on those with whom I have come in contact. I have visited every district in the state once, and a goodly number a second time, holding sehools of instruction for all who were interested. These meetings, with few exceptions, have been well attended. I want to. express my appreciation to the District Lecturers who have rendered an invaluable service to the Grand Lodge and the Fraternity. Without their tireless effort the work of the Grand Lecturer would be greatly curtailed. At the beginning of the year I was a little apprehensive of what might be accomplished as I was faced with the problem of starting about one third of the District Lecturers new and inexperienced. I can say now that my fears were unfounded. The new District Lecturers have made every effort to learn the work correctly so they could impart it to the brethren of their districts. They have all made wonderful progress and some of them are able to take a place' with the best. Their enthusiasm seemed to carry to the brethren and what seemed to be inactive distriets have become most active. 1'00 much credit cannot be given the District Lecturers for the work they do. They not only give freely of their time and knowledge but are constantly trying to become more proficient in the work. They have set up wne meetings in five sections of the state and attend these meetings four times a year at their own expense. Many Lecturers travel over three hundred miles, round trip, to 'attend these meetings just to have the opportunity to practice and improve themselves. These are not dosed meetings. They are attended by many District Deputy Grand Masters and other brethren. As a result of these meetings the Grand Lecturer is in every section of the state at least four times each year. Therefore, when a question arises on any part of the work that the District Lecturer is in doubt of, the


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

115

brethren do not have to wait long for the desired information. The outcome of the work of the District Lecturers, these zone meetings and the interest of the brethren, is that our ritualistic work is more uniform throughout the state today, than ever before. So long as we have brethren like these, and we will always have them, there can be no doubt about the future of the ritual in Missouri. There are some lodges that, for a number of reasons, will never attain the desired degree of proficiency the Grand Lecturer would like to sec. However, these lodges cannot be judged solely on their ritualistic ability. They, as well as all l,odges, hold an important place in their respective communities and what they may lack in ritualistic ability, make up in other phases of masonic activity. The number of petitions has fallen off compared with the peak years, yet there has been a normal increase in membership the past year. Freemasonry is enjoying a healthy and prosperous growth.' The interest and enthusiasm of the brethren is greater now than it was a year ago. This is due, in part at least, to the activity of the Grand Lodge Line Officers, the District Deputy Grand Masters and the District Lecturers. The activity of these officers has a direct bearing in relation to the interest of the brethren over the state. Death invaded the ranks of the District Lecturers twice during the year. First on June ]5, 1953 when R. 'V. Brother Robert W. Fowlkes, Charleston, Missouri, District Lecturer of the 50th District, was called "From Labor" and again on September 4, 1953 when R. W. Brother William E. Harris, Piedmont, Missouri, District Lecturer of the 52nd District, "Answered the Summons." These two brethren were outstanding ritualists and always deemed it a pleasure and privilege to assist the brethren of their respective districts. The Grand Lodge is deeply indebted to them for their long years of service. . The Grand Lodge Officers and the District Deputy Grand Masters have given me splendid cooperation. They have left no shme unturned to make my year a most successful one. I sincerely thank them for their assistance. It has been my privilege to attend a small number of meetings with Our Grand Master, Most Worshipful Brother Richard O. Rumer. His frankness, loyalty and enthusiasm have endeared him in the hearts of all those with whom he has come in contact. Being a past District Lecturer and an excellent ritualist, he has been an inspiration to me. I thank him for his personal interest. Fraternally submitted, FREELON K. HADLEY, Grand Lecturer. REPORT OF RITUAL COMMITTEE

R. W. Brother Freelon K. Hadley, Chairman, presented the report of the Ritual Committee which was adopted and is as follows:


116

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

To the Most Worshipful Grall.d Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: . BRETHREN: The Committee met at Jefferson City, November 10. This meeting served a twofold purpose, first to consider the matters to come before it and second to afford the members, who are not District Lecturers, the opportunity to attend the meeting of the District Lecturers the following day. Last Year the Committee reported that there was a growing demand to divide Subdivision II of the Certificate Plan into three separate parts. This was laid over to give the Committee time for further study. After careful consideration, at our meeting this year, it was agreed that it should be divided. Proper "Rules and Regulations" and "Application Forms" were adopted and the new plan was put in effect. The results, thus far, have been most encouraging. It is hoped that this new plan will continue to grow in popularity. A considerable amount of time was sp~nt in discussing portions of the esoteric part of the work. This serves as a refresher course for the Committee members and gives them assurance that they are in accord with one another. Therefore when a question arises on any part of the work, they are qualified to give the correct answer. We wish to thank our Grand Secretary, M. W. Brother Harold L. Reader for his efficient work and splendid support in our behalf. A list of the brethren receiving Certificates, under the Certificate Plan, will be incorporated as a part of this report. Fraternally submitted, FREELON K. HADLEY, Chairman, ANTHONY F. ITTNFiR, BRUCE H. HUNT, GEO. M. McANINCH, WM. J. CRAIG, BRACE E. KITCIIELL. No. Name Lodge 1963 Clarence William McCalister York Lodge No. 563 1964 John Louis Schmidt Anchor Lodge No. 443 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 1965 Joseph S. Marshall, Jr 1966 Harry E. Evers N aphtali Lodge No. 25 Fellowship Lodge No. 345 1967 Merrill Dean Box 1968 William James Thurman Fellowship Lodge No. 345 1969 John Jay Bain Friend Lodge No. 352 1970 Oscar Eugene Eakins Friend Lodge No. 352 1971 Clarence William Estabrooks, Sr.. Lexington Lodge No. 149 1972 Frank Vernon Jones California Lodge No. 183 1973 Clarence Eugene Fawks Fayette Lodge No. 47 1974 John Russell Flannagan York Lodge No. 563 1975 Irvin Williams Cunningham Lodge No. 525 1976 James C. Simmons Unionville Lodge No. 210 1977 Ho,v-ard Melville Eaton, Sr Magnolia Lodge No. 626 1978 Thomas Bernard Dunlap Elvins Lodge No. 599 Star of the West Lodge No. 133 1979 Alvin Thomas Leeker 1980 John Robert Toot Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 Unionville Lodge No. 210 1981 William H. Shuey Northeast Lodge No. 643 1982 Jarold R. Brookshire 1983 David William Landis Liberty Lodge No. 31 1984 Joseph Elmo Parrish Overland Lodge No. 623 1985 Herbert William Koester Overland Lodge No. 623 1986 Charles Robert McIntosh East Gate Lodge No. 630 Grand River Lodge No. 276 1987 George Orville Ellis 1988 John Edward Reece, Jr Seaman Lodge No. 126


1953 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 ]996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 20]9 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

117

Max Robinson Unionville Lodge No. 210 Harry E. Lewellen , Eureka Lodge No. 73 Carlyle Russell Humphreys Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Arthur Richard Cullor Unionville Lodge No. 210 Clayton D. Bruce Unionville Lodge No. 210 Clarence Orner Guill Overland Lodge No. 623 Vernon K. Abel Joachim Lodge No. 164 Earl Wayne Orr Vienna Lodge No. 94 Marshall Hasty U Ilion Lodge No. 593 Arthur C. Stein St. Marks Lodge No. 93 Quentin Jeriel Watkins Stanberry Lodge No. 109 J esse Miller Webster Lodge No. 98 Eugene Emmett McFarland ~ .. Hermon Lodge No. 187 Harry E'dmond Ball Montgomery Lodge No. 246 Gus T. Fischer .................â&#x20AC;˘Tonesburg Lodge No. 457 Wesley Earl Heath Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Clarence Elisha Pierce Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Frank Herman Becker Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Theodore Howard Cherie Overland Lodge No. 623 Kenneth Eugene Stark East Gate Lodge No. 630 .T ames Billington Overland Lodge No. 623 Andy Leon Keithley Star of the West Lodge No. 133 Emery II. Welsh Unionville Lodge No. 210 Robert Lee Lynch Ancient Landmark Lodge 356 Sherman Hillhouse Competition Lodge No. 432 Lloyd Hurst Worick '" Cache Lodge No. 416 George Edward Hiemann Cache Lodge K o. 416 John Edward Leonard Grandin Lodge No. 579 Lee Lunsford Kirkman Barnes Lo(lge No. 116 Raymond Neal Huston Overland Lodge No. 623 Charles Sylvester Atkinson Grand River Lodge No. 276 Carl Frederick Bal'thley Country Club Lodge No. 656 Albert John Leppert Overland Lodge No. 623 Richard C. Schober, Jr Cache Lodge No. 416 Abe Press Heroine Lodge No. 104 Morris L. Wolff Cornerstone Lodge No. 323 Everett L. McAllister Lincoln Lodge No. 138 William Osa Swanson 'l'wilight Lodge No. 114 Andrew T. Dorsey 'fwilight Lodge No. 114 Melvin Bierman St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Joe John Shipman Kennett Lodge No. 68 Frank G. Watsoll Craft Lodge No. 287 Everett L. Pape Concordia Lodge No. 464 ',' Savannah Lodge No. 71 Russell M. Elder Clyde C. King Webster Lodge No. 98 George Barkard Watsoll Fellowship Lodge No. 345 Morgan Wilson Owens Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327 Finley 11'1 Pinkston Marcus Lodge No. 110 John William Jenkins Samaritan Lodge No. 424 Thomas tr. Bryant Sullivan Lodge No. 69 Francis C. Martin Sullivan Lodge No. 69 Ben Frank Cenatiempo Wellston Lodge No. 613 Paul Eben Watters Webster Lodge No. 98 Fred H. Roam Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 99 Leonard Martin Seymour Jewel Lodge No. 480 William Henry Hedrick Jewel Lodge No. 480 John William Lanner Twilight Lodge No. 114 Albert Roy Adams Cache Lodge No. 416


118 2047 2048 2049 2050 2051 2052 2053 2054 2055 2056 2057 2058 2059 2060 2061 2062 2063 2064 2065 2066 2067 2068 2069 2070 2071 2072 2073 2074 2075 2076 2077 2078 2079 2080 2081 2082 2083 2084 2085 2086 2087 - 2088 2089 2090 2091 2092 2093 2094 2095 2096 2097 2098 2099 2100 2101 2102 2103 2104

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Ronald E. Jacobs Harmony Lodge No. 499 Joseph Dudley Sappington .......â&#x20AC;˘r ewel Lodge No. 480 Robert Snyder Weaton Shekinah IJodge No. 256 William. Joe Robertson Hornersville Lodge No. 215 David Don Pierce Hornersville Lodge No. 215 Roy Henry Bush Kennett Lodge No. 68 Claude Nelson Watson Laclede I.Jodge No. 83 Gerald Thomas Ward Acacia Lodge No. 602 Douglas O. Glascock Ashland Lodge No. 156 Charles T. Babbitt Wm. D. Muir Lodge No. 277 Donald Edward Hooper Cooper Lodge No. 36 Frank E. Officer Cambridge Lodge No. 63 Delbert T. Cook Friend Lodge No. 352 Harry D. McGuire Charity Lodge No. 331 Jennings Lodge No. 640 Charles William Brueggeman Howard Franklin Carter Northeast Lodge No. 643 Arthur Slocum Shelbina Lodge No. 228 Donald Edwin Hale St. Andrew's Lodge No. 96 John William Staggs St. Andrew's Lodge No. 96 Silas G. Dees Marcus Lodge No. no Noah Braswell Marcus Lodge No. no Leonard Elmo Kindred Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Clarence Edward Sadler Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Joe M. Glasscock ' Miller Lodge No. 567 Yale Myers Mountain Grove Lodge No. 158 Del L. Clary Clinton Lodge No. 548 Ted Cockrum Clinton Lodge No. 548 Frank John Schafer Maplewood Lodge No. 566 William ]'red Tiefenauer Tyro Lodge No. 12 Ralph Montgomery Competition Lodge No. 432 John H. Corey, Jr East Gate Lodge No. 630 Clarence 1. Harper Oregon Lodge No. 139 Raymond D. Polsgrove Oregon Lodge No. 139 Donald Guy Brown Oregon Lodge No. 139 Earl Allen Banning Oregon Lodge No. 139 Elton Eugene Mansell Ada Lodge No. 444 Henry Francis Burkhead St. John's Lodge No. 28 William Ray Glaus George Washington Lodge No.9 Wilbur Allen Sale Tuscan Lodge No. 360 Louis Rosenblatt Cosmos Lodge No. 282 Horatio G. Sprague Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Charles P. Neeley Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Jacob A. Pugh Charity Lodge No. 331 Harley W. Craig Ionia Lodge No. 381 Alvin Dwight Neidhardt Jennings Lodge No. 640 Kenneth Owen Krieger Westport Lodge No. 340 Leonard Emerson Barnhill Eastgate Lodge No. 630 John S. Smith Williamstown Lod~e No. 370 Charles Norma Tucker Williamstown Lodge No. 370 Willard Wilson May Huntsville Lodge No. 30 James Buford Thomason Samaritan Lodge No. 424 John Llewellyn Aull Brentwood Lodge No. 616 James R. Fenwick Eminence Lodge No. 607 Gilbert L. Rader Eminence Lodge No. 607 Friend BosseI' Greene Eminence Lodge No. 607 Edwin Claus Carlson Marceline Lodge No. 481 Earl Doss Marceline Lodge No. 481 Luman Elmer Norton Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 99


1953 21.05 2106 2107 2108 2109 2110 2111 2112 2113 2114 2115 2116 2117 2118 2119 2120 2121 2122 2123 2124 2125 2126 2127 2128 2129 2130 2131 2132 â&#x20AC;˘ 2133 2134 2135 2136 2137 2138 2139 2140 2141 2142 2143 2144 2145 2146 2147 2148 2149 2150 21.51 2152 2153 2154 2155 2156 2157 2158 2159 2160 2161 2162

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Howard A. Scott Emmett Lee Bunton James Howard PauL Francis Michael Marietta Norman JJavern McKelvey Benjamin Leo Pierce Jimmy G. Courtney Carroll J. McCubbin Jennings McKee Richard Minton Easter Howard 'rhomas Smith Delbert Gann Lloyd Pershing Branum Billy Ray McKee William Joseph Moore Lester John KarL Carl W. Sandstedt Douglas C. Rhincluu,t ' Murl Edwin Husted Charles Carlton Neeley Paul N. Cotton Elmer Lee Blackwell Earl Scott Miller Harold Bradley Combs Gustav Winter August Virgil Butler John Samuel Quinn James Kenneth Bailey Clyde Butler , Johnny Wright. Howard C. Brewington Paul 'l'urner Leslie J. Sampson Floyd F. Allen Frederick E. Whitehead Leo Donald Lindsey Lester B. Detwiler Frank E. Hannah ',' Richa.rd O. Ramsey Robert Allen Holmes .Tames W oodron Dougan Henry Herbert' Sweigert Herbert Kenneth Edwards Willie B. Hasberry Adolph Clarence Kuester, Sr LeRoy Elmo Smith Gene M. Wampler William Woodrow Ragan Paul Victor Raney Karl John Berry Isaac Wesley Broyles James T. Byland James M. McCullach Adelbert Eo Blackwood Howard Donald Cresswell Lloyd J. Kelly Joseph Lee Filbeck Jack Wallace Driggers

119

Ionia Lodge No. 381 Hermon Lodge No. 187 DeWitt Lodge No. 39 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Laclede Lodge No. 83 Brumley Lodge No. 203 Iberia Lodge No. 410 Noel Lodge No. 647 Dockery Lodge No. 325 Samaritan Lodge No. 424 Hornersville Lodge No. 215 Marlborough Lodge No. 569 Trenton Lodge No. 111 Jennings Lodge No. 640 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Knobnoster Lodge No. 245 Unionville Lodge No. 210 Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Star of the West Lodge No. 133 Marcus Lodge No. 110 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Marcus Lodge No. 110 Marcus Lodge No. 110 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Wyaconda Lodge No. 24 Wyaconda Lodge No. 24 Censer Lodge No. 172 Censer Lodge No. 172 Marcus Lodge No. 110 Solomon Lodge No. 271 Trenton Lodge No. 11 Fairmont Lodge No. 290 Fairmont Lodge No. 290 Ionic Lodge No. 154 Algabil Lodge No. 544 Friend Lodge No. 352 Friend Lodge No. 352 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Rosendale Ilodge No. 404 Rosendale Lodge No. 404 Moberly Lodge No. 344 Kennett Lodge No. 68 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Fairmont Lodge No. 290 Savannah Lodge No. 71 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Potosi Lodge No. 131 Sedalia Lodge No. 236 Sedalia Lodge No. 236 Adair Lodge No. 366 Laclede Lodge No. 83 Ingomar Lodge No. 536 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Raytown Lodge No. 391 Gate City Ilodge No. 522 Lambskin Lodge No. 460


120 2163 2164 2165 2166 2167 2168 2169 2170 2171 2172 2173 2174 2] 75 2176 2177 2178 2179 2180 2181 2182 2183 2184 2185 2186 2187 2188 2189 2190 2191 2192 2193 2194 2195 2196 2197 2198 2199 2200 2201 2202 2203 2204 2205 2206 2207 2208 2209 2210 2211 2212 2213 2214 2215 2216 2217

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Clay P. Bixler Donald Shelton Cox William Harrison Tucker Edgar Douglas Walsworth Ralph A. Dooley Bobbie Leroy McDonald Eugene LeRoy Wigger D. C. Coley Edgar Paul Luff Robin Dale Ward Earl Raymond Moriset Donald Wade Turpin Irvin Franklin Strycker Clyde Shortell ; Wintha Lee Henry Edwin Russell Morgan Louis Arnold Guerrant Roy E. Burton Alan Dale Wright Joseph M. Brown William L. McMullen J oe Wayne Craig Robert Kermit Moore Ernest Wesley Adkins John William Greer William Anthony Mudd Calvin Haskell Hardwick Dallas L. Davis '" Lawrence Woodson Stanley Joshua Roy Hendrix Bob Eugene Gowin Don Cloves Brunson Harry Allen Wilber Crawford Dudley Tillman Ellis Keay William Lawrence Key Wilber Pershing Minor James Garrett Magee Wilbur Lee Molloy Marion Porter Owen Dudley Carter William Henry Creed Harry Harold Lincoln Irwin Lee Butler Kenneth Leon Barrett. Jerry Oliver Kelley Frederick William Hare Sam Kahn Cecil O. Norman James Franklin Conway Fremont Goetz Oscar Martin Seiden Harold Eugene Gray Prince Ashley McDougal Hugh Vincent Ashley, Jr

1953

Kennett Lodge No. 68 Nodaway Lodge No. 470 Marceline Lodge No. 481 Marceline Lodge No. 481 Bosworth Lodge No. 597 Ionia Lodge No. 381 Farmington Lodge No. 132 Farmington Lodge No. 132 McDonald Lodge No. 324 Moberly Lodge No. 344 Solomon Lodge No. 271 Bolivar Lodge No. 195 York Lodge No. 563 Richmond Lodge No. 57 Blackwell Lodge No. 535 Saline Lodge No. 226 , Jewel Lodge No. 480 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Bethel Lodge No. 537 Bethel Lodge No. 537 Trenton Lodge No. 111 , Liberty Lodge No. 31 Country Club Lodge No. 656 York Lodge No. 563 Webster Lodge No. 98 Rising Sun Lodge No. 13 Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 , Kennett Lodge No. 68 Richmond Lodge No. 57 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Independence Lodge No. 76 Independence Lodge No. 76 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Meramec Lodge No. 313 Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 Independence Lodge No. 76 New Hampton Lodge No. 510 New Hampton Lodge No. 510 Cypress Lodge No. 227 Neosho Lodge No. 247 Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 Raytown Lodge No. 391 Raytown Lodge No. 391 Jewell Lodge No. 480 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Swope Park Lodge No. 617 North Star Lodge No. 157 Somerset Lodge No. 206 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 St. Louis Lodge No. 20 Shekinah Lodge No. 256 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 St. Marks Lodge No. 93


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

121

SUBDIVISION I-SERIES A-RENEWALS

No. A 565 A 566 A 567 A 568 A 569 A 570 A 571 A 572 A 573 A 574 A 575 A 576 A 577 .A 578 A 579 A 580 A 581 A 582 A 583 A 584 A 585 A 586 A 587 A 588 A 589 A 590 A 591 A 592 A 593 A 594 A 595 A 596 A 597 A 598 A 599 A 600 A 601 A 602 A 603 A 604 A 605 A 606 A 607 A 608 A 609 A 610 A 611 A 612 A 613 A 614 A 615 A 616

Name Harold A. Reichel Claude Walker Dunnaway Earl J. Crawford J. Sterling M~rshall, Sr Clell Moultrie Gilbert Elza Lee Humes Charles Martin Prigeon Robert Wayne Grimes James Ernest Blackmore Herbert Woolsey Charles Wesley Roemer Eugene F. Schaberg Drury A. Wake George Alfred Fagan Gail M. Jobe Trueman Daniels Boone Walter Lee Shelton Earl F. Pentecost John Hadley Rich Glenn V. Bulla C. Earle Armstrong J. Fred Park James Milton McMillin Robert Edward Kleinschmidt Harry Johnson Enochs Joseph Edward McIlvaine Henry William Henrion Stanford M. Burge Carol Turner William Albert Turner Floyd J. Lollar Melvin L. Drummond Clyde M. Reid Richard Norman Robinson Charles Wesley Loveland Virgil T. Foreman Elmer W. Pickles Walter Clyde Anthony Fred P. Womack William Karl Attebery, Sr Montie L. Asher John Henry Bender William Henry Luttrell Carl Pittman O. C. Winkler Darrell Gordan Elam Freeman Harry Cole John Wesley Kinman Stanley Earl Green Clifford W. Hodes' Arthur Manley Willian Chester Allen McAfee

Lodge Ionia Lodge No. 381 Versailles Lodge No. 320 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 York Lodge No. 563 Xenia Lodge No. 50 Acacia Lodge No. 602 Breckenridge Lodge No. 334 Twilight Lodge No. 114 Palestine I.1odge No. 241 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Comfort Lodge No. 533 Star of the West Lodge No. 133 St. Marks Lodge No. 93 l"riend Lodge No. 352 Clintonville Lodge No. 482 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Ancient Craft Lodge No. 377 Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327 Mt. Zion Lodge No. 327 Mt. Zion Lodge No..327 Joachim Lodge No. 164 Belton Lodge No. 450 Polar Star Lodge No. 79 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Lincoln I.1odge No. 138 Lincoln Lodge No. 138 Acacia Lodge No. 602 W estern Star Lodge No. 15 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Western Star Lodge No. 15 South Gate Lodge No. 547 Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Samaritan Lodge No. 424 Webster Groves Lodge No. 84 Jackson Lodge No. 82 St. Francois Lodge No. 234 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Bismarck Lodge No. 41 Clifton Heights Lodge No. 520 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Raytown Lodge No. 391 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Huntsville Lodge No. 30 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Marceline Lodge No. 481 Marceline I.1odge No. 481


122 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

617 Wallace Ray Stonger ..•...•••• Marceline Lodge No. 481 618 .James Tazewell Akers .. ~ Marceline Lodge No. 481 Bozworth Lodge No. 597 619 Benjamin 1-1. Wilhelm 620 Earl A. 0 'Neil. Bozworth Lodge No. 597 621 Vernon M. Wohlgemuth Bozworth Lodge No. 597 622 Chesley B. McAfee Bozworth Lodge No. 597 623 Elam Jacob Nienstedt Sikeston Lodge No. 310 624 Wm. R. Probst Everton Lodge No. 405 Wheeling Lodge No. 434 625 Raymond Jeffords 626 Virgil W. Slaughter Dockery Lodge No. 325 Haytown Lodge No. 391 627 Donald L. Gregory 628 Charles G. Kuhn Bosworth Lodge No. 597 Country Club I.odge No. 656 629 James J. Dumit 630 Andrew Angus McCOry Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 631 Eldie Andrew Clinton 632 Harry William Warrings West Gate Lodge No. 445 Shelbina Lodge No. 228 633 Arthur Eric Carlson 634 John Sherman Cotton Bogard Lodge No. 101 635 Lewis Rupert Amick Livingston Lodge No. 51 '636 .Jewel W. Pike King Hill Lodge No. 376 637 Conrad M. Kraushaar Trinity Lodge No. 641 Saline Lodge No. 226 638 Ruthford Dwight Smith 639 Alfred L. Gates California Lodge No. 183 Saline Lodge No. 226 640 Carl Leonard Miller 641 Harvey Ivan Whaley Xenia Lodge No. 50 Orient Lodge No. 546 642 Harry Lee Rippetoe 643 William }<~dgar Lewis Northeast Lodge No. 643 Northeast Lodge No. 643 644 Charles Price Woods 645 Russell August Grosch Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 East Gate Lodge No. 630 646 Roy Albert Stuart East Gate Lodge No. 630 647 Clyde N. Richardson 648 Joseph Moore Hampton Monroe Lodge No. 64 St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 649 Harold Oscar GraueL 650 ]<~rederick Daniel MicheL .....• Maplewood Lodge No. 566 651 Jesse Sylvester Cass Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Western Star Lodge No. 15 652 James.J. Manring New Hampton Lodge No. 510 653 Wilburn Scott Christie 654 Harry Brown Craven Bogard Lodge No. 101 Blackwell Lodge No. 535 655 John Forest Barewore Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 656 Orrin Leroy Mark York Lodge No. 563 657 Paul Edward Kelly Jefferson Lodge No. 43 658 Louis Sam Stein : Mt. Moriah Lodge No. 40 659 Clinton A. Rockwell 660 Roland Edward Vandall. York Lodge No. 563 SUBDIVISION I-SERIES B-RENEWALS

No. B 145 B 146 B 147 B 148 B 149 B !fW B 151 B 152 B 153 B 154

Name Kenneth A velIe Williams Ronald Earl Bradley Albert E. Pray Clyde H. Tinsley Alfred A. Dunlap Arthur G. Lynch Joseph A. Halley Ishem G. Lewis George M. DeWoody Urcil DeWitt Smith

Lodge Sikeston Lodge No. 310 trackson Lodge No. 82 Clintonville Lodge No. 482 G~intonviIle Lodge No. 482 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Eureka Lodge No. 73 Shavey Lodge No. 646 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Eminence Lodge No. 607 Wellston Lodge No. 613


1953 B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B

155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Leo L. Bowlin Grand A. Murry Walter Charles Niehaus Everett L. Ogle , Fred B. Manes Milton Jackson Daily Fred A. U eligger John Walter Martin Morris Edward Ewing Avery Wilson Griffey George 1. Downing Andrew T. Young A. Lincoln Green Ira G. Barton Arthur Loy Jones Claude William Sansberry William W. Forrester ' George Calvin Lichty Camillus B. Waddell George V. Baskett James Riley Bryant Israel Raymond Coen Nelson Kenneth Simmons Waldemar Henry Sudbrock Lawson M. Branham William Presley Mathews Floyd Anderson Morgan William Grayson Mills Frank M. Brunscher Milton C. Smith Howard Benjamin Blanchard

123

Savannah Lodge No. 71 Westport Lodge No. 340 Paul Revere Lodge No. 330 Richland Lodge No. 385 Richland Lodge No. 385 Eureka Lodge No. 73 Lincoln Lodge No. 138 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Pleasant Lodge No. 160 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Wakanda Lodge No. 52 Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Ivanhoe Lodge No. 446 Sedalia Lodge No. 236 Shelbina Lodge No. 228 Fairmont Lodge No. 290 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Kirkwood Lodge No. 484 Lexington Lodge No. 149 Gorin Lodge No. 72 Nodaway Lodge No. 470 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Independence Lodge No. 76 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 East Gate Lodge No. 630 Alpha Lodge No. 659 Rural Lodge No. 316 Orient Lodge No. 546 Bogard Lodge No. 101 Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 Rural Lodge No. 316

SUBDIVISION I-SERIES C--RENEWALS

No. C 1 C 2 C 3 C 4 C 5 C 6 C 7 C 8 C 9 C 10 C 11 C 12 C 13 C 14 C 15 C 16 C 17 C 18

Name Freelon K. Hadley William Jasper Craig Eugene T. McCullough Charles W. Werdein William H. Cox Arthur W. Rauch George M. McAninch Joseph M. Cross Charles B. Whitchurch Louis Frederick Dahn Vernon V. Goslee Perry O. Sansberry Arno C. Cooper Bruce H. Hunt Joseph J. Anway, Sr Brace Elder Kitchell Archie Louis Fox Julius R. Edwards SUBDIVISION

144 145

J. Earl Landes George J. Sei!

,

Lodge St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Canopy Lodge No. 284 Canopy Lodge No. 284 Gate City IJodge No. 522 Cache Lodge No. 416 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Cache Lodge No. 416 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Skidmore Lodge No. 511 Fairmont Lodge No. 290 West Gate Lodge No. 445' Adair Lodge No. 366 Mt. Washington Lodge No. 614 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Rural Lodge No. 316 Centralia Lodge No. 59 2-0riginals Shekinah Lodge No. 256 Missouri Lodge No.1


124

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

146C Charles James Schuster 147 John McGarvey Martin 148 Reuben Y. Hume 149 Fred William Kocher 150 Thomas R. Wilkins 151 Jewel Walter Pike

1953

Geo. Washington Lodge No.9 Keystone Lodge No. 243 Armstrong Lodge No. 70 Shekinah Lodge No. 256 Four Mile Lodge No. 212 King Hill Lodge No. 376

SUBDIVISION 2-SERIES A-RENEWALS

A 38 A 39 A 40 A 41

Thomas William Cook Joseph W. Moore Julius R. Edwards Charles W. Werdein

Alpha Lodge No. 659 Putnam Lodge No. 190 Centralia Lodge No. 59 Canopy Lodge No. 284

SUBDIVISION 2-CARDS PART

1 Roy Lockwood Johnston 2 Harry Robert Sherer 3 John McGarvey Martin 4 J. Ovid Crook 5 Robert Edward Kleinschmidt 6 Alfred Arthur Mitchell 7 William Arthur Bramble 8 Robert LeRoy Hughes : 9 George Orville Ellis 10 Charles Goodman 11 Paul Olen Erwin 12 George H. Merrymon 13 Ralph B. Trussell 14 William Osa Swanson 15 Howard L. Martin 16 Robert William Adams 17 Wesley Turner Hoy 18 Virgil S. Beavers 19 Lester Earl Maness 20 Allen Robert Masterson 21 }<'rank Vernon .J ones 22 Ralph 1. Morgan 23 Claude W. Dunnaway 24 Harry Lee Hall 25 James Vester Fugate 26 Arthur L. Collins 27 James Howard PauL 28 Arthur G. Lynch 29 Jewell H. Tiller 30 Rex L. Brooks 31 Drury A. Wake 32 L. Marshall Hollenbeck 33 Alonzo A. Harrison 34 Jacob Bierman 35 Joe Melvin Glasscock 36 Herbert Walker Stark 37 Walter Charles Niehaus 38 Harry E. Ball 39 Frank E. Morgan 40 Louis F. Dahn 41 Albert Edward Loehr

1

Belton Lodge No. 450 Gate of the Temple No. 422 Keystone Lodge No. 243 Adair Lodge No. 366 Joachim Lodge No. 164 Hebron Lodge No. 354 Hebron Lodge No. 354 Cleveland Lodge No. 651 Grand River Lodge No. 276 Beacon Lodge No.3 Carthage Lodge No. 197 Tuscan Lodge No. 360 Bogard Lodge No. 101 Twilight Lodge No. 114 Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Van Buren Lodge No. 509 Compass Lodge No. 120 Fenton Lodge No. 281 Harmony Lodge No. 499 St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 California Lodge No. 183 Sedalia Lodge No. 236 Versailles Lodge No. 320 Howard Lodge No. 4 Laclede Lodge No. 83 Howard Lodge No. 4 DeWitt Lodge No. 39 Eureka Lodge No. 73 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Cosmos Lodge No. 282 Miller Lodge No. 567 Granite Lodge No. 272 Paul Bevere Lodge No. 330 Montgomery Lodge No. 246 York Lodge No. 563 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Shaveh Lodge No. 646


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

125

42 Joseph A. Halley .' .......•... Shaveh Lodge No. 646 43 Albert Lee Bohlen East Gate Lodge No. 630 44 Lonnie Kelley Joplin Lodge No. 335 45 John E. Adams Ferguson Lodge No. 542 46 Vernon V. Goslee Skidmore Lodge No. 511 47 Paul Edward. Kelly York Lodge No. 563 48 Edward B. Hawkins Higbee Lodge No. 527 49 Charles B. Whitchurch Western Star Lodge No. 15 50 Paul Turner Solomon Lodge No. 271 51 Clifford W. Hodes Brentwood Lodge No. 616 52 John Steele Stillwell Putnam Lodge No. 190 53 Earl Raymond Moriset Solomon Lodge No. 271 54 Clarence Anthony Hughes ; Brentwood Lodge No. 616 55 Joseph ]'-'rancis Thess Meridian Lodge No.2 56 Ray Neff St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 57 Clyde M. Shortell Richmond Lodge No. 57 58 George Edward Grubb Hunnewell Lodge No. 415 59 Edward Raymond Cox Monroe Lodge No. 64 60 Eugene Emmett McFarland Hermon Lodge No. 187 61 Richard H. Kerr Holla Lodge No. 213 62 Joy L. Ortloff Carthage Lodge No. 197 63 William Robert Howell Monroe Lodge No. 64· 64 Charlie Smith Hicks Monroe Lodge No. 64 65 .Joseph Moore Hampton Monroe Lodge No. 64 66 ~lfred Elonzo Reed Wakanda Lodge No., 52 67 Sam Martasin Rock Hill Lodge No. 663 68 Carl Frederick Barthley Count.ry Club Lodge No. 656 69 Charles E: Elston Jennings Lodge No. 640 70 James Riley Bryant Nodaway Lodge No. 470 71 Sherwood Schmill United Lodge No.5 72 Charles W. Schafer J efferson Lodge No. 43 73 William Karl Atteberry, Sr Maplewood Lodge No. 566 74 Weaver F. Conlin '" Missouri Lodge No.1 SUBDIVISION 2-CARDS PART

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ]6 17 18 19 20 21

Roy Lockwood Johnston Donald Cedric Brown Harry Robert Sherer Robert Edward Kleinschmid t J. Ovid Crook Robert LeRoy Hughes George Orville Ellis Paul Olen Erwin Alfred Arthur Mitchell Howard L. Martin Robert Waliam Adams Joseph A. Halley Virgil S. Beavers William Travis Ruff James Travis Childress William Osa Swanson Wesley Turner Hoy Claude W. Dunnaway Harry Lee Hall J ames Vester Fugate Rex L. Brooks ,

2

Belton Lodge No. 450 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Joachim Lodge No. 164 Adair Lodge No.' 366 Cleveland Lodge No. 651 Grand River Lodge No. 276 Carthage Lodge No. 197 Hebron Lodge No. 354 Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Van Buren Lodge No. 509 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Fenton Lodge No. 281 St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 Twilight Lodge No. 114 Compass Lodge No. 120 Versailles Lodge No. 320 Howard Lodge No.4 Laclede Lodge No. 83 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78


126 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Jewell H. Tiller Midas Charles Cadwallader Hervey Ballentine., Arthur L. Collins John E. Reece, Jr Arthur G. Lynch : Joe Melvin Glasscock Herbert Walker Sta.rk Walter C. Niehaus Jacob Bierman Harry E. Ball. Drury A. Wake Louis F. Dahn Lonnie Kelley Everett W. Torre;yson Albert Edward Loehr Abe Press Andrew A. McCory John McGarvey Martin Vernon V. Goslee Tom J. Collier Charles B. Whitchurch Ralph B. Trussell Edwin B. Ha·wkins L. Mar~hall Hollenbeck Richard H. Kerr Alonzo A. Harrison John Steele Stillwell Julius L. B~rndt James E. Manning Charles W. Schafer John Edward Adams Delbert Ivan Scott Ray Neff George Edward Grubb Edward Raymond Cox William Joseph Moore Joy L. Ortloff William Robert Howell Charlie Smith Hicks Joseph Moore Hampton James Dempsey Hurst William Karl Atteberry, Sr Weaver F. Conlin .. "

St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Harmony Lodge No. 499 Steele Lodge No. 634 Howard Lodge No.4 Seaman Lodge No. 126 Eureka Lodge No. 73 Miller Lodge No. 567 Granite Lodge No. 272 Paul Revere Lodge No. 330 Cosmos Lodge No. 282 Montgomery Lodge No. 246 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Joplin Lodge No. 335 Hebron Lodge No. 354 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Heroine Lodge No. 104 Brentwood Lodge No. 616 Keystone Lodge No. 243 Skidmore Lodge No. 511 Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Bogard Lodge No. 101 Higbee Lodge No. 527 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Rolla Lodge No. 213 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Putnam Lodge No. 190 Magnolia Lodge No. 626 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Jefferson Lodge No. 43 Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Ferguson Lodge No. 542 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Hunnewell Lodge No. 415 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Trenton Lodge No. III Carthage Lodge No. 197 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Neosho Lodge No. 247 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Missouri Lodge No.1

SUBDIVISION 2-CARDS PART

1 ' Roy Lockwood J ohuston 2 Tom J. Collier 3 Robert Edward Kleinschmidt 4 J. Ovid Crook 5 Robert LeRoy Hughes 6 George Orville Ellis 7 Howard L. Martin 8 Robert William Adams 9 Virgil S. Beavers 10 Donald Cedric Brown

3

• Belton Lodge No. 450 Brotherhood Lodge No. 269 Joachim Lodge No. 164 Adair Lodge No. 366 Cleveland Lodge No. 651 Grand River Lodge No. 276 Caruthersville Lodge No. 461 Van Buren Lodge No. 509 ]'enton Lodge No. 281 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78


1953 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

William Travis Ruff William Osa Swanson Joseph A. Halley Lonnie Kelley Rex lJ. Brooks Hervey Ballentine Wesley Turner Hoy Arthur L. Collins .rohn E. Reece, Jr Arthur G. Lynch .Toe Melvin Glasscock John E. Adams Herbert Walker Stark Walter Charles Niehaus Jewel Tiller Drury A. Wake '" L. Marshall TIollenbeck Louis F. Dahn Harry E. Ball Alfred Arthur Mitchell Albert Edward Loehr Charles Franklyn Humphrey Jacob Bierman Charles E. Elston Fred C. Schneider Harry Robert Sherer Charles Dean Sharp Vernon V. Goslee Charles B. Whitchurch Edwin B. Hawkins James Vester Fugate Richard H. Kerr David .Loren Fear Alonzo A. Harrison Stanford M.. Burge Leo L. Bowlin Ernest Kendall Loyd Edward Melvin Reuter George Washington Westfall John Steele Stillwell Hobert Roslyn Moore William Wesley Knibb James E. lIfanning Earl Raymond Moriset Ray Neff Alfred L. Gates Edward Raymond Cox George Edward Grubb William Robert Howell Charlie Smith Hicks James .T; Dumit A be Press Joseph Moore Hampton Robert Glen White Harold Eugene DeVita James Travis Childress William Karl Attebery, Sr James Dempsey Hurst Weaver F. Colin :

127

St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 Twilight Lodge No. 114 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Joplin Lodge No. 335 St.â&#x20AC;˘r oseph Lodge No. 78 Steele Lodge No. 634 Compass Lodge No. 120 Howard Lodge No.4 Seaman Lodge No. 126 Eureka Lodge No. 73 Miller Lodge No. 567 Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Granite Lodge No. 272 Paul Revere Lodge No. 330 St. Joseph Lodge No. 78 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Wellston Lodge No. 613 Montgomery Lodge No. 246 Hebron Lodge No. 354 Shaveh Lodge No. 646 Berkeley Lodge U.D. Cosmos Lodge No. 282 Jennings Lodge No. 640 Harmony Lodge No. 499 Gate of the Temple Lodge 422 Solomon Lodge No. 271 Skidmore Lodge No. 511 Western Star Lodge No. 15 Higbee Lodge No. 527 Laclede Lodge No. 83 Holla Lodge No. 213 Ferguson Lodge No. 542 Sikeston Lodge No. 310 Lincoln Lodge No. 138 Savannah Lodge No. 71 Zeredetha Lodge No. 189 Olive Branch Lodge No. 576 Occidental Lodge No. 163 Putnam Lodge No. 190 Raytown Lodge No. 391 Gardenville Lodge No. 655 Gate City Lodge No. 522 Solomon Lodge No. 271 St..Toseph Lodge No. 78 California Lodge No. 183 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Hunnewell Lodge No. 415 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Country Club Lodge No. 656 Heroine Lodge No. 104 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Monroe Lodge No. 64 Wellston Lodge No. 613 St. Mark's Lodge No. 93 Maplewood Lodge No. 566 Neosho Lodge No. 247 Missouri Lodge No.1


128

PROCEEDINGS OJ<" TIlE

1953

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES

R. 'V. Brother R. Jasper Smith, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Appeals and Grievances which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Appeals and Grievances submit the following report: Only one item of business has been referred to the Committee during the past year. I

IN RE: EDWARD F. HEFTER Edward F. Hefter, at one time a member of Lafayette Lodge No. 437, petitioned for restoration of membership. When the Charter of Lafayette Lodge No. 437 was arrested in February, 1941, he had been suspended for non-payment of dues since 1936. Marlborough Lodge No. 569 has investigated him, and recommends that the petition be granted and that he be restored to membership so that he may become affiliated with Marlborough Lodge. Marlborough Lodge further recommends that the amount of the indebtedness the records show was owed by Edward I<'. Hefter at the time of his suspension in the amount of $34.00 be reduced. After considering the petition and supporting evidence your Committee recommends that the application for restoration be approved and that Edward F. Hefter be restored to membership in the fraternity. On the basis of the evidence submitted, however, your Committee sees no legal basis under the By-Laws for the recommendation that the amount of indebtedness be reduced and your Committee therefore rec-' ommends that the request for reduction in indebtedness be denied. . Respectfully submitted, R. .J ASPER SMITH, Chairman, MARVIN E. BOISSEAU, RALPH V .. WILSON, PERRY W. SEALON.

REPORT OF BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD

'V. Brother vValter Bublitz, Chairman, presented the report of the Building Supervisory Board which was .adopted and is as follows: To the Most TVorshipful Grand Lodge A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRE'l'HREN: The Building Supervisory Board submits herewith its decisions and permissions granted to the following Lodges in connection with plans for remodeling, purchasing and financing their buildings and building- sites for the year 1952-1953, to-\vit:

Mack's Creek Lodge No. 43, A. F. & A. M. Under .date of November 24, 1952 permission was granted Mack's Creek Lodge to borrow $750.00 to be repaid at the rate of $75.00 per year plus interest to assist in building a new temple. Under date of November 25, 1952, Claude T. Wood, District Deputy Grand Master, requested a decision as to the jurisdiction of the Building Supervisory Board regarding and over the plans of the bUilding. The Bui,lding Supervisory Board for years have assumed jurisdiction


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

129

. only of the financing plans for the construction or purchasing of a building, or a building site. The location of th~ building and the general adaptability of the building suitable for Masonic purposes has been left to the approval of the District Deputy Grand Master who lived in the vicinity and could visit and approve the site and building arrangements. The architect of the building and the building committee of the lodge have had jurisdiction over the blue prints, details, specifications and the construction work so long as these were within the financial limits and the permission granted to the I.Jodge. To clarify Section 198 of the By-Laws and conform with this practice, this board is recommending a change in the By-Laws so when changed it will read as follows: "From and after the adoption of this By-Law, no Lodge shall be permitted to erect or become interested in, use or occupy a building or building site until the plans for financing the purchase and/or construction thereof shall first have been submitted to the Building Supervisory Board and its permission obtained; provided that before granting permission to proceed the Building Supervisory Board shall have been advised by the District Deputy Grand Master in the Masonic district of the applicant Lodge that the site and the building would be suitable and adaptable for Masonic purposes." This resolution will be presented and is to be considered here only as an explanatory portion and not as an integral part of this report when this report is voted upon for adoption by this session of the Grand Lodge.

Rockbridge Lodge No. 435, A. F. and A. M. Under date of February 18, 1953 a letter was received from R. W. Brother J. Fred Park, District Deputy Grand Master of the 53rd Masonic District advising that. Rockbridge Lodge were constructing a new temple at Almartha and it would shortly be ready for dedication, and that no indebtedness had been incurred. We advised the Grand Master that Rockbridge Lodge No. 435 was in violation of Section 198 of the By-Laws in proceeding with the Construction of their temple without first obtaining the approval of路 the Building Supervisory Board, and asked that when he so notified them to also request that complete information as to the financial status of their building program be promptly submitted to this Board, all of which was accordingly done. On March 23, 1953 permission was granted Rockbridge Lodge to continue with their building until it was completed providing all funds were available and no money was to be borrowed. We call attention to officers of all Lodges that even if necessary funds arc available with no uncertainty, it is still the obligation of every Lodge before proceeding to erect or purchase a new building site or building,to obtain written permission of the Building Supervisory Board.

Lockwood Lodge No. 521,A. F. and A. M. Under date of March 23, 1953 Lockwood Lodge was granted permission to borrow not to exceed $6750.00 to be repaid at the rate of $500.00 per year plus in~rest to purchase a building to be remodeled for a new lodge hall.

Rushville Lodge No. 238, A. F. and A. M. Under date of March 30, 1953 permission was granted Rushville


130

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Lodge to make a loan of $750.00 to be paid in the near future by money received from pledges of its members to assist in purchasing a building to replace their present one which is beyond repair. â&#x20AC;˘

Clarksdale Lodge No. 559, A. F. and A. M. Under date of June 25, 1953 Clarksdale Lodge was granted permission to purchase jointly with the Clarksdale Bank the Odd Fellows Hall in which we urged utmost caution in any joint ownership agreement that might be made with the Clarksdale Bank so that the lodge would be fully protected and any embarrassing situations of future maintenance problems be eliminated.

. Fraternal Lodge No. 363, A. F. and A. M. Under date of July 8, 1953 permission was granted to Fraternal Lodge to borrow $1500.00 to be repaid at the. rate of $300.00 per year plus interest to pay for a new roof for their hall.

Sikeston Lodge No. 310, A. F. and A. M. Under date September 11, 1953 permission was granted Sikeston Lodge to proceed with the construction of a new temple with the understanding no money was to be borrowed and that $38,000.00 on hand and available would complete the building for occupancy, and that additional money would be raised in due time to fully complete all details of construction.

Chaffee Lodge No. 615, A. F. and A. M. This lodge was granted permission on November 30, 1950 to borrow $5000.00 and on March 15, 1952 permission was granted to borrow an additional $10,000.00. . Under date of September 14, 1953 permission was again granted Chaffee Lodge to borrow an additional $3000.00 to be repaid at the rate of $30.00 per month to complete the accessories and conveniences of their lodge hall. Your committee does not like to receive repeated requests for additional financing hoping that the complete financial structure is planned from the beginning to prevent embarrassing situations subsequently arising. In the case of Chaffee Lodge, however, the planning and the means of repaying loans was sound and presented no difficulty.

New Madrid Lodge No. 429, A. F. and A. M. Several letters were received from officials of New Madrid Lodge regarding plans for a new temple they contemplated building. The information submitted to the Building Supervisory Board was at variance in the several letters. Also information was given to the Grand Master that New Madrid Lodge was soliciting funds in violation of Grand Lodge law whereupon the Grand Master notified the lodge to cease such illegal solicitation. Thereupon the Building Supervisory Board notified New Madrid Lodge not to proceed with the construction until they had satisfied the Grand Master that they were no longer in violation and had submitted to this Board correct and accurate information as to their financial plans. To date nothing further has been heard from New Madrid Lodge. .


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

131

Bloomfield Lodge No. 153, A. F. and A. M. Under date of July 17, 1953 we received a letter from the secretary of Bloomfield lodge advising that the foundation of a new temple was under construction and giving information as to their plans of financing. Under date of July 22, 1953 their letter was answered asking for more definite information on their financial plans assuring this board that funds would be ava.ilable when needed, and also advising them that they were in violation of Gra.nd Lodge law in proceeding with construction without permission of this board. To date no answer or advice has been received from Bloomfield Lodge. We recommend that the present or incoming Grand Master advise Bloomfield Lodge that they take steps immediately to obtain the approval of the Building Supervisory Board.

California Lodge No. 183, A. F. and A. M. Under date of May 22, 1953, permission was granted to California Lodge to purchase a building, with the understanding that all money to do So was available and that no money was to be borrowed. Respectfully submitted, WALTER J. BUBLITZ, Chairman.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT RE DEDICATION OF HALL RESOLUTION

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Be it hereby resolved that the following sentence be added to Sec. 33, of the By-Laws, as follows: , , No hall is to be dedicated until Lodge has certified to the Grand Master that it has complied with Sec. 198 of these By-Laws." so that when amended Sec. 33 will read as follows: "Sec. 33. Election, Installati01~ and Dedication. A chartered Lodge shall not proceed to work until the election and installation of its officers, the dedication of its hall, and consecration of its Lodge. No hall is to be dedicated until Lodge has certified to the Grand Master that it has complied with Sec. 198 of the By-Laws." Respectfully submitted, WALTER J. BUBLITZ, THORNTON J. MANRYâ&#x20AC;˘

.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT RE DUTIES OF D.D.G.M. RESOLUTION

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Be it hereby resolved that the following sentence be added to paragraph (b) Sec. 28 of the By-Laws, as follows: . "In cases where h!:l is aware of a Lodge in his District contemplating the purchase of a site or a building or the erection thereof, and if requested by the Grand Master or the Building Supervisory Board, he shall inspect the site and/or the building or the plans thereof, and advise the Building Supervisory Board if the site and/or building would conform to Masonic custom and usage." Respectfully submitted, WALTER J. BUBLITZ, THORNTON J. MANRY.


132

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

PROPOSED AMENDMENT RE BUILDING SUPERVISORY BOARD RESOLUTION To the Most Worshipful GrandLodge, A. F. and A.. M. of Missouri: Be it hereby resolved that the sentence and portion of the paragraph in Section 198 of the By-Laws reading as follows: "}'rom and after the adoption of this By-Law, no Lodge shall be permitted to erect or become interested in, use or occupy a building or temple until the plans for the purchase, construction and financing thereof shall first have been submitted to the Building Supervisory Board and its permission obtained." be amended so that when amended that sentence will read as follows: "From and after the adoption of this By-Law, no Lodge shall be permitted to erect or become interested in, use or occupy a building or building site until the plans for financing the purchase and/or construction thereof shall first hav!J been submitted to the Building Supervisory Board and its permission obtained; provided that before granting permission to proceed the Building Supervisory Board shall have been advised by the District Deputy Grand Master in the Masonic district of the applicant Lodge that the site and the building would conform to Masonic custom and usage. ' , Respectfully submitted, WALTER. J. BUBLITZ, THOR.NTON J. MANRY.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CHARTERED LODGES

\V. Brother Lee Barger presented the report of the Committee which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most W(ffshipful Grand Lodge, A.. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRETHltEN: After examination and consideration of the returns of chartered lodges, your Committee begs to submit the following report: STATISTICAL 1952-1953

"

Number of Chartered Lodges, September 10, 1952 595 Lodges U.D. 2 Number of Chartered Lodges, September 10, 1953 . 594 Lodges U.D .'......... 1 September ]0, ]953, Total Membership 12째196 September 10, ]952, Total Membership in 597 Lodges .. 118,008 Less: Adjustment by audit of individual Lodges 8 Total Number: . Raised Affiliated Re-Instated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

0

'118','000

4,762 793 1,454

7,009 Less: Total Number: Dimitted ' Deaths Suspended, N.P.D

'"

. . .

817 2,173 1,816


1953

133

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Suspended, U.M.C. . Expelled

. .

7

4,813 Net Gain, September 10, 1953

2,196

COMMENTS

-y

1120,1~~,1/'

Weare pleased to report that all Lodges have -forwarded their returns for 1953, to the Grand Secretary's Office. The secretaries of the various lodges are to be congratulated. An analysis of the membership figures of this year with the immediate preceding years indicate a very en路 couraging condition. Th.e number raised and affiliatcd were considerably more than that of the preceding year. Reinstatements, were slightly less. The net gain was 325 greater than that of the preceding year. RBgardless of satisfactory conditions in the main, it usually occurs that certain conditions exist at times that require special consideration and ours is no exception. Out of our total number of 594, we find that 32 lodges did no work last year. Out of these 32 Lodges: 1 lodge has done no work for 2 years; 2 lodges have done no work for 3 years; 1 lodge has done no work for 4 years; 1 lodge has done no work for 5 years; 1 lodge has done no work for 6 years. With 'the great majority of lodges doing work, with some requiring many called meetings, and a few doing no work for 2 or more years, does not the question arise as to whether thc officers are lacking in interest or leadership or should this lodge be consolidated with a near-by lodge' In the six lodges that have done no work for 2 or more years, the average membership is 43. The av~rage amount of dues for these lodges per year is $4.87. This means that averaging the six lodges, the amount received in the. lodge from dues for the year amounted to approximately $102.00 after deducting per capita. We are wondering how a lodge can function properly with this amount of dues per year. Does it not seem apparent that a lodge that does no work for two or more years is either so lacking in life as to be altogether unattractive to young men in its vicin~ty, or is situated in a community in which there is literally no material to draw from' We feel that this condition should be given seriious consideration. Please do not understand that we are condemning a lodge simply because it is small in numbers. Th!'3re are many small lodges that serve their community and' the fraternity admirably-furnishing splendid examples of loyal leadership, good fellowship, attracting worthy young men to its membership. Such examples are worthy of every encouragement. IN CONCLUSION

Reports and observations clearly indicate that Freemasonry in Missouri is in excellent condition. With few exceptions the officers are performing their duties earnestly, efficiently and with a vision of the future undimmed by doubt or fear. As in all ages of the past, Freemasonry has met the problems of thj3 time, courageously, unflinchingly, though martyrdom has been the lot of many of our leaders. So the future holds

I I


134

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

the same promise of faithful adherence to the eternal principles of our honored institution to the end that we may hopefully look forward to the eventual realization, of the brotherhood of man. Fraternally submitted, R. L. BARGER, Cha.irman, VERNIE G. FISHER.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON LODGES U.D.

R. 'N. Brother Harry B. DePriest, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Lodges V.D. ,vhich was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of M'issouri: BRETHREN: During the past year there were no dispensations granted by the Most Worshipful Grand Master, and your Lodges Under Dispensation Committee respectfully submits the following report: BERKELEY LODGE, BERKELEY (8'1'. LOUIS COUNTY), :MO.

Dispensation was issued to Berkeley Lodge, Berkeley, Mo., on June 12, 1952. This Lodge was duly organized and set to work under dispe'nsaHon on .Tune 19, ]952 by Right Worshipful Hugh H. Barden, D.D.G.M. of the 57th Masonic District. At the last Grand Lodge Session it was recommended and approved that this lodge be continued under dispensation because of the short time it' had been at work. As of August 21, 1952 the lodge had cash on hand $138.21, had a membership of 32, had initiated 4 and passed 2 members. As of August 20, 1953 the lodge had cash on hand of $670.98, had a membership of 48, and in the preceding year initiated 9, passed 10 and raised 12 members. In this period it also had 4 affiliations which makes a net gain of 16 members, there having been no suspensions or deaths. It is noteworthy to mention that of the 12 members raised in the past year eleven of them have turned in their Third Degree Proficiency Examination, for which they and the Lodge are to be commended. The secretary's records were found to be complete in, every detail and he is to be commended for such an excellent job. Right Worshipful John W. Alverson, D.D.G.M. of the 57th Masonic District has made a most favorable report on the conduct and administration of the lodge for the past year. Wherefore, your Committee recommends that a Charter be issued to Berkeley Lodge. Fraternally submitted, H. B. DEPRIEST, Cha.irman, J. P. HALL, W. R. USHER, A. EDWARD TURLEY.

REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON HOME FOR NON-INDIGENTS

R. W. Brother Russell, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on the Home For Non-Indigents which was adopted and is as follows:


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

135

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, ..4.. F. and A. M. of Missouri: The committee appointed by the Grand Master' to investigate and report on the following resolution: Whereas, there seems to be a definite need for a Home for aged Masons, financially independent, their wives and widows; and Whereas, before our Grand Lodge could undertake to sponsor such a Home the whole question should be thoroughly and exhaustively explored; Therefore, Be It Resolved, That the incoming Grand Master be, and he hereby is directed to appoint a Committee of three or more brethren whose duty it shall be to investigate the apparent need for, and the feasibility and initial cost of such an undertaking on the part of the Grand Lodge; and whose further duty it shall be to make such other recommendations relative to the above as their judgmcnt may suggest. We submit the following report: , 1. A study was made with reference to the cost for a building to start such a home and it appears that the minimum economic size of such a building should be adequate to accommodate one hundred guests. 2. An architects's preliminary drawing covering an institution of this size with necessary facilities and equipment to meet the needs of one hundred guests as determined from those of experience in operating similar institutions has been prepared and is attached to this report. This would be a building of simple design and nothing elaborate, but of SUbstantial construction. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $500,000.00. The committeG did however, receive un offcr from an outstanding, reputable General Contractor, a member of the Fraternity, that if a building of this nature is decided upon, he would undertake the general contract without remuneration, also he would secure the same assistancc from other Sub-Contractors, thereby making the cost to the Fraternity, consisting only of labor and materials. 3. We next considered the cost per annum for keeping a guest in such a home. From expcrience in our own Masonk Home and others it was estimated at $1,2000.00. That is on the same standard as our present home, but there is some doubt as to whether a paying guest would be satisfied with this. 4. There are many troublesome problems which a project of this nature presents. A few of these problems requiring additional study to determine a possible solution are set out below: ' FINANCES: (a) Whether this should be obtained from voluntary contribution of the members of the Masonic }<'raternity of Missouri. The amount of the endowment fund necessary to carry operating and depreciation expenses after building cost have been met. (b) The minimum contribution necessary for a guest to become an occupant of this home, or should he be permitted to pay so much per month. If the contribution is a fixed amount, how much would' be necessary. If the contract for admission is to be a fixed contribution should there be an irrevocable contract or should the guest be free to leavl;l the home and路 what if any refunds of his or her contribution should be made. The minimum 'age to which a guest should be eligible for admission in this home. (c) What disposition is to be made of guests when they become serious hospital patients. Also what obligation should or can the home assume in the event of death of a geust. (d) Whether a non profit corporation to handle this project can be


1136

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

formed within the prescription of the taxing agency to operate it free from taxes. (e) What changes can and must be made in the article of incorporation of the Grand Lodge and the by-laws of the Grand Lodge to enable it to sponsor such a project. 5. Sponsorship of such a project would, as a practical matter, necessitate arranging for its financing separate and apart from the present funds of our Masonic Home. No prospect appears but that the present Masonic Home's purposes require all of th~ endowment fund and other assets there on hand. 6. We attempted to determine the apparent need for such a home by contacting brethren in differ~mt localities throughout the state and asked them to check with the lodges in that particular area. Nearly all the brethren responded and reported that there seemed to be little or no interest in such a project in their districts. However, there was a great deal of interest and expressed desire for such a home by the members of Lodges in the St. Louis and St. Louis County districts. In view of the many problems as outlined above,the committee was unable to reach any conclusion relative to the feasibility, that is, whether it is practical or capable of being dealt with successfully and advisable, . or as to what is proper to be done or wise because of the many unsolved problems which a project of this nature presents. There is a variance of opinion among the members of the committee, therefore your committee respectfully reports as above, leaving it that the incoming Grand Master, if he so desires may appoint another committee to study this project further and report to the next session of this Grand Lodge. Fraternally Submitted, R. E. MURRAY, Chairman, HARRY PLOETZE, R. E. DEWHIRST, HENRY W. Fox, WILLIAM H. UTZ, JR., OLIVER LUFT,

HARRY THIES.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MASONIC TEMPLE ASSOCIATION OF ST. LOUIS

w. Brother Thomas Heape, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on the Masonic Temple of St. Louis which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Lt.. F. and Lt.. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Among other things brought to the attention of your Committee on the Masonic Temple, these are the more important ones: 1. The installation of a special pipe to convey steam for furnishing quicker heat in the mornings for the Grand Secretary's office, which was satisfactorily handled. 2. The acquisition of properties for use as Parking. Lots, which are now operating and about to be operated for the accommodation of all our members attending meetings in our Masonic Temple, which will, it is hoped, cause increased attendance. 3. It was brought to the attention of your Committee Chairman that the collection of Past Grand Masters portraits assembled on the third floor of the Masonic Temple were in b~d condition. Subsequently I I


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

137

scoured the metropolitan area for artists who would be capable of restoring these portraits. Three estimates for work to be done by qualified people wcre received by me and transmitted to the Grand Master for his consideration and action. This colledion of portraits, unless they are properly rcstored soon, will dctcriorate faster and becomc entirely unsightly. Fraternally yours, THOMAS H. HF..A.PE, Chairman.

A STONE FROM THE WHITE HOUSE

R. W. Brother Bruce H. Hunt introduced M. \V. Brother Harry

Letter From President Truman


138

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

S. Truman, Past Grand Master of Missouri, and M. W. Brother Renah ~. Camalier, Past Grand Master of the District of Columbia. These Past Grand Masters 'were greeted with applause by the brethren and escorted to the East where they were cordially received by Grand Master Rumer. M. \V. Brother Camalier then, as a representative of former President Harry S. Truman and the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia, presented to M. \V. Brother Harry S. Truman, Past Grand Master of Missouri, a stone with Masonic markings thereon taken from the walls of the 'White House during its reconstruction. M. \V. Brother Truman in turn presented the stone to Grand Master Rumer for the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Grand Master Rumer then received from M. Vi. Brother Camalier the letter, framed in wood also taken from the 'Vhite House, from former President Harry S. Truman. CALLED FROM LABOR

At 4 :00 p. m. the Grand Lodge was called from labor, the Grand Chaplain offering prayer.


TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 29,1953,7:45 P. M.

(Meeting open to the public) ORGAN RECITAL Oscar Jost PRESENTATION OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS SCOTTISH RITE CHOIR Charles M. Galloway, Director ADDRESS OF THE GRAND ORATOR R. "'Nor. R. Jasper Smith CHORAL CLUB ... HARRIS TEACHERS COLLEGE Miss Helen Louise Graves, Director The address of the Grand Orator follows: "SEND OUT THY LIGHT" Most Worshipful Sir, Brethren, Friends: I have chosen as the subject of this address tonight the title of one of the g-reat anthems of the world, a beautiful and inspiring masterpiece of Gounod, "Send Out Thy Light." To Masons and their friends alike this title is obvious; but to Masons alone it should carry with it a somewhat deeper significance. "Send out thy Light! Send out thy Light and thy Truth. Let them lead me; And let them bring me to thy holy hill. ' ,

Most of you have been present during the public installation ceremony when the newly installed Master of the Lodge is given that breath-taking challenge: " ... It is your province to spread and communicate light and instruction to the brethren of your Lodj:{e. Forcibly impress upon them the dignity and high importance of Masonry, and seriously admonish them never to disgrace it. Chargc them to practice out of the lodge those duties which they have been taught in it, and by amia"blc, discreet and


]40

PROCBEDINGS OF THE

1953

virtuous conduct to convince mankind of the goodness of the institution, so that when a person is said to be a member of it, the world may know that he is one to whom the burdened heart may pour out its sorrows; to whom distress may prefer its suit; whose hand is guided by justice, and whose heart is expanded by benevolence."

For a few moments this evening- I wish you would go with me to review Masonry's most illustrious 200 years; to consider, if you will, Masonry today; and to speculate for a little while on Masonry to-' mOITO\"'. Keep in your JY1ind that charge I read, which is given to a Master when he takrs over the responsibility of governing his Lodge; and that immortal first stanza, "Send out thy Light and thy Truth -Let them lead me." How many of you have heard of the Green Dragon Tavern ~ That tavern, as were many other taverns 200 years ago, was the regular meeting place of a Masonic Lodge-in this instance Saint Andrews Lodge, which was organized about 200 years ago. It was located in Boston, and later became known as Freemasons Hall, and was sometimes called-with others-the Cradle of the American Revolution. Here, too, was organized the Massachusetts Grand Lodge, something less than 200 years ago, with the great Joseph Warren, who was to fall at the battle of Bunker Hill, as its Grand Master. Here, tradition tells us-and, actually, records go somewhat beyond the scope of tradition-either bef~re or after a meeting of St. Andrews Lodge--the Boston Tea Party was formed. We will never know definitely, but circumstantial evidence in history tells us that Joseph \Varren, Paul Revere, Samuel Adams and other great names in history were a part of that group of "Mohawk Indians" who in 1773 made cold tea of Boston harbor. As a lawyer it thrills me a little to know that it was the same Samuel Adams, active member of that same St. Andrews Lodge, inflammatory patriot, lover of liberty, who dared professionally, in the face of bitter public feeling, to defend and acquit the British soldiers charged with the Boston Massacre three years earlier. Those taverns constituted meeting places for our fraternity long before lodge halls as we know them came into existence. Little bits of history tell us of the many, many times the woodsmen, the farmers, the business men travelled sometimes weary miles quietly to attend meetings of their lodges at taverns and inns scattered throughout Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Virginia, and elsewhere, with the tiler literally and actually guarding against the approach of cowans and eavesdroppers-for even then organized tyranny had no love for Masonry. Of course the Boston Tea Party was an incident. There would have been a Revolution without it. The Green Dragon Tavern and the members of St. Andrews Lodge did not cause the revolt of the American colonies, but they helped. They crystallized sentiment. They produced a happening which had all the inspiration which


1953

141

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

mystery, picturesqueness, patriotism and daring could add. They did something which has· gone down through the years a's an expression of the determination of colonial Americans not to be slaves. It is no accident that when the wrongs committed by a distant and autocratic government could no longer be borne, Masons as individuals became active. The American Colonies were a forum wherein appeared such men as Otis, Dickinson, Hancock, WaITen, Livingston, Patrick Henry, Hamilton, Madison, Jefferson, Franklin, Washington, and hundreas of others-Masonic leaders who in those stirring times, at the risk of their individual lives, liberty and fortune, stood forth and proclaimed those Masonic principles of liberty, justice, equality and individual responsibility which today are taught in every accredited Masonic lodge in the world. The part which Masons had in the events preceding the Declaration of Independence is well known, and likewise we are all familiar with their participation in the drafting of that important document. Some over-enthusiastic brethren have claimed that all of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were Masons. The facts are impressive enough without resorting to fancy. Well documented evidence indicates that 29 of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were M~sons-numbering in that group such important men as John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Robert Morris, Roger Sherman and others. It cannot be surprising, in view of the general participation of Masons in the events leading· up to the Revolution, that we should find them active in the actual warfare. From the Commander-inChief down to the privates in the ranks we find colonels, majors, captains, lieutenants and common soldiers, Master Masons. Such outstanding heroes as Hamilton, Marshall, General Green, General Lee, General Sullivan, Lafayette, General Steubin, Montgomery, Jackson, Knox, and Ethan Allen were men who had distinguished themselves not only as soldiers and· patriots but as Masons. Bernard Fay, historian, who was not himself a Mason, says: "American Masonry cannot decline the honor and responsibility of having given the signal for rebE)llion.•.. Freemasonry cannot deny the outstanding role played by its' leaders in the Revolution, or that the Continental Congress where .the delegates from the Colonies met to prepare a common political program and to organize the defense against England was in majority composed of Masons. These Congresses were imbued with the purest Masonic spirit as proved by their action which was expressed in the Declaration of Independence."

And yet-and careful continued search has not developed a particle of evidence to the contrary-no lodge itself as an organization took any part in that conflict, and not one single Mason who participated in it attempted to involve the institution or have. it stand at his back. Those records are known to you, but it is interesting that, well I


142

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

known as is the participation of Masons in the events prior to 1787, there is not the same general knowledge and appreciation of the part played by individual Masons in the drafting. of the Constitution of the United States and the struggle for its ratification. Important as was the Declaration of Independence, and vital as was the Revolution, both would have succeeded of themselves and failed of final objective if the Constitutional Convention had failed to achieve the result which has come to be known us the greatest document ever struck off by the mind and purposes of mali at a given time. Certainly it is appropriate that September should be regarded as Constitutional Observance Month; and certainly all Masons should give careful attention to it at this time, 166 years ¡after its writing. I wish time permitted the reading to you tonight of an address I have in my files. It was written after exhaustive research by a more distinguished citizen than I am, my uncle, a Past Grand Master of California, and delivered by him at a meeting of the Grand Lodge of California on the 160th birthday of the Constitution. It is a carefully prepared history of the backgmund leading up to its drafting; and it shows very dearly that that document was not struck off at a given time by a body of men inspired by the occasion, but was the result of painstaking, laborious struggle by men who had the record of centuries of protest against tyranny to guide them. Not all of the framers of the Constitution were Masons, but 31 of them were; not all of the signers of that document were Masons, but at least 18 of them were. This Union of States, this Government of laws and not of men, this Constitution of the United States, based upon the Masonic principles of. liberty, justice, equality, and individual responsibility, was an accomplishment of Masons, and whoever cherishes Masonry for its accomplishments can, beyond doubt, look for justification upon this work as the great heritage of American Masonry. Let us turn pages on the calendar. Thomas Jefferson, with his vision of a great nation, started the westward course,of empire with the Louisiana purchase, and shortly thereafter comes the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Thanks to our own illustrious Masonic historian, Most \Vorshipful Brother Ray V. Denslow, the history of the Grand Lodge of Missouri reads like a history of the western United States. As the pioneers traveled \Vestward and ever Westward until they spanned this great continent and were standing on the shores of the vast Pacific, many of them carried warrants for Masonic lodges in their hands, as well as the spirit and light of Masonry in their hearts. The Centennial celebrations in Oregon, Vi.Tashington and California have been too recent for us to overlook the influence of the development of the great yVest and Northwest by our own Grand Lodge of Missouri. .

â&#x20AC;˘


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

143

As a matter of interest, however, how many of you' recognize the names of Charles Bent and Christopher Carson? Both of them were members of the Grand Lodge of Missouri. Charles Bent was Governor of the territory of Ne\~ Mexico, but many years before that he established what is known throughout western history as Bent's Fort. lIe probably had as much to do with the development of the Santa Fe Trail and the growth of the great Southwestern area of the United States as any man in the history of this country. Christopher Carson, as his membership is carried on the rolls of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, will ever be a hero of the boys of the United States as Kit Carson, the fabulous scout of the "w est. Romance and adventure surround their names, and yet how few Missouri Masons know that these distinguished sons of the plains, who contributed so such to the history of the Vvestern portidn of the United States, were members of our fraternity-not only members but active working members until the time of their deaths. Oh yes, in times of crisis during the history of our nation, individual Masons have forcibly impressed upon their brethren and the 'Vorld "the dig-nity and hig-h importance of Masonry"; and they have "practiced out of the Lodge those duties which they have been taught in it"; and by their amiable discreet and路 virtuous conduct . have convinced mankind of the goodness of the institution-but it has not all been done by warriors, b J7 statesmen, by pioneers, by mountainmen, by woodsmen. Have you ever read in your Masonic or other history the influence of the Masonic fraternity as a whole in the development of public education in the United States? Did you know that it was largely the influence of our Brother DeWitt Clinton of New York that caused the whole i~ea of public education to come into being7 Did you know that throughout the midwest and West, Freemasonry established colleges-our own Masonic College for example. in 1844? Did you know that in the early days in Texas practically every lodge sponsored a school which met in the lodge hall and thereby laid the groundwork for free public education there? Did you know that' today in many Grand Lodge juriSdictions-notably in California and Texas-public education is a vital living program of Lodge activity? Have you ever heard of the pementia Praecox project of the Northern Supreme Council of Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, . and how it has contributed so much in money, and skill and education in controlling this dread disease of the mind? Do you know how m'any millions of dollars annually go to the support of the Shriners Hospitals for Crippled Children, and do you know how many crippled, twisted young bodies have been healed and placed on the road to normal, healthy living? Do you know that the Knight Templar Education Foundation,


144

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

one of the largest student loan funds in the world, has made it possible for many young men and women to receive college educations who otherwise could not ~ I am acutely aware of that program because the Knight Templar Education Foundation helped me through the University of Missouri. A most respected authority has concluded that the Maso~ic fraternity over the years has spent a billion dollars for education in the United States; and the value of Masonic Homes and Masonic Home Funds runs into millions and millions of dollars. Let us turn the calendar forward again to yesterday. Only a few short years ago, too close to forget, when the Japanese war machine entered Manila, two orders were given: First, all city officers must remain on the job and run the city under orders of' the Japanese military government. Second, "round up" all Masons. Let's think of the implications of that last order. It is an order not unusual in totalitarian states. Similar. orders were given in Germany, in Italy, in Russia, in the Balkans. Masonry can exist only under a government of freedom, and the spirit and teachings of Masonry are of vital concern to Dictators. The population of Missouri is approximately three and three-quarters millions and of that number approximately 120,000 are Masons. That is a small percentage, but consider, if you will, what would happen to Missouri if that 120,000 were "rounded up." Missouri is a normal average pattern for the entire nation. What is the pattern ~ ]'ifteen presidents of the United States have been Masons. One of them is a Missourian. A majority of the Governors of the forty-eight states are Masons. One of them路 IS a Missourian. A majority of both Houses of Congress are Masons. Several of them are Missourians. The last check I made 23 of the 34 members of the Missouri State Senate were Masons; and in your own acquaintance think of state officials, city officials, county officials, the men who patrol our streets and highways, the men who protect our houses and property from fire and robbery, the men who run our trains, and our busses, our lawyers, our doctors, our engineers, our teachers, our preachers, our everyday citizens who run our shops, our stores, our assembly lines-what would happen if all'those men you know were "rounded up"~ That the key positions in Government and in our lives are held by Masons is their glory and oU,r heritage. Freemasonry's great objectives, to build character and hold ideals before men's eyes, have worked miracles in men; but we must remember that it is men and not the Order, except as it has moulded men, who have worked out the miracle which is America. In carrying out our Masonic duty; in moving the calendar up to the present and to the future; in recognizing our responsibility to God, to our neighbor, to ourselves, certain trends in our national thinking must give us concern. An example:


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

145

In one of our \Ves~ern state~s, 9 students from 9 different high schools prepared theses on "The vVorld I Want." Each argued to a conclusion for "security." Not one argued for freedom of opportunity, the right to pioneer, to serve himself, to serve his neighbor, to serve his country, to serve his God. "Security is the lot of the slave, of the bondmaid, of the bondman." You are all successful in your various occupations. How did you do it? I am venturing the guess you did not get it by waiting for your Government to bring it to you. I opine that an opportunity knocked at your door-you opened it-you ventured-you pioneered -you won. A distinguished brother, General John J. Pershing, in an address several years ago remarked that "the greatest danger faced by the American people today is indifference." All those things which in former days were held in high regard; the church, the community house, the affairs of government, the rights of the people, and of the individual are, today, to too many of our citizens more or less matters of indifference in their daily lives. \Ve are prone to give little or no concern to those things which do not immediately and directly affect our purse or our person. If there is a danger to our fraternity existing now, and on a parallel basis if there is a danger to our nation and our way of life existing now, an indifferent passive attitude on the part of you a's Masons -is a major contributing factor. There is nothing in the ancient landmarks of the fraternity requiring Freemasons to be passive citizens. There are plenty of references to our being good citizens and loyal citizens. The best citizens are not always the passive ones; and in my opinion we, as individual Masons and as an organization of Masons are failing to take advantage of路 the opportunities for good militant citizenship available to us in all life's activity. We don't have to be warriors to be good citizens; we don't have to be statesmen either; but we can't be passive. It is the militant citizen who is of most service to his country. The great Christian Exemplar himself grew militant when occasion demanded and threw the moneychangers from the temple. Let me mention this to you, with the suggestion that you think about it carefully. One of the leaders of our nation, in an address before the United Nations General Assembly, in one sentence summarized the reason that fear today haunts the whole world: "Since 1939, some 600 million people of some 15 nations have been brought into the Soviet camp of dictatorships, and in no case has this come about by voluntary action of the. peoples and nations concerned." He concluded, "History records no more frightening fact." That is a restrained but massive thought. A monstrous tyranny bestrides the Eastern world like a colossus.


146

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

It has ravished the liberties of 15 nations 3I1d continues to reach out for more. It me1laces our own land as it has never been menaced in all the years we have been a nation. And the cold facts of history prove that it is a deadly menace to the Masonic fraternity. Today there is no Masonic fraternity in those 15 nations. If America is to go forward, it most produce men and women imbued with the ideals of service for others. The failure of Masons as eitizens to take part in the battle for preservation of democracy is a failure to perform an essential duty imposed in every element of Masonic teaching. Masonry is strong and ma..<;;onry flourishes, not in the autocracies or dictatorship countries of the world, but in the democracies; and if democracies go down, Masonry, the child of democracy, will also sink into oblivion. Masonry cannot survive in any other soil. Masons are taught to covet the right, the privilege, the opportunity and freedom to strive for the good things, ineluding the self-respect, self-support and contentment essential under our own scheme of government. t t Send out thy Light and thy Truth; Let them lead me."

May I give you my own private :Masonic creed as I borrowed it years ago from my Dad: In solving the problems of today, and in promoting the eternal verities of our Masonic faith, "I shall aim for the sunshine and not the clouds; I shall struggle for the good things and not the bad; I shall strive for a heaven and not a hell."


SECOND DAY WEDNESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 30, 1953,

The Grand Lodg-e was called to labor at 9 :00 a. m., Grand Chaplain Clarke offering prayer. PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO REPEAL SEC. 77-A To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Lt. F. and A. M. of Missouri: GREETINGS: In Article IV of our By-Laws Section 27 was amended in 1950, as well as were Sections 28 and 29. Section 77-A was added in Article VI the previous year, 1949. A careful perusal of the last specified section, 77-A, will be convincing of the fact that it is obsolete. There are now no "Ritualistic Districts" and in Section 27 there are no paragraphs (b) or (g) as referred to in line nine of Section 77-A. Section 28 (e) now places on the District Deputy Grand Master in each' 'Masonic Distriet" the duty and responsibility of calling a "Lodge of Instruction," and with this section 77 -A is in direct conflict. In these particulars and respect Section 77-A: has been the subject of some concern and controversy of opinion. Be it therefore resolved that Section 77-A of Article VI in our By'Laws be now repealed. . D. LEAR. TANNER, P.M., Swope Park Lodge No. 617, D. 'rHO:M:AS MOFFITT, P.M., Orient Lodge No. 546 VERNIE S. FISHER, Orient Lodge No:. 546 }'RED H. KNIGHT, Gate City Lodge No. 522.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MASONIC PUBLICATIONS

M. W. Brother W. F. Woodruff, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Masonic Publications which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Lt. F. and..A. M. of Missouri: The members of the Committee are: Martin B. Dickinson, Kansas City Willis J. Bray, Kirksville L. O. Weigel, St. Joseph Henry Diller, Webster Groves W. F. Woodruff, Kansas City, Chairman. M. W. Bro. Bray is not in attendance as he is "sojourning" in Texas. We have a letter from him agreeing in advance to action of other members of the committee. Other members have attempted to stay within bounds that will not cause M. W. Bro. Bray to regret his confidence. We call attention to the report of this Committee, approved by The


148

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Grand Lodge at the 1952 Annual Communications to be found at pages 120-123, Proceedings 1952. That action was disapproval of three publications and establishe.;l a "policy" with respect to "Masonic Publications" as follows: That the Grand Master from year to year, appoint a committee on Masonic Publications whose duty it shall be to get information on socalled Masonic PUblications circulating in this jurisdiction and make report to the Grand Lodge for its action. That no Freemason of Missouri shall authorize or sanction directly or indirectly the use of the word "Masonic," the Masonic Emblem or any other term, sign or symbol of Freemasonry for use by privately owned publications until such use has been approved by action of the Grand Lodge. The Grand Master's address reports on the three disapproved publications: The Masonic and Eastern Star N eW8 discontinued publication. The Blue Lodge Mason changed its name to "The Club of the Month News" and has removed the pretense of a Masonic Publication. The Ma.'1onic Review published by William M. Brown of Oklahoma City but circulated in Missouri, has made only pretext of complying with the 1952 action of this Grand Lodge. Front cover of the issue of a few months ago gives the name as "The Review" but retains masonic emblems and at an obscure place we find this: "This publication is named for Missouri THE REVIEW" Brown, the Editor, attempted to' get the Secretary of Joplin Lodge No. 335 to distribute copies to members of that Lodge. Also he called on Rt. W. Bro. Chas. A..Jobson, D.D.G.M. 44th District, making the statement that he was in the clear by using "The Review" instead of . , 'The Masonic Review" on the cover "for Missouri." The Grand Master properly advised that the issue should not be distributed. All officers of the Grand Lodge and of Lodges should refuse aid directly or by acquiescence in distributing this publication and Missouri parties using it for advertising should be notified that its circulation among Freemasons in Missouri is not approv~d by the Grand Lodge. The Masonic Service Association of St. Louis and St. Louis County (33rd and 57th Masonic Districts) sponsors THE TROWEL, a publication which serves all the Lodges of these two Masonic Districts and is financed by the Lodges. It is not a privately owned publication, carries no advertising and is not in violation of the policy adopted in 1952. For a number of years there has been a publication in Jackson County (59th District) called " Jackson County Masonic News." It publishes a Directory and Calendar of the Lodges, eleven in the District, and other masonic bodies, Also news about Masonic activities and personal items of interest. About one-half of the space is advertising, but not objectional advertising. In effect it serves the same purpose and meets the same need as THE TROWEL. Independence No. 76, with a membership of over 1,000, regularly purchases the number of copies necessary for mailing to each of its members. Several other Lodges in the District do the same. So long as the present standard and policy is maintained this Committee considers that The .Tackson County Masonic News meets a need of the 59th District and may be continued in the absence of further action by the Grand Lodge. If there are publications in this jurisdiction, other than those dealt 1Vith in this report and the report of 1952, which should come to the attention of any member, information should be furnished through the


1953

149

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Grand Secretary's Office so it will come to the attention of this Committee. . This committee again emphasizes the urgent need of a Grand Lodge publication in the nature of a News Letter or News Bulletin that will be a medium of disseminating informaiton of activities and spreading the news. Respectfully submitted, W. F. WOODRUFF, Chairman, MARTIN B. DICKINSON, L. O. WEIGEL, HENRY G. DILLER.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BOARDS OF RELIEF

M. W. Brother VV. F. 'Voodruff presented the report of the Committee on Boards of Relief which was adopted and is as follows: To the Mo.~t Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Boards of Relief has received reports of the Boards of Relief in Kansas Gl.ty, St.â&#x20AC;˘Joseph, Springfield, St. Louis, and St. Louis County, and of the St. Louis Masonic Employment Bureau. After a careful reading of these reports we desire to submit the following: Ka.nsas City. The Board has continued to render assistance to transients, and during the year arranged funCJ;alsfor twenty-three members of Lodges outside of Kansas City. An assessment was made for the year 1953. A large number of requests for assistance or relief were !eceived, most of which the Board was able to care for. A fine spirit of cooperation with the Lodges in the rrwenty-Second Masonic District prevailed. The financial statement in substance is as follows: Balance, July Receipts: From other Initiations, Initiations,

1, 1952 Lodges, funerals, relief, etc 1951 1952

$ 5,145.08 $

72.56 335.00 1,445.00

1,852.56 $6,997.64

Disbursements: Fraternal assistance outside Missouri Miscellaneous, including salaries Balance, June 30, 1953

197.21 1,230.62 $1,427.83 $5,569.81

The Board renders a fine service to the brethren and Lodges, not only of this District, but to the entire Masonic fraternity. While this involves many duties and detail, the satisfaction is great, and inspires our members to put forth a greater effort to make this Board useful, not only a Board of Relief, but a real Board of Masonic Service to' all Freemasons and their families. . Edward 1. Gorsuch is President, and Vernie G. Fisher is SecretaryTreasurer. , St. Joseph. The Board serves the five Lodges in St. Joseph. During the year arrangements were made for five funerals for members of Lodges outside of St. Joseph. Arrangements were made with the Board of Relief, Los Angeles, California, for a funeral for a member of a St. Joseph Lodge.


150

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

The Board complied with a number of requests for Masonic courtesies, and information as to location of Lodges, and continues its efforts to pUblicise the loss of dues receipts cards. No financial relief was extended to transient members. The financial statement in substance is as follows: Balance, September 1, 1952 Receipts: Reimbursements and interest

$286.62 29.34 $315.96

Disbursements: Operating expense Balance, August 31, 1953

46.60 $269.36

R. W. Brother Orestes Mitchell Jr. is President, and Paul Priestley is Secretary. Springfield. The Board serves the three Lodges in Springfield. Arrangements were made for two funerals for members of Lodges outside of Springfield. The financial statement is as follows: Balance, July 1, 1952, cash, $406.44; U. S. Gov't bond $500.00 Receipts': Interest

$906.44 12.50 $918.94

Disbursements: Long distance telephone call Balance, June 30, 1953

9;11 $909.83

Assistance was rendered to transient members, and checked facts relative to members of other Lodges. No assessment was made. For many years M. W. Brother Bert S. Lee has been President, and Brother M. F. Smith, Secretary. St. Louis and St. Louis County. The Board as usual, has been busy, with 354 new cases, and 18 carried over for several years, making a total of 372 cases. The new caS!:lS are catalogued as follows: 2 clandestine Lodges; 9 were frauds; 8 suspended (persons living in St. Louis, suspended from Lodges away from St. Louis, who had petitioned for reinstatement, and their Lodges requested the Board to investigate their fitness for reinstatement); 9 women unable to establish claims, listed as unknown; 7 women found to be in good standing, but unworthy; 10 receipts reported lost or stolen; 20 were cases outside the jurisdiction of this Board (some had membership in Missouri but had died in distant places and a Grand Secretary wired the Grand Secretary of Missouri asking permission to give Masonic burial, others resided in Illinois); 14 had no claim (these were seeking emergency relief and frankly admitted no affiliation with Freemasonry); 1 withdrew his application to the Masonic Home when he learned suspension had rendered him ineligible; 22 were cases in hospitals; 96 investigations were made for St. Louis and St. Louis County Lodges (these include Masonic funerals for local members buried away from St. Louis and investigations of petitioners for reinstatement, and other problems involving members away from St. Louis; 146 were found worthy and were taken care of (this included


1953

151

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

47 funerals for transient members cdnducted by Lodges in St. Louis and St. Louis County). . , The Chairman of the Blood Donors Committee reported that members of local Lodges had given blood for 38 persons, while 69 were supplied by the Red Cross. The blood situation in St. Louis is serious. Although appeals are being made constantly, the responses are negligible. The Board is not responsible for blood,-it has to rely on the members of the Lodges who comprise it, and when these members fail to answer the call, they are sidestepping an obligation. The Hospital Committee reported 32 calls on sick members, and the office registered 788, a total of 820 calls. This Board came into being, July 22, 1854, when representatives of five Lodges-11issouri No.1, Meridian No.2, Naphtali No. 25, Polar Star No. 79 and Erwin No. 121, met at the old Masonic Hall, to organize and draw up a standard of procedure, and has been in continuous operation ever since. The finaneial statement in substance is as follows: Balance, cash on hand July 1, 1952 Receipts: Interest Initiations Refunds

$3,247.33 '.......

$ 37.50 919.00 924.69

1,881.19 5,128.52

Disbursements: Audit of books ' Office expense Office rent Printing, postage, stationery President's expense : Salaries Relief Telegrams, telephone, tax Withholding tax, social security, and City

. $ 250.00 . 148.80 . 360.00 ' . 131.67 . 250.00 . ] ,328.73 ' . 982.90 . 570.29 . 358.21

4,380.60

Balance, cash on hand June 30, 1953 $ 747.92 Reconciliation: Cash on hand, June 30, 1953 $ 747.92 482.50 Moneys on hand, property Grand Lodge of Iowa .. Actual cash on hand', .Tune 30, 1953 Moneys invested in bonds Actual resources of the Board, June 30, 1953

265.42 8,088.50 $8,353.92

The Board extends thanks to the officers and members for their understanding and help in carrying on its work during the year. Herman Linck is President and Harry Kantorwitz is Secretary, Mrs. Jeanette Johnson, daughter of Brother Andrew J. O'Riley, is in charge of the offiee which is at her home, 3872 Hartford. Her zeal never lags. The Ma.,;onic Employment B1.lrem,t of St. LO'ui,s and St. Louis County: A report of its labors for the fiseal year ending June 30, 1953. In calling on employers and seeking contacts in the interest of our unemployed, the sacred usages and strict mandates of our Fraternity have been adhered to, bearing in mind at all times the traditions of Freemasonry in attempting to find positions for our unemployed so that I

I


152

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

they might thereby be enabled tOI contribute to' their own well-being and that of their loved ones, instead of sacrificing self-respect by acceptance of the implied dole from their Lodges. Placements made by the Bureau during the year are as follows: 96 Master Masons; 5 widows; 23 wives; 66 daughters; 26 minor sons; 15 sisters; 2 DeMolay boys; 3 Eastern Stars; and 77 relatives, including sons of Master Masons who have reached their majority. The Employment Bureau, the first of its kind in the United States, and the only one in Missouri, points with pride to its accomplishments during the 58 years of its existence, in the face of economic unrest and other adverse conditions. We feel a fraternal need has been accomplished, and earnestly solicit a continuance of the confidence, loyalty and respect the Grand Lodge has always held for this great institution of Freemasonry. 'rhe financial statement in substance is as follows: Balance, July 1, 1952, cash $2,536.15; U. S. bonds $1,500 $4,036.15 Receipts: Per capita tax $9,261.00 Miscellaneous 48.75 9,309.75 13,345.90. Disbursements: Salaries $6,720.00 Social Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100.80 Telephones' 687.36 Postage, printing and stationery 331.61 Rent 744.00 Auto and insurance 580.58 Miscellaneous ........................â&#x20AC;˘........ 416.65 Balance, June 30, 1953

9,581.00 $3,764.90

Elmer C. Goewert is President and Owen D. Snyder is Secretary. The Chairman of this Committee attended the Biannual Meeting of Masonic Relief Association of United States and Canada at Nashville, Tennessee on September 13, 14 and 15. Faithful Brothers Herman Linck, President, and Harry Kantorwitz, Secretary, of the Masonic Board of Relief of St. Louis and St. Louis county also attended the meeting. ' This association has been in¡ continuous existence since 1885 and its membership consists of practically all of the Grand Jurisdictions of the United States and Canada. The first president, ]885-1888, was R. W. Bro. Martin Collins of St. Louis, Missouri. The late esteemed Brother Andrew J. 0 'Riley was president, 1914-1915. M. W. Br. Thomas Earl Doss, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee 'was president 1952-1953, and the Grand Lodge of Tennessee was a v~ry satisfactory and generous host at this meeting at Nashville. The president's address, brief and to the point, defines the purpose of Masonic relief as applied to present conditions, so accurately that it justifies quotation: " We meet to consider the practical and effective application of the Masonic Principle:...-Relief. , 'Although the word Relief through present day application is somewhat limited, we as Masons fully understand its proper application. , , We do not consider Masonic Relief as a dole~ It may be a word of


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

153

encouragement, a word of sympathy, it may be a friendly hand clasp, a job, it may be advice, it may be a temporary loan, it may be a contribution, but never a dole. " We, in the work of this the practical side of Masonry, know that the outstanding factor in Masonic Relief must always be the human touch, love for your Brother. "With the advent and inclusiveness of Federal and State social legislation and the necessity of a certain merchanization we find professional social workers resorting to an impersonal service because they are not vitally interested in the problem of the applicant. We still have the opportunity to enrich our assistance with the spirit of Masonic kindness and sympathy. "As delegates from these service stations of the Craft, we gather to exchange ideas, to improve our service to our Brethren and to more adequately provide for those less fortunate than ourselves that which is lacking in mechanized relief of today." W,e have several Boards of Relief in this 'jurisdiction that are furnish, ing this type of effective relief. This non-mechanized relief is a. very desirable service that too many of us are unaware of. Frequently we are ask~d what 1<'reemasonry does in the field of practical relief or "Charity." The use of the word" Charity" is too often taken in the narrow sense of giving financial relief, to someone in need. Charity in a Masonic sense embraces the improvement and happiness of man. It may be applied to almost anything that tends to promote the well-doing and well-being of social man. . In recent years Masonic Boards of Relief have extended their services into another field which provides something more vital and effective than just financial relief-The Blood Bank. The report of the St. Louis and St. Louis County Board informs us that request for blood for a master mason' is referred to the Board of Relief with the result that in great numbers this need is supplied, though the response from members lags far too much. The Masonic fraternity is not organized principally as a benefit society. Such a society requires payments in the nature of premiums. So, we do not have the funds for effective financial relief. However, through these Boards of Relief, we manifest in a practical way the spirit of Masonic kindness and sympathy. The committee recommends a wider understanding and recognition of these "service stations" of the Craft. As this report indicat~s there arc only four Boards of Relief in the State, St. Louis and St. Louis County, Kansas City, St. Joseph and Springfield. However, Sec. 196 of 1947 By-Laws provides: "SEC. 196. Boards ()f Relief. In cities and towns where there are two or more and less than thirty Lodges, and in areas where thirty or more Lodges have concurrent jurisdiction, the Master of each Lodge shall, immediately after his installation, appoint two of its members' who shall be members of a General Board of Helief for said city, town or' area, to which Boa.rd transient applicants for charity shall be referred, and if found worthy, relieved." Joplin, Columbia, Independence, Kirksville, Hannibal and Sedalia each have two Lodges but no Board of Relief. This is something that should be looked into by the incoming administration. Fraternally submitted, W. F. WOODRUFF, Chairman, JAMES W. SKELLY, JESSE MOORE.


154

PROCEEDINGS O}' 'l'HE

1953

PROPOSED AMENDMENT IN RE RESIGNATION OR REMOVAL FROM OFFIO'E We propose the following amendment to the By-Laws of the Grand Lodge: Strike out Section 103 and rewrite as Section 96a, as follows: SEC. 96a. Resignation or Removal From Office. Any officer of a Lodge may resign, with the consent of the Lodge. An officer can not dimit until his resignation has been accepted by the Lodge. An installed officer can be removed only by death, approved resignation, or expulsion. â&#x20AC;˘TAMES W. SKELLY, GEORGE F. MORRISON.

ELECTION OF OFFICERS

The tellers appointed by Grand Master Rumer were announced, and the following officers were elected for 1953-1954: J ames McBrayer Sellers Orestes Mitehell, Jr "William J. Craig Harold M. Jayne Edmund E. Morris Harold L. Reader

M. Wor. Grand Master R. W. Deputy Grand Master R. lTT. Senior Grand Warden R. lV. Ju.nior Grand Warden R. lV. Grand TreaS1trer R. W. Grand Secretary

ELECTION OF DIRECTORS OF THE MASONIC HOME

For Term Ending 1955-Lester M. Heckman. For Term Ending 1957-Claude T. 'Vood, Eugene L. McGee. REPORT OF JURISPRUDENCE COMMITTEE

M. W. Bro. Byrne E. Bigger, Chairman, presented the report' of the Jurisprudence Committee which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: Your Committee on Jurisprudence submits the following report:

1. DECISIONS We approve Decisions 1, 3, and 5, as reported in the Grand Master's Address. Decision 2 involves the question of lodge jurisdiction. Under paragraph 1 of this decision the Grand Master calls attention to the jurisdiction of Grandview Lodge No. 618 and Marlborough Lodge No. 569. â&#x20AC;˘ Marlborough Lodge being located in Kansas City, the distance between that lodge and the surrounding lodges should be computed from the city limits of Kansas City; but as to Grandview Lodge, there being only one lodge in Grandview, the corporate limits of that town do not enter into the picture, and the fact that Grandview is incorporated makes no difference, but the distance from Grandview is to be based on the distance from the lodge hall in Grandview, and so this part of the decision is disapproved. We approve paragraphs 2, 3, 4, and 5 of Decision 2. Deeision 4 relates to the issuance of a Certificate of Dimission by a lodge. Section 176 as amended in 1950 provides that where an Entered Apprentice or a Fellow Craft has removed from the jurisdiction of the


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

155

lodge he is entitled as a matter of right to a Certificate of Dimission upon his request therefor. If he still resides within the jurisdiction of the lodge to which he belongs then the lodge by a majority vote can grant him this Certificate of Dimission. . As thus clarified and modified the decision is approved. II. IRREGULAR OR ILLEGAL INITIATIONS The Grand Master passed upon several questions of "Irr~gular or Illegal Initiations, etc. " We approve the Grand Master's action in Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. In the matter of rremple Lodge No. 299 and David Louis Blair, the eommittee has gone into th~ matter very thoroughly, heard a statement of facts about the subsequent action of the lodge, and submits the following as the law in the case. The Grand Master ruled that when the petition was first presented to Temple Lodge, David Louis Blair had not resided in Missouri for twelve months before the date of his petition to Temple Lodge. The Grand Master therefore found and reports "that Temple Lodge was without jurisdiction to receivl.') and act upon the petition, that all proceedings thereon were a nullity, and that all monies wh,ich Temple Lodge No. 299 had received from David Louis Blair by reason of the filing of his petition, the degrees conferred thereunder, and for dues, should be refunded to him . .My order was accordingly." 'We need not go into the questions covered by this part of the ruling of the Grand Master. It was acquiesced in by Temple Lodge and David Louis Blair. Thereafter David Louis Blair re-petitioned Temple Lodge and was elected therein on September 1, 1953. On September 15, 195:~, David Louis Blair presented himself to Temple Lodge for initiation; he was duly announced and no objection to his initiation was made; thereupon the District Deputy Grand Master of the 22nd District pursuant to the instruction of the Grand Master, stated that "the Lodge should not be required to go through the proeess, whieh process would ha\'e been a formality only, of again having David Louis Blair participate in such ceremonies as a candidate; that his status thereupon should be that of a Master Mason, a member of Temple Lodge No. 299, subject, however, to the qualification that he should be under the same requirement of standing an examination in open lodge in the proficiency lecture of the first section of the degree of Master Mason as if he had been raised to that degree on September 1, 1953. " Your committee is o.f the opinion that this latter portion of the ruling of the Grand Master is contrary to Masonic Law. When the Grand Master ruled that all of the earlier proceedings" were a nullity" David Louis Blair was in the position of being a profane without any Masonic connection. His subsequent petition to the lodge should proceed in the same manner as that of any other petitioner to the Fraternity; the proclamation or ruling of the Grand Master that when he presented himself for initiation he should be deelared to he a Master Mason was tantamount to the conferring of the degrees "at sight" which is prohibited by Grand Lodge resolution. Your committee is of the opinion that David Louis Blair should be regularly initiated an Entered Apprentice but without the right of anyone to ob.1eet to his initiation as that part of the ceremony has been complied with ; that he should be examined as to his proficiency in this degree and wait at least 28 days before the Fellow Craft degree is conferred, and again examined and again wait at least 28 days before the Master Mason degree is conferred upon him. The question might arise as to whether the Grand Master would have


156

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

the right to "heal" the candidate. This power was not exercised when the matter was first called to the attention of the Grand Master. Whether the candidate should be, or should not be, "healed" was a matter within the discretion of the Grand Master and having failed to exercise that prerogative it would not be available in the subsequent petition and proceedings. Therefore your committee disapproves of the subsequent ruling of the Grand Master in this case. Brother Martin Dickinson having been of counsel for David Louis Blair did not participate in this part of the committee's report. III. DISPENSATIONS -We have examined the dispensations granted as' reported by the Grand Secretary. All of them appear to be within the discretion of the Grand Ma.ster. We, therefore, approve the actions of the Grand Master in granting these dispensations. IV. AMENDMENTS TO THE GRAND LODGE BY-LAWS 1. We recommend that the proposition to amend Section 204, found on pages 47 and 48 of the 1952 Proceedings, be adopted in the following form: SEC. 204. Burial Duties in Cities. When there are two or more lodges in the same town or city the duty of interring the bodies of transient deceased Master Masons shall be performed by these lodges in turn, beginning with the oldest. It shall be the duty of the Board of Relief to designate the lodge and to keep a record of such funerals. 2. A proposition to amend Section 157, relative to exemption from dues, appears at page 48 of the 1952 Proceedings. We do not believe it would be wise to increase the number who may be exempt from dues or to lower the requirements as now provided by law. We therefore recommend that the amendment to Section 157 be not adopted.

3. On page 49 of the Proceedings of 1952 is a proposition to amend Section 13, subdivision (d), relative to the compensation of the Grand Lecturer. The Committee being of the opinion that there should be a limitation on the expenses of the Grand Lecturer, we have rewritten the amen~ment to read as follows: SEC. 13. . . . (d) The compensation of the Grand Lecturer shall be $5500.00 per annum, payable monthly, and he shall be allowed necessary traveling expense incurred in the performance of the duties of his office, not exceeding the sum of $2400.00 per annum. He shall submit an itemized statement of his expenses monthly which when approved by the Grand Master shall be paid monthly. We recommend that the above amendment be adopted. 4. On page 100 of the Proceedings of 1952 is an amendment to Section


"

1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

157

]89 providing that, in any territory in which three lodges or less have concurrent jurisdiction, requests for waivers shall be filed with and acted upon by each lodge. After giving careful considcration to this amendment the committee is of the opinion that the proposed amendment might cause scrious difficulty in other parts of the state than that in which the proposed amendmcnt was intended to apply. Your committee is also of the opinion that the proper remedy is already at hand in other provisions of the Grand Lodge By-Laws. We therefore recommend that the amendment not be adopted. 5. On page 84 of the Proceedings of 1952 there is a proposed amendment relative to Boards of Helicf. Your committee has had the Presidents of the Kansas City and St. Louis Boards of Relief before it and has made some modifications in thc proposed amendment which meet with the approval of those Boards of Relief. Said proposed amendment as rewritten by the committee is as follcHvs: SEC. 196. Boards of Relief. In cities and towns where there are two or more and less than thirty lodges, and in areas where thirty or more lodges have concurrent jurisdiction, the Master of each lodge shall, immediately after his installation, appoint two of its members who shall be members of a General Board of Relief for said city, town or area, to which Board transicnt applicants for charity shall be referred, and if found worthy, relieved. Each of said Boards of Relief shall, before September first of each Grand Lodge year, if it deems it necessary, make an assessment against each of the lodges in its respective jurisdiction, not exceeding the sum of five dollars for each candidate initiated during said eurrent Grand Lodge ycar; provided, however, that no assessments shall be made for said eurrent Grand Lodge ycar by such of said Boards, if any, which, at the beginning of said eurrent Grand Lodge year, shall have on hand the following amounts: (A) In areas where thirty or more lodges have coneurrent jurisdiction, the sum of tcn thousand dollars; (B) In cities and towns having more than five and less than thirty lodges, the sum of five thousand dollars; (C) In citics and towns having more than two and not exceeding five lodges, the sum of one thousand dollars; (D) In eities and towns having two lodges, the sum of two hundred dollars. The words "Grand Lodge Year" shall mean the period from July] through June 30 as covered by the Grand Lodge report each year. Each lodge in this jurisdiction, other than those herein before speeified, shall select one or more of its members as a Board of Relief and shall provide sufficient funds for the relief of transient applicants, if found worthy. We recommend that the above amendment be adopted.

6. On page 131 of the Proceedings of 1952 is an amendment of Section 119. This is to repeal the amendment adopted in 1952, providing that the Worshipful Master may defer for 30 days the giving of the lecture in the Master Mason degree, if he deems it advisable. 'rhe present law having been in force only one year, your committee is of the opinion


158

1953

PR.OCEEDINGS OF THE

that final a~tion on it should be deferred until a little further study could be'made of the present law. We therefore recommend that this amendment be referred to the in.coming Ritual Committee for such study and observation as they may deem best and to report thereon at the next annual communication.

7. On page 117 of the Proceedings of 1952 is a proposed amendment to Section 74. '1'his is the section that raises the per capita tax from $2.50 to $2,75. Your committee is of the opinion that this increase is necessary in brder for the Grand Lodge to function properly. \Ve therefore recommend the adoption of the amendment as proposed.

V. PROPOSED AMENDMENT HE ,JURISDICTION OF LODGES The Grand Master has recommended amendment of Section 190, relating to territorial jurisdiction of lodges, and of other sections pertinent thereto. This proposal would abolish exelusive territorial jurisdiction in Missouri. It would materially affect the territorial jurisdiction of every subordinate lodge except those in the City of St. Louis. Amendment of several other sections may be required to maintain equity among the lodges. These questions affect fundamental policies of this Grand Lodge, and should not be decided without fun consideration of all interests. . We therefore recommend that the incoming Grand Master be authorized in his discretion to appoint a Special Committee of seven to study and recommend with regard to this proposal, and that said proposal be referred to such committee, if appointed, and to the incoming Jurisprudence Committee. Respectfully submitted, BYRNE E. BIGGI<~R, ChaiT1nan, SAM: WILCOX, MARTIN B. DICKINSON, HARRY G}<;RSHENSON.'

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RELIEF AND CHARITY

1\1. VV. Brother 1\1. E. Ewing presented the report of the Committee on Relief and Charity which was adopted and is as follows: SUMMARY OF FUNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED DURING THE YRAR

Balance on Hand October 1, 1952 Received from Grand Lodge

$ 89.69 3,500.00

Paid for Relief

$3,589.69 3,147.50

Balance on Hand at Close of Year

$ 442.19

'fhe following is a list of Lodges assisted and the amount of appropriations to each Lodge. Cecile Daylight Lodge No. 305, Kansas City . $ 202.50 Charleston Lodge No. 407, Charleston . 240.00 Clayton Lodge No. 601, Clayton . 30.00 Compass Lodge No. 120, Parkville . 600.00


1953

159

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Dockery Lodge No. 325, Meadville Euclid Lodge No. 505, St. Louis Fellowship Lodge No. 345, .Toplin Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Springfield Lock Springs Lodge No. 488, Lock Springs Meridian Lodge No.2, St. Louis Saline Lodge No. 226, St. Mary's Salisbury Lodge No. 208, Salisbury St. Louis Lodge No. 20, St. Louis Strafford Lodge No. 608, Strafford Summersville Lodge No. 555, Summersville Zeredatha Lodge No. 189, St. Joseph

. . . . . . . . . . . .

300.00 285.00 110.00 120.00 300.00 120.00 250.00 , 30.00 300.00 60.00 20.00 180.00 $3,147.50

A few things are essentially necessary if your Lodge expects your Relief and Charity Committee to act promptly or at all. . 1. Specific information about the applicants and their needs as' well as a statement of the lodge regarding their desire and ability to assist the needy is a must. 2. The desire on the part of the Lodge to assume responsibility for the relief of their own members. 3. Proper financial structure within the Lodge to enable those in charge to promptly care for need when ,it 'arises. Your committee is of the opinion that as this Relief and Charity work continues it is going to be necessary for the local Lodge to take more interest in their memhers and assume more responsibility for their relief. Of course the finances will in the main have to come from the local level, whether directly or indirectly. M. E. :KWING, ORESTES MI'rCHELL, JR.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON DISTRICT MEETINGS

R.. W. Brother Vlilliam .T. Craig, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on District Meetings which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and .A. M. of Missouri: BRE'l'HRI<~N: Your Committee on Program for District Meetings submits the following report: On November 10, 1952 at the meeting of Distriet Deputy Grand Masters, held by the Grand Master in .Jefferson City, several members of this committee were in attendance and the importance of holding administrative meetings and the benefits derived from them were discussed. On Decemher 3, 1952 a letter was sent to the District Deputy Grand Masters urging that each of them immeuiately start making plans for one or more of these meetings, arranging a suitable program and inviting discussion of the various questions which those present might have. It was suggested that the topics discussed at the District Deputies' meeting in .Jefferson City November 10 could with henefit be used and that other problems and questions concerning the different lodges might he cleared up or the way paved for doing so. The District Deputies were assured that members of this committee would render any assistance possible in making the meetings a success and that other Grand Lodge Officers would be glad to help. It was requested that the chall'man of this com-


160

PROClpEDINGS OF TH]<J

1953

mittee be advised of the plans in each district and that a report be made after the meeting was held showing the number present from the various lodges and anything else of interest. The response to our circular was fairly satisfactory but as several months passed and quite a number of districts had not reported, another letter was sent on May 4, 1953 to those who had not made a report, requesting them to advise the chairman of their plans and that if no plans had been made they were urged to do so. A stamped self-addressed Post Card was enclosed on which a brief report could be made and quite a number of these were returned. Later a Postal Card was sent to each District Deputy who had still not answered, requesting him to arrange for a meeting and make a report. In St. Louis and Kansas City meetings are held by the various organizations within the fraternity which serve the same purpose as thjJ administrative meetings. Reports of some kind were received from all other districts except seven, in which apparently no action was taken. In three of these, changes in District Deputies no doubt was responsible for meetings not being held, but it is not known why reports were not received from the other four districts. It is hoped that meetings were held in those districts and that the District Deputies simply overlooked making a report. From the numerous letters which this committee reeeived we learned that in some districts there was a great deal of interest, that the meetings were a pronounced success and that all who attended were enthusiastic about the benefits received. In other districts were meetings which appear to have been disappointing in the number of officers and members who attended. The reason for this is not known as in some instances where meetings were held in two different districts at approximately the same time and under the same weather conditions, one was a success while in the other the response was not so good. We do not, however, feel that any of the meetings, regardless of how disappointing they might have been, could be termed a failure. Those who did attend could not help but benefit from the discussions. In some districts one meeting was held at a convenient point while in others two or more meetings were held in different localities. Various plans and programs were used and it would be difficult to go into detail regarding the manner in which the different meetings were conducted. In some instances the meeting was conducted as a roundtable discussion of various problems and questions with the District Deputy Grand Master presiding. In others certain topics were assigned to different ones to lead the discussion on such topics and at several places the George Washington National Memorial sound movie or the Masonic Home slides were used with good effect. At a number of the meetings refreshments were served at the close and a social period was enjoyed by the members. No doubt past experience in each district will be a guide in planning future meetings. Your Grand Master attended several of th~se meetings and we are sure that the reports received do not exaggerate the inspiration that the members received from his presence and addresses. The members of this committee attended as many of these meetings as possible, rendering what assistance they could in helping the District Deputy Grand Masters. Assistance was also rendered by other Grand Lodge officers,- Past Grand Masters, District Lecturers and other well-informed brethren throughout the State. We reeommend that the program of holding these meetillgs be continued and that the incoming Grand Master appoint a committee. for that purpose. Appropriate subjects can be suggested to the various District Deputies by the committee but at the same time it is realized that while


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

161

all districts have certain problems in common, there will be others which should be brought up and discussed. The District Deputy Grand Masters should be fre~ to adopt a program which they feel will be of the greatest benefit in their district. We also recommend, as did the committee last year, that where it is practical to do so the administrative meetings be held separately from路 the schools of instruction and discussion of matters of ritual. There are 110 doubt enough administrative problems in each district that could with benefit to the officers and members, occupy an entire evening. \Ve feel that such meetings should not be hurried for other purposes, however, the District Deputy Grand Master should be allowed to use his own judgment in these cases. Our observation has been that those meetings which were most successful were those in which there was a free discussion by all present. Many questions can be definitely answered and advice given in connection with various problems. In other cases where Masonic law is concerned it will be necessary for the District Deputy Grand Master to give the matter more deliberate consideration and possibly to refer the question to the Grand lIfaster for final decision. Not all questions concerning Masonic Law can be answered hastily and care must be exercised in this respect. There are, however, a number of. well-informed Masonic students who can answer many of the questions that will be brought up, and these administrative meetings afford a splendid opportunity for utilizing the services and the experience of these brethren. The George Washington National Memorial sound movie and the Masonic Home slides can be used to good advantage in future meetings. We wish to thank all of those District Deputy Grand Masters who gave freely of their time and efforts in making so many of these meetings a success. We also thank the other Grand Lodge officers, past Grand Masters and all who had a part in these programs. 1!'raternally submitted, WM. J. CRAIG, Chairman, HAROLD L. READER, HAROLD M. JAYNE, FRANK P. BRIGGS, ROBRRT L.ARONSON.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CELEBRATION OF THE 200TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MASONIC BmTHDAY OF GEORGE WASHINGTON

R. \V. Brother vVilliam .J. Craig, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on the Celebration of the 200th Anniversary of the Masonic birthday of George \Vashington,路 which was adopted and is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Following is report of the special committee appointed in December 1951 by Most Worshipful Brother Homer L. Ferguson, then Grand Master, to make plans for participation of Missouri Lodges in a nation-wide observance of the 200th anniversary of the Masonic birthday of Brother George Washington which oecurred November 4, 1952. Following our appointment, literature was obtained from the Virginia , 'George Washington Bi-Centennial Commission" and on June 4, 1952 at the request of the committee th~ Grand Master issued a circular to all Missouri Lodges advising them of these plans and urging them to


162

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

make arrangements for路 such meetings in the various districts throughout the State. . The idea of celebrating George Washington's Masonic birthday was not a new one for this State as in 1922 the Grand Lodge adopted a resolution urging each lodge in its jurisdiction to observe the same by appropriate ceremonies to the end that our American Institutions, our American form of Government, and our principles shall become first of all in the hearts and minds of the people of this country. A pamphlet "George Washington-the Freemason" containing some interesting and instructive data on the life and Masonic career of George Washington, was obtained from the Virginia Bi-Centennial Commission and was sent to all districts. A history of the George Washingto'n Masonic National Memorial was also distributed. The various -members of this committee were assigned certain districts to assist in making and executing plans. The results were very gratifying. While meetings were not held in all districts, a number of districts did respond and some of the celebrations were outstanding. The District Deputy Grand Masters, District T,ecturcrs, officers and members of the lodges in most of the districts were enthusiastic in promoting these celebrations. Inasmuch as November 4, 1952 was the date of the National election, most if not all of the celebrations were held on other dates but this did not lessen their effectiveness. Most jf not all of the meetings were open to the public and were very instructive to all who attended them, reminding all of ~he fine character of General Washington, his great influence on our fraternity and his wonderful service to his and our country. . Fraternally submitted, W:M:. J. CRAIG, Chairman, BRUCE H. HUNT, H. O. GRAUEL, JOHN A. WITTHAUS.

REPORT OF THE MISSOURI LODGE OF RESEARCH

R. VIf. Brother James M. De'Vitt, 'iVorshipful Master, presented the report of .the Missouri Lodge of Research which the Grand Master ordered received and printed in the Proceedings. The report is as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F .. and A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: It is a pleasure and an honor to bring to you a report of the activities of the Missouri Lodge of Research for the year of 1952-53. Since this Lodge was chartered by the Grand Lodge on September 30, 1941, the membership has grown to a total of 744 divided as follows: Life-I, Active--502, Corresponding-119, Subscribing-120, and Exchange-2. . With the consent of the Grand Master and the Grand Lecturer, I wrote each of the District Deputy Grand Masters and Lecturers requesting their aid in increasing the membership of the Missouri Lodge of Research. Their response is shown by the number of members that have been added to our roster, and their efforts are sincerely appreciated by the officers of this Lodge. During the year the following publications have been distributed to all the members: (1) The'Masonic World (2) The Grand Master's Address


-" \."

. 1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

163

(3) Proeeedings of the Conferenee of Grand Masters

(4) Transaetions . (5) Chronologieal Chart of NatIons in Biblieal Times by Jerome

Moss. Many additions have been made to the Lod'ge of Researeh Library at Independenee during the pIlst year. Ross J. Camblin sent to the Library the Proeeedings of the Grand Chapter of Iowa with the exception of the first issue whieh he did not have. . William F. Evers, of Nebraaka, furnished the Proeeedings of' the Grand Lodge of Nebraska from the date of its organization to 1900,

At Library of Lodge of Research, Independence, August 84-, 1958. (From left to right) George C. Marquis, P.D.D.G.M.; Harry S. Trumatn, P.G.M.; Richard O. Rumer, G.M.; Jannes McB. Sellers, D.G.M.; Elvin K. Luff, G.H.P. and the Grand Seeretary of that Grand Lodge has assured us of his aid in securing the proceedings from 1900 to the present date. Most Worshipful Brother Harry S. Truman presented the Library with an autographed volume of his correspondence as President with the Pope of Rome. Much historical material pertaining to Past Grand Master Ralls has been reeeived and together with a printed story of the eentennial of Rall8 Lodge in book form has been plaeed in the Library. Numerous other publieations and articles of historical value have been added during the year, and I am particularly indebted to Brother George Marquis for his fnterest and his aid to the. Lodge of Researeh in seeuring so many of them. M9st Worshipful Brother Ray V. Denslow is tireless in his efforts to bring to us the very best of Masonic History in the. publications which are mailed to each of our members. Beeause of his standing as a Masonie Historian we have been able to obtain a great amount路 of valuable material that would not 路otherwise have been available.


164

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

At Library of Lodge of Regearch, Independence, A'1.ÂŁgust $4, 1959. Harry S. Truman, P.G.M.; Richard O. Rumer, G.M.; James McB. Sellers, D.G.M. I appr~ciate this opportunity to extend my thanks to all the officers of the Masonic Lodge of Research, particularly to Brother Clyde Evans, our Secretary, for the aid given me during the past year. I also wish to express the hope that this Lodge may continue to grow until every Freemason in Missouri becomes aware of its value. Fraternally submitted, JAMES

M. DEWITT,

Worshipful Master, Mis80uri Lodge of Re8earch. M. W. BROTHER WILLIAM R. GENTRY

R:

M. W. Brother William Gentry, Past Grand Master, 84 years of age on September 27, 1953, was presented. The brethren rose and sang "Happy Birthday," and Brother Gentry cordially responded. PROPOSED AMENDMENT IN BE. GRAND LODGE OFFICERS

R. W. Harold O. Grauel proposed the following amendment: RULE :AMENDING .ARTICLE II SECTION I OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE GRAND LODGE OF ANCIENT, FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI RESOLVED, That Section 1 of Article II of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri entitled Officers and Mem~ers-Proxies-Voting be amended


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

165,

by striking therefrom all that appears in the first paragraph thereof and substituting therefor the following: SEC. 1. Enumeration of Officers and Members. The Grand Lodge shall consist of th~ following officers and members, with the following rank and title: A Most Worshipful Grand Master; A Right Worshipful Deputy Grand Master; A Right Worshipful Senior Grand Warden; A Right Worshipful .Junior Grand Warden; A Right Worshipful Grand Treasurer; A Right Worshipful Grand Secretary; A Right Worshipful Grand Lecturer; Seven Right Worshipful Grand Chaplains; A Right Worshipful Grand Orator; A Right Worshipful Senior Grand Deacon; A Right Worshipful.Junior Grand Deacon; A Right Worshipful Senior Grand Steward; A Right Worshipful .Junior Grand Steward; A Right Worshipful Senior Grand Marshal; A Right Worshipful .Junior Grand Marshal; A Right Worshipful Grand Sword Bearer; A Right Worshipful Grand Pursuivant; A Right Worshipful Grand Tiler; Most Worshipful Past Grand Masters; Right Worshipful Past Deputy Grand Masters; Right Worshipful Past Grand Wardens; Right Worshipful Past Grand 'rreasurers; Right Worshipful District Deputy Grand Masters. H. O. GRAUEL, BRUCE H. HUNT, FREELON K. HADLEY, .JOHN A. WITTHAUS, ROBERT L. ARONSON.

PROPOSED AMENDMENT IN RE DISTRICT LECTURERS

R. W. Brother Harold O. Grauel presented the following proposed amendment: Resolution Amending Article IV, Section 27b of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri Resolved, That Section 27b of Article IV of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Missouri entitled Masonic Districts be amended by striking out the words District Lecturer and substituting therefor the following: District Deputy Grand Lecturer who shall have the title of Right Worshipful. BRUCE H. HUNT, HAROLD O. GRAUEL, FREELON K. HADLEY, HAROLD L. READER, GEORGE C. MARQUIS, ROBERT L. ARONSON,

WMâ&#x20AC;˘ .J. CRAIG.

CALLED FROM LABOR

At 12 :10 p. m., the Grand Lodge was called from labor until 1 :30 p. m., the Grand Chaplain offering prayer.


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 1:30 P. M.

The Grand' Lodgoe was called to labor at 1 :30 p. m., Grand Secretary Reader offering prayer. INVITATION TO USE SCOTTISH RITE TEMPLE

W. Brother Harry H. Balsiger, secretary of the Scottish Rite bodies of St. Louis extended the use of the Scottish Rite Temple for the Grand Lodgoe next year, and Grand Master Rumer expressed to Brother Balsig~r· the thanks of the Grand Lodge. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MILEAGE AND PER DIEM·

W. Brother Walter Shrodes, Chairman, for the 46th time presented the report of the Committee on Mileage and Per Diem. Brother Shrodes was greeted by applause by the brethren. The report was adopted and is as follows: . St. Louis, Mo., September 30, 1953 To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Mileage and Per Diem at this session of the Grand Lodge begs to report allowances paid for mileage and per diem as follows: Grand Officers ~ Past Grand Masters District Deputy Grand Masters District Lecturers Committee on .Jurisprudence Committee on Appeals & Grievances Committee on Ways and Means o. Committee on Credentials Committee on Mileage and Per Diem .. Chairman of Committees Chartered Lodges : IJodges D.D Assistant Grand Tilers Adjustments 1951 and 1952 . 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••••••••••

•••••••••••••••

0

••••••

0

Grand Total

•••••••••

0

0

0

••

•••••

••••••••••••• 0 ••••••

0

$ 654.36 590.68 . 2,020.96 1,835.08 204.60 . 181.92 174.68 278.76 . 149.84 144.]6 18,633.52 20.00 60.00 78.08

••••

••••••••••••••••

0

0

0

••••••••••••••••••

0

••

0

••

••••••••••••••••••••

$25,026.64 R€spectfully submitted, W. R. SHRODES, Chairman, R. A. MILLER, J. L. LUTES, 1. W. NICHOLS.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

167

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

R. W. Brother James M. DeWitt, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on V\T ays and Means which was adopted and is as follo\vs: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Musouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Ways and Means desires to commend the offices of the Grand Lodge on the work they have done in the past year. The business of th!,! Grand Lodge has been carried out in a fine manner. The committee feels that the Grand Secretary can, with great benefit to the Craft, conduct conferences for secretaries of local lodges and do other promotional work as directed by the Grand Master. To this end we have increased the Budget item for expenses of the Grand Lodge officers, Order of the Grand Master, in the sum of $1,000.00. We recommend that $5,000.00 from the fund of Voluntary Contributions be appropriated to the Hospital Visitation Program of the M.S.A. We further recommend that the Grand Master appoint a committee with power to act on the care and disposition of, portraits now displayed in the Hall of the Masoni~ Temple. We recommend the following Budget: Items Budget Appropriation Expenses'--Grand Master ; $ 3,000.00 Salary-Grand Secretary 7,200.00 Salary-Grand Treasurer 500.00 Salary-Grand Lecturer 5,500.00 Expenses-Grand Lecturer 2,400.00 79.31 Deficiency Appropriation Expense Grand Lecturer, Aug. 1953 M. W. Bro. A. F. Ittner, Honorarium " '" 1,878.00 Grand Lodge Office Help 8,000.00 Expense, Grand Correspondent 750.00 Bonds, Grand Secretary and Grand Treasurer and Insurance 550.00 Jewel for Grand Master :..... 300.00 Expense Grand Lodge Officers (O.G.M.) 2,000.00 Grand Lodge Officers' Conferences ............. 600.00 D.D.G.M. and District Lecturer Conferences 2,400.00 Washington Meetings :..... 600.00 路For Commission on recognition of other Grand Jurisdictions . 200.00 Grand Master's Contingent Fund 1,000.00 Expenses, D.D.G.M.'s :.................. 300.00 Ritual Committee Expense 350.00 Expenses: Grand Lodge Session 4,700.00 Reporter: Grand Lodge Session 125.00 Printed Proceedings 3,500.00 Audit Company 250.00 Relief and Charity 5,000.00 2,201.96 Masonic Service Association Masonic Helief Association 425.49 Contingent Fund: G. L. Expense Account 1,000.00 Maintenance-Grand Lodge Office 1,800.00 Printing, Postage and Stationery 5,500.00 Telephone & Telegrams-G. L. Office 500.00 Care of Portraits of Past Grand Masters 50.00 Filing Equipment 1,000.00 Office Equipment 500.00


168

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Missouri Lodge of Research-Publication Transactions Missouri Lodge of Research-Binding Proceedings Mileage and Per Diem

. .

1,000.00 250.00 25,026.64 $90,436.40

Total

Respectfully submitted, JAMES M. DEWITT, ARTHUR D. NORDBERG, W. H. UTZ, JR., HARRY THIES.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS

W. Brother Fred Knight, Chairman, presented the report of the Committee on Credentials which was adopted and is as follows: Wednesday, September 30, 1953 To the Most Wm-shipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN: Your Committee on Credentials submits the following report. At the present Session of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge there are represented 438 subordinate lodges ;md there are present: Grand Lodge Officers Past Grand Masters Grand Representatives District Depllty Grand Masters DistriCt Lecturers Past Masters Worshipful Masters Senior Wardens ..................â&#x20AC;˘................. Junior Wardens Chairman Committees............................... Distinguished Visitors

21 18 8 46 42 358 393 159 85 17 6 1,153

Actual attendance without duplication: Past Masters W orsbipful ~asters Senior Wardens Junior Wardens Assistant Tilers

358 393 159 85 3

Total

'"

..

..

998

Lodges without Representation 161. Fraternally submitted, FRED H. KNIGHT, Chairman, GEORGE A. McKEAN, SEIBERT ETTER, GEORGE F. PRATER, LOWELL H. SCOTT.

COMMUNICATION RE THREE ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THE PROCEEDINGS FOR EACH LODGE

A communication, signed by the Master and Wardens of Har-


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

. 169

mony Lodge No. 499, relative to furnishing each lodge with three additional copies of the Proceedings for the Master and \Vardens, was read and referred to the Jurisprudence Committee. RESOLUTION RE SUPPLYING PAPERS AND DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY GRAND LODGE LAW

The following resolution was presented and referred to the Jurisprudence Committee: BE IT RESOLVED that the Grand Secretary b~ authorized and requested to supply to all subordinate lodges all forms of petitions, applications for certificates and such other pa.pers or documents required by the Grand Lodge law to be furnished or supplied by subordinate lodges, the expense thereof to be paid by the subordinate lodges. HUSSEL E. MURRAY, P. M., Missouri Lodge No.1 GEORGE E. HIMMEGER, Wor. Master . Missouri Lodge No. 1 THOMAS H. HEAPE, P. M., Cornerstone Lodge No. 323

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND HOTELS

The report of the Committee on Transportation and Hotels was presented and adopted as follows: To the Most WO?'ship!ul Grand Lodge, ..4. F. and ..4. M. of Missouri: BRETHREN; The duties assigned this committee have been performed. W. F. MILLER., Cha,irrn.an.. REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ENTERTAINMENT OF DISTINGUISHED GUESTS

R. \V. Brother Bruce Hunt, Chairman, reported that the duties assigned the Committee on Entertainment of Distinguished Guests had been performed. The report was adopted. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON UNFINISHED BUSINESS

The report of the Committee on Unfinished Business was presented and adopted as follows: To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, ..4. F. and A. M .. of Missouri: BRETHREN: I beg to report that your committee on Unfinished Business has performed all the duties assigned. There is no unfinished business ~upw~ . Respectfully submitted, ANDRE'" T. YOUNG, P. M., Ferguson Lodge No. 542. VOTE OF THANKS TO M. W. BROTHER RUMER

A vote of thanks .vas tendered to M. \V. Brother Rumer for the efficient manner in which he had presided over the sessions of the Grand Lodge.


170 .

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

APPOINTMENTS Freelon K. Hadley, R. W. Grand Lecturer Emmett L. Robison, W. Grand Chaplain Samuel Thurman, W. Grand Chaplain James W. Clarke, W. Grand Chaplain Hampton Adams, W. Grand Chaplain Plincy H. Elliott, W. Grand Chaplain Frank P. Briggs, Grand Senior Deacon Robert L. Aronson, Grand Junior Deacon Harold O. Grauel, Grand Senior Steward Bruce H. Hunt, Grand Junior Steward Robert H. Mann, Grand Marshal John A. Witthaus, Grand Marshal J. Renick Jones, Grand Sword Bearer R. Jasper Smith, Grand Pursuivant Frederick J. Marston, Grand Orator John F. Baber, Grand Tiler.

INSTALLATION

The hour for installation having arrived, M. W. Brother VV. F. assisted by M. W. Brother Morris E. Ewing, as Grand Marshal, installed the following officers:

,V oodruff,

J AMES McBRAYER SELLERS •...••...•• M.

W. Gmnd Master lV. Deputy Grand Master WiLLIAM J. CRAIG • • . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . R. W. Senior Grand Warden HAROLD M. JAyNE . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • • . R. W. Junior Gmnd llTarden EDMUND E. MORRIS . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . R. W. Grand Treasurer HAROLD L. READER . • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . R. VV. G1'and Secretary FREELON K. HADLEy •..•.•.•..•••.• R. lV. Grand Lecturer FRANK P. BRIGGS .•.•.••.•.••.••••• Grand Senior Deacon ROBERT L. ARONSON ..••.•....••.•• Grand Junior Deacon HAROLD O. GRAUEL ••..•..••....•••• Grand Senior Steward BRUCE H. HUNT .•....•...•.••.•.•• Gmnd Junior Steward ROBERT H. MANN . . . . . • • . . . . . • . . • • • Grand Marshal JOHN A. 'VITTHAUS ••.•.•..••..•.•• Grand Mar;hal J. RENICK JONES •.••••.•.•••..•••• Grand Sword Bearer R. JASPER SMITH .•...•••.•.. , •.•..• Grand Pursuivant JOHN F. BABER .•••.•..•••......•.. Grand Tiler ORESTES MI'l'CHELL, JR..•....••....• B.

Following the installation M. W. Brother Rumer presented Grand Master Sellers with the Grand Master's Jewel, and M. W. Brother Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, presented Grand Master Sellers with the Grand Master's Apron. M. W. Brother W. F. Woodruff presented M.\\T. Brother Rumer with the Past Grand Master's J ewe!. R. 'V. Brother George C. Marquis presented W. Brother Elmer T. Schaberg, W. M. of Lexington Lodge No. 149, the Grand Master's own Lodge, accompanied by a large delegation of the brethren of Lexington Lodge, who on behalf of the members of Lexington Lodge No. 149 presented Grand Master Sellers with a beautiful silk hat.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

171

At the close of the installation M. W. Brother James VY. Skelly presented to the Grand Sword Bearer a sword formerly belonging to Col. Fred W. Schaurte, and to the Grand Tiler a saber which had been owned by 'Col. John A. Laird. BENEDICTION

M. ""V. Brother Harold L. Reader, Grand Secretary, pronounced the benediction. CLOSING

The Most 'Vorshipful Grand Lodge, A. F. and A. M. of the State of Missouri rested from its labors and was closed in Ample Form at 3 :00 p. m. this day, the thirtieth day of September, 1953, no further business appearing, to meet again in St. Louis, Missouri, the last Tuesday, viz.: the twenty-eighth day of September, 1954. HAROLD L. READER, Grand Secretary. STANDING COMMITTEES 1953-1954

Jurisprudence-Martin Dickinson, Chairman, 1002 Walnut St., Kansas City; Henry Fox, 1200 Land Bank Bldg., Kansas City; Sam Wilcox, 206 N. Noyes Blvd., St. Joseph; Harry Gershenson, 506 Olive St., St. Louis; John Bond, 709 Joplin National Bank Bldg., Joplin. • Appeals and Grievances-Robert L. Hoy, Chairman, 1000 West 72nd, Kansas City; Marvin E. Boisseau, 705 Olive St., St. Louis; J. V. Gaddy, Corby Bldg., St. Joseph; Ralph V. Wilson, 1008 Kuhs Pl., St. Louis; Perry W. Seaton, 1218 Commerce Bldg., Kansas City 6. Ways and Means-J. M. DeWitt, Chairman (3), Kirksville; Harry Theis (3), 314 N. 4th St., St. Louis; Solon Cameron (2),508 N. Grand, St. Louis; Arthur D. Nordberg (1),5717 Locust St., Kansas City; William H. Utz, Jr. (1), Tootle Bldg., St.•Toseph. Credentials-Fred Knight, Chairman, 9th and Harrison, Kansas City; George Prater, 321 E. Macon, Carthage; George McKean, Lexington; Lowell H. Scott, 1347 So. Jefferson, Springfield; Seibert Etter, 1349a McCausland, St. Louis. Mileage and Per Diem-Walter Shrodes, Chairman, Union Station, Burlington, Iowa; J. L. Lutes, Flat River; John W. Adams, Marshall; 1. W. Nichols, 106 W. Dunklin, Jefferson City. Rit1tal-Freelon K. Hadley, Chairman, 2005 Penn St., St. Joseph; Bennett Klingner, 436 E. Pacific, Springfield; Brace E. Kitchell, 1618 Yale, Richmond Heights; L. Marshall Hollenbeck, Sikeston; Joseph A. Halley, 2410 Wismer Rd., Overland; George M. McAninch, 3806 Euclid, Kansas City; Anthony F. Ittner, Emeritus,2353 So. Compton, St. Louis. Correspondence-Ray V. Denslow, Trenton. Necrology-James W. Skelly, Chairman, 3637 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8; Emmett L. Robison, 2416' Doniphan, St. Joseph; Samuel Thurman, 225 So. Skinker Blvd., St.· Louis. ' Auditing-C. K. Benson Company. Grand Master's Address-Richard O. Rumer, Chairman. All Past Grand Masters in attendance. Entertainment of Disting1dshed Guests-Bruce H. Hunt, Chairman, Unfinished Business-Frank A. Lewis, 3201 Park, Kansas City. Box 721, Kirksville; Robert H. Mann, 101 W. 11th St., Kansas City; Robert L. Aronson, Civil Courts Bldg., St. Louis 1.


172

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

Transportation and Hotels-Wm. F. Miller, 1600 Missouri Pacific Bldg., St. Louis. Chartered Lodges-Robert Lee Barger, Chairman, 317 E. Dent, Ironton; Ray Bolin, California; Vernie a. Fisher, 903 Harrison, Kansas City; Lewis O. Weigel, Box 331, St. Joseph; Charles A. Jobson, 106 Joplin, Joplin. Lodges U.D.-Harold O. Grauel, Chairman, Cheney Hall, Cape Girardeau; W. R. Usher, 1501 Paris, Hannibal; J. P. Hall, Lexington. Relief and Charity-Russell E. Murray, Chairman, 4870 Natural Bridge Ave., St. Louis; Orestes Mitchell, Jr., 717 Corby Bldg., St. Joseph; William J. Craig, 1035 So. Pickwick, Springfield ; James M. Bradford, 4165a Shaw, St. Louis; Lester M. Heckman, 9401 Manor Rd., Kansas City. Masonic Boa.rds of Relicf-W. F. Woodruff, Chairman (2), 314 Temple Bldg., 903 Grand, Kansas City; James W. Skelly (3), 3637 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8; J.esse Moore (1); Charles S. McClellan (2), 4215 Athlone Ave., St. Louis; Elmer W. Wagner (2), Mercantile Trust Co., 8th & Olive, St. Louis. Building Slbpervisory Board-Walter J. Bublitz, Chairman (1), 6629 Overhill Road, Kansas City 13; James M. Bradford (1), 4165a Shaw Ave., St. Louis; Fred Heuerman (1), 4826 Penrose Ave., St. Louis. Legal Advisor to Grand Ma.~ter-C. Lew Gallant, 818 Olive St., St. Louis. SPECIAL COMMITTEES 1953-1954 Masonic Temple Association of St. Lmtis-Thomas H. Heape, Chairman, 3863 W. Pine, St. Louis; Louis F. Dahn, 5968 DeGivervillc, St. Louis; Robert C. Brinkman, 611 Olive St., St. Louis. George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association-Bert S. Lee, Chairman, 401 ',xl. ('.tOmmercial, Springfield; Anthony F. Ittner, 2353 So. Compton, St. Louis; Harry S. Truman, Independence. Recognition of F01'eign Gmnd Lodges-George C. Marquis, Chairman, 114 E. Ruby St" Independence; Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8; William Denslow, Trenton; Harris C. oJ ohnston, Boonville; Ray Bond, 709 Joplin National Bank Bldg., Joplin. Masonic Publications-W. F. Woodruff, Chairman, 314 Temple Bldg., 903 Grand, Kansas City; Martin B. Dickinson, 1002 Walnut St., Kansas City; L. O. Weigel, Box 331, St. Joseph; Henry Diller, 450 California Ave., Webster Groves 19. P1'ogram for District Meetings-Harold Jayne, Chairman, Memphis; Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis; Frank P. Briggs, Macon; Harold O. Grauel, Cheney Hall, Cape Girardeau; Robert L. Aronson, Civil Courts Bldg., St. Louis 1. LIVING PAST GRAND MASTERS OF THIS JURISDICTION Name and Location Year of Service Arch A. Johnson, Landers Building, Springfield 1911-12 Tolman W. Cotton, Van Buren , ", 1914-15 Bert S. Lee, 1324 Washington, Springfield., 1922-23 William W. Martin, 5540 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis 1925-26 Anthony F. Ittner, 2353 South Compton Avenue, St. Louis 1927-28 Byrne E. Bigger, Courthouse, Hannibal .. , 1928-29 William R. Gentry, 717 IJouderman Building, St. Louis 1930-31 Ray V. Denslow, Trenton 1931-32 F. C. Barnhill, Marshall 1933-34 DuVal Smith, Court House, St. Joseph 1934-35 James W. Skelly, 3637 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis 1935-36 Harold L. Reader, 3681 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis 1937-38


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

173

Henry. C. Chiles, Lexington 1938-39 Harry S. Truman, Independence :. ~ 1940-41 Harris C. Johnston, Boonville : 1941-42 Forrest C. Donnell, 4615 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8 1942-43 W. F. Woodruff, 314 Temple Bldg., 903 Grand, Kansas City .. 1943-44 Willis J. Bray, 4500 Birchman, Fort Worth, Texas 1944-46 Solon Cameron, Metropolitan Building, St. Louis 1946-47 Morris E. Ewing, Morrisville 1947-48 Harry F. Sunderland, 4302 Woodland Ave., Kansas City 4 1948-49 James M. Bradford, 4165A Shaw Ave., St. Louis 1949-50 Ray Bond, 709 Joplin Nat'l Bank Building, Joplin 1950-51 Homer L. Ferguson, Box 744, Kirksville 1951-52 Richard O. Rumer, 1509 Washington Ave., St. Louis 1952-53

DISTRICT DEPUTY G. M. 's 1953-1954 1. Marshall Story, Kahoka 2. E. Lee Baker, Kirksville 3. Rex S. Cooley, Vnionville 4. Clyde C. Evans, Box 483, Trenton 5. Ransom Hook, Bethany 6. G:F. Kling, 109 N. Smith St., Albany 7. Clyde Roberts, Maryville 8. Lawrence R. Fawks, Forest City 9. E. Glenn Pearce, Sr., Maxwell Heights, St. Joseph 10. Alfred Dunlap, Winston 11. Percy M. Best, Liberty 12. John H. Bryan, Hamilton 13. Virgil Slaughter, Meadville 14. W. A. Bagley, Shelbina 15. J. S. Quinn, La Grange 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Nelson Russell, Louisiana Dallas C. Osterhout, Center Herman G. Kidd, Jacksonville Milton J. Dailey, Brunswick Earl Deardorff, Hale

21. Harvey B.Hufford, Gashland 22. D. Lear Tanner, 705 E. 70th St., Kansas City 23. James P. Hall, Lexington 24. Dorsey Bail, 354 W. Summit, Marshall 25. L. t. Williamson, Boonville 26. J. Edward Richardson, Harrisburg

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

DISTRICT LECTURERS 1953-1954 George V. Baskett, Wyaconda Junior L. Couch, 511 N. Florence St., Kirksville Joseph W. Moore, Newtown Florian M. McKinney, Box 457, Trenton Wilbur Scott Christie, New Hampton Glenn V. Bulla, King City

7. Vernon V. Goslee, Skidmore 8. Wayne A. Sharp, Cra.ig 9. Rex L. Brooks, 2524 Pacific, St. Joseph 10. Chas. B. Whitchurch, Winston 11. Joe L. Moore, 809 N. Lightburne, Liberty 12. Herbert F. Woolsey, Mooresville 13. Warren W. Dray, Linneus 14. Virgil Culler, Shelbyville 15. Virgil P. Caulk, 1319 Central Ave., Hannibal 16. Russell J. Rowe, Louisiana 17. Francis A. Ely, Monroe City 18. Edwin B. Hawkins, Higbee 19. Irvin Williams, Sumner 20. Charles S. Rutt, 410 N. Jefferson, Carrollton 21. Arthur C. Mothershead, Gashland 22. George M. McAninch, 3806 Euclid, Kansas City 3 23. Camillus B. Waddell, Lexington 24. Daniel W. Krumsiek, Shackleford 25. Basey Vanlandingham, 304 W. Broadway, Columbia 26. Turner A. Barnhart, Columbia


174

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

27. A. W. Griffith, Fulton 28. Harry E. Ban; Montgomery City 29. Jack Vann, Elsberry 30. Melge W. Golterman, Foristel 31. John Rich, 217 Pine, Jefferson City 32.â&#x20AC;˘Terry Cottrell, Pacific 33A. Milton C. Lauenstein, 7023 Pernod, St. Louis 33B. Chas. F. Ballak, 706 Chestnut, Rm. 312, St. Louis 1 34. Groyer C. Kimberlin, Garden City 35. D. O. Bradley, Butler 36. George B. Collins, Holden 37. 38. 39. 40.

Joseph S. Kidwell, Windsor Claude T. Wood, Richland W. W. Jackson, St. James A. L. Schwaegerle, Box 572, De Soto 41. Samuel B. Brown III, Boliyar 42. Parks Bacon, Eldorado Springs 43. Urban B. Jones, Box 232, Nevada 44. Ralph E. Brown, 923 S. Madison, Webb City 45. Paul A. King, 502 Holland Bldg., Springfield. 46. J. W. Nickle, Mountain Grove 47. George DeWoody, Ellington 48. Jesse L. Holloway, Elyins 49. Roy D. Drum, Oak Ridge 50. Aubrey French, Charleston 51. J. Richard Neely, Carnthersville 52. Henry A. Tanner, Doniphan 53. J. Fred Park, West Plains 54. Raymond H. Patterson, Galena 55. George Fagan, Wheaton 56. Bert St. Clair, Noel 57. George G. Winter, Box 745, Kennerly Rd., Sappington 23 58. A. Roscoe White, Eldon 59. Byron Auld, Buckner

1953

27. Alfred A. Mitchell, 802 E. Monroe, Mexico 28. Paul A. Thomas, Montgomery City 29. Herbert J. Crosby, Winneld 30. Joseph B. Peyton, 616 Wash., St. Charles 31. Frank V. Jones, 304 Randolph, California 32. William S. Juergens, Sullivan 33. Alfred F. Hermeling, 5348 Neosho, St. Louis 9 34. Roy L. Johnston, Belton 35. Ralph O. Fritts, Amsterdam 36. Henry E. Richardson, 317 W. Fifth St., Sedalia 37. Philip D. Trainer, Clinton 38. James V. Fugate, Lebanon 39. W. Frank Houk, St. James 40. J. Earl Landes, 309 Virginia Crystal City 41. L. B. Parrish, Bolivar 42. Albert E. Pray, Eldorado Springs 43. Rayford B. Thomas, Harwood 44. George F. Prater, 321 E. Macon, Carthage 45. .T. Bennett Klingner, 436 E. Pacific, Springfield 46. John H. Hicks, Mountain Grove 47. Robert W. Adams, Van Buren 48. Oran J. Holdman, 401 Bell Aye., Bonne Terre 49. James T. Childress, 631 North, Cape Girardeau 50. L. M. Hollenbeck, Sikeston 51. J. John Shipman, 203 E. Wash., Kennett 52. A. H. Harwell, 315 Oak St., Poplar Bluff f)3. Adelbert E. Blackwood, Willow Springs 54. Fred O. Wade, Ozark 55. Charles W. Werdein, Aurora 56. Troy P. Ferrell, 210 N. Valley, Neosho 57. J. Harold Burton, 1327 Drayton, Webster Groyes 19 58. ClaudeW. Dunnaway, Versailles 59. Owen S. Taylor, 11201 E. 9th, Kansas City 3


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

175

LIST OF GRAND SECRETARIES AND THEIR ADDRESSES Alabama, C. H. Stubinger, Box 98, Montgomery. Arizona, Joseph A. E. !vey, P. G. M., Box 1488, Tucson. Arkansas, W. A. Thomas, P. G. M., Little Rock. California, Lloyd E. Wilson, P. ,G. M., ,25 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 2. Colorado, Harry W. Bundy, 300 Masonic Temple, Denver. Connecticut, Earle K. Haling, P. G. M., 201 Ann St., Hartford 3. Delaware, Chester R. Jones, 818 Market St., Wilmington 24. District of Columbia, Raymond N. Babcock, Masonic Temple, Wash. ington 5. Florida, George W. Huff, 512 Masonic Temple, Jacksonville 2. Georgia, Daniel W. Locklin, 811 Mulberry, Macon. Idaho, Clyde 1. Hush, P. G. M., Box 1677, Boise. Illinois, Richard C. Davenport, P. G. M., Harrisburg. Indiana, Dwight L. Smith, P. G. M., Masonic Temple, Indianapolis. Iowa, Earl B. Delzell, Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids. Kansas, Elmer F. Strain, P. G. M., Topeka. Kentucky, Alpheus E. Orton, P. G. M., 200 Shubert Bldg., Louisville 2. Louisiana, D. Peter Laguens, Jr., 300 Masonic Temple, New Orleans. Maine, Convers E. Leach, Masonic Temple, Portland. Maryland, Claud Shaffer, Masonic Temple, Baltimore 1. Massachusetts, Frank H. Hilton, 51 Boylston St., Boston 16. Michigan, Charles T. Sherman, P. G. M., Masonic Temple, Grand Rapids 3. Minnesota, John B. Tomhave, P. G. M., Masonic 'l'emple, St. Paul. Mississippi, Sid F. Curtis, Meridian. Missouri, Harold L. Reader, P. G. M., 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8.

Montana, Ralph N. Lodge, Box 896, Helena. Nebraska, Carl R. Greisen, 401 Masonic Temple, Omaha. Nevada, E. C. Peterson, P. G. M., Carson City. New Hampshire, J. Melvin Dresser, P. G. M., Concord. New Jersey, Isaac Cherry, Masonic Temple, Trenton. New Mexico, Chandler C. Thomas, Box 535, Albuquerque. New York, Edward R. Carman, 71 W. 23d St., New York City. North Carolina, Wilbur L. McIver, Box 3068, Raleigh. North Dakota, Harold S. Pond, P. G. M., Fargo. , Ohio, H. S. Johnson, P. G~ M., Masonic Temple, Cincinnati 2. Oklahoma, J. Fred Latham, P. G. M., Masonic Temple, Guthrie. Oregon, Harry D. Proudfoot, P. G. M., Masonic Temple, Portland. Pennsylvania, George S'. Avery, Masonic Temple, Philadelphia. Rhode Island, N. Arthur Hyland, 127 Dorrance St., Providence 3. South Carolina, Henry F.Collins, P. G. M., 901 Palmetto State Life Bldg., Columbia. South Dakota, Elvin F. Strain, Box 468, Sioux Falls. Tennessee, T. E. Doss, P. G. M., Box 216, Nashville. Texas, Harvey C. Byrd, Box 446, Waco. Utah, E. Roy Gibson, P. G. M., Masonic Temple, Salt Lake City. Vermont, Aaron H. Grout, P. G. M., Burlington. Virginia, Dr. James N. Hillman, P. G. M., Masonic Temple, Richmond. Washington, John 1. Preissner, Masonic Temple, Tacoma 3. , West Virginia, Frank F. Flaig, P. G. M., Box 2346, Charleston 28. Wisconsin, Paul W. Grossenbach, 705 East Wells St., Milwaukee 2. Wyoming, Irving E. Clark, Masonic Temple, Casper.


176

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Grand Lodge Alberta Argentina Austria Brazil (Rio De Janeiro) Brazil (Rio Grands do SuI) Brazil (Minas Gerais) British Columbia

Grand Secretary Edward H. Rivers A. Lappas Rudolph Rappos J acy Garnier de Baccellar J oad Yorge Ribi

Canada

Ewart G. Dixon

Chile

Zacarias Gomez M.

China Costa Rica Cuba

David W. K. Au, P.G.M., Acting Enrique Chaves B. Dr. Jose F. Castellanos

Denmark

Sv. Jacobsen

England

Sydney A. White, M. O. Bruno Kivikoski

Finland France (Nat '1 Grand Lodge) Guatemala Greece Ireland Italy (Grand Orient) Iceland Manitoba Mexico (York) Mexico (Campeche) Mexico (Cosmos) Mexico (El Potosi) Mexico ( Nueva Leon). Mexico (Occidental) Mexico (Tamaulipas)

Sergio A. Ivanenko W. R. Simpson, P.G.M.

L. F. Poirson Manuel A. Triboullier

1953 Address Calgary Buenos Aires Vienna Caixo Postal No. 2215 Caixo Postal 683, Porta Alegra Caixo Postal 5, Belo Horizonte 692 Seymour St., Vancouver P. O. Drawer 217, Hamilton, Onto Casillo 2867, Santiago lIa Hart Ave., Kowloon, Hong Kong San Jose Carlos TIl, No. 508, Havana Blegdamsvej 23, Copenhagen Freemasons' Hall London W.C. 2 P. Esplanadik 35, East Helsinki 65 Boulevard Bineau, Neuilly-sur-Seine

Apartado Postel 312, Guatemala City Dr. Antonios Rammos 19 Acharnon St., Athens Henry S. SheIlaI'd Freemasons' Hall, Dublin Enzo Munitillo Rome Olafer Gislason Freemasons' Hall, Borgartun 4, Reykjavik Harry Coddington, Masonic Temple, Winnipeg Cantwell C. Brown Apartado 1986 Mexico, D. F. Omar C. Livera G. Apartado 17, Campeche, Camp. Rigoberto Trevino Apartado 171, Chihuahua, Chih. Abel E. Elizondo Apartado 104, San Luis Potosi Reinaldo Guzman Apartado 309, Monterrey Joaquin Yanez Albarron Apartado 9, Guadalajara Ruben Marquez Romo Apartado 419, Tampico'


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Mexico (Valle de Mexico) Netherlands New Brunswick New South Wales New Zealand Nicaragua Norway Nova Scotia Panama Philippine Islands Prince Edward Island Puerto Rico Quebec Queensland San Salvador Saskatchewan Scotland South Australia Sweden Swiss Alpina Tasmania United Grand Lodge in Berlin United Grand Lodge of Germany Venezuela Victoria Western Austrialia

177

Apartado 10, Mexico City 22 Fluweelen Burgwal, Dr. A. A. Galestin The Hague Saint John R. D. Magee Sydney James S. Miller Box 1193, Wellington H. A. Lamb Box 102, Managua Victor M. Delgoddillo Odd Lie-Davidson N. Volgate 19, Oslo Reginald V. Harris, Freemasons' Hall, Halifax K.C., P.G.M. Eduardo E. De Diego O. Panama City 520 San Marcelino, Antonio Gonzales, Manila P.G.M. Box 112, L. A. Mcbougall Charlottetown Box 747, San Juan Jose J. Vicens Masonic Temple, R. W. Louthood Montreal E. G. Radford,. Box 675, K.G.P.O., P.D.G.M. Brisbane Segunda Calle, Jose Lacayo Tillez Ariente 27 Robert A. Tate P. O. Box 246, Regina Alexander F. Buchan, 96 George St., M.B.E., B.S.C., Ph.D. Edinburgh F. J. Ellen, P.G.W. Freemasons' Hall, Adelaide Dr. G.E. A. Bottiger Frimurareorden, Blasieholmsgatan 6, Stockholm F. Mueller-Ruegg Bogenschutzcnstrasse 8, Berne H. A. Wilkinson, Hobart P.G.W. W. E. Weinmann Friedenau, Hackenstrasse 2, Berlin Dr. Karl Manecke Friedrich-Ebert Str. 37 Frankfurt-on-Main Jesus M. Chango G. Apartado 927, Caracas Wm. Stewart, 25 Collins St., P.D.G.M. Melbourne N. J. Munro, Freemasons' Hall P.S.G.W. Perth Pablo C. Gonzales

NUMERICAL LIST OF LODGES WITH CHARTER DATES Missouri 33 . . . . . . . .. Oct. 8, 1816 Meridian 33 . . . . . . . . . . .. May 6, 1852 Beacon 33 . . . . . . .. May 10, 1849 Howard 25 . . . . . . . . . . .. May 6, 1852 United ',' . . . . . . . . . .. 45 .. . . . . . . . . .. May 20, 1857 . . 0 'Sullivan '45 . . . . . . . . . . .. Oct. 19, 1867 . .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.


178 9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Geo. Washington Agency Pauldingville T!~o : RIsIng Sun Eolia Western Star Memphis Clarksville Palmyra Paris Union St. Louis Havana Wellington Florida Wyaconda Naphtali Ava Evergreen St. John's Windsor Huntsville Liberty Humphreys Ralls Troy Mercer Cooper Hemple Callao De Witt Mt. Moriah Bismarck Jefferson Fair Play Bonhomme Wentzville Fayette Fulton Holt Xflnia Livingston Wakanda Weston Index Arrow Rock Tipton Richmond Monticello Centralia New Bloomfield Waverly Vinci! Cambridge Monroe Pattonsburg Grant City

'

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

33 9 30 40 21 16 10

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31 41 57 30 25 27

1

16 15 17 33 6 9 17 15

33 46 32 15

37 18 11 3

17 29 4 25 11

14 20 33 48

11 7 25 20 21 34 24 31 23 15 26 27 23 11 24 17 10 6

1953 May 10, 1849 June 1, 1866 May 8,1852 Apr. 7, 1825 May 6, 1852 Oct. 16, 1884 June 1, 1866 May 6, 1852 Oct. 8, 1830 Apr. 25, 1831 Mar. 1, 1835 Oct. 24, 1836 Oct. 16, 1879 May 6, 1852 May 6,1852 Oct. 11, 1877 Oct. 14, 1839 Oct. 13, 1887 May 26, 1864 Oct. 14, 1839 June 2, 1866 Oct. 8, 1840 Oct. 9, 1840 Oct. 13, 1887 June 9, 1853 Oct. 7, 1841 June 9, 1853 Oct. 9, 1841 Oct. 18, 1900 June 2, 1866 Oct. 17,1878 Oct. 14, 1841 Oct. 6, 1891 Nov. 15, 1841 Oct. 18, 1900 Oct. 9, 1846 June 2, ]866 Oct. 17, 1842 Oct. 17, 1842 May 25, 1854 June 2, 1866 Oct. 12, 1876 Oct. 17, 1842 Oct. 14, 1842 Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 17, 1842 June 2, 1866 Oct. 13, 1842 Oct. 12, 1842 Oct. 19, 1867 :May 25, 1854 May 2, 1866 Oct. 19, 1867 June 2, 1866 June 2, 1866 May 29, 1854 Oct. 10, 1894


1953 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76.

77. 78. 79. 80. 8!. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 10!. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. 111. 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124.

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Kennett Sullivan Armstrong Savannah Gorin Eureka Warren Silex Independence Lebanon St. .Joseph Polar Star Bridgeton

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.Jackson Laclede Webster Groves Miami Brookfield Washington Defiance Friendship Russellville Madison Perseverance St. Mark's Vienna Pomegranate St. Andrew's Bethany Webster Mt. Vernon Ash Grove Bogard Bloomington West View Heroine Kirksville Gallatin Greenville Stanberry Marcus Trenton Maitland Plattsburg Twilight Laddonia Barnes Helena Kingston De Soto Compass Erwin Triplett Hermann Union Star

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' .. . . . . . . . .

.'

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

51

32 25 9 1

19 19 29 59 39 9

33 57 13 38 57 24 13 42 6 12 31 17 16 49 39 33 14'

5 45 55 45 20 14 49

22 2 10 52 6 48 4

8 11 26 27 46 9 12 40 21

33 19

32 10

179 Oct. 17, 1889 .June 2, 1866 May 25, 1854 Oct. 28, 1844 Oct. 13, 1892 Oct. 16, 1845 Oct. 20, 1845 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. 14, 1847 Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. 14, 1846 Oct. 15, 1846 May 25,1854 Oct. 21, 1897 .June 2, 1866 .June 2, 1866 Oct. 12, 1847 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 12, 1847 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 12, 1847 Oct. 25, 1847 Oct. 14, 1847 Oct. 17, 1878 Sept. 21, 1916 May 10, 1848 May 25; 1854 May 28, 1858 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 17, 1899 Oct. 14, 1886 May 10, 1849 .Jan. 2, 1866 May 10, 1849 May 26,1864 Oct. 16, 1879 Oct. 14, 1886 Oct. 17, 1878 May 10,1849 May 9,1850 Oct. 19, 1867 May 9,1850 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 28, 1882 Oct. 17, 1879 Nov. 8, 1924 Oct. 19, 1868 Oct. 19, 1867 May 10; 1850 May 9,1851 Oct. 12, 1893 May 10, 1850 Oct. 15, 1885


180 125. 126. 127. 128. 129. 130. 13I. 132. 133. 134. 135. 136. 137. 138. 139. 140. HI. 142. 143. 144. 145. 146. 147. 148. 149. 150. 15l. 152. 153. 154. 155. 156. 157. 158. 159. 160. 161. 162. 163. 164. 165. 166. 167. 168. 169. 170. 171. 172. 173. 174. 175. 176. 177. 178. 179. 180. 181. 182. 183.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

1953

8

May 10, 1850 May 28,1858 May 8,1851 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 16, 1890 Oct. 14, 1886 May 8,1851 May 10, 1857. May 5,1851 May 30,1860 Oct. 17, 1889 May 9,1851 Oct. 17, 1895 June 2, 1866 May 31,1855

. . . . .

35 25 40 41 39

Sept. 27, 1906 May 31,1855 May 26, 1864 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 19, 1899

Cass

.

34

Oct. 17, 1867

L~xi~gton

Blrmlng Milton Linn Creek Bloomfield Ionic

. . . . . .

23 9 18 38 50 48

Ashland North Star Mountain Grove Green City Pleasant Clifton Hill Whitesville Occidental Joachim

. . . . . . . . .

26 8 46

40

May 28,1859 May 29, 1856 Oct. 15, 1885 Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 27, 1867 Oct. 15, 1858 May 28, 1856 May 29, 1856 May 31,1856

Portageville

.

51

Oct. 16, 1890

Colony Camden Point Benevolence Hartford Censer Gray Summit Sturgeon

. . . . . . .

2 21 12

May 22,1864 Oct. 19, 1867 May 30,1857 May 30,1857 Oct. 14, 1875 Oct. 23, 1903 May 30, 1857

Point Pleasant Texas Griswold Pride of the West Pyramid

. . . . .

51 46 28

33 33

May 30,1857 Oct. 19, 1867 May 28,1858 May 28,1858 Sept. 21, 1916

Pilot Knob California

. .

4631

Oct. 17, 1895 Oct. 19, 1898

Gentryville Seaman Athens Lorraine Monett Hume Potosi Farmington Star of the West Olean Braymer Phoenix Delphian Lincoln Oregon

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Amsterdam Pleasant Grove Irondale Modern Latimer

6 3 6

5 55 35 40 48 48 58 12 16 47 9

3 41 18 9

33

3 14 32 26

· . . . . . . . . . .. · . . . . . . . . . .. · . . . . . . . . . .. · . . . . . . . . . .. ·........... · •

June 4, 1855 May 28, 1858 .June 11, 1865 Oct. 12, 1869 May 28, 1859 Oct. 17, 1901


1953 184. 185. 186. 187. 188. 189. 190. 191. 192. 193. 194. 195. 196. 197. 198. 199. 200. 201. 202. 203. 204. 205. 206. 207. 208. 209. 210. 211. 212. 213. 214. 215. 216. 217. 218. 219. 220. 221. 222. 223. 224. 225. 226. 227. 228. 229. 230. 231. 232. 233. 234. 235. 236. 237. 238. 239. 240. 241. 242.

181

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Morley ................................ Chamois ........

..

..................... ........ ...............

•••

••••

0

....

Hermon Hannibal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0" Zeredatha .. ........................ Putnam ............................................... Frankford ........................... .. Angerona .. ...................... Wellsville .............................. .. Bolivar ................................ .. Quitman ................................ .. Carthage ............................ .. Allensville 'II' .... •• ........ •• .. •• .... New Hope ....................... . Sonora Ravenwood Westville Brumley Rowley . ................... Trilumina . ................ Somerset .................. Clay Salisbury Poplar Bluff Unionville Hickory Hill Four Mile Rolla Forest City Hornersville Hale City Barbee Good Hope Albert Pike ............... . Kansas City Mystic Tie La Belle ..... .... ..... ..... Ray Hamilton Salem Saline Cypress ................... . Shelbina .................. . ••

..............

.........

••••

0

•••

................

0.0

••••

0.00.0

•••••••

..............

••••••••••

•••

0

0

0

0

••

00.00

00

0

0

•••••••••••

••••••••••••••••••

.1o

•••

101o

••

1o

101o1o1o

••

1o.1o1o

•••

101o1o.1o

1o

•••

••

1o

1o

........

1o

1o.1o.101o1o

•••••••••••

1o.101o1o1o1o

1o

••••

0

1o

••

101o

0

1o.'

••

1o

••••

••

1o1o

0

••••••

...........

1o

••

0

1o.

••

••••••••••••••••

0

1o

••

1o

•••••••••

•••••••••••

0

•••

••

••

1o

1o.1o.101o

1o.1o

•••••

.1o

•••••••••

Sedalia La Plata Rushville Hopewell

.1o

•••••••••

Palestine ••

•••

1o

.

........

••••••••••••••••••

••

1o

•••

0

••

1o

1o

•••

•••

1o

101o

•••

••••••

•••••••••••

0

••••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

•••••

0

16 11 28 41 7 44 6 29 8 7 19 38 21 24 3 11

19 52 3 31 51 39 8 51 20 24 33 22 22 49 15 23 12 39 48 13 14

1o

1o.1o.1o

••••

1o

•••

•••••••••

•••••••••••••••

••••

•••••

1o

1o

36 14 9

47

'

•••••••••

•••••••••

39 51 12 13 48

••

••••••••••••

••••••••

101o

1o

••

..

.................

. ................... ................... . .................

Oct. 19, 1899 May 28, 1857

..

43 15 9 3

••••••••••••••••••••••••

St. James ................ Cardwell Polo Bucklin St. Francois ••

1o

••••••••••••••

••••••••

•••••

••

1o

••••••••••••••••••••

1o

•••••••••

••••••••

'.

••••••

••••••••••

•••

••

•••••

••••••••••••

1o

101o1o

•••••••••••••

.........

101o.1o.1o

•••

•••••

50 31

30

..

..................

..

.................

..

......................

................. , ..

......................

..

..................

..

.. .. ..

......................

.................. ................

................

..

...................

••••••

0000

•••••

0.0000.

.0.00

••

0

••••

••••••••

•••••

0

0.0

••

••••

••••••••

0

0

••

••••••

•••

0

••

••••••

0.'

•••••••••

0

••

0

••

••••••••

101o1o1o1o

•••••••

. ............ 1o

••••

101o.1o1o1o

••••••••

0

..1o

••••

••

1o.1o

•••

•••••

•••

..

............

••••

..,

1o.1o

•••

1o

•••••

1o.101o1o

•••

101o1o.

0

••••••

0.0

••••••

•••••

•••••••

0

•••••

101o

••

. ........... .0

.0

••

••••••••••

••••••••

0

••

••••••••••

••

0

•••••

••••

0

0

••••••

0

••••••

••

•••••

1o

•••••••••••

0

••

0

0

••••••

••

0

••••••••

••••

••

0

••

0

0

••

00

••••••

. .......... .1o

'

May 28, 1863 Oct. 19, 1899 Oct. 17, 1878 May 26, 1864 May 26, 1864

•••••

••••••••••

0

May 26, 1859 May 28, 1859 May 30, 1860 Oct. 19, 1867 May 30, 1860 Oct. 19, 1867 May 30, 1860 May 30, 1880 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 13, 1892 June 2, 1866 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 19, 1867 Dec. 9, 1867 May 29, 1861 May 30,1861 Oct. 19, 1867 May 30, 1861 May 30, 1861 Oct. 19, 1867 Oct. 19, 1867 May 30, 1861 May 30,1861 May 30, 1861 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 19, 1867 May 30, 1861 Oct. 17, 1895 May 30, 1861 May 30, 1861 Oct. 11, 1888 Sept. 21, 1921 Oct. 19, 1867 May 29,1862 May 19, 1861 May 29, 1862 May 29, 1862

0.'

............ 1o

Oct. 17, 1889 May 30,1859 May 28, 1859 May 28, 1859

••••

•••••••

•••••

1o

1o

•••

............ ••••••••••

1o

. ...........

May 26, 1864 June 22, 1866 May 26,1865 Oct. 13, 1881 May 26, 1865


182 243. 244. 245. 246. 247. 248. 249. 250. 25l. 252. 253. 254. 255. 256. 257. 258. 259. 260. 261. 262. 263. 264. 265. 266. 267. 268. 269. 270. 271. 272. 273. 274. 275. 276. 277. 278. 279. 280. 281. 282. 283. 284. 285. 286. 287. 288. 289. 290. 291. 292. 293. 294. 295. 296. 297. 298.

299.~

300. 301.

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Keystone Middle Fabius Knobnoster Montgomery Neosho

. . . . .

33 1 36 28 56

May May May Jan. May

Carroll

.

20

Oct. 19, 1887

Hope

.

32

Oct. 16, 1868

Laredo . Butler ...........â&#x20AC;˘......... Alton . Shekinah . Lodge of Light .

35 53 40 5

L~dg~' ~f' 'L~~~ .::::::::.:

4

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

26, 1865 26, 1865 26,1865 12, 1920 28, 1856

15, 15, 15, 15, 15,

1868 1868 1863 1868 1868

:::

1

Mechanicsville

.

30

Oct. ]5, 1868 Oct. 30, 1868

Holden Summit

. .

36 59

Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868

Corinthian

.

36

Oct. 15, 1868

Aurora Lodge of Truth Brotherhoo,d New Salem' Solomon Granite St. Clair Cold Spring

. . . . . . . .

33 14 9 39 45 36 37 36

Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15,'1868 Oct. 19, 1922 May 29,1862 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 16, 1879

Grand River Wm. D. Muir Essex Hogle '8 Creek

. . . .

34 25 50 41

Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 11, 1878 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 15, 1868

Fenton Cosmos Stockton Canopy Earl

. . . . .

57 33 42 55 10

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

Craft Hermitage Graham Fairmont Edina Lamar Sarcoxie Mound City Moniteau Sparta

. . . . . . . . . .

15 41

Sampson Templ(;l Doric White Hall

. . . .

7 1

2 43

44 8

31 54 53

22 45 7

15, 15, 15, 17, 15,

1868 1869 1868 1889 1868

. . . . . . . . . . .. Oct. 15, 1868 ............ \ Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 18, 1900 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

18, 15, 15, 15,

1900 1868 1868 1868-


1953 302. 303. 304. 305. 306. 307. 308. 309. 310.

311. 312. 313. 314. 315. 316. 317. 318. 319. 320. 321. 322. 323. 324. 325. 326. 327. 328. 329. 330. 331. 332. 333. 334. 335. 336. 337. 338. 339. 340. 341. 342. 343. 344. 345. 346. 347. 348. 349. 350. 351. 352. 353. 354. 355. 356. 357. 358. 359. 360.

183

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI . .

17 43

Oct. 15, 1868 Oct. 15, 1868

Cecile Daylight ....â&#x20AC;˘....... Ashlar . New London . Parrott .

22 50 17 10

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

Sikeston Kearney Cuba Meramec Pine Jerusalem Rural Osborn Eldorado Paulville Versailles Jonathan Hardin Cornerstone McDonald Dockery Linn Mt. Zion Cainsville

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50 11 39 57 52 42 22 10

Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 13, 1887 Oct. 19, 1923 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 22, 1896 Oct. ] 2, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Sept. 19, 1917 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Dec. 12, 1869 Oct. 12, 1869 Oct. 19, 1898 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1870

Paul Revere Charity Excello

. . .

33 14

Oct. 26, 1923 Oct. 13, 1870 Sept. 29, 1904

Breckenridge Joplin Hallsville Blue Springs Herculaneum Fidelity Westport Rockville Circle

. . . . . . . . .

12 44 26 59 40 21 22 35 37

Oct. 15, 1870 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 13, 1887 Oct. 19, 1922 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 11, 1894 May 10, 1900 Oct. 15, 1870

Moberly Fellowship' Arlington America

. . . .

18 44 39

33

Oct. 31, 1870 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1870 Sept. 17, 1919

Pollock

.

3

Oct. 16, 1884

Mosaic Friend Barnesville Hebron Adelphi Ancient Landmark

. . . . . .

48 54 47 27 21 26

Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 15, 1871 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 17, 1873

Northwest Garrett Tuscan

. . .

42

Lick Creek Osage

1

2 58 6

20

33 59 13 31 53 5 9

8

33

17, 12, 12, 12,

1923 1869 1869 1869

Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 15, 1870


184 361. :~62.

363. 364. 365. 366. 367. 368. 369. 370. 371. 372. 373. 374. 375. 376. 377. 378. 379. 380. 381. 382. 383. 384. 385. 386. . 387. 388. 389. 390. . 391. 392. 393. 394. 395. 396. 397. 398. 399. 400. 401. 402. 403. 404. 405. 406. 407. 408. 409. 410. 411. 412. 413. 414. 415. 416. 417. 418. 419.

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Riddick ....................... Hiram .. ................... ..... Fraternal .......... ......... ...... Higginsville ......................... . Bayou ................................... . Adair ................................ .. Barry ............................... .. Crescent Hill .. .......................... Composite .. .............................. Williamstown .......................... .. Sheldon .................................... .. Nonpareil .. ............................ Belle .. ......................................

41

1 32 23 53 2 55 35 52 15 43 34 39

................................................... ..

Waynesville . ............................. King Hill .. ............................ Ancient Craft . ............. Berlin ..................... Billings Queen City ................ Ionia .....................

6 54 1 58

Pythagoras . ............... East Prairie .............. . Richland ..................

55 50 38

.0

•••••••••••••••••

.......................... .

•••••••••••••••••••••

'O

6

••••

.................. .......................... .

Woodsidl:l Arcana

38 9

53

....................

3

..................

59 59 23

.......................... .

Raytown Christian Bee Hive

.................. .................. ...................... ..... . ..........................

Western Light ........... . 41 Gower . .................... 11 Jasper . ................... 44 Pike ...................... 16 Decatur .................... 55 Carterville ................. 44 24 Malta Lowry City 37 9 Rosendale Everton 42 Malden ................... . 51 Charleston ................ . 50 Montrose 37 Louisville . ................ 29 Iberia . .................... 38 Joppa ..................... 46 Appleton City .............. 37 Valley ................... . 9 Greensburg ............... . 2 Hunnewell 14 Cache . .................... 33 Whitewater ............... . 49 •

••••••••••••

I

I

••

I

I

1.1

I

I

1.1

•••••••••••

••••••

I

•••••••

I

I

I

I

""

I

••••••••••••••••

....

••••

I

I.

•••

"'

••.•••

••••

I

•••••

...... ............. ...... ... ......... ......... ....

Star

37

. ............... " .. ............. ". . .................. .. .................... .. .................. .. .................. ..

.................

..

....................

. ...............

. ............... .................... . ................. . ................ . ................. .. .............. . ........... . ........... . ........... ............ . ........... ............ . ........... . ........... . ........... ............ . ........... . ........... . ........... . ........... . ........... ............ ............ . ........... . ........... ............ . ........... . ........... . ............ . ........... . ........... •

••••

•••••

0

••••••

I.

I

I

•••

••

1

•••••

I.,

I

••

I

•••••

I.

..........

I

I

•••••

............ ............ . ........... . ...........

............ . .......... , . ........... . ........... . ........... ............ ............ . ........... . ........... •

••••••••

I

...

Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 15, 1870 Oct. 14, 1880 Oct. 11, 1888 Oct. 13, 1881 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1871 May 7, 1870 Oct. 15, 1870 Oct. 11, 1883 Oct. 17, 1873 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 19, 1888 Oct. 13, 1870 Oct. 13, 1872 Mar. 19, 1906 Oct. 13, 188l Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 13, 1871 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 18, 1901 Oct. 13,1871 Oct. 13,1871 Oct. 13,1871 Oct. 13,1871 Oc~ 13, 1871 Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

13,1871 16, 1872 17, 1873 13, 1871 13, 1871 12, 1893 17, 1901 17, 1873 22, 1896 15, 1885 13, 1881 12, 1893 13, 1871 17, 1902 13, 1871 16, 1872 13, 1872 17, 1873 27, 1871 18, 1871 18, 1871 13, 1881

Oct. 16, 1872


1953 420. 42l. 422. 423. 424. 425. 426. 427. 428. 429. 430. 431. 432. 433. 434. 435. 436. 437. 438. 439. 440. 44l. 442. 443. 444. 445. 446. 447. 448. 449. 450. 45l. 452. 453. 454. 455. 456. 457. 458. 459. 460. 461. 462. 463. 464. 465. 466. 467. 468. 469. 470. 471. 472. 473. 474. 475. 476. 477. 478.

185

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Itaska Urbana Gate of the Temple Galt Samaritan Green Ridge Rothville Glenwood

Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 15, 1886 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 16, 1872 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 21, 1897 Oct. 17, 1873

33 41 45 4 48 36 19 ,.

1

Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 19, 1894

New Madrid Winona

51 47

Competition . . . .. Mack's Creek Wheeling Hockbridge ................â&#x20AC;˘

38 38 12 53

Oct. 15, 1891 Nov. 1, 1878 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 21, 1897

11

33 23 33 22 6 43

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

Belton

34

Oct. 16, 1872

ForsJth Continental Hinton Wallace Jonesburg Melville Hazelwood Lambskin Caruthersville Santa Fe Clifton Concordia

54 10 26 25 28 42 45 33 51 17 53 23

Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 21, 1903 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 12, 1893 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 16, 1872 Oct. 17, 1873 Oct. 13, 1881 Oct. 17, 1873

Southwest

56

Oct. 15, 1890

Plato Nodaway.................. Mineral Pickering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nineveh

46 44 7 29

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

Golden Mt. Hope.................. Henderson

43 23 45

Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 15, 1874

'\'

Temperance Mt. Olive Trowel Excelsior Burlington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anchor Ada West Gate Ivanhoe Jacoby Schell City

" ,.

45 49 49 7

7

.

16, 16, 16, 16, 13, 16, 16, 16, 17, 17, 17,

17, 16, 17, 17, 15,

1872 1872 1872 1872 1881 1872 1872 1872 1901 1901 1873

1887 1872 1873 1873 1874


186 479. 480. 48l. 482. 483. 484. 485. 486. 487. 488. 489. 490. 491. 492. 493 . 494. 495. 496. 497. 498. 499. 500. 50l. 502. 503. 504. 505. 506. 507. 508. 509. 510. 511. 512. 513. 514. 515. 516. 517. 518. 519. 520. 521. 522. 523. 524. 525. 526. 527. 528. 529. 530. 531. 532. 533. 534.. 535. 536. 537.

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Rich Hill ............................. Jewel ............................ Marceline .................. Clintonville Fairfax Kirkwood .......................... Coldwater ......................... Cairo .................................... Chilhowee .................................. Lock Springs ........................ .. Lakeville ................................. .. Montevallo .......................... .. Vandalia .................................. Daggett ..................................... ..

...............

...........

t

.o

.....

..........

................................................ .. Lewistown ................................

Unity ..................... Robert Burns Equality ••••••

0.00

0000

••

••

0

•••••••

0.0.000000

0000.000.0.0

••••

0

••

0.0

••

0000

••••••••

00.000.0

.0

0

••

00.0

••••••••••••

0

•••••••••••

•••••••••

0

•••••••

•••••••••

••••••

0

0

••••••

••••••

0

••••••

••

•••••

0

0

0

•••

••••••••••••

0.0

0

••••••

••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••

•••••••

0

•••••••••••••

•••••••

••••••

0

••

•••••••••••••••

••••••••

0

0

•••••

••••••••

0

.0

0

••••

0

•••

0

0

0

••

••

000

••

0.00.0

•••••••••••••••••

0

••

••••••••••••••••

0

••

11 7 9 47 5 7 44 51 56 54 43 24 54 33 42 22

4 19 52 18 38 33

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Lane's Prairie Dexter .................... Comfort ................... Columbia .................. Blackwell ................. Ingomar Bethel ..................... 0

••

0

•••

0

••••••••

••••••••••

0

•••••

. ............... ..

.. ..

.. .. .. .. ..

.................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ................... .................... ...................... ................... ...................... .................... ................

..

.

..

.. ..

................

.. ..

..................

..

...................

....................

. ........... ..00.000

•••

0

.00000.0000.

Oct. 29, 1881 Oct. 17, 1878 Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 13, 1881 Oct. 20, 1874 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 15, 1874 Oct. 25, 1876 Oct. 12, 1876 Oct. 15, 1876 Feb. 2, 1895 Oct. 11, 1877 Sept. 27, 1906

..00000.000.

33 10 59 15 25 21 33

•••••••

Spickardsville .............. Cunningham Wayne Higbee Conway Apollo .................... •••••••

15 43 53 39

0.0.

Harmony Jameson Buckner ................... Philadelphia ............... Prairie Home Platte City Euclid Lathrop ................... Clearmont Saxton .................... Van Buren ................ New Hampton Skidmore .................. Webb City ................. Senath Granby Galena Milford ................... .......................... . Oriental Crane Clifton Heights ........... . Lockwood ................. Gate City ••

35 34 13 42 8 57 34 18 36 10 50 43 27 28

39 50 55 32 40 53 14

••

0

•••

0

•••

•••••

0.00.0

0.00

••••

000.00

. ........... . ........... •

•· • • • • • • • •

..0.0

00

0.

•••••••

••••••••••

..0

••

00

•••••

••••

••

0.0

0

••

•••

0.0.00.

. ........... •

••••••••

0

••

. ........... . ........... •

••

0

•••••••

0

..0

•••••••••

..0

•••••••••

. ........... ..00

..0

.0

••••••••

•••••••••

••••••••••

. ........... .00.0

•••••••

..0

•••••••••

0.0

•••••••••

00

••

0

•••••••

............ ..00

••

0

.000

••

00

•••••

••••

..0··

••

0

..0.0

••

00

••••

•••

••

•••••

0

••••

0.0

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

11, 1883 22, 1896 10, 1894 11, 1883 11, 1883

Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 16, 1884 Oct. 15, 1885 Oct. 15, 1885 Oct. 18, 1885 Sept. 18, 1918

•••

. ........... •

Sept. 19, 1917 Oct. ll, 1877 Oct. 11, 1877 Oct. 11, 1878 Oct. 13, 1881 Oct. 13, 1881 Sept. 20, 1917 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 12, 1882 Sept. 12, 1882 Oct. 28, 1925 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 22, 1902 Oct. 22, 1912 Oct. 12, 1882 Oct. 12, 1883

•••

. ............ . ...........

............

. ...........

Oct. 15, Oct. ]2, Oct. 19, Oct. 13, Oct. .1 3 , Oct. 13, Oct. 11,

1885 1887 1898 1887 1887 1887 1888


1953 538. 539. 540. 541. 542. 543. 544. 545. 546. 547. 548. 549, 550. 551. 552. 553. 554. 555. 556. 557. 558. 559. 560. 561. 562. 563. 564. 565. 566. 567. 568. 569. 570. 571. 572. 573. 574. 575. 576. 577. 578. 579. 580. 581. 582. 583. 584. 585. 586. 587. 588. 589. 590. 591. 592. 593. 594. 595. 596.

187

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Stella Dawn Winigan Jacksonville Ferguson Mansfield Algabil Zalma Orient South Gate Clinton Carl Junction Rose Hill Pendleton Calhoun Clarksburg Foster Summersville Prairie . ,Moscow Clarksdale Nelson Cowgill . york Jamesport Tebbetts Maplewood Miller Naylor Marlborough Republic Hayti Rutledge Bernie La Monte Easter Olive Branch Ewing Forest Park Grandin . IllIno Koshkonong Novinger . Shamrock Criterion Branson St. Francisville . Advance Barnett La Russell Union . Cole Camp Puxico

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56 12

3 18 57 路46 33 49 22 22 37 44 33 48 37 31 35 46 5

Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 17, 1889 Oct. 17, 1889 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 16, 1889 Oct. 15, 1891 Sept. 19, 1917 Oct. 15, 1890 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 15, 1890 Oct. 15, 1891 Oct. 15, 1891 Nov. 27, 1891 Oct. 15, 1891 Oct. 15, 1891 Oct. 15, 1891 Oct. 17, 1891 Oct. 13, 1892

29 10 24 12

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct.

22 10 27 57 55 52 22 45 51

Oct. 17, 1895 Oct. 19, 1898 Oct. 21, 1902 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 29, 1904 Sept. 29, 1904 Oct. 26, 1927 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 28, 1905 Sept. 27, 1906 Sept. 27, 1906 Sept. 27, 1906 Oct. 1, 1906

1

51 36 32 33 15

33 47

20, 12, 12, 12,

1892 1893 1893 1893

2

Sept. 27, 1906 Sept. 27, 1906 Sept. 27, 1906

27 44 54 1

Sept. 27, 1906 Sept. 26, 1907 Sept. 26, 1907 Sept. 26, 1907

50 58 44 32

Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.

36 50

Oct. 19, 1898 Sept. 30, 1908

50 53

26, 26, 21, 26,

1907 1907 1921 1907


188 597. 598. 599. 600. 601. 602. 603. 604. 605. 606. 607. 608. 609. 610. 611. 612. 613. 614. 615. 616. 617. 618. 619. 620. 621. 622. 623. 624. 625. 626. 627. 628. 629. 630. 631. 632. 633. 634. 635. 636. 637. 638. 639. 640. 641. 642. 643. 644. 645 646. 647. 648. 649. 650. 651. 652. 653. 654. 655.

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Bosworth Leadwood . ................ Elvins ................... . Cosby ..... ..... ........... Clayton ................... Acacia Morehouse· .............................. .. •

........

'O

..

'O

••••

'O'O'O'O

•••••••••••••••••

...................................

'O

0

••

••

................

••

••••••

••

00

..0·.0

•••

000

00

0

0

••••

•••••

00

0.000.0

••

0

'O.

••

••••••••••

0

•••••••

•••••

••••••

•••••••

0

0

0

••••••

••••••••

00

•••••••••••••

0.00

•••••••

•••••

0

9

57 26 50

........

Walker .................................. .. Craig ..................... Eminence ........................ . Strafford .................... . Warrenton ................... . Clark ........................ . Centertown Mokane .......................... . Wellston ................. . Mt. Washington .......... . Chaffee ................. .. Brentwood ................ . Swope Park ............. .. Grandview ................ . ... ........................ Willard .................. . Anderson ................. . Norwood ................. . Overland .... .... .......... Ovensville ................ . Sheffield .................. . Magnolia ................. . .......................... . Mendon .................. . Valley Park .............. . East Gate ................ . Tower Grove ............. . Belgrade ................. . Archie ................... . Steele .................... . Greentop ................. . Freedom ................. . Mountain View ........... . Triangle ................. . Mizpah ................. .. Jennings ................. . Trinity ................... . Benj. Franklin ........... . Northeast Grain Valley Clarkton Shaveh Noel Elmer University o. Parma Cleveland ................. . Pilgrim .................. . Shawnee .................. . Commonwealth ............ . Gardenville ............... . •••••••

20 48 48

.••••••

43 8 47 45 30 18 31 27 57 59 50 57 22 59

. ........... . ........... . ........... . ........... . ...........

. ............. ..

...................

..

.................... ..................... ....................

.. ..

. ............ . ............. . ............... . ................

................. . ................ . ........... . ........... . ...........

. ...........

. ...........

. ...........

Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.

30, 1908 30, 1908 30, 1908 3, 1908 30, 1908 29, 1909 29, 1909

Sept. 29, 1909 Sept. 29, 1909 June 17, 1909 Sept. 28, 1910 Sept. 19, 1917 Sept. 28, 1910 Sept. 28, 1910 Sept. 28, 1911 Sept. 28, 1911 Oct. 19, 1911 Sept. 28, 1911 Sept. 28, 1949 Sept. 28,' 1911 Sept. 28, 1911

. ...........

45 56 4() 57 32 22 33 19 57 22 33 40 34 51 1 57 53 33 33 57 33 33 22 59 51 33 56 14 33 51 34 33 36 33 57

. ........... ............ . ....... . ... -

. ...........

. ........... . ........... . ........... . ........... . ........... . ........... . ...........

. ........... . ........... . ........... . ........... . ...........

. ........... . ...........

. ........... . ........... . ...........

............ . .......... . .0

••

0

•••

•••

0

•••••••

••••

0

••

00

•••••••

•••

0

••••

••••

0

••

0

0

••

0

0

•••

0.0

0.0.

•••

0

••

0

••

•••••

............

............ •

•••••••

0

•••

. ...........

............ ••••••••••

O

Sept. 25, 1912 Sept. 25, 1912 Sept. 25, 1912 Sept. 28, 1949 Sept. 25, 1912 Sept. 25, 1912 Oct. 2, 1913 Oct. 15, 1913 Oct. 2, 1913 Oct. 2, 1913 Oct. 2, 1914 Oct. 15, 1914 Oct. 1, 1914 Oct. 1, 1914 Oct. 22, 1924 Sept. 25, 1946 Sept. 29, 1915 Sept. 29, 1915 Sept. 30, 1915 Sept. 21, 1916 Sept. 21, 1916 Sept. 21, 1916 Sept. 21, 1916 Sept. 21, 1916 Dec. 15, 1948 Sept. 22, 1920 Sept. 22, 1920 Sept. 22, 1920 Oct. 18, 1920 Sept. 22, 1920 Sept. 22, 1920 Sept. 21, 1921 Sept. 21, 1921 Sept. 21, 1926 Sept. 21, 1921


1953 656. 657. 658. 659. 660. 66l. 662. 663. 664. 665. 666. 667.

189

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Country Club ............. . Progress ................. . Purity ................... . Alpha .................... . Holliday ................. . Theo. Roosevelt ........... . Clarence .................. . Rockhill '; ................. Aldrich .................. . Wardell .................. . Lilbourn ................. . Berkeley ................. .

22 33 33 22 17 33 14 22 41 51 51 57

............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

....... ..... -

............ ............ ............

............ ............

Oct. 4, 1921 Oct. 5, 1921 Sept. 21, 1921 Sept. 21, 1921 Oct. 17, 1923 Oct. 17, 1923 Oct. 22, 1924 Mar. 5,1925 Oct. 26, 1927 Sept. 27, 1951 Sept. 30, 1952 Sept. 29, 1953

ALPHABETIOAL LIST OF LODGES-LOOATIONS-DISTRIOTS A

602 Acacia Columbia 444 Ada Orrick 366 Adair Kirksville 355 Adelphi Edgerton 590 Advance Advance 10 Agency .Agency 219 Albert Pike Kansas City 664 Aldrich .Aldrich 544 Algabil .8t. Louis : 198 Allensville Allendale 659 Alpha N. Kansas City 255 Alton Alton 347 America St. Louis 141 Amsterdam Amsterdam 443 Anchor University City 377 Ancient Craft King City 356 Ancient Landmark Harrisburg Anderson 621 Anderson 193 Angerona Missouri City 529 Apollo St. Louis , ..Appleton City 412 Appleton City 389 Arcana Harris 633 Archie Archie 346 Arlington Dixon 70 Armstrong .Armstrong 55 Arrow Rock .Arrow Rock 100 Ash Grove Ash Grove 156 Ashland Ashland 306 Ashlar Commerce Albany 127 Athens 267 Aurora St. Louis 26 Ava Ava

Boone Ray Adair Platte Stoddard Buchanan Jackson Polk

26 23 2 21 50 9 22 41 33-B Worth 6 Clay 22. Oregon ..' 53 , 33-A Bates .............• 35 " 33-A , Gentry ; 6 Boone 26 McDonald 56 Clay 11 33-B St. Clair 37 Sullivan 3 Cass 34 Pulaski 39 Howard 25 ·Saline 24 Green 45 Boone 26 Scott 50 Gentry ' 6 33-A Douglas 46

B

217 591 116

Barbee Barnett Barnes

Sweet Springs Barnett Cabool

Saline Morgan Texas

:

24 58 46


190 353 367 365 3 393 632 373 450 170 642 378 573 97 537 379 150 41 535 153 102 337 101 195 45 597 587 135 334 616 80 86 269 203 233 501 442 254

PROOEEDINGS OF THE Barnesville Ellington Reynolds Barry Washburn Barry Bayou .Bakersfield Ozark Beacon St. Louis Beehive Lawson Ray Belgrade Belgrade Washington Belle Belle Maries Belton Belton Cass ' Benevolence Utica Livingston Benjamin Franklin .. St. Louis .. : Berlin Fairport De Kalb Bernie Bernie Stoddard Bethany Bethany Harrison Bethel .Bethel Shelby Billings Billings Ohristian Birming Faucett Buchanan Bismarck ·.. Bismarck St. FrailCois Blackwell Blackwell St. Francois Bloomfield Bloomfield Stoddard Bloomington Bevier Macon Blue Springs , .Blue Springs Jackson Bogard Bogard ' Carroll : Bolivar Bolivar Polk Bonhomme ......•...Ballwin St. Louis Bosworth Bosworth Oarroll Branson ; .. Branson Taney Braymer Braymer Caldwell Breckenridge Breckenridge Caldwell Brentwood Brentwood St. Louis Bridgeton St. John 'sStation . St. Louis Brookfield Brookfield Linn Brother~ood St. Joseph Buchanan Brumley Brumley Miller Bucklin .. Bucklin Linn Buckner Buckner Jackson Burlington Burlington Jet Nodaway Butler .Butler Bates

1953 .47 55 53 33-A 23 .40 39 34 12 33-A

, 6 51 5 14 54 9 48 40 50 14 59 20 41 57 20 :.54 12 12 57 57 13 9 38 13 59 7 35

o 416 328 486 552 18:~

38 63 169 284 231 549 249 401

Cache St. Louis Cainsville Cainsville Cairo Cairo Calhoun Oalhoun Oalifornia California • Callao Oallao Cambridge Slater Camden Point Camden Point Canopy .Aurora . Cardwell .........•. Cardwell Carl Junction Carl Junction Carroll Norborne Carterville Carterville

Harrison Randolph Henry Moniteau Macon Saline .Platte Lawrence Dunklin Jasper Carroll J asper

33-A :... 5 18 37 31 14 24 21 55 51 44 20 .44


1953 197 461 147 305 172 611 59 615 185 331 40 7 487 392 342 662 610 553 559 17 645 207 601 507 651 463 520 161 548 482 274 485 595 168 534 533 654 120 432 369 464 454 528 36 265 323 600 282 656 561 287 606 519

GRAND LODG I<~ OF MISSOURI

191

Carthage Carthage Jasper 44 Caruthersville Caruthersville •.... Pemiscot •.......... 51 Cass Harrisonville Cass 34 Cecile-Daylight. Kansas City Jackson 22 14 Censer Macon Macon Centertown Centertown Cole ..•............ 31 Centralia Centralia Boone 26 Chaffee Chaffee .scott 50 Chamois ..•.........Chamois Osage 31 Charity St. Joseph Buchanan 9 Charleston Charleston Mississippi 50 Chilhowee .chilhowee Johnson 36 Christian Oak Grove Jackson 59 Circle Roscoe St. Clair 37 Clarence Clarence Shelby 14 Clark Clark Randqlph 18 Clarksburg .clarksburg Moniteau 31 Clarksdale Clarksdale De Kalb 10 Clarksville Clarksville Pike .............•. 16 Clarkton Clarkton Dunklin 51 Clay Bxcelsior Springs,..Clay 11 Clayton Clayton St. Louis 57 Clearmont. Clearmont Nodaway 7 Cleveland Cleveland Cass 34 Clifton Thayer Oregon 53 Clifton Heights St. Louis 33-A Clifton Hill Clifton Hill Randolph 18 Clinton Clinton Henry 37 Clintonville EI Dorado Springs .Cedar 42 Cold Spring Leeton Johnson 36 Cold-Water DrexeL " .. Cass 34 Cole Camp '.Cole Camp Benton 36 Colony Colony Knox 2 Columbia Pacific Franklin 32 Comfort Wheaton Barry 55 Commonwealth St. Louis 33-A Compass Parkville Platte 21 Competition Competition Laclede 38 Composite Doniphan .Ripley' 52 Concordia Concordia Lafayette 23 Continental Stewartsville De Kalb 10 Conway Conway , Laclede 38 Cooper Boonville Cooper 25 Corinthian Warrensburg J"ohnson 36 Cornerstone St. Louis , 33-B Cosby Cosby Andrew 9 Cosmos St. Louis 33-B Country Club Kansas City Jackson 22 Cowgill Cowgill .caldwell 12 Craft Canton Lewis 15 Craig Craig Holt :........ 8 Crane Crane , Stone 54


192 368 586 312 525 227

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Crescent Hill Criterion Cuba Cunningham Cypress

Adrian Alba CUba Sumner Laclede

1953

Bates , 35 Jasper •........... .44 Crawford 39 .chariton 19 Linn 13 D

492 539 400 88 137 119 39 532 325 300

Daggett Dawn Decatur Defiance Delphian De Soto De Witt Dexter Dockery Doric

McKittrick Ludlow Pierce City Sheridan Birch Tree De Soto De Witt Dexter Meadville Elkland

Montgomery Livingston Lawrence Worth .shannon Jefferson Carroll Stoddard Linn Webster

28 12 55 6 .47 40 20 50 13 45

Daviess Jackson Mississippi Franklin Knox Clark Macon St. Francois Shannon Pike Phelps

10 22 50 32 2 1 14 .48 47 16 : .. 39 33-B 50 33-B 19 32 42 15 14 18

E 285 630 384 575 291 318 648 599 607 14 497 121 278 505 73 27 405 577 332 441

EarL East Gate East Prairie Easter Edina Eldorado Elmer Elvins Eminence Eolia Equality Erwin Essex Euclid Eureka Evergreen Everton Ewing Excello Excelsior

Coffey Kansas City East Prairie .st. Clair Edina Luray Elmer Flat River Eminence Eolia Newburg St. Louis Essex .st. Louis Brunswick New Haven Everton Ewing Excello Jackson

483 290 44 132 47 345 281 542 339 23

Fairfax Fairmont. Fair Play Farmington Fayette Fellowship Fenton Ferguson Fidelity; Florida

Fairfax Wyaconda Fair-Play Farmington Fayette J oplin Fenton Ferguson Farley Florida

Stoddard Chariton Franklin Dade Lewis Macon Cape Girardeau

F

Atchison Clark Polk · St. Francois Howard Jasper St. Louis St. Louis Platte Monroe

8 1 41 48 25 44 57 51 21 17


1953 214 578 453 554 212 192 363 636 352 89 48

Forest City Forest Park Forsyth Foster Four Mile Frankford FraternaL Freedom Friend Friendship Fulton

193

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI Forest City '.st. Louis Forsyth Foster Campbell Frankford .Robertsville Mehlville Ozark Chillicothe Fulton

Holt Taney Bates Dunklin Pike Franklin' St. Louis Christian Livingston Callaway

·

8 33·B 54 35 51 16 32 57 54 12 27

G 515 106 423 655 359 522 422 125 9 427 475 218 72 397 289 644 514 57.9 276 618 272 66 173 159 425 414 635 107 178

Galena Galena Gallatin Gallatin Galt Galt Gardenville Gardenville Garrett Arcola Gate City Kansas City Gate of the Temple .. Springfield Gentryville Gentryville George Washington .. St. Louis Glenwood Glenwood Golden Golden City Good Hope St. Louis Gorin Gorin Gower Gower Graham Graham Grain Valley Grain Valley Granby Granby Grandin Grandin Grand River Freeman Grandview Grandview Granite Sedalia Grant City Grant City Gray Summit Gray Summit Green City Green City Green Ridge Green Ridge Greensburg Greensburg Greentop Greentop Greenville Greenville Griswold Bellflower

Stone Daviess Grundy St. Louis Dade Jackson Greene Gentry Schuyler Barton '" Scotland Clinton Nodaway J ackson Newton Carter Cass J ackson Pettis Wortli Franklin Sullivan Pettis Knox Schuyler Wayne Montgomery

54 10 4 57 42 22 45 6 33·B 1 .43 33·A 1 11 7 59 56 47 34 59 36 6 32 3 36 2 1 52 28

H

216 336 224 188 322 499 171

Hale City Hallsville Hamilton Hannibal Hardin Harmony Hartford

Hale Hallsville Hamilton Hannibal Hardin St. Louis Hartford

Carroll Boone Caldwell Marion .Ray Putnam

20 26 12 15 20 33·A 3


194 21 571 459 354 117 37 477 338 123 288 187 104 211 527 364 455 362 279 262 660 49 251 239 215 4 130 32 415 30

1953

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Havana Hayti. Hazelwood Hebron Helena HempIe Henderson Herculaneum Hermann Hermitage Hermon Heroine Hickory Hill Higbee Higginsville Hinton Hiram Hogle's Creek Holden Holliday Holt Hope Hopewell Hornersville Howard Hume Humphreys Hunnewell Huntsville

McFall Hayti. Seymour Mexico Rochester Hemple ~ Rogersville Herculaneum Hermann Hermitage Liberal Kansas City Eugene Higbee Higginsville Hinton Kahoka Wheatland Holden .Holliday Holt Washington Lesterville Hornersville New Franklin Hume Humphreys '.Hunnewell Huntsville

Gentry Pemiscot Webster Audrain .Andrew Clinton Webster J efferson Gasconade Hickory Barton Jackson Cole Randolph Lafayette Boone Clark .Hickory Johnson ,Monroe Clay Franklin Reynolds Dunklin Howard Bates Sullivan Shelby Randolph

.- 6 51 .45 27 9 11 45 40 32 .41 43. 22 31 18 23 26 1 .41 36 17 11 32 .47 51 25 35 3 14 18

Miller Scott Jackson Cass Howell Miller St. Francois Washington Jackson

38 50 59 34 53 58 48 .40 33-B 22

Linn Randolph Gentry Daviess Daviess Jasper Cole :St. Louis

13 18 6 10 10 44 31 57

I

410 Iberia 581 lllmo 76 Independence 54 Index 536 Ingomar 381 Ionia 154 Ionic 143 Irondale 420 Itaska 446 Ivanhoe

Iberia Illmo Independence Garden City Willow Springs Eldon Desloge lrondale St. Louis Kansas City

82 Jackson .. ~ 541 Jacksonville 447 Jacoby 500 Jameson 564 Jamesport. 398 Jasper 43 Jefferson 640 Jennings

Linneus Jacksonville Darlington Jameson Jamesport. Jasper Jefferson City Jennings

,

J

'


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

315 Jerusalem 480 JeweL 164 Joachim 321 Jonathan 451 Jonesburg 335 Joplin 411 Joppa

Jerico Springs Pleasant Hill Hillsboro Denver Jonesburg Joplin Hartville

Cedar Cass .Jefferson Worth

220 311 68 243 376 118 105 484 245 582

Kansas City Kearney Kennett Keystone King HilL Kingston Kirksville Kirkwood Knobnoster Koshkonong

Kansas City Kearney Kennett St. Louis St. Joseph Kingston Kirksville Kirkwood Knobnoster Koshkonong

222 83 115 489 292 460 574 531 237 253 592 506 145 598 77 494 149 31 302 666 138 326 152 51 • 521 488 257 259 268 128

La Belle La Belle Lewis Laclede Lebanon Laclede Laddonia Laddonia Audrain Lakeville Bell City Stoddard Lamar Lamar Barton Lambskin St. Louis La ~onte La ~onte Pettis Lane's Prairie Vichy ~aries La Plata La Plala ~acon Laredo Laredo Grundy La Russell La Russell .Jasper Lathrop Lathrop Clinton Latimer Licking Texas Leadwood Leadwood St. Francois Lebanon Steelville. ' Crawford Lewistown Lewistown Lewis Lexington Lexington' Lafayette Liberty Li berty Clay Lick Creek Perry Ralls Lilbourn Lilbourn New Madrid Lincoln Fillmore Andrew Linn Linn Osage Linn-Creek Camdenton Camden LivingSton Glasgow Howard Lockwood •..•...... Lockwood .•...... Dade Lock Springs Lock Springs Daviess Lodge of Light Eagleville Harrison .." Lodge of Love Lancaster Schuyler Lodge of Truth Atlanta ~acon Lorraine Ridgeway Harrison

~ontgomery

J aspet Wright

195 .42 34 .40 -6 28 44 .46

K

Jackson Clay Dunklin Buchanan Caldwell Adair St. Louis Johnson Oregon

22 11 51 33-B 9 12 2 57 36 53

L

15 38 27 50 43 33-B 36 39 14 4 .44 11 39 .48 39 15 23 11 11 51 9 31 38 25 .42 10 5 1 14 5


196 409 403

PROCEEDINGS OF THE Louisville Lowry City

Louisville Lowry City

Lincoln St. Clair

1953 29 37

M 433 91 626 112 406 402 543 566 481

no

569 324 260 458 16 628 313 35 2 85 244 516 567 151 471 1 639 344 144 612 129 295 64 490 246 58 408 603 184 351 558 294 614 158 637 476

Mack's Creek Mack's Creek Camden 38 Madison Madison Monroe 17 Magnolia St. Louis 33-A Maitland Maitland Holt 8 Malden Malden Dunklin 51 Malta ............•.Malta Bend Saline 24 Mansfield Mansfield Wright 46 Maplewood Maplewood St. Louis 57 Marceline Marceline Linn 13 Marcus Fredericktown Madison .48 Marlborough (Jackson Co.) Jackson 22 McDonald Independence ,Jackson 59 Mechanicsville Defiance St. Charles 30 Melville ,Dadeville Dade .42 Memphis Memphis Scotland 1 Mendon Mendon Chariton 19 Meramec Eureka St. Louis 57 Mercer Princeton Mercer 4 Meridian .........•• St. Louis 33-B Miami ............• Miami Saline 24 Middle Fabius Downing Schuyler .,. ~ . . . . . .. 1 Milford Milford Barton 43 Miller Miller Lawrence 55 Milton Milton Randolph 18 MineraL Oronogo Jasper ' .44 Missouri St. Louis 33-A Mizpah St. Louis 33-B Moberly Moberly Randolph 18 Modern Humansville ,Polk .41 Mokane Mokane Callaway 27 Monett Monett Barry 55 Moniteau Jamestown Moniteau 31 Monroe Monroe .City Monroe •........... 17 Montevallo Montevallo Vernon .43 Montgomery Montgomery City. Montgomery 28 Monticello Monticello Lewis 15 Montrose Montrose Henry 37 Morehouse Morehouse New Madrid 50 Morley Morley. . . . . . . . . . Scott 50 Mosaic Belleview Iron .48 Moscow Moscow Mills Lincoln ~9 Mound City Mound City Holt 8 Mount Washington .. Mt. Washington .. Jackson 59 Mountain Grove Mountain Grove .. Wright .46 Mountain View Mountain View Howell 53 Mt. Hope Odessa Lafayette 23


1953

197

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

439 40 99 327 221

Mt. Olive Mt. Moriah.: Mt. Vernon Mt. Zion Mystic Tie :

Rogersville, R. 3 .. Webster St. Louis Mt. Vernon Lawrence W cst Plains Howell Oak Ridge Cape Girardeau

25 568 560 247 60 510 199 307 429 270 473 470 647 372 643 157 358 622 583

Naphtali. St. Louis Naylor Naylor Nelson Nelson Neosho Neosho New Bloomfield New Bloomfield New Hampton .....• New Hampton NewHope Elsberry New London .....•. New London New Madrid ,New Madrid New Salem Winfield Nineveh Olney Nodaway Maryville NoeL Noel. Nonpareil East Lynne Northeast Kansas City North Star Rockport. Northwest Tarkio Norwood Norwood Novinger Novinger

163 134 576 139 546 518 303 317 7 623 624

OccidentaL .st. Louis Olean Olean Miller Olive Branch St. Louis Oregon Oregon Holt Orient Kansas City Jackson OrientaL .........• .Blackburn .saline Osage Nevada ....•..... Vernon Osborn ....•........Osborn De Kalb O'Sullivan Walnut Grove Greene.: Overland Overland St. Louis Owensville ........• Owensville Gasconade

45 33-B 55 53 .49

N

33-A 52 24 56 27 5 29 17 51 29 29 7 56 34 22 8 8 .46 2

,Ripley Saline Newton Callaway '" Harrison Lincoln Ralls New Madrid Lincoln Lincoln Nodaway McDonald Cass Jackson ,Atchison Atchison Wright Adair

o

,

33·A 58 33-B 8 22 24 43 10 45 57 32

P 241 18 19 650 308 65 11 .330 319

Palestine Palmyra Paris Union Parma Parrott Pattonsburg Pauldingville Paul Revere Paulville

St. Charles St. Charles •........ 30 Palmyra ........• Marion 15 Paris Monroe 17 Parma New Madrid 51 Maysville De Kalb 10 Pattonsburg Daviess 10 Wright City Warren 30 St. Louis 33-B Hurdland Adair' ..........•.. 2


198

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

551 92 502 136 472 399 652 182 314 469 504 113 160 142 467 176 79 349 232 95 209 166 131 556 503 179 657 658 190 596 180 383

Pendleton Doe Run Perseverance Louisiana Philadelphia Philadelphia Phoenix Bowling Green Pickering Pickering Pike ..........•.... Curryville Pilgrim St. Louis Pilot Knob Richville Pine Bardley Plato Plato· Platte City Platte City Plattsburg Plattsburg Pleasant Morrisville Pleasant Grove Otterville Pleasant Hope Pleasant Hope Point Pleasant. Conran Polar Star St. Louis Pollock Pollock Polo Polo Pomegranate St. Louis Poplar Bluff Poplar Bluff Portageville Portageville Potosi. Potosi. Prairie Gilman City Prairie Home Prairie Home Pride of the West St. Louis Progress St. Louis Purity St. Louis Putnam Newton Puxico Puxico Pyramid St. Louis Pythagoras Cassville

380 196

Queen City Quitman

St. Francois Pike .Marion Pike Nodaway Pike Douglas Ripley Texas Platte Clinton Polk Cooper Polk New Madrid Sullivan Caldwell ; Butler N ew Madrid Washington Harrison Cooper

Sullivan Stoddard Barry

1953 .48 16 15 16 7 16 33-A .46 52 46 21 11 41 25 .41 51 33-B 3 12 33-A 52 ·51 .40 5 25 33-B 33-B 33-B 3 50 33-A 55

Q Queen City Quitman

Schuyler ........... 1 Nodaway 7

R

33 201 223 391 570 479 385 57 361 13 496 435

Ralls Ravenwood Ray Raytown Republic Rich Hill Richland Richmond Riddick Rising Sun Robert Burns Rockbridge

Center Ralls Ravenwood Nodaway Camden Ray Raytown J ackson Republic Greene Rich Hill Bates Richland Pulaski Rrchmond Ray Buffalo Dallas Barry. . . . . . . .. . .Platte Gainesville Ozark Almartha .ozark

17 7 23 59 45 35 38 23 41 21 53 53


1953 663 341 213 550 404 426 204 316 238 90 572

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Rockhill Rockville Rolla Rose Hill Rosendale Rothville Rowley Rural Rushville Russellville Rutledge

Kansas City Rockville Rolla St. Louis Rosendale Rothville Dearborn Kansas City Rushville Russellville Rutledge "

J ackson Bates Phelps , Andrew Chariton Platte J ackson Buchanan Cole Scotland

199 22 35 39 33-A 9 19 21 22 9 31 1

S 225 226 208 424 298 462 293 71 508 448 126 236 513 585 646 653 625 256 228 371 310 75 511 271 206 200 547 466 296 524 96 273 588 234 230 28 78

Salem Saline Salisbury Samaritan Sampson Santa Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Seaman Sedalia Senath Shamrock Shaveh Shawnee

:

Sh~ffield

Shekinah Shelbina Sheldon Sikeston . Sile'x Skidmore Solomon Somerset Sonora South Gate Southwest Sparta Spickardsville St. Andrews St. Clair St. Francisville St. Francois St. James St. John's St. Joseph.,

Salem ,St. Mary's ,Salisbury Bonne Terre Lutie Santa-Fe Sarcoxie Savannah Saxton Schell City Milan Sedalia Senath Shamrock St. Louis Warsaw Kansas City Festus Shelbina Sheldon Sikeston Silex ,Skidmore Springfield Powersville Watson Kansas City Southwest City Sparta Spickard Shelbyville .osceola Wayland Libertyville St. James Hannibal " St. Joseph

,Den t Ste. Genevieve Chariton St. Francois Ozark Monroe Jasper Andrew Buchanan Vernon .sullivan Pettis Dunklin Callaway Benton J ackson Jefferson Shelby Vernon Scott Lincoln Nodaway Greene Putnam Atchison Jackson McDonald Christian Grundy Shelby St. Clair Clark St. Francois Phelps Marion Buchanan

39 48 19 48 53 17 44 9 9 43 3 36 51 27 33-B 36 22 40 14 .43 50 29 7 45 3 8 22 56 54 4 14 37 1 48 39 15 9


200

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

20 St. Louis ..' St. Louis 93 St. Mark's Cape Girardeau Stanberry 109 Stanberry 419 Star..•............ Taberville Ironton 133 Star of the West 634 Steele Steele 538 Stella Stella Stockton 283 Stockton 608 Strafford Strafford 174 Sturgeon Sturgeon ,Sullivan 69 Sullivan 555 Summersville Summersville 263 Summit Lee's Summit. Kansas City 617 Swope Park

1953

33-A Cape Girardeau 49 Gentry •............ 6 St. Clair 37 Iron ~ . .48 Pemiscot 51 Newton 56 Cedar 42 Greene .45 Boone 26 Franklin 32 Texas .46 Jackson 59 J ackson 22

or 565 438 299 177 661 56 631 111 638 205 641 122 440 34 360 114 12

Tebbetts Tebbetts Callaway 27 Temperance ....•... Smithville Clay , 11 Temple Kansas City Jackson 22 Texas Houston ,Texas 46 Theodore Roosevelt. University City St. Louis 33-A Tipton Tipton Moniteau 31 Tower Grove St. Louis 33-A Trenton Trenton Grundy 4 Triangle St. Louis 33-A Trilumina Marshall Saline 24 Trinity St. Louis 33-A Triplett Triplett Chariton 19 TroweL Marble Hill Bollinger ..•....... .49 Troy Troy Lincoln 29 Tuscan St Louis 33-B Twilight Columbia .Boone 26 Tyro ' Caledonia .....•.. Washington .40

593 124 210 5 495 649 421

Union ........•.....Union Franklin Union Star Union-Star De Kalb Unionville •.•.......Unionville Putnam United Springfield Greene Unity ..........•...Richards ........• Vernon University •........ University City St. Louis Urbana ...........• Urbana Dallas

u 32 10 3 .45 .43 33-A 41

v 413 629 509 491 320

Valley •...........• Bolckow Valley Park. '. ....•. Valley Park Van Buren. '. ...•... Van Buren Vandalia .•....•....Vandalia Versailles •. : Versailles

Andrew •........... 9 St. Louis 57 Carter 47 Audrain 27 Morgan ..•......... 58


1953 94 62

201

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Vienna Vinci!

Vienna Cameron

Maries Clinton ..'

'

~

39 .11

W 52 605 456 665 74 609 87' 61 526 375 512 98 84 22 613 194 46 445 103 396 15 53 340 202 434 301 417 162 620 370 29 540 430 277 387 24

Wakanda Walker Wallace ~ WardelL Warren Warrenton Washington Waverly Wayne Waynesville Webb City Webster Webster Groves Wellington Wellston Wellsville Wentzville West Gate West View Western Light Western Star Weston Westport Westville Wheeling ' White Hall Whitewater Whitesville Willard Williamstown Windsor Winigan Winona Wm. D. Muir Woodside Wyaconda

Carrollton Carroll Walker Vernon Bunceton ,Cooper Wardell. Pemiscot Keytesville Chariton Warrenton Warren Greenfield Dade Waverly Lafayette Piedmont Wayne Waynesville Pulaski Webb City Jasper Marshfield Webster Webster Groves St. Louis De Kalb Buchanan Wellston St. Louis Wellsville Montgomery Wentzville St. Charles St. Louis Millersville ..•....Cape Girardeau Louisburg Dallas Winston Daviess Weston Platte Kansas City Jackson W estville Chariton Wheeling Livingston Barnard Nodaway Whitewater Cape Girardeau Whitesville .Andrew Willard Greene Williamstown Lewis ,Windsor Henry Winigan Sullivan Winona Shannon Pilot Grove Cooper Thomasville Oregon La Grange Lewis

20 43 25 51 19 30 42 23 52 38 44 45 57 9 57 28 30 33-B 49 .41 10 21 22 19 12 '. 7 .49 9 45 15 37 3 .47 25 53 15

x 50

Xenia ......•.......Hopkins

Nodaway

7

y

563

York

.Kansas City

'.Jackson ..........•. 22

Z

545 189

Zalma Zeredath~

,Zalma St. Joseph

Bollinger .Buchanan

.49 9


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT

[\:J

o

[\:J

ci NAME AND NUMBER -OF LODGE

~I] ~ ~ I I ~ ~ ~.5

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

QI

:5

.;

!E

'Qj

0..

~

I 1 2 3 4 5 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

~

i

~

<~

I

fIl

.s' ~,

A

A

I'

I

111 11.. ..

d

~ ~l'~\ c. P,~

Z Po

rg

I

QI

10'"

'S

~

~

I

1.... I...."I""

Co

'",,'; "

~

~o..

QI

~

~

~

U~

~~

0':) ...

I

I....

·

""QlA =' P-.",

fIl

Qi

Missouri................ 17 1 61121 11' ... .... Meridian................ 16 17 10.... 1 2 141 1........ Beacon.................. 45 53 53 8 9 11 401 10........ Howard................. 6 7 8 .... 2 .. . . 31 21' . .. .... United.................. 45 48 42 7 10' 7 101 8..... .. . O'Sullivan , 3 4 4 " .. 11 1. . .. Geo. Washington........ 6 6 8 1 9 5 221 3........ Agency................. 9 6 6 .... 1 11 2........ Pauldingville............ 6 6 6 3 11............ Tyro.................... 7 6 5 1 41 2...... .. RisingSun 16 16 16 1 1.... 11 9 Eolia , 1 1 9 1 2 " .... Western Star............ 1 3 2.... 2 :... 11............ Memphis................ 6 61 6 1 2 2 41 ........ ,... clarksville , 31 ••...... /.,., Palmyra................ 6 2 2 3 .... 51 2. . .. .... ParisUnion 19 11 9 1 1 1 2 St. Louis................ 15 28 25 2 2 2 111 21....... . Havana·· ..... ················.········.····1 1 .... 1 I .. Wellington.............. 1 1 1 31 Florida , 1 .••.•.. , Wyaconda , 2 5 5 1. .. . 1 21 1 , ,... Naphtali................ 10 8 11 1 3 2 61 7........ Ava '.......... 4 4 7 7 11 4 ,.... Evergreen , 2 4 4 1 2 1 .. " St. John's............... 18 19 19 1 2 5 131 2........ Windsor., .......,........ 1 1 1............ 11 -1.... Huntsville............... 6 3 2.... 1 .... 21 2. . .. Liberty................. 17 10 9 1 16 1 1 9 Humphreys............. 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 Ralls................... 2 2 2 2 . 2 41. . .. Troy.................... 101 7 7 2 1 61 1........ I I I

I \

t

Ul~

?:l

Ul

~

UQI

.l!l

t)

:a

~

'"

-;

I

$1092.10 1601.30 4771. 70 362.15 2625.40 207.50 1405.90 252.40 162,60 290.00 360.40 182.10 255.00

~l:&: ~:a S

~ §.i

e,,~QI

P-.

P-.

~~:s

I

.. 00.. I ...... $170.001I $ 17.00 .60 150.00 15.00 .. . . .. 450.00 46.00 ...... .. .. 00 70.00 7.00 1 450.001 45.00 . . . . .. . . . . . .. 30.001 3.00 ... 00. .. .. 00 70.00 7.00 90.00 9.00 . . . . .. ...... 5.00 50.001 5.00 . . . . .. . 1 70.00\ 7.00 180.00 18.00 . . . . .. . . . . .. ..•... . .•..... I•••••.•• ...... .80 10.001 1.00

g~:~g ::::::

318.80 206.70 1615.00 106.00 157.50 80.00 167.50 948.80 417.50 220.00 1198.30 340.00 331.40 623.30 125.00 232.50 320.00

\l)~~

~~~

QI

U'"'

~

I=:~

§P.=, ~~~

I

446 $1092. 10 1 1600.70 646 1918 4771. 70 362.15 147 1057 2625.401 83 1 207.501 1405.901 563 252.401 105 147.501 60 118 290.001 360.40 148 182.101 64 254.201 101 472.501 194 172.101 69 126 318', 80 1 206.70 83 1515.001 609 105.001 43 155.00 62 80.001 32 167.501 68 947.801 385 167 421. 75 1 220.00 88 1196.901 482 340.001 1361 331.401 138 240 623.30\ 117.10 47) 232.501 97 320.001 134

g-g

.~

.. 00 "

::: ::: :::::60.001 ::: I: ::::::: 6.00 170.001 170.001

00....

I

2.50

001

.. . ...... 1.00 4.25. . . . . . ...... ...... ...... 1.40

50.001 100.00 60.00 20.00 _210.001

00 7.90

;.

~

oo

trj

ttl

t;j ~

Z

Q

(f)

o""j 8

::z:: trj

..

I.••••..•

. . ... .. . . . . ..

17.00 17.00

'"0

I

20.001 220.001 20.001 40.001 100.001 1

·

6.00 10.00 6.00 2.00 21.00

.

2.00 22.00 2.00 4.00 . 10.00

~

CD C)1

CoO


1

35 36 37 38 39 40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65

66 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

1

Mercer............ . . . . . . 5 3 6 .... 1.... .... Cooper.................. 6 3 6 1 .... 2 Hemple................. 7 4 4. . . . 3 Callao.................. 7 6 6 De Witt................. 3 3 3 Mt. Moriah.............. 37 37 48 3 • 6 Bismarck............... 6 6 7 .... 1 Jefferson................ 35 30 30 3 14 3 Fair Play. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1 .... .... 1 .... Bonhomme.............. 4 6 7 1 .... 1 Wentzville.............. 3 2 2 .... 1 2 Fayette................. 3 3 3 1 .... .... Fulton.................. 4 3 2 1 1 5 Holt.................... 4 6 9 . . .. .... .... Xenia................... 8 9 9 2 2 1 Livingston.............. 4 5 5 2 .... 1 Wakanda............... 8 8 13 1 1 4 Weston................. 2 2 2 1 2 1 Index................... 8 8 5 . . .. 2 Arrow Rock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... .... .... Tipton.................. 1 5 5..... 1 Richmond............... 29 18 16 2 2 4 Monticello............... 1. . .. Centralia................ 8 5 5 4 .... 2 New Bloomfield.......... 4 3 2 Waverly................ 1 1 1 1 1 Vinci!.................. 8 5 2 2 3 2 Cambridge.............. 3 3 3 1 1 3 Monroe................. 5 6 5 4/ 1. .. . Pattonsburg............. 6 6 8 .... 1.... 2 Grant City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 2. . .. .... 2 Kennett................. 11 12 11 1 4 2 Sullivan................. 6 4 3 2 2 1 Armstrong.............. 1 1 1 1 .... Savannah ..........'...... 10 10 8 2 1 Gorin................... 1 1 1 1 2 .... Eureka................. . 5 3 7 1 .... .... Warren................. 1 2 2 1 1.... Silex.................... 1 1 1 .... .... 1 Independence 121 113 125 9 1 11 Lebanon................ 2 2 3 2 1. 2 St. Joseph............... 24 20, 22 1 2 1 PolarStar 8 61 4 4 I>

1

....

11 91

11 3 1

1

. .. .

1. ... . .

.

21 371 4 81 11 21 11 51 81 11 21 11 111 21 21

. ... I 11 61 31 21

11

1 2 1 8 5 3

2 5; 2 5 1

.. . .. .. . . . . .. . . ..

2

..

1 1

. .

2

.

1

.. .. . .

7 4

..

1 2 51 21 11

1 1 2 1

. . .. . ..

.... 1

1

.

51 12 41 1\ 11 1 7/ 1 11. . .. . 11 2 1/

. . . . . . .

.... 1-:- • .. • •.•

111 4

161 101

14

.

6 '" . 2

..

3

..

151 249 47 101 63 1335 120 637 60 196 62 125 217 47 117 81 401 134 75 30 68 313 58 157 79 79 148 156 107 115 147 168 220 59 241 69 133 63

I

44 1172 208 791 610

1

I

352.101 607.501 127.501 252.501 157.501 3280.001 297.101 1585.001 147. 50 1 489.60 150.001 310.001 375.00' 117.501 284. 60 1 173.60 964.20 336.701 186.701 70.001 172. 50 1 777.10 145.001 542.501 . 192.501 197.101 377. 50 1 387.90 269.601 282.101 367.501 417.501 551.101 142.50/ 595.00 176.701 330.001 157.50/ 112.501 2909.601 520.901 1964.601 1484.201

I

352.10 607.50 127.50 252.50 157.50 3280.00 297.10 1585.00 147.50 489.60 152.50 310.00 375.00 117.50 285.00 173.60 964.20 336.70 186.70 70.00 172.50 777.10 145.00 542.50 192.50 197.10 377.50 395.80 267.50 282.10 367.50 417.50 551.10 142.50 595.00

I

. . . . ..

.

. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. ...... . . . . ..

5.00 7.00 5.00 4.00 35.00 5.00 43.00 2.00 3.00

I

2.50

\ . . . . . .. '" . ..

I I II

. .. .. ...... 7.901 2.10 . . . . . . ...... . . . . .. . I

1

"I".. "I I......

176.70 '" . .. 330.00 157.50 '" . .. 112.50 2909.60 I 520.90 1964.60 . I 1504.20 . .. . . . 20.001

'1' ..... I

I I

I........

10.001 270.001 10.DO 80.001 20.001 10.00 80.00 30.00 60.001 60.001 50.001

1.00 27.00 1.00 8.00 2.00 1.00 8.00 3.00 6.00 6.00 5.00

60.001

90.001

6.00 . 9.00

20.001 20.00 10.00 10.001 1250.001 30.001 240.001

2.0\) 2.00 1.00 1.00 125.00 3.00 24.00

I

..

.

I I

~.

<:0 ~ ~

.

30.001 3.00 40.001 4.00 30.00 3.00 .40\ 80.001 8.00 40.001 4.00' 110.001 11.00 .\.. .. .... I........ 70.001 7.M

...... ...... . . . . .. . . . . ..

'" . .. '" . ..

I

I••.••... 50.00/ 70.00 50.00\ 40.001 350.001 50.001 430.00 20.001 30.001

.

Q

~

>Z

t:1

§t'" Q

"r' c.

o"".j ~

H

if) if)

o q

~

H

t:>:)

o

~


,114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 141 142 143 144 145 147 149 150 151 152 153 154 156 157 158 159 160

Twilight................ 14 Laddonia '" . 1 Barnes.. .. .. .. . .. . • .. .. . 5 Helena.. . . .. . . . .... .. 4 Kingston " .. .. .. De Soto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Compass.. .. 11 Erwin .. 10 Triplett " .. .. 2 Hermann............... 1 Union Star.............. 3 Gentryville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Seaman................. 12 Athens.................. 7 Lorraine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Monett. 10 Hum,:. . . . . . . .. .. 3 PotOSI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Farmington............. 6 Star of the West.. .. .. .. . 3 Olean. . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Braymer................ 4 Phoenix. . . .. . . . . . 5 Delphian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Lincoln. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 00

00

~~t~~d~~: ::::::::::::

~

17 3 4 1

18 2 4 2

1

4

2

51

.

15 1 1 ... .

11 11

4 •.....•. 1

9 12 2 3 3 14' 5 1 6 1 14 13............ 2 ..•. ..•. 2 1 2 .... 2 2 2

4, ....

2 .•..

2 ••..

31

I

1 1 3 '

.

8 3

. . .

141

1

1••••

21 11 31 1 . 4 4 2 4 •... 1•••• 61 1, .... 6 2 . 71 ,

. .

1 1 . . .. .... .... 15 14........ 2 6 5 1 1 7 7 . 2 2 7 6 8 5 5 .. 3 3 7 . ... 5 5 1 -2 6 6 3 . 4 4 2 21 .. 3 2 .... 1 . . .. . ... 1 5 . 3 4........ 1 61 1. 2 2 11 13: . 3 3 1 .... , 2 .. 1 '" . 1 2 1 1 .... . . 001

:

~ :::: ... i :::: ::: J .. ~

..

::::

Pleasant Grove. .. . . . . . . . 1 2 2 ... . 1 . 2 2 . Irondale " . 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 . Modern. . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . • 8 7 4 2 .... 1 1 .... . j . Latimer. . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . 1 4 5 2 2 2 2 2. . .. . . Cass.................... 9 8 10 7 4 1 6 . Lexington.. . .. . .. .. . .. .. 9 7 7 2 2 2 3 .. .. Birming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... .... 2 1 2 ... Milton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 3 . . .. 1, 1 Linn Creek.............. 9 5 7 7 6 2 3 Bloomfield............... 2 2 2 2 3 1 .... 3 Ionic... . . .. . . .. .. . . .. . . 11 10 8 1 . .. . 61 4, •... Ashland.. . .. . .. .. .. • .. .. 2 2 2 1 .... 2 1 NorthStar.............. 6 12 18 1 1.... 2 .. Mt. Grove. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 8 7' 3 2 1 21 Green City. . . . . . • . . . . . .. .... .... .... 2 4 . . .. . ... 1 1 . Pleasant ............•............................... 1••••

'1' .

'1' .

I

~7

I

ft 100 47

1••••

H

251 1~

450 ~

"2

87 ~

212 U4

U

~O ~ ~2

220

"2 ~

118 155 55

U

104 84 1M 84~

86 131

1~

"1U ~

1ft 173 ~6

roo

"5

197 ~

n

I

I

1

1

819.601 819.60 . I•.••••.. 97.50 10.001 1.00 97. 50 1 277.50 50.001 5.00 277.50 117.10 1 ~~:~g :4.0 ..•. ~~:~O ..•.. ~,.O.O 80 68. 1 608.70 608.70 . . . . .. 130.001 13.00 343.50 343.50 ..•... 15i>.001 15.00 1120.001 1120.00 .. . 90.00 9.00 I•••••••. 155. 70 1 155.70 382.50 387.50 . . . . . . 5.00 10.001 1.00 218.80 219.20 . . . . . . .40 30.001 3.00 .... 10.00 1.00 115.00 115.001 525.00 522.50 2.50 . . . . .. . . 409.60 410.00 ..•... .40 60.00 6.00 157.501 157.50 . . . . .. . I.•.••... 110.001 11.00 1042.001 1042.00 232.10 232.10 . . . . .. ,20.00 2.00 355.00 355.00 •..... . . 520.70 528.20 . . . . . . 7.50 I..•...•• 25 327.25 1 . 327. 97.50 1 97.50 . . . . .. 30.00 3.00 277.10 277.10 . . . . .. . . 387.50 375.00 12.50. . . . . . 40.00 4.00 130.001 ...... 3o.00f 3.00 130.00 155.001 160.00 . 5.00 20.00 2.00 20.00 2.00 247. 10 1 247.10 212.50 212.50 40.001 4.00 264.201 264.60 .. .. .. .401" ...... I........ 207.501 197.50 10.00. . . . . . 40.001 4.00 . . 212. 50 1 212.50 319.15 319.15 10.00 1.00 449.60 449.60 . . . . .• 80.00 8.00 20 411.20 .. 90.00 9.00 411. 180.00 180.00 . . 69.60 69.60 . . . . .. 30.00 3.00 363.90 379.90 16.00 80.00 8.00 439.601 4.40,.00 ... .40 454.601 467.50 . .. . .. 12.90 120.00 12.00 60 249.60 . . . . .. •.•.•. 30.00 8.00 249. 419.50 1 420.50 . 1.00 70.00 7.00 495.00 495.40 .40 60.00 6.00 255.70 245.00 10.70 92.50 92.50 ....••......................

::::::

00

00

00

..

......

1-£ ~

01 CJj

ol;d > Z' tj

~

otj Q t.%j

o

~

~

H

t/1 t/1

oq

l;d H

1

'1'

..

l .

I

~

o

01


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued l:\:)

o

t3

~

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

p.; Qj

:5

2

....ell

Qj

.~

ell il<

6' 1 13 5 25 4 3 6

....

Qj

~

I Clifton Hill . Whitesville . Occidental. . Joachim . Portageville . Colony . Camden Point. . Benevolence . 171 Hartford . 172 Censer . . 173 Gray SUnimit 174 Sturgeon . 176 Point Pleasant . 177 'fexas . 178 Griswold . 179 Pride of the West . 180 Pyramid . . 182 Pilot Knob 183 California . 184 Morley . 185 Chamois . 187 Hermon . 188 Hannibal . 189 Zeredatha . 190 Putnam . 192 Frankford . 193 Angerona ....•.......... 194 Wellsville . 195 Bolivar . 196 Quitman . 197 Carthage . 198 Allensville . 161 162 163 164 166 168 169 170

'"~ "'1'$ :=: ·s !E

'".s '" ~ gj '"'"

ell

'" I::

<

'Qj ~

ell

!=l

Po 00

3

~ Qj

<:I

:<

I .. . 1 .. ·

•••.

..

· ..

10

9

4

5

2 10 2 2 8 141 5 8

1 8 2 2 8 18 1 3 6[

1 1 1. . . . 8 .... 7 1 2 1 1 1 2............ 7 .... 2 2 19 2 1 21 2. . . . 2 3 21 1 2

31 1 7 12 23 2 2 14 4 8 12 15 2

221 7 14 201 1 2 16' 3 3 6 18 3

1 11 7 311 121 271 .. 9 1 4 .... 21 12 . 13 1 5 3 151 12 .. 28 3 11 6 221 26 . 3 21 3 1 21 2 . 2............ 21 2 . 14 . . .. 11 .. 3 30j 3 3 5 12 . 3 4 2 2 3 .. 7 .. . . 2 1 .... 1•••••••••••• 14 5 17 4 81 141 .. 3............ 4\ 1 ..

4

1

2

1

1

. .

11 9 11 51· 3 11. . .. 11 .... 111 6. . .. 91 3 11 1 61

. . . ..

1 ........

. .. .. . ..

~~

il<ell

E Qj :E

Q. ~

11

J., ::l Qj!=l

J.,

I

1 •••

1

'" .0

'"

~

6 .... 2 11 1 1 2 1 1 1 13.. .. 2 3 71 4 8 3 1 2 .... 1 1 2& 3 2 5 21 11 3 .... .... .... 11 3 2........ 11 1 3 3 I 3 .... 2 11 5 9 . . .. 1 1 4

<Il

U'" ;....;j

UQ)

I

i 6 1 14 7 27 4 3 5

Po 00

~

Q)

is

A

A ell

~ ;:i

Z

'" ~

~

~

....

~.~

~.~

I

~

5~~:~~11

I

Q)

::l

!

132.10 172.50 519.60 340.00 589.60 90.00 201.70 102.50 171.70 590.00 259.00 226.70 195.40 388.80 160.00 984.60 1170.00 145.00 357.50 304.60 342.50 353.00 1039.20 2399.60 337.50 132.50 101.70 385.00 361.70 140.00 1002.50 153.30

Qj

~~§

al:a .

I:: ell

:a

~

U

I

0'-

I

.40 ...... . . . . .. . . . . .. 2.50 ...... . . . . .. ...... 1.20 .40 \ . . . . .. . . . . . .. 5.00. . . . .. . . . . . .. . ...... .50 . . . . .. ...... 5.00 . . . . .. . . . . .. ..

2.10

...... . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . ..

. .;

I I

~~~

il<

il<

I

,

t.:l~~

~~.:;

~

'@

"'I::~

~E"":

1J

~

. . . . . .. . . . . .. ......

1::Q.1::

ell

£oo~ Qj

!=l

1

54 132.101 172.501 68 208 519.201 135,. 340.001 249 36 81 201.70 101.30 38 172.10 86 242 590.00 104 259.001 97 231.701 73 195.401 157 388.301 64 160.001 396 979.601 475 1170.001 58 145.00 150 357. 50 1 115 304.60 137 342.501 124 353.00/ 416 1037.10 954 2399.60[ 133 337.50/ 56 132.50 41 70 101. 1 152 385.00 148 361. 70 140.00 55/ 1002.501 398 153.301 63

1::",

.~ ~"O

I I

..

10.00\ 100.00 40.001 220.001 . 30.001 60.00 I

I 40.001

I I I

1.00 10.00 4.00 22.00 . 3.00 6.00 ..

.

4.00

. . .

50.001 80.001 130.00 40.00 80.001 30.00 30.001 230.00\ 100.00 240.001 20.001 30.00 140.001 40.00

5.00 8.00 13.00 4.00 8.00 3.00 3.00 23.00 10.00 24.00 2.00 3.00 14.00 4.00

150.001 30.001

15.00 3.00

I . I....••••

I

~

~ o t;r:j

tr1

C; H

Z

o w ofo:;j 1-3

l:I1 t:j

f-4

~

01 CJ,;l


199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210

211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221

222

223 224 225 226 227 228 230 231 232 233 234 236 237 238 239 241 243 244 245

NewHope.............. Sonora. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .

21 .... i.... 6

3

2 2 11 .... 1 4/ .... ' .. 2 . . .. .... .... 11 .... I. . .. . .

~f~!~~d:i::iiii:::~:~i:;:::;::' ::;:::' ::J:;I:: 2~....

Trilumina............... Somerset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clay.................... Salisbury............... Poplar Bluff............. Unionville............... Hickory Hill. . . . . . . . . . . . Four Mile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rolla. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Forest City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hornersville............. HaleCity Barbee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Good Hope. .. . . . . . . . . . . . Albert Pike............. Kansas City............. Mystic Tie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . La Belle , Ray............. Hamilton............... Salem ,. Saline.................. Cypress. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shelbina................ St. James............... Cardwell................ Polo.................... Bucklin St. Francois....... Sedalia................. La Plata. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rushville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hopewell............... Palestine................ Keystone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Middle Fabius Knobnoster. . . . . . . . . . . . .

21 3 13 6 16

51

5. 3! 201 1 8 4 4 16 14 24 4 6 4 5 12 14 1 11

6 5 5

17 5 8 7 15

12........ 3 4; . . .. .... 2 4.... 4 1 5 4 2 1 19 8 1 ....

3 3 41 23 1

9 .... 9 3 1 7 3 21 2 23 61 8 1. . . . 2 6.... 2 3 5 1 2 16 2 6 15 3 41 271 11 14 21 . . . . 1 6 .... 1 11 .... 31 61 11 101 3 2\ 17 2.... 11 1 I 111 1 1 3/ 21 1 5 11 61 3!.... 4 11· .. · 51

61

1 51 12 15 29 4 9 2 4

11 14 1 10 51 8 41

31 ····14

16 1 3

61

141 16 11

jl

41 ... 1 .... i. . .. . .. 41 61.... . .. 31 31.... ... 81 .... I.... . .. 2 11 41.... . .. 1 .... 1 2. . .. . .. 1 6: 6 . 5 61 10 . 1 11 1. . .. . . 1 11 4 .. 1 311 . 21 51 2 . 2 151 9 . 4 41 4 .. 5 171 13 .. 1 11. . .. . . 3 31 3 .

I........3

3\

1 1 21 \

3

4........... . 13 17 51 4 2 2 3 2 3 4 4 7 .... 51 16 131 11 1.... 23/ 18 1 4 4 ','" 11.... 1/ 1. . ..

J

·1· .. ·

1.

..

41'" .\ 3 3 11. . .. . 21 11

. ..

1. . . .

1

I· ..·

1....

11

1

61

..

1

.

..

21

..

1 18 .. 1 3 .. 31 71 .. 11 . 91 5 . 31 1 : . 11 2. . .. . . 21 1 1 141 3 . 51 21· .. · · .. · 11' .

·1···· j

..

1

1021 72 103 1 71 43 106 .284 76 186 176 362 185 51 189 503 72 104 74 141 1070 402 748 116 140 34 128 237 174 81 150 152 l11i , 113\ 56 47 532 147 106 1 106 251 565 60 32 I

I 260.001 180.001 252.501 187.501 95.801 295.001 690.001 179.251 447.101 436.701 875.701 484.601 139. 60 1 471.70 1245.901 179.60 I 260.001 184.601 352.101 2654.201 995.301 1848.001 290.001 342.50 85.001 322.501 591.501 430.001 202.501 375.001 376.301 280.801 287.501 149.601 115.001 1324.301 362.501 279.001 265.001 612.101 1392.601 152.501 80.001

I

I

i~g:gg

I

I

... ~'.~Ol: ::::: I.... 20.001 ~~'.O.O I..... ~,.O.O 252.50 . . . . .. 2.00 187.50 1 95.80 295.00 . 690.00 ,...... 181.75 . 2.50\ 447.10 436.70 . . . . .. . I 888.60 . . . . . . 12.90 484.60 . 1 139.00 .60 . . . . . . 480.00 ... 8.30 1245.90 2.901 182.50 , 260.00 184.60 . .. . I 352.10 I...... 2661.70 / 7.501 995.30 I.•.•.. I 1848.00 1 .401 290.40 342.50 , 1 85.00 322.50 591.50 I 1 430.00

I

1......

~~~:gg ::::::

376.30 288.30 287.50 149.60 115.00

282.50 267.50 612.10 1392.60 152.50 82.50

II:::::: \···i30:ool····i3:00

. . . . .. . ..... I ...... 7.501 . ..... .. I I ...... . ...... . I

1~~t~~ : : : : : :

...... ... . . ...... ......

I .. I••......

40.001 4.00 210.001 21.00 30.00\ 3.00 130.00 13.00 50.001 5.00 I ..•..... 140.001. 14.00 50.001 5.00 40.001 4.00 210.00/ 21.00 10.001 1.00 80.001 8.00 40.001 4.00 40.001 4.00 160.001 16.00 140.001 14.00 240.001 24.00 40.001 4.00 50.001 5.00 40.001 4.00 40.001 4.00 110.001 11.00 160.001 16.00

..

60.001 I 10.001 10.001 30.001

6.00 . 1.00 1.00 3.00

20.001 70.001 110.001 160.001

2.00 7.00 11.00 16.00

~

<:.0 Ol CI:l

Q ~

:;..-

Z

t;1

t"

o

t;1 Q

trJ

ob:j ~

H

m

if)

o q

~

H

::~Ol ... :~~'.0.01 .... :~,.O.O

3.50 2.501 ..... ..... . . . .. . 2.50/

I I I

.

. ..

t>:.l

o

-.::J


GRAND SEORETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

246 247 249 251 253 264 265 266 257 259 260 262 263 265 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 276 277 278 279 281 282 283 284 285 287

~

~e i ~ 'S is '" <

og

~ .... ]

og

III

1l

ell

gj

og ell

.~

III

~

Po.

~

I

I

d )i

l:i p;

og

NAME AND NUM~ER OF LODGE

Z ::i

~III

l:i.

l:i.

gj rn

ell

Cl

gj rn

I

Montgomery ............ 3 2 8 .... 8 3 .... 11 10 10 Neosho ................. 4 4 6 4 8 Carroll ................. 1 .... 1 .... 1 Hope ................... 15 9 10 4 1 1 1 3 2 2 Laredo .................. ... 6 Butler .................. 6 8 3 5 4 31 1 .... Alton ................... 14 11 12 2 1 14 14 14 1 3 Shekinah ............... 3 1 .... 2 Lodge of Light .......... 2 4 2 6 .... .... Lodge of Love ........... . ... 41 2 1 1 1 .... .... .... Mechanicsville .......... o. 9 10 10 1 ... 1 .... Holden ................. 9 10 9 2 1 .... 21 .... .... Summit ................. 5 6 8 Corinthian ....•......... .... 5 .... , 10 21 11 7 9 9.... 4 2 Aurora ................. 3 1 .... 3 ... Lodge of Truth ......•... 31 Brotherhood ....•........ 35 28 25 9 4 6 .... 81 NewSalem ..•...•.•..... 3 1 2 1 1 Solomon ................ 62 48 66 5 6 1~1" '7 5 Granite ................. 12 11 12 2 2 5 4 .... 91 St. Clair ................ 2 1 1 3 6 3 6 .... 61 Cold Spring............. .... .... ·1 1 .... 1 21 .... . ... Grand River ............. 2 2 2 1 4 4 .... 1 Wm.D.Muir ............ 1 .... .... 1 1 Essex ................... 6 6 8 1 2 7 .... 3 Hogle's Creek ........... .... .... .... 2 .... 1 .... 15 16 19 Fenton .........•....... 3 1 .... 1 .... 16 18 17 Cosmos ................. 1 2 4 .... 2 111 2 4 Stockton ................. 3 7 1 .... Canopy .................. 21 12 14 6 10 5 6 Earl .................... 6 5 6 3 Craft ................... 2 .... I I 0

....

0

....

0

'L..I ' . ~

41 ... ~ ... ~ ~

0

~I

....

~

~

~

~I ... ~

!I

... 41~

~

Po

Po

.J!!

Cl

12ell

elICl

~Po.

c

s.c

='

s.clll

Po

'S

Po.",

ril

~

~

~

1 404.601, 737.501 237.501 557. 50 1 145.40 407.501 327.601 753.401 127.60 347.601 210.001 386.001 499.601 527.501 841.301 160.001 1214.601 240.001 2090.001 1065.30 343.601 166.001 175.001 99.601 296.301 224.601 572.601 1084.20 ' 342.10 890.90 107.60 367.60

404.60 737.50 237.50 557.50 146.40 407.60 327.60 763.50 127.60 347.60 210.00 385.00 499.60 527.50 862.10 160.00 1216.00 240.00 2090.00 1065.30 360.00 166.00 182.60 99.60 296.30 224.60 672.50 1084.20 342.10 892.60 107.60 367.50

~

><

....

.... ....

....

....

.... .... .... .... .... .... ....

.... . ... .... .... ....

~

....

10'"

ell

I

154 288 96 223 60 160 138 301 63 139 86 166 201 203 343 66 476 97 836 430 134 64 66 40 120 90 233 437 133 355 48 150

(,)

~~

o

~~ IO'M

(,)

I::og

.IS

;l!lS..l

'"

Po.

.;~::a Po.

o Po=,

'"

:g

...... ...... . ..... ...... . ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... . ..... ...... . ..... . ..... ...... ...... . ..... . ..... ...... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... . ..... ...... ...... ......

...... ...... ...... ...... ......

'; III

00

~t§ ~.S~ to'..r:: 8

Cellc

='

ell

.

.,.. C)"C

ell

ell

III og

~

o

0

~~~

~~]

og~elI

80.001 130.00

3.00 13.00

150.001 20.00/ 60.00 160.001

15.00 2.00 6.00 16.00

........ I........

... ~~~:0.01 .... ~~,.O.O 20.001 2.00 10.001 1.00 80.001 8.00 10.00 100.001 60.00 6.00 100.001 10.00 :: 3.00 30.001 .40 35.00 360.1> 0 1 ...... 50.00 5.00 ...... 480.00 48.00 12.00 120.001 6.40 20.00 2.00 .10

...... ...... ...... ......

......

~~.:8:01

"d

~

o a

t;rj t;rj

t:1

H

Z ow

o

~

1-3 ~

t;rj

........ I........

7.50 ........ I........ 10.001 1.00 80.001 8.00

...... ...... ...... ......

::: ~~~Ol

.. ...... I........ 190.001

19.00

90.001 190.001 20.00 60.001 1

9.00 19.00 2.00 6.00

........ I........

~

to Cl

Cl:)


288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 298 299 300 301 302 303 305 306 307 308 810 311 312 313 814 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 826 327 328

Hermitage. . . . . . .. . . . . . . Graham. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fairmont............... Edina , Lamar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarcoxie................ Mound City............. Moniteau ' Sparta.................. Sampson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Temple................. Doric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . White Hall.............. Lick Creek. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Osage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cecile-Daylight. . . . . . . . . . Ashlar.. ; . . . . . . . . . . .. New London............ Parrott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sikeston................ Kearney. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cuba. . . . .. .. . . . . Meramec................

9

1

1 .... . ... 1

9

6 6 11 9 5 4 3 1 4 26 2

2 4 13 9 4 5 3 1 3 26 3

2 ..•. •.•. ..•• 4 2 2 2 15 1 5 2 12 1 4 1 4 4 2 5 .... 1 3 • . .. 1 1 2 2 . 12 2 29 4 3 3 4 1

6 8 11

4 12 9 1 4 5 35 1 5 3

3 2 1 2 3 . . 16 1 2 3 8 1 . . .. . . 6 ...• 2 4 1. . .. . . 2 .. .. 2 . . .. . . 4 2 ..•.........•.•......... 5 1 1 2 1 . 37 11 6 3 31 6 .. 1 1 2 .... 11 . 3 1 2 . .. . 41 3 . 3 ••.. 10.... 11 5 .

15

20

21 3 . 11 1 .. 41 7 . 41 2. . .. . . 11 . 31 2 . 21 .. , .......•. 21 11 .. 11 8. . .. . . 431 30 . 1 1 . . 1

4 6 34 2 6 3

~~~~~ie~: :::::::::::::::::: ::::

Rural................... 13 Osborn , 4 Elaorado. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Paulville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Versailles. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 6 Jonathan.. . .. .. . . . . .. . . 4 Hardin................. 2 Cornerstone............. 17 McDonald. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Dockery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Linn , 5 Mt. Zion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Cainsville. . . .. . . . ... . . . . 10 330 Paul Revere. . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 331 Charity '...... 84 332 Excello................. 1 334 Breckenridge............ 1 335 Joplin :...... 36

3 3 4 4

5 3 14 32

3 6 1 9 26 38 1 2 34

3

1. .

9

1

.

i ... 2~ 3L.. 3~ 121~ I" . 5i :::: ::::. 2........ 2 2 5 ....

1 5 1

5

1

1

3 1 2 2 15............ 29 3 2 6

31 16 2·

6

1

1

2 .

3 . . .. .... 5 .... 1

, 2 5 3 ....

.

1.....

5

.. . 1 .

.

.. 2 1 8. . .. . .

1 .... 1\.....

. . .. ..

1 2 9 1 6 14. . .. . ... 11 2 ..............•...•..... 29 3 2 3 41 6 . 83.... 6 2 24 10 . 1 1 21 . 3 1 31 . 25 3 3.... 191 9 ..••.••.

88 52 85 143 186 100 130 60 69 83 1183 61 21 117 326 191 39 66 156 377 68 196 109 48 57 399 39 51 88" 147 85 94 563 532 65 206 269 72 441 1197 73 92 735

I

250.00 122.50 217.10 369.20 457.60 254.60 293.20 150.00 170.001 235.001 2918.80 147.10 52.50 291. 10 1 802.50 478.801 90.001 50 157. 1 382.50 953.60 176.00 491.70 281. 50 1 107.10 137. 10 1 991.70 97.50 132.501 217.901 370.001 212.10 223. 80 1 1394.60 1331.5 0 1 149.50 511.701 645.101 167. 50 1 1100.00 2978. 80 1 175.00 231.70 1802.101

I

250.00 122.50 217.50 369.20 462.50 265.00 294.20 160.00 170.00 235.00 2918.80 147.10 52.50 291.10 800.00 479.60 90.00 157.50 382.50 953.60 175.00 491.70 281.50 110.25 137.50 991.70 97.50 132.50 217.90 870.00 211.30 224.60 1394.60 1331.50 149.50 511.70 645.10 167.50 1100.00 2978.80 175.00 229.20 1802.10

I

,..... . •. ...... . •. . . . .40 ..• ... ...... .•• . • • 4.90 .•.... .40 •. . . •. 1.00 •.

120.00 40.00 30.00 90.00 100.00

I

12.00 4.00 3.00 9.00 10.00 . . . . . .. . .•..... 20.00 2.00 20.001 2.00 ••. . .. •..... 40.00 4.00 240.00 24.00 . . . . .. ...... 20.00 2.00 .......••.•................. . • . . .. . ,. 40.001 4.00 2.50 ... 80.00 8.00 ...... .80 90.00 9.00 .. 30.00 3.00 .. 40.00 4.00 30.001 3.00 . . • . .. •....• 330.00 33.00 20.001 2.00 . . . . .. " 30.00 3.00 . .. 10.001 1.00 I••• ',' ••• ...... 3.15 . .. . . . .40 I•••.•••• . . . . .. ..•... 130.001 13.00 .. 50.00 5.00 70.00 7.00 40.00 4.00 60.001 6.00 .80 . 60.001 6.00 2.00 ...... .80 20.001 . . . . .. ....•. 180.001 18.00 400.00 40.00 . . . • .. 4.00 , 40.00 50.00 5.00 .. 30.00 3.00 100.001 10.00 . . .. ..

I--' 1:.0 CI CIj

~ >Z

tj

t-t

o

.tj Q

t?::l

ol'2j ~

H

00 00

g ~

I••••.•••

. .. . ' . • . . .. ••..•. 2.50 .. : . . . . .. .•.

340.001 10.00 10.001 360.001

I

34.00 1.00 1.00 36.00

~

o

1:.0


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

.... I\:)

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

~ .:;

336 337 338 339 340 341 342 344 345 846

347 349 351 352 353 354 355 356 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371

I I Ie

~"t:l"t:l ~ ~ ~

"t:l

~

ll<

1

.~ ~

I]

~!l .~ ~

"t:l

-<

.~ ~

d

ci $

"t:l ;::

.5 ~

rJl

::: ~ ~

P.til

~r! ~;g

Z ci.

]

P ci.

U)

ril

~

.1. \ .

HallsvillE; " 2 2 2 3 '" . 1 Blue Sprmgs............ 10 H 12.... 3 2 11 5 . Herculaneum............ 8 9 9 2 2 1 21 1 •••• Fidelity '.' . . . . . . . . . 3 5 5 . . .. 11 Westport.. . . .. . . . .. . .. . 35 33 31 7 21 6 271 38 . Rockville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 .... 1 3 11 3 . Circle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 2 .... 1 .... .... 1 . Moberly................. 23 25 27 1 7 3 111 3 . Fellowship.... 31 36 28 8 2 4 191 6/ . Arlington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 3 . ••. 4 ••. . 11 7 •••. America................ 22 20 14.... 1 1 71 Pollock 1 3 1 11 . Mosaic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 2 1 1. . .. . 1 1 . Friend. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 9 11 1 1 .... . I 1 'j' . Barnesville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... .... 2 1 1 11 11' .. Hebron................. 17 15 11 4 1 3 4 2 .. Adelphi 1 21 1 1/ 1 1 . Anc. Landmark......... 1 1 1 11 3 . Northwest.............. 1 3 41.... 2 1 21 .... 1 1 . Garrett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 1 ... . 1 .... . ... I. . .. . .. Tuscan................. 29 26 25 5 8 6 211 9 . Reddick................. 3 3 2 3 4.... 21 71 . Hiram.................. 17 12 11 3 1 1 .. Fraternal. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. .... .... .... .... . I..• Higginsville............. 8 7 4 3 4.... 11 8 . Bayou. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 2 1 . . . . 2 .... I 3 . Adair 17 15 14 2 10 12 71 9 , . Barry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 .... 1 . ... I 1/ CrescentHill 7 6 4 1 5 21 11 .. Composite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 5 . . .. 1 61 11· . Williamstown. . . . . . . . . . . 7 8 2 . . .. 1 2 ... Sheldon.. . . .. . . .. . . .. . .. 6 6 7 3 1 ... . I, 1 ..

'1' .

I .

'1' .

'1' .

'1' .

'1'

"I".. .... ,.

'"CIl~::s

~

,Q

><

U)

IS

~ Po

~

o:s!

OCll

'" til

~ll<

ll<tIl

E

~.~

CQ .... lO'~

~

~

~

44

77 106 48 945 127 154 90 97 77 579 41 131 112 61 114

CIl.B l:

~~~

::s

~

"t:l

>Q

o

82.101 82.10 . 391.701 391.70 . 249.20 . 249.201 20 194.20 . 194. 1 2917.40 139.60 114.601 114.60 . 1533.501 1534.10 . 65 1855.65 . 1855. 1 234.00 227.50 . 6.50 60 937.50 2.10 939. 1 139.60 144.60 . . . . . . 177.50 180.00 . . . . . . 1 50 392.50 . 392. 1 190.00 190.00 . 872.50 872.50 . 108.40 . 108.001 177.50 . 177.50 272.10 . 269.60 122.00 . 121.75 . 2359.20 2362.10 327.50 . 324.601 385.00 . 385.001 225.00 . 225.MI 80 234.80 . 234. 1 192.50 192.50 . 1438.80 1438.80 . 95.00 95.00 . 310.00 . 310.001 267.50 267.50 . 147.801 147.80 . 285.00 . 285.001

"'l:~

.

~:.a Cl~E

ll<

~ ~

CII

"t:l~~

~:z:.:;

~

Ci

~~::s

~§~

Ill

~

I:: III

I

1

34 158 100 78 1178 56 46 613 759 90 379 58 70 157 76 356

l:"t:l

.:1 ~]

CIl

~

.... ····1

2n~:~~ :::::: I.. ~~·.~O, .60 .

. 5.00 2.50

o

.

100.001 100.00 30.00 370.00

10.00 10.00 3.00 37.00

30.00 350.00 350.00 70.00 180.00 10.00 30.00 290.00

3.00 35.00 35.00 7.00 18.00 1.00 3.00 29.00

,

.

.... :: .. ·i70:ool····ii:oo

I

1

.40

10.001

1.00

2:50 .... 60:001' .... 6:00 .25 2.90 2.90

10.001 290.001 30.00r 170.001

I

..

1

I-Ij ~

o

ot.%j t.%j

t1

H

Z

Q

00

o

~

8

II1

t.%j

1.00 29.00 3.00 17.00

..

.

70.001

7.00

70.001 70.00 70.00 60.00

7.00 7.00 7.00 6.00

... ~~~:~Ol .... ~~:~o I

~ ~

c:.it Cl:l


372 373 375 376 377

378 379 380 381 383 384 385 387 389 391 392 393 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 419 420 421 422

1 Nonpareil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 7 7 1 11 1 31 .... 1, ;1' . Belle. .. . . •. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 6 5 .... 4 11 10 . Waynesville... .. .. .. 10 6 6. . . . 51 ~ 11 31 . 310 KingHill 29232610 2 1 81 1 . Anc. Craft. . . . . . . . . . .. . . 1 1 1 11 2 3 2 . Berlin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... .... 1 . . .. .... .:.. 21. . .. •... . . Billings................. 5 4 0 3 1 11 .. Queen City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 1 .... 1 .... 11 Ionia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 15 14 4 2 1 61 2 . Pythagoras.............. 5 5 5 .... 8 1 11 61 . East Prairie. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4 4 2 3 3 11 3 . Richland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 7 8 . .. . 7 . .. . 1 13 Woodside. .. . . .. . . .. . . . . 1 1 1 .... 2 1 .... Arcana. . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . 4 2 2 . . .. .... . ... I. , .. . Raytown................ 48 44 44 10 4 ,... 3 6 Christian.... . .. .. . .. ... 6 6 6 1 2 1 1 3 .. Beehive .. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 2 .... 4 1 3 6 . Western Light........... 2 3 3 .... 4 2 71 . Gower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 5 1 5 .... 1 Jasper 1 2 2 1 ......•. 2 . Pike ....................................•...........•....... 1 . Decatur..................... 1 2 1 1 11 2 ,' . Carterville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5 5 1 1 .... 5 14 . Malta................... 2 1 2............ 21 . Lowry City.............. 2 2 2............ 21 .. Rosendale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 1 1 .... 21 I . Everton................. 2 2 2 3 3 21 1/ . Malden. .. . . .. .. . .. . .. .. 9 9 9 1 .... 3 31 5 .. Charleston.............. 8 8 10.... 5 5 111 81 . Montrose. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . 4 5 6 . . .. ..... 11 1 . Louisville ,..... 1 1 1 1 2 1 .. .. . . Iberia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 2 .... 2 . . •. 2 1•••• Joppa... 2 1.... 1 21 1 . Appleton City........... 4 4 4.... 1 .... 3 . Valley.................. 1 1 1 .... .... 31 .. Greensburg............. 1 1 1 1 5 21 8 . Hunnewell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 4 .••. .••. ..•. , ... I.... I . Cache .. ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 10 11 5 1 4 2 111 31' . Whitewater............. 12 7 9 1 ..•. 1/ 1 .. Star ".. . 1 1 1 . Itaska.. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. 8 8 9 1 1 2 121 1 .. Urbana , " ,.... 5 5 5. . . . 1 .,.. 11 . Gate of the Temple. . . . . .. 62 48 52 7 14 2 191 10 .

'1' .

I

1

~

I

1W U6 ~6

120 37 75 66 291 197 105

"2 U

46

HI 105 103 46 69 77

M W4 148 ~

66 66 ~

131 257

n

43 117 75 113 56 87 ~ ~2

156 51 319 64 1179

I 1 I 119.201 119.20 I I 70.001 7.00 376.701 376.70 . I•••.•. ,. 397.501 402.50 ~. . . . . 5.00 100.00\ 10.00 1467.101 1467.10 . . . . .. 290.00 29.00 325.001 325.00 . I , . 92.501 92.50 I . 60 187.50 50.001 5.00 187. 1 167.50 167.50 : I . 717.50 720.00 . . . . . . 2.50 110.001 11.00 506.301 506.70 . . . . . . .40 90.001 9.00 265.001 260.00 5.00. . . . . . 120.001 12.00 372.10 . . . . . . 2.50 20.001 2.00 369. 60 1 82.50 82.50 , I•••••••. 116.70 40.001 4.00 116. 70 1 880,00 880.00 480.001 48.00 10.001 UlO 262. 50 1 262.50 257.50 257.50 10.001 1.00 127.501 127.50 90.001 9.00 170.001 170.00 40.001 4.00 186.701 187.20 .50 10.001 1.00 82.501 82.50 I•••.•••• 260.001 260.00 . I•......• 342.50 .40 . . . . . . .. I..•••..• 342.101 138.30 .. 20.001 2.00 138.301 165.001 165.00 . .. 20.001 2.00 155.30 . . . . . . 5.00 I•.•••.•• 150.301 219.601 240.00 . . . . . . 20.40 20.001 2.00 319.70 I . 319.701 650.00 ... 7.50 80.001 8.00 642. 50 1 175.00 175.00 90.00 9.00 105.00 105.00 1 .. 294.601 300.00 . . . . . . 5.40 50.001 5.00 180.001 ~~~:~~ 269. 60 1 140:00 140.00 . . . . .. 10.00 1.00 235.001 235.00 . . 102.501 102.50 60.001 6.00 1869.601 1870.00 .. . . . . .40 100.001 10.00 395.00 2.90 120.001 12.00 392. 10 1 108.30 108.30 . . . . .. •..... . .....•. I . 779.601 779.60 . .. 80.001 8.00 162.101 162.10 .. 70.001 7.00 2945.101 2945.10 490.001 49.00

~

'0 01

~

Q !;1j

>Z

t:1 t'l

o

t:1

Q

t.".:l

o

~

~

H

m 00 o q

~

H

... i:95!: ::::: .... 30:001" ... 3:00

I

I'"

I

t>:) ~

I--'


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABUL.AR STATEMENT---cContinued

t>:l ~

~ NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

~ :5 ~ 'tl

~

423 424 425 426 427 429 430 432 433 434 435 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 450 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461

p.;

'tl 'tl

'i .ra ~

] .~

~

Galt.................... .... .... .... .... Samaritan.............. 13 10 8 1 Green Ridge............. 3 2 2

41

o i

S ~ :S ZQ. ~ 's

;:i

gj

ci. gj

00

00

CIS

~

17 7

~:~:~:::::::::::::::"'2

is

I

1 2 ..•.

ClI

l:l

I

41 31 31

4 3

"i

l:lo >< r:l

. . .

'''26 '''212...... :::: ::::.. ::::5 ... ~I:::: ::::. 11 11

New Madrid.. .. .. .. Winona..................... .... .... 1 1 2 1 1 . Competition............. 4 4 4 .... 1 2 1 . Mack's Creek. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 4 .... 3 . 2 8 . Wheeling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 2 2. . .. . . Rockbridge. .. .. . . . . . . .. . 4 4 2 . . .. 1 3 . Temperance............. 11 9 7 1 1 5 21:'" Mt. Olive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 . . .. .... .... 7 . Trowel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 6 3 1 9 2 3 3 . Excelsior. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 9 6 .... 2 .... 2 . . .. . . Burlington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 3 1 ... . 1 1 .... Anchor................. 33 31 23 6 5 .... 111 2, .... Ada.................... 1 .... .... .... 1 1 1 .... West Gate.. . .. .... . ... .. 9 10 8 .. .. 5 2 16 6 . Ivanhoe................. 86 78 76 13 80 21 68 17 .. Jacoby...................... .... .... .... 1 .... 2 11 . Schell City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 2 . . .. .... 1 1 5 . Belton.. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. .. 8 7 9 1 1 3 1 6 .. Forsyth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5 4 . . .. .... 2 1 6 . ContinentaL............ 2 1 1 1 2 1 .. Hinton...................... 1 1•••••••• Wallace................. 2 2 2 2 1 •••••••• 21 1 Jonesburg............... 1 1 1 1 .... .... 2 2 Melville ......•............. 5 .... 1 ........ Hazelwood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4 3 1 1 1 11 2 , . Lambskin. . . . . . • . . . . . . . . 40 41 37 5) 7 2 14/ 4 . Caruthersville.. . . ... . .. . 11 9 9 3 3 4 4 71 .

·1....

I....

'tl ~

~ U41

U'tl

J.40;

l:l

~l:l

~~

41

<:I

Po CIS

",,::s

~

'S

~.~

41

~~

~

~

90 158 58 39 66 162 31 78 88 58 52 127 52 128 183 71

692 60 539 3067 52 66 184 97 55 22 37 63 66 65 916 235

I

I

251. 70 1 394.60 145.001 ·92.50 160.00 400.001 79. 60 1 185.00 222.50 141.701 130.001 317. 10 1 127.50 337.101 458.001 170.401 1721.70 152.10 1341.90 7690.50 130.00 162.50 445.001 240.00 140.00 47.901 92.101 166.151 160.001 159.601 2261. 30 1 585.20

251.70 394.60 145.00 92.50 160.00 400.00 77.50 185.00 222.50 141.70 130.00 320.00 132.50 337.10 458.00 170.40 1721.70 155.00 1341.90 7692.50 130.00 162.50 445.00 240.00 140.00 47.90 87.10 166.15 160.00 160.00 2264.60 585.20

~

::s

.

.5

I:

1

~

CIS

t.'gj~

0

~oo~

~~,:; ~

I

. . . . ..

t~§

~e.; O'~

U

I::l:l

g~r;

~~~ ~

I .. ...... I........ 80.001

........ j

..... I

I ••••••

t>:l

'a l:lo::s gog

§'tl

60.001 110.00

8.00 .

..

6.00 11.00

2.10 ..... I........ . 80.00/ 8.00 . 130.00 13.00 . 10.00 1.00 . 40.00 4.00 . 2.90 60.00 6.00 . 5.00 10.00 1.00 . 50.00 5.00 . 100.00 10.00 . 30.00 3.00 . 330.001 33.00 ....•. 2.901 110.00 11.00 . ... 90.00 9.00 . 2.00 760.001 76.00 . ........ I .. . .... 90:00\' 9:00 ....•. . 80.001 8.00 ..•••. ..•... , •....• .... ~~:o.o ..... ~ . o.o 5.00 30.00 3.00 . . . .40 60.00 6.00 . 3.30 350.00 35.00 . 110.00 11.00

io:ool" ...i:oo

""d

~

o a

t;rj t;rj

t:J

I-l

Z' Q 00

o

~

t-3

I:Il

t;rj

~

l:.O

01

Cij


1 462 Santa Fe................ 2 2 2/ ............ 1 . 463 Clifton. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . 5 2 2 2 3 1 31 1..... . 464 Concordia............... 5 6 6 .... 1 .... 11 . 466 Southwest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 •... . ... 467 Pleasant Hope........... 1.... 4 1 8 ..•..... 469 Plato. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . . .. 2 2 2 1. . . . 1 11 ....•....... 470 Nodaway. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 10 13 5 3 5 .. 471 Mineral. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6 5 . 1 .... .... 5 . . 472 Pickering............... 1 ..•. .... .... 1 21 1 .. 473 Nineveh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 2 1 4 1 3 6 . . .. . . 475 Golden 1 4 1. . .. . . ,....... 3 4 4 . 3 476 Mt. Hope. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . 14 11 16 1 1 1 1 , . 477 Henderson.............. 7 7 7 .... 4 3 8 . 479 Rich Hill ........ ; .. .. . .. 13 12 11 1 2 1 3 .... . . 480 Jewel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6 10 2 1 .... 11 1. . .. . . 481 Marceline............... 12 12 12 1 3 2 .... 1 4 .. 482 Clintonville. . .. .. . . . . . . . 8 6 7 2 1 2 11 3 . 483 Fairfax ,.. 3 4· 4 1 2 41 .. 484 Kirkwood............... 29 88 39 10 8 12 9 . 485 Coldwater............... 4 3 2 2........ 31 2 •. , . 486 Cairo '" 5 11 3 . 487 Chilhowee............... 3 4 8 2 1 31 2 .. 488 Lock Springs........... . 4 4 4 2 1 . 489 Lakeville.. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. 2 1 2.. .. 2 1 11 2...... .. 490 Montevallo. . . . . .. . . . . . . . 2. . .. .•.. 1 11 7 . 491 Vandalia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 3 1 1 .... 41 1. . .. ., .. 492 Dag~ett................. 2 2 2........ 1 11 . 494 Lewistown.·, .. ,........ . .... 2 1 21 . 495 Unity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 3 1 6 2 . . 496 Robert Burns. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 2 1 5 1 1 8. . .. . . 497 Equality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 7 6 1 2 .... 11 1. • .. . . 499 Harmony............... 14 13 17........ 4 131 4 . 500 Jameson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4 4 .... .... 11 .... I. . .. . . 501 Buckner................ 18 14 11 2 2 I 11 .. 2 1 1 .... .... 11.......... .. 502 Philadelphia..... .. .. .. . .. 503 Prairie Home.... ........ 1 1 1.... 1 1 41 .... 1. . . . . . . . 504 Platte City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 8 7 3 .. ,. .... 21 1...... .. 505 Euclid ..... : .. . .. .. .. . .. 11 9 9 1 .... 6 506 Lathrop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 3 .... 2 1. . . . 2 ..,. 507 Clearmont 10 3 4........ 1 21 1 .. 508 Saxton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 .... 11 1 9. .. .. 509 Van Buren. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3 4 1 3 2 3 2 . . 510 NewHampton........... 4 4 5 1 1 1 :1 ..

21

6

61

21

4....

41

4

2

41'

21

I

1

.. ..

40 162 61 80 66 103 377 55 50 37 77 166 108 125 188 221 201 149 566 80 76 78 86 118 26 123 66 69 82 96 118 382 52 127 25 53 110 532 47 57 78 128 83

90.001 60 399. 154.25 194.60 185.00 255.001 929.10 135.00 124, 60 1 100.00 195.001 414.20/ 274.20 808.80 452.50 558.40 499.60 352.10 1431.70 200.00 202.50 192.50j 220.001 290.00 53.30 310.001 162.10 170.00 219.60 247.101 287.501 955.00\ 130.00 393.101 62.501 135.00 259.60 1315.00 121.70 142.50 190.00 315.70 202.50 1

1

90.00 404.60 152.50 195.00 185.00 255.00 929.10 135.00 124.60 100.00 195.00 414.20 276.70 308.80 452.50 558.40 500.00 352.10 1431.70 200.00 202.50 190.00 220.00

I

..

...... 20.001 2.00 5.00 40.001 4.00 1.75 . • • . . . 50.001 5.00 .....• .40 10.001 1.00 .....••.••.......... I . ....•.........•.•••• I.....•.• ....•. . .....•. ·1 .•...... . . . . .. 70.001 7.00 .........•........•......... ..••.. 10.00 1.00 30.00 3.00 . . . . .. .. . ... 140.00 14.00 ...... 2.50 80.00\ 8.00 100.00 10.00 70.001 7.00 100.001 10.00 . . . . .. ...... .40 30.00 8.00 ...... 20.001 2.00 ..,... 140.001 14.00 ,. 40.001 4.00 ................•........... 2.50 . . . ....•................

2~i:~g :::::: 310.00 162.10

. ..

ng:~g~:::::

: ..5.0 .... ~~'.0.01 ..... ~,.O.O 50.001 6.00 20.00 2.00

:::::: :::::::: I:::::::: I .

247.10 . 287.50 ,.. . 966.00 . . . . .. 130.00 393.10 62.60 136.00 . .. 259.60 .•.... 1315.00 122.10 .40 142.60 190.00 •..... 317.70 2.00 202.50

j......

I

130:001 30.001 130.001 10.001 10.001 80.00 120.00 10.00 110.001 50.00 40.00 40.00

I

.

13.00 3.00 13.00 1.00 1.00 8.00 12.00 1.00 11.00 5.00 4.00 4.00

1-£

<:.c

C)l

C..:l

Q ~

> Z l:'

~

o

l:'

Q

t?j

o

~

~

H

00

W

oq ~ H

t..:l

1-£ C..:l


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued ~

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

.2S

'tl

'tl

+l

~

.!!l

01

~

:§ 611 512 513 514 516 516 618 519 520 521 522 524 625 526 527 528 529 631 632 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 643 544 545

~

'tl 'tl

'tl

e<

01 ~

il< I

.2S

.is

~

I

Skidmore ............... 2 2 Webb City ............... 8 10 Senath .................. 4 6 Granby ................ '. 3 2 Galena.................. 2 3 Milford ................. 2 3 1 Oriental. ............... 2 4 Crane ................... 3 Clifton Heights .......... 16 18 2 Lockwood ............... 3 64 67 Gate City ............... SpickardsvilJe ........... .... .... 2 2 Cunningham ............ 2 4 Wayne .........•........ 1 .... Higbee .................. 1 1 Conway ................. 9 Apoll,o .... :.: ........... 12 Lane s Pralne ........... 2 2 Dexter .................. 17 21 Comfort ................ 5 5 Columbia ............... 20 20 BlackwelL .............. .... 4 Ingomar ................ 7 5 BetheL ................. 3 3 2 Stella ................... 3 Dawn ................... 2 3 Winigan ................ .... .... J acksonvilJe ............. .... 6 32 Ferguson ............... 36 4 10 Mansfield ................ 13 10 Algabil ................. 8 6 Zalma ..................

~

B ~

'Qj ~

1 ·s is

z

I1l

..c::

A

~

01

~

~

Cl

UJ

d )i

;:5 A ~

UJ

I 1 I I I 1 .... 21 .... 1 2 5 1 21 2 .... 6 1 .... 31 6 .... .... 1 .... I 21 .... 1. . . . 3 2/ ........ .... .... 1 1 .... 1. . . . 4 .... 4 2 11 13 .... 16 6 4 3 3 .... .... .... 141 9 .... 64 7 3 6 36 3 .... 1 2 .... 2 .... .... 1... ·1 .... 4 4 1 2 31 1 11 1 .... 1 .... 1 5 .... 8 1 4 51 ........ 2 .... 17 4 8 31 .... .. 6 161 3 3 1 1 .... 20 2 4 .... 1 .... I 1 .... 7 .... 1 1 4 .... 241 7 2 11 ........ 2 1 2 3 21 4 .... 4 .... 6 1 .... 1 .... 1 .... 1 1 .... 4 1 1 .... 31 3 3 10 8 1 2 1 .... 1........ 15 2 1 2 111 2 .... 7 .... .... 1 .... I 11 .... I I 1 9 3 3 3 6 2

.... ....

~I ... ~

.... .... ....

....

....

~I

l'"

Po

'tl ~

~

ril

~

....

....

l'"'1"'...." .... 'I

1"

.... ....

T'

l'" .... .. ,,1''''1:::: .... ....

~Cl

~

S

....

~ ::l

is ..Q

~

><

til Q~

O')~

~

10''-

~

I

98 261 120 126 116 43 80 153 680 68 1323 38 64 157 105 59 260 70 186 91 141 50 148 70 70 48 79 76 386 86 442 116

"""1

I

······1I

I

245.00 30.001 3.00 664.20 .40 . . . . . . 80.00 8.00 653.80 302.10 304.20 .:.... 2.10 80.00 8.00 302.10 302.10 . .. 30.00 3.00 287.501 287.50 . I..•..•..•...•... 107.50 107.50 .. 1 10.001 1.00 200.00 I. 10.00 1.00 200.00 . 373.60 373.60 . I . 1672.10 1672.10 ,...... 160.001 16.00 167.50 167.60 . .. . I . 3236.30 3236.30 ,...... 640.001 64.00 101.30 101.30 . I...••.•• 157.60 157.50 ,...... 10.001 1.00 391.70 ...... 50.00 5.00 391.70 10 257. 1 257.10 30.00 3.00 142.50 142.50 . :. 10.001 1.00 646.301 646.70 .40 110.001 11.00 176.001 j I .. 175.00 140.001 14.00 507. 50 1 507.50 217.60 5.00 217.50 60.00 347.501 347.60 . .. 200.00 20.00 126.001 125.00 . . 359.60\ 359.60 . .. 50.001 5.00 174.60 174.60 30.00 3.00 189.601 189.60 . .•... 50.00 5.00 122.501 122.50 30.00 3.00 188.651 188.66 , . 190.00 . . . . . . 2.50 90.00, 9.00 187.50/ 954.60 964.60 330.001 33.00 217.101 217.10 20.001 2.00 1099.601 1100.00 . . . . . . .40 130.001 13.00 288.401 80.00 8.00 288.40 . . . . ..

'1' .....

~

!:d

oo

M M

t:t

H

Z

o00 o"":j 1-3

p::

M

I

I

I

~ ~

Ol ~


546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 558 559 560 561 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 672 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 581 582 583 585 586 587 588 590 591 592 593

Orient. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Gate........... ... Clinton................. Carl Junction........... Rose Hill. .. . . .. .. .. . . . .. Pendleton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Calhoun. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .

1 43 36 19 7 10 2. 3

1 1 51 52 1\ 28 30 .... 1 18 18 5 5 7 ... 15 12. . . . 3 2. . . . 2 .. " ••••

3

~:~~::....: : ..: ..: ..: ..: ..: : : . ~

2

~

Clarksdale Nelson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Cowgill. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .... .... York. .. .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . 16 14 Jamesport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 Tebbetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... Maplewood. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 28 26 Miller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 Naylor.................. 4 5 Marlborough............ 36 32 Republic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 8 Hayti. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 Rutledge.................... 1 Bernie.................. 15 15 LaMonte 6 3 Easter.................. 12 10 Olive Branch. . . . . . . . . . . . 24 19 Ewing.................. 1 1 Forest Park. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 5 Grandin............... . 6 5 IIImo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 6 Koshkonong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... Novinger............... 2 1 Shamrock .. 1 1 Criterion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 Branson................ 8 2 St. Francisville. . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Advance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3 Barnett. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 La Russell.............. 3 2 Union........... ....... III 11 I

00...........

'1' .

14 3 5

241 191 171 5 . 31 51 . 2 41···· 1 1 151 5 . 6 . . .. . ... 1 9 . 11 2 11 .... 1.•.• 1 • • • .

·1.... ....

~:~:~~~~::::::::::::::"'i:::: ::::

Summersville. .. .. . .. .. ..

III 7 8

::::1"'3 ::,:: ::::1'''8'':::: 31 3 ....

·1....

11

i ::: :I::::I:::: I

....

1\ ·1···· 11 3. . .. . . 11 .. 001' ... 91 4 I

11 12 2 6 7 1 2 2 .... I 2. . .. . . .... 1 1 .... 11 .... 1 . 24 3 91 9 101 6 .. 5 1 .... . 1 11...... .. 5 3 2 I 1 .... I .. 31 3 6 1 41 41'" .1 . 7 2 1 1 11. . .. .... . . .... 5 I 2 1 4 . . .. . . 1 1 2 2\ 2 .. 15 2 1 1 •••.••.. 3 1 31 , . 9 1.... 2 ... 1 ' . 18. . . . 1 1 19 3 •....... 1........ 1 1 . 2 1 .... .... 7 4 , . 5 .... 1 1 21 2 .. 8 .... 1 .... 4 71 01 • • • • .... 1 10.... 41 5 .. .... .... 21 . 1 1 .. .. 11 9 •... 2 1 7 1 21 51 . 3 .. " .... .... 3 .... . . 3 3 4 .. . . 4 51' . 2 1 11 . 2 .... 21 4 .. 13 1.... 3 5 2 ..

'j'

2j 1...... "I'

!

I

I

I

I

I

~7

Ml 124 472 ~

41

W

3 .... 1....

~ I: : : : I: : ::

I

1248

.

68 73 58

U

63 50 48 478

ro5

51

"2 ll5

J:

149

III

~1

1M

W

1" 513 31 2~

97 230 44 43 . 14 51 168 W 110

a

& In

I

3115. 30 1 1640.50 876.70/ 304.20 1169.00 137.50 102.10 77.50 177.10 182.50 145.00i 207.501 159.00\ 117.50 50 1163.60 117. 1 252.50 125.00 1667.50 287.501 185.001 781.701 367.101 277.501 135.001 238.001 147.501 447. 50 1 1247.50 7.001 540.001 242.501 545.001 114.601 132.501 35.001 130.001 426.451 235.001 275.901 95.001 119.201 430.00/

I

I

!

3115.30 / 1640.50 . . . . .. 876.70 ,. . . . . . 304.20 ...... 1169.60 .601 137.50 '1' . . . ..

1~~:~g : : : : ::

\

420.00 350.001 190.001 70.00

42.00 35.00 19.00 7.00

30.001

3.00

I

'1' .....

.

00

I

I

Clj

.

:::::: I, ~~,.O.O I ~'.O.O 177.50 ,... .40 \ . 182.50 . . . . .. ,...... 80.00 8.00 20.00\ 2.00 145.00 . . . . .. 207.50 40.00 4.00 I•••••••• 159.00 . 117.50 I ' 117.50 10.001 1.00 1163.60 . . . . .. 100.00 10.00 272.50 . . . . . . 20.00 80.001 8.00 125.00 1667.50 . . . . .. ....•. 190.00 19.00 287.50 . . . . .. 10.00 1.00 185.00 ...... 80.00 8.00 782.50 . . . . . . .80 410.00 41.00 377.50 10040 120.00 12.00 277.50 \...... 90.00 9.00 135.00 20.00 2.00 238.00 140.00 14.00 147.50 . . . . .. . I . 447.50 .· ·1 100.001 10.00 1247.50 240.00 24.00 7.00 20.00 2.00 540.00 . .. 70.001 7.00 242.50 .....• . 1 90.001 9.00 545.00 30.001 3.00 115.00 .40 10.001 1.00 132.50 I . 35.00 I . 130.00 . I...••... 423.95 2.50 . . . . . . 30.00 I 3.00 235.00 . I...••••. 275.90 . I . 95.00 1 I .. 119.20 ..•................. \ 430.00 110.00 11.00

I

f-£

'-0 <:J1

Q

t:d

:> Z

tj

t"4

o

tj Q t%j

o

"'::l ~

~

l/l l/l

o

q

~

H

t-:l ; f-£

<:J1


GRAND SECRETARY'S TABULAR STATEMENT-Continued

.... l'-:)

0)

NAME AND NUMBER OF LODGE

I] CIl

~

:s 696 696 597 598 699 600 601 602 603 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 620 621 622 623 6:!4 625 626 628 629

~

"tl "tl

"tl

~

.!5

CIl

p..

.21

~

<

1 1 Cole Camp .............. 1 3 Puxico .................. 7 5 Bosworth ............... 19 12 12 2 2 2 Leadwood ............... Elvins .................. 19 21 19 4 6 Cosby ................... 5 Clayton ................. 12 11 11 Acacia .................. 23 17 18 6 8 Morehouse .............. 10 2 2 Walker ................. 2 5 Craig ................... 4 4 9 9 9 Eminence ............... 5 5 6 Strafford ................ 2 2 Warrenton .............. 2 Clark ................... .... .... .... 2 2 2 Centertown ............. Mokane ................. 1 1 1 Wellston ............. : .. 34 31 27 Mt. Washington ......... 38 39 37 Chaffee ................. 15 15 13 Brentwood .............. 18 18 10 Swope Park ............. 31 22 21 Grandview .............. 27 25 24 6 Willard ................. 10 8 Anderson ............... 5 6 5 4 4 Norwood ................ 4 Overland ................ 20 14 16 Owensville .............. 11 8 8 Sheffield ................. 48 36 51 Magnolia ................ 15 18 23 2 1 .... Mendon ................. Valley Park ............. 9 11 10

~

]

<II

"tl

i'" '~S ..c:.... 'S is '" I1l

is

~

Z

::)

ci.

ci.

Q)

rn

rn

r:il

I

..•. .... 11 .... 3 7 3 .... .... 2 2 2 1 .... 3 3 1 4 6 5 1 1 .... .... 9 6 11 3 5 5 1 5 1 3 28 30 2 .... •••• 1 1 2 1 .... 1.... 4 1 .... 1 6 .... 2 11 ..•. 4 .... ..•. / 6 .... 1 ..•. 1 .... .... .... .... .... 1 2 22 1 .... 10 8 3 .... 3 2 4 9 .... .... 1 11 7 12 6 2 4 2 1 1 1 .... 1 .... 1.... 2 6 .... .... I 7 .... 5 .... / ....1 11 3 .... 1 3 1 2 21 3 11 5 121 16 2 2 6 271 4 1 .... 1 .... 2 ... ; 2 6 1 2 2 4 3 ....

. ~~I'" ~ 1~1· ..; :1

.... .... 1

2

~

b.

:i

~

CIl

~

d

p.;

."21'" i

~

x

. ... .... . ... 1

.... ....

.... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....

.... . ...

.... ....

.... . ... .... .... .... ....

.... .... .... .... .... ....

.... .... .... . ...

.... .... .... ....

t~§

~:g

QI~

p..", et) ....

~p..

u

s

III

!l :0

::;15..;

et)!i

"tl 0'"

~~~

::;1

~

l%l

0

p..

p..

CIl

.... .... ....

..•. .... .... ..•. .... .... .... .... ..•.

s:l"tl

CJ"O

C CIl s:l

'" ",,::s

CIl ,Q

Po

.~

CIl

OCll

~

"tl ~

b.

u

10'"

38 101 98 114 344 103 399 423 122 51 55 119 81 134 65 65 110 923 738 139 127 621 316 127 125 68 138 203 665 875 68 195

81.70\ 267. 50 1 245.00 282.501 812.101 255.00 997.50 1052.26 320.00 131.70 141.30 306.70 197.501 340.001 135.00 147.50 50 277. 1 2277.50 1850.00 347.101 317.501 1617.801 794. 60 1 308.20 314.201 182. 60 1 345.00 607.50 1605.001 2172.10 165.001 492.50

""CIl

10'"

~

81.70 267.50 245.00 282.50 812.10 255.00 ~ 997.50 1054.30 320.00 132.35 141.30 307.50 197.50 340.00 135.00 147.50 277.50 2280.00 1850.00 347.10 317.50 1617.80 794.60 308.20 314.20 182.50 355.00 507.50 1605.00 2172.10 165.00 492.50

::s

oPo::s

~

CIl

s:l

-;

gjrn~

~.5~

CIl,C

'Qj~::;1

'Qj=~

l::

...... . .....

...i30:o.I···· i.:o. 190.00 19.00

...... . ..... ........ I........ . ..... . ..... ...... . ..... . ..... . ..... ...... . ..... . ..... ...... . ..... ...... . ..... ...... ...... ......

...... ......

2.05 .65 .80

...... . ..... . .... . ....

2.50

..... ..... . .... ..... .....

'"d

~

380.00 40.00 90.00 200.00 50.00 30.00 20.00 300.00

38.00 0 4.00 - 0 t.%J 9.00 t.%J 20.00 t1 5.00 H 3.00 Z 2.00 30.00 Q 00

40.00 20.00 10.00\ 400.00 360.00 110.00 180.00 290.00 270.00 80.00 80.00

4.00 2.00 1.00 40.00 36.00 11.00 18.00 29.00 27.00 8.00 3.00

····..:·l···':OO

...... . ..... . ..... ...... . .... ...... . .... . ..... ........ I........ ...... 10.00 230.001 23.00 . ..... ...... 100.001 10.00 . ..... . ..... ••• ~~~:~O •••• ~~ ••~O . ..... ...... 80.00 8.00

"'.001 ".00 I

0

~

8

tIl t.%J

I-' ~

CJ1 ~


630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655

656 657 658

659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666

UD

East Gate Tower Grove Belgrade Archie Steele Greentop Freedom Mt. View Triangle Mizpah

. 116 109 . 6 7 . 1 1 . 4 5 . 9 8 . 1 2 . 25 21 . 5 2 . 4 3 . 11 13 18 20 ~~i~A~~·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.· 15 13 Benj. Franklin . 24 13 Northeast . 47 49 Grain Valley . 3 5 Clarkton . 6 4 Shaveh . 21 21 Noel . 3 5 Elmer . 5 4 University . 2 5 Parma . 6 5 Cleveland . 6 6 Pilgrim . 12 18 Shawnee . 2 6 Commonwealth . 12 12 Gardenville..........•... 11 12 Country Club . 23 23 Progress . 11 8 Purity •.•............... 19 12 Alpha . 60 50 Holliday . 1 3 Theo. Roosevelt . 9 6 Clarence . 1 2 Rockhill . 25 20 Aldrich . 2 2 Wardell . 10 8 Lilbourn . 4 7 Berkeley . 13 12

I 89 6

I 12

33

6

3 4.... 6 7 1 2 23 2 .... 1 .... 6 3.... .... 14 4 1 22 .... 1 19 ..•. 4 15 .... 5 42 2 13 7 1 3.... 16 . . . . 1

14 3

2

1 1 3

2 3

7 1

311 51

I 1

11 21 1 21 141 51 3 4

30\ 3

.

.

..

2 7\ . 3 . 2 .. 9 .. 1 4 ' . 2 .. 4 8

. .

1

91 13 1 . 1 .... 1 9 71 3 , ...

2

71

: ::::

~ :::: ... \ .. ~ 1::::

7

5

5

1

4

1

12 2 5 1 .... 8 '" . 1 15 3 .... 18 7 3 5 .... 1 14 '" . 1 50 6 12 3

~ ::::

~

2

11 2 1 1 2 6 1 1 3

~

2

..

,

.

61 21 .. 21 21 . 41' 1 41 2 . 71 12 . 5 4 1 .. 4 3 41 6, .... I 1

~I ... ~1 ::::

23 2 6 1 31 8 2.... .... .... 3 1 4 1 3 1 8 3 11 . 12 4 •••.•••••.•• 1 • • • • • • • •

I .

I

I

""'01"

~

I

2258 5639. 20 1 962.50 382 44 110.001 144.60 581 119 312.501 64 162.501 177 435.001 73 180.00 242 594.001 697 1742.101 358 892.501 389 969.201 519 1294.901 751 1904.201 111 277.501 52 155.001 344 855.001 61 160.00 66 165.00 262 646.70 116 300.001 56 144.601 293 737.501 83 207.501 206 507.501 270 672.501 1346.501 538 357 889.001 313 777.901 401 1045.001 24 57. 50 1 222 567.10 58 147.501 393 994. 60 1 47 117.50 42 110.00 51 127. 50 1 48 120.00

5651.70 962.50 110.00 144.60 312.50 162.50 435.00 180.00 594.00 1742.10 892.50 962.90 1308.20 1904.00 277.50 155.00 855.00 160.00 165.00 646.70 287.50 144.60 737.50 207.50 507.50 672.50 1346.50 889.00 777.90 1047.50 57.50 567.10 147.50 994.60 117.50 110.00 127.50 120.00

1 I ...... 12.50 1090.001 .. . 70.00 . .. 20.00 . .. 30.00[ . .. 150.001 ....•.........•..... I . . . . .. •..... 250.001 . . . . .. 30.00 . . . . .. 40.00 110.001 . •. •..... 300.001 6.30 ..... . 160.00 ...... 13.30 240.001 .20 . 450.001 ...... 50.001 . . . . .. 30.00 210.00 70.00 60.001 30.00 12.50. . . . . . 130.00 . I . .. 140.001 10.00 80.00 110.00 ... 230.001 120.001 . .. 160.001 ...... 2.50 580.00 ....•............... I .. 90.001 30.00 . . . . .. 320.00 20.001 70.001 .....• 1 . . . . .. 130.00

I......

I

109.00 7.00 2.00 3.00 15.00

Cij

.

25.00 3.00 4.00 11.00 30.00 16.00 24.00 45.00 5.00 3.00 21.00 7.00 6.00 3.00 13.00

.

14.00 1.00 8.00 11.00 23.00 12.00 16.00 58.00

.

Q

~

Z t1 ~

o

t1

Q

t%j

o

I'%j

rs:

I-t

00 00

oq

~

9.00 3.00 32.00 2.00 7.00 ..

13.00 l'I:)

""'"

-:J


I\:)

I--' 00

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS FIRST DISTRICT-MARSHALL STORY D. D. G. M., Kahoka, Mo. County Clark

Scotland Schuyler

Lodge . Fairmont Eldorado........ Hiram St. Francisville . Memphis........ Gorin........... Rutledge . Middle Fabius Lodge of Love Queen City Glenwood ,. Greentop

NO.1 Location 290jWyaconda 318ILuray 362IKahoka 588IWayland 16 Memphis 72 Gorin 572IRutledge 244 Downing 259ILancaster 380lQueen City 427IGlenwood 635iGreentop

Master LeRoy E. Smith Ben Hufford D. O. McLaughlin Harold D. O'Day J. A. Daggs Dean Buford Clarence A. Bertram. H. H. Lewis Edward S. Dodson , Gilbert N. Gosser , Leslie H. Burns Curtis Myers

Secretary A. G. Dieterich, Wyaconda, Mo Chas. Sisson, Luray, Mo...................... .. Elmer C. Dinger. Kahoka, Mo Harold W. Brammer, Box 173, Wayland, Mo E. F. Bertram, 414 E. Jackson, Memphis, Mo Richard E. Shacklett, Gorin, Mo James A. Bailey, Rutledge, Mo , R. W. Farris, Box 26, Downing, Mo H. C. Burkland, Lancaster, Mo G. L. Lauer, Queen City, Mo Donald R. Griffith, Glenwood, Mo........ . B. F. Arnold, Greentop,Mo

Time of Meeting 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Fri ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon.

~

pj

o o

t<:l

t::j

t1

H

Z

o

w

o

"'=j

1-3

P::

SECOND DISTRICT-E. LEE BAKER, D. D. G. M., Kirksville, Mo. Adair Knox

' Kirksville Adair Novinger . Colony Edina Paulville Greensbur~

. . . . . . .

l05lKirksville 366 Kirksville 583 Novinger 168lColOny 291 Edina 319lHurdland 414lGreensburg

;" . . . . . . .

Charles A. Lovell Leslie Bagley Clarence Zeigler Paul Bozarth Carl A. Shumate Wm. H. Foglesong J. J. Pearce

. . . . . . .

Grover C. Chambers, Kirksville, Mo Ernest T. Scofield, Box 331, Kirksville, Mo Donald E. Daniels, Novinger, Mo C. F. McKay, Rutledge, Mo Edward C. Hickman, Edina, Mo John R. Botts, Hurdland, Mo Eddie L. Priebe, RR I, Baring, Mo

t<:l

. . . . . . .

1st & 3rd Tues. 2rid & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Tues. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Mon.

I--'

'0 CJl CJ:l


J--'

'-0 CJ'l C>..:>

THIRD DISTRICT-REX S. COOLEY, D. D. G. M., Unionville, Mo. Putnam Sullivan

.

Hartford Somerset Unionville . "Humphreys Seaman Green City Putnam Pollock Arcana Winigan

. 171IHartford . 206 Powersville . 210jUnionville . 32IHumphreys " 126IMilan . 1591Green City , . 190INewtown . 349IPollock . 389IHarris.......... . 540 IWinigan ,

Monroe Dye . Raymond Buck , Robert K. Wilson . Clyde J. Humphreys. John Reece . Glen Rouse . John S. Stillwell . Ervin M. Baldridge . Max C. Wescoat . Everett Jacobs .

Chester Latimer, Livonia, Mo , , C. R. Ethington, Powersville, Mo James W. Comstock, Unionville, Mo Wm. E. Alexander, Humphreys, Mo ' Charles E. Smith, Milan, Moo. , Wayne Bennett, Green City, Moo. .. , , Earl Duley, Newtown, Moo. , Otis Reinhard, Pollock, Moo. , , Cecil M. Clem, Box 68, Harris, Mo Carl B. Abbott, Winigan, Mo , ,.

. . ,. . , . . . , ,.

1st Fri. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Thurs. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st Wed. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Wed.

Q ~

> Z

t:1 H

8 '-' Q

FOURTH DISTRICT-CLYDE O. EVANS, D. D. G. M., Box 483, Trenton, Mo.

t%j

Grundy .. . .. . .. . Mercer, .. ,...

'1 Trenton. ',' Laredo

'1 253ILaredo 11llTrenton

Galt 423IGalt Spickardsville 524ISpickard .. , Mercer ,.. 35!Princcton ,

'I Chas. Eugene E. Andereck, 'I Stanley McKemy, Box 286, Trenton, Mo W. Ingraham .. Wayne Freeman, Box 154, Laredo, Mo , Charles H. Barnett Carl Swafford Charles E. Ross

R. E. McCracken, Box 107, Galt, Mo , G. E. Shaw, Spickard, Mo , , L. B. Mabe, Princeton, Mo ,

, ,

,

1s t Thurs. ea. mo. '1 2nd & 4th Thurs.

,., , .. 2nd & 4th Fri. , 1st Wed. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

o

Io:l:j

~ H

00 00

o q

FIFTH DISTRICT-RANSOM HOOK, D. D. G. M., Bethany, Mo.

..

Harrison ..... , Bethany., Lorraine Lodge of Light Cainsville New Hampton Prairie

. , . . . .

971 Bethany. . . . . . . .. 128lRidgeway ' 257IEagleville....... 328ICainsville , 510 New Hampton 556iGilman City

Garland Ross , W. S. Hendren Gordon H. Shaw. , .. Glen Posler ;., Vincent S. Watson B. D. Oliphant .. ,

. . , . . .

Joseph Marshall, Bethany, Moo. Joe W. Campbell, Ridgeway, Mo Cleve Reece, Eagleville, Mo , Robert A. Chambers, Cainsville, Mo Dr. R. L. Grun, New Hampton, Mo F. E. Eberhart, Gilman City, Mo.. ~

:;1 H

2nd & 4th Tues. , 1st & 3rd Mon. , , 2nd & 4th Wed. , . . . . . . . .. 1st & 3rd Thurs. , 1st & 3rd Tues. , , 2nd & 4th Wen. l\:)

J--' \.0


~ ~

o

LODGE DmECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued SIXTH DISTRICT-G. P. KLING, D. D. G. M., 109 No. Smith St., Albany, Mo. Lodge No. I Location I . Master I Secretary I Time of Meeting Havana•......... 21lMcFall Leslie Gray H. Hovey Manring, McFall, Mo , 1st & 3rd Fri. Stanberry . 109IStanberry....•.. B. R. Agee R. E. Lee, Stanberry, Mo 1st & 3rd Thurs. Gentryville . 126 Gentryville Bobbie Allenbrand... George Crawford, McFall, Mo 2nd & 4th Sat. Morris M. Magee L. Frank Smith, 102 Stapleton, Albany, Mo 2nd & 4th Thurs. Athens . 127 Albany Ancient Craft . 3771King City S. F. Sweat C. R. Wilson, Rt. 2, Union Star, Mo " 1st & 3rd Thurs. L. L. Meadows L. F. Shipp, Maysville, Mo 2n.d & 4th Thurs. Berlin .••..•...... 378 Berlin Earl Martin, Darlington, Mo.................... 1st & 3rd Fri. Jacoby . 447 Darlington ...•... Eugene Weatherd 66 Grant City W. R. Penney J. Harry Kibbe, Grant City, Mo 1st & 3rd Mon. . W~;th........ Grant City Roger McAlister, Box 666, Sheridan, Mo 2nd & 4th Mon. Defiance.••.....•. 88 Sheridan ....•.•. Duane Walker Hobert K. Combs T. Wilkinson, Grant City, Mo 2nd & 4th Thurs. Allensville ••....•. 1981 Allendale Ray W. Law Clyde Pryor, Denver, Mo......................•. 2nd & 4th Wed. Jonathan . 321 Denver County

Ge~try.••....

~

~

a

t;j t;j

tj I-l

Z

~

00

o

~

SEVENTH DISTRICT-eLYDE ROBERTS, D. D. G. M., Maryville, Mo. Nod~way..••.

Xenia Quitman Ravenwood Graham White Hall Burlington Nodaway Pickering Clearmont Skidmore

. . . . . . . . . .

60IHopkins 196IQuitman 201IRavenwood.; 289IGraham 301 Barnard 4421Burlington Jet 470lMaryville 4721 Pickering 607 IClearmont 611 Skidmore

. . . . . . . . . .

Charles Wilkinson John E. Logan Burton Ralston Alfred Prettyman Keeran Coulter Omar L. Brown W. B. King James C. Ware Cleo H. Lane Paul E. Taylor

. . Lloyd E. Pine, Rt. 2, Hopkins, Mo . Joseph E. McDonald, Quitman, Mo.............•. . Clyde Adcock, Ravenwood, Mo•.................. . Raymond E. Geyer, Graham, Mo...•............. . Paul D. Stalling, Barnard, Mo . . . Miles S. Graves, Burlington Junction, Mo . . Walter E. Smith, Box 217, Maryville, Mo . . J. Ervin Neal, Pickering, Mo . . Louis Skeed, Clearmont, Mo , . Glenn J. Stevens, Skidmore, Mo

8 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon.

~

t;j

~ ~

c:.n~


.f-6 ~

<:.n

~

EIGHTH DISTRICT-LAURENOE R. FAWKS, D. D. G. M., Forest Oity, Mo. Atchison

. North Star Sonora Northwest Fairfax Holt ..â&#x20AC;˘....... Maitland Oregon Forest City Mound City Craig

. 157lRockport. " . 200IWatson . 358 Tarkio . 483lFairfax . 112iMaitiand . 13910regon . 2141Forest City . 294iMound City . 606ICraig

. Sam Kahn . Donald V. Bacon . F. John Jones . Donald Bowman . Lynn N. Crockett . Kenneth Kneale . Allen Buetzer . S. P. Allen . S. C. Combs

. . . . . . . . .

Virgil E. Walter, RFD 1, Rockport, Mo j W. L. Moore, Watson, Mo Ralph Dragoo, Tarkio, Mo '.' N. F. Dragoo, Fairfax, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Ernest Rowlett, Maitland. Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Everett Planalp, Box 65, Oregon, Mo J. S. Clanton, Forest City, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. D. B. Burnett. Mound City, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. C. M. Randall, Craig, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues.

B ""~ Z

t::1

~

NINTH DISTRIOT-E. GLENN PEAROE, SR., D. D. G. M., Rt. 7, Box 259a, Maxwell Heights, St. Joseph, Mo. Andrew

, Savannah Helena Lincoln Whitesville Rosendale Valley Cosby Buchanan ..... Agency Wellington " St. Joseph Birming Zeredatha Rushville Brotherhood Charity KingHiIl Saxton

"\

. 71 :Savannah . 1171 Roches tel' . 138/Fillmore . 162 Whitesville . 4041 Rosendale . 413 Bolckow . 600 Cosby . 10 Agency . 22IDeKalb . 78 St. Joseph . 1501 Faucett . 1891St. Joseph . 238lRushville . 2691St. Joseph . 3311St. Joseph . 3761St. Joseph . 508ISaxton

. Leo L. Bowlin . . Norman Maughner . . . C. G. Lambright . . Russell Bashor . . Boyd Mackey . . Charles C. Arnold . . Charles Dickson . Richard D. Rullman .. . . Harold Roach . Jewell H. Tiller . . Edison Leroy Hayes .. . . Paul Trullinger , . Wm. W. Page . Glenn E. Swails . . . G. G.Phillips . L. R. Albright. . . . L; A. Donaldson

Lloyd L. Schmitt, Box 82, Savannah, Mo H. E. Shanks, Rt. I, Helena, Mo Bruce F. Wilkes, Savannah, Mo Marion O. Barton, RFD, Union Star, Mo C. J. Watts, Rosendale, Mo Glenn Neely, Bolckow, Mo W. B. Durant, RR 1, Cosby, Mo Robert H. Adams, Agency, Mo John T. Morris, DeKalb, Mo W. L. Mulvania, 511 Faraon St., St. Joseph, Mo Ellis C. Nash, Rt. 6, St. Joseph, Mo Milton W. Taylor, 2809 Duncan, St. Joseph, Mo Elmer Moore, Rushville. Mo V. T. Cummings, 1015 Logan, St. Joseph 44, Mo Lewis O. Weigel, Box 331, St. Joseph, Mo Elvis R. Poff, 5601 So. 4th St., St. Joseph 47, Mo Joseph S. Lang, 3210 Seneca, St. Joseph 39, Mo

. 1st & 3rd Thurs. . 2nd & 4th Mon. . 1st & 3rd Mon. . 1st & 3rd Wed. . 2nd & 4th Thurs. . 1st & 3rd Thurs. . 1st & 3rd Sat. . 1st & 3rd Sat. . 1st Sat. ea. mo. . 1st & 3rd Tues. . 4th Tues. ea mo. . 2nd & 4th Tues. . 2nd & 4th Mon. . 2nd & 4th Fri. . 2nd & 4th Mon. . 1st & 3rd Thurs. . 1st & 3rd Wed.

o

t::1

'0 trj

o

~

~

H (J] (J]

o

q

t;lj H

~ ~

f-6


t-:> t-:> t-:>

LODGE DmEOTORY BY DISTRIOTS-Oontinued TENTH County

Lodge Union Star ...... Parrott.......... Osborn .......... Continental. ..... ....... Clarksdale ....... Daviess ....... Western Star .... Pattonsburg ..... " Gallatin ......... Ear!. ............ " Lock Springs .... " Jameson ......... " " ....... Jamesport ... , ...

De~alb.......

.... .

....... .......

....... .......

DISTRIOT~ALFRED DUNLAP,

Location No.1 1241Union Star ...... 308 Maysville ........ 317 IOsborn .......... 454/Stewartsville ..... 559 1Clarksdale ....... 151 Winston ......... 651 Pattonsburg..... 106 Gallatin ......... 2851 Coffey ........... 4881Lock Springs .... 500IJameson ........ : 5641J ames port. . . . . ..

Master Floyd Pierce ......... Ben W. Ausman ..... Otis Mix ............ W. E. Summerfield ... Loren C. Riggs ...... Floyd Lollar ......... J. Clinton Rowlette .. Edward E. Nixon .... Kirk B. Roberts ...... Thomas I. Eads ...... Laurence R. Holley ... R. E. Fisher .........

D. D. G. M., Winston, Mo.

Secretary Blair L. Constance, Union Star, Mo.............. C. T. Pilcher, Maysville, Mo., DeKalb County ..... S. O. Borland, Osborn, Mo....................... Clarence C. Waller, Stewartsville, Mo............ Donald M. Barrow, Clarksdale, Mo............... Alfred Dunlap, Winston, Mo...................' . Harvey F. Nalle, Box 125, Pattonsburg, Mo....... Bruce Holbrook, Gallatin, Mo.................... W. S. Underwood, Coffey, Mo.................... Robert L. Wickizer, Lock Springs, Mo............ Sam Pugh, .J arneson, Mo........................ Doyle C. Kime, Jamesport, Mo...................

Time of Meeting 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon.

't1

~

o a

trj trj

tj H

Z

Q

'00

ot'%j ELEVENTH DISTRIOT-PERCY M. BEST, D. D. G. M., Liberty, Mo. CI,~Y ••••••..••

Liberty . Holt . Angerona . Clay . Kearney . .......... Temperance . Clinton· . Hemple . Vinci!. .....•.... Plattsburg . Gower ...•..•.... Lathrop .

31jLiberty " .. 49 Holt . 193 Missouri City . 2071Excelsior Springs 311 Kearney . . 438 Smithville 37 Hemple . 62ICameron . . 113 \Plattsburg 397 Gower . 5061 Lathrop .

. 2nd & 4th Mon. Robt. G. Kirkland . Henry B. Early, 40 So. Jewell, Liberty, Mo Leon L. Carter , Lawrence W. Bartee, Holt, Mo . 2nd & 4th Mon. W. H. Lingenfelter . Robert E. Hicklin, Missouri City, Mo . 1st & 3rd Tues. Emil Unger , A. A. Forsythe, Box 443, Excelsior Springs, Mo . 1st & 3rd Mon. . 1st & 3rd Thurs. Ezra Decker . Don Thompson, Box 553, Kearney, Mo Joe Edwards , E. V. Wolfe, Smithville, Mo . 1st & 3rd Wed. Edgar W. Snyder . James R. Vaughn, Hemple, Mo . 1st & 3rd Fri. . O. Rex Orr, Cameron, Mo . 1st & 3rd Mon. C. L. Downing . 1st Thurs. C. C. Breckenridge . Hugh O. Marshall, Plattsburg, Mo William M. Porter , Jewell W. Singleton, Gower, Mo . 1st & 3rd Wed. . 3rd Mon. ea. mo. Arthur A. Gibbs . James L. Taylor, Box 262, Lathrop, Mo

1-3 ~

trj

f-l <:.0

01 C>:l


J--l 1:0

TWELFTH DISTRICT-JOHN H. BRYAN, D. D. G. M., Hamilton, Mo. t:aldwell

Kingston Braymer Hamilton Polo Breckenridge • • • • • • 1 Cowgill Livingston .. "1 Friendship .. . .. , Benevolence Wheeling :: •••.1 Dawn 1

. 118\Kingston . 135 Braymer. . . . . . .. . 224IHamilton . 232IPolo , . 3341 Breckenridge. . .. . 561 Cowgill . 89 Chillicothe . 170 IUtica . 434IWheeling . 539IDawn

Richard L. Adams . Jacob A. Pence . N. L. Snyder . John D. Patton . Paul Boulton . Floyd Smith . Joseph F. Wingo . Edgar Kohl . R. V. Carpenter . Webster McCully, Jr..

C1 Ci:I

R. G. Geilker, Kingston, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st & 3rd Thurs. D. Irving Farrar, Braymer, Mo 2nd & 4th Tues. 1. C. Wilson, Hamilton, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st & 3rd Tues. Claud Craven, Polo, Mo 2nd & 4th Wed. Herbert Woolsey, Breckenridge, Mo 2nd & 4th Thurs. T. M. Parker;Cowgill, Mo 2nd & 4th Fri. F. W. Cornue, 611Y, Locust St., Chillicothe, Mo.. . 2nd & 4th Fri. H. D. Rice, Utica, Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2nd & 4th Sat. Stephen H. Biggerstaff, Wheeling, Mo.. . . . . . . . . .. 2nd & 4thThurs. M. F. Pollard, Ludlow, Mo...................... 2nd & 4th Fri.

Q ~

> Z

THmTEENTH DISTRICT-vmGIL SLAUGHTER, D. D. G. Linn

"

.

Jackson Brookfield Cypress Bucklin Dockery I Marceline

. 82lLinneus . 86lBrookfield . 227 Laclede . 233lBucklin . 3251 Meadville . 481IMarceline

. Claude 1?owell . A. H. DeCanniere.: . Russell Neeley . F. I. Anderson . Lester L. Collis . William H. Tucker

. .. . . . .

:M.,

tJ

Meadville, Mo.

Ronald E. Bradley, Linneus, Mo.•............... A. P. Boyles, 1105 Brookfield, Brookfield, Mo . Wm. H. Childress, Laclede, Mo . ' . D. R. Owen, Bucklin, Mo Jack E. Friesner, Meadville, Mo . Arthur M. Willian, 420 W. Walker, Marceline, Mo.

~

2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Tues. ea. Tues. night 1st & 3rd Thurs.

o

tJ

Q t?;j

o""j ~

H

FOURTEENTH DISTRICT-W. Macon

Sh;!by

~

W

BAGLEY, D. D. G. M.; Shelbina, Mo.

. 38ICallao . Callao Roger Freeman Bloomington . 102IBevier Harold Julius Censer . 172IMacon W. C. Goodson, Jr L. W. Johnston La Plata . 2371La Plata... Lodge of Truth . 268IAtlanta......... Hugh Wiggans. Charlie Green Excello . 332lExcello Ernest N. Bailey Elmer . 648IElmer 96IShelbyville Harold Krieg . . St. Andrews Arthur Slocum Shelbina . 228IShelbina Russell yancey Hunnewell . 415IHunnewell Chas. N. Rouner Bethel. . 637IBethel. Edward F. Bruns Clarence . 662IClarence

Bert B. Bledsoe, Box 771, Callao, Moo. C. F. Larsen, Box 126, Bevier, Mo Wm. L. Moore, IllY, N. Rubey, Macon, Mo Harry D. Carter, Box 157, La Plata, Mo Ernest R. Pierson, Atlanta, Mo Ross King, RR 2, Excello, Mo Ivey H. Grubbs, Elmer, Mo W. S. Parrish, Shelbyville, Mo , Fred R. White, Shelbina, Mo.......... J. Albert Howe, Hunnewell, Mo Wm. A. Looney, Bethel, Mo Claude Oylear, Clarence, Mo

W

o 1st & 3rd Frio 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues.

c:::l ~ H

to-:) to-:)

Ci:I /


l\:) l\:)

~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTEENTH DISTRICT-J. S. QUINN, D. D. G. M., LaGrange, Mo. County Lewis........ "

Marion

I

Lodge Wyaconda....... Monticello....... LaBelle Craft Williamstown Lewistown Ewing . Palmyra......... St. John's........ Hannibal. Philadelphia

Location 241La Grange 58 Monticello 222 LaBelle 287/Canton 3701 Williamstown 494ILewistown...... 577 IEwing'. . . . . . . . .. 18IPalmyra 28IHannibal. 188IHannibal. 502IPhiladelphia

NO.1

Master -James F. McRae Kenneth S. Plant. Russell E. Kruse C:aude H. Prentice Junior L. English Warner R. Smith.... J. W. Terpening H. J. Gardhouse Rolla O. Apple L. B. Turner Pearl Glascock

Secretary Leslie Edwards. LaGrange, Mo...... R. Lance West, Monticello, Mo Frank L. Young. LaBelle, Mo Jere Bradshaw, Canton, Mo John S. Smith, Williamstown, Moo. Archie E. Graves, Lewistown, Mo '" Kenneth Wiseman, Ewing, Mo R. L. Haydon, 322 So. Main, Palmyra, Moo. W. H. Blackshaw, 1214 Paris, Hannibal,Mo Frederick E. Herrin, Box 401, Hannibal, Mo Thomas J. Bleigh. Philadelphia, Mo

Time of Meeting 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st Thurs. ea mo.

." ~

oo

M M

tj H

Z o

w

o"'=j 1-3 ~

SIXTEENTH DISTRICT-NELSON RUSSEI.L, D. D. G..M., Louisiana, Mo. Pike .......

.. ; "11 Eolia Clarksville Perseverance Phoenix Frankford Pike

. 14lEolia . 17IClarksville . 92ILouisiana . 1361Bowling Green . 1921 Frankford . 399 ICurryville . . . . . ..

Dennis B. Page . Milton F. Duvall, Jr.. George M. Collier . Charles A. Wells . Virgil Cook . Dal~o B. Myers .

William H. McDannold, Eolia, Mo Edward N. Hawkins, Clarksville, Mo Russell J. Rowe, Louisiana, Mo Thomas B. Fitzgerald, Bowling Green, Mo John S. Brown, Frankford, Mo L. D. Harris, Curryville, Mo

M . . . . . .

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 3rd Fri. ea. mo.

I--' ~

c.n c,.:i


~

\,:)

Cl

SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT-DALLAS O. OSTERHOUT, D. D. G. M., Oenter. Mo. Mo~roe

.

~lls .. :::::::

Paris Union Florida Monroe Madison Santa Fe Holliday Ralls Lick Creek New London

. : .. . . . . . . .

19iParis..... 23IFlorida 64 Monroe City 91 Madison. . . . . . . .. 462 Santa Fe. . . . . . .. 660 Holliday. . . . . . . .. 33 Center 302/perry " 307 New London

L. A. Wright Robert Woodrow Joseph M. Hampton. Jay H. Beauchamp. .. Charles G. Wilson. . .. Paul K. Callison , Dallas Osterhout Eugene Deckerd. . . .. Dan C. Niday

James W. Reed, Paris, Mo Edward M. Adams, Paris, Mo Caleb E. Hedges, Monroe City, Mo Johnnie A. Summers, RR 2, Madison, Mo Philander H. Stuart, Santa Fe, Mo Thomas E. Sparks, Holliday, Mo Grover C. Layne, Center, Mo Jack H. Biggers, Perry, Mo " J. Porter Fisher, New London, Mo

~

. . . . . . . . .

2nd & 4th Mon. 3rd Wed. ea mo. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. Fri. nt. bef. 3d Sun. 1st & 3d Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Fri.

Q

!;d

> Z t:1

EIGHTEENTH DISTRIOT-HERMAN G. KIDD, D. D. G. M., Jacksonville, Mo. ; /.

Ran~olph.....

Huntsville....... Milton Clifton Hill...... Moberly......... Cairo............ Higbee.......... Jacksonville Clark. . . . . . . . . . ..

t-

. "\.

30/Huntsville 151 Milton 161iClifton Hill! 344IMoberly 路 486/Cairo........... 527IHigbee 541IJacksonville 610IClark...........

O ,Warren A. Dennis... 1M. Lee Burton J. L. Schupback Edward F. Wilson A. R. Kribbs , Everette Westfall Lloyd Samp Delmar H. Bailey ,

Leonard P. Bradley, Huntsville, Mo Arthur Haak, RR 3, Moberly, Mo George K. Hill, Clifton Hill, Mo J. W. Tate, 618 West Coates, Moberly, Mo U. L. Dameron, Rt. 1, Cairo, Mo Edwin B. Hawkins, Higbee, Mo Oresta C. Gross, Jacksonville, Mo Frank L. Ornburn, Clark, Mo

. . . . . . . .

1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

tj

Q.

t".i

o

"'=j

~

H

Ul Ul

o

NINETEENTH DISTRIOT-MILTON J. DAILEY, D. D. G. M., Bnmswick, Mo. Cha;,iton

. Eureka Warren Triplett Westville Salisbury Rothville Cunningham Mendon

. . . . . . . .

73IBrunswick 74 IKeytesville. .. 122ITriplett. 202IWestville 208/Salisbury 426IRothville 525ISumner 628IMendon

Sidney Newsom Harold Edwards H. L. Twyman Richard Harrington .. Gerald B. Mason Warren E. Brewer Franklin L. Garrett .. James W. Taylor

~ !;d . --4

Arthur G. Lynch,402 Broadway, Brunswick, Mo . 1st & 3rd Tues. Marvin G. Wilson, Keytesville, Mo . 2nd & 4th Tues. R. Gregory, Triplett, Mo . 1st & 3rd Thurs. Floyd Porter, Bynumville, Mo . 3rd Sat. ea. mo. H. H. Brummall, Salisbury, Mo . 2nd Tues. ea mo. Lee Clair, Rothville, Mo . 2nd & 4th Wed. Leslie O. Allen, Sumner, Mo . 2nd & 4th Wed. C. G. Shull, Box 75, Mendon, Mo . 2nd & 4th Mon. t>:l t>:l

Cl


t-.:l t-.:l ~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTIETH DISTRICT-EARL DEARDORFF, D. D. G. M., l.Iale, Mo. County Carroll

"

Ray

Lodge De Witt..•....... Wakanda . Bogard . Hale City . Carroll . ....... Bosworth . . Hardin . .

No. I Location 391De Witt . 52 Carrollton . 101 Bogard . 216IHale . 2491 Norborne . 697 Bosworth ..•..... 322 Hardin . J

.\l as ter C. O. Utley Edmund L. Staton Harry Craven Forrester E. May Leo Miles C. E. McAfee Paul W. Grimes

. . . . . . .

Secretary George Hollister, DeWitt, Mo Harry Schanz, RR 2, Carrollton, Mo Frank Brunscher, Bogard, Mo Robert Baker, Rt. 2, Hale, Mo R. H. Robinson, 611 So. Elm St., Norborne, Mo C. F. McPherson, Bosworth, Mo S. L. Lockridge, Box 67, Hardin, Mo

. . . . . . .

Time of Meeting 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues.

J

"

Rising Sun ..•.... Weston . Compass ......••• Camden Point.... Rowley ....•..••. Fidelity......•.•. Adelphi. . Platte City ......•

13IBarry 531 Weston. " 120 Parkville ......•. 169 Camden Point 204iDearborn ..•.•.•• 3391 Farley..•........ 366/Edgerton 504 Platte City

M M

t1

H

Z

Q

if.).

ofxj

TWENTY-FmST DISTRICT-HARVEY B. HUFFORD, D. D. G. Mo, Gashland, Mo. Platte .....• :.

t-j ~

o Q

Ernest E. Craig Charles Corbin Bruce P. Riley Jean D. Deal. Frank Downing, Jr GUY Kamphefner E. E. Nash Parlin Farmer ,

Geo. C. Harrington, Acting, Gashland, Mo J. A. Offutt, Box 116, Weston, Mo L. A. Robbins, 504 East St., Parkville, Mo Chas. W. Chandler, Box 13, Camden Point, Mo Ben F. Duncan, Dearborn, Mo Lee Fox, RFD I, Box 70, Parkville,Mo Clyde M. Newman, Edgerton, Mo Herman Klein, Platte City, Mo

. . . . . . . .

1st Sat. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Mon. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon.

1-3 ~

M

1-1 ~

01

Cl:l


TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT-D.

~AR

TANNER, D. D. G. M., 705 E. 70th St., Kansas City. Mo.

I-l CO

01

Col)

Heroine ......... 104jKansas City ..... Harold R. Toub ...... J. S. Epstein, 3301 Woodland, Kansas City 9, Mo.. Albert Pike ...... 219 Kansas City ..... Wm. J. Embree ...... C. L. Soderstrom, 6716 Locust, Kansas City 5, Mo.. Kansas City ...... City ..... Thos. D. Williamson .. R. I. Newton, Sr., 540 S. Jackson, Kansas City, Mo.............................. Temple .......... 299 Kansas City ..... Frank A. Nelson ..... G. M. McClelland, 2905 E. 52d, Kansas City, Mo... " Fred F. Shirley, Jr... Cecile-Daylight:.'. 305 Kansas City ..... M. C. Morgan, 4407 Campbell, Kansas City, Mo.... " Rural. .........'. 3161Kansas City ..... E. M. Sumner ....... H. B. Blanchard, 3339 Tracy, Kansas City 9, Mo... " Jos. A. CampbeH ..... Geo. R. Seay, 3845 Broadway, Kansas City 2, Mo... Westport ........ 340lKansas City ..... " Ivanhoe......... 4461Kansas City ..... John L. O'Brien ..... Frank A. Lewis, 3201 Park, Kansas City, Mo...... " Ray 0. Shoemaker ... Gate City ........ 5221Kansas City ..... Fred H. Knight, 903 Harrison, Kansas City 6, Mo.. " Orient........... 546jKansas City ..... Otto M. Gehrke ...... Vernie G. Fisher, 903 Harrison, Kansas City 6, Mo " South Gate ....... 547 Kansas City ..... Ralph L. Vaughn .... H. B. Hurd, 3937 Genesee St., Kansas City, Mo.... " York ............ 5631Kansas City ..... Howard M. Harris ... L. E. Reedy, 3912 Michigan, Kansas City 4, Mo.... " Marlborough ..... 569jKansas City ...... Walter D. Sievers .... Roy E. Case, 4543 Chestnut St., Kansas City, Mo. Swope Park ...... 6171Kansas City ..... Roger W. Parker ..... L. V. Hosic, 3828 E. 59th St., Kansas City, Mo.... Sheffield ......... 625 Kansas City ..... Francis A. Brown .... Robt. O. Fulton. 5421 Ralston, Kansas City 3E, Mo East Gate ........ 630lKansas City ..... A. G. Putney ........ L. T. Gillham, 2547 Jackson, Kansas City, Mo..... " Northeast ........ 643 Kansas City ..... C. W. Liggett ........ Edw. N. Haynes, 5520 Tracy, Kansas City 10, Mo.. " Country Club .... 656\Kansas City ..... H. C. Hoffman ....... R. T. Swearingen, 5940 Rockhill Rd., Kansas City 4, Mo............................ Rockhill ......... 663 Kansas City ..... Robt. W. Alexander .. J. Weinsaft, 715 Commerce Bldg., " Kansas, City, Mo........................ ; .... Clay .......... Alpha ........... 6591N. Kansas City ... Alba M. Gillespie ..... J. W. Whiteside. 4933 Marvin Rd., Kansas City 16, Mo........................... I

Jackson ......

.. "

...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...-... ...... ...... ...... ......

22raMM

2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Mon.

Q ~

;>

Z

tj H

o tj Q t;Ij

o

l';j

~

H

00

00

o

c:::l

TWENTY-THIRD DISTRIOT-JAMES P. HALL, D. D. G. Mo, Lexington, Mo. LafD;rette ..•.. Waverly ........• Lexington . Higginsville . Concordia . Mount Hope . Richmond . R,~Y .. Ray ..••........• Bee Hive . Ada .

61lwaverlY~

149 Lexington .' .. 364 Higginsville. . . .. 464IConcordia 476IOdessa ....•..... 57 Richmond 223 Camden 393 Lawson : 44410rrick

C. W. Zumalt. . . . . . .. Dr. E. T. Schaberg Gene Whitener Ray Mering Paul A. Mahon...... Oliver H. White, Jr Vaughn J. Thomas Burl Johnson Floy McGlothlin

W. C. Rowe, Waverly, Mo.....•......... : " Eugene S. Holman, 1315 Franklin, Lexington, Mo. Herbert E. Mock, Higginsville, Mo J • • •• Everett Pape, Concordia, Mo Rufus H. Kelly, Odessa, Mo Forest B. Thompson, Richmond, Mo F. P. Kirkland, 503 N. Thornton, Richmond, Mo L. D. Estill, Lawson, Mo Eunice Roe, Orrick, Mo

~

H

2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Fri. 3rd Mon. ea. mo. 1st Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd Thurs. ea. mo.

~ ~

-:J


~ ~

00

LODGE DmECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-DORSEY BAIL, D. D. G. M., 354 W. Summit, Marshall, Mo. County Saline

I Lodge INo.1 Location I Arrow Rock...... 551Arrow Rock Cambridge. . . . . .. 631 Slater Miami. . . . . . . . . .. 85 Miami Trilumina....... 205IMarshall Barbee 2171Sweet Springs Malta 402 \Malta Bend Oriental. 518 Blackburn I Nelson..... 560INelson

..

. . . . . . . .

Master Rolla Humburg J as. H. Thompson H. D. Breshears R. L. Leeper Russell Thomas C. M. Henke Thos. T. Martin, Jr Carl C. Mounts

Secretary . John Emmerson, Gen. Del., Arrow Rock. Mo . Frank G. Schmidt, 201 E. Lincoln, Slater, Mo . Geo. W. Wilson, Miami, Mo . G. Howard Fuller, Marshall, Mo . Paul Wylie, Sweet Springs, Mo . Elmer H. Wilson, Malta Bend, Mo . George W. Borchers, Blackburn, Mo . Harry H. Coburn, Nelson, Mo

. . , . . . . .

Time of Meeting 2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 1st Tues. ea. mo. 4th Tues. ea. mo. 1st Thurs. ea. mo. Last Fri. ea. mo 1st Tues. ea. mo. 3rd Tues. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Tues.

"'0 ~

o

a

t:zj t:zj

t:::l

H

Z

Q

00

o

TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-L. L. WILLIAMSON, D. D. G. M., Boonville, Mo. Co?per .......

..

Howard

.

Cooper . Pleasant Grove . Wm. D. Muir . Wallace . Prairie Home . Howard . Fayette "''':''' Livingston ~ . Armstrong .

36IBoonville 14210tterville 2771Pilot Grove 456IBunceton 5031Prairie Home 41New Franklin 47IFayette 51IGlasgow 70 Armstrong

Laurence White. Paul G. Sanders G. H. W. Eichhorn Don McKnight Earl Moore Roy H. Rude Cleo V. Blakemore Rollie M. Ballew B. T. Tippett

Clarence L. Hurt, Boonville, Mo J. H. Gunn, Otterville, Mo P. E. Hays, Pilot Grove, Mo J. W. Gerhardt, Bunceton, Mo Fred L. Schilb, Prairie Home, Mo R. W. Hall, New Franklin, Mo Samuel P. Ayres. Jr., Fayette, Mo.... James E. Borders, 611 Howard, Glasgow, Mo Robert R. Walker, RFD 1, Armstrong, Mo

l:Ij

2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rdWed. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

1-3 ~

t:zj

I-l

'-0 C1 C\j


I-l ~

01 ~

TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-J. E. RICHARDSON, D. D. G. M., Harrisburg, Mo. Boone

.

"

Centralia . Twilight . Ashland . Sturgeon . Hallsville . Ancient Landm'k. Hinton . Acacia .

591 Centralia 114 Columbia 156IAshland 174 Sturgeon 336 Hallsville 356IHarrisburg 455IHinton 602lColumbia

J. C. Willis Don. O. Wayland Estil D. Glascock.· E. Mathis Glenn W. Frink W. H. Semon W. E. Throckmorton. E. L. Glascock

Paul R. Pruett, 507 W. Singleton, Centralia, Mo Walter A. Reed, 6th & Bdway, Columbia, Mo Ross N. Glascock, Hartsburg, Mo M. W. Esteppe, Sturgeon, Mo Olin C. Caldwell, Hallsville, Mo J. E. Richardson, Harrisburg, Mo Tilford Goslin, Browns Station, Mo Walter H. Baird, 1619 Bass, Columbia, Mo

. . . . . . . .

1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues.. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st Fri. ea. mo. 1st Tues. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Sat. 1st Sat. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Tues.

Q ~

> Z

.tj

TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-A. W. GRIFFITH, D. D. G. M., Fulton, Mo. Audrain

.

......

Call~way .....

Laddonia . Hebron . Vandalia . Fulton . New Bloomfield .. Tebbetts . Shamrock .

115ILaddonia . 354 Mexico . . 491 Vandalia 48 Fulton . 60!New Bloomfield .. 565lTebbetts . 585 Shamrock. ' .

Mokane

612lMokane

.

I

Jesse B. Beshears. . .. Howard F. Kizer John W. Heim Harry K. Irick Harry B. Rich Wallace Snyder Harry J. Robison. . ..

. W. F. Vandelicht

t"

o

Howard Christopher, Laddonia, Mo B. C. Denton, Box 120, Mexico, Mo M. L. Motley, 305 S. Jefferson, Vandalia, Mo Fred R. Babbitt, 822 Nichols St., Fulton, Mo C. M. Holt, New Bloomfield, Mo Henry Hazlett, Tebbetts, Mo W. S. Armstrong, Shamrock, Mo J. L. Pierce, Mokane. Mo

. . . . . . . ~

2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd Fri. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Wed. Fri. eve. or or bef. full moon . 1st & 3rd Thurs.

t:l

Q

txj

oI";j ~ ~ W. W

oq ~

~

TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-HARRY E. BALL, D. D. G. M., Montgomery City, Mo. Montgomery .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

1Griswold Wellsville Montgomery Jonesburg Daggett

'1

······1

1781 Bellflower. Donald S. BOwlby····1 194Iwellsville Elmer A. Hoffmeyer .. 246 Montgomery City John A. Robinson 457IJonesburg Paul L. James 492IMcKittrick...... A. J. Wesemann

Paul Rodgers, Bellflower, Mo C. O. Gooch, Wellsville, Mo Max Oliver, Montgomery City, Mo Luther Watkins, Jonesburg, Mo D. T. Brashear. McKittrick, Mo

3rd Thurs. ea. mo. '1 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Mon. 3rd Mon. Ist'& 3rd Sat. t>:l t>:l

e:.c


t--:l

LODGE DmECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued

Cl:l

o

TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT-JACK VANN, D. D. G. M., Elsberry, Mo. I

County Lincoln

1

Lodge Troy . Silex ....•. '" .•. New Hope . New Salem . Louisville . Nineveh . Moscow ..•.......

NO.1

Location

34ITroy 75Isilex

Master . Martin L. Sentman . Fred A. Street

. 199 Elsberry 270jWinfield . 409 Louisville . 473!OIney ...•....... 558 IMoscow Mills ....

Wayne B. Leftwich .. James L. Bayne Hollis R. Howerton J. L. Harness Clyde F. Justus

I

Secretary Wm. F. Martin, Troy, Mo•............. R. E. Williams, Silex, Mo

Time of Meeting t ••...•••

Lon H. LaRue, Elsberry, Mo H. H. Arnhold, Winfield, Mo Wayne Bufford, Eolia. Mo Fred R. Worell, New Hartford, Mo A. O. Langford, Moscow Mills, Mo

THIRTIETH DISTRIOT-MELGE GOLTERMAN, D. D.

~.

. . . . . .

2nd & 4th Mon. Fri. on or bef. full moon ea. mo. 2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st Frio ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Sat.

I-Ij ~

8t.:tj t.:tj

M., Wentzville, Mo.

t1

I-l

St. Charles "

1 Wentzville.......

46 IWentzville Palestine 2411St. Charles Mechanicsville... 260 Defiance Warren ..•...., Pauldingville..... 11!wri g ht City " Warrenton ••.•... 609 Warrenton

Eugene Minner R. D. Prinster Julius Kessler Richard Koopman Alfred Grave

J. M. Carter, Box 318, Wentzville, Mo 'Ilst & 3rd Fri. E. R. Engholm, 419 Boone, St. Charles, Mo 1st & 3rd Tues. King Pugh, Defiance, Mo 2nd & 4th Wed. G. C. Schmitt, Wright City, Mo 1st Thurs. ea. mo. Frank Ehrmann, Warrenton, Mo................ 2nd & 4th Fri.

Z

Q

w.

o

~

1-3 ~

THmTY-FmST DISTRICT-JOHN RICH, D. D. G. M., 217 Pine St., Jefferson City, Mo. Cole ..•......

'1 Jefferson •.......

Russellville . HickoryHill . Centertown . .. Moniteau ..... Tipton California . " Moniteau . Clarksburg . O~~ge . Chamois ....•.... Linn .

..........

431Jefferson City .... 1 R. S. Cunningham, Jr. N. F. Steenberger, 2216 Oakview Dr., Jefferson City 10, Mo " . Herbert A. Tambke .. George Wilson, Russellville, Mo " . E. R. Scrivner . J. M. Logrbrinck, Eugene, Mo " . C. Merrifield . Harley Hutchinson, Centertown, Mo . William H. Helt, Tipton, Mo...................•. . Estill A. Norman . A. E. Wilson, California, Mo••................ " . A. L. Gates . John E. Steiner . H. C. Harkins, Lupus, Mo , . . . . . .. . Dona M. Maness . L. J. Stephens, Clarksburg, Mo " . A. A. Townley . Ernst H. Schowengerdt, Chamois, Mo . L. B. Landwehr . F. Edward Busch, Linn, Mo "

90 Russellville 211 Eugene 611 Centertown 56 Tipton 183 California 295 Jamestown 553/Clarksburg 185 Chamois 326ILinn

t.:tj

1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd Fri. ea. mo. 1st Thurs. ea. mo. 1st Tues. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st Sat. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 4th Fri. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Sat.

~

e.o

CJl Cl:l


THmTY-SECOND DISTRICT-JERRY COTTRELL; D. D. G. M., Pacific, Mo. ~

Fra~klin ..•.•.

..

Gasconade..•.

Evergreen ..••••• Sullivan ......•.. Gray Summit . Hope . FraternaL . Columbia . Easter.••...•.•.. Union ·. Hermann ....•.•• Owensville .

27/New Haven 69 Sullivan ......• " 1731Gray Summit 2511 Washington 363lRobertsville '" 534 1Pacific ........•. 5751St. Clair .....••.. 593IUnion 123IHermann 62410wensville

John W. Sheible . Tony Dunnegan . R. H. Bishop . J. G. Wattenberg . Dale Prichard . E. L. Winrod . Richard Wall ....•... George M. Brown . Geo. L. Van Horn . Herbert F. Owens .

Karl L. Junge, New Haven, Mo H. E. Vieten, 4 W. Euclid, Sullivan, Mo.. . . . . . . . .. Wm. E. Arnold, Gray Summit, Mo...•......... " Walter A. Pfautsch, 316 Cedar, Washington, Mo.. Louis H. Bruns, Catawissa, Mo " Jerry Cottrell, Pacific, Mo•..................•... Foy E. Haywood, St. Clair, Mo Wm. S. Toelke, Union, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . • .. . . . . .. W. D. Stoenner, 218 W. 6th, Hermann, Mo " H. Underwood, 205 E. Monroe, Owensville, Mo

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Fri.

THIRTY-THmD DISTRICT (A)-MILTON O. LAUENSTEIN, D. D. G. M., 7023 Pemod St., St. Louis, Mo.

c:o

CJl ~

~ ~

>

Z

tj

St. Lo~.is City.

. ...... ..

...

.. . .. .. ..

Missouri. ........ Beacon .......... St. Louis ........ Naphtali. ........ Pomegranate ..... Occidental. ...... Pyramid: ........ Good Hope ....... Aurora .......... America ......... Cache ..•...•.•.. Harmony ........ Clifton Heights ...

liSt. 31St. 201St. 25/St. 951St. 163 St. 180 St. 2181St. 267 St. 847 St. 1 4161St. 4991St. 520 St. 1 550 St. 626 St. 631 St. 638 St. 641 St. 642 St. 6521St.

Louis ........ Louis ........ Louis ........ Louis ........ Louis ........ Louis ........ Louis ........ Louis ..•..... Louis ........ Louis ........

Louis ........ L. J. Winkeler ....... Louis ........ George V. Horne ..... Louis ........ Wm. L. Rose .........

Rose Hill ..... '" Louis ........ Magnolia ........ Louis ........ Tower Grove ..... Louis ........ Triangle ......... Louis ........ Trinity.......... Louis ........ Benj. Franklin ... Louis ........ Pilgrim .......... Louis ..... : .. Commonwealth ... Lou;, .•....•. 81. Louis Co.. : Anchor....•...•. 443 University City .. St. ~~uis Co•.. University....... 649 University City .. Theo. Roosevelt .. 661 University City ..

664IS" I

Geo. E. Himmeger ... William Dietrich ..... Max E. Orenstein .... Edgar A. Shumake ... Thomas H. Vinyard .. J. L. Wood .......... Paul E. Guffey ....... William C. Osterloh .. R. W. Mueller ........ Raymond F. Brand ...

Herbert H. English ... William R. Brown .... Norman G. Reheis .... Nathaniel P. Duffy ... Conrad Kraushaar ... Ralph I. Dyer ........ Emerson O. Jacobs ... Fritz A. Grossius ..... Fred W. Blanche ..... Walter W. Barlow .... Wm. C.Daily ........

J. Wohradsky, Jr.•2108 Ann Ave., St. Louis, Mo... H. E. Waldt, 8609 Tara Lane, St. Louis 21, Mo.... Harry Schwartz, 975 Kirkham, Glendale 22. Mo... Rudy Brock, 2719 Ashby Rd., Overland 14, Mo..... R. C. Winkelmaier, 6015 Pernod, St. Louis 9, Mo.. W. C. Smith, 7361 Chamberlain, St. Louis 5, Mo... R. S. Lorimier, 3965a Palm St.,St. Louis, Mo...... Elmer M. Ruffin, 6407 January. St. Louis 9, Mo.... Chas. V. Ehrmann, 3735 So. Spring, St. Louis, Mo G. H. Holdsworth, 4943 Schollmeyer, St. Louis 9, Mo............................... Gustav Heinichen, Rt. 11, Box 135, Lemay 23, Mo.. Wm. E. Punt, 5610 Nottingham, St. Louis 9, Mo... J. E. Winterton, Jr., 5328 Jamieson, St. Louis 9. Mo............................... Earl H. Pleitsch, 1130 Wilshire, St. Louis 24, Mo.. Henry C. Mayer. 6638 Bancroft, St. Louis 9, Mo... A. H. Liebmann, 5508 Rhodes Ave., St. Louis, Mo. H. G. Diller, 450 California, Webster Groves, Mo.. Harry E. Treece, 2103 Lilly, St. Louis 10, Mo...... Albert Krause. Acting, 6625 Delmar, St. Louis, Mo A. Edward Turley. 9 Holly Dr., St. Louis 19, Mo... Duval O'Neal, 5905 Julian, St. Louis 12, Mo....... A. W. Reiter, 6623 Hoffman, St. Louis 9, Mo...... Alfred A. NaIl, 6921 Waterman, St. Louis, Mo..... H. E. Dute, 7724 Burr Oak Lane, University City 24, Mo................. : ......

1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Sat. 1st & 3rd Tues.

t""

otj

Q (:I:j'

ot.,g ~

H

2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Sat. 1st & 3rd Mon.

Ul Ul

2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Thurs• 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Mon.

~

2nd & 4th Mon.

~

oq H

~~


t:-:l

~

t:-:l

LODGE DmECTORY BY DISTRICT8-Continued THmTY-THIRD DISTRICT (B)-CHAS. F. BALLAK, D. D. G. M., 706 Chestnut St., Room 312, St. Louis, Mo. County St. Louis City. ..

I

I

I

I

Lodge NO.1 LucaLlO1l Master Secretary, Meridian........ 21St. Louis ..•.... Jos. T. Waters, Jr•... Harry C. Ploetze, 4636 Quincy, St. Louis 16, Mo... Geo. Washington. 9 St. Louis Raymond W. Hotto R. C. Brinkman, 611 Olive, Rm. 2061, St. Louis 1, Mo , Mt. Moriah 1 40ISt. LOUis / Sheldon H. Stock . E. F. Schilling, 1070 Fontaine Pl., St. Louis, Mo... Pohir Star. . . . . . . 79 St. Louis. . . . . .. Edward A. Maessen .. Val Krapp, 3948 Meramec, St. Louis 16, Mo Erwin ..........• 121 St. Louis Charles F. Cook . A. A. Blankenmeister, 6535 Devonshire, St. Louis 9, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. James Barbero . E. C. Deuser, 24 So. Dellwood, St. Louis 21, Mo... Pride of the West. 1791St. Louis . . W. H. Hatch . George J. Tischler, Box 831, St. Louis 1, Mo...•... Keystone . 243 St. Louis . C. J. RaIl, 1522 Jonquil Dr., Webster Groves, Mo.. . J os. Silverstein Cosmos . 282 St. Louis Cornerstone . 3231St. Louis . Robt. T. Wolken, Jr.. A. S. Dawson, 2626 Alhambra Ct., St. Louis, Mo... . John B. Dryer, 962 Canaan, St. Louis 15, Mo.. . . .. . Jacob E. Nolde Paul Revere . 330 St. Louis .. : . Landon B. Atkins . Wm. C. Hilmer, 4 Beverly Pl., St. Louis 12, Mo.... Tuscan . 360 St. Louis . C. F. Knamiller . W. E. Haustein, 9411 Westchester Dr., ltaska . 420 St. Louis St. Louis 21, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. West Gate 4451St. LOUis , C. Stanley Adkison . E. B. Partenheimer, 8757 Oriole Ave., St. Louis 15, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Lambskin 460 St. Louis Julian W. Cox . Arthur E. Bush, Acting, 6701 Bartmer, St. Louis 14, Mo . Euclid . 5051St. Louis . Robt. E. Bernstein . M. E. Campbell, 5808 Delor Ave., St. Louis 9, Mo.. Apollo . 5291St. Louis . George Ruths, 7280 Mackenzie Rd., Affton 23, Mo•. . John Pitts . Emil F. Uhly . Wm. E. Bridegroom, 5022 Gerritt, St. Louis 16, Me Algabil. . 544 St. Louis . David A. Wayne Olive Branch .. ; .. 576 St. Louis . Fred L. Oatman, 3939 Minnesota, St. Louis 18, Mo

I

St. Lo~,is Co...

Forest Park . Mizpah ........•. Purity .........•. Shaveh . Progress .

. 578 St. Louis 639\St. Louis . 658 St. Louis . 6461Univeristy City. 6571University City.

Wm. E. Reed John B. Grotewiel. Wm. C. Miner James A. Gillespie Arthur J. Brunk

1 Wm. C. Rese, 7127 Lanham, St. Louis 17, Mo . Herbert L. Stein, 7432 Augusta, Normandy 21, Mo John Heines, 5224 Nagel, St. Louis 9, Mo . A. G. Sewing, 5050a Wabada Ave., St. Louis, Mo.. Robt. F. Mohr, 528 Ford Dr., Ferguson 21, Mo.....

Time of Meeting 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Sat. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Wed. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Mon.. 2nd & 4thFri. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. • 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 11 a.m. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

I-d

~

o ot:j t:j

t1

H

Z 0, w.

o

~

1-3 ~

t:j

~

1:.0 ~ ~


~

THmTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-GROVER C. KIMBERLIN, D. D. G. M., Garden City, Mo.

<:.0 C1 C/.:)

Cass

. Index ..•......... j Cass '1' Grand River..... NonpareiL , Belton : Jewel '1' Coldwater Archie Cleveland

541Garden City 147 Harrisonville. . .. 276 Freeman 372 East Lynne 450 Belton. . . . . . . . . .. 480lPleasant Hill 485 DrexeL 633 Archie 651 Cleveland

. Orville T. Allen . E. Lyle Knight. Garden City, Mo Ernest R. Dickey . Jesse L. Van Meter, Harrisonville, Mo.........•.. . William L. McNatt . John C. Waldron, Box 514, Freeman, Mo Wm. E. Collings . C. H. Bradley, East Lynne, Mo . Allen I. Reid . L. D. Laffoon, Peculiar, Mo . . Wm. H. Hedrick . Leonard M. Seymour, Pleasant Hill, Mo Basil T. Webb . Clarence H. Bundy, Drexel, Mo . . Joseph C. Ohlert . Martin Hackler, Archie, Mo . Wilbur L. Fisher . Earl L. Young, Box 124. Cleveland, Mo

1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 3rd Fri. ea. mo. 2nd Tues. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd Fri. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Tues.. 2nd Tues. ea. mo.

Q ~

> Z

tj

THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-D. O. BRADLEY, D. D. G. M., Butler, Mo.

to"

Bates

. Hume Amsterdam Butler Rockville Crescent Hill RichHill Foster

. . . . . . .

130jHume 141 Amsterdam 254IButler 341 Rockville 368 Adrian 479 Rich Hill 554 Foster

C. M. Wheeler Chas. W. Stanfill M. E. Epperson Willard Dains A. L. Bright, Jr James N. Bradley John Oldham

. John D. Hess, Hume. Mo . E. A. Smiser, Amsterdam, Mo . S. L. Rook. Butler, Mo . Wm. R. Watkins, Rockville, Mo . Edwin L. Blocher, Adrian, Mo . Marion A. Moreland, Rich Hill, Mo . O. D. Jennings, Box 143, Foster, Mo

. . . . . . .

1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st Thurs. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon. Ea. Fri. night

o

tj Q trj

o

b:j J;;;;"

""" m m o q ~

THmTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-GEORGE B. COLLINS, D. D. G. M., Holden, Mo.

.. ..

Henton Johnson

Pettis

.

Cole Camp Shawnee . Knobnoster Holden Corinthian Cold Spring Chilhowee . Sedalia Granite Green liidge LaMonte

. . . . . .

5951Cole Camp 653 Warsaw 245lKnobnoster 262IHolden 265 Warrensburg 274 Leeton ',' 487IChilhowee . 2361sedalia . 272 Sedalia . 425 Green Ridge . 574ILaMonte

Pete J. Otten E. H. Intelmann, Box 117, Warsaw, Mo , A. E. Constance... .. J. H. Cooper, Warsaw, Mo . Fred Neitzert C. L. Saults, Knob Noster, Mo . Herbert Tuepker C. O. Landes, Holden, Mo . Wm. C. Baker, Jr Chas. H. Malone, 115 E. South, Warrensburg, Mo.. William F. Ham.· D. E. Bailey, 209a S. Maguire, Warrensburg, Mo•. Marion Evans M. A. Wallace, Chilhowee, Mo . E. Leonard Hall Ralph F. Boies, 510 W. 16th St., Sedalia, Mo . S. F. Swearingin Joseph R. Smetana, 1108 E. 10th, Sedalia, Mo . Horace Stark S. M. Dowdy, Green Ridge, Mo . R. E. DeFrain R. B. Burke, RR 2, LaMonte, Mo . 1

1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st Fri. ea. mo. 3rd Fri. ea. mo 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd Fri. ea. mo.

PO

H

I:\:) ~ ~


~

CI:l ~

LODGE DmEOTORY BY DISTRICTS--Continued THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-JOSEPH S. KIDWELL, D. D. G. M., Windsor, Mo. Lodge NO.1 Location Windsor . 29/Windsor . Montrose . 408 Montrose .. , . Clinton . 648lClinton . Calhoun . 552 Calhoun ..•...... , .. 273 I Osceola . St·.9,Iai~:::::: St. Clair , . Circle . 342lRoscoe Lowry City . 4031 Lowry City . Appleton City . 412 Appleton City . Star . 419 Taberville . Count1

H~~ry........

Master Wilber S. Allen Carl Conrad Glenn T. Brown B. D. Bennett. Rex Miller R. E. Bell Eugene Tally Loyd Lewellen Lloyd W. Long

Secretary . W. B. Johnson, 406 N. Commercial, Windsor, MoO' . Geo. F. Towler, Montrose, Mo•................... . J. B. Holcomb, 216 E. Lincoln, Clinton, Mo . . . H. L. Redford, Calhoun, Mo . . Roger P. Frank, Osceola, Mo . . C. A. Weinlig, Roscoe, Mo . Martin R. Tally, Lowry City, Mo•......•......... . David Scroggs, Jr., Box 6, Appleton City, Mo . . Kenneth Ingalls, Taberville, Mo , .

Time of Meeting 1st & 3rd Tues.. 2nd & 4th Mon. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 3rd Tues. ea. mo. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. 1st Fri.ea. mo. 3rd Mon. ea. mo. 4th Fri. ea. mo.

'~

~

oo

~

t.1J

tj H

Z o

U1

o

~

TUmTY-EIGHTH DISTRIOT-eLAUDE T. WOOD, D. D. G. M., Richland, Mo.

8 C~den .......

Linn Creek ..•... Mack's Creek ..... La~!ede:: : : : : : Laclede ...••..... Competition ..... Conwa1•.....•.• Pul~ki : : : : : : : Waynesville .. , ... Richland ..•.•.... MiNer.. : : : : : : . Brumley•...•... '. Iberia' .

152ICamdenton 4331M8Ck'S Creek 83 Lebanon 432 Competition. . . .. 528 Conway. . • • • • . •. 375lwayneSville. .. .. 385 Richland 203 Brumley , 410IIberia

Henry Bobbitt Jas. A. Noland, Jr Leyburn Holt Sherman Hillhouse Jacob Keesling Chas. Quentin Ray Harry Bowman, Jr James G. Hix Okley Kinder

. . . . . . . . .

Joseph Jaeger, Jr., Camdenton, Mo Roy A. True, Urbana, Mo Edwin H. Draper, Lebanon, Mo D. E. Cook, Competition, Mo E. Herschel Harris, Box 56, Conway, Mo Roy C. Wilson, Waynesville, Mo F. A. Jones, Hazelgreen, Mo Donald Williams, Tuscumbia, Mo B. C. Livingston, Iberia, Mo

. 2nd Thurs. ea. mo. . 1st Sat. ea. mo. . 1st Wed. ea. mo. . 1st Sat. ea. mo. . 1st Sat. ea. mo. . 2nd Tues. ea. mo. . 2nd Wed. ea. mo. . 2nd Wed. ea. mo. . 1st Thurs. ea. mo.

~

t.1J

'~ """" c.n

CI:l


~

<:.0

C)1 CJj

THIRTY-NINTH DISTRICT-W. W. JACKSON, D. D. G. M., St. James, Mo. . Cra~ford,' ..::: Lebanon ...•..... Cuba .••......... . Dent..•..•... Salem Maries ..•..... Belle ..•......... Lane's Prairie..•. Vienna . . Pb~ps: : : : : : .. Rolla St. James ..••.... Equality...•..... Pulaski.·.·:.·.·,'.· Arlington . Texas . Latimer .

77ISteelville ..•..... 312 Cuba .••.•....... 226 Salem. . . . . . . . . .. 373 Belle 631 Vichy 94 Vienna 213 Rolla 230 St. James 497 Newburg 346/Dixon 146 Licking

R. C. Kehner . Wm. K. Counts . John H. Herring . J. F. Herron . William Motl. . Ralph Branson •..... Richard H. Kerr . A. L. Browning . Harry E. Fuller . Louis F. Lauman . Karl McIntyre .

W.1. Carr, Steelville, Mo Chas. F. Wilmesherr, Cuba, Mo J. L. Bangert, Box 427, Salem, Mo N. B. Stockton, Bland, Mo " William W. Nangle, Vichy, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Carl A. Baldwin, Vienna, Mo Walter C. Campbell, 203 W. 1st St., Rolla, Mo W. W. Jackson, St. James,Mo H. R. Pinto, Newburg, Mo " Ralph W. Goforth, Dixon, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. W. D. Rodgers. Box 174, Licking, Mo

1st Sat. ea. mo. 2nd Sat. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd Sat. ea. mo. 1st Sat. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Thul'S'. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

"1

De Soto '1 1191 De Soto ...•..... 'I Joseph E. Wall to • • • • • . Joachim •.•.•.•.. 164 Hillsboro.•...... Julius T. Hausgen " ••••.. Herculaneum , 338 Herculaneum ..•. Burnell O. Lucas Washington Tyro ,.... 12 Caledonia Willard Rieffer

'1 1311potosi. .......•.. 143 Irondale .......•.

Potosi. ...•.••.. Irondale ..•.•.•.. ... Belgrade St. Francois \ Blackwell .•...... Jefferson..... Shekinah

Lee F. Rowe Jesse W. Neel. 632 Belgrade M. E. Turner 636 Blackwell ..•..... Marvin E. Smith 266 Festus Julian A. Gordon

'I

A.L. Schwaegerle, Box 572, DeSoto, Mo Edw. W. Williams, Hillsboro, Mo Geo. W. Hegel, Rt. 1, Imperial, Mo " Frank Wallis, Caledonia, Mo George Carr. Potosi, Mo GUY D. Maxwell, Irondale, Mo Lewis Pierce, RFD 1, Caledonia, Mo Geo. V. Welch, 201 So. 4th St., DeSoto, Mo Byrl Degeare, 730 N. Mill, Festus, Mo

zt;l t'l

ot;l Q t'=j

o

FORTIETH DISTRICT-A. L. SCHWAEGERLE, D. D. G. M., Box 572, DeSoto, Mo. Jefferson

Q !;l:j

:>

~

'1, 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Fri. Sat. on or bef. full moon & 2d Sat. thereafter 1st Fri. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Sat• 3rd Tues ea. mo. 1st Sat. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Tues.

~

H

Ul

00

o o

~

t-:>

00

C)1


~ ~

0")

LODGE DIREOTORY BY DISTRIOTS-Oontinued FORTY-FmST DISTRIOT-SAMUEL B. BROWN III, D. D. G. M., Bolivar, Mo. County Dallas

Lodge INo.1 Location . Riddick 361 Buffalo ; .. Western Light 396 Louisburg . ........ Urbana 421 Urbana . Hickory ' Hogle's Creek 279 Wheatland . " . Hermitage 288 Hermitage . Polk . Fair Play. . . . . . . . 44 Fair Play . Modern ' 144\Humansville . Pleasant 160IMorrisville . Bolivar. . . . . . . . .. 195IBoIivar . Pleasant Hope... 4671Pleasant Hope . Aldrich 664 Aldrich .

Master Dan Looney Bertram Booth Charley Clymore L. F. Jenkins L. Mabary Howard Price Arthur H. Brown Nathan L. Weems D. W. Turpin Fred Derrough George Cooper

. . . . . . . . . . .

Secretary I Time of Meeting ~yron Rea, Buffalo, Mo , 4th Fri. ea. mo. 1st Tues. ea. mo. Roscoe S. Lindsey, Louisburg, Mo James R. Fowler, Urbana, Mo , 2nd & 4th Sat. B. M. Crates, Wheatland, Mo , 1st Thurs. ea. mo. Homer A. Wilson, Hermitage, Mo 3rd Sat. ea. mo. Glenn Lyon, Fair Play, Mo 1st Mon. ea. mo. Fred V. Hogan, Flemington, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2nd Mon. ea. mo. Morris E. Ewing, Morrisville, Mo........â&#x20AC;˘...... , 3rd Mon. ea. mo. S. B. Brown III, Bolivar, Mo 2nd Wed. ea. mo. Floyd P. Slagle, Pleasant Hope, Mo , 1st Thurs. ea. mo. Marion Mitchell, Aldrich, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st Tues. ea. mo.

I-'1j

~

(':2

trl

trj

t::1 Z

H

o (fl

o

""::l ~

FORTY-SECOND DISTRICT-PARKS BACON, D. D. G. M., Eldorado Springs, Mo. Ce?,ar

.. Stockton Jerusalem Clintonville Dade.'.::::::: Washington Garrett Everton Melville Lockwood

. . . . . . . .

283IStockton . 315 Jerico Springs . 4821Eldorado Springs. 87 Greenfield . 369 Arcola . . 405 Everton . 458 IDadeville . 621 Lockwood

Harvey Levi. W. E. Albrecht Roy D. McCuIlick D. E. Ruark Carl Glenn Ron Grantham W. J. Dunn T. D. Combs

. . . . . . . .

Howard M. Wrenn, Stockton, Mo,. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. F. O. Potts, Jerico Springs, Mo , Earl F. Pentecost, EI Dorado Springs, Mo , J. Van Dam, Greenfield Lbr. Co., Greenfield, Mo James E. Gillen, Rt. 2, Lockwood, Mo , Wm. R. Probst, Everton, Mo , R. P. Myers, Dadeville, Mo Thos. M. Morris, Lockwood, Mo

::q 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 4th Tues. ea. mo. 2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

trj

~ ~ C)1

~


~

\.0

01

~

FORTY-THIRD DISTRICT-URBAN B. JONES, D. D. G. M'"Box 232, Nevada, Mo. Vernon

Barton

. Osage . Sheldon . . Schell City Montevallo . Unity . Walker . . Hermon . Lamar . Golden . Milford "" ..

303 Nevada 371 Sheldon 448 Schell City 490 Montevallo 495 Richards 605 Walker 187 Liberal. 292 Lamar 4751Golden City 516 Milford

. . Clem V. Ewing , . Fay E. Current '. . Robt. L. Blakely . . Basil Mark . : . S. E. Bloesser . . John R. Walker . Paul E. Worsley .. , . . C. M. Wattenbarger .. . , .. T. D. Combs . Elmer L. Thomas .

David V. Morris, Nevada, Mo H. L. Burney. Sheldon, Mo , Harold Mosher. Schell City, Mo Oral Faith, Montevallo, Mo Robert Miner, Richards, Mo , Ralph Bloesser, Walker, Mo.. ' , W. F. Renner, Liberal, Mo W. A. Heydenberk, Rt. 3. Lamar, Mo Ross L. Stansberry. Golden City, Mo , Eldon Gardner, Milford, Mo

. . . . . . . . . .

2nd Fri. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Sat. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Fri.

FORTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-RALPH E. BROWN, D. D. G. M., 923 S. Madison, Webb City, Mo. J~per

. Carthage Sarcoxie Joplin Fellowship Jasper Carterville Mineral. Webb City Carl Junction Criterion La Russell

. . . . . . . . . . .

197/Carthage 293 Sarcoxie. . . . . . . .. 335IJoPlin 345 Joplin 398IJasper 401ICarterville 471 IOronogo 512\Webb City 549 Carl Junction 586 Alba 5921La Russell

Arlo S. Royer A. L. Cockrell John A. Yancer H. L. Huelster Sam Miller Roy N. Lowrey Alfred W. Sheets Richard E. Board Wm. W. Byler G. L. Dale C. A. Brunner ,

. . . . . . . . . . .

Geo. F. Prater, Acting, Box 274. Carthage. Mo Nelson Brown, Sarcoxie, Mo , Sherman A. Smith, Box 97, Joplin, Mo.. Mark E. Whitaker, Box 35, Joplin, Mo , Lawson L. Sharp, Jasper Mo Paul Terry, Carterville, Mo Paul Ritter. RR I, Webb City, Mo " R. L. Sullens, 717 W. First St., Webb City, Mo Herbert D. Sandy, Carl Junction, Mo Walter Stephens, Alba, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. J. V. Patton, LaRussell. Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Friday 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Fri.

Q ~

>Z

l;j

t"i

o

l;j Q t?:j

o

";j

~

H

m m o

q

~

H

t..:> ~

-:J


t-:l

Cl:l

00

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRIOTS-Oontinued FORTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-PAUL A. KING, D. D. G. M., 502 Holland Bldg., Springfield, Mo. County Greene

Lodge I NO.1 Location I Master . United. . . .. . . . . . 5 Springfield. . . . .. Paul L. Beazley O'Sullivan....... 7 Walnut Grove Frank Hawkins Ash Grove 100 Ash Grove J. Edgar Jenkins Solomon 271 Springfield Robt. R. Donahoo Gate of Temple 422 Springfield N. O. Edwards Republic 570IRepublic Donald S. Maness Strafford. . . . . . .. 6081 Strafford. . . . . . .. L. F. Bodenhamer Willard 620 Willard Earl Rea Webster ..•... Webster......... 98 Marshfield ....•.. C. E. Boulson Doric 300 Elkland Robert Latimer Mount Olive 4391Rogersville, RR.3 J. E. Blinn Hazelwood \469ISeymour........ Benton George Henderson 477 Rogersville Sherman Ferrell

Secretary . . M. F. Smith, 3060 E. Walnut, Springfield, Mo . . R. M. Fagan, Walnut Grove, Mo . W. H. McCray, Ash Grove, Mo•.................. . M. W. Kinloch, 628 E. Normal, Springfield, Mo. . . Wm. G. Clark, 1615 Boonville, Springfield, Mo . . Frank J. Comisky, Box 225, Republic, Moo. . . Harry E. Grier, Box 38, Strafford, Mo . : Glen Hall, Willard, Mo . . Paul V. Rathbun, Marshfield, Mo D. W. Haymes, RR 2, Box 57, Conway, Mo . . . . M. J. Faulkner, Fordland, Moo. . . Willard H. Davis, Seymour, Mo . . E. F. Bracken, Rogersville, Mo

Time of Meeting 3rd Mon. ea. mo. 2nd Tues. ea. mo. 2nd Thurs. ea. mo 2nd Mon. ea. mo. 3rd Thurs. ea. mo; 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st Thurs. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd Fri. ea. mo. 2nd Sat. ea. mo. 3rd Friday ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Mon. 3rd Thurs. ea. mo.

t,j !;lj

o a

tr1 tr1 t:l ~

Z

Q

rn

oI%j FORTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-J. W. NICKLE, D. D. G. M., Mountain Grove, Mo.

8

P:l

Ava Do,:~las ..•.... Pilot Knob

I

; .. H. P. Hesterley . 26/Ava . 182 Richville. . . . . . . .. Clyde Bell

Barnes . Texas ....•.•.... Plato . Summersville . W1~ht:.·.·.·.·.·.·. Mountain Grove .. Joppa •........•. Mansfield . Norwood .

Texas ....•• :.

116!Cabool. 1771 Houston. . . . . . . .. 469IPlato ..........•. S55ISummersville 1681Mountain Groye .. 411IHartville 543IMansfield .. : 622INorwood

1. H.Williams Harold Eberhart Ewell M. Groves Wilby Harmon Cleon Thompson Earl Shaddy Demond Ward Ben Smith

. Fred O. Lethco, Ava, Mo . C. M. Cearley, Dora, Mo . . . . . . . .

Clovis Cunningham, Box 157, Cabool, Moo. E. E. Scott, Houston, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. W. L. Tilley, Plato, Mo A. B. Hawkins, Summersville, Mo Yale Myers, Box 367, Mountain Grove, Mo Edward B. Garner. Hartville, Mo.. . . .. . . . . . . . . .. Donald Livingston, Mansfield, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Forrest N. Freeman, Macomb, Mo...............

1st & 3rd Wed. Fri. on or bef. full moon 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. 1st Mon. ea. mo. 2nd Sat. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

tr1

~

I':C

01

Cl:l


~

c:.o

FORTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-GEORGE DEWOODY, D. D. G. M., Ellington, Mo.

01 ~

Carter •.••.•.. I Van Buren

. 5091Van Buren

Grandin ..•.•.... . Barnesville . Shannon::::: .- Delphian •....... Winona .••....... Eminence .

Rey~ol~::::: : Hopewell

..

579/Grandin 239\Lesterville 353 EIlington 137lBirch Tree 430 Winona 607 Eminence. . . . . ..

Roy Miller H. F. Gaines C. B. Hassler Earl L. Brown Harold Walton D. H. Lockman D. D. Searcy

H. D. Condray, Van Buren, Mo , GUY A. Smith, Grandin, Mo J. F. Faulkenberry, Box 14, Lesterville, Mo R.L. Daniels, Ellington, Mo E. L. Pulliam, Birch Tree, Mo W. M. Bockman, Winona, Mo W. A. Despain, Eminence, Mo

. On or after full moon of ea. mo. . 2nd Sat. ea. mo. . 2nd & 4th Sat. . 2nd Sat. ea. mo. . 1st & 3rd Mon. . 2nd Tues. ea. mo. . 1st Sat. & 3d Wd.

> Z

FORTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-JESSE L. HOLLOWAY, D. D. G. M., Elvins, Mo.

..

Iron ..•....... Star of the West .. .......... Mosaic . Madison •••••• Marcus .....•.... St. Fr~ncois... Bismarck ...•.... Farmington . Ionic . St. Francois . Samaritan ..•.... Pendleton •....... Leadwood . BIvins . Ste. Genevie~~. Saline .

133lIronton . 351 Belleview . 110 IFredericktown . 41IBismarck . 132 Farmington . 154 Desloge . 234lLibertYVille , .. 424 Bonne Terre . 551 Doe Run . 598lLeadwood . 5991 Flat River ....•.. 2261St. Mary's .

Alfred W. Janke James Brooks E. G. Hunter Homer L. Strader. . .. H. H. Kay. . . . . . . . . .. John W. Kells. . . . . .. Wm. Barron Richard K. Lemon. .. Lawrence Hunt, Jr... Clyde E. Mayberry. .. Cleo White Francis P. Oster

Andy L. Keithly, Ironton, Mo . V. O. Sutton, Belleview, Mo•.................... Gus Winter. Box 325, Fredericktown, Mo . Clyde Ruble, Bismarck, Mo . Hezzie Graham, 414 W. 6th St., Farmington, Mo.. Floyd H. Buckner, Box 192, Desloge, Mo . Sam Foley, Knob Lick, Mo . John L. Poston, Bonne Terre. Mo . Milton J. Schnebelen. Box 405, Farmington, Mo . F. T. Westlund. Frankclay. Mo . J. E. LaBruyere. Box 191, Rt. 1, Elvins. Mo . Dwight Smith, 439 N. West St., Perryville, Mo .

Q l;d tj

2nd & 4th Fri. 1st Sat. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st Thurs. ea mo. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Wed. 2nd & 4th Sat. 1st & 3rd Tues. 4th Sat. ea. mo.

~

o

tj Q t:t.j

o

~

~

H

00 00

o

ol;d H

FORTY-NINTH DISTRICT-ROY D. DRUM, D. D. G. M.. Oak Ridge, Mo. Boll!~ger ..•..

Trowel •......... Zalma•.......... . West View . . MyStic Tie Whitewater . Excelsior .

CapeGi;.a~d~~~ St. Mark's

440lMarble Hill . 545IZalma ....•...... 931Cape Girardeau .. 103IMillersville•..... 221 Oak Ridge . 417 Whitewater . . 441 Jackson

Hadley Kirkpatrick .. Raleigh Payne . . A. L. Seabaugh E. L. Linebarger . Clauda F. Hahs . Benjamin F. Kight . Chas. J. Van Duzer ..

J. Virgil Thompson, Marble Hill. Mo . H. D. Nichols. Zalma, Mo.................•....• A. C. Stein, 1615 Themis, Cape Girardeau, Mo . Luther J. Statler, RR 2, Jackson, Mo . Roy D. Drum, Oak Ridge, Mo . Daniel F. Jones, Whitewater, Mo . Daniel G. Seibert, Jackson, Mo .

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd & 4th Thurs.

t-5

~

c:.o


1:,:) ~

~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTIETH DISTRICT-AUBREY FRENCH, D. D. G. M., Charleston, Mo. Lodge NO.1 Location . East Prairie ....â&#x20AC;˘ 3841East Prairie Charleston . 4071 Charleston . 184 Morley Scott . Morley Ashlar . 306lCommerce Sikeston . 310lsikeston Illmo . 581 Illmo Chaffee . 615:Chaffee . 153IBloomfield Stoddard . Bloomfield Essex . 278 Essex Lakeville . 489 Bell City Dexter . 532IDexter Advance . 590 Advance Puxico . 596 Puxico New Madrid .. Morehouse . 603 Morehouse County

Miss~ippi.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Master R. H. Williams . R. T. Reed . James A. McMullin . Wm. P. Bear.dslee . J. S. Marshall . Clarence Seal. . Luther J. King, Sr . Howard Maupin . Jene Kirby . J. F. Armstrong, Jr.. E. F. Asberry, Jr . Glen Bidewell . Hollan Fann . Frank Parrish .

Secretary I Time of Meeting Joel M. Savell, East Prairie, Mo 2nd & 4th Thurs. Dee Jennings, Charleston, Mo...... . 1st & 3rd Thurs. John D. Uptain, Oran, Mo 2nd & 4th Mon. Albion H. Anderson, Commerce, Mo " 2nd & 4th Tues. A. A. Harrison, Box 374, Sikeston, Mo 1st & 3rd Thurs. O. C. Amick, Box 354, Illmo, Mo " 2nd & 4th Thurs. Otis Snyder, 115 Gray, Chaffee, Mo " 1st & 3rd Thurs. Koss W. Blomeyer, Bloomfield, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st & 3rd Wed. E. Y. Launius, Essex, Mo " 2nd & 4th Tues. H. A. Parker, Bell City, Mo 2nd & 4th Tues. E. F. Asberry, Sr., Dexter, Mo 1st & 3rd Tues. Lloyd E. Revelle, Advance, Mo 1st & 3rd Thurs. Alva Wilfong, Puxico, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 1st & 3rd Mon. Aquilla Grimes, Box 261, Morehouse, Mo " 2nd & 4th Tues.

fo'Ij ~

o

ot:Tj t:Tj

t:::; H

Z

Q

lf1

o

~

1-3

::q t'j

~

<:.0 CJl C.;>


!--'

c.o

OJ ~

Q

FIFTY-FmST DISTRIOT-J. RIOHARD NEELEY, D. D. G. M., Oaruthersville, Mo. Dunklin

.

New Madrid ...

" Pemiscot

.

... "1

Stoddard. . . . .. Dunklin. . . . .. Pemiscot. . . . .. New Madrid

Kennett . Four Mile . Hornersville . Cardwell . Malden . Senath . Portageville . Point Pleasant . New Madrid . Parma . Caruthersville . Hayti. .â&#x20AC;˘........ Steele." . Bernie . Clarkton . Wardell . Lilbourn .

68IKennett 212lcaniPbell. . . . . . .. 215 Hornersville 231 Cardwell 406IMalden .. , 513ISenath 166IportageVille..... 176 Conran 429 New Madrid 650 I Parma .. , 461Icaruthersville 571 Hayti. . . . . . . . . .. 634 Steele... . . . . . . . .. 573 Bernie 645IClarkton 665 I Wardell â&#x20AC;˘..... ,., 666ILilbourn

Roy W, Bush . Hiram Stephens . Austin A. Parsons . Otis Miller . H. W. Hendricks . Milton L. Ballinger . James G. Riddle . U. G. Totty . Herman J. Shepard .. Jesse Hill . James D. Bingham . James H. Pullam . Fred Bray . CarlO. Thurston . Elton James . Robert Simer . Lewis W. Stone .

Clay P. Bixler, Box 164, Kennett, Mo John P. Slankard, Campbell, Mo Archie A. Young, Hornersville, Mo Howard Tillman, Arbyrd, Mo R. C. Patterson, 503 Madison, Malden, Mo Truman Ponder, Senath, Mo R. D. Ellington, Jr., Box 85A, Portageville, Mo R. J. McAlister, Portageville, Mo C. M. Barnes, Box 178, Marston, Mo Orville Coffey, Parma, Mo Donald V. Magee, Box 137, Caruthersville, Mo Floyd M. Carlock, 301 So. 2nd St., Hayti, Mo Howard L. Yeager, Rt. 3, Steele, Mo , Geo. D; Abernathy, Bernie, Mo Lavern Downing, Box 825, Gideon, Mo D. L. Potts, Box 626, Wardell, Mo Harold D. Jones, Box 155. Lilbourn, Moo. ,

!;lj

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon.

> Z

t:j ~

o t:j Q t'j

o

~

~

H

If.J If.J

o q

!;lj H

~

~

!--'


~

~

~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTY-SECOND DISTRICT-HENRY A. TANNER, D. D. G. M., Doniphan, Mo. County Lodge Butler ..••.•.. Poplar Bluff Rir,ley •••..... Pine Composite Naylor W~rne . Greenville Wayne

NO.1 Location . 209jPoplar Bluff..... . 314lBardley ..•....... . 369 Doniphan . . . 668 Naylor . 107 Greenville . . 626 Piedmont .

Master T. S. Allen Fred Ollar Claud C. Grieb John Belew Wayne E. Barrow Thos. J. Davis. Jr

. . . . . .

Secretary Time of Meeting Arthur W. Morse, 315 Oak St., Poplar Bluff, Mo . 2nd & 4th Tues. . 3rd Sat. ea. mo. Clyde Turner. 106 So. Grand, Doniphan, Mo E. H. Rongey, Doniphan, Mo . 2nd & 4th Tues. Ralph Chedister. Naylor, Mo . 1st & 3rd Thurs. . 1st & 3rd Thurs. Cleo W. 'Mabrey, Greenville, Mo Russell C. McGhee, Piedmont, Mo . 2nd & 4th Sat.

I,j

l;d

o

atrj trj

t:l H

Z

FIFTY-THIRD DISTRICT-J. FRED PARK, D. D. G. M., West Plains, Mo.

Q

00

Howell ..•... "1 :: .. .. .... ..•.. •.. Oregon ..••.. ,

Oz,~rk .•......

Mt. Zion ....•.... Ingoma: ... : .. Mountam VIew . Alton .....•......

3271west Plains 536 Willow Springs .. 637 Mountain View.. 255IMton

Morgan Owens A. E. Blackwood Roy J. Miller J. L. Hays

. Archie L. Glinn. Box 465, West Plains. Mo . C. C. Brinsmaid, 722 Center, Willow Spgs., Mo . Frank N. LeBaron, Mountain View. Mo . D. H. Gohn, Alton, Mo

. . . . .

Woodside

. 387IThomasville

Harry Griffin

. Richard D. Boyd, Thomasville, Mo

Clifton Koshkonong Sampson Bayou

. 463 Thayer. . . . . . . . .. . 682IKoshkonong . 29~ILutie . 365jBakersfield

E. E. Roberts Jas. L. Kennemur James Wolf. R. C. Dobbs

. . J. W. Mitchell, Box 183, Thayer, Mo . Wallace B. Hodge, Act., 120 Grove, West Plains . . C. J. Hogan, Isabella, Mo . . Virgil Wiles, Bakersfield, Mo

Rockbridge Robert Burns

. 435 Almarlha . 496 Gainesville

D. P. Wade Marvin Looney

. C. E. Hicks, Wasola, Mo . Everett Herd, Gainesville. Mo

. .

1st Thurs. ea. mo~ 2nd Tues. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Tues. Sat. night on or before full moon Fri. on or ber. full moon 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. Sat. bef. 3rd Sun. Sat. on or bef. full moon 2nd Sat. ea. mo. 4th Fri. ea. mo.

ol':I;j 8

~

trj

i-l

<:.c

01 Cl;I


~

CO

<:.n

(J,j

FIFTY-FOURTH DISTRICT-RAYMOND H. PATTERSON, D. D. G. M., Galena, Mo... Christian

1 Sparta

.."'1

Friend

Billings , Forsyth . • .•..•.• Branson Stone. . • . . . . •. Galena Crane

Ta,~ey ..•....

. 296Isparta . 352 Ozark . . . .

.

. Keller Bradley. . . . . .. James Jenkins, Sparta, Mo .. John J. Bain. . . . . . ..

379!Billings . 4531 Forsyth . 587lBranson . 515lGalena.........• 519 Crane .

Virgil H. Barbee Harry Eddings...... John R. Jones Clyde L: Robinson Guy Peters. . . . . . . . ..

Wilbur Wilson, Ozark, Mo Eldon L. Hale, Billings, Mo Clayton P. Cooper, Forsyth, Mo S. G. Prather, Branson, Mo Raymond H. Patterson, Galena, Mo David A. Holderman, Crane, Mo

. Fri. night on or bef. full moon . Sat. on or bef. full moon . 1st Thurs. ea. mo. . 2nd & 4th Wed. . 1st & 3rd Fri. . 1st & 3rd Thurs. . 2nd & 4th Tues.

. .. Monett Barry . Pythagoras . Comfort . Lawre'r;,d~::::. Mount Vernon . Canopy .......•.. " Decatur . Miller ......•....

129lMonett. . . . . . . . .. 367 Washburn 383 Cassville 533IWheaton 991Mount Vernon 284IAurora 400lPierce City 567 Miller. . . . . . . . . ..

M. L. Clements Armon Banks Emory Melton Leslie A. Phillips J. B. Gum, Jr F. L. Montgomery Ray McConnell Quentin Friar

. F. E. Williamson, Box 184, Mopett, Mo . N. E. Edens, Washburn, Mo . W. T. Priest, Cassville, Mo . George A. Fagan, Box 72, Wheaton, Mo . Leon Pugh, Mt. Vernon, Mo . W. H. Lloyd, Aurora, Mo . A. K. Kelly, Rt. I, Pierce City, Mo . Thomas F. Webb, Miller. Mo

~ ~

Z

t; t,-l

ot; ot'j o

~

FIFTY-FIFTH DISTRICT-GEORGE FAGAN, D. D. G. M., Box 72, Wheaton, Mo. B~ry

o

. . . . . . . .

1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Sat. 2nd & 4th Fri. 2nd Thurs. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Wed.

~

H

UJ UJ

o q

~

H

~

t+:--

(J,j


t-:) ~ ~

LODGE DIRECTORY BY DISTRICTS-Continued FIFTY-SIXTH DISTRICT-BERT ST. OL.A.IB., D. D. G. M., Noel, Mo. County Lodge McDonald ..•.. Southwest Anderson " NoeL Newton . Neosho Granby Stella

. . . . . .

No. I Location Master 466 ISouthwest City . Joseph Dixon . 621lAnderson . Norman D. Mitchell.. . 647jNOel . Truman Harmon . . Walter P. Stark 247 Neosho . . Ernie R. Carter 514 Granby Irl Culp . 538IStella .

Secretary George Kramp, Jr., Southwest City, Mo Henry Eppard, Anderson, Mo Claude Eskridge, Noel, Mo Henry C. Bacon, Neosho, Mo Clarence H. Bucklew, Box 143. Granby, Mo Earle D. Young, Box K, Stella,.Mo

. . . . . .

Time of Meeting 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Wed. 1st & 3rd Wed. 1st Thurs. ea. mo. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st Thurs. ea. mo.

I-d

~

o o

t;rj t;rj

FIFTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT-GEORGE G. WINTER, D. D. G. M .. Box 745, Kennerly Rd., Sappington 23, Mo. St.

~ouis ...... Of

" ....

...... ......

.....

"

Of

"

..

Of

"

Of

"

...

"

......

Bonhomme ....... Bridgeton ........ Webster Groves .. Fenton .......... Meramec ........ Kirkwood ........ Ferguson ........ Maplewood ...... Clayton .......... Wellston ......... Valley-Park ...... Jennings ........ Gardenville ...... Freedom ......... Brentwood ....... Overland ........ Berkeley .........

45IBallwin ......... Chas. J. Lacey ....... Henry F. Woerther, Ballwin, Mo................. 80 St. John's Station. W. D. Bruce ......... W. Reinemer, 2716 Lyndhurst, Overland, Moo. .... 84\Webster Groves .. E. Claude Baity ...... Fay G. Fulkerson, 525 Sunnyside Ave., Webster Groves 19, Mo........................ 28renton .••....... Arthur J. Wilde ..... H. E. Reynolds, Rt. 1, Box 94, House Springs, Mo. 313 Eureka .......... John F. Schwarz ..... J. W. Thee, Eureka, Mo......................... 484 Kirkwood ........ Norman G. Theurer .. L. L. Keevil, 408 W. Rose Hill, Kirkwood, Mo..... 542 Ferguson ........ George E. Rector ..... John E. Adams, 219 S. Clark, Ferguson 21, Mo.... 566lMaplewood ...... Arthur M. Headrick .. W. F. Harris, 7572 Wise, Richmond Hghts. 17, Mo. 601 Clayton ......... A. Ed. Spaete ........ R. W. McElhinney, 3 Daniel Rd., St. Louis, Mo.... • 13 well 'ton ..•...... Arthur C. Daily ...... H. T. Semple, 5985a Lotus, St. Louis, Mo......... 629 Valley Park ..... J. Harold Burton ..... Elmer T. Hiscox, 10 Boyd Ave., Valley Park, Mo.. 640 Jennings ........ Virgil C. Phillips ..... John T. Cassens, 2507 Ada, St. Louis 21, Mo...... 655 Gardenville ...... A. P. Koopmann ..... H. A. Gast, 9743 Tesson Ferry Rd., Affton, Mo.... 636iMehlville ........ Marion Thomas ...... H. A. Kolb, 2630 S. Broadway, St. Louis, Mo...... 616\Brentwood ....... N. B. Frohwitter ..... P. D. Bragg, 638 Oakwood, Webster Groves, Mo... 623 Overland ........ August H. Brewer ... W. F. Hecht, 8444 Lackland Rd., Overland 14, Mo. 667lBerkeley ......... Chas. F. Humphrey .. Virgil E. Kolb, 8911 Guthrie, St. Louis 21, Mo.....

l

1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues. 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Fri. 2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Tues. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 2nd & 4th Thurs. 1st & 3rd Thurs.

t:1

H

Z Q w

o':tj 8

~

t;rj

~

'0 01

~


~

<.0 <:';'l

ClJ

FIFTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT-A. ROSCOE WHITE, D. D. G. M., Eldon, Mo. Morgan ....•.. 1 Versailles '1 " ....••. Barnett Miller Olean........... .. . Ionia

320lversailles 591 Barnett 134/0Iean 381 Eldon

, C. W. Dunnaway J. G. Tompkins Milton L. papen J. A. Pace

W. B. Todd, Versailles, Mo

1 Robert Edmondson, Barnett, Mo 1 Clarence E. Herfurth, Olean, Mo

Ford Vaughan, Eldon, Mo

'12nd & 4th Mon. 2nd Wed. ea. mo. 3rd Thurs. ea. mo. 2nd & 4th Mon. .

o ~ > Z

t:1

t-t

o t:1 ot.'j

FITTY-NINTH DISTRICT-BYRON AULD, D. D. G. M., Buckner, Mo. Jackson

M. W. Sudbrock, 1309 N. Spring, Independence, M Wm. A. Harvey, 109 E. 3rd St., Lee's Summit, Mo. J. E. McCluhan, 1815 Norwood, Independence, Mo. George M. Hale, Sr., Blue Springs, Mo Henry W. Poertner, Box 434, Raytown, Mo Marvin Harris, Oak Grove, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. H. W. Bergschneider. Box 63, Levasy, Mo G. B. Christy, 10008 Truman Rd. Independence, Mo . 618/Grandview•...... Wm. B. Vaught, Sr . Herbert L. Bratton, Grandview, Mo.. . . . . . . . . . . .. . 6441Grain Valley ..... Charles Kitley . Clarence D. Marble, Grain Valley, Mo

. . Independence Summit . McDonald . Blue Springs . Raytown . Christian . Buckner . Mt. Washington .. Grandview Grain Valley

76lIndependence . 2631Lee,s Summit . 324 Independence . . 337 Blue Springs . 391 Raytown . 392 Oak Grove 501lBuckner . 6141Mt. Washington ..

Prewitt Fisher . . Rollie McClendon Courtney W. Brown .. Everett W. Kern . N. P. Brouillette . J. E. Perry . E. L. Hamilton . John T. young .

2nd & 4th Mon. 1st & 3rd Tues. 1st & 3rd Mon. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 1st & 3rd Fri. 1st & 3rd Tues. . 2nd & 4th Fri. 1st & 3rd Thurs. 2nd & 4th Tues.

ot'lj ~

H

00 00

o

q

~

H

to-:l ~

01


LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI

~

H::..

~

FROM ITS ORGANIZATION. APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election

Grand Master

D. Grand Master

Senior G. Warden

Junior G. Warden

Grand Treasurer

April,1821. Thos. F. Riddick .. * James Kennerly ..• William Bates * Archibald Gamble .. * Oct., 1821. Nath'l B. Tucker .. * Thompson Douglas. * Edward Bates * William Bates - Archibald Gamble .. * Oct., 1822 Nath'l B. Tucker .. * Thompson Douglas.- Edward Bates * Wm. G. Pettus * Archibald Gamble .. * Oct., 1823 Nath'l B. Tucker .. * Geo. H. C. Melody .. * Edward Bates * Wm. G. Pettus * Archibald Gamble .. * Oct., 1824 Nath'l B. Tucker .. * Geo. H. C. Melody .. * Wm. G. Pettus ..•• Thornt. Grimsley * Archibald Gamble .. * Oct., 1825.... Edward Bates * Geo. H. C. Melody ..• Wm. G. Pettus • Thornt. Grimsley * Archibald Gamble .. * Oct., 1826 Edward Bates * Hardage Lane * Martin Ruggles * John F. Ryland * Rich. T. McKinney.* Oct., 1827 Edward Bates * Hardage Lane * Martin: Ruggles * H. R. Gamble * Thornton Grimsley.* Oct.. 1828.... Hardage Lane , * Geo. H. C. Melody .. * H. R. Gamble * Adam L. Mills * Thornton Grimsley. * Oct., 1829 Hardage Lane * Fred L. BiUon * H. R. Gamble * Adam L. Mills * Bernard Pratte Oct.• 1830 Hardage Lane - Geo. H. C. Melody .. * SincTair Kirtley .. - Adam L. Mills - Thomas Andrews * Dec., 1831. Edward Bates * Geo. H. C. Melody .. * Oliver Parker * Augustus Jones * Thomas Andrews * Oct., 1832 ..•. H. R. Gamble * Geo. H. C. Melody,.* M. J. Noyes • Augustus Jones * Thomas Andrews * Dec., 1883 ..•. Sinclair Kirtley * A. B. Chambers * John Wilson * G. A. Tuttle * Geo. H. C. MelodY .. * Nov., 1834 ... § A. B. Chambers * Sinclair Kirtley * Oliver Parker * S. W. B. Carnegy * Geo. H. C. Melody .. * Oct., 1835 .. tt A. B. Chambers * Sinclair Kirtley * Oliver Parker • S. W. B. Carnegy ...• Geo. H. C. Melody .. * Oct., 1836 .... S. W. B. Carnegy.* John D. Daggett * Edward Searcey .. • Granville Snell. * Geo. H. C. Melody .. • Oct., 1837.... S. W. B. Carnegy. * John D. Daggett * A. B. Chambers * Thomas Andrews '" Geo. H. C. MelodY .. * Oct., 1838 S. W. B. Carnegy.* John D. Daggett - A. B. Chambers - Aex. T. Douglass * Geo. H. C. Melody .. * Oct., 1839 P. H. McBride * A. B. Chambers * Alex T. Douglass •• Wm. C. Vance * Geo. H. C. Melody .. * Oct., 1840 P. H. McBride • Joseph Foster * Alex T. Douglass.* John Orrick * Geo. H. C. MelodY .. * Oct.; 1841. P. H. McBride * Joab Bernard * Joseph Foster * C. H. Bowers Geo. H. C. MelodY .. * Oct., 1842 P. H. McBride * Joab Bernard * Joseph Foster * C. H. Bowers John Simonds * Oct., 1843 ..•. P. H. McBride * Joseph Foster * J. W. S. Mitchell.* E. S. Ruggles • Fred L. BiUon * Oct., 1844 , J. W. S. Mitchell.* Fred L. BiUon * E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F. Jacoby * John S. Watson * Oct., 1845 .••. J. W. S. Mitchell.* John D. Taylor * E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F. Jacoby * John S. Watson * Oct•• 1846 John Ralls * John D. Taylor * E. S. Ruggles ' .. * J. L. F. Jacoby - John S. Watson * Oct., 1847 Joseph Foster * E. S. Ruggles * J. L. F. Jacoby * Cyrus Osborn * John S. Watson * May. 1848 Joseph Foster * E. S. Ruggles Cyrus Osborn * Joseph Megguire * John S. Watson * May. 1849 John F. Ryland * E. S. Ruggles * Joseph Megguire.* .P. Draper * John M. Reed * May, 1&50..•. John F. Ryland * B. W. Grover * P. Draper * S. F. Currie * J. T. Johnson * May 1851. B. W. Grover * E. S. Ruggles * S. F. Currie * J. H. Turner * J. T. Johnson * May, 1852 B. W. Grover..•.. * S. F. Currie ....•... * J. H. Turner ..••• * S. H. Saunders * J. T. Johnson * June, 1853 Wilson Brown •.•. * L. S. Cornwell * J. W. Chenoweth.* R. C. Hill .....•.... * Joseph Foster * May, 1854 L. S. Cornwell * D. P. Wallingford .. * James H. Britton.* •.......••.....•. *- Joseph Foster *

Grand SecretarY William Renshaw* William Renshaw. William Renshaw. T. Douglas· T. Douglas* John D. Dagge~t* John D. Daggett* John D. Daggett. John D. Daggett· John D. Daggett· Fred L. Billon* Fred L. Billon. Fred L. Billon. John Garnett. Thos. W. Conyers· Thos. W. Conyers· Richard B. DaUam* Richard B. DaUam* Richard B. Dallam* Richard B. Dallam* RichardB. DaUam*' Richard B. DaUam* Richard B. DaUam* Richard B. Dallam· Richard B. Dallam. Fred L. BiIlon* Fred L. Billon* J. W. S. Mitchell* J. W. S. Mitchell* C. D. W. Johnson* C. D. W. Johnson* C. D. W. Johnson* A.O·Sullivan* A. O'Sullivan* A.O·Sullivan*

I-d

~ o

t:j t:j

t::::1 H

Z

o

w

o

t:rj

"'3

~

t:j

~

'-0

01

~


~ ~

May, May, May, May, May. May, May, May. May, May, May. May, Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct.. Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct., Oct.,

1855 1856 1857 1858 1859 1860 1861. 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 1875 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881. 1882 1883 1884 .•.. 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891. 1892 •••. 1893 1894 1895

L. S. Cornwell • Benjamin Sharp .. • S. H. Saunders • S. H. Saunders • Marcus Boyd '" M. H. McFarland.* Wm. R. Penick * Goo. Whitcomb * John H. Turner .. • John F. Houston.* John F. Houston.· John D. Vinci!. .. • W. E. Dunscomb.· John D. Vinci!. .. • William D. Muir.* Thos. E. Garrett.· Thos. E. Garrett.· Samuel H. Owens.· R. E. Anderson .. • John W. Luke • James E. Cadle • Xen. Ryland • T. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan • Jos. S. Browne * W. R. Stubblefield· Alex. M. Dockery.· Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall. • Robt. F. Stevenson* James W. Boyd .. * Geo.. R. Hunt * Wm. M. Williams.'" James P. Wood ... IT Theodore Brace .. Geo. E. Walker B. H. Ingram John R. Parson • Harry Keene ...• • J. B. Thomas • A. M. Hough •

W. A. Cunningham .. P. Draper......... * Marcus Boyd .....• • M. H. McFarland .. • W. R. Penick • John Decker • John H. Turner • Wm. N. Loker John D. Vincil John D. Vincil. * W. E. Dunscomb • C. A. Rowley R. E. Anderson * T. E. Garrett • R. E. Anderson * R. E. Anderson * J. E. Ryland • John W. Luke • Xenophon Ryland .. • Xenophon Ryland .. • Thos. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan • Joseph S. Browne .. • W. R. Stubblefield .. • Alex. M. Dockery * Chas. C. Woods * Lee A. Hall • Robt. F. Stevenson.* James W. Boyd • George R. Hunt • W. M. Williams • James P. Wood ....• Theodore Brace Geo. E. Walker B. H. Ingram John R. Parson Harry Keene .....•• J. B. Thomas ..•...• A. M. Hough .......• D. A. Jamison ..•.. -

J. W. Chenoweth.· H. E. Van Orsdell.· S. H. Saunders • Marcus Boyd • Marcus Boyd • John F. Houston • John F. Houston .. * John Decker • W. R. Penick • John Decker • John Decker • Samuel M. Hayes * Geo. Whitcomb • A. L. McGregor • Wm. N. Loker • Samuel Russell • John D. Vincil. .. * A. L. McGregor • A. L. McGregor .. • Martin Collins • Martin Collins * R. E. Anderson • R. E. Anderson • A. L. McGregor * T. E. Garrett • Wm. D. Muir • Wm. D. Muir • Alex M. Dockery • A. M. Dockery * Sam H. Owens • Sam H. Owens • John E. Ryland ....• Sam H. Owens • John E. Ryland * John W. Luke Jas. E. Cadle • Jas. E. Cadle • Xenophon Ryland .. • Jas. E. Cadle * Thos. C. Ready • Thos. C. Ready • Noah M. Givan • Noah M. Givan * M. G. Hubble Jos. S. Browne • W. R. Stubblefield.· W. R. Stubblefield· Jas. E. Carter • Jas. E. Carter IT. Alex. M. Dockery * Chas. C. Woods • Lee A. Hall • LeeA. Hall Robt. F. Stevenson.· Robt. F. Stevenson· James W. Boyd • James W. Boyd ... * Geo. R. Hunt * George R. Hunt .• * Wm. M. Williams * Wm. M. Williams .• James P. Wood • James P. Wood •· Theodore Brace ...• Geo. E. Walker * Goo. E. Walker • B. H. Ingram • B. H. Ingram - John R. Parson • John R. Parson - Harry Keene ......• • Harry Keene J. B. Thomas J. B. Thomas - A. M. Hough A. M. Hough * D. A. Jamison ..•... • D. A. Jamison • F. J. Tygard .......• F. J. Tygard .....• E. F. Allen •

John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett • John D. Daggett * John D. Daggett * Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker * Wm. N. Loker ..•.• • Wm. N. Loker ..... * Wm. N. Loker ....• • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker • Wm. N. Loker * Wm. N. Loker * John W. Luke * John W. Luke • John W. Luke ....• 11 John W. Luke ...... Samuel M. Kennard· Samuel M. Kennard· Samuel M. Kennard· Samuel M. Kennard· Samuel M. Kennard. Samuel M. Kennard· Samuel M. Kennard Samuel M. Kennard. Samuel M. Kennard * Samuel M. Kennard. Samuel M. Kennard * Samuel M. Kennard. Samuel M. Kennard. Samuel M. Kennard.

A. O'Sullivan. A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan. A. O'Sullivan. A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan* A. O'Sullivan* A. O'Sullivan* A. O'Sullivan* A. O'Sullivan· A. O'Sullivan·t G. Frank Gouley*:!: G. Frank Gouley* G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley* G. Frank Gouley* G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley· G. Frank Gouley**11 John D. Vinci!· John D. Vincil* John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!* John D. Vincil* John D. Vinci!· John/D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!· John D. Vinci!* John D. Vincil· John D. VincilJohn D. Vincil* John D. Vincil* John D. VincilJohn D. Vinci!John D. Vinci!*

<:Jl ~

Q t;d

>

Z

t1 ~

o

t1

Q

trJ

o

I':Ij

~ ~

W

W

o q

t;d ~

t>:l ~

-::a


t>:) ~

LIST OF ELECTED OFFICERS OF THE GRAND LODGE A. F. & A. M. MISSOURI

00

FROM ITS ORGANIZATION, APRIL 23, 1821 Date Election

Grand Master

D. Grand Master

Senior G. Warden

Junior G. Warden

Grand Treasurer

Oct., 1896 Oct., 1897. ' Oct., 1898 Oct., 1899 Oct., 1900 Oct., 1901. Oct., 1902 Oct., 1903 Sept.,1904 Sept.• 1905 Sept., 1906 Sept., 1907 Sept., 1908 , Sept., 1909 ' Sept.,1910 , Sept., 1911 Sept.• 1912 ' Oct., 1913 Sept., 1914. '" Sept.• 1915 ... , Sept., 1916 .••. Sept., 1917 , Sept.• 1918 Sept., 1919 Sept., 1920 , Sept., 1921. Oct., 1922 Oct., 1923 Oct., 1924 Oct., 1925 Oct., 1926 Oct., 1927 Sept., 1928 Sept., 1929 Oct., 1930

D. A. Jamison • F. J. Tygard • E. F. Allen * C. H. Briggs .......• Campbell Wells .... • Joseph C. Finagin.· John C. yocum • Wm. F. Kuhn • Leroy R. Valliant .. * A. S. Houston D. M. Wilson * John T. Short * R. R. Kreeger .....• Wm. A. Hall • Clay C. Bigger * Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert ....• Van Fremont Boor* Tolman W. Cotton .. Frank R. Jesse .... Edward Higbee ....• Wm. A. Clark * John W. Bingham .• Julius C. Garrell .... Wm. F. Johnson ...• O. A. Lucas ........• Bert S. Lee Joseph S. Mcintyre * Orestes Mitchell * W. W. Martin John Pickard ...•.. Anthony F. Ittner .. Byrne E. Bigger•... S. R. Freet ......... Wm. R. Gentry.....

F. J. Tygard .......• E. F. Allen C. H. Briggs ......• Campbell Wells .... • Joseph C. Finagin ..• John C. yocum • Wm. F. Kuhn • Leroy B. Valliant A. S. Houston * D. M. Wilson * John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger William A. Hall ....• Clay C. Bigger .....• Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert • Van Fremont Boor .• Chesley A. Mosman .• Frank R. Jesse ....• Edward Higbee .•..• Wm. A. Clark * John W. Bingham ..• Julius C. Garrell • Wm. F. Johnson • O. A. Lucas • Bert S. Lee Joseph S. McIntyre .• Orestes Mitchell. • W. W. Martin John Pickard A. F. Ittner B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet ........• Wm. R. Gentry ..... Ray V. Denslow. . . ..

E. F. Allen ..•....• • C. H. Briggs • Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin .• John C. Yocum * Wm. F. Kuhn • Leroy B. Valliant.· A. S. Houston • D. M. Wilson * John T. Short • R. R. Kreeger • William A. Hall * Clay C. Digger * Arch A. Johnson , Jacob Lampert • Van Fremont Boor.· Chesley A. Mosman· Tolman W. Cotton .. Edwarq Higbee • Wm. A. Clark * John W. Bingham.* Julius C. Garrell * Wm. F. Johnson • O. A. Lucas • Bert S. Lee Joseph S. McIntyre .• Orestes Mitchell. * W. W. Martin John Pickard • A. F. Ittner B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet • Wm. R. Gentry, Sr.. Ray V. Denslow ..... Thad B. Landon ...•

C. H. Briggs ..•.... • Campbell Wells • Joseph C. Finagin .. * John C. Yocum * Wm. F. Kuhn * Leroy B. Valliant .. • A. S. Houston * D. M. Wilson • Howard Watson * R. R. Kreeger • William A. Hall * Clay C. Bigger • Arch A. Johnson Jacob Lampert • Van Fremont Boor.· Chesley A. Mosman .• Tolman W. Cotton Frank R. Jesse • Wm. A. Clark • John W. Bingham.· Julius C. Garrell .. * Wm. F. Johnson ...• O. A. Lucas • Bert S. Lee Joseph S. McIntyre.· Orestes Mitchell * W. W. Martin John Pickard • A. F. Ittner B. E. Bigger S. R. Freet Wm. R. Gentry, Sr Ray V. Denslow ..•. Thad B. Landon ... * Frank C. Barnhill..

Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard. * Samuel M. Kennard.· Samuel M. Kennard.· John R. Parson • John R. Parson • Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart· Alphonso C. Stewart* Alphonso C. StewartAlphonso C. Stewart* Alphonso C. Stewart* Alph. C. Stewart .••• Wm. A. Hall * Wm. A. Hall * Wm. A. Hall • Wm. A. Hall • Wm. A. Hall ......• • Wm. A. Hall • Wm. A. Hall * Wm. A. Hall • Wm. A. Hall ·ttt E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris E. E. Morris........

Grand Secretary John D. Vinci!. John D. Vincil. John D. Vincil. John D. Vinci]. John D. Vincil* John D. Vinci]* John D. Vincil. John D. Vinci!. John D. Vincil.~~ John R. ParsonU. John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. ParsonJohn R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parson* John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parson. John R. Parsontt* Frank R. JesseFrank R. Jesse. Frank R. JesseFrank R. Jesse. Frank R. Jesse* Frank R. Jesse••tt Arthur Matherttt Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather. Arthur Mather.

I-Ij ~

oo

txJ ~

t;j H

Z

o

if)

o

~

8

~

txJ

f--l CO al ~


~

<:.0 <:Jl

Sept.,193!. Ray V. Denslow Thad B. Landon * Frank C. Barnhill Du Val Smith .....•. Sept., 1932 Thad B. Landon * Frank C. Barnhill Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Sept.,1933 F. C. Barnhill Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly .....• Geo. W. Walker ..•.• Sept.,1934 Du Val Smith Jas. W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker ....• H. L. Reader Sept., 1935 James W. Skelly Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles Sept., 1936 Geo. W. Walker H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods t Setp.,1937 H. L. Reader Henry C. Chiles Elwyn S. Woods t Karl M. Vetsburg Sept., 1938 Henry C. Chiles ElwYn S. Woods Karl M. Vetsburg Harry S. Truman Sep"t., 1939 Karl M. Vetsburg Harry S. Truman Harris C. Johnston .. Forrest C. Donnell .. Sept., 1940. '" Harry S. Truman Harris C. Johnston .. Forrest C. Donnell .. Grover C. Sparks. §§ Sept.,194!. Harris C. Johnston .. Forrest C. Donnell.. Grover C. Sparks.§§ Wm. F. Woodruff ... Sept.,1942 Forrest C. Donnell.. Grover C. Sparks.§§ W. F. Woodruff James A. Kinder.§§§ Sept., 1943 W. F. Woodruff Willis J. Bray Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing Sept., 1944 Willis J. Bray Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland Sept., 1945 Willis J. Bray Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland Sept., 1946 Solon Cameron Morris E. Ewing Harry F. Sunderland. James M. Bradford .. Sept.,1947 Morris E. Ewing '. Harry F. Sunderland. James M. Bradford .. Ray Bond Sept., 1948 Harry F. Sunderland. James M. Bradford .. Ray Bond Homer L. Ferguson. Sept., 1949 .. " James M. Bradford.. Ray Bond.......... Homer L. Ferguson. Richard O. Rumer. .. Sept., 1950 Ray Bond." Homer L. Ferguson .. Richard O. Rumer ..• James McB. Sellers .. Sept.,195!. Homer L. Ferguson .. Richard O. Rumer James McB. Sellers .. Orestes Mitchell, Jr.. Oct., 1952 Richard O. Rumer James McB. Sellers .. Orestes Mitchell, Jr.. " William J. Craig Sept., 1963 James McB. Sellers.. Orestes Mitchell, Jr William J. Craig Harold M. Jayne ·Deceased. §Was not installed. tResigned. *tDied August 11, 1866, while in office. ·~Appointed August 13, 1866, by John D. Vincil, Grand Master. "IIDied April 11, 1877, while in office. "'UUDied October 12, 1904, while in office. ""'Died April 22, 1916, while in office.

·1!John W. Luke served, by appointment, as Grand Secretary, from April 11, 1877 to October 11, 1877, and died October, 1888. UDied within week after his installation. ttThere was no Communication in 1835, owing to the anti-Masonic excitement. **Withdrawn from Masonry. tt*Resigned May 20, 1921, account ill health. ***Appointed October 22, "1904, by Leroy B. Valliant. Grand Master.

E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E. E.

Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris Morris........ Morris Morris Morris Morris

Arthur Mather'" Arthur Mather'" Arthur Mather'" Arthur Mather'" Arthur Mather· Arthur Mather· Arthur Mather· Arthur Mather· Arthur Mather'" Arthur Mather· Arthur Mather'" Arthur Mather'" Arthur Mather§§§§ Harold L. Reader"'§ Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader Harold L. Reader

*tttDied November 7, 1924, while in office. **ttDied August 29, 1927, while in office. ttt Appointed September I, 1927, by J6hn Pickard, Grand Master. §§Died December 28, 1942, while in office. §§§Died May 8, 1943, while in office. §§§§Died April 22, 1944, while in office. *§Appointed May I, 1944 by W. F. Woodruff, Grand Master.

CJ.:)

Q

~ Z

tJ ~

o

tJ

Q t::j

o":I:j ~

H

m m

o

c:::: ~

H

OFFICERS OF THE ORGANIZATION, FEBRUARY 22, 1821 EDWARD BATES, Worshipful Master JOSEPH V. GARNIER, Treasurer

J AMES KENNERLY, Senior Warden

WILLIAM BATES, Junior Warden ABRAM BECK, SecretarY ~

iot'-

<:.0


~

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI TO MISSOURI Grand Representative Robert L. Aronson Wm. C. Rese John Horn Byrne E. Bigger John W. Adams ............' Russell E. Murray

GRAND LODGE Post Office St. Louis , Alabama ' St. Louis , Alberta . St. Louis ' Argentina . , HannibaL ' .........•. Arizona ........•..• " Marshall................. Arkansas . , , ., Austria . St. Louis Brazil-Rio de Janeiro .

::::::: 'Kir·k~~~·.·.·.:·.·.: '

W~~~~~·D~~~h~;.· j~:: ................... , " Frank G. Ade ..............• John A. Witthaus. . . . . . . . . .. ..•..•...•••..••......••• '" Henry W. Fox .......•...... , James M. DeWitt : , Thomas B. Mather Thornton Jennings Harold M. Jayne Robert L. Hoy , Wm. C. Gordon ..........•.. , J. M. Sellers

: ' ' ' .·

Joplin , St. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ; Kansas City , ' Kirksville , Kansas City , , Clinton Memphis ' Kansas City , ' Marshall , , Lexington ,

~ys~H~;~~~::::::::::::: 6~i;~bi~::::::::::::::·

B~~~ii~i>~ S~::::::::: Brazil-Minas Gerais . British Columbia . Canada . Chile . China . Colorado . Connecticut . Costa Rica . Cuba . Delaware . Denmark .•......... District of Columbia .

:::.. ::::::~7~~ida~·::::.;::::: . Cape Girardeau ...................•. France ........•... ,

Harold O. GraueL W. W. Martin St. Louis . .' ' Georgia . Vernie G. Fisher, Sr......... Kansas City ,, , , , Greece, ,., . Walter A. Higbee " Lancaster , Guatemala . ..•..............................................•.. , Iceland . Walter J. Simon St. Louis ' Idaho . DuVal Smith St. Joseph , Illinois . Elmer W. Wagner St. Louis ,' Indiana . Forrest C. Donnell St. Louis................ , .. , Ireland . Arthur O. Hodges. Independence ,., Italy (Grand Orient) . Chas. L. Woods , Rolla Kansas . F. C. Barnhill ..•............ Marshall , Kentucky ......•....

01

o

FROM MISSOURI Grand Representative

Post Office

Blake W. Harper ..•......... Archibald West. . . . . . . . . . . .. Ernesto F. J. Plaut. . . . . . . .. Lee Garrett Theo. Friedman ,

i: B~~t L'o',,'e·

:

:

:

Montgomery Edmonton Buenos Aires Tucson Little Rock' 'Ri~ d~·j~~~i~~

"

.

I-Ij ~

o

L~~~~~~~· ii~~I~y',

::: '. :: : '. ::.

'V~~'c~'u'~~r'"

.

Geo. D. Kleinhaus

Kitchener, Ontario

y ~ "'Vh~ 'Ch~~: :'. ::::::::'. ::.

Jos. M. NeaL Albert M. Gesler. . . . . . . . . . .. Rudolph Sasso Calixto Fajardo Bertram H. Blum. . . . . . . . . .. Alex Troedsson. . . . . . . . . . . .. Kenneth J. Fernald Hon. Wykeham Stanley , Hal W. Adams B. F. Howell , Robert A. Collins Dr. Antonios Rammos Tomas V. Contreras , OIafur Gislason. . . . . . . . . . . .. Clarence D. Parkhiser ..... ,. Robert J. Mitchell. . . . . . . . . ..

'chi~~""""""""" Meeker Orange, Conn. P. O. Box 186, San Jose Havana Dover Copenhagen Washington Kent Mayo Paris Unadilla Athens Guatemala City Reykjavik Caldwell 5427 Thomas St., Chicago

H~~t~; c;', '6: D~~~~: .... :::.. ::.. Fabio Luzzatto. . • . . . . . . . . .. D. A. Meredith Sam K. Veach. . . . . . . . . . . . ..

'r~~i~~d"""""" Milan Kansas City Carlisle

o

(rj (rj

t:t H

Z m. Q

a

~

1-3 ~

(rj

..... I-l <:.0

01

CI:l


J-l

~

01

Robert Brinkman , St. Louis ....................•...... Louisiana' Robert W. Smith .....•...... R. Jasper Smith Springfield Mexico--York ....•.... William Webber Arthur Nordberg Kansas City Mexico--Cosmos ......•• Antonio Hernandez R. M. Rankin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Rolla , ...•... Mexico--EI Potosi. . . . . .. Mauricio Lopez Rives. . . . . . .. Archie L. Fox. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Kansas City '.' ' Mexico--Nueva Leon. . . . .. Benito M. Flores. . • . . . . . . . .. Claude A. Ferguson Los Angeles Mexico--Occidental Mexicana .. Jose Carlos Flores .........•. William J. Craig ..•.......... Springfield , Mexico--Tamaulipas Amado Abrego V ........................................................ Mexico--Valle de Mexico Lie. Valentino Rincon , Frank P. Briggs Macon : Maine Edward H. Britton Harris C. Johnston Boonville Manitoba ..•.••.••• ~. Thomas C. Jackson James W. Skelly St. Louis : Maryland G. A:Rasch , Harold L. Reader St. Louis Massachusetts ..•.•.••• C. Weston Ringer Orestes Mitchell, Jr St. Joseph Michigan Neil W. Murray , Arch A. Johnson ..•......... Springfield , Minnesota .•....•..•. Harry E. Orr Ralph Wilson St. Louis Mississippi. , ";)'ames P. White Curtis J. Neal. Cape Girardeau Montana •.......... , Stephen C; Arnold E. E. Morris Kansas City Nebraska Edward E. Carr Morris E. Ewing Morrisville " Nevada Fred H. Callihan Guy C. Million Boonville New Brunswick Byard Stilwell , Henry C. Chiles Lexington ..........•........... New Hampshire Oscar Earle Jewell ....•..... E. L. Robison St. Joseph New Jersey H. E. Hutchinson A. B. Vanlandingham Columbia New Mexico Henry M. Rowley Richard O. Rumer St. Louis ' New South Wales E. A. Peisley Anthony F. Ittner St. Louis New york George C. Walters J. Fred Park West Plains , New Zealand Adam Smith

New Orleans Mexico. D. F. Chihuahua. Mexico San Luis Potosi, Mexico Monterrey Guadalajara JaI., Mexico Peynosa Tamaulipas Artes Num. 53,Mexico,D.F. Waterville Winnipeg Baltimore Needham Detroit St. Paul Bailey CulbertsonNorth Platte Box 469, Las Vegas St. John St. John Princeton Springer Sydney New York 66, N. Y. Wellington

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: :.:::::: :N::;haC:~~I~~~:::::::::~=~b~~tdIf.·~~~~i~~·"""""""",~~:u1~r?ranada Ray Bond Joplin , North Dakota Max M. Moore Valley City William R. Gentry St.Louis , Nova Scotia J. Wm. McLellan New Glasgow Fred O. Wood Kansas City Ohio ............•. James W. Morgan , Jackson , Sam Wilcox , St. Joseph :. ' Oklahoma Ernest C. Morris Drumright Martin Dickinson , Kansas City , Oregon Bryant A. Luzader. . . . . . . . .. Portland Bert'S. Lee '" Springfield Panama Julio Icaza Panama City Freelon K. Hadley. . . . . . . . . .. St. Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Philippine Islands " Primo I. Guzman. . . . . . . . . .. Manila Don Chapman Chillicothe Porto Rico Juan Olmo Barceloneta W. B. Massey Bonne Terre , Prince Edward Island F. Sidney Fielding. . . . . . . . .. CharJottstown George C. Marquis Independence Quebec , A. J. B. Milborne , Montreal W. F. Woodruff Kansas City , Queensland ......•... , W. H. Boyd , Brisbane T. W. Cotton Van Buren " Rhode Island Harry A. Reed Providence

C,Ij

Q ~

;>

Z

t:l t"i

o

t:l

Q (:%j

o

I:Ij

~ .....

00 00

o

~

~

H

t-:)

01 J-l


~

01 ~

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES TO AND FROM THE GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI-(Continued) TO MISSOURI Grand Representative

FROM MISSOURI GRAND LODGE Post Office

James M. Bradford Harry S. Truman

St. Louis Independence

Saskatchewan Scotland

Robert C. Winkelmaier John N. Blomquist Robert Lee Barger Solon Cameron. . . . . . . . . . . . .. Leo H. Johnson WilIisJ. Bray Roy B. Meriweather. Ernest Dunford ............................ Homer L. Ferguson Julius R. Edwards O. H. Swearingen Ransom A. Breuer Harry F. Sunderland C. Lew Gallant John M. Gallatin

St. Louis , South Dakota Kansas City Sweden Ironton Swiss Alpina St. Louis , Tasmania. . . . . . . . . .. Neosho ~ Tennessee Kirksville Texas Monroe City The Netherlands St. Louis United Grand Lodge of Germany. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Utah -. . . . . . . . .. Kirksville Vermont..... . Centralia............... . Victoria ~ ~ .. Kansas City Virginia Hermann Washington Kansas City Western Australia St. Louis West Virginia......... Chillicothe Wisconsin

~~~~lv~:l~r~i~~~::::::::::: ~:~~d:'.~r.~ •. ~~~.:::::::: .. ·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.~~':t\~~:~W~:::::::::::

Grand Representative J. Orville Clark John B. Peden

Post Office

. Govan . Edinburgh Adelaide ~i~l.iCh~~~~~~~~~~il·.:·.:· Charleston George W. Toft . Mitchell T. C. Bergent . Stockholm Emil Glaser . Switzerland Herbert Hays . Hobart . G. R. Montgomery . Fort' Worth W. B. T. Hoffman . Amsterdam Theo Vogel. . Frankfurt on Main Edwin Charles Randall . Ogden N. Dean Rowe . Johnson Alfred Melbourne Derham . Newtown Vernon G. Hardin . Harrisonburg John I. Preissner . Yakima F. A. Gregory . Perth Wm. C. Wharton . Parkersburg Claude J. Hendricks . Milwaukee

'i:1 l:d

o

otrj trj

t;I H

Z

o

w

o

f:tj

t-3

::q trj

f-ol l:J:)

01 c,.;)


·

(

• f

,

THE MASONIC WORLD

I


"

GRAND MASTER OF ENGLAND AS A KNIGHT OF THE GARTER The Earl of Soarbrough, Privy Counoilor to the 1te'W Queen of England. (From a painting in the Gra.nd Lodge of England--oourtesy of Grand Secretary Sydney White.)


THE MASONIC WORLD By

RAY

V.

DENSLOW,

P. G. M.

(Note: Any opinions expressed in this Review are not necessarily the opinions of the Grand Lodge of Missouri but those of the Reviewer.R. V. D.) OUR MOTHER GRAND LODGE

The. affairs of the Mother Grand Lodge, England, are, and should be, of interest to every regular Freemason. One thing that impresses most of us is the close relationship which has ever existed between the Masonic fraternity and the Royal Family. Our frontispiece to the Masonic World of 1953 is a photograph of a painting recently made by the Grand Lodge of England, of its recently installed Grand Master, The Earl of Scarbrough; he is shown in the robes of the Order of the Garter, one of the highest Orders conferred by the government; recent photographs of the new Queen Elizabeth show her wearing the insiguia of this distinguished Order. The Grand Master has been honored by Queen Elizabeth in being named the Lord Chamberlain of the Royal Household. Actually, ne is Lawrence Roger Lumley, but by title he is the 11th Earl of Scarbrough, an ancient Saxon line. To those of us not acquainted with English customs, the duties of a Lord Chamberlain might be a matter of curiosity. The Freemasons' Chronicle, a London Masonic newspaper says: In the household of our Norman monarchs, patterned on that of their ancestors the Dukes 'of Normandy, the Chamberlain, with a Master Chamberlain at their heads, looked after the King's bed-chamber and at first controlled his treasury. But before the death of Henry I the Treasury had been separated from the Chamber, with a new officer, the Treasurer, at its head. It was lIenry I, who also in 1133, created a separate hereditary Master Chamberlain for England.... if the holding' of a Coronation banquet were revived it would be his duty to resume the menial function of his forerunners and hold a silver basin for the Queen to wash her hands in before and after meat. Despite this humble origin, by the 13th century, the Lord Chamberlain had grown too great a man to supervise domestic matters; he left them to a deputy or substitute.

But more about the Earl of Scarbrough: ,

He attended Eton, Sandhurst, and Magdalen College, Oxford, and when but 26 years of age became a member of Parliament (1922) for


4c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

East Hull. In 1937 he was appointed Governor of Bombay; he caught the eye of Austen Chamberlain, then Foreign Secretary, who made him his Parliamentary Secretary. , K 0 Governor in India proved a better administrator than Sir Roger Lumley; his uprightness) simplicity and devotion to the welfare of the people earned him the respect and affection of the most anti-imperial Indian politicians.

Freemasons throughout the world know of the high Masonic, station held by the late King George VI; it was he who gave to the Earl of Scarbrough his most distinguished recognition-Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. Since 1782 there has been no fewer than seven members of the Royal family as Grand Masters, including two Kings of England, four Princes of the Blood Royal, and a son-in-law of the'monarch. To these are added) as Past Grand Master, His late Majesty, King George VI; also, as Grand Master of the "Antients" priO{" to the Union, in 1813, the Duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria and brother of George IV, who, as Prince of Wales, was for 23 years Grand Master of the first Grand Lodge. And it must be recalled that Queen Victoria reigned for half a century or more during which time it was impossible to have a sovereign who was, or had been active Masonically. And, in December, it was announced that the consort of Queen Elizabeth had received the Masonic degrees, and, undoubtedly, in due time he will be advanced in Masonic rank which is a standard policy in Englana. There are numerous accounts of visits of the late Queen Mary, and the Queen Mother to Masonic hospitals, institutions, and museums. The Grand Lodge Museum has been the 'happy recipient of many gifts at the hands of the family Royal. Quite worthy of note is the fact that Queen Mary's husband, the late King George V was not a Freemason, but before her marriage to George V she had been engaged to the Duke of Clarence, eldest son of King Edward VII and heir to the throne; the Duke of Clarence was a Freemason, initiated by his father in 1885; he died in 1892 within a week of his 28th birthday, and five weeks before the date set fO,r his marriage. But she married his brother eighteen months later and proved great help-mate. In her last illness she was attended by two vrrry distinguished Freemasons and outstanding physicians.

a

..

As a result of world conditions the United Grand Lodge of England has erased from its roll of lodges the following: Shankaracharya Lodge No. 6251, Srinagar, Punjab. Tongshan Lodge No. 3001, Tongshan, North China. Northern Star of China Lodge No. 2673, Tsingtao, North China.

It has also established new lodges at the following places:


1953

. GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

5c

.Santo Amaro Lodge No. 7250, Sao Paulo, S. America. Corinthian Lodge No. 7251; Pretoria, Transvaal. Ja~aica Lodge No. 7254, Mona, Jainaica. MfantBipimLodge No. 7260, Cape Coast, Gold Coast. In addition to the above, fifteen other lodges have been established, one to be known as Coronation Lodge; the last numbered lodge is No. 7262. W. Ivor Grantham, distinguished Freemason and student, has been named Librarian to succeed the late J. Heron Lepper who died December 26, 1953.

In our 1952 Masonic World we made a statement that England , 'continues its policy of refusing to replace a Grand Representative in a Grand Lodge--if that Grand Lodge recognizes any Grand Lodge with which England bas no reciprocal relations." The statement was called to our attention by Sir Ernest Cooper, Chairman of the Board of General Purposes of the United Grand Lodge of England, who ought to know, if anyone aid, as to English policy. He informed us that the statement was untrue! NQw we have always strived for accuracy in reporting to our readers, so we went to the files for material upon which our statement was made. We found it in the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of· Alabama; we wrote the Grand Secretary, who replied: The errdr was caused by one of our Past Grand Masters in, quoting the Gr.and Lodge of Ellglalld when it should have been the Grand Lodge ·of Irelatnd. The Grand Lodge of Ireland does not .recognize the Grand Lodge of Alabama because we reccrgnize the Grand Lodge of France. And so 'we o:we the Grand Lodge of England an apology due to information which we had in the printed proceedings of one of our Grand Lodges. Weare happy to make this statement in justice to our Mother Grand Lodge; and our thanks are due Sir Ernest for calling the matter to our attention. It is our opinion that Ireland has not refused to recognize the Grand Lodge of Alabama, although it does refuse to appoint a representative in that jurisdiction, which, to our mind is absolutely wrong.

Jubilee Masters Lodge No. 2712 was established at the time of the commemoration of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in June, 1937; the Grand Master at the time was H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. The Lodge numbers among its members, all of whom must be Installed Masters, Grand Secretary White, several Lord Mayors of London, and Sir Ernest Cooper, President of the Board of General Purposes.


6c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

LONDON'S EXOLUSIVE GUILDHALL LODGE NO. 3116

Guildhall Lodge No. 3116 is not by any means the oldest lodge in the City of London for it was constituted November 14, 1905, but it is one of the most exclusive, its membership being made up largely of those who have served, or are serving, as Lord Mayors of London. It was organized at the famous Mansion House" but it holds many of its communications in the crypt of the ancient City Guildhall, especially when the Lord Mayor of the year (when he is a

Guildhall, London, England. (From a 19th Century Engraving.)

Freemason) is elected Master of the Lodge; if the Lord Mayor not be a Freemason, the Lodge returns to its meeting place in the Mansion House. With the Installation of Sir Rupert de la Bere on Febrnary, 1953, the record shows that forty Lord Mayors have served as Master in the past 48 years. This year the occasion was graced by the presence of the Grand Master, the Earl of Scarbrough, who installed the officers of the Lodge. In 1951 and 1952, the Grand Master was unable to install the officers, first because of illness, and again because he was on official business in Africa; under those conditions Sir Sydney White, the Grand Secretary, was designated as installing officer. Sir 'Rupert de la Bere is a member of Parliament, and as noted by th~ prefix to his name has been Knighted. He succeeds Sir Leslie


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

7c

Boyce who was at one time Senior Grand Warden of the Province of Gloucestershire. Since 1936 there has been but one break in the continuity of the sequence of Lord Mayors of London in holding ! the Chair of the Lodge. A list of those in attendance at the recent February installation included the Grand Master, the Earl of Scarbrough; Grand Secretary Sy~ney White; Former Lord Mayors, Sir Denys C. F. Lowson; Sir Frederick Rowland (1949-50); Sir Frank Newson-Smith; Sir Bracewell Smith; and there was Lord Newall of the Royal Air

The Lord Mayor's Mansion House. From a colored engrO/Ving of 174S-Parker Gallery, London.

Force; Sir Eric Studd, son of a former Lord Mayor; Sir William Savory, grandson of a former Lord Mayor; His Excellency, Sir Frederick Doidge, High Commissioner for New Zealand; Bro. D. J. _ Muir, Agent-General for Queensland; Bro. W. A. McAdam and R. A. McMullen, Agent-Generals of British Columbia and Alberta; Bro. Chas. Zarine of Sweden, former Envoy for Latvia; Bro. Brig Tor Hedquist, Military Attache of the Swedish Embassy; several of the City Aldermen, the City Chamberlain, Sheriffs, and others. At the conclusion of the installation, the members and guests repaired to the Mansion House where in the beautiful Egyptian Hall, scene of many social functions, a sumptuous dinner was served. Then followed the addresses; reference was made to the onerous duties falling upon the new Lord Mayor by reason of it being Coronation Year in which numerous duties路 fall upon this city official.


Be

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

From the Guilds of the City of London we take this description of the Lord Mayor and the City of London : The Constitution of the City of London is unique in its independence of outside government. Within his domain the Lord Mayor is a supreme ruler, owing allegiance to the Sovereign but nothing more. Outside the City he has the rank of El!-rl. In feudal times the City was a Barony, or rather a collection of baroniel!. represented by different wards; and the baroDJl were self-governing and independent of the King except for loose homage. In 1191 London shook off its feudal fetters, and substituted for the Norman Portreeve a constitution of Mayor and Commune based oJ!. a French design, in which the Commune consisted of free citizens under aruler of their own choice. But in some way the City succeeded in retaining the independence which went .with its baronies, and has never, in theory, lost it. To this day when the Sovereign wishes to visit the City he makes formal application to the Mayor for permission. His procession is met at the gate nearest Westminster (if it is possible this was the reason why Temple Bar was· preserved when all the other gates had disappeared) and is stopped by the Lord Mayor accompanied by his Sheriffs and retinue, and bearing his sword of office. On a request of entry being made, the Mayor with dutiful obeisance, hands his sword to the Sovereign who returDJl it, the keys are handed over, and the entry is made. The ceremony is, of course a mere formality, but it is not without significance as illustrating the City's claim to autonomous rule. Of a similar kind is the ordinance which forbids His Majesty's troops to pass through the streets without permission. Only the Buffs, who are. descended from the London Train Bands, the Grenadier Guards, and the H.A.C. who belong to the City, are granted the special privi· lege of marching through the City with bayonets fixed, colours :flying, and bands playing. MISSOURI'S REPRESENTATIVE IN ENGLAND

Few of our members in reading the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri will recognize the name Stanley Wykeham, Kent which appears in the list of Grand Representatives as representing Missouri near the United Grand Lodge of England. Officially, StanleyWykeham is Baron Cornwallis of Linton, • County 01; Kent, England, a family long prominent in civic and Masonic circles in England. Those attendIng the Bi-Centenary of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, in 1931, may recall the presence there of Lord Cornwallis who was at that time the Deputy Grand Master of England (1926-1935). His death occurred in 1935; had he lived he would undoubtedly have been named Pro Grand Master, succeeding the late Lord Ampthill, for he had served the Province of Kent, in Eastern England, as Provincial Grand Master for 30 years, succeeding Lord Amherst who had served for 45 years. Lord Amherst was his father~and so the line of succession in the same family for. almost 93 years. Bro. Stanley Wykeham recently vacationed in the West Indies, at which time he observed his 61st birthday. He serves as Her


1953

9c

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Majesty's Lieutenant for Kent where he takes a great interest 111 agriculture. He was educated at the great English School at Eton; later he attended the Royal :Military Academy at Sandhurst and during \Vorld 'Val' I served with the Royal Scots Greys and on the General (' 714- J 727). Ceorge I. Grand Lodge formed I 71 7.

I

('727.1760). George II.

Frederil

Lewis, Prince of Wales. Initialed '737.

r

I

Ceorg. III.

I

I

GeGrie IV, C.M. (Modem).

1

I

I

Duke of Yorle,

Dulce of Clouculer,

Dulce of Cumberland,

P.CM.• 1767.

P.CM.• 1767.

CM. (Modem). 1762·1790.

I

W'dIiam IV, Initiated. 1786. Crand Palron. 1831.

1.790-WJ3.

, I

I

I

1-

nake of York, Initiated. 1787.

Duke of Kent, Dake of CumherlaDd, C.M. (Ancient). 1613.

Duke of SUI.e., C.M. (Modeml. 1613. CM. (V.C.L.). 1813·1843.

Inilialed. 1796.

I'

Victoria.

~ l_rOIL_---'-'-Ir-

r

Edward VII, G.M.• I 19.,.

I

Dnlce of C1areuu, l'rov. C.M.. Berks, 1890-1696.

1

Duke of Connaugbt,

Duke of Albany,

C.M.• 1901-1939.

Provo C.M.. Oxlord,hire. 1875.

Tm"',).

Provo C.M.• Su"ex. 1686-1901. 0;".

GM.

1887.

Prince Arthur of Comlaught, Provo C.M.• Berks. 1924-1939.

,--

C....:...'T

EdwL VIII,

P.GM.• 1936.

Pro•. G.M. s.....,. 19l<1

OJ,

V.

cJe T"

VI,

P.C.M .• 1937.

P.... GM.

princessr:ary= Heory, 6th Earl of Harewood,

-:J

KetII, C.M.. 1939-1942.

1924.1937. P,••. Gi·~~;::~;i~:io.l'" P.... GM.

W1'' . 193"''''.

£Iizabeth 11=

Duke of Edinburgh, Initiated. 1952.

Courtesy of London F1'eemasons' Chronicle.

Staff in France and Flanders, being awarded the Military Cross. He is now Honorary Colonel of a Regiment of Royal Artillery. Masonically, he held his first position in the Lodge Chair in 1927, being Master of Douglas Lodge No. 1725, Maldstone; this was his father's mother lodge and he had oecupied the same chair 34 years


10e

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

before. In 1933 he became Junior Grand 1,Varden and acted as such during the dedication of the new Freemasons' Hall on Great Queen , Street. Missouri is proud of being represented in the Mother Grand Lodge by so distinguished a brother and citizen. BOOKS, PAMPHLETS

Illinois, The Rise and Progress of Freemasonry in: The Grand Lodge of Illinois issued in August 1952 a story of Freemasonry in that jurisdiction, written by Everett R. Turnbull, well known to Missouri Freemasons. The volume contains 400 pages of historical material, bound in blue buckram, and a credit to that Grand Lodge. It is written topically which makes the material easily available, and is well indexed. One chapter is devoted to Missouri's lodges chartered in Illinois; another chapter to the Mormons; the negro question; military lodges; Masonic Congress as held in that state; the Conservators, and many other vexious questions of days long past. 'Ve presume that copies may be purchased from Grand Secretary R. C. Davenport, Harrisburg, Ill. M.B.A. Publications: The Masonic Service Association continues to publish some valuable bulletins and brochures. They may be obtained by writing the M.S.A. at 700 Tenth St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Pocket Encyclopedia of Masonic Symbols: A sixty page pamphlet dealing with 218 Masonic symbols. The author is the well known Masonic student, Carl H. Claudy. George Washington, Master Mason: Thirty-three pages of interesting material about our first president; thirteen pages are devoted to facts about Washington, the remaining pages are given over to photographs and drawings illustrating his life. The frontispiece is a reproduction of the Washington painting in color, property of Alexandria-Washington Lodge. Masonic Parallels in Shakespeare: Dr. Raymond B. Pease has written this copyrighted story in 34 pages. The pamphlet is written for the advanced student in Freemasonry, and especially those who are lovers of Shakespeare-or was it Bacon ~ More Modern Ideas in Masonic Education: This is a reprint of the Second Midwest Conference on Masonic Education held in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, October 2-3, 1951; it is a complete reprint of the 158 page report.

Geo. Washington, Freemason: The Grand Lodge of Virginia has done a fine thing for American Freemasonry in issuing a volume under the above title to commemorate the bi-centennial of the initiation of General George Washington, our first president. The actual work, was done by Dr. William Moseley Brown, one of our great Masonic scholars. It is a 542 page volume, cloth bound, done in six parts and with a most comprehensive index-a thing to which too little attention is ordinarily ,paid by writers; when we say that the


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

lIe

index covers 72 pages it will be self evident that this volume cannot be criticized in that 'respect. Dr. Bro\vn takes occasion to correct many misstatements about Washington. A very fine color plate of \Vashington adds beauty to the volume; it is a copy of the Alexandria-'Vashington Lodge portrait by Williams. And Dunmore's "The Petition" as a frontispiece was a fine selection of a great Masonic painting. The volume sells for $10.00. George TVasMngton) Master Mason: Carl Claudy of the Masonic Service Association has prepared and distributed a 30 page brochure containing a number of old paintings and drawings of George 'Vashington as a Freemason; most of these are taken from photographs in the Congressional Library. To these he has added an explanation of the painting, telling us of the painter, and of the conditions under which they were made. The frontispiece is a colored print of the celebrated painting of 'Vashington in the Alexandria- ,-r-..Tashington Lodge. The set is being sold for $1.00. Masonic Organizations .and Allied Orders and Degrees: Harold V. B. Voorhis has written a volume of 146 pages containing a wealth of material on the above subject. His statistics cover most of the generally recognized Masonic groups and some that are not so recognized. In addition to Grand Lodges, the General Grand Chapter, the General Grand Council, the Grand Encampment, and the two Supreme Councils of the Scottish Rite, he has listed such groups as: Allied Masonic Degrees, Philalcthcs Society, Blue Friars, Shrine, Jesters, Grotto, Tall Cedars, Golden Key, Acacia, National Sojourners, R.T. Priests, C.B.C.S., College of Rites, York Cross of Honour, Societas Rosicruciana, Red Cross of Constantine, Royal Order of Scotland, the Sciots, and 14 women's groups. Also listed are the DeMolay, the Builders, Royal Ark Mariners and the Prince Hall Grand Lodges (negro). The volume will prove very acceptable to those who are looking up statistics or other similar information dealing with these bodies. It is a Macoy publication. Missouri Lodge of Research) Transactions 1951: Volume IX of the Missouri Lodge of Research was mailed in November 1952 and covers the period to June 30, 1951. The volume is well bound as usual; has over 300 pages, and is well indexed. The subject matter is "Freemasonry and the Presidency," and it gives all of the most recent information concerning each of the Masonic Presidents, as well as some information about those who 'were not Masonic. For example, Calvin Coolidge once addressed the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts; he also sat on the platform when the cornerstone of the George Washington National Masonic Memorial was laid. Herbert Hoover attended the dedication of the same building, and several Presidents participated in Masonic ceremonies. One page or more is devoted to the "anti-Mason" John Quincy Adams. The Missouri Lodge reports


12c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

more than 700 members-the largest of its kind in the vYestern Hemisphere. American Lodge of Research: Volume V, No. 3 of this Lodge reaches us on January 1, 1953. It has but 80 pages including roster of members, etc. It has some very int(~resting articles, such as Facts About the vYashington Gavel (Ray Baker Harris); Early Royal Arch Masonry in New York ('iV m. L. Cummings) ; The Craft Covers the Caribbean (Richardson \Vright); Old German Masonic Books ( Jacques Frankel) and several articles termed Miscellanea. The Lodge has 32 active members and 230 subscribing members, a total of 262 members. The Proceedings are unbound. Miscellanea: The annual publication of the Allied Masonic Degrees for 1952 which completes 194 pages of Volume V. The pamphlet contains stories of the History of the Allied Masonic Degrees; a story of Ezra Ames, noted early day Freemason; Freemasonry and Symbolism; the Order of Light; the Architect Degrees; th,e All Seeing Eye, and several similar articles. Order of Constructor Masons: In October, 1952, this organization issued a directory of its membership. Its beautiful cover, depicting in color, the flags of all the nations of the Western Hemisphere, makes it very attractive. Each country is listed and the membership is shown in each of these sections. There must be more than 1,500 members. The object of the association is a laudable one-the unity of the Americas. Twenty-three names of United . States citizens are listed, extending from Massachusetts to California. George Washington: The Christian Science Monito?', October 16, 1952, contained a full page story of the life of Washington; it was illustrated by pictures of V.,rashington and his Masonic life. The author was Leon V. Stone. Masonic Year Book, 1953: From Grand Secretary Sir Sydney \Yhite we received in December the usual book issued by the United Grand Lodge of England. One can hardly realize our universality without glancing through this volume which contains names of lodges throughout the civilized world. Beeause of the close relationship with Royal Arch Chapters, the list of Chapters working under England is also included. Rocky Mountain Conference: The States of Colorado, Montana, Utah, and vYyoming have organized a "Rocky Mountain Masonic Conference," which held their first conference at Casper, vYyoming, July 11-12, 1952. A printed volume of 56 pages contains the full story of matters discussed. History of the Grand Encampment .Knights Templar of the U. S. A.: The volume is just "v'hat it is stated to be. We wish that it might have been more, for most of us are interested in the background of Templary and its relation to Freemasonry. Its 584


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

13c

pages are filled with a "review" of Grand Encampment proceedings. Ninety-two pages are taken up with biographical sketches of Past Grand Masters. The list of mythieal Grand Masters is given; apparently, Dr. Scully, the author, is a believer in the Larmenius' forged charter. Much material has been ~ssembled, in this one volume, but it should have been printed by the Grand Encampment and sold at a price less than has to be asked, $9.00. Scotland Year Book.: Through the courtesy of the Grand Secretary and Grand Librarian of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, we have reeeive<l a eopy of the first Year Book (1952) to be issued by that jurisdietion; it is filled with interesting bits of information about our Scottish brethren which gives us a finer appreciation of the work being carried on by this ancient grand lodge; it contains 208 pages and lists all lodges working under Scottish Constitution. (Note: \Ve have just received the 1953 Year Book, which is fully up to the high standard set by the 1952 volume.) History of Ralls Lodge No. 33: As a feature of the observance of the Centennial of this old Missouri Lodge a souvenir program was issued and given out at the meeting held .June 17, 1953, and attended by the Grand Master. A historical sketch prepared under the direction of Grover C. Layne adds to the value of the publication. The lodge was originall J located at :Madisonville but about 1877 was removed to Center-once spelled "Centre." The lodge has had two fires, one in 1864, the other in 1912. The distinguished John Ralls, P.G.M., served as Master nine years but his record was bettered by J. B. Vardaman who served ten yeats. Freemasonry in Costa Rica: During the Conferences in \Vashington, D. C., in February, copies of "Freemasonry in Costa Rica" were distributed. It was the address of Grand Master Jaime Granados made at the Conference of Grand Masters. This Grand Lodge has eight subordinate lodges; one uses the English language (La Luz No.3). Membership in 195:3 was 500 members. lIJasonic Addresses and lVritings of Roscoe Pound: For sometime there has becn a demand for the printed copies of addresses by this disting-uishcd :Masonic jurist, and we are indebted to the Supreme Council of the Northern Jurisdiction of the Seottish Rite for its present publication. It is being distributed by Macoy Publishing Co. at the price of $5.00. In its 384 pages, Pound discusses the Philosophy of Freemasonry (he calls it Masonry), introducing 'to us \Villiam Preston, Karl C. F. Krause, George Oliver, and Albert Pike. A second chapter is devoted to Johann Fichte and his letters to the fictitious "Constant" on philosophy. 'The third chapter discusses' the divergence of ritual. And there is Pound's address before the Grand Lodge of New York and the Conference of Grand Masters (Landmarks); the volume ends with a chapter 7


14c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953.

on Masonic Jurisprudence, including Masonic Landmarks, Masonic Common Law and the Masonic Law in the Making. Pound's volume will never be what is termed a popular book, but it is a valuable book and truly represents modern day thinking of Freemasons, written by a member of our fraternity who has achieved fame in his chosen profession, and one who has received the American Bar Association award for "conspicuous service to the cause of American Jurisprudence." CONFERENCE OF GRAND MASTERS

One of the best attended meetings of Grand Masters was that held in Washington, D. C., February 24-25, 1953. After the usual routine opening, the Conference Committee, headed by Grand Master Ingvald Hembre of Wisconsin presented their program for the year. The meeting had a decided international flavor due to the presence of brethren from Germany (Dr. Vogel); Costa Rica (Granados, Holst, Yamuni); Mexico (Cisneros, Buentello, Turnpaugh, Ramos); Cuba (Pineiro and Franchesi); Philippine Islands (Cervantes); Argentine (Onsari and Awsalom); China (Young); and the u5ual representation from the Canadian Provinces. . Missouri was represented by Grand Master Rumer, Grand Secretary Reader, Past Grand Masters Lee and Denslo'w, Grand Marshal Hunt, and Edwin Knudsen. Clyde II. '\Vilson of Tennessee was elected to preside over the Conference. The subjects discussed included: Freemasonry, Bastion of American Democracy Freemasonry in Argentina By Our Good Works Shall We know Them Connectives in Freemasonry Philosophy of the First Degree Freemasonry in Costa Rica Freemasonry in Germany Report of Committee on Foreign Recognition. Report of Committee on Legitimacy of Origin Report of Committee on Belief in God Report of Committee on Exclusive Jurisdiction

Each Grand Lodge has been presented with a marked stone taken from the old White House before its renovation; this was through the courtesy of Missouri's Past Grand Master and ExPresident (Truman) . Some hair-splitting went on over the Foreign Recognition Com- mittee report; it was whether "observers" attending international . conference represented the Confcl"ence or the Conference. Committee, from which it would appear the Conference is attempting to evade its responsibility and afraid that some of the foreign grand lodge association might rub off. International unity will never be


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

15c

obtained through a "stand-offish" attitude. Weare dealing with Freemasons and not communists or fascists. Let's not go around the stump. Most of the leaders of Latin Freemasonry we have found to be men of honor and integrity-at least we have found them such; as men, they have a right to our respect. As Freemasons, they have a right to our friendship. If the Conference of Grand Masters expects to attain its objective it cannot continue to carryon a wishy-washy policy. Now is the time to make our friends in times of peace, not when war is near and economic aid ~ssential to maintain our standing as a nation. America needs friends. It is in our power to make friends. CONFERENC'E OF GRAND SECRETARIES

The twenty-fifth annual conference of Grand Secretaries was held in the Pan-American Hoom of the Hotel Statler, Washington, D. C., February 25, 1953. Ted Doss (Tennessee) presided. Conference subjects discussed were: Liability Insurance for Subordinate Lodges, Lloyd E. Wilson (California). What Is Masonic Education; How Obtained' Earl W. Taylor (Massachusetts). Responsibilities and Opportunities of a Lodge Secretary, Wilbur L. McIver (North Carolina). Automatic Suspension for N.P~D., Carl R. Greisen (Nebraska).

At a dinner in the South American Room, Past Grand Master Ansel A. Packard of Connecticut spoke. His subject was "Look to the East." The address was of the inspirational type. Ted 1)oss was continued as President of the Association and Earl D. Delzell (Iowa) will continue to serve as Secretary. The 70-page printed proceedings, issued so promptly after the session, contains a mass of detailed information about Grand Lodges, their annual communications, Masonic Homes, biographical material about Grand Secretaries, dual and plural membership, fees for degrees, annual dues, affiliation fees, jurisdiction over rejected candidates, transfers of membership, courtesy degrees, election. and proficiency of candidates, time between the degrees, etc. Some complaint is being made that the meetings of the Grand Secretaries takes away some of the interest in the Conference of Grand Masters.' MASONIC SERVICE ASSOCIATION

The annual meeting of the Masonic Service Association of the United States was held in the South American Room of the Hotel


16c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

Statler, vVashington, D. C., February 26, 1953. It was the thirtyfourth annual meeting and one of the best attended in recent years.' It was presided over by Samuel Wragg, P.G.M. (Massachusetts) . The Executive Commission is charged with the conduct of the Association affairs in the interim between annual meetings. Among the items reported were the death of Lloyd B. Johnson (New Mexico); the present membership of thirty-five grand lodges as shown in our last MASONIC WORLD; offers of relief for Mid-V\Test flood and Philippine storm damage; $250 for stranded Russian Masons in France and $1,000 for food and clothing in Germany. Then there were several Digests: Freemasonry's Great Monument Annual Report of Commission Old Masonic Art The Gutenberg Bible District Deputy Systems, U. S. A. Modern Ideas in Masonic Education World's Oldest Living Freemasons Foreign Grand Lodge Recognition Chart George Washington, Master Mason Masonic Parallels in Shakespeare Structure of Freemasonry Cipher Rituals

Twelve Short Talk Bulletins were issued during the year ; Not in the Ritual; Tool Symbolism; Day of Visitation; Masonic Manners; '1'",,'0 Masonic Prayers; Ethos of Freemasonry; Those Terrible Exposes; The English Great Light; Deacons and Stewards ; Vvashington, the Man; Preston ian Charges; Thirty Years. The Association prides itself on its welfare work in the Armed Forces; hospital service was discontinued at Springfield, Missouri, because the V. A. Hospital was closed. It is planned to open a similar service in Kansas City, Missouri, when a new Hospital for Veterans has been completed. Three addresses '''ere on the program : Edward J. Franta (North Dakota) on "Sinews of Peace"; Ray V. Denslow (Missouri) on "Harmony, Cooperation, Unity"; and Dr. Theo Vogel (Germany) on conditions in Germany. . THE GRANDE LOGE NATIONALE FRANCAISE

American Grand Lodges lack information concerning the Grande Loge N ationale Francaise (National Grand Lodge of France), probably because officials of that Grand bodge have never seen fit to make application for recognition. Yet this Grand Lodge appears to be the only regular Grand Lodge in France, although a few American juriSdictions recognize either the Grand Orient of France, or the Grand Lodge of France.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

17c

Just how this Grand Lodge came to be formed is explained in a recent issue of the English ((Freemason's Chronicle": It was in 1877, that the break came between the United Grand Lodge (of England) and the French Grand Orient, upon the latter altering the first article of its Constitution of 1849, which read: the basis of Freemasonry is a belief in God, and in the immortality of the soul, and in the solidarity of humanity. To it was substituted with the consent of two-thirds of the Lodges under its obedience: Its basis is absolute liberty oj; Conscience and the solidarity of humanity. All its rituals were altered in conformity, and every allusion to the G.A.O.T.U. eliminated. Thereupon the Grand Lodges of England, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, and most of the U. S. A., immediately broke off relations . . . the French Grand Orient, whilst acknowledged as an independent Masonic body by England, had never been formally recognized, and no correspondence had passed between them, nor were there mutually appointed representatives. As it will be readily understood, the new definition of the basic principle of Freemasonry as adopted by the French Grand Orient, at once opened the door to the admission of the atheist and the so-called freethinker, a loose term which like the latter-day one of agnostic, implies the negation of a Supreme Being. Not until 1910, however, was there revealed the first sign of a new movement on the part of some members to return to the true light of Freemasonry, and it took shape in a revival of an old lodge, Centre des Amis, Paris, originally founded in 1785. The prime mover was Bro. M. E. Zde Ribacourt, who was later to become the first Grand Master of the new Grande Loge. Finally, breaking away from the Grand Orient, in 1913, and joined by another famous old Lodge, known as the Loge Anglaise No. 204, Bordeaux, the new Grande Loge Nationale, Independante et Reguliere pM la France et les Colonies Fmncaises came into being, its title being since modified to the present and shorter one.

In 1952, for the first time since the new Grand Lodge was established, a whole lodge which had been working under the Grand Orient, joined the National Grand Lodge; it was Les F1'eres Reunis, "now No. 39; it was once located at Strasburg, in Alsace-Lorraine. The Grande Loge Nationale was dormant during the war period and a commission sent from the United States was unable to contact its offieers at the close of World War II. However, it is now known that M. W. Bro. Pierre Cheret is, and has been Grand Master since 1947. In the last year we have noted the formation of several new lodges working under Grand Lodge Nationale which might infer that some of our French brethren are anxious to assume regularity. One of these new Jodges is Les Amis Vigilants which meets in Paris; Lacydon Lodge No. 37 is to be located at Marseilles; and there is to be another lodge at Strasburg. The lodge at Marseilles works in English. In January, 1952, Brother Patrice Cheret was installed as Master


18c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

of Loge L)Entente Cordiale No. 36) in Paris, the ceremony being performed by his father, the Grand Master. An unusual event was the presence at this installation of three sons of Grand Masters: Patrice Cheret, son of Pierre Cheret, Grand Master. Pierre de Ribaucourt, son of the first Grand Master, Dr. E. de Ribaucourt, who served for six years, now deceased. Charles Vivrel, son of Marcel Vivrel, Grand Master in 1938, and who held the title during World War II.

Officially, the Grande Loge Nati~nale was constituted in 1920, following the first World Vvar; the ceremonies were performed by officers of the Grand Lodge of England who went to Paris for that· purpose. Among the Founders were 19 bankers which we might say assured the Grand Lodge of business success. The late Lord Ampthill, in November, 1927, journeyed to Paris to install officers in one of the English speaking lodges in Paris. Following the custom of the Grand Lodge of England, the Royal Arch degree is being introduced into France. vVe may add that in England, officers of the Grand Lodge, when qualified as Royal Arch Masons, hold similar position in Royal Arch Chapters, or Grand Chapter. On April 17, 195:3, a Chapter of the Royal Arch was instituted at Rouen; it will be attached to the Lodge Jeanne d'Arch No.5, under the National Grand Lodge of France. Thirty companions from England crossed the Channel to assist in the birth of this new Chapter. This Chapter will work under the Grand Chapitre de l'Arche Royale pour la France, another group little known to the Freemasons of the United States. The Grand Master, Pierre Cheret, is also the First Grand Principal. The Grand Lodge has recently established a new Province in Flandres; it has the following lodges: Godffroi de Bouillon No.5, Boulogne-sur-mer, meeting at the Hotel Continental. (1917.) Works in English. Entente No. 18, Lille. Works in French. Philadelphes No. 40, Lille. Works French Rectified Rite. Baudoin de Flandres No. 41, Dunkirk. Works French Rectified Rite. Justice &- Fraternite, Calais. Works French Rectified Rite.

FRANOE

In September, 1953, the Grand Lodge of France will decide on whether they shall remain outside the pale of Masonic regularity or become a part of the world federation. The matter is to be decided by the annual "convent" of deputies from all lodges in France working under Grand Lodge allegiance. It appears that Grand Master Doignon is prepared to push through the matter of replacing the VSL on French Masonic altars at all costs; he has


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

19c

opposition as might be expected; it comes from those who take the attitude that such a rule is an "infringement of the. liberties of conscience of the Master Mason." This opposition is found largely in the provincial lodges where lodges occupy the premises of subordinates of the Gr~nd Orient-which works in friendly relations with the Grand Lodge. A return of the Bible would widen the breach between these two national groups.

.It is interesting to know that the Russian lodges working under the Grand Lodge, and which might be thought communistic-or anti-religious-are in the forefront advocating the return of the

VSL. Many Grand Lodges in this country received a letter from the Secretary General, General Meunier, of the Grand Orient of France, 16 Rue Cadet, Paris, announcii1g a meeting on July 4-5, 1953, in Paris to discuss many matters; the letter referred to various situations which the letter said "did not exist in the 18th century" and we should conform by changing our laws so as to harmonize ,vith 20th century practices. The letter bore the heading "to the Grand Masters of Masonic Po,vers which recognize the freedom of conscience." The Grand Lodge believes that when we require our petitioners to express a belief in God we are limiting his freedom of conscience-if you get the idea. FRANCE AND ITS LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE

Only one or two American Grand Lodges recognize the Grand Orient or the Grand Lodge of France. There is little difference between them. Many of our readers are unfamiliar with Grand Orient ideas. vVe shall quote them. On April 28, 1953, the Grand Orient of France sent out a circular letter from its headquarters, 16, Rue Cadet, Paris. It was addressed as follows: The Council of the Order· of the Grand Orient of France, to the Grand Masters of all Masonic Powers recognizing the Absolute Liberty of Conscience.

A circular letter enclosed the explanation of a meeting which is proposed; it was first set for the last of May, but later moved up to July 4-5, 1953. The circular asked that all of those Grand Lodges which expected to be represented should advise them. We have translated, rather roughly, some of the material appearing in the circular; we hope we· have not distorted its meaning in translation. It quotes from Article I of the Grand Orient


20c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

Constitution where they define Freemasonry, and which no doubt is the basis for their actions which have caused non-recognition throughout the Masonic World. Freemasonry is an institution, essentially philanthropic, philosophical and progressive, and has for its object the search after Truth, a study of the moral and practical solidarity, the amelioration of material and moral difficulties, and the perfection of intellectual and social ideas of humanity. In support of this doctrine there should be mutual tolerance, respect of others for the same, and absolute liberty of Conscience. Considering the conceptions of metaphysical to be the exclush:e right of selection by the individual and our members, we .refuse all dogmatic affirmation.

1.'he circular goes on to state ': Freemasonry is an attempt to gather together all persons who are strangers into a center of union (Anderson Constitution). A Freemason is essentially an apostle of concord among all men. The Grand Orient of France believes that this mission exists, not only for a high moral value, but also because of the (need) for absolute liberty of conscience. It is to be admitted that the first Rules of our Order did not admit absolute liberty of conscience, but the thought which those formulas expressed at the opening of the 18th century does not serve humanity of the 20th century, and if our society does not follow the progress of human spirit it does not measure up to the standards of its founders. Because it is progressive our Freemasonry does not attempt to limit the spirit of complete liberty, or absolute liberty of conscience. A Freemasonry which intends to accomplish its mission should seek to recover all the Moral Virtues capable of fortifying itself. Races, social situations, political ideas, economic conceptions, intellectual involvements, religious vocations, all the beliefs, all the manners of seeking communion give the same wish for personal elevation and of general concord. Therefore t,he cohesion of the Moral Virtues permit humanity to achieve those things peacefully. . .. We judge. ourselves capable of elevating ourselves. Weare persuaded that the Masonic Powers which do not admit absolute liberty of spirit and conscience are imperfectly declaring themselves, and our wish is to aid them in the attainment of the pure light. With that view in mind, we invite you to join us in an attempt at federation, that in the end we may assure the triumph of the true Masonic Ideal.

When will France realize that they are literally out of step with the rest of the Masonic World ~ \Ve cannot feel the rest of the world to be two centuries behind the thought of France! It has been said that "the proof of a pudding is in the tasting." If in all these years the Freemasonry of France has produced nothing that would leave a good taste, then we should be happy that we are so old fashioned as to place some restrictions upon our minds and consciences. The Freemasonry of Britain, Scandinavia, and the Americas has prospered while teaching the belief in God,


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

21c

the Volume of the Sacred Law, and the brotherhood of man. Why should we fly to a system which has produced nothing worthy of emulation ~ France, with its three Grand Lodges, has made little imprint upon the life of the nation. Catholicism and Communism seem to be the dominant forces. Neither can ever produce Toleration, Liberty, Fraternity nor respect for the rights of others. GERMANY'S DILEMMA

The United Grand Lodge of Germany has been in a dilemma ever since the founding of its Grand Lodge in 1949. 'When peace had been assured and the German brethren came out of their hiding places and began to assume their rightful place, in the free world, brethren of the Grand Orient and Grand Lodge of France offered them the use of their buildings as meeting places and even gave relief to their widows and orphans. :For this the Masonic Vvorl<1 may well commend the fraternity in France. But the other side of the picture was that few of the Grand Lodges of the world recognized either of the French national groups; the Grand Lodges of the British Isles were particularly opposed to recognition, believing that it ,vould break down the barriers and make recognition a motkery. Recognition was broken off in the early 70's, and this was followed by the erection of a Grand Lodge National which carries none of the objections held against the other French bodies, although it is a small group as compared with Grand Orient and Grand Lodge. The French bodies sought recognition of Germany, and it was granted; our German brethren were anxious to heal the breach caused by two world wars. Other Grand Lodges refused to grant recognition until England gave the "green light." The whole matter came to a head at the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Germany, meeting at Luneberg, April 18-19, 1953. It seems that a local lodge., working unuer U.G.L. Germany, Lodge Lessing, of Frankfurt am Main, sent out a circular letter to other lodges urging postponement of the continued recognition of the French bodies until 1954, suggesting "further study" of the situation. The proponents were particularly anxious to have Grand Master Th. Vogel give. them full information as to his talks with the Grand Lodge of England. One paragraph will show the attitude: Over a period of years, the United Grand Lodge of England has shown' the cold shoulder to all 'efforts in arranging a discussion, in letters to German Freemasons . . . and only in October, 1952, were they prepared to receive a representative of the UGL in the person of the Grand Master. In the annual report of the Grand Master in Baden-Baden, it was


22c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

declared that the UGL carries greater responsibility with regard to foreign relations than ever any German Grand Lodge had to carry before. And with emphasis and purpose, the words were repeated which had been spoken at Bad-Ems: "German Freemasonry has passed from the state of self-respect into that of respect." But it seems to路 us that someone, who in better times is quickly prepared to break with his old friends, comes into the danger of losing his selfrespect and the respect of others. We said "quickly prepared." Or is this haste a misconception on our part i

An attempt was made at the Annual Communication to postpone action as to recognition and non-recognition until 1954. During this same communication the UGL considered the "Five Directive Points," which required the use of the VSL, abstainment from political discussions in lodges, statement as to sovereignty and a requirement that no grand lodge be recognized that did not have the same requirements. This, of course, settled the French problem. Dr. Vogel was unanimously sustained in his position on all points. 'Vith this attitude on the part of the U.G.L. we cannot see any reason for non-recognition by any Masonic jurisdiction in the world. Some had inferred in the discussion that England had forced the withdrawal of French recognition. Those who know Dr. Vogel will know that threats would be of no avail in rendering his own decision. The only question would be that if Germany wished 路to follow the rest of the Masonic 'Vorld, the adoption of the Five Directives was the only way this could be accomplished. We congratulate Dr. Vogel and his Grand Lodge upon taking this step which will demonstrate to the world their desire to be a part of the great international brotherhood. And in the middle of this discussion the Universal Freemasons' League decided to hold their convention in the City of Stuttgart in June, 1953; this was most untimely and against the wishes of the UGL. The convention will secure little support from the German groups. Elections in the Grand Lodge will be held this fall; the meeting will be held in Hamburg, honoring the memory of Frederick Ludwig Schroder, one of the greatest of German Freemasons. A feature of the last communication was the report of Grand Master Vogel in which he told of his stay in the United States, and his attendance on the Conference of Grand Masters in Washington; he expressed himself as highly pleased with his reception in this country, and we know that the representatives at the Congress were greatly impressed with him and his \vork. Undoubtedly his visit here made many friends for the United Grand Lodge of Germany. Our best wishes go to our German brethren in their attempt to recover the ground lost during the period covered by two world


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

23c

wars. They deserve success in view of all the adversities they have undergone. They have our sympathy and support. GERMAN GRAND MASTER EXPRESSES GRATITUDE

The gratitude of the German Freemasonry for the welfare work done by the Masonic Service Association through contributions of American Grand Lodges was expressed by Dr. Theo Vogel, Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of Germany, when addressing the Association at its meeting in 'Vashington in February. We feel that this report should be plaeed on perpetual. record. Dr. Vogel, after expressing his greetings to those present, said: I closed my report to the Conference of Grand Masters yesterday with words of gratitude for all the assistance that our Nation and Craft have received from the United States of America and the Masonic Fraternity of' this country. In addressing you, I should like to open by expressing similar remarks. Both the German Nation and German Freemasonry do not merely extend thanks for the generous help of food, clothing, money, and material benefits. It will go down forever in history that this was given to us since 1945 in such a great and wonderful measure. Much need has been mitigated, and much life has been saved; many tears have been dried. But it is not this help which I wish to praise and acknowledge. I want to raise onto a higher level all this which has been granted us by way of help and' gift; I don't just want to see the material value and to find an appropriate word of thanks-it is the ideal values that I am seeking to express. I wish to emphasize the spirit of genuine Freemasonry and genuine love of Humanity, through which, after a hard and bloody war, the warrior became a Good Samaritan. I wish to thank you with all my heart for having restored to us our belief in Humanity. Do you know, or could you imagine, what it means to have to live for fifteen years under the rule of tyranny, uncertainty of freedom, in possession of no' rights~ Do you know, my brethren, in particular what it means to be a member of a fraternity and to be persecuted and despised by a criminal government, to lose one's trust in public life, and what is more, to realize how the general belief in the good will of our路 people and the world's trust in us, vanishes through no fault of our own ~ Can you imagine how terribly difficult it is, after fifteen years of persecution, and it is well known, of isolation and despair, to have to rebuild our lodges again out of the ruins and rubble-heaps' From 1945 onward, I have had to serve my lodge and my brethren in this work: in the first weeks, I carried bricks and rubble with these my own hands; a~ Master, I took up the gavel-the same gavel which a high ranking American officer gave me in 1945-6, al'ld which is stilI in use in my lodge at the present day, and in good and bad times, I have carried the responsibilities of Grand Master. Often I was completely alone and very tired, and it was difficult not to lose courage. At that time, it happened that from this land of America-so far away as it seems to us-there came a fraternal message from this Masonic Service Association. We, the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Germany, shall never forget that it was the brethren from the U. S. A., the representatives of this great and important associa-


24c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

tion, who met and talked with us with fl'aternal frankness; who gave us their trust again; who gave us courage and the strength to remain at our work and to build on that work; who, through their counsel and example showed us the way; and through whose advice we were able to go on building, as we wish to go on building also today. I shall never forget those two men who shook hands there in the cellar of the bombed out Grand Lodge building in Frankfurt, which at that time was completely in ruins. These men I am proud to be allowed to call my friends: Ray Denslow and Martin Dietz. This United Grand Lodge of Germany of which I was able a few days ago to give favorable news, 'would not have become what it is today; it would not have stood so firm and respected among the Grand Lodges of the world; would not have found such true friends among all the jurisdictions of this continent-if the belief and the trust of the M. S. A. and the brethren of the U. S. A. had not been vouchsafed to it at its very cradle. It is my mission on this occasion to give utterance to all these matters, not only personally, but in the name of the whole of the lodges of Germany and Berlin, and in the name of the thousands whom you have approached as brethren. It is my privilege and honor to read out the names and the merits of the brethren of the Chain of Brotherhood which embraced us in that year of fate for German l!"'reemasonry (1949), and to whom the United Grand Loage of Germany awarded the Badge of Merit, and who are all members of the M. S. A. Carl Claudy, Washington, D. C. Ray V. Denslow, Trenton, Missouri Martin Dietz, Weehawken, New Jersey William A. Hunt, Baltimore, Maryland Carl Voigt, New York City Harvey Newton Brown, Falls Church, Virginia Allow me to repeat those words which were spoken, written and printed on March 21, 1950, as a permanent memorial, prefixed to the German Edition of the Report of the M. S. A. on Freemasonry in Germany: "After Fifteen Years." Let me add a personal word: that I could be here; that I could speak; that I could do my duty as Grand Master for my Grand Lodge, and my Nation-was one of the most beautiful and finest days of my Masonic life. THE GERMAN SITUATION

The last report from Germany shows that the United Grand Lodge has 213 lodges with 10,500 members; there are 123 "groups" which are not chartered because of the limited size. Two lodges joined up with UGL and have been accepted into fellowship; two lodges are working under dispensation; two others which worked UD have been constituted. During the past year, recognition has been extended by Arkansas, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Ohio, New York, Indiana, New Mexico, Tennessee, Virginia, and District of Columbia; these with the 24 American Grand Lodges already in the list make 35 American Grand Lodges. Others will undoubtedly follow duri ng the year.


1953,

GRA,ND LODGE OF MISSOURI ..

, -25c

The following statements have been made: .The Grand Orient of France has refused both verbally and in writing to recognize the Alpina (Switzerland) principles. Towards the end of the negotiations, the G. M. of the G. O. of France, made on his own initiative, the propositilln to take the same solution which was taken with the G. L. Argentina, and to consider the Masonic relations of both obediences to be broken off. The severance of these relations took place December 13, 1952, and was confirmed December 20. The Grand ,Lodge of France has informed UGL at the request . . . through .its Grand Representative, that it cannot at present accept the .:five points of Alpina in their entirety; but that efforts are being made to .re-introduce the Bible as an obligatory component of the lodge work. -In the hope that these efforts might in due course lead to this end, and that the attitude llf the Grand Lodge in this matter may 'help the forces serving these efforts to victory, the UGL has inter-rupted the existing Masonic relations. . The Grand Lodge of England did not put any conditions regarding severance of relations with the G. O. of France, the G. L. of France, or the dissolution of the German group of the League at the conference, nor has it considered the taking up of relatioos with the G.L. . . .

And our German brethren are practicing charity. Their report shows 3,000 DM sent to their brethren in Berlin and 2,000 DM sent to their brethren in Holland. ITALY

American grand lodges are being bombarded with literature (or should we say-propaganda) from the Serenissima G:ran LoggIa d'Italia, whose Grand Master is GoffredoSallazzo; it lJIeld its annualmeeting in Milan, Italy, November 16, 1952. . Giovanni Mori, a very distinguished Italian Freemason, and the Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite in Italy, died early in t:he year. He was a fine character and a loss to Italian Fr£;emasonry in his death. He has been succeeded by Galliano Tavolacci, a prominent attorney in Rome.

Sho.rtly after the death of Brother Mori was reported came announcement of the death of Ugo Lenzi, Grand Master of the Grand Orient of Italy (April 21, 1953). Lenzi was a strong character and it will be hard to replace him; his death was due to a disease of the heart. HISTORICAL AND ARTISTIC HINTS ABOUT THE PALAZZO GIUSTINIANI IN ROME

Palazzo Giustiniani is situated near the Piazza S. Luigi dei Francesi and constitutes a vast isolated block circumscribed on the West by the Via della Dogana Vecc~a, on the South by Via dei

"


26c

THE MASONIC WORLD

Palazzo Giutianini, Rome. (Home of the Grand Orient of Ita:ly.)

1953


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

27c

Crescenzo, on the East by the Piazza del Pantheon'and the North by Via Giustiniani: The Marquis Vincenzo Giustiniani, a lover of history and of fine Arts and noble Roman patrician, famous for his riches and magnificences, was born in Rome. in the second half of the XVIth century and died there in 1637; he entrusted Giovanni Fontana, brother of the famous Domenico, with the project and construction

Main Entrance Hall, Palazzo Giustianimi, Grand Orient of Italy.

of a palace, that later took the name of Palazzo Giustiniani, from the name of its contractor. The architect projected a building according to the XVth century ideas with the elevated part composed of a ground floor, a noble floor, and two more floors, and having its principal front in the West upon the Via della Dogana Vecchia, where is situated the main entrance portal, from which one enters into an elegant vestibule behind which is a rather simple square yard, limited by gilded walls decorated with bas-relief. There is near the back wall in the entrance axis, a modest fountain. From the hall one comes, on the left side, to a, large and easy stairs. The apartment of the noble floor is very large and is still decorated with pictures of the Brothers Zuccari, famous painters of that epic which according to some ancient chronist had portrayed, in the frieze of the principal hall, an inci-


28c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

dent referring to the life of the "Bella Giustiniana," a lady belonging to the patrician family owning the Palace and endowed of dazzling and prosperous virtues usual to the greater part of the Roman women of all times. After the death of Giovanni Fontana, in 1614, he was succeeded by the architect Borromini, who had certainly been the author of the principal entrance portal and the stone-framing of the windows, where one can easily note the decorative taste of this renowned artist. Some historians even state that the whole facade of the palace belongs to this Master of Barocco Archit.ecture in Rome; at any rate the composition of the rich entablature decorated with brackets, ovules and arenels, reminds more the character of路 the late XVth century. Between 1650 and 1657, he was entrusted with the renovation and enlargement of the palace, as it results from a contract dated Sept. 15, 1650, stipulated between the heirs of the Marquis Vincenzo Giustiniani and the Master Mason Giovanni Baptista Fonti who had to execute the work according to the designs. and models of Borromini. The Marquis had taken care to unite in his palace a rich collection of statues, busts, bas-reliefs, and classic marble ornaments found in the "Terme" of Nero and those of Alexander Severus. The historians say that at that time there was no other palace in Rome that contained a greater number of bas-reliefs and antique statues. The 'owner had chosen among these works of art, 560 masterpieees that he ordered reproduced in neat incisions, united later on and published in two volumes under the title "GALLERIA GIUSTINIANA" llJnd historically illustrated by him. The harmonious entrance, hall of the palace, adorned by twelve beautiful Doric columns of gray granite, contained 23 statues, 13 busts and 14 bas-reliefs. The halls were full of fine pictures, many by Albani, and some wonderful ones by Guido Reni-famous artists of the Bolognese School of Caracci-of Goerado delle Notti, of Antonio Tempesta, and of other famous painters of that time. Such a collection is a proof not only of the love of arts of the Giustiniani family, but also of the culture, that was not inferior to that of any other patrician Roman family, and contributed much to the development of all the aesthetic works of this city. . In the second half of the XVIIth century, during the course of the years, the beautiful collection disappeared. Towards the end of the XIXth century, even the statues and the other marble ornaments, that decorated the entrance-hall, "emigrated" to America; there remained in thllse rich premises only the twelve granite columns. In some niches at the entrance one can still see several copies of the antique busts. In an undetermined epic, but certainly between the XVIIIth and


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

29c

during the XIX-th century, there has been elevated in the palace an attic floor with successive irregular superstructures. The window!! of the upper floor of the facade, that primitively had a square form, were transformed by means of an opening into rectangular ones so as to cut the upper part of the original'stone-framing, thus constituting a decorative nonsense! In 1901, Italian Freemasonry transferred its seat to this palace, from which it took successively (in 1912) its name, distinguishing itself from another obedience, that had detached itself from the primitive stem, and that was called the Masonry of Piazza del Gesu, from the name of the place whereit was situated. In 1911, through an a"et dated Febr." 16, the Italian Masonry of Palazzo Giustiniani purchased the building and located its headquarters and its temples. In 1922, the Fascist regime had been installed in Italy, and later began its black-mailing campaign against Masonry. In the evening of August 7, 1924, occurred the first attempt on the part of the "black shirts," with an assault on the seat of the Grand Orient of Italy, that was repeated during the nights of Sept. 12 and 15 of the same year. Another attempt 'vas made by bands of squadrists armed with revolvers and daggers on Oct. 31. All the attacks were repulsed by the Brethren, ,vho guarded the premises night and day with wonderful attachment to the Order. In 1925, the violent acts of the Fascists against the persons and property of the Masonry of Palazzo Giustiniani became still more acute, and finally, Mussolini's government came to the legal supression of the Order. On November 5 of that year the palace was occupied and plundered by the fascist squadrons of action. The other Masonic Temples that existed in the city were equally invaded, plundered, and destroyed. The Ministry of Public Instruction, that later assumed the name of Ministry of National Education, issued on Jan. 29, 1926, a decree _by which it declared null and void the purchase of Palazzo Giustiniani by Italian Masonry, pretending a right of preference that did not exist. The Masonic Order, after the enslavement of the official government by the Fascist regime, was forced to sign an agreement that was stipulated on June 13, 1927 with a representative of the Italian State, by which the fraternity had to accept a very modest sum (3 millions of lircs) as eompared to the real value of the pala<;e, that had been requisitioned by sheer force. Later on the best part of the palace had been assigned to the administration of the Senate, whose seat was so near that it could provisionally be connected with the palace itself by a kind of covered passage over the via della Dogana Vecchia. The noble floor of the palace became the apartment of the President of the Senate and


30c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

remains such, up to the present time. This connecting passage had been removed after a certain time on account of the arrangement of the back-part of Palazzo Madama, the seat of the Senate, and also, because it constituted an anti-aesthetic solution of the problem that the government intended to resolve. Towards the end of 1944, as soon as Rome was liberated from the Germans and from the Fascist regime, that had oppressed Italy for nearly twenty-three years, the reconstituted Masonry of Palazzo Giustiniani brought a law-suit against the Italian Government for possession of its ancient seat. The government decided in favor of the Grand Orient and the property is to be restored. Another suit for accounting is now in a Court of Equity. NETHERLANDS The Grand Lodge of the Netherlands met in June, 1953; one of the problems confronting it was what to do with the Grand Orient and Grand Lodge of France. Both are .jurisdictions in which little stress is laid on the presence of the VSL (Bible). It was a l{)ng drawn out session, and in view of the friendly relationship which the Grand Lodge has had with their neighbors, it was hard to reach a decision. But with England and her associates, Ireland, Scotland, and the Scandinavian Grand Lodges urging them to withdraw recognition, it did constitute a problem. But, by a large majority of votes, the recognition ,vas withdra\vn because the Hollanders felt there should be some rule for international cohesion. These Grand Orients pleaded that the absence of the VSL on their altars does not mean that these Grand Orients are atheistic, but that they refuse to be subservient to the Roman Church and are therefore "Freemen." Holland hopes that their action may be of some assistance in securing the return of the Bible in both these Grand Orients-and we hope that it may do so.

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

An interesting table appears in the Algemeen Maconniek Tijdschrift which shows the age of candidates being accepted into the Holland Lodges; it shows that of 287 candidates: 1 was over 70 years of age 3 were over 65 years of age 12 were over 60 years of age 26 were between 55 and 59 years 33 were from 50 to 54 years 47 were from 45 to 49 years 49 were from 40 to 44 years 49 were from 35 to 39 years 39 were from 30 to 34 years 27 were from 25 to 29 years 1 was under 25 years.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

31c

Thus 217 were from the 30-59 year group. We think this compares with the statistics found in most American lodges.

A. F. L. Faubel, for many years the Grand 'Secretary of the Grand Lodge of the Netherlands, died at his home in the Hague, 'June 9, 1953 at the age of 88. Bro. Faubel was a great Freemason; he had written many volumes of Masonic literature many of which we have in our library, duly autographed. 'Ve visited him in his home in 1945, located in the vicinity of the Hague Peace Building and only a stone's throw from the spot in which the Germans launched their rocket bombs on London. MASONIC NOTES FROM LATIN AMERICA

Mexico: Nuevo Leon Freemasons report the death of the late Governor, A 1'tm'O B. de la Garza) June 26, 1952. Governor Garza was active in the consolidation of two grand lodges in his state. lIe made an outstanding Governor. The Grand Lodge of the State of Vera Cruz maintains a school and a medical dispensary. Many other Mexican jurisdictions do likewise. Gmnd 01'ient Espanol (Spain): This exile Grand Lodge has recently eleded Mateo Hernandez BrtTr080 its Grand Master. He was initiated in IIispano-American Lodge in Madrid, and served as Grand Secretary in Spain from 19:3:3 on. He held a government position-Director Gener~l of Communications. . Hondums: Mother's Day was celehrated by special ceremonies. Freemasonry was compared as "an institution, or spiritual mothercommon to all Freemasons who are her sons." Guatemala: The death of Dr. H. Abraham Cabrera R) noted jurist, educator, and citizen was noteo. Costa R1:ca: June 20, 1952 was celebrated as the 90th anniversary of the installation of Franciseo Calvo as a Freemason. lIe was a Roman Catholic, founoed Freemasonry in Costa Rica, ana was at the time "Canonigo Penitencia de la Cateoral de San Juan de Costa Rica." Chile: The ne".. President, General Carlos Ibanez del Campo, is a member of the fraternity and the Grand Lodge paid him due tribute at its session October 26, 1952. Other Chilean Presidents were Arturo Alesandri, Pedro Agui1"1'e Cerda, Juan Antonio Rios, Gabriel Gonzalez Vide la, and probably some others. Cuba: The wife of President Batista of Cuba, Senora Marta Fernandez de Batista has donated $30,000 to Masonic Charities . the Lodge Verdad has given to the city a Children's Park the Grand Lodge has been enabled to make several radio broadcasts . In January 1953, the Grand Lodge commemorated the anniversary


32c

THE MASONIC 'WORLD

1953

of Jose Marti, Cuban patriot. . . . '.rhe Grand Lodge is hoping to establish a National Masonic School . . . a plan is on foot to establish a Park in memory of the patriot martyr, Jose Enders Puente Badell, a Past Grand Master. Bmzil: Two new lodges have been established in Parana; they are Est1'ella at Pirai del Sur, and Culto a la Verdad at Joaquin Revora ... in Pernambuco, the Lodge Caballet路os de la Luz No.2 at Recife has constru'cted a new and commodious temple . . . the 17 Lodges in Minas Gerais edit a Bulletin; hvo new volumes have come out of this area-Historicos Masonicos and Encyclopedia Masonica. . . . In Rio de Janeiro, Eurico Figueiredo Sampaio has been re-elected Grand Master; Grand Secretary is J acy Garnier Bacelar . . . in Paraibia J nao A rlindo Correim has been elected Grand Master. . . . In Amazonas 20 lodges attended a memorial service for the late King George; present ,vas the Governor of the State. ECUADOR

The thirty-third annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Ecuador was held at Guayaquil, Ecuador, January 17, 1953. Garcia Moreno was named Grand Master; the Grand Secretary is Jose Aurelio Vallejo Ycaza (P.G.M.). There are ten living past grand masters. The address of the Grand Lodge is Templo M:asonico, Fco P. Lavayen 222, or P. O. Box (Apartado) No. 222, Guayaquil, Ecuador. It has six subordinate lodges, all in Guayaquil except Simon Bolivar Lodge No. 12 which meets in. Ekewheal but whose mail is ordered delivered to a Guayaquil address. It lists 91 grand lodges among its recognitions, including Missouri; the Missouri recognition is incorrect. It shows two grand lodges in Norway in the list and shows Switzerland-and again Swiss Alpina which are no doubt one and the same. The Grand Orient of France, Turkey, Egypt and many other questionable jurisdictions are in the list. VENEZUELA

The Gmn Logia de los Estados Unidos de Venezuela has announced that on February 10, 1953 at Caracas in that jurisdiction, Rafael Emesto Otero was elected Grand Master and Jesus M. Chango Gomez retained as Grand Secretary. The address of the Grand Lodge is Este No.3, No.5, or Postal No. 927, Caracas, Venezuela. During the month of June, 1953, we had as our guest in Trenton, Missouri, Illustrious Brother Nicolador Garcia Batista, Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite of Venezuela; he was accompanied by his wife and son Eduardo. The son has been for the past year a cadet at Culver Military School in Indiana. The Grand Lodge was established and incorporated September 9,


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

33e

1838 at about the time the country was divided into three parts, Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador. '1;'he Grand Lodge of Maryland had founded the Lodge Regeneradares No.6 in the city of Maracaibo, June 24, 1812, so that North America did play a part in the early history of the fraternity in Venezuela. URUGUAY

Following the Mexico City Inter-American Conference, we had high 'hopes that the Grand Lodge of Uruguay would realize the necessity of conforming to International Masonic standards, but the action of their grand lodge since that time is not at all convincing. The unfortunate part of the whole matter is that there are many fine brethren in Uruguay \vho would like to see the return of the VSL to the Masonic altars, but there is a small group which apparently opposes. One of our friends who knows the situation writes us: After careful consideration and much debate, the Grand Lodge of Uruguay decided to accept everything but the requirement concerning the use of the VSL. On this matter they decided: (a) When the Grand Lodge meets, both the VSL (Bible), and the Volume of Moral Law (the Constitution) shall be put on the altar, opened. (b) The Grand Lodge grants the subordinate lodges the right to put the Book of the Sacred Law, the Book of the Moral Law-or both - i f they so decide. Once the problem has been known and discussed, the majority of Uruguayan lodges will place both books on the altar, and as time goes on, more and more lodges will do so. I believe that only four or five lodges will resist the VSL by the end of 1953.

The Uruguayan Bible situation had its repercussions in the LatinAmericas; one of the vice-presidencies of the Conference had been located in Uruguay. Since that time, Uruguay resigned the nomination, believing there was a moral issue involved. There had been opposition to Uruguay by the Grand Lodges of Peru, Chile, and Argentina which are very close neighbors. Thus are the seeds of disunity being sown. Time only will produce unity. GUA'l'EMALA

The Grand Lodge of Guatemala has named Miguel Angel Castillo of Guatemala City as Grand Master; the newly elected Grand Secretary is Carlos Bainchi, Callejon Manchen No.4, Guatemala City, Guatemala. SAO PAULO

In a letter dated May 6, 1953, to the Grand Lodge of Iowa, from Dr. Carlos路 Barcellos Fagundes, Grand Secretary of Foreign Rela-


34c

THE MASONIC WORLD

195:3

tions of the Grande Loja Simbolica do Rio Grande do SulJ Caixa Postal 683, Porto Alegre, says he is enclosing a Decree 433-436, the first recognizing the United Grand Lodge of Sao Paulo, and the second expelling from the Order, Altamir Mesquita do Amaral, "partisan of communism." He also announces the death of J oaquim Monteiro de Souza Magalhaes. The Sao Paulo group they -recommend is headed by Dr. Sidney Delcides de Avila. 'Ve favor non-intervention, and non-rccognition, of the Sao Paulo groups until they have settled their internal troubles. GOVERNMENT MISSIONS

In these days when \ve are scnding mission after mission to foreign countrics to learn the true status of some of those countries to which we have been supplying financial aid, it is well for our readers to know just what is happening. 'Ve once accompanied a Masonic mission to Europe; while en route we encountered three or four congressional groups engaged in a junket tour in the hopes of compiling information helpful to them in making up their minds as to American policy. In one instance we rode on the same plane; we saw the group of about 10 (many with ladies) received by the American Minister in person; they were hauled to the leading hotel, registered and taken in charge; they were dined at a big dinner which lasted until a late hour; the next morning they arose late and were taken for a drive over the city; the next day they were rounded up in the hotel and batches of printed and mimeographed material were turned over to them. And they later took a plane for the return, fully satisfied with tile .vonderful lot of "information" which they had personally secured. The information was just what the embassy wanted the committee . to have-and no more. In view of what we have just said, the letter from a Masonic friend in a country hostile to Freemasonry gives us another situation: It is easier today to sec (head of the government), to whom even the ministers cannot see, due to the precautions with which he is surrounded, than to be near a foreign personage who has come to (country deleted) to observe personally the situation, because it is built (by the government) an iron wall; they are very diplomatic-very polite-and full of attention-and feasts-but the persons permitted to be near the important visitor is carefully predetermined, and the approach of any others is almost impossible. Phones, mail, telegraph-everything is "under perfect control" in order to "prevent the personage from being annoyed while here by Inopportune people."

Fact finding committees ~ Hardly.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

35c

NEWS STORY FROM BRAZIL THE MASONIC MEETING ENDS IN A BRAWL

The general assembly of the Grand Orient of Brazil, of yesterday, was disturbed by two exasperated followers of Grand Master Rodrigues Nfrves (presently in license) who, being unable to prevent the meeting since he is no more in control of the majority 9f .members, has made everything within his power to avoid the discussion of the scandalous case of renting of the property in the Fatima section of the town, going as . far as to promote a conflict. When one of the Masonic deputies requested the presiding officer to send a motion to the Council of the Order, to the effect of starting at once an investigation with the purpose of disclosing tho names of those implied in the affair and charging them with the responsibility which resulted therefrom, a certain Mr. Noemio Silva-who was the agent of the Grand Master's orders by giving a favorable advice on the subject of the rent-threatened the lodges and Masons who protested against his action, declaring that, on June 25, when the licensed Grand Master returns to activity, the" rebelled" Brethren would be expelled from the organization. As his attitude resulted in a general protestation by those present, a fonner arti8~ of the Dudu Circus, known by the nickname of "Charlie" and who is also one of the most fanatical supporters of Grand Master Neves,insulted the members of the Assembly, challenging them even to a fight outside the precinct. At that time, the meeting was suspended and the two partisans of the Grand Master were thrown out of the place under a shower of slaps and kicks "in the most perfect order," according to the expression used by one of those witnessing the facts. â&#x20AC;˘ The work was resumed and a process was ordered to be made, in view to define the intellectual responsibility of Grand Master Neves in the whole conflict. The session was proceeding with the discussion of these matters when the already mentioned former Circus Clown, who happens to be a foreigner, returned to the room and insulted the Superior Masonic Tribunal, saying among other things that, if it were in his native country, things would turn out quite differently. Thereupon, the Grand Chancellor .who, by the way, is also Mr. Neves' close friend, lost his temper and, unexpectedly, rose and applied a pair of noisy slaps on the face of the recalcitrant individual, throwing him out into the garden of the Masonic Temple.-(From the "ULTIMA HORA" of June 4, 1952, Ri.o de Janeiro.) GRAKDE LOJA DO PIADI

This Grand Lodge held its annual communication at Teresina, State of Piaui, Brazil, June 25, 1952 and elected its officers for the three year period (1952-55). Dr. Antonio de Castro Franco was elected Grand Master and Captain Antonio da Rocha Andrade, Grand Secretary. 1'hc address of the Grand Lodge is Grande Loja do Piaui, Almirante Tamandare 797-N; postal address is Caixa Postal 10, Teresina, Estado do Piaui, Brazil. The Grand Lodge was founded November 13, 1948 and "regularized December 9, 1948." It has the following lodges under its obedience:


36c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

At T eresina Mestre Higino Cunha No. 31 Patria E. Liberdade No. 32 Nogueira Paranagua No.2 At Campo Maior Costa Araujo No. 33 .A t Piripi1'i Abdias Neves No.1 At Parnaiba Francisco Correia No. 3 A t Amarante Acacia Amarantina No.4 At Gilbues Uniao E. Justica

American jurisdiction recogmzmg Piau! are Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Louisiana. Also recognizing Piau! are these: Grand Lodge of France Serenissima Grand Lodge of Italy.

BOLIVIA

Bolivia has an area approximately the size of the two American States of Texas and Montana. Its capital city is La Paz. It is bounded on the'west by Peru and Chile, by Brazil on the north and east, Paraguay on the east, and Argentina on the south. Accordin.g to the 'Vorld Almanac: It lies across the Andes, and its chief topographical feature is the great central plateau at an altitude of 12,000 feet, over 500 miles long, lying bcb<:een two great cordileras having three of the highest peaks in America. Lake Titicaea, on the Peru-Bolivian border, is the highest lake in the world on which steamboats regularly ply (12,500 feet), and is the largest lake in South America (4,000 square miles). The legal capital is Sucre, but La Paz, a city more accessible, is the actual seat of government. : .. It lies in the heart of a gigantic canyon about three miles wide, ten miles long, and 1,500 feet deep.

Bolivia was once a part of the great Incan Empire, and for centuries was dominated by the Spanish government in Madrid, Spain. In 1825 occurred the revolution in which independence was gained. The country was named for the great South American Liberator, and Freemason, Simon Bolivar. There have been many revolutions and counter-revolutions, and the fortunes of the Masonic institution have gone up or down depending on \vhich party was in power. In 1947, by a new Constitution, the President was elected by popular vote for a term of four years; he cannot be re-elected. Women have the right of suffrage; there is a Senate and a House of Deputies. The President elected in 1951, is Vietor Paz Estenssoro. There was a revolution, December 20, 19路13,


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

37c

and the President at that time, who was a Freemason, General Enrique Peneranda, was thrown o,ut of office. The recognized religion, as may be suspected, is Roman Catholic; and we find 85 per cent illiteracy; re(;ently, education was made free and compulsory. Other religions are permitted; the language is Spanish. 'With so few prospective members, we find the fraternity weak numerically, and yet they carryon their Freemasonry in a way to command our respect; they have founded an orphanage; whether this institution is still operating we do not know. An official circular issued by the Gran Logia de Bolivia, 1946, stated The Grand Lodge of Bolivia was regularly constituted on the 20th of November, 1929, by seven Symbolic Lodges, and received its Charter from the Grand Lodge of Chile, April 12, 1930. It works according to the A.A.S. Rite, while permitting two of its Lodges to use the York Rite according to the U.G.L. England. Actually the G.L. Bolivia, the only Symbolic Masonic Power in Bolivia, has sixteen lodges formed, and four in process of formation.

Lodges, at that time, were located in Potosi (8), Sucre (1), Cochabamba (1), Oruro (2), Cobija (1), Uncia (1), Uyuna (1). There are "Triangle" (Clubs) at Tarija, Santa Cruz, Tupiza, and Villamontes. Freemaso,nry in Bolivia is a young institution. It too underwent persecntion and internal troubles before it started its period of growth. In 1916, it is said that a certain Colonel in the British Army established in the Valley of La Paz, the Logia Illiman's)' it worked under the Grand Lodge of Chile and was very cosmopolitan in character, being composed of two Germans, four Bolivians, two Chileans, two Englishmen, three Italians, one Jugoslavian, one North American (15). The life of the Lodge was short; in 1920, the members were persecuted and assaulted and the Temple was closed. But the Bolivians had had a touch of Freemasonry, and in ] 927 we learn that the Minister Plenipotentiary of Bolivia appeared before the Governor of the Republic of Uruguay and became a member; we find: August 19, ]927, the Grand Commander acting, in the absence of the Grand Commander, Dr. Julio Bastos, initiated with the consent of the Supreme Council, into the Symbolic Degrees, 1 0 , 2 0 , and 3째, the profanes: J. Minor Gainsbor and Waldo Belmont Pool, to petition the Lodge Hermes, to confcr with the Minister Plenipotentiary of Bolivia and his secretary, that they may carry into their country, and initiate an era of progress for Scottish Masonry among the Lodges under the obedience of the Grand Lodge of Uruguay.


38c

'l'HE MASONIC WORLD

1953

Again: Pebruary 9, 1928, Gainsbor 33 0 (He went up in a hurry I) communicated to the Supreme Council of Uruguay that he had initiated into the Grades 2 0 , 3 0 , 4 0 , eight profanes who were to be the foundation of the Lodge Linares, in the Valley de Oruro; and the same procedure was followed in the case of eight profanes who organized the Lodge Tiahuanuco, in the Valley of La Paz, who work in the A.A.S.R. under the obedience of the Masonry of Uruguay.

The Grand Lodge of Uruguay gave free Charters and the right to a Supreme Council, and rejoiced in being able to get into a country where they had failed to establish the light of Truth, and when they were able to install a Supreme Council of the A.A.S.R., independent, regular, and recognized, to the end that Bolivia can constitute a Grand Orient to be another link in the chain of universal fraternity. In 1929, Bolivia sent a delegation to Chile, and there November 20, 1929, they received a Charter for the Grand Lodge of Bolivia which was founded on that date, electing Nomberto Galdo, Grand Master. (Note: There is an Anglo-Bolivian Lodge No.7 in the City of La Paz. The York Rite has a Lodge there-Brothers of the Future.)

PAltAGUAY

In 1889, there was founded at Asuncion, Paraguay, the Lodge Aurora de Paraguay; it worked under the Grand Orient and Supreme Couneil of the Republica Oriental del Uruguay. But on November 16, 1892, it received a Charter from Oriente la Logia Perfecta Armonia del Valle de Villa Concepcion which worked under the Grand Lodge of Uruguay. July 8, 1895, Uruguay gave permission for the formation of a Supreme Council in Paraguay, and this was accomplished March 26, 1896. It v,'as the Supreme Council thus established which set up the Grand Lodge of Paraguay; The Supreme Council and the Grand Orient were one and the same body. OOLOMBIA 'l'HE INQUISITION IN THE NEW WORLD

Should you have any idea that the Inquisition is dead-go to Colombia where persecution of Protestants and Freemasons has now reached its highest peak. For the past several months we have been receiving page after page of letters telling of how protestant people, protestant churches and others "not of the true (~) faith" are being killed, imprisoned, and tortured by fanatical members of the official church which talks


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

39c

tolerance when it needs tolerance, but which practices intolerance where in control. Masonic groups have had to dispense with their labors during several months; brethren who wished to attend the Masonic conference in Mexico City last March 1952, had trouble in securing passports. Official information has gone forth from Masonic groups there that correspondence should cease since it was positively dangerous to attempt to communicate with them. There are five grand lodges in that area; they are small grand lodges and they have little influence in a country so preponderant Roman Catholic. As we \vrite this article, information comes that the president has heen deposed; we Ca.J1not say at this time whether this is helpful or not. We can say this, however, that American arms have been turned over to Colombia and they have been enjoying some sort of aid from the United States. It would seem to be the time for withdrawing our support from such a country. We quote from an official circular sent out by a neighboring grand lodge: The reactionaries are advancing! Yesterday they stole from and murdered our Brothers in Spain. Today they are getting ready to do the same in Colombia. Which of the other countries are next in linef An extensive and well combined plan seems to be on the march. In Mexico-the leader of our democracies 1-parties of women are being formed in which most of the members are under the decisive influence of the clergy, and also it is pretended there to obtain the signatures of all Mexicans as proof of total Catholicism in a supplication to the Pope for the pardon of Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla and the annulment of his excommunication, as if this would be a blemish instead of a sign of pride. (An offensive in favor of Counter-Reform f) In Ecuador the International Press Association is labeled as Masonic because they fight for the freedom of the press. Everywhere the right of self-determination is eliminated. Freedom is being killed. And we, who are so proud of the great deeds of our Masonic ancestors do not try to be their worthy successors to maintain unsullied their work or increase it I Here are some actual facts now present in the glorious Fatherland of our Brothers Santander, Narifio, and many others. The Government of Colombia has prepared a series of 36 bases for reforms in the Constitution to be presented to a Constituent Assembly which was formed by "elections" where only the Government party voted, and which will meet on June 15 of this year. By these reforms as has been well stated by the Grand Master of Bogota: ". . . in a categorical form and without any disguise they throw the country and all its activities into the hands of the Roman Apostolic Catholic clergy. There can be only one political party, that is the Government Party which fashions its idealogies and methods of action from the fundamental principles of Christian Democracy-in Colombia the meaning of Christia1~ to the Government and to the Clergy is Roman Catholic. Article 19 not only bans Masonry in Colombia but it pr,oscribes it, which means that it will be persecuted until it is eradicated." Imagine the political and religious fanaticism of the Colombian Conservatives incited to its maximum by the ferocity and sadism of the new inquisitors.


40c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

Since I cannot transcribe all the articles, I do it only with the first one which contains the general foundation of all the reforms, and the one pertaining to Masonry which most directly concerns us. I-The political, moral, social, economic and educational doctrine is that which flows as from its natural source, from the Roman Apostolic Catholic Religion, which is that of the Nation, the country's pride, glory of the past, guide of the present and light of the future. Therefore, this religion must have the protection of the State as an essential element of social order, and foreign cults will be tolerated only as long as they do not conflict with Christian morality/ wholesome practices and the peace of the people. Noone is to be molested for their religious opinions3 nor compelled to practices that are against his conscience. The church will continue to enjoy the freedom of managing its own affairs, and for the governing of those that are under the common power of the Church and State, the Concordat System will continue in force. 19-Proscription of secret societi.cs, which do not benefit the cornrnu1~ity but originate untold evils as proven by hiBtory: Sirnon Bolivar said-" 011.ly c1'irne w01'ks in darkness." Cynics! Pretending to destroy Masonry there, basing their arguments on a quotation from the Illustrious Mason, Liberator and Father of Colombia! ! With reference to all this the Grand Master of Bogota continues: "Articles 0, 7, and 8 of the resolutions of Theme II of the Mexican Conclusions are categorical and clear enough to be placed in immediate practice. 'This is the occasion for the Inter-American l\.'fasonic Confederation to show its efficiency. For the moment we urgently request that the voices of the press, the radio, and all other possible means be raised regarding the freedoms that are oppressed here and the similarity with Falangist Spain, 110 longer camouflaged but baro-faced, like a challenge to all that was agreed upon at the International Conventions, Brother Carlos Saul Hernandez, Representative of the Sovereign Grand Commander of the Order of Masonic Constructors in Colombia writes: "In the presence of this regime in Colombia, an exact replica of the horrible Spanish Falangism, it is easy to understand what such a measure means to Masonry; therefore, we ask you to convey the news IN AN URGENT MANNER to the Grand Master of your Grand Lodge, as well as to those friends who, by means of the press are able to announce to the Continent this new attack on spiritual freedoms, which is approaching with definite characteristics of a monstrous tragedy. In this bitter hour of trial the Order of !lfasonic Constructors of Colombia asks for your moral support and asl,s you to remain on the alert in case the events determine the exile of our Brethren, as the only escape from chains and death. In this, that may be the last of our postal messages, the members of the Order of Masonic Constructors of Colombia reaffirm their ideals of universal love and fraternity among all peoples, and once more proclaim the CONTINENTAL UNITY AND SOLIDARITY." The Most Worshipful Brother, Doctor Abraham Mora S., Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Colombia, with headquarters in Bogota, has entrusted me with the sacred mission of transmitting his message to you, and I quote parts of his letter as follows: "As I informed you in my previous letter which was accompanied by a newspaper clipping, here things are about to change for us, and it has been said they are 1. Latin-American democracies. 2. Investigate what they have done to the Protestantism. 3. Roman Catholic opinions.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

41c

not going to leave' puppets with heads' as it is a crusade directly and vigorously requested by the clergy and peacefully conceded by the Government. Regardless of what comments have been made on this measure they will establish the means to put an end to the institution but to everything that has anything in common with Masonry. The manner in which the Article is written and that serves as the basis for this activity of the Government leaves no doubt. We are going to be treated like criminals, like individuals that have committed crimes against the State, against the Church, and against God. They want to make theatrically a semi-inquisition. Those who, not content with exercising power in government desire to satisfy also themselves by provoking a clerical war as worthy successors of Torquemada like gluttons hungry with inquisitorial appetites. . . . In each country there are outstanding Masons whose activities in the press and in high positions let their voices be heard around the world. We in Colombia are going to be the first victims in the Americas. Weare serving ~s the warning voice. "Little by little the limits of freedom are growing narrower, and little by little we are finding ourselves reduced within a circle of tyrannies squeezing us to suffocation. I cannot see a better opportunity for Inter-American Masonry to make its power felt, if it has any; its fervor, if it does exist; its yearning for freedom, if it yearns for the freedom of everyone, than this opportunity offered by the Government of Colombia when it places in its basis for Constitutional reforms the proscription of Masonry in Colombia. This is not an attack against Masons only in Colombia, they have not raised the dagger against a small group of Brothers who Jive in this country-it is an open challenge, clear, bare-faced against American Masonry, against Universal Masonry, against Masonry. We are to be proscribed because of the offense of calling ourselves Brothers and for the sin of trying to be Brothers. ' , FREEMASONRY IN ARGENTINA

The Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Spain once said: "The History of Freemasonry in Argentina will never be written because of the lack of authenticated documents."

There are however, two periods in the history of Freemasonry in the Argentine-the first being the early period which is undocumented; the second is the documented period. The first period begins with the establishment of the first Lodge in Argentina, in 1795; it was the mother lodge, Union del Plata No. 1. There was another Lodge, Independencia, established in the same year and thought also to have been the first; it worked under the Grand Orient of France of the A.A.S.R. There is also evidence of a Lodge known as San Juan de Jerusalem which existed in that area. Because of the religious persecution, it was unsafe to be known as a Freemason and the names of members were never路 written into any documents or membership lists. The earliest known Masonic document was in May 1810. , The English established lodges in Brazil as early as 1806-7. Their two lodges were (1) Star of the South and (2) Sons of Hiram. The honor of being the first Argentinian to conceive a plan for the


42c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

liberation of his people was a well known Freemason, Senor Don Saturnino Rodriguez Pena. But the best known Lodge in Argentinian history was the Lodge Lautaro founded by the great patriot, General don Jose de San Martin and don Carlos Maria de Olevear together with don Matias Zapiola. General Mitre says of this .Lodge : The famous Lodge de Lautaro which as a revolutionary institution produced both good and bad, had its origin in Europe under the inspiration of San Martin and Olevear. In those first momentous days, it gave the revolution a new impetus.

Don Jose de San Marlin organized a daughter lodge, Lmttm-ina Mendoza, in the Province of Mendoza which worked secretly as Academy of Mathematics. In the meantime, England established Lodge Excelsior in 1853; this was followed by the organization the Lodge Amiga de los Naufrages.

de an its of

THE SECOND PERIOD

The Second Period may be said to have begun with 'the foundation of the Lodge Mad1'e Union del Plata, March 9, 1856; it worked under the \Grand Lodge of Uruguay. Sar.miento was a member of this Lodge; he became the President of Argentina, as did Don Bartolome Mitre. A ne"w era had begun for the Freemasons. In addressing a Masonic gathering, President Mitre said: The two portals of the Temple symbolize-the one the light of daythe other the darkness of the night.

With the growth of the fraternity it became necessary to properly house it; this was done by the erection of a new Masonic Temple, in 1869, at a cost of $16,000; it was, and is, located at 1242 Cangallo, Buenos Aires. The next move was to establish a Grand Lodge, which was consummated November 25, 1856; it was composed of the following Lodges: Union del Plata Confraternidad Argentina Consulo del In fortano Tolerancia Regeneracion LeaItad.y Constimcia

The two Lodges, Excelsior No. 617 (English) and Amie des Naufrages (French) did not join in the formation of the Grand Lodge. Italy had had a Lodge in Argentine, but it became dormant. A German Lodge also became dormant. In 1857, a Supreme Council was established as a result of the


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

43~

work of some Uruguayan brethren, especially Dr. Jose Roque Perez. Then came a Treaty of Amity between the Grand Lodge of England and Argentine, February 13, 1860, which included the degrees of Royal Arch Masonry. The degrees were conferred upon the following distinguished Argentinians: Santiago Dergin, President of the Republic General Bartolomeo Mitre, Governor of Buenos Aires Colonel Juan Abdres, Minister of War Justo .Jose de Urgueza, Minister of Army and Navy.

(Notes) In 1932 there were Lodges in Argentine working under the Grand Orient Espanol (Spain). October 10, 1852 there was established a Gennan speaking .Lodge Teutonia, which emerged from the Lodge Excalibar No. 900. Teutonia was No. 1092 on the English Register. Teutonia and Acacia No. 1178 (now 876 of Montevideo) (~) formed, in 1861, a Provincial Grand Lodge which later became the District Grand Lodge under England.

'" There is an irregular grand lodge in Argentine known as the Fedeml Argentino j it was established in 1935 under Scottish Rite working and caused the official organ "Verba" of the regular Grand Lodge to say: It has abolished from its ritualistic practices the invocation to the Grand Architect of the Universe, and the placing of the Holy Bible on the altar.

Representatives from this latter group appeared at the first American Congress in Montivideo and the resentment was so strong that certain South American Grand Lodges would not consent to attend further Conferences unless assured the Federal Argentino would not be represented. The Second Conference in Mexico City, in 1952, was held without them. Their location is 1872 Calle Sarmiento in Buenos Aires. THE WORDS OF DON BARTOLOMEO MITRE

The high regard in which the Masonic Fraternity was held by the President of the Republic-and its First President-is shown in an address which Dr. Bartolomeo Mitre made October 10, 1868 (in part) : Notwithstanding, I had no information as to the program of this


44c

'l'HE MASONIC

WO~LD

1953

meeting, and did not thillk I would be called upon for an address, yet I have been invited to that, and I accept the task which you have imposed, because each one of us ought to be willing and always prepared for the work of making the light of the day and the darkness of the night. (He compares the portals of the Temple, which symbolize the Light of Day and the Darkness of" the Night.) And to do that gives me confidence, not imposed through vanity, but for me, support the facts in the ideas which come to me at this moment. Illustrious and dear brothers: You who have been born in this Valley of the Republic of Argentine, and you sons of other lands, who have come here to be identified with our. ideals, and all these, and each of you, who congregate in the Temple to pay homage and tribute to the cultivation of Virtue-Greetings and best wishes. The generous words with which you have honored me, have penetrated my heart of gratitude. I accept them, not because I believe them merited, but as a tribute to the Religion of Truth and the Justice which you profess, and because I have been a champion of that. To fight is also to work. To fight for the Right, for Liberty, for Justice, in the name of those Eternal Principles which form the human conscience, is to work in promoting Civilization and Progress.

*

*

*

Who is Sarmiento ~ A poor man such as I; an instrument such as this (picks up the compasses) as the workman takes in his hands to produce Good or Evil on a greater or less scale. I shall not speak further of the role of each of those (~), but if it be left to me to decide, let me pay tribute to the President of the Masonic Lodges. It has been said that there was a time when brother Masons gained for society the rights which were denied them. Brothers, the Masons gained those rights in life, and also in death, and that is a paTt of the message I bring my brethren. A brother who was orie of the clergy-I speak of the venerable Dr. Aguero-died only a few years ago after having preached the Truth of Philosophy. Ultimate repose which the earth concedes to the mortal rest of man was denied Dr. Aguero. The Gate of the Temple and the Gate of the Sepulcher were denied for his poor bones. His body was disinterred from its tomb in the land of the living and denied the sleep of the dead. I shall speak in the defense of the rights of that dead body. I have the honor to speak for our brethren, for once and for all, the right of the sleep Eternal. Note: Dr. Aguero's body had been disinterred by. the official church because he was a Freemason.

There are strange things happening in Argentina. In the first place there are two grand lodges-the Grand Lodge of Argentina and the Gran Oriente Federal Argentino. Undoubtedly the regular group is the first named. The latter group was originally made up of brethren who were Spanish refugees, made Freemasons before the Civil War in Spain. The rift between these two branches of Argentine Freemasonry is only one example of the troubles brought to the Western Hemisphere by Spanish refugees; they were sponsored by the Grand Lodge of Chile and by a spurious Grand Lodge in


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

45c

Uruguay. While the Grand Oriente Federal is highly irregular, yet its members are said to be truly democratic and freedom-loving. Many of them are now languishing in Peron's prisons. Uruguay recognized both Argentinian grand lodges several years ago; in 1951, Chile withdrew its recognition of Federal Argentino; Uruguay did not. The Federal Argentino group has insistently accused the Grand Lodge of Argentina as being pro-Peron ever since Peron took over as President. Here are some interesting side-lights: (a) Three or four years ago, Evita Peron's newspaper-Demoeracia -began a murdering assault upon Argentine Freemasonry. At about the same time, the famous Peronis representative, Father Fillipo issued a thunderous blast in a speech before the Argentine House of Representatives along the same lines. In three days everything was over and there have been no attacks against the fraternity since that time. Evidently, some superior order was issued when you know that all newspapers are regimented. Word ,vas passed that the Minister of War, General Soso Molina, was a Freemason. It was even stated that Peron himself was a Freemason. Nobody seems to know, but the facts remain. (b) A few months ago, the Grand Lodge magazine, Simbolo, published a laudatory article dealing with the life and death of Eva Peron; the Grand Lodge, by order of its officers, remained closed for several days during the funerals. This act caused much resentment in Uruguay. On the other hand, the Federal Argentino group did nothing. These accusations are denied by the Grand Lodge of Argentina.

We would welcome more facts about the whole affair before expressing any opinion. At any !'ate it is somewhat mixed up. FREEMASONRY IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA

There is at this time no organized Freemasonry in Czechslovakia so that our heading may be somewhat misleading. But there are things going on in that country which have to do with Freemasons and Freemasonry. The trial against Rudolf Slansky, former Central Secretary of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, and 13 other leading Communists took place in Prague from November 20 to 27, 1952 and resulted in 11 capital and :~ life sentences. Slansky and a few other defendants were charged with being supported in their "conspiratorial" activities by-among others-Freemasons. The following is a translation of the respective passages of the indictment and trial records as far as they are available and have been examined: In Part II of the indictment of November 14, 1952 it is said: In this his hostile activity I (Rudolf Slansky) relied, together with the other members of the anti-State conspiratorial center on various hostile groups and organizations, as tllere were Trotskyites, Zionists, Bourgeois路 Nationalists, Freemasons, faked Partisans and others. (The indictment quotes an alleged confession made by Slansky during the pretrial investigations.)


46c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

The following is an excerpt from the part of Slansky's interrogatory which dealt with the "Criminal activity of Zionist Organizations" : Presiding Judge: Did you rely, in addition to Zionist organizations also on other organizations'

The Accused (Slansky) : Yes, upon the Freemasons.

Judge: Depose (give evidence) on this subject!

Accused: The anti-State conspiratorial center, relied not only on Zionist organizations but in the same way also on the Freemasons- and their lodges. I had contacts with Freemasons, e.g. with Mr. Machon and Dr. Vancura, who were important functionaries in Masonic Lodges. I met Machon some time in 1945. He told me that he was a Mason and I agreed with his continuing his Masonic activities. I also gave my consent to the activities of the Masonic Lodges which were reestablished at that time. I also agreed to various people; like Machon, beiRg at the same time Masons and members of the Communist Party. This means that they could cover their hostile Masonic activity by the membership cards of the Communist Party.

Judge: This was the situation since 1945. What happened after the February events in 1948'

Accused: At that time I also cooperated with the Masonic Lodges and individual Freemasons. After Februa.ry 1948 I further cooperated with the Masonic Lodges, made possible their activities and legal existence and protected them. I was also in contact with Dr. Vancura, an outstanding Mason, who had relations vd.th Masonic Lodges abroad, above all in England. I knew of these relations and also of the fact that they served for anti-State espionage purposes. I also aided those Freemasons who were members of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia to preserve their membership in the Party. I made possible their screening in the Party and thus their further membership.

Public Prosecutor: Why did you rely on these hostile organizations and why did you entertain relations with the Masons'

Accused: The Freemasons had similar aims as the conspiratorial anti-State Centrum which was headed by me. Their activities aimed likewise at restoration of capitalism in Czechoslovakia and at liquidation of the


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

47c

people's democratic order. In the Masonic Lodges various cosmopolitans, intellectuals and borgeois cosmopolitan politicians were concentrated. Their cosmopolitism, their lack of national feelings served the imperialists in the use of these people as their a.gents for activities against the peopIe's democratic order, in Czechoslovakia. By being linked with Masonic Lodges' in the capitalistic countries, above all in London, the Masonic Lodges; on which I relied served to establish through their instrumentality relations between the anti-State conspiratorial center and the Western imperialists. The hostile character of the Masonic Lodges was demonstrated also by the fact that Dr. Edward Benes, the imperiali.st agent, was also their member.

Prosecutor: I have in my hands a letter which was sent to you by the Grand Master of the Masonic Lodges in Czechoslovakia, Dr. Vancura, with whom, as you just said, you maintained contacts. He wrote in that letter: i t On that occasion" (he spoke in his letter of his journey to England in May 1948) "I arranged also a meeting with leading functionaries of the great English Lodges. They received my information with great interest and confidence." On that letter a reply is added with your hand in which you thank Vancura. What does the letter prove~

Accused: As I deposited, I knew of Vancura's contact with the Masonic Lodges in London and also that through this relationship he was carrying out a hostile activity.

The accused Slansky admits the genuineness of the letter which is produced to him. He also confirms the authenticity of another letter which was 'written to him by Mr. Machon. In that letter Machon wrote: In reestablishing the Lodges after 1945 and during further developments I have always sought your advice and your directives have always been decisive for me....

The Prosecutor produces two further written documents: In the first Grand Master of Masons Prof. Mecanda, wrote: Dr. J aroslav Stransky put the question of the Masonic Order in a meeting of the Government Presidium and I understand tJlat he 'was firmly rejected by Gottwald.

In the second document Machon noted down on June 30, 1847 that Slansky had a positive relationship (attitude). towards the Freemasons. Machon also registered a directive by Slansky that he should ask Slansky before any decision w~s made and that Slansky would explain the matter to him. Prosecutor: What do these facts give evidence off

Accused: I maintained in conflict with the line of the Party chairman relations


48c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

with Freemasons, I cooperated with them and I made possible their activities. I maintained contacts both with imperialist groups directly, and also through Zionist organizations and through the instrumentality of the Freemasons.

Prosecutor: You and the entire anti-State center'

Accused: Yes.

In the part of Slansky's deposition referring to the "Aims of the Conspiracy" we find the following passage:

Accused: ... I knew that in the case of seizing power it would be necessary to get rid of Klement Gottwald. I admit that I left with the President of the Republic as his doctor the Freemason Dr. Haskovec and I hid from the President of the Republic the fact that Haskovec was an enemy. I could use Haskovec to eliminate the President in the interest of my seizing power.

Slansky admits that he assisted Haskovec insofar as the latter did not treat the President of the Republic as it was necessary and that he worked towards the shortening of the President's life. From the deposition of Evzen (Eugene) LobI, Deputy Minister of Foreign Trade, on November 23, 1952:

Presiding Judge: Were you also a member of a Freemasons' Lodge'

Accused Lobl: Yes. In 1930 I became a member of the Harmonia Masonic Lodge in Bratislava. There I came openly¡ forward against the progressive movement....

From the Prosecutor's concluding speech made on November 26, 1952: (Slansky) had already made preparations to destroy the life of the beloved leader of the people. As attending physician of President Gottwald he kept Dr. Haskovec, a Freemason, a collaborationist, an enemy! He admits: "I speculated that in case of seizing power it would be necessary to get rid of Klement Gottwald! . . . " I could use Dr. Haskovec to eliminate Klement Gottwald in the interest of full seizure of power," admits SIansky and indeed there can be no doubt about that. . . .

Comment by Dr. P. Korbel: As Grand Secretary of the National Grand Lodge of Czechoslovakia from 1945 to April 1949 and as Chief of the Legal and Legislative

â&#x20AC;˘


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

49c

Division of the Government Presidium who attended all Cabinet meetings and had access to the records of the meetings of the Government Presidium consisting of the Prime Minister and his deputies, I know that there is no truth whatever in the allegations made by the indictment, the public prosecutor and the presiding judge or in the "confessions" of the main defendant, Rudolf Slansky. In the reconstruction of the Grand Lodge we were most anxious to observe all laws and regulations and to be loyal to the Government of Czechoslovakia, in accordance with the Ancient Charges. We did not wish to distinguish between members of the Craft who were members of any political party or 11on-partisans and we only required them to be faithful and loyal to the rules and regulations of our Order and its aims and purposes and to be loyal and law-abiding citizens. Knowing that the Communist Party was the strongest political party, that the Prime Minister and the Minister of the Interior under whose direction and jurisdiction all associations and societies and their activities had to be formed and carried out we were naturally desirous of obtaining the necessary approval of the authorities concerned. It was given in 1947 by the Communist Minister of the Interior on the basis of an authorization by the Government Presidium headed by the Prime Minister. Vancura was a loyal citizen and a sincere Mason. He never dreamed of engaging in anti-State activities. His relations with Slansky as Central Secretary of the Party were quite innocent and before leaving for England in the spring of 1948 he wanted to make sure whether further existence and activities of our Grand Lodge would be permitted. This was promised and Vancura refers to this permission in his report to Slansky and to nothing else. It is quite obvious that the charges against Slansky and Vancura and Machon are "framed" and quite ridiculous. The same applies to Dr. Haskovec who was by no means Gottwald's only physician. Besides, there is Mrs. Gottwald, Gottwald's son-in-law, National Defense Minister Dr. A. Cepicka and his wife Marta, Gottwald's daughter, who are in constant contact with Gottwald and would certainly not have left the choice of Gottwald's doctor and the methods of his treatment in the hands of Rudolf Slansky.

FREEMASONRY IN KOREA

In the early years of the twentieth century the foreign population of Korea (predominantly American, British and Canadian) was, for the most part, limited to three general groups-merchants, miners and missionaries. Among this foreign population were a number of the members of the Masonic Order. It is not definitely known who were the instigators of the movement to establish an independent Masonic Lodge in Korea, but we do know that several meetings were held in Seoul during late 1907 and carly 1908, at which steps were taken to prepare a petition to the Grand Lodge of Scotland. At one of these meetings, held in the home of Dr. William B. Scranton, a medical missionary,. it was suggested that the petition be given to Brother Walter H. Aldridge, who was connected with one of the large mining firms, and have him take it to the mines on his next trip and there secure signatures from Brethren employed


50c

THE MASONIC WORLD

195::l

by his company. How well Brother Aldridge succeeded is shown by the faet that over one-third of the signers of the petition were mining men. The petition as finally prepared contained the signatures of twenty-four Master Masons. Brother Frank E. C. Williams, a missionary, had attended several of the preliminary meetings and had planned to be one of the signers, but duties and travel prohibited his so doing, much to his regret. The signed Petition was forwarded to Hiogo and Osaka Lodge in Kobe, Japan, where it received the support and endorsement of six Past Masters and the Senior and Junior Wardens of that Lodge. The favourable endorsement and recommendation of Right Worshipful Brother George W. 'iVhymark, District Deputy Grand Master, E.C. (Japan) was also affixed and the Petition was forwarded to the Grand Lodge of Scotland with the request that a Charter be granted to the Seoul Brethren. The Grand Lodge considered the Petition with favour and on 5th November 1908 issued a Charter for the new Lodge. The name which had been recommended for the new Lodge was Han Yang, one of .the ancient Korean names for the capital city now known as Seoul. The Grand Lodge assigned the number 1048 to the new Lodge. It was not until 29th May 1909 that the new Lodge was opened and consecrated. At this meeting the Founder Members signed the Charter. The Installing Officer was Brother John Thomas Griffin, widely known as "The Father of Masonry in Japan." Brother Griffin was a raw silk merchant in Yokohama, Japan and made frequent trips to Korea and had taken an active interest in the new Lodge from the first. He held many high Masonic honours. On the opening evening of the Han Yang Lodge Brother Griffin applied for membership in the new body. Difference of opinion exists as to the exact place the first meeting was held. Some remember it to have been in a room in the Sontag Hotel, others recollect it as having been in a room on the second floor of a building owned by Brother James Henry Morris. These buildings were located almost directly opposite each other on Legation Street, now called by the Korean name "Chung Dong." Since Brother Morris was not initiated into the Lodge until late in 1909, it would appear that the benefit of the doubt might be toward the hotel. Suffice it to say that the opening communication was held 011 Legation Street. It is definitely known that the Lodge did meet in the room in Brother Morris' building for some time. The Lodge finally moved to the building of the Seoul Club, located but a few hundred feet along Legation Street in a compound adjacent to the U.S. Consulate compound. Here it occupied a small room on the second floor.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

51c

The Office-bearers installed at the opening of the new Lodge were Alexander S. Hamilton, Right 'Vorshipful Master; Ernest T. Bethell, Depute Master; David "Y. Deshler, Substitute Master; George R. Frampton, Senior Warden and David E. Hahn as Junior 'Varden. Dr. W. B. Scranton was the first Secretary and .Albert Goshalk was named Treasurer. After the first meeting the Lodge recessed for the summer. Records indicate some meetings were held during the fall of 1909 and at a meeting held on 4th December, we find records showing that Brother Frank E. C. ""Villiams and Brother 'Villiam R. Harvey were accepted as members by affiliation. The first candidate ,to receive a Degree in the new Lodge was Brother James Henry Morris, who was initiated on 11th December 1909, closely followed by Brother Henry G. English, who received the First Degree on 8th January 1910. Brother Morris took a very active part in the work of the Lodge and served for many years as its Treasurer. Although the Lodge now had a membership of over thirty, great difficulties were experienced at times in having sufficient Brethren present to properly open Communications. Many of the members were still located at points far removed from Seoul. Tales are told of the opening of meetings being delayed until messengers could locate some of the resident members and get them to the Lodge room. In 1911 Brother Griffin, whose interest in the Lodge was as active as ever, secured a special Dispensation from the Grand Lodge to hold a series of meetings at one of the mines in the northern part of the country. He came to Seoul and, accompanied by Brother W. B. Scranton, who was Master that year, journeyed to the Taracol Mine located near the town of Pukchin in Pyongyang-pukdo Province. Brother Harry J. Evans,who was employed at the mine, relates how the dining hall at the mine camp was transformed into a temporary Lodge room on the evenings when meetings were held. Several Brethren located at the mine assisted Brother Griffin and Scranton in conferring the Degrees on a class of ten candidates. Brothers Griffin and Scranton remained at the mine camp for over a month so that the proper time might elapse between the various Degrees. So far as is known, this was the only time meetings of the Lodge were held outside of Seoul. While the membership increased in numbers, difficulties in travel still made the attendance at meetings in Seoul small. As the years passed, the foreign population in and near Seoul increased. Many joined the Lodge an~ less difficulties were experienced in having sufficient members present at meetings. In early spring of 1925 a disastrous fire practically destroyed the Seoul Club building. The Lodge lost heavily in properties but the \yorst loss was that of the original Charter and many records. A


52c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

cable ,vas dispatched to the Grand Lodge explaining the situation and a reply was received reading, in part "You are authorised to hold meetings with this cable as your Charter." During the time required to rebuild the Seoul Club building, the Lodge met in a room in the "go-down" (warehouse) belonging to Brother A. vv. Taylor. The exact location of this building is not known. Worshipful Brother Charles E. II. Diuitt, who was then Master, tells how the cable reposed on his desk as the authority for the meeting, until the duplicate Charter which the Grand Lodge issued, could be received. While the Seoul Club was being rebuilt, the Lodge entered into an agreement with the Club whereby the Lodge advanced certain sums of money and in return changes were made in the rebuilding plans. A new meeting room, about forty by eighty feet, was constructed across the entire front of the second floor. Preparation and retiring rooms as well as a washroom and a complete kitchen were provided for the use of th~ Lodge. The Lodge was also granted a lease in perpetuity to the entire second floor of the building. The new rooms ,vere much larger than the quarters prior to the fire. Japanese laws prohibited any forms of secret societies. To overcome this difficulty, the Lodge operated ostensibly as a club. Under the law, the secret police were empowered to demand admittance to ali.y meetings but no record shows that they ever enforced this power. There was evidence, however, that the Lodge rooms had been searched on several occasions. On one visit the police tried to force the lock on a closet containing regalia, tools, etc., but were not able to force the lock, so tried a second time by placing a ladder outside the building and trying to force a window entering the closet, unsuccessfully. This hostility, and a definite threat by the Japanese gendarmes to break into any meetings, caused the Lodge to recess a few months earlier than usual in the spring of 1940. Discussions were held as to the best manner in which to protect the Lodge properties and the matter was left to the Master, Senior Warden, Secretary, Treasurer and Brother C. II. Crowe. Brother Thomas Hobbs, then Secretary, kept the Charter, records and other valuable papers in a safe in his office. It was finally decided that this safe would be taken to the home of Brother Crowe, a retired miner, who had made up his mind to remain in Seoul with his Korean wife, rather than leave the country as most of the foreign population were then doing. Another retired miner, Brother A. MacFarlane, who lived with his Japanese wife in Sosha, a village between Seoul and Inchon, also decided to remain. As he was Treasurer of the Lodge, he took all the financial records to his home. A large box was prepared containing the office-bearers' regalia,


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

53c

working tools, certain small books and articles belonging to the Lodge and this was taken to the U.S. Consulate, the Senior Vvarden, Brother Gaylord Marsh, being the U.S. Consul General at the time. Some of the .larger items of furniture, etc., were stored in the attic of the home of Worshipful Anders Kristen Jensen, the Master. With the departure of Brother Hobbs from Seoul in May 1941, only three members remained in Korea, Brothers Crowe, Marsh and MacFarlane. The Lodge was closed. Under the terms of the Armistice with the Japanese of 15th August 1945, troops of the U.S. Army occupied that part of Korea south of the thirty-eighth parallel. The first troops reached Seoul on 12th September 1945, and before October had passed a Masonic Club had been formed among members of the Craft serving with the troops. Meetings were held at various places, the Throne Room in the CapitOl; the auditorium of the Seoul City Hall; in the Chosen Hotel and other places. These meetings ,vere largely attended, at times over' 200 Brethren attending. In November 1945 Brother Frank E. C. Williams returned to Korea and soon was in contact with the members of the Masonic Club. They expressed great interest in Han Yang Lodge and wished that it could be re-opened. Bl;other W'illiams communicated with the Grand Lodge in Edinburgh, asking under what conditions it would be possible to re-open and received a cable through the British Consulate advising him that if three members of Han Yang Lodge were present, they might accept five other Master Masons from the Masonic Club and re-open the Lodge. vVorshipful Brother Jensen, who had been Master at the time the Lodge was obliged to close in 1940, returned soon after Brother \iVilliams received the reply, but it was not until several months later that Brother Vernon A. Gulick returned, making the three members necessary under the Grand Lodge instructions. L~te in June 1946, permission was obtained from the Military Government, which had requisitioned the Seoul Club building for military use, to use the Han Yang Lodge room for a meeting. At this meeting Brothers Gulick, Jensen and Williams, all Past Masters, accepted the required members as directed by the Grand Lodge and Han Yang Lodge was again opened in full form. Prior to the meeting Brother 'Williams had secured the box which had been stored at the U.S. Consulate and also obtained the safe from the home of Brother Crowe. Brother Lt.-Col. King went to Brother MacFarlane's home at Sosha and obtained the records stored there. Both of these Brothers had died during the war years but their widows were faithful to the trust which had been imposed on them and safely cared for the Lodge property. Some of the


54c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

furniture which had been stored in Brother Jensen's home had been stolen or lost, but fortunately some very important pieces necessary for use in the Lodge were still there. At the first meeting no business was transacted except to get the Lodge reorganized, nominate office-bearers, etc., and then the reopened Lodge recessed until fall. In the fall, regular meetings were held. The newly elected office-bearers were installed, 'Vorshipful Brother Jensen acting as Installing Officer, Brother Vernon A. Gulick was installed as Master, Lt.-Col. John P. King as Senior Warden and Brother Harold E. Dagley as Junior vVarden. The other officebearers were all members of the armed forces. Starting with the first meeting of the Lodge, the desk of the Secretary was piled high with applications for both affiliation and also for initiation. Attendances at the meetings were very large, at times beyond the seating capacity of the room, some Brethren having to stand during the entire evening. 楼,T ork was carried on .in full form and classes were given their degrees at practically every meeting. At one time candidates were advised that their names could not be reached for at least a year, although meetings were held weekly. By midsummer 1947 the Military Government released the Seoul Club building and starting that fall the Lodge again re-occupied their regular rooms路 in that building. The ''leather during the winter of 1947-1948 was very severe. The only means of heating the Lodge room was one small open fireplace at the west end of the room. It was not uncommon to see the Brethren present sitting with their heavy overcoats or parkas on and their hands deep in the pockets. 'l.'he electrical supply was also very uncertain due to breakdowns in transmission equipment and not infrequently the light would fade out, usually at some important moment during the ceremonies and the Master would request the Brethren on the sidelines to illuminate the room by means of their pocket flashlights. In spite of all these adverse conditions, the Lodge continued to carryon regularly. Meetings still were held weekly. During 1947 the complexion of the Lodge started to change. Many civilians were arriving in Korea to take places with the Government and many of the armed force were returning home. These civilians made their presence felt not alone in the applications for initiation but also in those desiring to affiliate with the Lodge. By 1948 all offiees of the Lodge were filled with civilians with two exceptions. Full classes continued to receive their Degrees and attendance remained high. During the summer of 1949 the Lodge redecorated their entire quarters. The meeting room was repainted, floors scraped and new electrical fixtures installed. Among these was a light placed over the altar which was controlled by a rheostat allowing it to be dimmed or give a very bright light as required during the degree work. New blue


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

55c

silk drapes, with inner light-coloured curtains, were placed at all the Lodge room windows. The outer blue curtains had a valance on which was embroidered the square and compass. Over $2,000.00 U.S. and several million \Von (local currency) were expended and when completed the rooms compared favourably with many homeland Lodge rooms. . 'Vork continued regularly during the 1949-1950 season. In Decem.ber 1949 Brother Charles K. Bernheisel was elected as Master. He was installed by W orshipful Brother Jensen. The last meeting of the season, a combination supper for members and Masonic guests, as well as the ceremony of the Third Degree, was held on 23rd May 1950. The Lodge then recessed for the summer and \Vorshipful Brother Bernheiscl left shortly thereafter for leave in the States. On 25th June 1950 disaster struck both the Republic of Korea and Han Yang Lodge for on that day the forces of communist North Korea invaded the Republic. One of the first places to fall to the invaders was the city of Kaesong, where the communists captured Worshipful Brother Jensen, who had gone there only the day previous on business connected with his mission. The same morning the' Secretary of the Lodge, Brother George Hopkinson was stricken with poliomyelitis and removed to the hospital. The next forty-eight hours were hectic indeed. On Monday, the 26th, the American Ambassador ordered the evacuation of all dependent women and children. This order included the wife and twoyear old son of Brother Hopkinson. Attempts were made by some members of the Lodge to reach Brother Hopkinson's home on Monday afternoon to rescue any Lodge records which he might have pad there, but on arrival they. found that the house had already been thoroughly looted and nothing was found except a few receipted bills and like papers of no value. These members then went to the house occupied by R. W. M. Bernheisel, where it was known he had the Lodge Charter and other Masonic records in a locked closet. Attempts to force the closet door failed and thus the Charter and all records of the Lodge were lost. On Tuesday morning, 27th June 1950, all remaining personnel of the American Mission to Korea were evacuated by air from the Kimpo Airport. As many of the Han Yang members were waiting for their planes, word was received that Brother Hopkinson had passed away at 7 o'clock. He was buried in a Korean Christian cemetery just路 outside Seoul. Thus, for the second time, Han Yang Lodge was obliged to close by reason of war. Right Worshipful M. Bernhcisel was recalled to duty with the U.S. Army in August 1950. He returned to Seoul within a few days after that city had been re-occupied by United Nations forces.


56c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

In September 1950, just prior to his return to Korea, Brother Bernheisel met with several friends for an informal supper in Washington. Among those present were members of the lIan Yang Lodge who had reached home. The conversation naturally turned to the future of the Lodge and Brother Bernheisel requested Brother . W. Lloyd Heath, one of those present, to assume the duties of Secretary and see what could be done to contact other members of the Lodge. Since all records had been lost, this was a rather hard assignment. However, through personal contacts, assistance of other Brethren and diverse means, many were contacted. The Grand Secretary furnished a list of the names of the Han Yang membershi p as shown by his files, but this list had no addresses. Out of the 247 names listed, it has been possible to contact over 150 Brethren. Early in 1952 it became apparent that steps would have to be taken by the Lodge to adopt some formal resolutions and approve certain forms required by banks and other institutions in connection with Lodge funds. A special dispensation was obtained from the Grand Lodge and an emergency business meeting of the Lodge was held in 'Vashington, D.C., on 1st July 1952. Almost thirty members attended and the necessary actions taken. Brother Bernheisel had by this time returned from Korea and presided. As was the case in 1945, no sooner had the United Nations armed forces entered Korea, than Masonic Clubs sprang up in Seoul, Pusan, Taeue and at the Kimpo Airport. The Pusan Masonic Club, of which the Depute Master of Han Yang Lodge, Brother Lt.-Col. Joseph C. Matthews, Jr., is an active member, have been very active. They have assumed the sponsorship of a hospital for children and an orphanage. In keeping with the practice of past years the Lodge has made a contribution to assist in their work. A shipment of whole powdered milk is being arranged which will be a very welcome aid at the hospital. Many Brethren have also sent individual contributions to assist iri the work. What of the future~ Until the present military situation is cleared up and it becomes safe again for civilians to return to Korea, not much can be done. However, when that day arrives, Han Yang Lodge has a tradition to keep up. vVe WILL return, and like the legendary phrenix of old, a newer, stronger and greater HAN YANG LODGE will rise from the ashes of the past to again fake its rightful place among the active Daughter Lodges of the Grand Lodge of Scotland. May the Great Architect of the Universe in his infinite judgment will that day soon to come. So Mote It Be.-Scottish Masonic Year Boole. THAT ISRAEL MATTER

If the Arabs and Jews are confused in Palestine, the Masonic fraternity of that region is even more so ! We have not recommended


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

57c

the recognition of any of the so-called Masonic groups in that country for the very excellent reason we know so little about them. Some of our American jurisdictions, under some local pressure, have rushed out and extended recognition without going to the trouble of "tracing their genealogy," at least Masonically. Any attempt to trace genealogy would have taken the investigator to the National Grand Lodge of Egypt whose background has never been too good and which has had "schism" after "schism." The situation was one in which the newly organized Grand Lodge of Israel had, without question, invaded the jurisdiction of Scotland which had lodges in that area. And we did not like that, although it has been done in many instances before-but this time without even consulting the Grand Lodge of Scotland. A letter sent out by the Grand Lodge of Scotland clarifies some of the things disturbing American Grand Lodges; it reads: (March 23, 1953) Some three years ago the :Masonic lodges in Palestine (now Israel), under the jurisdiÂŤtion of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, petitioned permission to return their charters to Scotl::.md for the purpose of erecting a sovereign Grand Lodge of the State of Israel, the petitioning lodges being the Founder Lodges. Prior to the disturbances in 1948, the Grand Lodge of Scotland had ten chartered Lodges in Palestine, the oldest of which received its charter in 1910, - but it has become necessary to declare one of these Lodges dormant, and another has been transferred to Syria. Of the remaining eight Lodges, five are in Israel ( Jewish); one is in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jord:m (Arab); and the remaining two are meantime inactive although not declared dormant. There is at present in Israel a body designated the Gra-nd Lodge of Israel, formerly known as the National Grand Lodge of Palestine. This body was formed in 1932, being sponsored by the Grand Lodge of Egypt. The immediate problem which evolved from this petition was whether it would be advisable to sponsor a Grand Lodge of the State of Israel when there already existed a body with a similar name. The question of territorial rights naturally arose. This exercised the thoughts of the Scottish Committee concerned, who, after careful and anxious deliberation, were of the opinion that when the so-called National Grand Lodge of Palestine established itself in 1932, without reference to, or recognition by the Grand Lodge of Scotland, who had already established lodges in Palestine, this National Grand Lodge of Palestine thereby infringed existing territorial rights. At no time was recognition given to this body by the Grand Lodge of Scotland. That being so, it was held that there was sufficient justification for sponsoring a Grand Lodge whose nucleus consisted of Lodges which had developed on regular Masonic lines, and who had at all times, adhered strictly to the Ancient Landmarks of the Order. Consequently, at its Quarterly Communication on 2d August, 1951, the Grand Lodge of Scotland agreed to approve the request of the petitioning daughter lodges in Israel to return their charters so that they could initiate steps to establish a sovereign Grand Lodge of the State of Israel. This approval was given subject to the condition that the Aims and Relationship of


58e

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

the Craft, as practiced in all regular Grand Lodges would be rigidly adhered to. This decision was not arrh-ed at lightly, but only after the institution of many searching inquiries, careful investigations, and having especial regard to the fact that the Scottish Lodges in Israel had been supervised by a resident District Superintendent since their inception. The request was accordingly acceded to in the full conviction that Freemasonry in Israel would benefit from the project. If these lodges were to continue to maintain a definite connection with what must be to them a Foreign Jurisdiction, they might fear that their National loyalty would be impugned by such adherence to Scotland. I have now been advised by the organizing secretary of the Grand Lodge of Israel that the Ceremony of Erection and Consecration is to take place within the Y.M.C.A. Hall, .Terusalem, Tuesday, October 20, 1953.

And thus it would appear that the REAL Grand Lodge of Israel has not as yet been formed. An examination of the records show the following Lodges which have been chartered in Israel: Salah-ed-din No. 1071; Acre, Israel; chartered August 4, 1910; it was dormant in 1925; revived in 1930; again reported dormant in 1951. Carmel No. 1085; Haifa, Israel; chartered May 4, 1911. Star No. 1831; Ramalla, Israel; chartered Nov. 6, 1924; dormant 1935. Jordan No. 1339; Jaffa, Israel; chartered May 7, 1925. The Golden Throne No. 1344 ; Jerusalem, Israel; chartered February 4, 1926; dormant 1943; revived 1949 and given duplicate charter. King Hiram No. 1351; first located at Haifa, Israel; later moved to Tripoli, Syria. Chartered August 5, 1926. The Lodge of the Holy City No. 1372; Jerusalem, Israel; chartered Nov. 6, 1930. Rubin No. 1376; Haifa, Israel; chartered May 7, 1931. Mizpah No. 1383; Jerusalem, Israel; chartered May 4, 1933. Sharon No. 1387; Tel-Aviv, Israel; chartered Nov. 1, 1934. Aviv No. 1397; chartered November 7, 1940.

V"le have had considerable correspondence with the (irregular)路 Grand Lodge of Israel going back to 1949 when their Grand Lodge was established. For the purpose of the record we quote from Grimd Secretary Dubinsky's letter of September 6, 1949: On the 26th day of April, 1949, a general meeting of the Grand Lodge was held, and it was unanimously decided to confirm the decision taken at the previous general meeting of the Grand Lodge, namely; to change the name of the" National Grand Lodge in Palestine of A.F.& A.M." into the tt Grand Lodge of Israel of A.F.& A.M." The reasons prompting this decision are obvious. Palestine has no more a political mean路 ing and remained a geographical definition only since the day when it ceased to be a British Mandatory Territory . . . the Grand Lodge of Israel occupies exclusively its territorial jurisdiction. . . .

That the new Grand Lodge was once the Grand Lodge of Palestine is proved by their own statement; that they occupy "exclusively" the jurisdiction is not borne out by facts we have above cited.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

59c

Secretary Dubinsky wrote us June 14, 1950 stating: Our Grand Lodge was constituted in 1932, then under the name of the Grand Lodge of Palestine, by seven private regular lodges which received their charters from the National Grand Lodge of Egypt, from which we also received the Charter for the constitution of our Grand Lodge. Twenty-one lodges in several cities and towns are now working under our Constitution.

He lists the names of the Grand Lodges which have extended recognition; they are: , Argentina, Baja California, Belgium, Bogota, Bolivi~, Brazil (Grand Orient), Cali, Costa Rica, Grand Lodge of Denmark (~), Del Pacifico, Dominican Republic, Grand Lodge of France, Grand Orient of France, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Louisiana, Montana, New York, Nicaragua, North Dakota, Nuevo Leon, Panama, Parahyba, Paraguay, Pernambuco, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Potosi, Rio Grande do SuI, San Salvador, Swiss Alpina, Syria, TUl'key, Uruguay, and Venezuela-but no Egypt which sponsored it!

Recognition of such groups as Grand Orient of Brazil, Belgium, Grand Lodge of France, Grand Orient of France, Turkey and some others will not help their reputation as a Grand Lodge which wishes to live by accepted Masonic standards. And note there is no recognition from England, Ireland, Scotland or the Scandinavian countries. An examination of the list of lodges. show seven lodges in Jerusalem; eight in Tel-Aviv; three in Haifa; arid others in Tiberias, Petach Tikvah, Ramat Gan. There are twenty in all, not counting a Lodge of Instruction. On August 7, 1952, Dr. A. Shaoni, as Chairman of Foreign Relations Committee of the G.L. of Israel wrote: I was fUl'nished with a copy of the Proceedings of your Grand Lodge for 1950 . . . according to its contents your committee has not recommended to recognize the G.L. of Israel for the reasons stated therein, As to the first point stated, only three of ou?' subordinate Lodges took their origin from the Grand Lodge of Egypt. . . .

Note that Grand Secretary Dubinsky had written in 1950: Our Grand Lodge was constituted by . . . seven private lodges which roceived their charters from the Nationa.l Grand Lodge of Egypt.

And what happened to Egypt' Dr. Shaoni writes: Our Grand Lodge is among the many Grand Lodges which are not satisfied with the conduct of Egyptian' Freemasonry, as pointed out by your committee ... we have no relations with the Grand Lodge since soon after our consecration. (Note: They don't even recognize the Mother who gave them birth.)

Dr. Shaoni continues: As to the second point; our Grand Lodge was consecrated in 1932;


60c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

at that time the Grand Lodge of Scotland had no lodges working in our country* only a few years later, when our Grand Lodge was the only regular Masonic jurisdiction in the country, four private lodges, which obtained their charters from the Grand Lodge of Scotland, started to work here . . . so you may see for yourself that no invasion was made by our Grand Lodge . . . it (the country) was already occupied by a regular sovereign Masonic jurisdiction-that being our Grand Lodge.

He supplied us with a new list of jurisdictions recognized which included the American Grand Lodges: Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, 'Oklahoma. A Scottish friend writes us: 'rhe Grand Lodge of Israel is quite inaccurate when it says that the Grand Lodge of Scotland had no lodges working in Israel in 1932, and that is the crux of the position. . . . Scot1::l.l1d has regarded Israel as open territory since 1910, a period of just over 40 years. The Grand Lodge of Egypt was equally entitled to regard Israel as open territory, and so as a matter of fact was the Gralld Lodge of England, who also issued eharter . . . since neither England nor Scotland recognize the G.L. of Egypt, it followed that when three of its subordinates erected themselves into a Grand J.1odge hI 1932, this could in no way alter the position. 1'his Grand Lod.r;e could not be rccognizcd aB having been formed from an unrecognized body and the position remained that until two or three years ago. HUMOR

The following items are taken from our notebook: .Joiner. In Hutchinson, Kans., Jeweler Glenn Brown caught a bad-check artist who casually remarked that he was both a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Masons.-1'ime, December 8, 1952.

â&#x20AC;˘ To some of our membership the remarks of a Shrine member before a Great Lakes Shrine Association might, or might not be, humor. He was discussing public relations "with other Masonic bodies." In the course of his remarks, he said: We know, of course, and all other the Shrine has become the publicity out the Shrine, Masonry could not nected individual cells ... take a look did not have the Shrine.

Masonic bodies should realize that department of Masonry .â&#x20AC;˘. withbe more than a series of disconat other countries where (Masonry)

Our Shrine brother should also consider what he has to say, for if we recall, it was in his own jurisdiction, where for the last several ye'ars the advertising given Freemasonry by the Shrine was not at all helpful. At least that is what certain Grand Masters had to say * Statement is inaccurate.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

61c

about it. It is true the Shrine Hospitals are good advertising-but we hope that it was not the purpose of the Shrine when they \vere established. He mentions the effect of parades on the general public -but up until the last two or three years, one or two drunken shriners destroyed all of the effect of a colorful parade. And again, he asks us to look at other countries where there is no Shrine. Very well, we shall look at England, Ireland, and Scotland, where they won't allow the Shrine to light-and what do we find ~ Vve find that even in depression years when Freemasons and Shriners were dropping out like flies, the lodges grew in number and in member- . ship. The "individual cells" grew in the days when there was no such a thing as the Shrine. They will continue to grow, with or without it, in these coming years.

Humor: One of the trial re('ords reports in the Grand Lodge proceedings of California tells of a certain brother who had been convicted for the selling of certain goods which had included ]81 pairs of ladies Argo Knit pants. In making its report, the committee said: "We do not wish to be misunderstood as over emphasizing the gravity of that specification against the accused in' which he is charged with a 'panty raid.' Indulgence in sueh conduct by boys of college age for the purpose of displaying either skill or courage, if that be the purpose, differs somewhat from the conduct of the accused here, in that the theft of 181 pairs of ladies pants is not merely a playful prank."

This from the Virginia Masonic Herald: Editor's Note.-The report from Ruth Lodge is rather brief this month due to Brother Mason being confined to the hospital. His address is: General Hospital, Maternity Section, Norfolk, Va. The good brother has a swelling-in his foot.

Looks as if the good brother is out of his element! MASONS IN THE NEWS

Robert Bernerd Anderson, Secretary of the Navy, is a member of both Rites of Freemasonry, holding his membership in Texas, where he has for several years been connected with many large corporations and civic projects. Eric C. Murray, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Costa Rica died September 21, 1952; a complete issue of Gaceta Masonica was devoted to his life and death. He was born in London, August 21, 1888, later moved to California, and then to Costa Rica where he became identified with many civic and fraternal enterprises. His death was a great blow to Costa Rican Freemasonry..


62c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

Myron Green) restaureteur; died in Kansas City, Mo., January 21, 1953. Frank C. Jones) past imperial potentate of the Shrine and past grand commander of Knights Templar died at Houston, Texas, Nov. 15, 1952; he was born at Kirksville, Mo., April 2, 1873. R. Pearson Bowles died at New Britain, Conn., January 6, 1953; he was a native of Louisiana, Mo., born there July 13, 1893 and graduated at'the University of Missouri. He was grand high priest of the Grand Chapter of New York in 1939. Roland Blanchard Caylwod, President of the H. D. Lee Co., died J anua'ry 7, 1953 at his home in Kansas City, Mo. He was active in the wholesale grocery business. Arthur Henry Clark, publisher, died May 15, 1951 in California; he had published many important historical volumes. . General Clarence II. Danielson died May 22, 1952 and was buried at \Vest Point; he served in 1944 as commanding general of the Seventh Service Command. Clarence J. lVest) one of the foremost authorities on the paper industry, died at his home in Appleton, \Visconsin, January, 1953. F1"eemasons in South Dakota G01Jernment: The Oriental Consistory News of Yankton, S. D., gives a list of Freemasons active in their state government. The list includes Governor Sigurd Jensen, Lt. Gov. Rex A. Terry (P.G.M.), twenty state Senators (including J. T. Vucurevich (PGI-IP), and forty members of the House of Representatives. â&#x20AC;˘T. Heron Lepper, veteran librarian of the United Grand Lodge of England, died Dec. 26, 1952. He was the author of several columns dealing with Freemasonry. Thomas J. Watson, President of International Business Machines, was recently honored by the presentation of a medal as a past officer of Valley Lodge No. 109, Rochester, N. Y. Adolph Zuko1", president of Paramount Pictures was recently given his 50-year pin at a reception given him by his lodge, Centennial (N.Y.) No. 763. Brother \Vill Hays an associate of Bro. Zukor was also present. Hays was once Postmaster General. Official record was made in the minutes of the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia that President Truman had nominated, and the Senate had confirmed the nomination, Grand Master R. F. Camalier to be one of the Commissioners of the District of Columbia. Past Grand Master Roger Keith, of Massachusetts, has been made an honorary member of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi. This should smooth over matters in the recent controversy over Negro Grand Lodges, when IVI:ississippi almost broke through the traces over the action of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. Fortunately, several heads prevailed and Mississippi continued their harmonious rela-


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

63c

tions with Massachusetts. A fine solution to ,vhat threatened to be a difficult problem. U. S. Senator Z. N. Ecton attended the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Montana, in 1952, and addressed the Grand Lodge at some length. At one time he was in the official line of the Grand Lodge. The address of welcome to the Grand Lodge of Ohio, meeting in Cincinnati, was delivered by the Mayor of that City, Brother Cm'l lV. Rich. Past Grand Master Henry L. Muldrow, of Oklahoma, died November 22, 1951. His mother was the daughter of a pre-war Governor of Mississippi. He was in the party, which, in 1898, surveyed Mt. McKinley in Alaska. In 1899, he was married to a highly cultured daughter of a prominent Choctaw Indian family. One of his sons is Gen. Hem'y L. Muldrow, Jr., commanding the 45th Division U. S. Army in Korea. The Grand Orator who addressed the Grand Lodge of South Dakota, in 1952, was Supreme Court Judge Boyd Leedom. Past Grand Master Pat M. Neff, of Texas, died January 21, 1952. He was eighty years of age; he was President of Baylor University from 1932 until his retirement. Bishop Hiram A. Boaz, of the Methodist Church, served as acting Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Texas at its 1952 annual' communication. Rear Admiral John W. W. Cumming (retired), of Midday Lodge No. 132, attended the Grand Lodge of Virginia and delivered a special eulogy to the American Flag. The Virginia proceedings tell of a visit, on June 6, 1951, of P1'esident Harry S. Truman to Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22, .at which time he was presented to the Lodge by Robert S. Barrett. Ford Q. Elvidge, PGM (\Vashington), has been named as Governor of Guam. Bro. Elvidge is an officer of the Grand Imperial Council, Red Cross of Constantine. And1'ew Jackson Higgins, ship builder, died August 1, 1952. He ,vas born in Columbus, Nebraska, and during the war was identified with the construction of amphibious landing boats. Ugo Lenzi, Grand Master of the Grand Orient of Italy died suddenly of a heart attack at his home in Bologna, April 21, 1953. Thomas J. Harkins (N.C.) was elected Sovereign Grand Commander of the A.A.S.R. at a meeting of the Supreme Council in 1952; Dr. Claude Young of Kansas was made Secretary General. In the President's Cabinet are the following Freemasons: Charles E. Wilson, Secretary of Defense Douglas McKay, Secretary of the Interior Sinclair Weeks, Secretary of Commerce Robert B. Anderson, Secretary of the Navy Arthur Summerfield, Postmaster General


64c

1953

THE MASONIC WORLD

In the Supreme Court are the following: Fred M. Vinson Stanley F. Reed Hugo L. Black Harold H. Burton

Robert H. Jackson Tom C. Clark Wm. O. Douglas Sherman Minton

The M.S.A. has issued a list of members of Congress who are Freemasons. Missouri's Sen.ators, for the first time in years, are not members. Connecticut, Louisiana, Maine, Montana, New Jersey, New York,Rhode Island, Utah and Vermont are in the same boat as Missouri..Missouri has the following Freemasons in the House of Representatives: Clarence Cannon A. S. J. Carnahan Wm. C. Cole Jeffry P. Hilleson

Paul C. Jones Morgan M. Moulder Dewey Short

It is noted that the following states have no Freemasons House: Connecticut Delaware Idaho New Mexico

111

the

Rhode Island Utah ""Vest Virginia

01 the SelltilOrS, 58 are Freemasons; of the Congressmen, 223. ANTI-MASONRY

Separation of church and state in the Philippines has become a greater problem since the establishment of the Republic; the issue now has become one over the religious teaching in the schools. 'Ve have reeeived a copy of a suit file~ in the courts there against four very prominent members of the Philippine Grand Lodge by the Committee on Catholic Action in the Philippines and the Archdiocese Union of Holy Name Societies. The charge states: The respondents, Cecilio Putong, Benito Pangilinan, and Venancio Trinidad are members of the Grand Lodge of F. A. A. M. of the Philippines, whieh passed a resolution creating a special committee for the elimination of religious instruction in public schools (the committee members named above together with Mauro Baradi as chairman); that said committee approved a resolution and submitted its recommendations for the elimination . . . which appears in the official report of said Masonic society, etc.

The report which appears in the proceedings of the Grand Lodge reads: 1. That we adhere to the provisions of the Constitution . . . that optional religious instruction in the public schools shall be maintained as authorized by law (Article XIV, Section 5). 2. That we be ever vigilant and fight all schemes to circumvent the Constitution of the Philippines on the question of religious instruction in the public schools.


1953

65c'

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

3. That on proper occasions, and if when circumstances warrant, we show the dangers and adverse effects of such instruction.

The complaint is that three members of the committee of the Grand Lodge are the three highest officials in the Department of Education and that their membership on a Grand Lodge committee constitutes a "violation of their sacred oaths of office." In reply the defendants admitted they were the committee of the Grand Lodge and that they held important .positions in the Educational Bureau of the Islands but denied any attempt to eliminate religious instruction as charged but always within the bounds of the Constitution. They admitted they were opposed to compulsory religious instruction during school hours. The reply further stated (and this was the fiy-in-the-ointment) : If the ground for which the petitioners would like to have the respondents removed from their office is their being Masons, it is respectfully submitted that being a Mason is :riot a ground for disqualification to hold public office in any free and enlightened country, much less in the Philippines.

There are elections being held in the Philippines this year; the President has issued an ordinary "that upon request of parents religious teaching may be given their children 'before, during, or after classes.'" National Christian Association: One of the most vicious groups of anti-Masons is that working under the above name out of Chicago. One of the pamphlets issued tells of a Mason who has 138 which we must admit is quite a colleetion. Then it deletes from text a quotation presumably taken from the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri 0

We know no government save our own.

Anyone who belongs to the Grand Lodge of Missouri knows that no one in the organization believes the statement to mean what they would infer. And the organization also sells such interesting (') and valuable (') pamphlets as: Does God Want You to Be a Lodge Member~ (Concordia Publishing路路 House.) A Frank Exposure of Masonry (Baptist Examiner, Russellville, Ky.).

The Concordia Publishing Co. is the official printing concern of the Missouri Synod of the Lutheran Church and路 well known for the type of misleading information which it issues as a part of its propaganda campaign against secret societies. The late Theo Graebner, author of many anti-Masonic tracts, once wrote your reviewer asking for information about Freemasonry stating that he was favorable to the institution and wished to give his people a true


66c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

statement of facts; at the same time he was issuing pamphlets attacking the fraternity. While attending a quarterly communication of the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin, January 17, 1953, in Madison, Wisconsin, the following article appeared on the first page of the Milwaukee Journal. Grand Master Hembre told us he had received a telephone call that morning from the Journal asking him what he had to say about the article-and it is substantially as stated. A new blast at the Masonic order and other men's lodges was issued by a Lutheran minister Friday night. The Rev. II. H. 路Wiechmann, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church at Freistadt, told 200 persons at a Lutheran Laymen's League meeting at Emmaus Lutheran Church, 2826 N. 23rd Street, that sincere Christians who belong to such lodges should quit and get other church members to do likewise. Missouri synod churches 'which harbor lodge members despite the synod constitution, which bans such membership, should be expelled from the synod, he said. "The thing is far more serious than we think," Mr. Wiechmann said. "If you go on living in a sin, I don't care what that sin is named,

you are going to hell. " SEES FALSE TEACHING

He charged that the Masonic order and similar lodges are religious orders which deny Christ and the holiness of the Bible, teach a false way to heaven, require un-Christian oaths and discriminate in choosing members. (Ingvald O. Hembre, Madison, grand master of all Wisconsin Masons, replied Saturday: "Masonry is not an anti-church institution, nor is Masonry a substitute for the church. We do not leave Christ out -neither do we insist that a member follow the teachings of Christ. We believe in God an'd each Mason worships God according to thedictates of his own conscience and his own background.' ')

Mr. vViechmann stood before the Missouri synod laymen's group like a prosecuting attorney, armed with documents to prove his case against the lodges. He distributed mimeographed copies of his evidence, which matched Masonic teachings paragraph by paragraph with Bible quotations. In dramatic fashion, he would read a Masonic statement, then call upon the audience to read aloud the Bible passage which refuted it. HEARERS THUNDER BACK

He read from a Masonic book: "If Freemasonry were simply a Christian institution, the Jew and the Moslem, the Brahman and the Buddhist could not conscientiously partake of its illumination. But its universality is its boast. . . . At its altar men of aU religions may kneel, to its creed disciples of every faith may subscribe."


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

67c

The audience thundered back, with a passage from Galatians: "But there be some that trouble you and would pervert the gospel of Christ. But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you other than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed."

Mr. Wiechmann read another Masonic tenet: "The religion of Masonry is cosmopolitan, universal. . . . God is equally present with the pious Hindu in the temple, the Mohammedan in the mosque and the Christian in the church."

And his audience read back, from the book of John: "All men should honor the Son, even as they honor the Father. He that honoreth not the Son, honoreth not the Father which hath sent Him." INCENSED AT PASSAGE

Mr. Wiechmann was particularly incensed at a Masonic passage which said the Masonic religion "is that general one of nature and primitive reyelation." "It is a religion of nature-sun worship, if you want to go back far enough," he said. "The Masons teach a way to heaven but not the Bible way," he said. He read again from a Masonic publication: . "Freemasonry in practice teaches that all good men, whatever their personal beliefs, have a right to hope for salvation. Each Mason can for himself work out his own conception of God and thereby achieve salvation. ' , "This, ladies and gentlemen," said Mr. Wiechmann, "answers the question .of what kind of religion it is-one in which it makes no difference what you believe. God will smile and say, 'You're nice people anyhow, and in the end I'll give you that piece of candy.' " SAYS HYMNS REWRITTEN

His audience chanted back the passage he gave them from Ephesians: "By grace are ye saved through faith, and that not by yourselves. It is the gift of God, not of works, lest any man should boast."

Masons have rewritten famous Christian hymns to delete any reference to Christ and His sacrifice; "they have taken the blood out of 'Rock of Ages,' " he said. Masonic oaths are an offense to all Christians, he charged.

'"

'"

Mr. \Viechmann said "the general points of our objection will stand for all lodges." He selected the Masonic order because it is "the granddaddy of all lodges," he said. An elderly woman asked if it were true that Masonic recruits had to drink wine out of a skull. Mr. \Viechmann said he didn't know about that.


68c

THE MASONIp WORLD

1953

One rarely hears of the Catholics who have become Protestant, although broad headlines blare forth the converts to the Roman Catholic Church. In the Diocesan (Kansas City, Missouri) Bulletin of the Episcopal Church for January, 1953, we learn In the year 1952, 29 adults were received from the Roman Catholic Church in this Diocese.

REGULAR, mREGULAR AND CLANDESTINE

There seems to be a general misunderstanding as to the terms: regular, irregular, and clandestine. In a recent issue of the Iowa Masonic Bulletin, usually noted for its accuracy appears the following: Q. Who are "clandestine" Masons ~ A. Recently we have had occasion to answer questions involving" clandestine" Masons. The limitations in regard to "clandestine" Masons and "clandestine" lodges are specific and familiar to all Master Masons. But who are "clandestine" Masons ~ Regular lodges are set forth in publications where all interested Masons may refer to them. Lodges not so listed are clandestine and hence an individual claiming to be a member of a lodge not so listed is a clandestine Mason.

We feel sure that the answer to this inquiry is wrong. We take it that the "publications where all interested Freemasons may refer to them" means the Directory of Masonic Lodges. If so, there are a lot of good Grand Lodges which would be regarded as clandestine -all the South American countries, Central America, and Mexico. Nor would we find Switzerland, Iceland, Finland and many others. My Grand Lodge recognizes the Grand Lodges of Mexico and Central America; they are not clandestine bodies, or Missouri would never have considered recognition. England, Ireland, Scotland and the Canadian gronps do not recognize these grorips as a rule, yet that does not make them in any way clandestine. A clandestine lodge is one which meets secretly, without authority of a Grand Lodge and which is usually in competition with some regular Masonic group. A fine example of this was the McBaine Thompson group brought before the Federal Courts a few years ago. There are numerous instances on the 'Vest Coast where clandestine groups operate. There is no discussion as to what constitutes a regular Masonic group; it is one whose genealogy is clear and undisputed and which complies with the generally accepted landmarks-whatever they are -of Freemasonry. The British Isles, Canada, Australia, and the American groups would be accepted without question. Now an irregular lodge or group is one which has never been extended general recognition because of some slight failure to comply with路 the generally recognized standards. The Scandinavian groups, for many years, in this country, were regarded as irregular because of their limitation of members to the Christian religion.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

69c

Once recognized-although they did not change their· requirementsthey became regular. Certain Grand Lodges of the British Isles do not recognize the Grand Orient of Italy; there is no doubt as to its genealogy but the British group believes there are certain standards which do not agree with the English customs. A Grand Lodge cannot be irregular and clandestine at the same time. It is one or the other. To most of us the Grand Orient of Brazil is irregular-just as irregular as it can be, but it is recognized by England and we cannot regard it as clandestine.

Negro Grand Lodge gives to Polio Fund: A news dispatch in the Marshall (Mo.) Daily Democrat News of January 29, 1953, announces the gift of $250 to the local Polio Drive made by Dr. W. H. Madison, head of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Missouri. The dispatch said the Missouri branch had 6,000 members. EISENHOWER TAKES "OATH" ON MASONIC BIBLE

We quote from a news dispatch taken from the St. Louis Post Dispatch at the time of the Eisenhower inauguration. We believe it to be of historical value: (12-29-1952) The Bible on which President-elect Eisenhower will place his hand while he takes the oath of office at the January 20 inauguration was pressed into service at the last moment for the April 30, 1789, inauguration of George· vVashington, in downtown Manhattan, as the first President of the United States. According to officers of St. John's Lodge, Free & Accepted Masons, to which the Bible belongs, Washington was crossing the Hudson river that day, en route to the ceremony, when an aide realized that a Bible would be required and that none had been brought along. 'The aide then sent a messenger to a downtown tavern, where St. John's Lodge regularly held its meetings, and borrowed the lodge Bible-a large volume that had been printed in England in 1767. The inauguration proceeded on the balcony of a United States building on the site where the United States Sub-Treasury building now stands. Shortly afterward, the lodge Bible lost its immediate availability. On Washington's deatp, the members of the lodge realized that they possessed an item of great historical importance. They created a complicated set of regulations regarding the use, care and lending of the volume which remain in effect now. In order for the Bible to be moved from the vault where it is kept on the of the Masonic Temple at and 23rd Street, the permission of the membership must be obtained by a vote, and an honor guard of three Masons must accompany it. wherever it goes.


70c路

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

The regulations go far in explaining why the Bible seldom leaves its vault. It has been used in a few highly important Masonic ceremonies, and in only one other presidential inauguration since that April day in 1789. Warren G. Harding was the only other president to use the Bible at an inauguration, and that was on March 4, 1921. Both Washington and Harding \'lere Masons. Gen. Eisenho'wer is not. Lodge officers are at a loss to explain why the Bible was not used in the inauguration of President Truman-by far the most active Mason ever to become President. One official explained that a request for or offer of use of the Bible involved must be so delicately balanced with a vote of the membership, giving permission for its usc, that few are made. He declined to discuss the nature of the negotiations involved in President-elect Eisenhower's planned use of the Bible, which the membership approved with a vote at a meeting on Thursday. MISSOURIANA

In a History of American Un1:on Lodge No.1, Marietta, Ohio, is an account of the life of Henry Drescher, of Palmyra, Missouri. The article says: Henry Drescher, Palmyra, Missouri, (honorary member). Elected October 11, 1875, as honorary member. On September 13, 1875, Brother Moses Smith moved that Brother Drescher, Past Master of Palmyra Lodge No. 18, of Palmyra, Missouri, be made an honorary member. Brother Smith explained that Brother Drescher had rendered him valuable assistance in time of need, having nursed him while sick during the Civil War. Before taking action, the Lodge instructed the Secretary to write the Palmyra Lodge No. 18, and determine the present standing of Brother Drescher. On the receipt of a favorable report, Brother Drescher was elected an honorary member on October 11, 1875.

'" Purchase parking site: Temples located in business districts of the larger cities are confronted with the problem of parking which materially affects attendance. This question has disturbed the minds of those bodies meeting in the great St. Louis Temple, but which may be helped according to a recent ne\vs dispatch announcing the purchase recently of a lot at 3672 Olive with a frontage of 80 feet and extending back to an allcy; it also acquired the southeast corner of Olive and Spring and will raze the building adding parking space of 72 feet on Olive and extending along Spring Avenue to the alley. In Kansas City the Masonic Temple at 9th and Harrison will be helped by the establishment of a park on the block west of the Temple site. Temple Associations are learning that when erecting buildings,


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

71c

without taking into account parking space, is like building a bridge with no approaches.

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

DISCOVERY OF RALLS PAPERS

One of the most valuable discoveries of historical papers dealing with the Mexican War and Missourians are the John Ralls papers recently added to the Masonic Collection in the Jackson County Library in Independence, Missouri, announcement of which was made at the semi-annual meeting of the Missouri Lodge of Research in Sedalia in April, 1953. These papers were secured through the timely intervention of Ford Q. Elvidge of Washington, a Past Grand Master of that state and the newly appointed Governor of Guam. Our columns are not available to make comment on the character of these papers, but we publish them in full from photostat copies furnished us by George C. Marquis who was instrumental in securing them. It will be recalled that Colonel John Ralls was Grand Master of Missouri in 1847 and accompanied a regiment of Missouri Militia (or Volunteers) to Mexico. As Grand Master he issued a Dispensation for Missouri Military Lodge to brethren who were members of that regiment. The first paper is his Commission as District Deputy Grand Master, issued at the order of John F. Houston, Grand Master (1864) . SIT LUX, ET LUX FUIT

OFFICE OF THE GRAND MASTER, Grand Lodge of Missouri, May 27, A..L. 5864. To All to Whom these Presents Shall Come, GREETING: KNEW YE, That the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Masons of Missouri, having confidence in the moral worth and masonic skill of Right Worshipful John Ralls do hereby constitute and appoint him a D. D. Grand Master for the fourth Masonic District, composed of the Counties of Boone, Callaway, L1.udrain, Monroe, Ralls, Pike, Montgomery, Warren, Lincoln, and St. Charles. \ And you, the said Rt. W. John Ralls are hereby required to discharge the duties of your office according to the Report of a Special Committee, as printed on page 50 of the Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri for 1862, and also of the Resolutions and By-Laws which the Grand Lodge may enact, from time to time, for the Government of the Craft in this jurisdiction. And you are further required to make an annual report to the Grand Master, thirty days prior to the meeting of the Grand Lodge. This commission to remain in force until the next annual communication of the Grand Lodge, unless sooner recalled by the Grand Master. (SEAL) John F. Houston, Attest Grand Master

Here is Ralls' commission as Captain in the Black Hawk War:


72c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

THE GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI. TO ALL WHO SHALL SEE THESE PRESENTS-GREETING: KNOW YE THAT, John Ralls having on the 6th day of June 1832, been duly elected to fill the office of Captain in the 5th Company of the 2nd Regiment of volunteers, from the 3rd Division: I DO HEREBY Commission him Captain of the said Company for six months, unless sooner discharged. HE IS THEREFORE, carefully and diligently to discharge the duty of Captain, by doing and performing all manner of things th'ereunto belonging. And I do strictly charge and require all Officers and Soldiers under his command, to be obedient to his orders, as Captain, as aforesaid; and he is to observe and follow such orders and路 directions from time to time, as he shall receive from me or the future Governor of the State of Missouri, or other superior officers set over him according to law, and rules and discipline of war. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the Great Seal of the State aforesaid to be affixed. Done at the City of Jefferson, the 2nd day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, of the Independence of the United States the fifty sixth, and of the State of Missouri the twelfth. By the Governor. John Miller. (SEAL) John C. Edwards, Secretary of State. (Reverse) State of MiSSOuri} Sct County of Ralls . (Notation on back reads) John Ralls Comm. I, John Ralls, Capt. in the time do hereby solemnly swear that I of the" Black Hawk" war will support the Constitution of 1832. the. United States, the Constitution of the State of Missouri, and Taken and Subscribed before me faithfully demean myself in ofon the day and date above written. fice as Captain of the fifth ComJ ames Carson, a Justice of the pany, Second Regiment. of VolunPeace, in and for the County of teers from the third Division. Ralls, Township of Spencer & Given under my hand at New LonState of Missouri, given under my don, This 12th day of July in the hand this day and date above year of our Lord 1832. writen. John Ralls.

This Commission names him as Aide-de-Camp in 1837: LILBURN' W. BOGGS GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI TO ALL WHO SHALL SEE THESE PRESENTS-GREETING: KNOW YE THAT, John Ralls, having been duly appointed Aid-deCamp, to the Commander-in-Chief, in the thirteenth Division M. M., I do hereby commission him Aid-de-Camp accordingly, and do a.uthorize and empower him to discharge the duties of sajd office according to law. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the Great Seal of the State of Missouri to be affixed, at the City of Jefferson, this thirtieth da.y of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, of the Independence of


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

73c

the United States the sixty-second, and of this State the eighteenth. (SEAL) Lilburn W. Boggs By the Governor: Peter G. Glover, Secretary of State. (Reverse) . State of Missouri } S t County of Ralls c. I, John Ralls, do solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the United States, the Constitution of the State of Missouri, and faithfully demean myself in office as Aid de Camp to the Commander in Chief in the thirteenth D~vision of Missouri Militia. Given under my hand this 26th day of September A. D. 1837. John Ralls. Sworn and subscribed to before me this 26th day of September A. D. 1837. William S. Lofland, Justice of the Peace.

And this paper supplies us with complete information concerning the Ralls Guards: The Company roll of the "Ralls Guards" of mounted volunteers raised under the requisition of the United States, on the State of Missouri, on the 31st day of March A. D. 1847, to serve during the war with Mexico, unless sooner discharged, on the 8th day of May 1847, to rendezvous at Independence, Mo.. (Note: Names in italics have Officers Named Capt. Wm. S. Lofland 1st Lieut. Dillard P. Fike (') 2d" John K. Hawkins (~) 2d" Wm. E. Jones

Privates Names Griffin Brizendine Thomas Elder Abraham Buford John E. P. Ledford John (?) John S. Ballard Isaac Sansbury McKinney Isaac Harlinger James Colvin James Organ Jacob N. Rwe Daniel Smith William Lambrith Robert Ashurst

been crossed out of report.) Non-Commissioned Officers 1 Richd. P. Samuel Or. Sgt. 2 Jno. R. Snell 2d Sgt. 3 H. C. McKnight 3d Sgt. 4 Chas. B. Jones 4th Sgt. Christopher W. Victor 1st Cpl. Tarton Smith 1st Cpl. Ed. D. Hyde 2d Cpl. 3d Cpl. George W. Ragan C. W. Victor 4th Cpl. Blacksmith Solomon Brown, 1 2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14

Privates Names Rusl. C. Gridley William Briggs Absalom Rwe W m. H. Peake Craig Ashurst Presley Organ Alfeus Payne J eremiah Johnson James Davison George F. Lyle W. H. Coontz H. H. Howell William H. Fenner Grandison D. Hawkins

5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13

15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28


74c

1953

THE MASONIC WORLD

Privates Continued .Tames H. Hawkins Emphrey .T. Hildreth Marcus Oury William W. Allison Edwin Radcliff Marshal M. Turley .Tames C. Ketchum Stephen Richards .T. B. Vardeman .Tames L. Oldham George. W. Colvin Augustus W. T. Steel Wm. R. Benn William Linsey (Daniel) H. E. McCune .Tames H. Shell James Mosley William G. Daulton William .T. Robison

Privates Continued William Curts Henry Snider (bellyache) Sterling T. Coalter William T. Busard Duval D. Phillips William E. Higgins William Fuqua .Tohn .T. Elgin H. G. Cipson (bellyache) William T. Cleaver Wilson A. Purdom Daniel Shriford Isaac D. Snedecor Henry Sarver William L. Richards .Tefferson A. Mayhall Gustavus F. Shepherd Henry Boles

29

30 31 32

33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 .47

48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

Privates Conti1llued Timothy S. Caldwell (father refuses) James B. Lur.as Harrison P. Haley W. K. Burbridge Samuel Kennedy .T. F . .Tamison C. 1. Austin Encampment Bevin Stephen C. Jones .Tames McKenney Thomas Lindsey (sick) John W. Edwards (sick) W. C. Goodnick A..T. Pickins (sick) Thomas B. Gaines Richard S. Smither Hiram T. Goss Harry Snider Carmil Hobson .Tohn R. Lawrence Privates Continued Thomas F. Smiley John G. Sinklear William M. Markle .Tohn B. Paris, .Tr. Samuel B. Downing Maston W. Wylie Thomas Butler Levi 'rhomas Archer Lewis Reynolds .Tohn W. Sneed William Howard Luke Whitamore Alexander McGaw Thomas Ely Cincinnatus True Michael Rockstrong Ulyses Norton David Blue Tho. A. Spalding

Privates Contiwued 'rhomas .T. Howard Stephen G. Myers .Tohn Shuck Sterling F. Coulter Corwin Ra,dcliff

99 100 101 102

(Endorsed on the back is the following) Company roll Capt. Lofland's Com. Mounted Volunteers

64 65

66 67

68

69 70 71

72 73

74 75

76 77 78

79

80 81 82 83 84 85

86 87

88

89 90

91 92 93 94 95

96 97

98


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

75c

MEMORIES OF THE MASONIC COLLEGE

,The publication in the October 3, 1952, issue of the Kansas City Times of an old drawing of the Masonic College at Lexington, Missonri, brings to our attention the work of the Grand Lodge of Missonri in attempting to implant education in the State of Missouri more than a century ago.

MaSonic College, MarUm. CO'URtty, Mo.

Beneath the drawing is this caption: The old Masonic College at Lexington, Missouri, depicted here as an old print showed it not long after the Civil War, was the center of a furious three-day battle in that war. One interesting tale which grew out of that fight is told below-the unusual story of the sWord which Col. James A. Mulligan, commander of .the Union forces, offered to surrender to General Sterling Price of the Confederacy.

We shall not quote the story which accompanied the article for it is of no Masonic value, but the picture brings. to our attention a story of the old college as it once existed at Philadelphia, Missonri. We will wager that you cannot locate Philadelphia on a Missouri map.


76c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

The story is contained in the Life of Frederick Kemper while he attended as a student the old Marion College, which later became the Masonic College. Dr. Kemper later removed to Boonville, Missouri, where he established a school, now Kemper Military School. We quote the sections of the voiume which have to do with the college life and its later history : "Sunday, October 2, 1836, finds them on the steamer Quincy, bound for Marion City, Missouri.· This was their landing in Marion County, nearest to Palmyra, the county-seat, their next objective point. They landed the same day, and on the next day, Monday, walked to Palmyra. On Wednesday, he walked to Marion City and back to Palmyra for dinner. In the afternoon he went to Marion City Col!lege and he and William Kemper were settled as students of that institution, of which we shall give some account in the succeeding chapter. MARION COLLEGE

The Presbyterian Church in Missouri has been unfortunate in the most of its college enterprises . • • it is true that there are in Missouri the graves of no less than three Presbyterian colleges-the City University in St. LoUis, Richmond College in Ray County, and Marion College near Palmyra. This last was the most magnificent failure of them all.••• we shall devote a chapter to an extended account of it taken from the catalogue of 1835-36. , 'The reputed richness of the soil of Marion County about nine years since, turned the tide of immigration) previously settling toward. the western side of the State of Missouri and the Boonslick country, to the north. In two or three years the county had acquired a respectable population; •.. the inhabitants were principally from Kentucky. A few of the residents of the prairi~, west of Palmyra, Marion County, applied to the legislature in the winter of 1830-31 for a charter locating a college in their midst. An ample charter was obtained, eleven acres of land were given for the site, and a schoolhouse was erected. The Rev. David Nelson, M.D., became at once both the presiding officer, cil.lled for by the charter, and the teacher of the school. , 'About this time it was determined to endow the institution with the land unoccupied around the buildings, and depend on its internal wealtll and the physical strength of the students in bringing it forth for its support. At this time the views of the friends of the college were very limited. A few thousand dollars, it was supposed, would be sufficient to purchase the necessary quantity of land, erect some plain dormitories for students; while from the benevolent it was hoped that the necessary library and philosophical apparatus could be procured. The principal aid was expected from citizens of Missouri. In this home agency Dr. Nelson was employed, while the Rev. Cyrus Nichols was commissioned to travel east and lay the wants of the institution before the benevolent. These agenciei;l, however, resulted in procuring a very small sum. A number of log cottages were erected and a small building for recitation rooms. "Another effort was now made, and through the agency of Dr. Nelson, a promise was obtained from the General Assembly's Board of Education of the church, of ten thousand dollars with which to purchase the necessary land. A misunderstanding arose between the agents of the trustees and the Board, growing out of the character of certain land purchased in consequence of which the original agreement was


1953

-GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

77<1

annulled and the whole purchase became the property of the Assembly's -Board. ,"Disappointed in their anticipated aid from the benevolent, and at the same time. aware that the reluctanee did not proceed from indifference to the project, but from the incredulity of the public mind as to the practicability of the scheme, the only remedy appeared to be in borrowing funds necessary to make the experiment. Three of the trustees remained unshaken-the Rev. David Nelson, Dr. Dav;id Clark, and William Muldrow-in April, 1833, borrowed in the city of New York, on their own responsibility, by mortgaging their property $20,000 for ten years at seven. per. cent interest. A condition of this loan was, that not less than 4,000 acres of land should be purchased in one body. With this money 470 acres only were secured in the vicinity of the college. For the body of land required by the agreement that it might be obtained at the government price, it was necessary to go a distance . of fourteen miles, where, in the midst of a beautiful and well watered prairie, 4,019 acres were purchased. For the purpose of securing timber and coal for fuel, it was subsequently deemed expedient to purchase of individuals, at a higher price, 480 acres additional. "The individuals above mentioned organized themselves into an association by the title of the 'Educational Company of the 'West,' and having, for the sake of counsel, increased their number to seven, proceeded to carry out the details of their plan. Accommodations were increased for 'students to one hundred; a boarding house and farm house were erected, and the small tract put under cultivation; while arrangements were made to erect accommodations for an equal number of students on the large tract, and to bring it under cultivation with the least possible delay. As soon as funds other than those borrowed by the gentlemen above named, began to be used, in the improvement of the farms, they, by a deed dated in October last, conveyed the title to the whole property to the Trustees of Marion College, in trust, for education purposes, securing only the right to direct the execution of the details of their plan; The method of support was to furnish each student, fifteen years of age, with twenty acres of' land, which was to be cultivated by employing equal portions for the production of corn, oats, wheat and timothy grass. Half of the products was his own, while the other half went to defray the expenses of the farm. He was to pay $50 per annum for his board, and $20 tuition. A confidence in the success of the enterprise now began to be felt, and a gradual accession of students commenced, which it was subsequently necessary to check for want of room. Recourse was had to the appointment of numerous traveling agents, in order to obtain the funds needEld to put the land into a state of cultivation and meet the expectations of the public. Though many of these agencies were voluntary, others were entered into at a salary, and resulted in bringing the institution into debt. It will not be surprising to learn that, up to the first of November, 1834, less than $6,000 had been received as donations by the trustees and education company. . , "During the last winter the three members of the board before alluded to visited the east for the purpose of conferring with prominent friends â&#x20AC;˘ ; . resulted in sec~ring a large number of friends, by whose counsel it was determined to enlarge the plan, and connect with the college a theological school. Accordingly, at a meeting of the trustees May ll, 1835; the fundamental regulations of the Theological Seminary were adopted, .and three professors and an assistant teacher chosen. Previously to this, the Rev. William S. Potts of St. Louis, having signified his acceptancy, of the presidency of the institution, in August last, the


78c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

regulations of the literary department were adopted, the college faculty organized, and classes regularly formed. At the same meeting, the Rev. D. Nelson, Dr. Clark, and W. Muldrow, having stated that the funds to pay the New York loan had been received, tendered a surrender of the direction of the trust estate of the corporation, which was accepted by the board, and the necessary writings ordered to be prepared. By this act the existence of the 'Education Company of the West' ceases, and the whole responsibility and control of the property rests with the corporation. The smaller tract of land will be occupied by the classes constituting the college proper. On this, buildings will be erected for the accommodations of the 'president, professors, and students, a boarding house, a.nd a house for the steward and farmer. The president's house and a new boarding house are now under contract, and will be finished as speedily as possible. Upon one division of the larger tract is the preparatory department, where accommodations for one hundred students, it is hoped, will be completed this fall; comprising dormitories, a recitation house, a boarding house,. and. residence for the steward and farmer, who superintends the labor of the students in this department. In the centre of this tract will be the buildings necessary for the accommodation of the professors and students of the Theological Seminary, and the farmer having the supervision of their labor. It is also the purpose of the trustees, should circumstances warrant it, to connect Law and Medical Schools, under competent teach~rs, with the plan. A Female Seminary of a high order will also be located in the vicinity. The plan at present proposed for the support of the professors and students is as follows. The president and each of the professors in the Theological School is to receive net income of 500 acres of college land, fifty of which is to be cultivated in grain and vegetables, and the remainder in timothy grass. Each of the professors in the literary department and the prineipal of, the preparatory school' is to have the net income of 300 acres, thirty of which are to be cultivated as a garden, and the remainder in timothy. Each student will be expected to cultivate one acre' of this land as a garden,' and harvest nine acres of timothy. The garden land will always lie in the immediate vicinity of the stude~.t 's dormitory, and the corner stake of his acre will be marked with the number o~ his room. This will be worked principally by hand, and in the hours assigned for labor in term time. The timothy will demand his attention only in harvesting and preparing the hay for market, which will occur during vacation. The timothy land will lie some distance from the college, and the students will encamp lipon the meadow, and continue there until the whole work of cutting, curing and baling is completed. The hay will be cut by a horse power machine and' baled by a power press. , 'The products of the land of each professorship will be divided, one third' to the professor, and two thirds to the students cultivating it. By this plan, five hundred acres of land are to support one professor in the theological department and fifty students; and three hundred acres support a professor in the literary department and thirty students. The garden-land, after supplying the grain and vegetables necessary for the consumption of the boarding houlles, will be used â&#x20AC;˘.. the tuition fees will go into the treasury of the institution to be used in keeping up repairs, paying salaries not otherwise provided for, and incidental expenses. One acre of land in the vieinity of the college, cultivated in onions, peas, beans, or hops, it is believed from experiments made, will yield to the student more than enough to pay his board." â&#x20AC;˘ . . The financial plan was worked out as follows:


1953

79c

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

"For each student the yield would be: 6 acres of hay, 12 tons at $10 ...................â&#x20AC;˘ $ 120.00 Garden crop of onions, enough for board. . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 Total for each student , 'For the president and each theological professor: 150 acres of hay, 300 tons at $10 Garden crop of 50 students, 1-8 Total for each For each college professor: 90 acres of hay, 180 tons, at $10 Garden crop of 30 students, 1-8

. $ 170.00 . $3,000.00 . 1,250.00 . $4,250.00 . $1,800.00 750.00 .

Total

$2,550.00

, 'These sums would, it seems, have been ample to sustain pupils and teachers well in those, early days. But who can suppress a smile as he reads the plan with all its details! The South Sea scheme was hardly more wild and chimerical. Doubtless to the infatuated imagination of CoI.Muldrow and Dr. Ely, it was as beautiful as any bubble that ever polarized the light of Bun . . . a grand university, with college, and theological, law, medical and female schools attached, to be supported by five thousand acres of raw land in the wilds of the West. The different departments fourteen miles apart; and the students to sustain it, in their leasure moments by raising onions and cutting timothy hay. Surely, as Dr. Breckenridge once remarked, Presbyterians, in some things, seem to be the Lord's silly sheep.

*

lo'

*

*

As we have seen, the Marion College premises embraced two tracts

of land. The smaller contained 470 acres; was in the vicinity of the point originally selected for the location of the college; was about 12 miles west from Palmyra; and had for its postoffice, West Ely. The larger tract, subsequently purchased, contained about 4,500 acres; was six miles south of Palmyra and twelve miles from Hannibal The former was known as "Upper College" and was the seat of the college proper. The latter was styled "Lower College" and was where the theological seminary and preparatory departments were located." Dr. Kemper's diary said, "Live mostly on mush, bread and molasses, Like it much. With the exception of Thursday, I have breakfasted ever since on bread and water." A friend wrote him from Lower College: "Weare living on corn bread and water which costs us something less than a shilling a week; cheap living but as good as I desire." . . â&#x20AC;˘ "we generally retire at ten o'clock and arise at four." .At the college he formed the friendship of W.T. Davis: "We refer to William T. Davis. He was born in Washington Cpunty, Missouri, May 3, 1817, and was educated at Marion College where he was graduated in 1841. He was a profeBBional teacher, devoting his entire life to the work. He first taught in the country schools around Fayette in Howard county; then in Columbia; then in' Fayette, in counection with W. T. Lucku; then in the M,asonic College at Lexington of which he waBat one time president; and finally at Glasgow, as the' principal of the Male High School there, from 1850 to the fall of 1864, when he died, October 14. He was a man of good mind, unusual intelligence, sound judgment, imperturbable good humor and sincere


/

SOc.

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

SIc

Christianity. A kinder, truer husband, father, friend, or neighbor never lived. As a teacher he was universally beloved and respected by his pupils, hundreds of whom still live to revere his memory (1881). "Marion College is to be classed with the visionary manual labor colleges. Its demise occurred probably in the year 1845, when it passed into the Masonic College. As such it was removed to Lexington, Missouri, 1847. There it was conducted with some degree of success by the Masonic fraternity, and took a part in training quite a number of young men, some of whom have since been well known in the state. It was donated by the Masons to the State of Missouri to be converted into a military school, which was known as the Missouri Military Institute. During the war the buildings and grounds were occupied as a camp by the garrison and around it occurred the siege of Lexington. . . . After the war the main building was repaired by the state and a military school opened. Its fame attracted to its classic halls an attendance of seven boys and eight girls whereupon the state returned it to the Masons. The Grand Lodge generously donated it to the Southern Methodist Church in the fall of 1871; and so by a series of changes, the Marion College founded for boys by the Calvinistic Presbyterians, under the lead of Dr. David Nelson, has become the Central Female College of the Arminian Methodists. , 'Among the letters preserved by Mr. Kemper there is one of John Clark, a student of Masonic College, in which there are some interesting statements. He speaks of the Masons having charge, and of the president, a Mr. Smith, as a jolly old bachelor from the East (J. Worthington Smith of Virginia-Ed.). They proposed to extend the course of study, and to put algebra, Virgil, Greek Testament, and part of the Graeca Majora into the preparatory course. Upon this he very wisely remarks, 'It should ever be remembered that it is not the number of studies that makes the scholar, but it is the studying well those things that he has anything to do with.' "Clark continued: 'It has been said that the Masons have said that the college cannot go on to any advantage without they get you here as a professor. I do not know how true that is, but I heard Mr. Montgomery say that the Masons would have you here if there was a chance.' Mr. Kemper was not a Mason, so that there was no reason of society affiliation why their thoughts should be directed to him." DANIEL C. JACKLING

To most Misspurians the name of Daniel C. Jackling is just a n!tme, but in the World of Industry it stands at the top for he has been internationally recognized. His native state of Missouri has recognized him in only a meager way, but his adopted state of Utah has recently decided to erect a statue to him. Now who was Jackling~ Daniel Cowan J aclding was born at Appleton City, Missouri, August 14, 1869; he became a studertt at the Missouri School of Mines at Rolla, Missouri, during which period he received the Masonic degrees in Rolla Lodge No. 213 A. F. & A. M. as follows: E. A.: January 17, 1891 F. C.: February 7, 1891 M. M.: February 21, 1891


82c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

He dimitted November 17, 1894, and served as Master of Rocky Mountain (Utah) Lodge U. D. from January 14, 1899 to December 8, 1899. The lodge was located at Mercur, Utah, and was chartered by the Grand Lodge as No. 11; Bro. J ackling was a charter membel'; he dimitted from this lodge to affiliate with Argenta Lodge No.3, June 3, 1903, and has been a member of that lodge since that date. The statue which is to be erected to him, according to the Committee on Education of the Grand Lodge of Utah, is to be placed in the rotunda of the State Capitol under the auspices of the Jackling Commission and Sons of Utah Pioneers. A Bulletin issued by the Grand Lodge says of J ackling: Unsurpassed vision, tenacity, and organization managerial endowments made possible the "Jackling Enterprise," an achievement that turned scorn and ridicule to admiration and respect. At the turn of the century, when .J ackling and Gennell completed the first comprehensive analysis of a mining enterprise based on the treatment of low-grade ores, investors were warned by well-intentioned pessimists against" J ackling's Wildcat." But so convinced was the feasibility of the plan that he purchased interest in the property and pushed it to major production, radically changing the history of copper mining and giving Utah what ,was for many years its most economic enterprise; since 1907 nearly two-thirds of a billion tons of ore have been removed from the "pit" that now covers nearly 1,000 acres. MISSOURIANS

Under the heading of "distinguished guests received," Arkansas records the presence of Grand Master Richard O. Rumer and Grand Secretary Harold L. Reader. Herschel Horn, Grand Master of Colorado in 1943-44, died May' 15, 1952. He \vas born September 12, 1878, at Glenwood, Missouri, and was educated in the public schools in Missouri. His father was a Methodist minister and during his life lived for two years in Coquimbo, Chile. At its annual, communication, October 14, 1952, the Grand Lodge of Illinois records the presence of Grand Secretary Harold L. Reader and Past Grand Master Ray V. Denslow. Iowa proceedings contain the special report of an Iowa brother who is at present living in Missouri; his address is the Missouri State Penitentiary at Jefferson City, Missouri, where he is serving a term for embezzlement. A路 special committee was appointed to make an investigation and report. We find no place in the proceedings where the report was made. Past Grand Master Harry F. Sunderland represented the Grand Master at the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Kansas in February, 1952. Newly elected Grand Master Lee Franklin Parks, of Oklahoma,


1953

GRAND Lo.DGE OF MISSOUIU

S3e

is a native of Missouri, born in Henry County, July 11, 1894. At the age of six he went to Oklahoma, where he has since resided. He is now connected with the Muskogee Iron Works. On the guest list at the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Oregon was Past Grand Master Ray V. Denslow. IN THE WORLD OF STAMPS

Our friend, John A. Mirt, the Masonic stamp collector of Chicago, calls attention to some new stamps issued during the year 1953, all of which have Masonic significance. Gadsden Pure.1wse Stamp: the lOOth anniversary of the "Gadsden Purchase, " a transaction negotiated by a Mason, is commemorated in a postage stamp issued in 1953. By the purchase from Mexico for $10,OOO,000-U.S. acquired about 20,000,000 acres along the southwest border in what is now New Mexico and Arizona.J a,mes Gadsden, who closed the deal for the U.S. was a pioneer in the opening of Florida Territory. While there, he became an early member of Jackson Lodge No. 23 at Tallahassee, Fla., chartered in 1825 by the. Grand Lodge of Alabama. Jackson Lodge is now No. 1 under the Grand Lodge of Florida. A me1'ican Bar Association Stamp: the 75th anniversary of the Association is commemorated by a stamp issued in 1953. When the organization, now comprising 49,000 lawyers, was formed in 1878, its announced aims were high standards of legal education, ethics and judicial administration. Since among the principles of Freemasonry are high standards of morality, ethics, and justice, it was fitting that a Mason-James O. Broadhead, St. Louis, Mo., should be chosen first President. Made a Mason prior to 1846, he was a member of Tuscan Lodge No. 360, St. Louis, at his death in 1898. Many other Freemasons have headed the A.B.A. , 'Sagamore Hill" Stamp: "Sagamore Hill" at Oyster Bay, N. Y., home of a Freemason, and now a national shrine, is shown on a stamp issued in 1953. The home was an integral part of the life of Theodore Roosevelt, one of the Nation's most revered Presidents. Roosevelt, member of Matinecock Lodge No. 806, Oyster Bay, was an ardent Freemason. Speaking before the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, November 5, 1902, he said: "Masonry should make, and must make, each man who conscientiously and understandingly takes its obligations, a fine'type of American citizenship, because Freemasonry teaches him his obligation to his fellows in practical fashion. New York City Stamp: the 300th anniversary of New York City is commemorated in a postage stamp issued in 1953. When George Washington, Master Of Alexandria Lodge (Va), No. 22, was inauguarated in 1789 as the first president of the United States, the historic event took place in New York City amid a Masonic setting. Robert R. Livingston, Grand Master of New York, administered the oath on a Bible borrowed from St. JOhn's Lodge No.1, warranted in 1757, and which is today, the oldest lodge in the State. Freemasons have been identified with the city's growth ever since Freemasonry was established there more than two centuries ago. EXTRANEOUS SOCIETIES

In Arkansas the Fort Smith Shrine Club violated an edict of the


84e

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

Grand Lodge by sponsoring a Sunday horse show. The parent Temple Scimitar had not been informed of the Sunday show, according to officers of the Temple. They proceeded to conduct an investigation and the President of the Shrine Club took full responsibility for the violation. He received a reprimand and made an apology. Hereafter Shrine Clubs in Arkansas will have to notify their Temple of all such events and to insert in their by-laws a law forbidding activities on the Sabbath. A brother in Georgia introduced a resolution in Grand Lodge calling attention to the presence in the host city of the Grand Royal Matron of the Order of Amaranth of the State of Georgia, and since it had "been customary in the past to allow the Grand Royal Matron of the Order of Amaranth to bring greetings to the Grand Lodge in person," he wanted her invited to address the Grand Lodge as the first order of business. The single word "tabled" gives an indi~ cation of the final action of the Grand Lodge. A Grotto in Louisiana wanted a ruling as to the "time after Master Mason degree," the Secretary of the Grotto stating: "Since the Grotto is no part of Masonry and does not claim to be, it is the concensus of opinion that the resolution in question does not apply to the Grotto or its subordinates." However, the Grand Master ruled that the resolution applied to "every organization which requires a man to be a Master Mason in good standing to be eligible to membership therein." Apparently when the Grotto wants members it is a part of Masonry; when it is a question of observing Masonic laws it is "no part of Masonry." A member of a South Carolina lodge was shown suspended in the annual returns; he was later elected Associate Patron of the Eastern Star, but was informed he would not be eligible for the position unless in good standing in his lodge, 路whereupon he called the Grand Secretary, who looked up the reeord and, 10, he was N.P.D. Then he proceeded to pay up two years dues, received his membership card showing him to be in good standing, and we presume qualified himself for the station to which he had been elected. CORNERSTONES Weare impressed by the small number of cornerstones being laid throughout the United States by the Masonic Fraternity. It is not due to the dropping off in the number of public buildings being erected, but largely to lack of aggressiveness on the part of our Masonic bodies. In many instances those in charge of erection of buildings give little thought to laying of cornerstone until after the building is well along and too late for Masonic ceremonies. Again, there are certain States which, in our memory, have never reported the laying of a cornerstone for other than Masonic buildings.路 The


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

85c

State of Ohio is an exception; it reports the largest number of cornerstones laid of any Grand Lodge for the year 1952. We like Florida's idea which suggests an approved inscription to be placed on cornerstones laid by the Grand Lodge of Florida, the only change from time to time being the change of dates as required. The Grand Lodge was hesitant about providing new legislation concerning the technical requirements of cornerstones which might be unwise, but recommended "that it be the policy of this Grand Lodge not to place the name of any living person on a cornerstone laid by this Grand Lodge," since the cornerstone represented the work of the Grand Lodge as an institution and not any of its executive officers. There are many Grand Masters who like to see their name on cornerstones; we happen to know of a few instances in which such an inscription proved an embarrassment to the Grand Lodge. Arizona laid the cornerstone of a new public library at Phoenix, December 28, 1951. Colorado laid the cornerstone of an elementary school at Manitou Springs on May 17, 1952, the Jefferson County Court House at Golden' on August 2, 1952, the 7th Street Grade School at Dove Creek on September 6, 1952, the City Hall at Brighton on October 4, 1952, and of a Shrine Club at Colorado Springs on November 29, 1952. The District of Columbia, where there are more public buildings than any place in the world, laid a cornerstone, but it was that of the Church of Self Realization Fellowship; inclemency of the weather necessitated postponement of the ceremony. Georgia laid the cornerstone of a new City Hall at Ellaville, an educational building of the Methodist Church at Columbus, a Baptist Church at Union City, and a Baptist Church near Cordele. The Grand Lodge of Iowa laid the cornerstone of the Monroe County Hospital at Albia, and a high school building at Pisgah. Kansas reported cornerstone layings of the Johnson County Court House at Olathe, and a grade school building at Belleville. The Grand Lodge of Louisiana laid the cornerstone of the Wm. D. Haas Methodist Church at Bunkie, Louisiana. Massachusetts Grand Lodge laid a cornerstone, but not in 'Massachusetts; the ceremony was performed in the Canal Zone, and was that of Margarita Union Church. The Grand Master of Massachusetts was present on the occasion and there were delegations including the Grand Masters of the Grand Lodges of Costa Rica and Panama. The cornerstone of a new memorial building of the Nebraska State Teachers College, at Chadron,was laid by the Grand Lodge, and the occasion was graced by the presence of Governor Peterson, a member of Antelope Lodge No. 276, who was the orator for the occasion. The cornerstone of the Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd in Reno, was laid by the Grand Lodge of Nevada on June 22,


86c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

1952. During the annual communication of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina, the cornerstone of the University Hospital was laid under Grand Lodge auspices. The Grand Lodge of Ohio laid the' cornerstone of the Anderson Hills Methodist Church, at Forestville, St. Paul's Congregational Church at Peach Grove, an elementary school at Blanchester, a high school at Martins Ferry, a grade school building in New Philadelphia, an elementary school building at Montgomery, and a number of Masonic Templc corncrstones. In Oklahoma, we find cornerstones were laid for the Okeene Christian Church at Okeene, the International Rainbow Temple in McAlester, a school building in Hooker, a public school building at Avant, and a school building in Tecumseh. The Grand Lodge of Oregon laid cornerstones for a school building at Oswego, a high school at Newport, a high school at Taft, a consolidated grade school at Dayton, and a high school at Jefferson. A cornerstone for the Eastern Star Home, at Sumpter, was laid by the Grand Lodge of South Carolina. Under the heading of "Cornerstones Leveled" wc find the Grand Lodge of Texas laying cornerstones for the First Methodist Church at Austin, elementary school building at \Vest, and a high school building at Granbury. A special communication of the Grand Lodge was held in Salt Lake City, Utah, November 22, 1951, to lay the cornerstone of a First Baptist Church. MASONIC PUBLICATIONS

In 1951, the Grand Lodge of California issued an edict which provided that no lodge, or member of a lodge, without the express sanction of Grand Lodge, "should solicit, sponsor, insert, place or print advertising of any kind in or for any medium or publication, which purports to be Masonic in name or character, or which is published by or for any body, order or organization requiring Masonic affiliation as a condition to membership." The whole matter was referred to a special committee on publications, which approved nine periodicals; three applieations were rejected. One of the rejected publications changed its name and in its first issue "carried a scathing article and a similar editorial both maligning and traducing Masonry, this Grand Lodge, and the officers thereof." Seven publications have not, presented applications. One of this latter group earried an ad which read: "Compliments of Most Worshipful Sun of Light Grand Lodge F. & A. M., Inc." It also carried a scathing editorial charging dictatorship on the part of Grand Lodge. An attempt to repeal the edict failed of adoption. A committee on policy would not express a legal opinion on some of the matters involved, especially whether they had "the power to tell another body, order or organization that it may not put out a publication


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

87c

which contains advertising matter." They added this significant statement: "It seems' to us to be an anomaly to have in our law the express provision that we do not recognize any but the first three degrees and at the same time to follow the policy of attempting to prohibit, or prescribe conditions under which they will be permitted to do things which are perfectly legal a.nd moral, namely, put out a publication with advertising and solicit for that advertising. The mere fact that some or a majority of their members may be members of our lodges does not warrant the continuance of the policy followed this past year any more than it would warrant a policy of telling the Los Angeles Times or the BOlT/, FrOllUJisco Examviner that it would have to stop carrying ads beeause the publisher, editor and staff were Master Masons. We, therefore, recommend a policy of withdrawal from this field."

In 1949, Florida voted to investigate the publishing of a Masonic magazine and contract was entered into with the Florida Mason, endorsing it as a Masonic publication, but without support or obligation on the part of the Grand Lodge. The publication failed to get the support to which it was entitled, and paid subscriptions did not invite sufficient advertising to make the publication a success. Then the Grand Lodge investigated the advisability of subscribing for every Master Mason at a 25c per year rate. The publishers would not agree to continue to 'publish for a year upon the agreement to pay for 45,000 subscriptions at 25c each, and there the matter rested. The Grand Master said he did not believe in subsidizing a private concern. Conditions were not improved when the aforesaid publication carried special stories concerning "a more or less prominent Mason, who it now develops is a candidate for Junior Grand Warden." He recommended that the contract be cancelled. As to the publication of a News Letter by the Grand Lodge "after considerable discussion from the floor it was declared lost." Georgia has a publication, "The Masonic Messenger." A resolution to increase the salary of the editor to $5,000.00 a year was reported adversely by the finance committee and rejected. In Idaho the publisher of a Masonic periodical attempted to secure credentials permitting him to solicit advertising and subscriptions, using the Grand Lodge of Idaho and its subordinates as a medium to force advertisements from merchants and others. The Grand Master said: "His method is far from good and in fact would be a detriment to Masonry in Idaho. His magazine is not bad, but the individual and his magazine are in trouble with the Grand I.. . odge of Washington. . . . He was informed that the Masons of Ida.ho had no business for him until he obtained a clear bill of health from the Grand Lodge of Washington."

The Grand Lodge of Illinois issues a publication, The Enlightener. An examination of the report of their Publication Committee suggested the publication of six issues a year. The disbursements in con-


SSe

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

nection with its printing and distribution amounted to $18,628.00 for the year. It usually appears as a four page sheet. 1ndiana proceedings give路 a review of some Grand Lodge publications, referring to New York's Family Magazine j this prQject costs the Grand Lodge of New York approximately $65,000.00 a year. A special committee revealed evidence of dissatisfaction with its publication; the Grand Lodge voted to continue it in 1951, but in the last few months it has been consolidated with the Masonic Outlook. It costs the Grand Lodge of Virginia $17,676.00 to continue sending the Virginia Masonic Herald to its entire membership. Nevada has a semi-annual Grand Lodge Bulletin, which it hoped to extend to a quarterly publication, but which, because of cost, will not be continued. The Grand Master of New Mexico was "dismayed from time to time because of suggestions made that the New Mexico Freemason be discontinued." He did not think the opinion was widely held, but there were some who thought that the publication could not be justified because of its expense. The Oklahoma Mason is the official organ of the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma. Its disbursements for the year were $10,739.00; 'sales of subscriptions and advertising accounted for $8,715.00, but the cash balance on December 31, 1951, was $2,000.00 less than at the beginning of the year. The Publication Committee found it impossible to continue the $1.00 subscription rate without running into a deficit each year. The committee also discovered"Unauthorized agents have solicited advertising for privately promoted magazines and periodicals, bearing the name Masonic or some auxiliary body." They have led advertisers to believe that they were the regular authorized representatives of Masonry when, as a matter of fact, their sole effort was to make money for themselves. The advertising they sold was absolutely worthless to the buyer and the publications which were issued had very little circulation. The result is that the buyers of this type of advertising are blaming Masonry for fraudulent intent.' ,

Texas issues its Grand Lodge magazine to 15,360 subscribers. The Grand Master hoped they could secure additional subscriptions. There are 209,000 Master Masons in Texas. In Washington the Grand Master directed a letter to the publishers of the Masonic Review D1:gest requesting them to eliminate the Square and Compasses, as well as the word "Masonic" from their publication. He received no reply. However, he had no information that the firm was still operating and he assumed the publication had ceased. Wyoming discussed the matter of joining with the States of Montana, Utah and Colorado in the publication of a Rocky Mountain Mason magazine; the proposal was to give eight official pages in


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

89c

each issue to Grand Lodge business. The matter is still being considered. RECOGNITION

Argentina: Recognized by California, Delaware, Kansas, Utah. Recognized by Connecticut. Brazil: Several American jurisdictions have turned down recognition of Sao Paulo because of their schism; among these were Ar.ka12sas, Louisiana, Nevada. Minas Gerais, Rio Grande do SuI were recognized by Connecticut; Piaui was recognized by Utah; Rio de Janeiro was recognized by California. Chile: R~cognized by Illinois. China: Recognized by Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Oklahoma. Colombia, Grand Lodge at Bogota: Recognized by Mississippi, South Carolina, Utah. Denmark, National Grand Lodge: Recognized by Nevada, Oregon. France, National Grand Lodge: Recognized by California, Colorado, Delaware, Nevada, North Dakota, Vermont. Germany, United Grand Lodge: Recognized by Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Massachusetts, Montana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Washington. Iceland: Recognized by Connecticut, District of Columbia, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, North Dakota: Utah, Vermont, Wyoming. '" Israel: Recognized by California. Italy, Grand Orient: Recognized by California, Connecticut, Washington. Mexico: EI Potosi recognized by Connecticut; Baha, California, recognized by Connecticut; Chihuahua recognized by North Dakota. Iowa has had a peculiar method of handling its foreign recognition; it has been given the name "Presumptive Recognition," which means that recognition is presumed to all legitimately constituted Grand Lodges until challenged, ,,,,hen the facts essential to legitimacy must be made to appear. Among the recent requests for recognition received by Iowa were those of Serenissima in Italy, the Negro Republic of Liberia, and the first of the Grand Lodges of Israel, but no action has been taken on their recognition. There are two or three Grand Lodges "in exile." As a general rule, recognition is not being extended to these Grand Lodges. Many of our Grand Lodges feel as Kansas : "We feel we should continue to extend our sympathies to these Masons who are living in Spain and continue to encourage so far as we may the Grand Lodge of Spain in Exile, which exists in Mexico City." Because of the situation in Uruguay, Oklahoma, Texas and Vermont have withdrawn recognition from that jurisdiction. A~tstria:


90c

THB MASONIC WORLD

1953

Recognition of the National Grand Lodge of Denmark by Washington was probably the last to be considered by. American Grand Lodges. A number of years ago recognition had been extended to the Grand Lodge of Denmark, but the committee in reporting this year said: "The Grand Lodges of England, Ireland and Scotland, and all the States of the U. S. A., with the exception of Washington and Wisconsin (Wisconsin has recently e:xtended recognition) have extended recognition to these Grand Lodges organized under the Scandinavian system. We are either out of step with the others or we are properly in step and the other fifty jurisdictions are out of step."

Action will be taken upon this .situation during the- 1953 communication. HISTORICAL

Several Grand Lodges arc planning centennial celebrations. These are Kansas} LO'ltisiana} Minnesota and Nebraska. Many old lodge records are hidden away and may eventually be discovered. In Delawa1'e} a history and research committee discovered in the archives of the Dela\vare Historical Society, the minutes of their Washington Lodge No.1; these records had been missing a great many years. The District of Columbia has a committee charged with bringing up to date the history of the Grand Lodge since 1911, at which time the history had been published. In Illinois} Everett R. Turnbull, Past Master of Mt. Nebo Lodge No. 76, has written, and the Grand Lodge has distributed, a book, "The Rise and Progress of Freemasonry in lllinois, 1783-1952." We were fortunate in securing a copy of this publication and can commend it to all brethren who are interested in the history of our neighboring Grand Lodge. In 1951, the Grand Lodge of Io'Wa appropriated $500.00 to erect a memorial to Oliver Cock} first Grand Master of Iowa, who is buried in Aspen Grove Cemetery, Burlington, Iowa. The monument is of red granite, and a photograph of it appears in the Iowa Grand Lodge proceedings. Chapman Lodge No.2, in New Mexico} is laboring to secure the naming of old Fort Union as a national monument; it was a most important military post in the early history of that country. Chapman Lodge No. 2 held its first communication there in 1872. Interest is also being shov,rn by our New Mexico brethren in a memorial to Kit Carson, at Taos; $40,000.00 was donated by the New Mexico Legislature to purchase and develop a site. When the question came up in the legislature as to whom was to be placed in Statuary Hall, Washington, D. C., representing New Mexico, the names of Archbishop Lamy and Kit Carson were proposed; Kit Carson won hands down.


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

91c

Ohio planned to observe its sesquicentennial in 1953. Over a million men have become Freemasons in Ohio; many have contributed to the welfare and development of the State in various capacities. Four Ohio Freemasons have been President of the United States. It was suggested, as a part of the program for the year, that a search be made, locally and state-wide, for the names of all officers of State, City and County governments, judges, presidents of colleges, principals of high schools, editors of newspapers, clergymen of churches, prominent authors, leaders in medicine, commerce, industry and arts, who have been Freemasons. Each lodge will be asked to place a framed memorial on the walls of its hall and unveiled on a certain night so that future generations may see the principal part played by Freemasons in the growth and development of the State. On April 28, 1952, South Dakota unveiled a Masonic plaque at Elk Point, commemorating the establishment of the Grand Lodge of Dakota June 21-23, 1875. In 1952, Virginia officially observed the bicentennial of George \Vashington's Masonic birth. One of the principal features of the observance was the issuance of a documented and complete history of "George Washington-Freemason," including brief histories of Fredericksburg Lodge No.4, Alexandria-\Vashington Lodge No. 22, the Grand -Lodge of Virginia, and the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association. This was done under the direction of the great Masonic scholar, William Moseley Brown, who was selected as research director. That he accomplished the task assigned is shown in the publication issued by the Grand Lodge of Virginia, a credit to the author and to the Grand Lodge which financed it. DEGREES Lodges in A rizona will be given a year to consider the question of the limitation of members to be raised in each lodge during any one year. The proposed limit is 20. It is thought the action would not be detrimental to the larger lodges, for they in turn would profit through selectivity of members, and such action would result in the formation of many new lodges and Freemasonry would profit in an increase in the number of Masters and officers at work. California has found it necessary to refuse to confer courtesy degrees in its Hawaiian lodges. The Grand Master of California recommended limitation on the number of candidates which lodges, over a certain number of members, might have in a given year. The matter is to be studied by a special committee. Reviewer Smith, in Indiana, finds that with the growth in size and influence, and the increasing emphasis on various Masonic and near-Masonic bodies, it was natural that the pendulum should swing from one extreme to the other. He thought other organizations might


92c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

be too zealous, even aggressive beyond the limits of propriety. At any rate, it happened and there was resentment over lack of attention given the symbolic lodge, over the app'arent air of condescension with which Ancient Craft Masonry was treated. He believed that if Symbolic Masonry had built up over the years a widespread system of Masonic instruction, waiting periods would have been unnecessary. East Gate Lodge No. 630, of Kansas City, Missouri, visited Siloam Lodge No. 225, Topeka, Kansas. The Topeka lodge had requested authority from the Grand Master to exchange degree work with the Missouri lodge. He consented to the exchange, the only requirement being that only Kansas work could be used in conferring degrees upon elected candidates of Siloam Lodge, but this did not restrict the Missouri brethren from conferring their work upon a regularly elected candidate from their own jurisdiction. The Grand Master of Kansas issued 217 dispensations during the year, 181 of which were for the conferring of degrees in less than statutory time. He ex~ plained, however, that most of these were for young men in military service. The Grand Lecturer of Mississippi believes that we are letting down the bars in accepting petitions for degrees, and states that the Masonic lodge is not a reformatory and that reformation should precede, not succeed, initiation. "If we accept man of immoral character we become a partner in his evil doings. No lodge ever went defunct because of carefully screening its membership. When we accept a petition of a man of doubtful reputation, we thereby sow seeds of dissension. It is easier to keep an immoral man out than it is to get him out. Getting him out disrupts the lodge; retaining him destroys the usefulness of the lodge in that community." New Mexico had one of its requests for courtesy degrees turned路 down. The jurisdiction which declined to render courtesy work suggested that the New Mexico lodge grant a waiver of jurisdiction so that when raised he would belong to them. From which we would judge it was the money they were after. The Grand Master of Washington let his sympathy get away with his good judgment. He granted a dispensation to a lodge to confer the degree of Master Mason in the home of the candidate. It appears that the candidate was confined to his bed and the physician refused to let him leave his home. Weare informed by the Grand Master: "The degree was conferred with more than usual solemnity and the candidate's bedside table made a convenient altar upon which the Great Lights, as well as the Lesser Lights, of Masonry were displayed. Much improvisation was required."

We imagine as much. The brother died within three months after receiving the Master Mason degree. The committee on jurisprudence disapproved the action of the Grand Master and, while commending


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

93c

him for his sympathy, stated that his action violated the fundamental principles in conferring of degrees and opened the door to serious deviation from the Ancient Landmarks. Two Grand Lodges note the conferring of the degree of Past Master upon all eligible candidates-those who have been elected and serving as Masters of Lodges. MASONIC TEMPLES

California has a Committee on Lodge Financing; it is a very busy committee, probably a hundred lodges have required their assistance. During the year 11 beautiful Masonic Temples were dedicated. The amazing thillg was that all of them were built by members of the Craft, with their own hands, and only two of them had any outstanding indebtedness. But the building of temples has its problems, and there is a special Committee on Taxation in the Grand Lodge of California; lodges were informed by this committee that lodges contemplating the creation of a/non-profit building corporation, generally speaking, placed the corporation in the same preferential group as the lodge, providing the lodge owns the stock of the corporation. This Grand Lodge has been busily engaged in the restoration of the Columbia Temple, a Masonic historical spot in that State. The Grand Lodge has appropriated approximately $10,000.00 for its restoration and this money involved the placing of floor cases, wall cases, chairs, table, and many other items. The first floor of the Columbia Temple is to be operated as a business by a prospective tenant, who proposes to operate it in an appropriate manner and in keeping with the gold rush days atmosphere. The Grand Lodge itself expects to start erection of a great Memorial Building, in view of the inadequacy of the present building. It will be erected in the downtown business area and plans are well under way for its construction. It will, of course, involve an\ increase in per capita tax of 50c per member. . The Grand Lodge of Kansas has gone into partnership with various local groups in Topeka and has purchased the former Masonic Temple for $350,000.00. One of the largest building projects in this country is that of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana) which, several years ago, erected a several story building for commercial purposes, the principal floors of which were kept by Masonic bodies. Hard times came along and for a time it looked as if they might lose their entire investment. Then came the war, the extra space was rented to the government, who have been tenants for approximately ten years; then the Grand Lodge placed an assessment on each member, and all indebtedness has been paid off. It is now producing considerable revenue which is to be used by the Grand Lodge for carrying on charitable activities.


94c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

,The Grand Lodge of New Mexico has been inspecting various tracts of land as a possible site for a Grand Lodge administration building. The site was finally purchased at a cost of $7,500.00. The Grand Lodge of Ohio plans to remove its offices to Worthington, Ohio. The building erected in 1820 for use by New England Lodge No.4 is being purchased by the Grand Lodge; it is the oldest lodge building in the State that has been used continuously as a meeting place. The intention is to preserve the old building as a place of Masonic interest and the purchase will furnish ground on which to build an office for the Grand Secretary; it is centrally located. Another suggestion was made that the office be located on the grounds of the Masonic Home at Springfield. The Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania owns a beautiful building in a prominent site in the City of Philadelphia; it has been one of the show places for more than eighty years, but in that length of time there has been much depreciation and this past year required an appropriation of $203,000.00 for the replacing and construction of a new roof; it is to be replaced with a roof wholly of aluminum, like that on the Mellon Institute in Pittsburgh. During the past year, 3,377 persons visited the building and were delighted at the decoration and period furniture it contained. Expense of maintenance for a year is $109,000.00 The Grand Lodge of South Carolina is to consider the question of the erection of a ne,,, Masonic Temple with adequate auditorium; it will be erected in the City of Charleston and, will undoubtedly require an increase of $1.00 in per capita for a number of years. One of the outstanding Masonic Temples in this country is the one in Waco, Texas) home of the Grand Lodge of that jurisdiction. JURISPRUDENCE

Many jurisdictions are becoming convinced that trial by commission is the most satisfactory method of handling Masonic discipline. Among cases noted in last year's reports where trial by commission has been successful were in Arkansas) Minnesota and Nebraska. The Grand Lodge of Missouri has been frequently criticized as a result of its handling of the "Nebraska case," wherein a member of a Missouri lodge, living in Nebraska and carrying on a liquor business, which was in violation of the laws of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, was tried and expelled by a lodge in that jurisdiction. It would be unfair for this reviewer to criticize his own Grand Lodge for any action it may take, for we criticize other jurisdictions rather than our own, but we will offer a few instances of this criticism. The Kansas revie\ver, speaking of Missouri, said: "The Grand Master brought up the case of the Missouri brother who had violated the laws of the Grand Lodge of Nebraska while residing


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

95c

in Nebraska, although the offense charged was not a violation of the Nebraska criminal laws, nor the Grand Lodge laws of Missouri. Missouri has been wrong in this matter and no amount of trying to justify itself is going to satisfy its own conscience, nor its own. law which deals with comity. "

California touched upon the Nebraska-Missouri situation in a case which came before its Grand Lodge. A member of a California lodge, residing in Nebraska, was president of a liquor corporation. Nebraska makes it a Masonic offense for a Mason to engage in the sale of liquor. The actions of the brother were, therefore, a violation of the Masonic law of Nebraska, and Nebraska trial commission ordered him expelled from his California lodge. The California committee said the action was beyond the jurisdiction of that Grand Lodge and stated. that they had no authority to expel a California Mason from a California lodge, that only a California lodge, with the approval of the Grand Lodge, could take such action. It believed the Grand Lodge of Nebraska could expel a Mason who was a resident from all right and privileges of Masonry in Nebraska, and they regarded this action as doing this and nothing more. The matter was brought to their attention in 1951 and the committee, by a vote of 5 to 2, recommended that no action be taken because the offense was not a Masonic offense in California, but the Grand Lodge did not go along with them and ordered the matter referred to the lodge in California in which the Nebraska expelled brother was a member. His lodge found him guilty of the specifications, but not guilty of unmasonic conduct, and he was, therefore, acquitted. Four of the committee recommended that the verdict of the California Lodge be affirmed; three members that he should be expelled; the minority argued that a sojourning Mason should conform to the Masonic regulations of the jurisdiction in which he resides and for a violation thereof should forfeit his rights and privileges of Masonry everywhere. They asserted the matter was covered by Landmark Seventeenth, which read: "Every Freemason is amenable to the laws and regulations of the Masonic jurisdiction in which he resides." The Grand Lodge first adopted the report of the committee, but later, on reconsideration, he was found guilty of unmasonic conduct and the penalty fixed at expulsion. This action on the part of the Grand Lodge of California was in full conformity to the whole Masonic precedence and laws; it is generally accepted that those who live in the community in which a brother resides are better able to judge as to any Masonic offense which might be committed by him than are those at a great distance. The Grand Lodge of Colorado goes into considerable detail in connection with Masonic trials in that jurisdiction. Four trials were held over. The Grand Master expressed his opinion that the principal complaint leveled against the Colorado system is over the delay that


96c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

sometimes occurs in concluding the trial and handing down a decision. Much of the delay was inevitable and some of it could be avoided; the effectiveness of a trial depends materially upon the speed with which it is conducted. Under the heading discipline, the Illinois proceedings report the case of a brother who was charged with immoral conduct. He was expelled from Freemasonry. In the course of investigation it was found one of the brethren who signed his petition had stated' he had known the petitioner fourteen months. Documentary evidence showed that less than thirteen months preceding the date of the petition the petitioner had been serving a one to ten year sentence in the Illinois State prison and had previously served sentences in penitentiaries in Massachusetts and Colorado. The recommending brother was suspended for a definite period. Such instances convince us that insufficent attention is given to the selection of committees on petitions; undoubtedly a little investigation would have discovered something about the past life of the above petitioner. An interesting case appears in the Grand Lodge of Iowa proceedings, where the Grand Secretary of Michigan wrote the Grand Secretary of Iowa for the Masonic record of a brother who had afiHiated with a Michigan Lodge from Iowa. It appeared that the brother had been suspended for non-payment of dues. lIe had petitioned the Michigan lodge for affiliation two years before being suspended in the Iowa lodge. The Iowa lodge sho\ved no record of a dimit having been issued, nor could the Michigan lodge produce such a dimit. It had a petition for the degrees in Missouri路 which had been marked dimit, but not on any Iowa form of any sort. The Iowa Grand Master thought it advisable for the brother to write the secretary of the Iowa lodge requesting reinstatement. If and when he ,vas reinstated, he could request a dimit which would clear him on the books of the Iowa lodge. He advised the Grand Lodge of Michigan, through the Grand Secretary, accordingly, but the Grand Master of Michigan wrote: , 'Regardless of whether Michigan has erred or Iowa has erred, reason dictated that any irregularity be healed quickly and with dispatch. You there, and the writer here, can do this with the shake of the pen. The Grand Master of Michigan will immediately declare such irregularities as may exist . . . be healed, and I trust that you in your wisdom will do likewise."

The Grand Master of Iowa did not like the tone of the Michigan letter and replied: , 'The Grand Master of Iowa is concerned in clearing every case that comes before him, but always in a straightforward, reasonable, and conclusive manner. There is no statute in the Iowa Masonic Code which permits a Grand Master, by the stroke of a pen, to wipe out a subordinate lodge record, or to change it in any way. Conditions in each jurisdiction


1953 in this Grand healed so far

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

97c

case are entirely different, and although the Grand Master of the Lodge of Michigan does and has declared the irregularities in Michigan, yet the conditions set forth in my letter still stand as to clearing the record in this case."

He received no further reply. A committee on jurisprudence in Iowa, however, referred to the matter as an unusual case, but fully approved the action of their Grand Master. In Ohio the lodges are becoming interested in liability insurance. The Grand Master told the Grand Lodge that Ohio lodges could not afford to be without it, for a suit could be brought in that State not only against th~'lodge but against each member of the lodge because the Grand Lodge did not permit its lodges to incorporate. The committee is to investigate. A lodge in Oak Ridge, Tenn., refused, by vote' of the lodge, 'to accept charges against one of its members who had attended a meeting in an intoxicated condition. The matter was brought to trial and the defendant 'vas expelled. But this did not settle the matter, the Grand :Master thought the lodge in refusing to accept charges convinced him that the high standards of Masonry could not be maintained. He ordered all physical property of the lodge to be turned over to the Grand Lodge and the matter was brought to Grand Lodge for final action, where we find that 20 Masters of Oak Ridge had petitioi1ed to form a new lodge. The committee approved the action of the Grand Master in arresting the charter of the previous lodge and were convinced that the element that promoted and condoned the disregard of all Masonic principles "were communistic in their actions if not actually directed by subversive elements in an effort to discredit the Fraternity and destroy the lodge."

LODGES Many Grand Lodges suffer from having oversize subordinate lodges, but very few do anything about it. California is an exception. The Grand Master, speaking to these large ,lodges, said: "It is my considered opinion that there comes a time when lodges become too large. When that happens, Masonry in general suffers. Anc. the opportunity to participate in our work is denied to many qualified and well-deserving brethren. The more. members a lodge has, the less opportunities there are for Masons to go through the chairs. "When a lodge gets too large its membership tends to divide into cliques. Sometimes the officers have their own private parties, and draw 'away from the membership. It becomes difficult if not impossible for the brethren to know one another. "Some lodges tend to become business, rather than fraternal organizations. Average attendance goes away down. Membership in numbers alone does not make good lodges; big bank balances and holdings of securities do not reflect Masonry at its best."

It was found that in California 128 lodges had a membership in


98c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

excess of 500; 18 had an excess of 800; 14 had more than 900; 10 had more than 1000; 4 had more than 1100; 1 had more than 1200. A special committee will investigate the situation. The question of Spanish-speaking lodges is another problem which is disturbing many States on the Mexican border. Unfortunately, the situation is not being handled in a way that will satisfy our Mexican brethren. A sIweial committee in California stated that it has been said "there is no real demand or need for Spanish-speak" ing lodges." However, the committee found there was a real demand for sueh lodges and particularly because of the clandestine- or irregular l\lexican lodges whieh operated in Soutfl.ern California. The chairman of the committee recommended the giving of dispensation to lodges which work in the Spanish language, but a majority of the committee would not sign the report because they had had no time to investigate. The eommittee on policy and general purposes, which appear to control procedure, did not approve and their report was adopted. The explanation was that "our lodge doors are not closed to members of' Spanish-speaking races and we have a number of fine members 0 f S punish descent in our California lodges. We should not be moving in an opposite direetion by extending and emphasizing racial disiinetion of Masons within our borders. The ritual committee report~ that it is unanimous in its disapproval of the proposal." Ca.lifornia has bvo lodges that work in French; two in German; one in Italian. The earliest of these lodges was chartered in ] 852. No new foreign-speaking lodges have been chartered in the past forty years. The Grand Master of Connecticut continued dispensation for the lodge in Stuttgart, G(路~rlllnny. He declined to grant dispensation for the formation of a lodge in Munich, even though petitioners had secured approval of the Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of Germany. Report of Stuttgart American Lodge shows that for the year 1951, 44 meetings had been held, 22 of which were stated; 72 degrees were conferred and 26 candidates raised during the year. Average attendance was 21. On January 27, ]951, members of the lodge journeyed to J\lunich, 150 miles south of Stuttgart, at the invitation of the Munich Masonic Club; a brother from Virginia came all the \-vay from Paris, France, to receive his Master Mason degree. A dinner dance and floor show follo\ved. Vvashington's birthday was eelebrated in the traditional manner, attended by 162 Masons, their wives and sweethearts; the speaker was a Germanborn Amerieall, native of Stuttgart, who was there visiting his parents; he was Paul Reinhardt, Past Master of Burlington (Wis.) Lodge. On :May 19, J.951, Grand Master Theodor Vogel, of the United Grand Lodge of Germany, paid Stuttgart Lodge an official visit.


1953

GH,AND LODGE OF MISSOURI

99c

The meeting was held in the famous castle at Ludwigsburg, Germany, and many German Master Masons were in attendance. Grand Master Vogel gave an inspiring talk praising the American Masons overseas for assistance to German Masons and their families in time of great distress. A member of Stuttgart Lodge attended the annual session of the United Grand Lodge in Bad Ems; he made an address, but declared "the Grand Master of Germany's English was much better than my German." The Grand Master of Flo1"ida rendered a decision that members of Florida lodges were not permitted to visit German lodges not recognized by the Grand Lodge of Florida, but were permitted to belong to a Masonic Club in Germany composed of American Freemasons. Indiana calls attention to the limitation of lodge membership, adding that no one does anything about it but Pennsylvania, which limits the number of new members to 10 petitions for initiation and affiliation per month in lodges of 600 members. If more than that, the number is even less, and in case of a lodge of 11 members, 5 petitions is the limit. At the June communication of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts the charter of Talien Lodge, at Dairen, South Manchuria, was revoked. It was decided to extend the jurisdiction of Sinim Lodge, at Shanghai, China, to include the City of Tokyo, Japan. It will be recalled that Massachusetts has subordinate lodges in the Canal Zone, Chile and China. There are 7 lodges in the Canal Zone, with a total membership of 3,673 as of August 31, 1952, an increase of 4 members for the year. These lodges range in size from Isthmian with 321, to Sojourners 'with 634. !J'here are three lodges in ChileBethesda, HucIen, St. John's; they show an increase of 12 members as of August 31, 1952. There are three lodges in China, the largest of which is Sinim with 148 members; there was a loss of 153 members in this district for the year 1952. In Nevada the Grand Master ruled that a Nevada lodge could not join with a local church in offering a protest to the appointment of Gen. l\.fark Clark as Ambassador to the Vatican, because partisan politics and religious issues are not permitted in Masonic lodges. New Jersey forbids establishment of military lodges and a prohibition of dual membership prevents their members from joining a military lodge. The Grand Master thought that New Jersey Masons should be permitted to become members of military lodges. Later the proposal was withdrawn because of the adoption of dual membership. In Texas the Grand Master advised brethren in El Paso, who asked as to the possibility of establishing a Spanish-speaking lodge, that he would not consider the granting of such a dispensation. Washington gave a dispensation to Kodiak Lodge V.D., at Kodiak, Alaska, January 10, 1952. During the year the Grand Master visited


100e

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

the various lodges in Alaska, some thirteen in number. Statistics of the Alaskan lodges show a total membership of 2,053, a net gain of 88 for the year. MISCELLANEOUS

The Grand Master of Arkansas experienced some legal troubles during his administration. He discovered liquor permits had been issued to members of the lodge at Stuttgart, Ark. He ordered the lodge to bring the brethren to trial. He received four unsigned letters severely criticising him for his actions, and threatened him with harm should he visit Stuttgart; he also received three phone calls, which he disregarded. The Grand Master sent his Grand Secretary to represent him. It appeared the lodge was stalling for time, waiting for a new Grand Master. In view of which, the Grand Master ordered the lodge suspended from the rolls. Later the lodge complied with the Grand Master's instructions, proceedings were lodged against the offenders aEd the suspension order was revoked. The Grand Master of Pennsylvania again exercised his prerogative by attending a special meeting of a lodge in Pittsburgh, where W. Sherman Skinner was made a Mason at sight. Among dispensations issued by the Grand Master were several to receive petitions of men who had not reache~ the age of twenty-one years; the youngest of these was twenty years, nine months, and ten days old. An edict ,vas issued against three brethren to prevent them from conferring degrees in any lodge, and for six years prohibited them from holding any office in a lodge in Pennsylvania, for the reason they had been using unauthorized gavels. Vermont is having hat trouble. The Grand Master discovered that in many lodges the dignity of the work had been seriously impaired by the kind of head-gear displayed on most occasions. He hoped that the Grand Lodge would decide upon an official head-covering' for Masters of lodges. The Grand Secretary added his bit, stating: "I have seen, and so have you, battered, ruffed-up and ill-fitting silk hats worn with tux and with business suits of all colors. I have seen both clean and dirty felt hats and even caps. I have heard candidates comment disparagingly on this, to them, strange custom. If etiquette of proper dress is considered, a silk hat with a business suit is taboo, and with a tux but little better. Any kind of a street hat is inappropriate for an indoor assembly."

The Grand Master of Washington approved the formation of a Masonic Club on Annette Island, near Ketchikan, Alaska, which is being sponsored by Ketchikan Lodge No. 159. Similar approval was given to a club at the Ladd Field Air Force Base near Fairbanks, Alaska, sponsored by Tanana Lodge No. 162. . Should you pass the age of one hundred years and still have a desire to petition a Masonic lodge, you may do so in Wisconsin.


1953

GRAND LODGE ;OF MISSOURI

101e

The Grand Master being asked as to whether a petition could be received from one who is one hundred years old, stated: "Mere age is not a determining factor. If a man is physically sound and mentally alert, he is eligible to petition." . Bequest : North Dakota is very proud of its library, maintained by Miss Clara A. Richards, librarian, whose coming retirement will be a blow to the work of the Grand Lodge. The library has recently been remodeled, and the building and equipping has been entirely met through the generosity and devotion of its greatest benefactor, Walter L. Stockwell, who left $30,000.00 in his will for that purpose. Clandestine: In 1949, a court action was instituted in Colorado to restrain a group of so-called Masons from operating ~nder the title Ivanhoe Grand Lodge A.F.&'A.M. A favorable decision was had in the District Court, but the defense taking appeal to the Supreme Court, the decision of the lower court was reversed on a technicality and the matter is still on the agenda of the Grand Lodg'e of Colorado. In Indiana, two years ago, the Grand Master reported the existence of clandestine lodges in South Bend. It was an organization of colored men, with very few white men involved. At that time the colored lodge agreed to exclude from its membership all the white men, but apparently they have not kept their promise, aI)d they are not only receiving white men, but actively soliciting their petitions. This organization calls itself "Benderson Lodge No.2, the National Grand Lodge F. & A.M., Scottish Rite of the World," and there are undoubtedly other lodges working in Northern Indiana under this name.. Electioneering: Florida is bothered \yith Masonic poUties. The Grand Master said: , 'During the past few years we have seen this abuse grow until it has become disgraceful and disgusting. . . . We have seen the organization of a 'Political Action Committee' with president and secretary, organized for the express purpose of controlling the election of Grand Lodge officers. . . . Members have been driving about the State for weeks prior to Grand Lodge, under orders from the president, seeking the support. of representatives for the chosen candidate. . . . It is disgusting and it is un-Masonic. . . . Suspicion and distrust has taken the place of confidence and esteem. ' ,

The Grand Lodge thought so too, and a special committee presented a report which provided that "It would be unlawful for any member in the jurisdiction to sponsor, join or engage in any planned or prearranged political activity on behalf of the candidacy of any member for elective office, ... provided that any member might speak to another member regarding the fitness and qualification for any candidate for office which would not be considered a violation." Fu路neraZ Service: There seems to be general dissatisfaction with


102c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

the funeral service used in various jurisdictions. This year we find it mentioned in the reports of Colorado} District of Columbia} North Carolina and Virginia. The Grand Master of Georgia found it necessary to arrest the charter of a local lodge. Accompanied by our good friend, Grand Secretary Locklin, and after due notice, he visited the City of Hillsboro where they found two members of Hillsboro Lodge present, including the secretary and 011C young member. In fact, that was all that ever showed up, although they remained at the hall two hours. The Grand Master tells us: (( The Master had a sick cow and he couldn't be bothered; three other members were down stairs engaged in a checker game and des!,ite repeated invitations to come up to the meeting continued their game. The records show that the lodge had not met in over four months."

The Grand Master arrested the charter-and presumably stopped the checker game, but no information was given as to the condition of the Master's sick cow. In a certain Grand Lodge, which will not here be mentioned because it was apparentl~T a typographical error, it was reported that on motion of a certain member, "dully seconded and adopted," the Grand Secretary was instructed to send a message of sympathy. Jurisdiction: In discussing the matter of waivers of jurisdictions, the Grand Master of Colorado found it was one of the major sources of friction. He recommended that when requests for waivers had been made that both parties would judge the problem, not from the standpoint of the lodge, but from the standpoint as to what is best for the candidate. In such a situation the interests of the candidate was paramount. Masonic Homes: In Florida an assessment which would have given support to the Masonic Home was voted down. Nebraska received a $100,000 donation from a Nebraska brother. There appears to be a Masonic Home for boys in Omaha which has seemingly never secured support of the Grand Lodge. It is unfortunate that brethren should fall out over Masonic charities. He discovered that the Grand Lodge had no control over its Masonic Home. Relief: Interesting cases of Masonic relief are given in the proceedings of the Grand Lodges of Arizona, Arkansas, California, District of Columbia, Kansas, Minnesota and New Mexico. The work ranges from blood banks to earthquake and flood relief: Research Lodges: It would appear that the Research Lodge field is being overdone. In the last few years, because of the successes of lodges in other States, many jurisdictions have attempted to follow the procession. It is a great work when well done, but it requires a lot of continued effort on the pa.rt of many enthusiastic Free-

â&#x20AC;˘


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

103c

masons who have to be willing to give of their time and money to make the lodges a success. California has organized Research Lodges in both northern and southern California; Colorado has a new Lodge of Research, as has Iowa and South Dakota. We shall watch their progress with interest. Ritual: The Grand Master of Flm'ida wrote his committee on Masonic Education and touched upon the matter of ritual. He told them he had heard many examinations of visitors in lodges and' perfection in catechism, but he had lrnown many good Masons who could barely pass an examination. He thought the degree of expertness does not necessarily reflect the heart and soul of the man, ,nor reveal the real Mason. He continued: "I have known many to be referred to as a 'bright Mason' because of their ability as ritualists. I have listened with a certain degree of envy at the perfection with which these bright Masons have conferred the three degrees, yet I have left many lodge rooms much more inspired because the spirit of Masonry and the love of Masonry was shown in every word spoken, although none of the officers could have rated a certificate of proficiency."

The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts declared the use of the name of Jesus in prayers was not objectionable, and they refused to change the ritual dealing with certain paragraphs used in the last section of obligations. THOSE "ANCIENT LANDMARKS?"

Grand Lodges continue to establish, define, and discuss what they term the "Ancient Landmarks." The epidemic has now reached the Latin American countries and they are undergoing similar discussion on the Antigugos Limites. Reams and reams of paper are being used in explaining the Ancient Landmarks of Freemasonry. They have failed to take into account that Ancient Freemasonry had no Landmarks! We don't carry our theory of the origin of Freemasonry back as far as K. Solomon, I-I. K. Tyre, Ad N. Iram and other of our ' traditional ancient brethren, but we are quite sure that the presence of the Koran, the New Testament, or the French Book of Constitutions was not a required bit of paraphernalia in Jerusalem, Mt. Moriah, or Mt. Zion Lodges or Queen of Sheba Chapter O.E.S. The Grand Lodge of England was formed in 1717; the first published'Masonic book was the Anderson's Constitutions of 1723. Read Anderson to your heart's content, inspect the ancient records of 1717, and what do you find about Ancient Landmarks. Not one word! There is evidence that in Scotland, previous to the formation of a Grand Lodge, an obligation was taken which required the candidate to


104c

THE MASONIC WORLD

1953

keep secret from Man Woman or Child Stock or Stone and never reveal it but to a Brother or in a Lodge of Freemasons and truly observe the Charges in a ye Constitucion all this you promise faithfully to keep and _observe without in any manner of Equivocation or mentall resarvation directly or Indirectly so help you god and by the Contents of this book.

There is little doubt but that it was the Holy Bible. But Anderson, the historian, did not think it necessary to set it forth as required. In fact, Anderson said this of Religion: A Mason is oblig'd by his Tenure, to obey the Moral Law; and if he rightly understand the Art, he will never be a stupid Atheist, nor an irregular Libertine. But though in ancient Times Masons were charg'd in every Country to be of the Religion of that Country or Nation, whatever it was, yet 'tis now thought more expedient only to oblige them to that Religion in which all Men agree, leaving their particular opinions to themselves; that is, to be good Men and true, or men of Honor and Honesty, by whatsoever Denominations or Persuasions they may be distinguished; whereby Masonry becomes the Center of Union, and the Means of conciliating true Friendship among Persons that might have remained at a perpetual Distance.

Vve are interested in "that Religion in which all men agree." Some Grand Lodges tell us that the "Legend of the third degree" is one of the Landmarks. Well, it was not in the degree work of the brethren of 1717. As a matter of fact there was but ONE degree in the beginning, and it did not concern itself with the Hiramic Legend, and it was no doubt a very short ceremony which consisted largely of an obligation and the reading of one of the manuscript rolls, a hundred or more being in existence at this date. What did the Ancient Grand Lodge of England say about innovations~

It said that It is not in the Power of any person, or Body of men, to make any alteration or Innovation in the Body of Masonry without the Consent first

obtained of the Annual Grand Lodge.

Too many of our brethren in their discussion of "Innovations" fail to.read the part which we have underlined. In other words ANY thing in Freemasonry can be changed-provided the Grand Lodge wills it. Now this does not mean that we believe the ritual, the tradition, and the customs of Freemasonry should be changed to meet the whims of a group of people-but we do not think the Laws or Traditions of the Fraternity would be violated should the Grand Lodge find it necessary to adjust their laws to the condition of the times. In other words there is no attempt to limit Progress or Advancement, and the brethren of Grand Lodge are those who may decide our course. We could go on and on to show wherein the so-called Landmarks


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

l05c

have been mislabeled, and in our belief it represents an attitude of some of our Masonic jurisp1'udists to read into our society things which are not germane to it. Dr. Albert Mackey was the father, mother, and instigator of the present Ancient Landmarks; he rounded up some twenty five "rules" which, in his opinion, represented Masonic thought of the time. Dr. Mackey was honest in his belief we do not doubt, but a hundred years ago, when he was writing these rules, he did not have before him the learned research of Masonic scholars in England. Incidentally, have you ever seen any Ancient Landmarks from the Mother Grand Lodge ~ At apy rate, there was an epidemic of Landmarks which swept over the Masonic Te'rritory of U.S.A. about a quarter of a century ago. Every Grand Master wanted to be in the front phalanx of the army of Landmarkers hoping that his collection of the aforesaid might be just a wee bit more powerful than his competitor. The epidemic swept on into Latin America; almost immediately, probably in a desire to follow the parade, our Southern brethren "accepted the Antiguos Liinites" in theory if not always in fact. Then along in the year 1952, Dr. Roscoe Pound, girding his armor, ventures into' the Conference of Grand Masters (Well, he didn't exactly venture himself; he sent our 'friend Judge Bushnell), and batted down all but seven of the "sacred" Landmarks. Now there is no doubt but that Freemasonry has its customs, its traditions, its ritual, and various forms of doing things, but when the Grand Lodge of England, at its organization in 1717, stated that changes could be made, when approved by the Grand Lodge, it thereby implied there was nothing sancrosanct in our Fraternity. And yet we should be unwilling to change those customs which have grown up with the fraternity, and which we think essential for its success. Our society should be made up of men-for a very- valid reason known to our membership. It should consist of God-fearing men, men who believe in God, under whatsoever name they might call him. Our Chilean brethren referred to him as "The Supreme Creative Power" and finally convinced the Mother Grand Lodge that it was an appropriate title. We believe that men should be of an age to fully understand the teachings of the fraternity-and following general law, it has been quite generally fixed at 21 years, except under some unusual situations. We could hardly say that our Landmarks required the three degrees when the Mother Grand Lodge started with ONE, yet all over the world we now find the three symbolic degrees, so because it is a custom, it should remain for uniformity's sake. And in Uniformity, we see the necessity for certain rules-not landmarks. A Landmark is a thing that may not be changed. Since the Mother


lOBe

1953

THE MASONIC WORLD

Grand Lodge has implied that any of our customs may be changed, then the so-called Ancient Landmarks now being promulgated, constitute no vital force in Freemasonry. You ask then-what are our Landmarks~ The ans,ver is quite simple. FAITH HOPE CHARITY.

'fhese Landmarks began with Father Adam. Nothing in the world can change them, 110t even the Mother Grand Lodge. They are presented to every Entered Apprentice when he first enters a Masonic Lodge flS the "Tenets" or "Landmarks" of Freemasonry. If a Man have Faith; he can be 110 ignorant atheist; he will, if he be a believer, have that 11 ope of Immortality which characterizes the Freemason of today, and having these beliefs he could do nothing else than practice what has been termed the greatest of the threeCHARITY. And if there ever was a Landmark in Freemasonry, it is Charity. But this Charity is best described as Love; Charity is not the giving of money; it is the giving of one's self. It is this Charity which has built Masol1ic Homes all over the world. It is this Charity which has founded the Crippled Children's Hospitals. It is this Charity which has distinguished Freemasons on the battle-field, in the busy marts of life, at the family fireside, the little red schoolhouse, or God's House on the lonely hill. To those Grand Lodges which want to adopt a Landmark, a Landmark which will distinguish them, and cover the entire field of Freemasonry, we offer the words of Micah: He hath shewed thee, 0 man, What is good; And what doth the Lord require of thee, But to do justly, And to love mercy, And to walk humbly, With thy God ~

And if these be not enough, try the Ten Commandments. Fraternally RAY V. Trenton, Mo. July 14, 1953.

DENSLOW.


INDEX Alaska: Masonic Club, lOOc; new lodge in, 99 Amaranth: action of Grand Lodge, 84c American Lodge of Research: Vol. V, No.3, l2c Ancient Landmarks: what constitutes, l03c Anderson, Robert B.: Secretary of Navy, 61c, 63c . Anti-Masonry: in Philippines, 64c; Concordia Publishing Company, 65c; Lutheran attack in Wisconsin, 66c; National Christian Association, 65c Argentina: attitude of Peron, 45c; formation District Grand Lodge, 43c; Freemasonry in, 4lc; irregular Federal Argentino, 43c; Onsari, Awsalom represent, l4c; states recognizing, 89c; treaty with England, 42c; two Grand Lodges in, 44c Austria: states recognizing, 89c Black, Hugo L.: in Supreme Court, 64c Bolivia: Freemasonry in, 36c Books and Pamphlets, lOc-13c Bowles, R. Pearson: death noted, 62c Brazil: English lodges in, 41c; Grand LOdge- of Piaui, 35c; Masonic conditions in, 32c; meeting ends in brawl, 35c; recognition, 89c Burton, Harold H.: in Supreme Court, 64c Calvo, Francisco: Catholic Freemason, 3lc Camalier, R. F.: in the news, 62c Cannon, Clarence: U.S. Representative, 64c Carnahan, A. S. J.: U.S. Representative, 64c Carson, Kit: in Statuary Hall, 90c Caywood, Roland Blanchard: death noted, 62c Chapman Lodge No.2 (N. Mex.): National monument, 90c Chart: genealogical, 9c Cheret, Pierre: Grand Master in France, 17e

Chile: lodge in Bolivia, 37e; Masonic Presidents, 3le; recognition, 89c China: :Massachusetts lodges in, 99c; recognition, 89c; Young represents, 14c Clandestine: Colorado suit against, lOlc; in Indiana, lOlc; what constitutes, 6Se Clark, Arthur Henry; death noted, 62c Clark, Tom C.: in Supreme Court, 64c Cole, Wm. C.: U.S. Representative, 64c Colombia: persecution in, 38c; recognition, 89c Conference of Grand Masters: 1953 meeting, l4c Conference of Grand Secretaries: 1953 meeting, 15c Constructor Masons, Order of : membership directory issued, 12c Cooper, Sir Ernest: mentioned, 5c Cornerstones: in Florida, Arizona, District of Columbia, Georgia, Indiana, Nebraska, Nevada, 85c; in North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, 86c; Governor attends laying of, 85c; wording on 85c . Corn~vallis, Lord: historical sketch, 8c Costa Rica: address of Grand Master, 13c; Granados, Holst, Yamuni represent, 14c; observes Calvo anniversary, 3lc Cuba: Masonic charities, 31c; patriots honored, 32c; Pineiro and Pranchesi represent, 14c . Cumming, Rear Adm. John '''.\V.: in the news, 63c Czechoslovakia: Freemasonry in, 45c; indictment of Freemasons, 45c; Dr. P. Korbel comment, 48c Danielson, Gen. Clarence H.: death noted, 62c Degrees: abuse of dispensation, 92c; courtesy in California, 9lc; exchange of visits, 92c; courtesy declined, 92c; letting down the bars, 92c; limitation in number,


lOSe

THE MASONIC WORLD

9lc; of Past Master, 93c; waiting period in Indiana, 91c del Campo, Gen. Carlos Ibanez: Masonic President in Chile, 3lc Denmark: recognition, 89c, 90c Drescher, Henry; member of American Union Lodge, 70c Douglas, Wm. 0.: in Supreme Court, 64c Duke of Edinburgh: receives Masonic degrees, 4c Eastern Star: status of Associate Patron, 84c Ecton, Senator Z. N.: in the news, 63c Ecuador: Masonic conditions in, 32c Eisenhower, President: Freemasons in Cabinet of, 63c; oath on Masonic Bible, 69c Electioneering: Florida incident, IOlc Elvidge, Ford Q.: in the news, 63c England: erased lodges, 4c; genealogy of Royal family, 9c; lodges in Brazil, 4lc; Missouri's representative in, 8c; new lodges, 4c; repla.cing Grand Representative, 5c; Royal family connection with Freemasonry, 4c; story of Mother Grand Lodge, 3c; treaty with Argentina~ 43c Faubel, A. F. L.: death noted, 3lc Federal Argentino: irregular Grand Lodge in Argentina, 43c, 45c France: and liberty of conscience, 19c; Holy Bible in, 18c; N ational Grand Lodge, 16c; N etherlands withdraws recognition, 30; recognition, 89c; relation with Germany, 2lc, 25c; Royal Arch degrees in, l8c Freemasonry: what constitutes regular, irregular, clandestine, 68c Funeral Service: general dissatisfaction, IOlc Germany: 1953 situation in, 24c; dilemma of Grand Lodge, 2lc; Grand Master visits American lodge, 98c; gratitude to U.S.A., 23c; recognition, 89c; relationship with France, 21c, 25c;

1953

Stuttgart Lodge, 98c; Dr. Vogel represents, l4c Grand Encampment K.T., U.S.A.: a history of, l2c Grand Masters: conference of, l4c Grand Secretaries: conference of, 15c Grande Loge N ationale Francaise: origin of, 16c Grantham, W. I VOl': new Librarian, England,5c Green, Myron, death noted, 62c Grotto: no part of Freemasonry, 84c Guatemala: death of Dr. H. A. Cabrera, 31c; new Grand Officers, 33c Guild Hall, London: photo, 6c Guild Hall Lodge No. 3116: installation of Lord Mayor, 6c; photo of, 6c; photo Mansion House, 7c; story of, 6c Han Yang Lodge (Korea) story of, 49c Harkins, Thomas .T.: in the news, 63c Higgins, Andrew .T ackson : death noted, 63c Hilleson, Jeffry P.: U.S. Representative, 64c Historical: Kit Carson in Statuary Hall, 90c; Delaware lodge missing minutes, 90c; District of Columbia history, 90c; Illinois Grand Lodge, 90c; memorial to Oliver Cock, Iowa, 90c; National monument in New Mexico, 90c; Ohio sesquicentennial, 9lc; South Dakota Masonic plaque, 9lc; Virginia Washington becentennial, 9lc Honduras: Grand Lodge celebrates Mother's Day, 3lc Horn, Herschel: former Missourian Grand Master of Colorado, 82c Humor: reviewer's comment, 60c Iceland: recognition, 89c Illinois: history of Freemasonry in, 90c Illinois, Rise and Progress of Freemasonry in: story of, 10c Iowa: memorial to first Grand Master, 90c Ireland: policy of Grand Representative, 5c


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Irregular Freemasonry: what constitutes, 68c Israel: Masonic conditions in, 56c; recognition, 89c Italy: Sel'enissima Grand Lodge, 25c; death of Giovanni Mori, 25c; death of U go Lenzi, 25c; history of Palazzo Giustiniani, 25c; photo of Palazzo Giustiniani, exterior and interior, .26c, 27c; government restores Grand Orient property, 30c; lodge in Argentina, 42c; recognition, 89c Jackling, Daniel C.: biography, 8Ic Jackson, Robert H.: in Supreme Court, 64c Jensen, Gov. Sigurd: active South Dakota Freemason, 62c Jesus: use of name in prayer, l03c J ones, Frank C.: death noted, 62c J ones, Paul C.: U.S. Reprcsentative, 64c Jubilee Masters Lodge No. 272: mentioned, 5c Jurisdiction: major source of friction, I02c Jurisprudence: criticism of Missouri, 94c, 95c; delay in trials, 95c; duty of recommender, 96c; Iowa-Michigan dispute, 96c; liability insurance in Ohio, 97c; low standards in Tennessee lodge, 97c; Nebraska case, 95c; trial by commission, 94c Keith, Roger: in the news, 62c Kemper, Frederick: story of life and Masonic College, 76c Korea: Freemasonry in, 49c; story of Han Yang Lodge, 49c Lenzi, Ugo: death noted, 25c,' 63c Leedom, Judge Boyd: in the news, 63c Lepper, J. Heron: death noted, 62c Liquor: Arkansas incident, IOOc Lodges: at Kodiak, Alaska, 99c; foreign language, 98c; German Grand Master visits, 98c; limitation of petitions, 99c; Massachusetts lodges in China, 98c; overseas, 98c; oversized, 97c; Spanish-speaking, 98c; Vatican protest in, 99c; visitation of Florida Masons, 99c Lord Mayors of London: authority in London, 8c; members of Guild

10ge

Hall Lodge, 6c; photo of Mansion House, 7c Lutherans: publication anti-Masonic material, 65c McKay, Douglas: Secretary of Interior, 63c Marion College: story of, 76c; photo, 75c Marseilles (France): new lodge in, 17c Maryland: early lodge in Venezuela, 33c Masonic Addresses and Writings of Roscoe Pound: a volume, l3c Masonic College, (Missouri): photographs, 75c, 80c; story in Kansas City newspaper, 75c Masonic Education, More Modern Ideas in: reprint of Midwest Conference report, lac Masonic Home: large Nebraska donation, l03c Masons in the News, 61c-64c Masonic Organizations and Allied Orders and Degrees: volume by Voorhis, llc Masonic Publications: California edict against, 86c; Florida cancels contract, 87c; Gcorgia publication, 87c; Idaho experience, 87c; Illinois publication, 87c; Indiana expensc, 88c; New York Outlook, 88c; Nevada bulletin, 88c; New Mexico expense, 88c; Oklahoma publication, 88c; Texas magazine, 88c; Virginia publication, 88c; Washington eliminated Masonic name, 88c; Wyoming considers, 88c Masonic Service Association: 1953 meeting, 15c; Digest issued by, 16c, lac; issued list of Congressmen who are Masons, 64c Masonic Symbols, Pocket Encyclopedia of: a pamphlet,' lac Masonic Temples: California Lodge financing, 93c; California restoration of temple, 93; new memorial building, 93c; Grand "Lodge of Kansas purchases temple, 93c; Louisiana Masonic temple, 93c; New Mexico purchases site, 94c; Grand Lodge of Ohio removes offices, 94c; Pennsylvania, 94C; South Carolina erects


110c

THE MASONIC WORLD

new, 94c; Texas outstanding, 94c Masonic Year Book: England, I2c; Scotland, 13c Mexico: Cisneros, Buentello, Turnpaugh, Ramos represent, 14c; death of Gov. de la Garza, 31c; recognition, 89c ; Vera Cruz maintains school and dispensary, 3lc Minton, Sherman: in Supreme Court, 64c Miscellanea: A.M.D. publication, I2c Mission, Government: value of, 34c Missouri: anti-Masonic attack on Grand Lodge, 65c; Masonic members in Congress, 64c; represented at Conference of Grand Masters, Hc Missouriana: Henry Drescher, of Palmyra, 70c; St. Louis Temple parking space, 70c; Kansas City temple, 70c; discovery of Ralls papers, 71c; Masonic College, 75c; Daniel C. Jackling, 8lc Missouri Lodge of Research: 1951 transactions, 1Ic Mitre, Bartolome: President of Argentina, 42c Mori, Giovanni: death noted, 25c Moulder, Morgan M.: U.S. Representative, 64c Muldrow, Henry L.: death noted, 63c Murray, Eric C.: in the news, 6lc Neff, Pat M.: death noted, 63c N etherlands: age of candidates, 30c; death of Grand Secretary Faubel, 31c; withdraws recognition of France, 3lc Ohio: sesquicentennial, 9lc Palazzo Giustiniani: history of, 25c; photos, 26c, 27c Palestine: see " Israel' '; Grand Lodge changes name, 58c Paraguay: historical, 38c Parks, Lee F.: former Missourian Grand Master of Oklahoma, 82c Pennsylvania: sight-Masons, IOOc Peterson, Gov. (Nebr.): speaks at cornerstone laying, 85e Philippine Islands: anti-Masonry in, 64e; Cervantes represents, l4c

19~3

Photographs: Earl of Scarbrough, 2c; Guild Hall, London, 6e; Lord Mayor's Mansion House, 7c; Palazzo Giustiniani, 26c, 27c; Missouri Masonic College, 75c, 80c Piaui, Grand Lodge of: conditions in, 35c Prince Hall Grand Lodge: donation to polio fund, 69c Queen Mary: Masonic connections, 4c Ralls, John: discovery of papers of, 71c; commission as DDGM, 7lc; commission as Captain, 72c; commission as Aide-(l'e-Camp, 72c; Company roll,' 73c Ralls Lodge No. 33, History of: souvenir program, 13c Recognition: Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Denmark, France, Germany, Iceland, Israel, Italy Mexico, Spain, 89c; Denmark, 90c Reed, Stanley F.: in Supreme Court, 64c Regular Freemasonry: what constitutes, 68c Research Lodges: newly organized, I02c Rich, Carl W.: in the news, 63c Ritual: value of examination, l03c Rocky Mountain Conference: a volume, 12c Royal Arch: degrees in France, l8c San Martin, Dr.: established lodges in Argentina, 42c Sao Paulo: Masonic conditions in, 33c Sarmiento: President of Argentina, 42c Scarbrough, Earl of : historical, 3c; honored by Queen, 3c; photo, 2c Scotland: organizes Grand Lodge of Israel, 47c; story of Han Yang Lodge, 49c; Year Book, 13c . Shakespeare, Masonic Parallels in: a pamphlet, lOc Short, Dewey: U.S. Representative, 64c Shrine: Club violated edict, 83e


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

Sight Masons: in Pennsylvania, 100c South Dakota: Freemasons active in state government, 62c Spain: Grand Orient in Exile, 31c; lodges in Argentina, 43c; recognition, 89c Stamps: Gadsden Purchase, American Bar Association, Sagamore Hill, New York City, 83e Strasburg (France): new lodge in, 17c Summerfield, Arthur: Postmaster General, 63c Supreme Court U.S.A.: Freemasons in, 64c 'rerry, lA. Gov. Rex A.: South Dakota Freemason, 62c 'rruman, Harry S.: in the news, 63c Uruguay: Bible situation in, 33c; establishes lodges in Bolivia and Paraguay, 38c; lodges in Argentina, 42c Venezuela: Maryland lodge in, 33c ; MasoI).ic conditions in, 32c; Nicolador Garcia Baptista visits U.S.A., 32c Vinson, Fred M. : in Supreme Court, 64c

llle

Virginia: history of Geo. Washington, 10c Vogel, Dr. Theodor: address before M.S.A., 23c; attends Grand Masters路 conference, l4c; report of visit to U.S.A., 22c; visits Grand Lodge of England, 21c Vucurevich, J. '1'.: South Dakota Senator, G2c vVashington, Freemason: volume commemorating bicentennial of initiation of, 10c Washington, Master Mason: a pamphlet, 10c; M.S.A. brochure, Hc Washington, The Christian Science Monitor: contains a story of Washington's life, 12c Watson, Thomas .r.: in the news, 62c Weeks, Sinclair: Secretary of Commerce, 63c West, Clarence J.: death noted, 62c ,Vilson, Charles E.: Secretary of Defense, 63c Wisconsin: Lutherans in attack on Masonic fraternity, 66c Wykeham, Stanley: see "Lord Cornwallis' , Zukor, Adolph: in the news, 62c


INDEX 1953 PROCEEDINGS

A Address of Grimd Master Bonds.................................................... Building Supervisory Board, The. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commission on Information for Recognition Conference of Grand Lodge Officers Con~~lidation of Lodges DecIsIons Dispensations Distinction Comes to Angerona Lodge No. 193 District Deputy Grand Masters' and District Lecturers' Conference .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Education l!'inances Form of Petition for Degrees, The George Washington Masonic Birthday Celebration. . . . . . . . . . . . . IIolland Relief Jurisdiction '. . . . . . . . . . . . Legal Advisor to the Grand Master, 'fhe J\1asonic Home... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Masonic Publications ............................â&#x20AC;˘ '. . . . . . . . . Masonic Service Association Hospital Visitation Program ..... Mileage and Per Diem Allowances for Committee Members. . . . Necrology Our Hitual and the Conferring of Degrees Physical Disqualifications Quit Claim Deed Religious Services and the Grand Master's Breakfast Resolution Regarding a Home for Non-Indigent Masons. . . . . . . . State and Condition of Freemasonry in This Jurisdiction, The .. Sunday Picnics '. . . . . . . . Use of the Word "Masonic" and of Masonic Signs and Symbols for Commercial Purposes by White Chapel Memorial \ Gardens, Inc. Visitations Visitations to Other Grand .Jurisdictions Washington Conferences Address of Grand Orator '. Alphabetical List of Lodges Amendments Adopted Section 196-Boards of Relief Section 204-Burial Duties in Cities Section 13 (D)-Compensation of Grand Lecturer Section 76--Mileage and PCI' Diem Section 74-Per Capita Tax Amendments Proposed Re Affiliation of Master Mason ,........... Re Appeal of Section 77-A ; Re Building Supervisory Board Re Dedication of Hall :.................... Re Disqualifications Re District Lecturers

I

PME

4 6 36 16 9 7 21 7 40 7 39 17 44 37 9 42 4:l

46 6 20 19 46 34 45 6 38 7 49 43 32 10 9 15 139 189 157 156 156 112 158 76 148 132 131 78 165


2d

1953

INDEX

Re Duties of D.D.G.M. R~ Form of Petition o ' Re Grand Lodge Officers Re Jurisdiction Re Hesigl1ation or Hemoval l!""rom Office o ' Re Sunday Picnics Appeals and Grievances, Report of Committee Appointments . o. Approval of 1952 Proceedings . Armstrong, R. E., Introduced . Auditor, l~eport of 00'

0

0

o'

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••••••

00

••

0

0

•••

••

0

0

0

0

••

000

0

0

0

0

0

0

000

0

0

0

00

0

000

0

0

0

000.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0000

••

0

00

o'

•••

0

0

0

0

0

••••••

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

00000.

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0000

•••

0

•••

0

••

0

0

•••

0

0

•••

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0000000.

0

00000.0.000.

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

000

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

131 77 164 75 154 76 128 170 4 4 66

B Benediction Biographical Sketch of Grand Master Rumer . Boards of Helief, Report of Committee Bray, Willis J., Message From Building Supervisory Board, Report of Buttons, Veterans' 0"

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••••••

0

0

000

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

o'

0

0

••

0

0

••

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

000

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.00

0

.,

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••••

0

•••

0

0

••

0

00

0

00

0

••

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

•••

0

•••••

00'

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

••••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••••

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

•••

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

000

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

•••••

0

0

0

0

••

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

o.

00000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

o.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

000

0

0

0

0

0.000

o'

0

0

••

0

o'

0

0

••

••

000

o

00

0

0

••••••

•••

••

0

00.0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

00'

C Camalier, Renah F. Introduced Presents Stone and Letter Celebration of the 200th Anniversary of the Masonic Birthday of George Washington Certificates of Proficieney Chartered Lodges, Report of Committee Chiles, Henry Co, Message }'rom . Closing o. Cortini, Publio, :Message From .. Committees, Special (1953-] 954) Committees, Standing (1953-1954) Communication He Three Additional Copies of tbe Proceedings for. Each Lodge " Credentials, Report of Committee (Interim) . Credentials, Report of Committee .0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

171 i 149 4 128 53

137 138 161 116 132 4 171 4 172 171 168 3 168

D

Delzell, Earl, Introduced Directors of Masonic Home, Election of Distinguished Guests, Introduced . District Deputy Grand Masters, Introduced District Deputy Grand Masters, List of (1953-1954) District Lecturers, Introduced District Lecturers, List of (1953-1954) ... District Meetings, Report of Committee . Duncan, IIerbert Bo, Message From .. 0

0

0

0

000

0

000

0

0"

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

00'

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

o'

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

o'

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

00

0

0

000000000

••

0

0

0

0

0

4 154 4 4 173 4 173 159 4

E

Eddlemon, Walter J., Introduced Elected Officers of Grand Lodge, List of . Election of Directors of the Masonic Home Election of Officers Entertainment of Distinguished Guests, Report of Committee 0"

0

••

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

••

•••

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

••••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

4 246 154 154 169


1953

INDEX

3d

F

Fifty Year Veterans' Buttons.......................... First Day, Afternoon First Day, Evening First Day, Morning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Foreign Correspondence, Report of Committee Foreign Recognition, Report of Committee

53 72 139 3 70 71

G

Gentry, M. Wor. Bro. Wm. R.., Presented 164 George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Report of Committee 113 Gordon, William C., Message From 4 Grand Correspondent, Report of 71 Grand Lecturer, Report of . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 114 Grand Lodges Recognized by Missouri 175 Grand Master Rumer . Address of 4 Biography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Photograph Prontispiece Grand Master's Address, Report of Committee 110 Grand Orator, Address of 139 Grand Representative, to and From Missouri 250 Grand Secretary,. Report of 51 Grand Secretaries and Their Addresses 175 Grand Secretary's Tabular Statement . . . . . . . . . .. 202 Greisen, Carl R.., Introduced 4 H

Hays, Charles B., Introduced Home for Non-Indigents, Report of Special Committee. . . . . . . . ..

4 134

I

Introduction Introduction Introduction Installation Invitation to Invocation

of Deputies and Lecturers of Distinguished Guests of Past Grand Masters Scottish Rite Temple .........................

4 4 4 170 166 3

J Jost, Oscar, Gives Organ Recital Jurisprudence, Report of Committee (Preliminary) Re Mileage and Per Diem Jurisprudence, Report of Committee

139 112 154

L

Lamb, Newel A., Message From Letter From President Truman List of District Deputy Grand Masters (1953-1954) List of District Lecturers (1953-1954)..................... . . . .. List of Elected Officers of Grand Lodge List of Grand Representatives List of Grand Secretaries and Their Addresses List of Living Past Grand Masters List of Lodges, Alphabetical List of Lodges, Numerical

4 137 173 173 246 250 175 172 189 177


4d,

INDEX

Lodge Directory, by Districts Lodges D.D., Report of Committee Luff, Elvin K., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1953 218 134 4

M

Masonic Home, Report of Masonic Publications, Report of Committee Masonic 'l'emple Association, Report of Committee , 'Masonic W orld " .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Massey, William B., Introduced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Messages Mileage and Per Diem, Report of Committee Missouri Lodge of Research, Report of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. N Necrology, Report of Committee Newton, Bruce, Introduced . Nominations for Masonic Home Board Numerical List of Lodges

78 147 136 1c 4 4 166 162 72 4 114 177

o Officers, Election of Opening

" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. -' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

154 3

P Past Grand Masters, Living 172 Past Grand Masters Presented 4 Photograph of Grand Master Rumer Frontispiece Photograph of Karl M. Vetsburg, P.G.M. ;..................... 73 Photograph of Letter From President Truman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 137 Proficiency Certificates 116 R Report of Auditor. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Report of Committee on: Appeals and Grievances Boards of Relief Building Supervisory Celebration of the 200th Anniversary of the Masonic Birthday of George Washington Chartered Lodges '" Credentials, (Interim) Credentials District Meetings Entertainment of Distinguished Guests '.' . . .. Foreign Correspondence George Washington Masonic Nat'!. Memorial Association Grand Master's Address Home for Non-Indigents Jurisprudence, Preliminary Jurisprudence Lodges D.D. Masonic Publications Masonic Temple Association Mileage and Per Diem Necrology Recognition of Foreign Grand Lodges . . . . . . . . .. Relief and Charity

66 128 149 128 161 132 3 168 159 169 70 113 110 134 112 154 134 147 136 166 72 135 158


1953

5d

INDEX

Ritual. .. .. . Transportation and Hotels Unfinished Business ' '. . . . . . . . . . . .. Ways and Means : ;. Relief and Charity, Report of Committee Report of Grand Correspondent Report of Grand Lecturer Report of Grand Secretary......... Report of Grand Treasurer ,. . . . . Report of Masonic Home Report of Missouri Lodge of Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Reppert, Vernon, Message From Resolution, Re Supplying Papers and Documents ' to Subordinate Lodges " . . . . .. Ritual, Report of Committee

115 169 169 167 158 70 114 51 65 78 162 4 169 115

S Second Day, Afternoon Second Day, Morning Smith, Fay, Introduced Stone From the White House, A Strain, Elmer, Introduced

~

.........

166 147 4 137 4

T Tabular Statement of Grand Secretary Transportation and Hotels, Report of Committee Truman, Harry S., Introduced Letter From Presents Stone

137 137 138

U Unfinished Business, Report of Committee

169

202 169

V

Veterans' Buttons Vote of Thanks to M. Wor. Br.other Rumer

53 169

W Ways and Means, Report of Committee

167


AMENDMENTS ADOPTED, 1952 SEC. 12(n). Grand Secreta1路y (p. 12). The salary of the Grand Secretary shall be seventy-two hundred dollars per annum, payable monthly. (Proo. 1952, p. 119.) SEC. 119. Same (p. 38). The first section of the First and Second Degrees, and the first and second sections of the Third Degree shall not be conferred on more than one candidate at the same time. In conferring the Third Degree upon any candidate, the first and second sections of the Degree must be without any break in their continuity, but the Master may, if in his judgment, it is best to do so, postpone the Master's Lecture and Charge in the Third Degree for such time as he deems best, not to exceed thirty days. (Proc. 1952, p. 118.) SEC. 199. Masonic Home Board (p. 53). Effective with the amendment of the Agreement of Incorporation of the Masonic Home of Missouri to provide therefor, the members and the board of directors of the Masonic Home of Missouri shall consist of the following officers of the Grand Lodge: the Grand Master, who shall be President, the Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden, and the Junior Grand Warden; together with eight Master Masons, members in good standing of Missouri Lodges, who shall be elected as hereinafter provided. The four present directors, whose terms end successively in 1953, 1954, 1955 and 1956, shall continue to serve to the end of such terms, and one additional director shall be elected at the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge in 1952 for a term ending with the Annual Communication in each of said years respectively, so that the terms of two directors shall end with the Annual Communication of each year. The terms of their respective successors shall be four years each. None of the eight elected directors shall be eligible to successive terms and none of the Grand Lodge Officers, serving on the Board, as aforesaid, shall be eligible for election as a director until the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge after their respective terms of office in the Grand Lodge shall have expired. .Nominations of directors to be elected shall be made on the first day of the Grand Lodge Communication, as soon after the Grand Master's address as can be conveniently done. If a greater number is nominated than the number to be elected; the Grand Secretary shall cause a ballot to be printed with the names of those nominated listed alphabetically, which said ballots shall be used for the election when held as herein provided. In the event that no more are nominated than are to be elected, the Grand Master shall order the Grand Secretary to cast the ballot for the members so nominated. The election of directors hereunder shall be held immediately following the election of the Grand Lodge Officers and shall be by plurality vote. The Board shall have full power and authority to provide by By-laws or otherwise, and to elect such officers, except President, as it may determine upon for the proper organization of the Board to handle all matters pertaining to the conduct and management of the Masonic Home and its properties, and also all matters of relief, in accordance with policies adopted or approved, from time to time, by this Grand Lodge; The respective duties and powers of the President and other officers shall be as determined by the Board from time to time. This By-law shall be effective immediately on its adoption. (Proc. 1952, p. 30.)


1953

GRAND LODGE OF MISSOURI

9d

DECISIONS APPROVED, 1952* SEC. 70. Decision (p. 27). In election of Lodge Trustees, a nominating committee may be used, providing the Lodge adopts the proper ByLaws, conforming to Section 70, 1947 Grand Lodge By-Laws. (The Jurisprudence Committee adds: "The second decision concerns the election of Lodge Trustees and the decision is right, but may be misleading. If a lodge has a By-Law as provided in Seetion 70, then they may be elected by ballot without nomination, or may be nominated from the floor, or by a nominating committee, if the lodge by-laws provide for a nominating commi.ttee, or by all of said methods.' ') (Proc. 1952, pp. 17, 118.) SEC. 115. Decision (p. 38). A Lodge in another Jurisdiction conferred the third degree by courtesy on ,a Missouri candidate when more than 'twelvemonths had elapsed after receiving the second degree. No provision was made for extension of time. The Grand Master declared the action illegal, but the candidate being found without fault, he was promised that if and when his petition for advancement was approved, the Grand ~faster would cause him to be healed. (Froc. 1952, p. 17.) SEC. 118. Decision (p. 38). A Lodge conferred the three degrees on a candidate on March 6, March 16, and March 23, 1951. The Lodge was severely reprimanded and warned by the Grand Master, that if it again violated this law of the Grand Lodge, that it would be necessary for him to arrest the charter. 'l'he Grand Master further ordered that the degrees of Fellowcraft and Ma.."lter Mason conferred OIl the said candidate be null and void, and that the status of the candidate is that of entered apprentice. (Proc. 1952, p. 17.)

* In order to understand the circumstances surrounding each decision, the record in the Grand Lodge Proceedings, as indicated by the reference, should be read.


Masonic Manual of Missouri Containing all the Missouri Monitorial work and funeral service. Pocket edition sold at 75 cents per copy.

Book of Constitutions The Grand Lodge Book of Constitutions, 1921 revision, bound in cloth, price 50 cents per copy. ~rand

Lodge Book of Constitutions, 1947, price $1.00 per copy.

Any of the foregoing books may be obtained from the office of the Grand Lodge by application to the Grand Secretary. HAROLD L. READER, Grand Secretary, Mlwmic Temple, 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri.


OFFICERS

Grand Lodge of Missouri 1953-1954

JAMES McBRAYER SELLERS M. W. Grand Master Lexington ORESTES MITCHELL, JR R. W. Deputy Grand Master 717 Corby Bldg., St. Joseph WILLIAM J. CRAIG R. W. Senior Grand WlM'den 1035 S. Pickwick, Springfield HAROLD M. JAyNE R. W. Junior Grand Warden Memphis EDMUND E. MORRIS R. W. Grand Trea81lorer Care Union National Bank, Kansas City HAROLD L. READER ......â&#x20AC;˘......... R. W. Grand Secretary 3681 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 8 FREELON K. HADLEy R. W. Grand Lecturer 2005 Penn St., St. Joseph EMMETT L. ROBISON W. Grand Chaplain 2416 Doniphan Ave., St. Joseph SAMUEL THURMAN W. Grand Chaplain 225 So. Skinker Ave., St. Louis 5 JAMES W. CLARKE.................... W. Grand Chaplain 44 Kingsbury Place, St. Louis 12 HAMPTON ADAMS W. Grand Chaplain 2 Windermere Place, St. Louis 12 PLINEY H. ELLIOTT W. Grand Chaplain Nevada FRANK P. BRIGGS Grand Senior Deacon Macon ROBERT L. ARONSON ~ Grand Junior Deacon Civil Courts Bldg., St. Louis 1 HAROLD O. GRAUEL Grand Senior Steward Cheney Hall, Cape Girardeau BRUCE H. HUNT Grand Junior Steward Box 721, Kirksville ROBERT H. MANN Grand Marshal 101 W. 11th St., Kansas City JOHN A. WITTHAUS Grand Marshal Court House, Clayton 5 J. RENICK JONES Grand Sword Bearer 724 N. Main St., Independence R. JASPER SMITH Grand Pursuivant 1005 Woodruff Bldg., Springfield FREDERICK J. MARSTON Grand Orator Boonville JOHN F. BABER Grand Tiler Richmond The 133rd Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge will be held in St. Louis, beginning Tuesday, September 28, 1954.